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Sample records for aerodynamic yawing moment

  1. High-angle-of-attack yawing moment asymmetry of the X-31 aircraft from flight test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cobleigh, Brent R.

    1994-01-01

    Significant yawing moment asymmetries were encountered during the high-angle-of-attack envelope expansion of the two X-31 aircraft. These asymmetries led to position saturations of the thrust vector vanes and trailing-edge flaps during some of the dynamic stability axis rolling maneuvers at high angles of attack. This slowed the high-angle-of-attack envelope expansion and resulted in maneuver restrictions. Several aerodynamic modifications were made to the X-31 forebody with the goal of minimizing the asymmetry. A method for determining the yawing moment asymmetry from flight data was developed and an analysis of the various configuration changes completed. The baseline aircraft were found to have significant asymmetries above 45 deg angle of attack with the largest asymmetry typically occurring around 60 deg angle of attack. Applying symmetrical boundary layer transition strips along the forebody sides increased the magnitude of the asymmetry and widened the angle-of-attack range over which the largest asymmetry acted. Installing longitudinal forebody strakes and rounding the sharp nose of the aircraft caused the yawing moment asymmetry magnitude to be reduced. The transition strips and strakes made the asymmetry characteristic of the aircraft more repeatable than the clean forebody configuration. Although no geometric differences between the aircraft were known, ship 2 consistently had larger yawing moment asymmetries than ship 1.

  2. Pitch, roll, and yaw moment generator for insect-like tailless flapping-wing MAV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, Hoang Vu; Park, Hoon Cheol

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we proposed a control moment generator, which is called Trailing Edge Change (TEC) mechanism, for attitudes change in hovering insect-like tailless flapping-wing MAV. The control moment generator was installed to the flapping-wing mechanism to manipulate the wing kinematics by adjusting the wing roots location symmetrically or asymmetrically. As a result, the mean aerodynamic force center of each wing is relocated and control moments are generated. The three-dimensional wing kinematics captured by three synchronized high-speed cameras showed that the flapping-wing MAV can properly modify the wing kinematics. In addition, a series of experiments were performed using a multi-axis load cell to evaluate the forces and moments generation. The measurement demonstrated that the TEC mechanism produced reasonable amounts of pitch, roll and yaw moments by shifting position of the trailing edges at the wing roots of the flapping-wing MAV.

  3. Yaws

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Michael; Mitjà, Oriol; Solomon, Anthony W.; Asiedu, Kingsley B.; Mabey, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Yaws, caused by Treponema pallidum ssp. pertenue, is endemic in parts of West Africa, Southeast Asia and the Pacific. The WHO has launched a campaign based on mass treatment with azithromycin, to eradicate yaws by 2020. Sources of data We reviewed published data, surveillance data and data presented at yaws eradication meetings. Areas of agreement Azithromycin is now the preferred agent for treating yaws. Point-of-care tests have demonstrated their value in yaws. Areas of controversy There is limited data from 76 countries, which previously reported yaws. Different doses of azithromycin are used in community mass treatment for yaws and trachoma. Growing points Yaws eradication appears an achievable goal. The programme will require considerable support from partners across health and development sectors. Areas timely for developing research Studies to complete baseline mapping, integrate diagnostic tests into surveillance and assess the impact of community mass treatment with azithromycin are ongoing. PMID:25525120

  4. Yaws

    MedlinePlus

    ... is closely related to the bacterium that causes syphilis, but this form of the bacterium is not ... test for yaws. However, the blood test for syphilis is often positive in people with yaws because ...

  5. Performance of an aerodynamic yaw controller mounted on the space shuttle orbiter body flap at Mach 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scallion, W. I.

    1995-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation of the effectiveness of an aerodynamic yaw controller mounted on the lower surface of a shuttle orbiter model body flap was conducted in the Langley 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel. The controller consisted of a 60 deg delta fin mounted perpendicular to the body flap lower surface and yawed 30 deg to the free stream direction. The control was tested at angles of attack from 20 deg to 40 deg at zero sideslip for a Reynolds number based on wing mean aerodynamic chord of 0.66 x 10(exp 6). The aerodynamic and control effectiveness characteristics are presented along with an analysis of the effectiveness of the controller in making a bank maneuver for Mach 18 flight conditions. The controller was effective in yaw and produced a favorable rolling moment. The analysis showed that the controller was as effective as the reaction control system in making the bank maneuver. These results warrant further studies of the aerodynamic/aerothermodynamic characteristics of the control concept for application to future transportation vehicles.

  6. Yaws

    MedlinePlus

    ... and resolution WHA66.12 of the 2013 World Health Assembly, yaws is targeted for eradication by the year 2020. Pilot implementation of the “ Yaws Eradication Strategy ” in 5 countries (Congo, Ghana, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands and Vanuatu) has provided promising results and practical ...

  7. Rolling Moments Due to Rolling and Yaw for Four Wing Models in Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Montgomery; Wenzinger, Carl J

    1932-01-01

    This report presents the results of a series of autorotation and torque tests on four different rotating wing systems at various rates of roll and at several angles of yaw. The investigation covered an angle of attack range up to 90 degrees and angles of yaw of 0 degree, 5 degrees, 10 degrees, and 20 degrees. The tests were made in a 5-foot, closed-throat atmospheric wind tunnel. The object of the tests was primarily to determine the effects of various angles of yaw on the rolling moments of the rotating wings up to large angles of attack. It was found that at angles of attack above that of maximum lift the rolling moments on the wings due to yaw (or side slip) from 5 degrees to 20 degrees were roughly of the same magnitude as those due to rolling. There was a wide variation in magnitude of the rolling moment due to yaw angle. The rates and ranges of stable autorotation for the monoplane models were considerably increased by yaw, whereas for an unstaggered biplane they were little affected. The immediate cause of the rolling moment due to yaw is apparently the building up of large loads on the forward wing tip and the reduction of loads on the rearward wing tip.

  8. Direct yaw moment control for distributed drive electric vehicle handling performance improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhuoping; Leng, Bo; Xiong, Lu; Feng, Yuan; Shi, Fenmiao

    2016-05-01

    For a distributed drive electric vehicle (DDEV) driven by four in-wheel motors, advanced vehicle dynamic control methods can be realized easily because motors can be controlled independently, quickly and precisely. And direct yaw-moment control (DYC) has been widely studied and applied to vehicle stability control. Good vehicle handling performance: quick yaw rate transient response, small overshoot, high steady yaw rate gain, etc, is required by drivers under normal conditions, which is less concerned, however. Based on the hierarchical control methodology, a novel control system using direct yaw moment control for improving handling performance of a distributed drive electric vehicle especially under normal driving conditions has been proposed. The upper-loop control system consists of two parts: a state feedback controller, which aims to realize the ideal transient response of yaw rate, with a vehicle sideslip angle observer; and a steering wheel angle feedforward controller designed to achieve a desired yaw rate steady gain. Under the restriction of the effect of poles and zeros in the closed-loop transfer function on the system response and the capacity of in-wheel motors, the integrated time and absolute error (ITAE) function is utilized as the cost function in the optimal control to calculate the ideal eigen frequency and damper coefficient of the system and obtain optimal feedback matrix and feedforward matrix. Simulations and experiments with a DDEV under multiple maneuvers are carried out and show the effectiveness of the proposed method: yaw rate rising time is reduced, steady yaw rate gain is increased, vehicle steering characteristic is close to neutral steer and drivers burdens are also reduced. The control system improves vehicle handling performance under normal conditions in both transient and steady response. State feedback control instead of model following control is introduced in the control system so that the sense of control intervention to

  9. Comparison of X-31 Flight and Ground-Based Yawing Moment Asymmetries at High Angles of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cobleigh, Brent R.; Croom, Mark A.

    2001-01-01

    Significant yawing moment asymmetries were encountered during the high-angle-of-attack envelope expansion of the two X-31 aircraft. These asymmetries caused position saturations of the thrust-vectoring vanes and trailing-edge flaps during some stability-axis rolling maneuvers at high angles of attack. The two test aircraft had different asymmetry characteristics, and ship two has asymmetries that vary as a function of Reynolds number. Several aerodynamic modifications have been made to the X-31 forebody with the goal of minimizing the asymmetry. These modifications include adding transition strips on the forebody and noseboom, using two different length strakes, and increasing nose bluntness. Ultimately, a combination of forebody strakes, nose blunting, and noseboom transition strips reduced the yawing moment asymmetry enough to fully expand the high-angle-of-attack envelope. Analysis of the X-31 flight data is reviewed and compared to wind-tunnel and water-tunnel measurements. Several lessons learned are outlined regarding high-angle-of-attack configuration design and ground testing.

  10. Vortical sources of aerodynamic force and moment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, J. Z.; Wu, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that the aerodynamic force and moment can be expressed in terms of vorticity distribution (and entropy variation for compressible flow) on near wake plane, or in terms of boundary vorticity flux on the body surface. Thus the vortical sources of lift and drag are clearly identified, which is the real physical basis of optimal aerodynamic design. Moreover, these sources are highly compact, hence allowing one to concentrate on key local regions of the configuration, which have dominating effect to the lift and drag. A detail knowledge of the vortical low requires measuring or calculating the vorticity and dilatation field, which is however still a challenging task. Nevertheless, this type of formulation has some unique advantages; and how to set up a well-posed problem, in particular how to establish vorticity-dilatation boundary conditions, is addressed.

  11. Correlation of forebody pressures and aircraft yawing moments on the X-29A aircraft at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, David F.; Richwine, David M.; Landers, Stephen

    1992-01-01

    In-flight pressure distributions at four fuselage stations on the forebody of the X-29A aircraft have been reported at angles of attack from 15 to 66 deg and at Mach numbers from 0.22 to 0.60. At angles of attack of 20 deg and higher, vortices shed from the nose strake caused suction peaks in the pressure distributions that generally increased in magnitude with angle of attack. Above 30 deg-angle of attack, the forebody pressure distributions became asymmetrical at the most forward station, while they remained nearly symmetrical until 50 to 55 deg-angle of attack for the aft stations. Between 59 to 66 deg-angle of attack, the asymmetry of the pressure distributions changed direction. Yawing moments for the forebody alone were obtained by integrating the forebody pressure distributions. At 45 deg-angle of attack, the aircraft yaws to the right and at 50 deg and higher, the aircraft yaws to the left. The forebody yawing moments correlated well with the aircraft left yawing moment at an angle of attack of 50 deg or higher. At a 45 deg-angle of attack, the forebody yawing moments did not correlate well with the aircraft yawing moment, but it is suggested that this was due to asymmetric pressures on the cockpit region of the fuselage which was not instrumented. The forebody was also shown to provide a positive component of directional stability of the aircraft at angles of attack of 25 deg or higher. A Mach number effect was noted at angles of attack of 30 deg or higher at the station where the nose strake was present. At this station, the suction peaks in the pressure distributions at the highest Mach number were reduced and much more symmetrical as compared to the lower Mach number pressure distributions.

  12. A theoretical and experimental investigation of the effects of yaw on pressures, forces, and moments during seaplane landings and planing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smiley, Robert F

    1952-01-01

    A theory for the side force, rolling moment, yawing moment, and pressure distribution during yawed landings and planing of seaplanes was developed. For the special case of the straight-sided wedge without chine immersion, the results of the theoretical analysis are presented in the form of generalized curves covering all step landing conditions. Experimental impact and planing data are presented for a prismatic wedge having an angle of dead rise of 22.5 degrees and are shown to be in reasonable agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  13. A study of the nonlinear aerodynamics of bodies in nonplanar motion. Ph.D. Thesis - Stanford Univ., Calif.; [numerical analysis of aerodynamic force and moment systems during large amplitude, arbitrary motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiff, L. B.

    1974-01-01

    Concepts from the theory of functionals are used to develop nonlinear formulations of the aerodynamic force and moment systems acting on bodies in large-amplitude, arbitrary motions. The analysis, which proceeds formally once the functional dependence of the aerodynamic reactions upon the motion variables is established, ensures the inclusion, within the resulting formulation, of pertinent aerodynamic terms that normally are excluded in the classical treatment. Applied to the large-amplitude, slowly varying, nonplanar motion of a body, the formulation suggests that the aerodynamic moment can be compounded of the moments acting on the body in four basic motions: steady angle of attack, pitch oscillations, either roll or yaw oscillations, and coning motion. Coning, where the nose of the body describes a circle around the velocity vector, characterizes the nonplanar nature of the general motion.

  14. High transonic speed transport aircraft study. [aerodynamic characteristics of single-fuselage, yawed-wing configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulfan, R. M.; Neumann, F. D.; Nisbet, J. W.; Mulally, A. R.; Murakami, J. K.; Noble, E. C.; Mcbarron, J. P.; Stalter, J. L.; Gimmestad, D. W.; Sussman, M. B.

    1973-01-01

    An initial design study of high-transonic-speed transport aircraft has been completed. Five different design concepts were developed. These included fixed swept wing, variable-sweep wing, delta wing, double-fuselage yawed-wing, and single-fuselage yawed-wing aircraft. The boomless supersonic design objectives of range=5560 Km (3000 nmi), payload-18 143 kg (40 000lb), Mach=1.2, and FAR Part 36 aircraft noise levels were achieved by the single-fuselage yawed-wing configuration with a gross weight of 211 828 Kg (467 000 lb). A noise level of 15 EPNdB below FAR Part 36 requirements was obtained with a gross weight increase to 226 796 Kg (500 000 lb). Although wing aeroelastic divergence was a primary design consideration for the yawed-wing concepts, the graphite-epoxy wings of this study were designed by critical gust and maneuver loads rather than by divergence requirements. The transonic nacelle drag is shown to be very sensitive to the nacelle installation. A six-degree-of-freedom dynamic stability analysis indicated that the control coordination and stability augmentation system would require more development than for a symmetrical airplane but is entirely feasible. A three-phase development plan is recommended to establish the full potential of the yawed-wing concept.

  15. Effect of Variation of Chord and Span of Ailerons on Rolling and Yawing Moments at Several Angles of Pitch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heald, R H; Strother, D H; Monish, B H

    1931-01-01

    This report presents the results of an extension to higher angles of attack of the investigation of the rolling and yawing moments due to ailerons of various chords and spans on two airfoils having the Clark Y and U. S. A. 27 wings. The measurements were made at various angles of pitch but at zero angle of roll and yaw, the wing chord being set at an angle of +4 degrees to the fuselage axis. In the case of the Clark Y airfoil the measurements have been extended to a pitch angle of 40 degrees, using ailerons of span equal to 67 per cent of the wing semispan and chord equal to 20 and 30 per cent of the wing chord. The work was conducted on wing models of 60-inch span and 10-inch chord.

  16. Aerodynamic potpourri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Aerodynamic developments for vertical axis and horizontal axis wind turbines are given that relate to the performance and aerodynamic loading of these machines. Included are: (1) a fixed wake aerodynamic model of the Darrieus vertical axis wind turbine; (2) experimental results that suggest the existence of a laminar flow Darrieus vertical axis turbine; (3) a simple aerodynamic model for the turbulent windmill/vortex ring state of horizontal axis rotors; and (4) a yawing moment of a rigid hub horizontal axis wind turbine that is related to blade coning.

  17. Aerodynamic potpourri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, R. E.

    1981-05-01

    Aerodynamic developments for vertical axis and horizontal axis wind turbines are given that relate to the performance and aerodynamic loading of these machines. Included are: (1) a fixed wake aerodynamic model of the Darrieus vertical axis wind turbine; (2) experimental results that suggest the existence of a laminar flow Darrieus vertical axis turbine; (3) a simple aerodynamic model for the turbulent windmill/vortex ring state of horizontal axis rotors; and (4) a yawing moment of a rigid hub horizontal axis wind turbine that is related to blade coning.

  18. Calculation of aerodynamic forces on a propeller in pitch or yaw

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crigler, John L; Gilman, Jean, Jr

    1952-01-01

    An analysis was made to determine the applicability of existing propeller theory and the theory of oscillating airfoils to the problem of determining the magnitude of the forces on propellers in pitch or yaw. Strip calculations using compressible airfoil characteristics were first made as though steady-state conditions existed successively at several blade positions of the propeller blades during one revolution. A theory of oscillating airfoils in pulsating incompressible potential flow was then considered from which it was possible to determine factors which would modify the steady-state forces.

  19. Experimental study of the aerodynamic noise radiated by cylinders with different cross-sections and yaw angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latorre Iglesias, E.; Thompson, D. J.; Smith, M. G.

    2016-01-01

    Vortex shedding from cylinders has been extensively studied due to its occurrence in many engineering fields. Many experimental studies reported in the literature focus on the aerodynamics of the vortex shedding process but the literature about the radiated noise is more scarce. The aim of the work presented here is to extend the available noise data. Aero-acoustic wind tunnel tests were carried out using cylinders with different cross-sections: circular, square, rectangular and elliptical. Flow speeds between 20 and 50 m/s were used, corresponding to Reynolds numbers in the range from 1.6×104 to 1.2×105. The dependence of the noise on the yaw angle, flow speed, cross-sectional shape, angle of attack and radiation angle (directivity) is assessed. The results obtained are compared, where possible, with those found in the literature for similar cases. It is intended that the results can be used for the validation and calibration of numerical and empirical aerodynamic noise prediction models.

  20. Unsteady Hybrid Navier-Stokes/Vortex Model for Numerical Study of Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine Aerodynamics under Yaw Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kensuke

    A new analysis tool, an unsteady Hybrid Navier-Stokes/Vortex Model, for a horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) in yawed flow is presented, and its convergence and low cost computational performance are demonstrated. In earlier work, a steady Hybrid Navier-Stokes/Vortex Model was developed with a view to improving simulation results obtained by participants of the NASA Ames blind comparison workshop, following the NREL Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment. The hybrid method was shown to better predict rotor torque and power over the range of wind speeds, from fully attached to separated flows. A decade has passed since the workshop was held and three dimensional unsteady Navier-Stokes analyses have become available using super computers. In the first chapter, recent results of unsteady Euler and Navier-Stokes computations are reviewed as standard references of what is currently possible and are contrasted with results of the Hybrid Navier-Stokes/Vortex Model in steady flow. In Chapter 2, the computational method for the unsteady Hybrid model is detailed. The grid generation procedure, using ICEM CFD, is presented in Chapter 3. Steady and unsteady analysis results for the NREL Phase IV rotor and for a modified "swept NREL rotor" are presented in Chapter 4-Chapter 7.

  1. Flight Test Determined Aerodynamics Force and Moment Characteristics of the X-43A Research Vehicle at Mach 7.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Mark C.; White, J. Terry

    2006-01-01

    The second flight of the HYPER-X Program afforded a unique opportunity to determine the aerodynamic force and moment characteristics of an airframe integrated scramjet powered aircraft in hypersonic flight. These data were gathered via a repeated series of pitch, yaw, and roll doublets, frequency sweeps, and pull-up/push-over maneuvers performed throughout the X-43A cowl-closed descent phase. The subject flight research maneuvers were conducted in a Mach number range of 6.8 to 0.95 at altitudes from 92,000 ft to sea level. In this flight regime, the dynamic pressure varied from 1300 psf to 400 psf with angle-of-attack ranging from 0 deg to 14 deg. The flight-extracted aerodynamics were compared with pre-flight predictions based on wind tunnel test data. The X-43A flight-derived axial force was found to be 10 to 15 percent higher than prediction. Under-predictions of similar magnitude were observed for the normal force. For Mach numbers greater than 4, the X-43A flight-derived stability and control characteristics resulted in larger than predicted static margins, with the largest discrepancy approximately 5-inches forward along the X(CG) at Mach 6. This would result in less static margin in pitch. The X-43A predicted lateral-directional stability and control characteristics matched well with flight data when allowance was made for the high uncertainty in angle-of-sideslip.

  2. X-43A Flight-Test-Determined Aerodynamic Force and Moment Characteristics at Mach 7.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Mark C.; White, J. Terry

    2008-01-01

    The second flight of the Hyper-X program afforded a unique opportunity to determine the aerodynamic force and moment characteristics of an airframe-integrated scramjet-powered aircraft in hypersonic flight. These data were gathered via a repeated series of pitch, yaw, and roll doublets, frequency sweeps, and pushover-pullup maneuvers performed throughout the X-43A cowl-closed descent. Maneuvers were conducted at Mach numbers of 6.80-0.95 and at altitudes from 92,000 ft mean sea level to sea level. The dynamic pressure varied from 1300 to 400 psf with the angle of attack ranging from 0 to 14 deg. The flight-extracted aerodynamics were compared with preflight predictions based on wind-tunnel test data. The X-43A flight-derived axial force was found to be 10-15%higher than prediction. Underpredictions of similar magnitude were observed for the normal force. For Mach numbers above 4.0, the flight-derived stability and control characteristics resulted in larger-than-predicted static margins, with the largest discrepancy approximately 5 in. forward along the x-axis center of gravity at Mach 6.0. This condition would result in less static margin in pitch. The predicted lateral-directional stability and control characteristics matched well with flight data when allowance was made for the high uncertainty in angle of sideslip.

  3. Flight-Test-Determined Aerodynamic Force and Moment Characteristics of the X-43A at Mach 7.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis. Marl C.; White, J. Terry

    2006-01-01

    The second flight of the Hyper-X program afforded a unique opportunity to determine the aerodynamic force and moment characteristics of an airframe-integrated scramjet-powered aircraft in hypersonic flight. These data were gathered via a repeated series of pitch, yaw, and roll doublets; frequency sweeps; and pushover-pullup maneuvers performed throughout the X-43A cowl-closed descent. Maneuvers were conducted at Mach numbers of 6.80 to 0.95 and altitudes from 92,000 ft msl to sea level. The dynamic pressure varied from 1300 psf to 400 psf with the angle of attack ranging from 0 deg to 14 deg. The flight-extracted aerodynamics were compared with preflight predictions based on wind-tunnel-test data. The X-43A flight-derived axial force was found to be 10 percent to 15 percent higher than prediction. Under-predictions of similar magnitude were observed for the normal force. For Mach numbers above 4.0, the flight-derived stability and control characteristics resulted in larger-than-predicted static margins, with the largest discrepancy approximately 5 in. forward along the x-axis center of gravity at Mach 6.0. This condition would result in less static margin in pitch. The predicted lateral-directional stability and control characteristics matched well with flight data when allowance was made for the high uncertainty in angle of sideslip.

  4. An Analysis of Once-per-revolution Oscillating Aerodynamic Thrust Loads on Single-Rotation Propellers on Tractor Airplanes at Zero Yaw

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogallo, Vernon L; Yaggy, Paul F; Mccloud, John L , III

    1956-01-01

    A simplified procedure is shown for calculating the once-per-revolution oscillating aerodynamic thrust loads on propellers of tractor airplanes at zero yaw. The only flow field information required for the application of the procedure is a knowledge of the upflow angles at the horizontal center line of the propeller disk. Methods are presented whereby these angles may be computed without recourse to experimental survey of the flow field. The loads computed by the simplified procedure are compared with those computed by a more rigorous method and the procedure is applied to several airplane configurations which are believed typical of current designs. The results are generally satisfactory.

  5. Yawing characteristics during slippage of the nacelle of a multi MW wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, M.-G.; Dalhoff, P. H.; Gust, P.

    2016-09-01

    High aerodynamic yaw loads coupled with electrical failures in the wind turbine can result to a slippage of the nacelle, due to limited braking capabilities of the yaw system. A slippage on the other hand can lead to a mechanical malfunction of the yaw system. To analyse the yawing characteristics of a wind turbine during nacelle slippage situations, a detailed multibody system model of the yaw system has been developed and incorporated in a multibody system model of a wind turbine based on a 3.3 MW turbine. Extreme load cases which lead to a nacelle slippage have been simulated. The dynamics and loads on different wind turbine components are presented and discussed. First results show minimal load increases of the rotor torque and the bending moments of the blade root sections during slippage but unfavourable rotational speeds of the yaw drives.

  6. Differential Canard deflection for generation of yawing moment on the X-31 with and without the vertical tail. M.S. Thesis - George Washington Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiting, Matthew Robert

    1996-01-01

    The feasibility of augmenting the available yaw control power on the X-31 through differential deflection of the canard surfaces was studied as well as the possibility of using differential canard control to stabilize the X-31 with its vertical tail removed. Wind-tunnel tests and the results of departure criteria and linear analysis showed the destabilizing effect of the reduction of the vertical tail on the X-31. Wind-tunnel testing also showed that differential canard deflection was capable of generating yawing moments of roughly the same magnitude as the thrust vectoring vanes currently in place on the X-31 in the post-stall regime. Analysis showed that the X-31 has sufficient aileron roll control power that with the addition of differential canard as a yaw controller, the wind-axis roll accelerations will remain limited by yaw control authority. It was demonstrated, however, that pitch authority may actually limit the maximum roll rate which can be sustained. A drop model flight test demonstrated that coordinated, wind axis rolls could be performed with roll rates as high as 50 deg/sec (full scale equivalent) at 50 deg angle of attack. Another drop model test was conducted to assess the effect of vertical tail reduction, and an analysis of using differential canard deflection to stabilize the tailless X-31 was performed. The results of six-degree-of-freedom, non-linear simulation tests were correlated with the drop model flights. Simulation studies then showed that the tailless X-31 could be controlled at angles of attack at or above 20 deg using differential canard as the only yaw controller.

  7. Comparison of blade loads of fixed and free yawing wind turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheney, M. C.; Bielawa, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    The self regulating composite bearingless wind turbine utilizes an automatic pitch control concept and a completely unrestrained yawing degree of freedom. Aerodynamic moments caused by skewed flow provide the control to align the wind turbine with the wind. Model tests demonstrated the feasibility of the concept and analytical studies showed the free system to experience lower blade loads compared to the fixed system.

  8. Engine Yaw Augmentation for Hybrid-Wing-Body Aircraft via Optimal Control Allocation Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Brian R.; Yoo, Seung Yeun

    2011-01-01

    Asymmetric engine thrust was implemented in a hybrid-wing-body non-linear simulation to reduce the amount of aerodynamic surface deflection required for yaw stability and control. Hybrid-wing-body aircraft are especially susceptible to yaw surface deflection due to their decreased bare airframe yaw stability resulting from the lack of a large vertical tail aft of the center of gravity. Reduced surface deflection, especially for trim during cruise flight, could reduce the fuel consumption of future aircraft. Designed as an add-on, optimal control allocation techniques were used to create a control law that tracks total thrust and yaw moment commands with an emphasis on not degrading the baseline system. Implementation of engine yaw augmentation is shown and feasibility is demonstrated in simulation with a potential drag reduction of 2 to 4 percent. Future flight tests are planned to demonstrate feasibility in a flight environment.

  9. Using the HARV simulation aerodynamic model to determine forebody strake aerodynamic coefficients from flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messina, Michael D.

    1995-01-01

    The method described in this report is intended to present an overview of a process developed to extract the forebody aerodynamic increments from flight tests. The process to determine the aerodynamic increments (rolling pitching, and yawing moments, Cl, Cm, Cn, respectively) for the forebody strake controllers added to the F/A - 18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) aircraft was developed to validate the forebody strake aerodynamic model used in simulation.

  10. Predictions of the cycle-to-cycle aerodynamic loads on a yawed wind turbine blade under stalled conditions using a 3D empirical stochastic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ELGAMMI, MOUTAZ; SANT, TONIO

    2016-09-01

    This paper investigates a new approach to model the stochastic variations in the aerodynamic loads on yawed wind turbines experienced at high angles of attack. The method applies the one-dimensional Langevin equation in conjunction with known mean and standard deviation values for the lift and drag data. The method is validated using the experimental data from the NREL Phase VI rotor in which the mean and standard deviation values for the lift and drag are derived through the combined use of blade pressure measurements and a free-wake vortex model. Given that direct blade pressure measurements are used, 3D flow effects arising from the co-existence of dynamic stall and stall delay are taken into account. The model is an important step towards verification of several assumptions characterized as the estimated standard deviation, Gaussian white noise of the data and the estimated drift and diffusion coefficients of the Langevin equation. The results using the proposed assumptions lead to a good agreement with measurements over a wide range of operating conditions. This provides motivation to implement a general fully independent theoretical stochastic model within a rotor aerodynamics model, such as the free-wake vortex or blade-element momentum code, whereby the mean lift and drag coefficients can be estimated using 2D aerofoil data with correction models for 3D dynamic stall and stall delay phenomena, while the corresponding standard derivations are estimated through CFD.

  11. Semiempirical method for prediction of aerodynamic forces and moments on a steadily spinning light airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pamadi, Bandu N.; Taylor, Lawrence W., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    A semi-empirical method is presented for the estimation of aerodynamic forces and moments acting on a steadily spinning (rotating) light airplane. The airplane is divided into wing, body, and tail surfaces. The effect of power is ignored. The strip theory is employed for each component of the spinning airplane to determine its contribution to the total aerodynamic coefficients. Then, increments to some of the coefficients which account for centrifugal effect are estimated. The results are compared to spin tunnel rotary balance test data.

  12. Special methods for aerodynamic-moment calculations from parachute FSI modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takizawa, Kenji; Tezduyar, Tayfun E.; Boswell, Cody; Tsutsui, Yuki; Montel, Kenneth

    2015-06-01

    The space-time fluid-structure interaction (STFSI) methods for 3D parachute modeling are now at a level where they can bring reliable, practical analysis to some of the most complex parachute systems, such as spacecraft parachutes. The methods include the Deforming-Spatial-Domain/Stabilized ST method as the core computational technology, and a good number of special FSI methods targeting parachutes. Evaluating the stability characteristics of a parachute based on how the aerodynamic moment varies as a function of the angle of attack is one of the practical analyses that reliable parachute FSI modeling can deliver. We describe the special FSI methods we developed for this specific purpose and present the aerodynamic-moment data obtained from FSI modeling of NASA Orion spacecraft parachutes and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) subscale parachutes.

  13. Roll-Yaw control at high angle of attack by forebody tangential blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedreiro, N.; Rock, S. M.; Celik, Z. Z.; Roberts, L.

    1995-01-01

    The feasibility of using forebody tangential blowing to control the roll-yaw motion of a wind tunnel model is experimentally demonstrated. An unsteady model of the aerodynamics is developed based on the fundamental physics of the flow. Data from dynamic experiments is used to validate the aerodynamic model. A unique apparatus is designed and built that allows the wind tunnel model two degrees of freedom, roll and yaw. Dynamic experiments conducted at 45 degrees angle of attack reveal the system to be unstable. The natural motion is divergent. The aerodynamic model is incorporated into the equations of motion of the system and used for the design of closed loop control laws that make the system stable. These laws are proven through dynamic experiments in the wind tunnel using blowing as the only actuator. It is shown that asymmetric blowing is a highly non-linear effector that can be linearized by superimposing symmetric blowing. The effects of forebody tangential blowing and roll and yaw angles on the flow structure are determined through flow visualization experiments. The transient response of roll and yaw moments to a step input blowing are determined. Differences on the roll and yaw moment dependence on blowing are explained based on the physics of the phenomena.

  14. An examination of the aerodynamic moment on rotor blade tips using flight test data and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maier, Thomas H.; Bousman, William G.

    1993-01-01

    The analysis CAMRAD/JA is used to model two aircraft, a Puma with a swept-tip blade and a UH-60A Black Hawk. The accuracy of the analysis in predicting the torsion loads is assessed by comparing the predicted loads with measurements from flight tests. The influence of assumptions in the analytical model is examined by varying model parameters and comparing the predicted results to baseline values for the torsion loads. Flight test data from a research Puma are used to identify the source of torsion loads. These data indicate that the aerodynamic section moment in the region of the blade tip dominates torsion loading in high-speed flight. Both the aerodynamic section moment at the blade tip and the pitch-link loads are characterized by large positive (nose-up) moments in the first quadrant with rapid reversal of load so that the moment is negative in the second quadrant. Both the character and magnitude of this loading are missed by the CAMRAD/JA analysis.

  15. Synthetic Jet Control of a Yawing Axisymmetric Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Thomas; Vukasinovic, Bojan; Glezer, Ari

    2012-11-01

    The global aerodynamic forces and moments on an axisymmetric yawing body are controlled in wind tunnel experiments by exploiting the interaction of an array of synthetic jet actuators with the cross flow over the tail section of the body. The model is supported by a vertical wire through its aerodynamic center and is free to move in yaw. The baseline motion of the model is a yaw oscillation with amplitude and frequency that both monotonously increase with free stream velocity, characteristic of vortex shedding. The aft-facing control jet actuators emanate from narrow, azimuthally segmented slots around the perimeter of the tail section, and activation of the control jets effects the model's path through localized flow attachment on integrated Coanda surfaces. The control jets are used to control the yaw trajectory of the model using a closed loop PID controller. The baseline and controlled model motion is monitored using a laser vibrometer, and the flow evolution near the body and in its near wake is investigated using PIV. The coupled, time dependent response of the model to the actuation is investigated with emphasis on controlling its unstable modes. Supported by ARO.

  16. An integrated CFD/experimental analysis of aerodynamic forces and moments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, John E.; Robertson, David D.; Moyer, Seth A.

    1989-01-01

    Aerodynamic analysis using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is most fruitful when it is combined with a thorough program of wind tunnel testing. The understanding of aerodynamic phenomena is enhanced by the synergistic use of both analysis methods. A technique is described for an integrated approach to determining the forces and moments acting on a wind tunnel model by using a combination of experimentally measured pressures and CFD predictions. The CFD code used was FLO57 (an Euler solver) and the wind tunnel model was a heavily instrumented delta wing with 62.5 deg of leading-edge sweep. A thorough comparison of the CFD results and the experimental data is presented for surface pressure distributions and longitudinal forces and moments. The experimental pressures were also integrated over the surface of the model and the resulting forces and moments are compared to the CFD and wind tunnel results. The accurate determination of various drag increments via the combined use of the CFD and experimental pressures is presented in detail.

  17. A novel technique to neutralize the Yawing moment due to asymmetric thrust in a hybrid buoyant aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, Anwar U.; Asrar, Waqar; Omar, Ashraf A.; Sulaeman, Erwin; J. S Ali, Mohamed

    2016-03-01

    Dorsal fin is used in swimming animals like shark for the generation of thrust as well as to meet the requirement of the lateral stability. In the case of aircraft, rudders are normally used for the said requirement. In the present work, this nature inspired idea is explored for its application to neutralize the unavoidable asymmetric thrust produced by the twin engines of a hybrid buoyant aircraft. First, the estimation of asymmetric thrust is obtained with the help of analytical techniques for maximum thrust condition at 4 degree angle of attack. The moment generated by it is utilized for the sizing of a dorsal fin which looks similar to a tapered wing and is placed aft of the center of gravity. Wind tunnel testing at subsonic speed is carried out to explore the design features of this rotatable dorsal fin. It is found that a small rotation of 5 degree can generate the required moment. However, such rotation requires a complete pneumatic/electro-mechanical system and an alternative of it is to use a cambered airfoil for the dorsal fin installed at fixed location. Such a flow controlling device can also be used as an antenna mast, which is commonly installed out the fuselage of the aircraft for communication purposes. Moreover, by incorporating this technique, a pilot doesn't have to put an extra effort to make the aircraft stable in the presence of side wind.

  18. Some Effects of Frequency on the Contribution of a Vertical Tail to the Free Aerodynamic Damping of a Model Oscillating in Yaw

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, John D; Fisher, Lewis R; Hubbard, Sadie M

    1953-01-01

    The damping in yaw and the directional stability of a model freely oscillating in yaw were measured tail-off and tail-on and compared with the values obtained by theoretical consideration of the unsteady lift associated with an oscillating vertical tail. A range of low frequencies comparable to those of the lateral motions of airplanes was covered. The analysis includes the effects of vertical-tail aspect ratio and the two-dimensional effects of compressibility.

  19. The forces and moments acting on parts of the XN2Y-1 airplane during spins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scudder, N F

    1937-01-01

    The magnitudes of the yawing moments produced by various parts of an airplane during spins have previously been found to be of major importance in determining the nature of the spin. Discrepancies in resultant yawing moments determined from model and full-scale tests, however, have indicated the probable importance of scale effect on the model. In order to obtain data for a more detailed comparison between full-scale and model results, flight tests were made to determine the yawing moments contributed by various parts of an airplane in spins. The inertia moment was determined by the usual measurement of the spinning motion, and the aerodynamic yawing moments on the fuselage, fin, and rudder were determined by pressure-distribution measurements over these parts of the airplane. The wing yawing moment was determined by taking the difference between the gyroscopic moment and the fuselage, fin, and rudder moments. The numerical values of the wing yawing moments were found to be of the same order of magnitude as those measured in wind tunnels.

  20. Modeling the Launch Abort Vehicle's Subsonic Aerodynamics from Free Flight Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, Christopher L.

    2010-01-01

    An investigation into the aerodynamics of the Launch Abort Vehicle for NASA's Constellation Crew Launch Vehicle in the subsonic, incompressible flow regime was conducted in the NASA Langley 20-ft Vertical Spin Tunnel. Time histories of center of mass position and Euler Angles are captured using photogrammetry. Time histories of the wind tunnel's airspeed and dynamic pressure are recorded as well. The primary objective of the investigation is to determine models for the aerodynamic yaw and pitch moments that provide insight into the static and dynamic stability of the vehicle. System IDentification Programs for AirCraft (SIDPAC) is used to determine the aerodynamic model structure and estimate model parameters. Aerodynamic models for the aerodynamic body Y and Z force coefficients, and the pitching and yawing moment coefficients were identified.

  1. Parametric Study of Urban-Like Topographic Statistical Moments Relevant to a Priori Modelling of Bulk Aerodynamic Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaowei; Iungo, G. Valerio; Leonardi, Stefano; Anderson, William

    2016-08-01

    For a horizontally homogeneous, neutrally stratified atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), aerodynamic roughness length, z_0 , is the effective elevation at which the streamwise component of mean velocity is zero. A priori prediction of z_0 based on topographic attributes remains an open line of inquiry in planetary boundary-layer research. Urban topographies - the topic of this study - exhibit spatial heterogeneities associated with variability of building height, width, and proximity with adjacent buildings; such variability renders a priori, prognostic z_0 models appealing. Here, large-eddy simulation (LES) has been used in an extensive parametric study to characterize the ABL response (and z_0 ) to a range of synthetic, urban-like topographies wherein statistical moments of the topography have been systematically varied. Using LES results, we determined the hierarchical influence of topographic moments relevant to setting z_0 . We demonstrate that standard deviation and skewness are important, while kurtosis is negligible. This finding is reconciled with a model recently proposed by Flack and Schultz (J Fluids Eng 132:041203-1-041203-10, 2010), who demonstrate that z_0 can be modelled with standard deviation and skewness, and two empirical coefficients (one for each moment). We find that the empirical coefficient related to skewness is not constant, but exhibits a dependence on standard deviation over certain ranges. For idealized, quasi-uniform cubic topographies and for complex, fully random urban-like topographies, we demonstrate strong performance of the generalized Flack and Schultz model against contemporary roughness correlations.

  2. The effect of delta 3 on a yawing HAWT blade and on yaw dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, F. W.; Jones, R.

    1982-01-01

    A single degree of freedom aeroelastic computer model, WMSTAB3, was employed to perform a parametric analysis of HAWT blade behavior during yaw maneuvers. Over 1,000 different combinations of delta sub 3 and normal frequency were analyzed. The effect of delta sub 3 and flapping stiffness on flapping frequency, phase, and magnitude are discussed. The moments transmitted to the fixed system during yaw maneuvers were calculated and reduced to time constants of response to step changes in wind direction. The significance of the time constants for the configurations considered relative to yaw response rate and lag angle is discussed, along with their possible significance for large HAWT.

  3. Free-molecule-flow force and moment coefficients of the aeroassist flight experiment vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.; Hinson, Edwin W.

    1989-01-01

    Calculated results for the aerodynamic coefficients over the range of + or - 90 deg in both pitch and yaw attitude angles for the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) vehicle in free molecule flow are presented. The AFE body is described by a large number of small flat plate surface elements whose orientations are established in a wind axes coordinate system through the pitch and yaw attitude angles. Lift force, drag force, and three components of aerodynamic moment about a specified point are computed for each element. The elemental forces and moments are integrated over the entire body, and total force and moment coefficients are computed. The coefficients are calculated for the two limiting gas-surface molecular collision conditions, namely, specular and diffuse, which assume zero and full thermal accommodation of the incoming gas molecules with the surface, respectively. The individual contribution of the shear stress and pressure terms are calculated and also presented.

  4. Aerodynamic Lift and Moment Calculations Using a Closed-Form Solution of the Possio Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Jensen; Iliff, Kenneth W.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we present closed-form formulas for the lift and moment coefficients of a lifting surface in two dimensional, unsteady, compressible, subsonic flow utilizing a newly developed explicit analytical solution of the Possio equation. Numerical calculations are consistent with previous numerical tables based on series expansions or ad hoc numerical schemes. More importantly, these formulas lend themselves readily to flutter analysis, compared with the tedious table-look-up schemes currently in use.

  5. A computational investigation of the three-dimensional unsteady aerodynamics of Drosophila hovering and maneuvering.

    PubMed

    Ramamurti, Ravi; Sandberg, William C

    2007-03-01

    Three-dimensional unsteady computations of the flow past a fruit fly Drosophila under hovering and free flight conditions are computed. The kinematics of the wings and the body of the fruit fly are prescribed from experimental observations. The computed unsteady lift and thrust forces are validated with experimental results and are in excellent agreement. The unsteady aerodynamic origin of the time-varying yaw moment is identified. The differences in the kinematics between the right and the left wings show that subtle change in the stroke angle and deviation angle can result in the yaw moment for the turning maneuver. The computed yaw moment reaches a peak value at the beginning of the maneuver and remains positive throughout the remainder of the maneuver. The origin of the yaw moment is investigated by computing the center of pressures on each wing and the individual moment arms. This investigation leads to the conclusion that it is the forward force and a component of the lift force that combine to produce the turning moment while the side force alone produces the restoring torque during the maneuver. The vorticity shed from the wing's leading edge and the tips show a loop like structure that during stroke reversals pinches off into Lambda-like structures that have not been previously observed in the wakes of flapping fliers.

  6. Unconventional Rotor Power Response to Yaw Error Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreck, S. J.; Schepers, J. G.

    2014-12-01

    Continued inquiry into rotor and blade aerodynamics remains crucial for achieving accurate, reliable prediction of wind turbine power performance under yawed conditions. To exploit key advantages conferred by controlled inflow conditions, EU-JOULE DATA Project and UAE Phase VI experimental data were used to characterize rotor power production under yawed conditions. Anomalies in rotor power variation with yaw error were observed, and the underlying fluid dynamic interactions were isolated. Unlike currently recognized influences caused by angled inflow and skewed wake, which may be considered potential flow interactions, these anomalies were linked to pronounced viscous and unsteady effects.

  7. Unconventional Rotor Power Response to Yaw Error Variations

    SciTech Connect

    Schreck, S. J.; Schepers, J. G.

    2014-12-16

    Continued inquiry into rotor and blade aerodynamics remains crucial for achieving accurate, reliable prediction of wind turbine power performance under yawed conditions. To exploit key advantages conferred by controlled inflow conditions, we used EU-JOULE DATA Project and UAE Phase VI experimental data to characterize rotor power production under yawed conditions. Anomalies in rotor power variation with yaw error were observed, and the underlying fluid dynamic interactions were isolated. Unlike currently recognized influences caused by angled inflow and skewed wake, which may be considered potential flow interactions, these anomalies were linked to pronounced viscous and unsteady effects.

  8. Quasi steady-state aerodynamic model development for race vehicle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohrfeld-Halterman, J. A.; Uddin, M.

    2016-01-01

    Presented in this paper is a procedure to develop a high fidelity quasi steady-state aerodynamic model for use in race car vehicle dynamic simulations. Developed to fit quasi steady-state wind tunnel data, the aerodynamic model is regressed against three independent variables: front ground clearance, rear ride height, and yaw angle. An initial dual range model is presented and then further refined to reduce the model complexity while maintaining a high level of predictive accuracy. The model complexity reduction decreases the required amount of wind tunnel data thereby reducing wind tunnel testing time and cost. The quasi steady-state aerodynamic model for the pitch moment degree of freedom is systematically developed in this paper. This same procedure can be extended to the other five aerodynamic degrees of freedom to develop a complete six degree of freedom quasi steady-state aerodynamic model for any vehicle.

  9. Bilinear tangent yaw guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brusch, R. G.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presents a parametric yaw steering law which has been used to provide closed-loop yaw guidance for the launch of the HEAO (High Energy Astronomy Observatory) satellite mission using the Atlas/Centaur launch vehicle. This bilinear tangent steering law provides near optimal yaw steering for maneuvers requiring insertion into orbits with a specified inclination and node. Bilinear tangent steering is shown to be optimal in both the pitch and yaw planes when a uniform gravitational field is assumed. The conditions under which the general bilinear tangent laws degenerate into linear tangent and constant attitude laws are presented. The flight computer implementation of these laws in a rotating coordinate system using real-time integration of the equations of motion is detailed. Explicit solution of the parametric guidance equations requires the inflight solution of (2x2) two-point boundary value problems in the pitch and yaw planes. Excellent results are obtained even for very large (greater than 50 deg) out-of-plane steering angles.

  10. Endemic syphilis and yaws

    PubMed Central

    Grin, E. I.

    1956-01-01

    Endemic syphilis and similar conditions are compared in this paper with yaws. Both are non-venereal and endemic, and they have very similar epidemiological characteristics. There is also considerable similarity in the clinical manifestations at the various stages of yaws and endemic syphilis, the differences that do appear being mainly due to different environmental and living conditions. No antigenic or immunogenic differences between syphilis and yaws have yet been demonstrated, and the sensitivity of both to penicillin is the same. Control measures for both diseases may be based on similar principles. The author considers the treponematoses to be closely related infections, and stresses the “unitarian” view put forward by various writers. PMID:13404469

  11. Experiments in aircraft roll-yaw control using forebody tangential blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedreiro, Nelson

    Flight at high angles of attack can provide improved maneuverability for fighter aircraft and increased lift capabilities for future supersonic and hypersonic transport aircraft during take-off and landing. At high angles of attack the aerodynamics of the vehicle are dominated by separation, vortex shedding and breakdown, which compromise the effectiveness of conventional control surfaces. As a result, controlled flight at high angles of attack is not feasible for current aircraft configurations. Alternate means to augment the control of the vehicle at these flight regimes are therefore necessary. In this work, the feasibility of using Forebody Tangential Blowing to control the roll-yaw motion of a wind tunnel model at high angles of attack is demonstrated. The method consists of injecting a thin sheet of air tangentially to the forebody of the vehicle to change the separation lines over the forebody and alter the aerodynamic loads. A unique model was developed that describes the unsteady aerodynamic moments generated by both vehicle motion and the applied blowing. This aerodynamic model is sufficiently detailed to predict transient motion of the wind-tunnel model, and is simple enough to be suitable for control logic design and implementation. Successful closed-loop control was demonstrated experimentally for a delta wing body model with a cone-cylinder fuselage. Experiments were performed at 45 degrees nominal angle of attack. At this condition, the natural motion of the system is divergent. A discrete vortex method was developed to help understand the main physics of the flow. The method correctly captures the interactions between forebody and wing vortices. Moreover, the trends in static loads and flow structure are correctly represented. Flow visualization results revealed the vortical structure of the flow to be asymmetric even for symmetric flight conditions. The effects of blowing, roll and yaw angles on the flow structure were determined. It was shown that

  12. A comparison of spanwise aerodynamic loads estimated from measured bending moments versus direct pressure measurements on horizontal axis wind turbine blades

    SciTech Connect

    Simms, D A; Butterfield, C P

    1991-10-01

    Two methods can be used to determine aerodynamic loads on a rotating wind turbine blade. The first is to make direct pressure measurements on the blade surface. This is a difficult process requiring costly pressure instrumentation. The second method uses measured flap bending moments in conjunction with analytical techniques to estimate airloads. This method, called ALEST, was originally developed for use on helicopter rotors and was modified for use on horizontal axis wind turbine blades. Estimating airloads using flap bending moments in much simpler and less costly because measurements can be made with conventional strain gages and equipment. This paper presents results of airload estimates obtained using both methods under a variety of operating conditions. Insights on the limitations and usefulness of the ALEST bending moment technique are also included. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Penetration of yawed projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Reaugh, J.E.

    1990-10-08

    We used computer simulations and experiment to study the penetration of tungsten-alloy projectiles into a thick, armored steel target. These projectiles, with length-to-diameter ratios of 4, strike the target with severe yaws, up to 90{degree}(side-on-impact), such as might be induced in an originally longer projectile by a multiple-spaced plate array. In this study, we focus on the terminal ballistics of these projectiles and ignore how the yaw was induced. We found that the minimum penetration depth occurs at 90{degree}yaw. This case is well approximated by the two-dimensional plane-strain penetration of a side-on cylinder. The ratio of penetration depth to diameter, P:D, for this case is larger than that for a sphere because the plane-strain geometry lacks hoop stress, which is activated in axisymmetric geometry. A more surprising result of work is that the penetration at 60{degree} yaw is only slightly deeper than that of the side-on impact. 8 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Wing kinematics measurement and aerodynamics of free-flight maneuvers in drone-flies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanlai; Sun, Mao

    2010-06-01

    The time courses of wing and body kinematics of two free-flying drone-flies, as they performed saccades, were measured using 3D high-speed video, and the morphological parameters of the wings and body of the insects were also measured. The measured wing kinematics was used in a Navier-Stokes solver to compute the aerodynamic forces and moments acting on the insects. The main results are as following. (1) The turn is mainly a 90° change of heading. It is made in about 10 wingbeats (about 55 ms). It is of interest to note that the number of wingbeats taken to make the turn is approximately the same as and the turning time is only a little different from that of fruitflies measured recently by the same approach, even if the weight of the droneflies is more than 100 times larger than that of the fruitflies. The long axis of body is about 40° from the horizontal during the maneuver. (2) Although the body rotation is mainly about a vertical axis, a relatively large moment around the yaw axis (axis perpendicular to the long axis of body), called as yaw moment, is mainly needed for the turn, because moment of inertial of the body about the yaw axis is much larger than that about the long axis. (3) The yaw moment is mainly produced by changes in wing angles of attack: in a right turn, for example, the dronefly lets its right wing to have a rather large angle of attack in the downstroke (generally larger than 50°) and a small one in the upstroke to start the turn, and lets its left wing to do so to stop the turn, unlike the fruitflies who generate the yaw moment mainly by changes in the stroke plane and stroke amplitude.

  15. Wind turbind speed control by automatic yawing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenemser, K. H.; Swift, A. H. P.

    1983-06-01

    A yaw dynamics analysis was developed for a two-bladed horizontal axis wind turbine with passive cyclic pitch variation achieved by letting the blade pair freely oscillate about a common axis with which the blades formed a small prelag angle. This type of rotor was found capable of high yaw rates without imposing vibratory hub moments and without producing noticeable flapping amplitudes. Experiments were conducted with a tail vane stabilized 7.6 m diameter wind rotor driving a three phase alternator tuned and loaded to produce a rotor torque proportional to the square of the rotor speed. Two yaw control systems which replaced the usual blade feathering controls were investigated: an active yaw control system using a hydraulic rotor speed governor, and a passive system responding to a combination of rotor thrust and torque. Both systems limited during strong gusts rotor speed quite accurately. The passive system appeared to be more promising because of its greater reliability and because of the greater ease of adapting it to larger size wind turbines.

  16. Propulsion and airframe aerodynamic interactions of supersonic V/STOL configurations. Volume 2: Wind tunnel test force and moment data report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zilz, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    A wind tunnel model of a supersonic V/STOL fighter configuration has been tested to measure the aerodynamic interaction effects which can result from geometrically close-coupled propulsion system/airframe components. The approach was to configure the model to represent two different test techniques. One was a conventional test technique composed of two test modes. In the Flow-Through mode, absolute configuration aerodynamics are measured, including inlet/airframe interactions. In the Jet-Effects mode, incremental nozzle/airframe interactions are measured. The other test technique is a propulsion simulator approach, where a sub-scale, externally powered engine is mounted in the model. This allows proper measurement of inlet/airframe and nozzle/airframe interactions simultaneously. This is Volume 2 of 2: Wind Tunnel Test Force and Moment Data Report.

  17. Aerodynamic characteristics of Magellan spacecraft in Venus upper atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rault, Didier F. G.

    1993-01-01

    The aerodynamic flight characteristics of the Magellan spacecraft in the Venus atmosphere are computed at a nominal altitude of 140 km over a wide range of incidence angles and roll angles. Computational methods are described which can be used to simulate flowfields in the transition and free molecular domains over vehicles of arbitrarily complex geometry. Values of the drag, lift, and transverse forces and of the pitch, yaw, and roll moments are given for incidence angles of -60 to 60 deg and roll angles of 0 to 360 deg. Transitional flow effects are quantified and shown to be small, but not negligible and should be accounted for if high accuracy is required.

  18. Wind Tunnel Testing on Crosswind Aerodynamic Forces Acting on Railway Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hyeok-Bin; Nam, Seong-Won; You, Won-Hee

    This study is devoted to measure the aerodynamic forces acting on two railway trains, one of which is a high-speed train at 300km/h maximum operation speed, and the other is a conventional train at the operating speed 100km/h. The three-dimensional train shapes have been modeled as detailed as possible including the inter-car, the upper cavity for pantograph, and the bogie systems. The aerodynamic forces on each vehicle of the trains have been measured in the subsonic wind tunnel with 4m×3m test section of Korea Aerospace Research Institute at Daejeon, Korea. The aerodynamic forces and moments of the train models have been plotted for various yaw angles and the characteristics of the aerodynamic coefficients has been discussed relating to the experimental conditions.

  19. Aerodynamic control with passively pitching wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravish, Nick; Wood, Robert

    Flapping wings may pitch passively under aerodynamic and inertial loads. Such passive pitching is observed in flapping wing insect and robot flight. The effect of passive wing pitch on the control dynamics of flapping wing flight are unexplored. Here we demonstrate in simulation and experiment the critical role wing pitching plays in yaw control of a flapping wing robot. We study yaw torque generation by a flapping wing allowed to passively rotate in the pitch axis through a rotational spring. Yaw torque is generated through alternating fast and slow upstroke and and downstroke. Yaw torque sensitively depends on both the rotational spring force law and spring stiffness, and at a critical spring stiffness a bifurcation in the yaw torque control relationship occurs. Simulation and experiment reveal the dynamics of this bifurcation and demonstrate that anomalous yaw torque from passively pitching wings is the result of aerodynamic and inertial coupling between the pitching and stroke-plane dynamics.

  20. Experiments in Aircraft Roll-Yaw Control using Forebody Tangential Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedreiro, Nelson

    1997-01-01

    the model to two degrees-of-freedom, roll and yaw, was designed and built. The apparatus was used to conduct dynamic experiments which showed that the system was unstable, its natural motion divergent. A model for the unsteady aerodynamic loads was developed based on the basic physics of the flow and results from flow visualization experiments. Parameters of the aerodynamic model were identified from experimental data. The model was validated using data from dynamic experiments. The aerodynamic model completes the equations of motion of the system which were used in the design of control laws using blowing as the only actuator. The unsteady aerodynamic model was implemented as part of the real-time vehicle control system. A control strategy using asymmetric blowing was demonstrated experimentally. A discrete vortex method was developed to help understand the main physics of the flow. The method correctly captures the interactions between forebody and wing vortices. Moreover, the trends in static loads and flow structure are correctly represented. Flow visualization results revealed the vortical structure of the flow to be asymmetric even for symmetric flight conditions. The effects of blowing, and roll and yaw angles on the flow structure were determined. It is shown that superimposing symmetric and asymmetric blowing has a linearizing effect on the actuator characteristics. Transient responses of roll and yaw moments to step input blowing were characterized, and their differences were explained based on the physical mechanisms through which these loads are generated.

  1. Low-speed, high-lift aerodynamic characteristics of slender, hypersonic accelerator-type configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatlin, Gregory M.

    1989-01-01

    Two investigations were conducted in the Langley 14 by 22 Foot Subsonic Tunnel to determine the low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of a generic hypersonic accelerator-type configuration. The model was a delta wing configuration incorporating a conical forebody, a simulated wrap-around engine package, and a truncated conical aftbody. Six-component force and moment data were obtained over a range of attack from -4 to 30 degrees and for a sideslip range of + or - 20 degrees. In addition to tests of the basic configuration, component build-up tests were conducted; and the effects of power, forebody nose geometry, canard surfaces, fuselage strakes, and engines on the lower surface alone were also determined. Control power available from deflections of wing flaps and aftbody flaps was also investigated and found to be significantly increased during power-on conditions. Large yawing moments resulted from asymmetric flow fields exhibited by the forebody as revealed by both surface pressure data and flow visualization. Increasing nose bluntness reduced the yawing-moment asymmetry, and the addition of a canard eliminated the yawing-moment asymmetry.

  2. Aerodynamic characteristics of sixteen electric, hybrid, and subcompact vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    An elementary electric and hybrid vehicle aerodynamic data base was developed using data obtained on sixteen electric, hybrid, and sub-compact production vehicles tested in the Lockheed-Georgia low-speed wind tunnel. Zero-yaw drag coefficients ranged from a high of 0.58 for a boxey delivery van and an open roadster to a low of about 0.34 for a current four-passenger proto-type automobile which was designed with aerodynamics as an integrated parameter. Vehicles were tested at yaw angles up to 40 degrees and a wing weighting analysis is presented which yields a vehicle's effective drag coefficient as a function of wing velocity and driving cycle. Other parameters investigated included the effects of windows open and closed, radiators open and sealed, and pop-up headlights. Complete six-component force and moment data are presented in both tabular and graphical formats. Only limited commentary is offered since, by its very nature, a data base should consist of unrefined reference material. A justification for pursuing efficient aerodynamic design of EHVs is presented.

  3. Evaluation of the Hinge Moment and Normal Force Aerodynamic Loads from a Seamless Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge Flap in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Eric J.; Cruz, Josue; Lung, Shun-Fat; Kota, Sridhar; Ervin, Gregory; Lu, Kerr-Jia; Flick, Pete

    2016-01-01

    A seamless adaptive compliant trailing edge (ACTE) flap was demonstrated in flight on a Gulfstream III aircraft at the NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center. The trailing edge flap was deflected between minus 2 deg up and plus 30 deg down in flight. The safety-of-flight parameters for the ACTE flap experiment require that flap-to-wing interface loads be sensed and monitored in real time to ensure that the structural load limits of the wing are not exceeded. The attachment fittings connecting the flap to the aircraft wing rear spar were instrumented with strain gages and calibrated using known loads for measuring hinge moment and normal force loads in flight. The safety-of-flight parameters for the ACTE flap experiment require that flap-to-wing interface loads be sensed and monitored in real time to ensure that the structural load limits of the wing are not exceeded. The attachment fittings connecting the flap to the aircraft wing rear spar were instrumented with strain gages and calibrated using known loads for measuring hinge moment and normal force loads in flight. The interface hardware instrumentation layout and load calibration are discussed. Twenty-one applied calibration test load cases were developed for each individual fitting. The 2-sigma residual errors for the hinge moment was calculated to be 2.4 percent, and for normal force was calculated to be 7.3 percent. The hinge moment and normal force generated by the ACTE flap with a hinge point located at 26-percent wing chord were measured during steady state and symmetric pitch maneuvers. The loads predicted from analysis were compared to the loads observed in flight. The hinge moment loads showed good agreement with the flight loads while the normal force loads calculated from analysis were over-predicted by approximately 20 percent. Normal force and hinge moment loads calculated from the pressure sensors located on the ACTE showed good agreement with the loads calculated from the installed strain gages.

  4. Epidemiology of yaws: an update

    PubMed Central

    Kazadi, Walter M; Asiedu, Kingsley B; Agana, Nsiire; Mitjà, Oriol

    2014-01-01

    Yaws, a neglected tropical disease, is targeted for eradication by 2020 through large-scale mass-treatment programs of endemic communities. A key determinant for the success of the eradication campaign is good understanding of the disease epidemiology. We did a review of historical trends and new information from endemic countries, with the aim of assessing the state of knowledge on yaws disease burden. Transmission of yaws is now present in Africa, Asia, and the South Pacific. At least 12 countries are known to harbor yaws cases and 21 to 42 million people live in endemic areas. Between 2008 and 2012 more than 300,000 new cases were reported to the World Health Organization. Yaws presented high geographical variation within a country or region, high seasonality for incidence of active disease, and evidence that low standards of hygiene predispose to suffering of the disease. Key data issues include low levels of reporting, potential misdiagnosis, and scarce documentation on prevalence of asymptomatic infections. Currently available data most likely underestimates the magnitude of the disease burden. More effort is needed in order to refine accuracy of data currently being reported. A better characterization of the epidemiology of yaws globally is likely to positively impact on planning and implementation of yaws eradication. PMID:24729728

  5. Influences of aerodynamic loads on hunting stability of high-speed railway vehicles and parameter studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiao-Hui; Wu, Han; Lai, Jiang; Sheng, Hong-Zhi

    2014-12-01

    The influences of steady aerodynamic loads on hunting stability of high-speed railway vehicles were investigated in this study. A mechanism is suggested to explain the change of hunting behavior due to actions of aerodynamic loads: the aerodynamic loads can change the position of vehicle system (consequently the contact relations), the wheel/rail normal contact forces, the gravitational restoring forces/moments and the creep forces/moments. A mathematical model for hunting stability incorporating such influences was developed. A computer program capable of incorporating the effects of aerodynamic loads based on the model was written, and the critical speeds were calculated using this program. The dependences of linear and nonlinear critical speeds on suspension parameters considering aerodynamic loads were analyzed by using the orthogonal test method, the results were also compared with the situations without aerodynamic loads. It is shown that the most dominant factors affecting linear and nonlinear critical speeds are different whether the aerodynamic loads considered or not. The damping of yaw damper is the most dominant influencing factor for linear critical speeds, while the damping of lateral damper is most dominant for nonlinear ones. When the influences of aerodynamic loads are considered, the linear critical speeds decrease with the rise of crosswind velocity, whereas it is not the case for the nonlinear critical speeds. The variation trends of critical speeds with suspension parameters can be significantly changed by aerodynamic loads. Combined actions of aerodynamic loads and suspension parameters also affect the critical speeds. The effects of such joint action are more obvious for nonlinear critical speeds.

  6. Yaws in the Solomon Islands.

    PubMed

    Fegan, D; Glennon, M; Macbride-Stewart, G; Moore, T

    1990-02-01

    Yaws is a chronic, relapsing, non-venereally transmitted disease caused by Treponema pertenue. As a result of the WHO mass treatment campaign of the late 1950s, the prevalence in the Solomon Islands fell dramatically. Here the disease was thought to have been eradicated until an outbreak occurred in 1981. In 1984 a mass treatment survey following modified WHO guidelines was carried out. Subsequent to this campaign, yaws recurred and in 1987 a further treatment survey was required. Two observations were made as a result of our recent experience in controlling yaws in the Solomon Islands. (1) The disease appears to be attenuated. (2) WHO control policy may now be an inappropriate method for dealing with yaws in the Solomon Islands and should be replaced by a method which is integrated into the existing primary health care (PHC) structure. PMID:2304133

  7. Aerodynamic Characteristics of an Aerospace Vehicle During a Subsonic Pitch-Over Maneuver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, William L.

    1996-01-01

    Time-dependent CFD has been used to predict aerospace vehicle aerodynamics during a subsonic rotation maneuver. The inviscid 3D3U code is employed to solve the 3-D unsteady flow field using an unstructured grid of tetrahedra. As this application represents a challenge to time-dependent CFD, observations concerning spatial and temporal resolution are included. It is shown that even for a benign rotation rate, unsteady aerodynamic effects are significant during the maneuver. Possibly more significant, however, the rotation maneuver creates ow asymmetries leading to yawing moment, rolling moment, and side force which are not present in the quasi-steady case. A series of steady solutions at discrete points in the maneuver are also computed for comparison with wind tunnel measurements and as a means of quantifying unsteady effects.

  8. Aerodynamic analysis of a helicopter fuselage with rotating rotor head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reß, R.; Grawunder, M.; Breitsamter, Ch.

    2015-06-01

    The present paper describes results of wind tunnel experiments obtained during a research programme aimed at drag reduction of the fuselage of a twin engine light helicopter configuration. A 1 : 5 scale model of a helicopter fuselage including a rotating rotor head and landing gear was investigated in the low-speed wind tunnel A of Technische Universität a München (TUM). The modelled parts of the helicopter induce approxiu mately 80% of the total parasite drag thus forming a major potential for shape optimizations. The present paper compares results of force and moment measurements of a baseline configuration and modified variants with an emphasis on the aerodynamic drag, lift, and yawing moment coefficients.

  9. Aerodynamic design of a Coanda induced force and thruster anti-torque system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velkoff, Henry R.; Tung, Chee

    1991-01-01

    A general method of analysis of the external and internal aerodynamics of a generic Coanda induced circulation anti-torque system is presented. The technique gives moment about the yaw axis and download induced on the boom as well as the force developed by an aft jet. The external flows including downwash, wake swirl and the boom circulation are considered. The internal flow and losses through the duct, fan, blown slots, cascades and nozzle are considered on a step-by-step basis. Limited comparison is made with open data where available.

  10. Analysis of Asymmetric Aircraft Aerodynamics Due to an Experimental Wing Glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartshorn, Fletcher

    2011-01-01

    Aerodynamic computational fluid dynamics analysis of a wing glove attached to one wing of a business jet is presented and discussed. A wing glove placed on only one wing will produce asymmetric aerodynamic effects that will result in overall changes in the forces and moments acting on the aircraft. These changes, referred to as deltas, need to be determined and quantified to ensure that the wing glove does not have a significant effect on the aircraft flight characteristics. TRANAIR (Calmar Research Corporation, Cato, New York), a nonlinear full potential solver, and Star-CCM+ (CD-adapco, Melville, New York), a finite volume full Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics solver, are used to analyze a full aircraft with and without the glove at a variety of flight conditions, aircraft configurations, and angles of attack and sideslip. Changes in the aircraft lift, drag, and side force along with roll, pitch, and yaw are presented. Span lift and moment distributions are also presented for a more detailed look at the effects of the glove on the aircraft. Aerodynamic flow phenomena due to the addition of the glove are discussed. Results show that the glove produces only small changes in the aerodynamic forces and moments acting on the aircraft, most of which are insignificant.

  11. The influence of wing, fuselage and tail design on rotational flow aerodynamics data obtained beyond maximum lift with general aviation configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bihrle, W., Jr.; Bowman, J. S., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center has initiated a broad general aviation stall/spin research program. A rotary balance system was developed to support this effort. Located in the Langley spin tunnel, this system makes it possible to identify an airplane's aerodynamic characteristics in a rotational flow environment, and thereby permits prediction of spins. This paper presents a brief description of the experimental set-up, testing technique, five model programs conducted to date, and an overview of the rotary balance results and their correlation with spin tunnel free-spinning model results. It is shown, for example, that there is a large, nonlinear dependency of the aerodynamic moments on rotational rate and that these moments are pronouncedly configuration-dependent. Fuselage shape, horizontal tail and, in some instances, wing location are shown to appreciably influence the yawing moment characteristics above an angle of attack of 45 deg.

  12. Wind tunnel tests of a 5.3 m diameter yaw controlled turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulen, Eskil

    1993-09-01

    In order to meet the need for accurate wind turbine operating data from a variety of situations, a wind turbine was designed, built and tested. A description of the equipment and test results are given from a control point of view. The intention of the tests was to get a better understanding of the performance of a wind power station which from a system point of view is characterized by: two blades with fixed pitch angle, variable speed, yaw control of max rotor speed, hub with teeter, and induction generator. Some tests in stall region were also included. The intention was to get practical experiences by performing tests in a wind tunnel as realistically as possible. Of special interest are the following points: the load and aerodynamic torque of the blades with realistic values of rotor speed and yaw rate and angles; magnitude of teeter angle under yaw control; the required yaw motor torque; the coupling between yaw movements and tower lateral resonance ('fish tail' movement); disturbances, especially around yaw axis caused by blade rotation; and the performance of a hub with teeter in stall region. A small complete wind power station with a realistic yaw servo was used.

  13. Body appendages fine-tune posture and moments in freely manoeuvring fruit flies.

    PubMed

    Berthé, Ruben; Lehmann, Fritz-Olaf

    2015-10-01

    The precise control of body posture by turning moments is key to elevated locomotor performance in flying animals. Although elevated moments for body stabilization are typically produced by wing aerodynamics, animals also steer using drag on body appendages, shifting their centre of body mass, and changing moments of inertia caused by active alterations in body shape. To estimate the instantaneous contribution of each of these components for posture control in an insect, we three-dimensionally reconstructed body posture and movements of body appendages in freely manoeuvring fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster) by high-speed video and experimentally scored drag coefficients of legs and body trunk at low Reynolds number. The results show that the sum of leg- and abdomen-induced yaw moments dominates wing-induced moments during 17% of total flight time but is, on average, 7.2-times (roll, 3.4-times) smaller during manoeuvring. Our data reject a previous hypothesis on synergistic moment support, indicating that drag on body appendages and mass-shift inhibit rather than support turning moments produced by the wings. Numerical modelling further shows that hind leg extension alters the moments of inertia around the three main body axes of the animal by not more than 6% during manoeuvring, which is significantly less than previously reported for other insects. In sum, yaw, pitch and roll steering by body appendages probably fine-tune turning behaviour and body posture, without providing a significant advantage for posture stability and moment support. Motion control of appendages might thus be part of the insect's trimming reflexes, which reduce imbalances in moment generation caused by unilateral wing damage and abnormal asymmetries of the flight apparatus.

  14. Body appendages fine-tune posture and moments in freely manoeuvring fruit flies.

    PubMed

    Berthé, Ruben; Lehmann, Fritz-Olaf

    2015-10-01

    The precise control of body posture by turning moments is key to elevated locomotor performance in flying animals. Although elevated moments for body stabilization are typically produced by wing aerodynamics, animals also steer using drag on body appendages, shifting their centre of body mass, and changing moments of inertia caused by active alterations in body shape. To estimate the instantaneous contribution of each of these components for posture control in an insect, we three-dimensionally reconstructed body posture and movements of body appendages in freely manoeuvring fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster) by high-speed video and experimentally scored drag coefficients of legs and body trunk at low Reynolds number. The results show that the sum of leg- and abdomen-induced yaw moments dominates wing-induced moments during 17% of total flight time but is, on average, 7.2-times (roll, 3.4-times) smaller during manoeuvring. Our data reject a previous hypothesis on synergistic moment support, indicating that drag on body appendages and mass-shift inhibit rather than support turning moments produced by the wings. Numerical modelling further shows that hind leg extension alters the moments of inertia around the three main body axes of the animal by not more than 6% during manoeuvring, which is significantly less than previously reported for other insects. In sum, yaw, pitch and roll steering by body appendages probably fine-tune turning behaviour and body posture, without providing a significant advantage for posture stability and moment support. Motion control of appendages might thus be part of the insect's trimming reflexes, which reduce imbalances in moment generation caused by unilateral wing damage and abnormal asymmetries of the flight apparatus. PMID:26347566

  15. Formulas for propellers in yaw and charts of the side-force derivative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribner, Herbert S

    1945-01-01

    General formulas are given for propellers for the rate of change of side-force coefficient with angle of yaw and for the rate of change of pitching-moment coefficient with angle of yaw. Charts of the side-force derivative are given for two propellers of different plan form. The charts cover solidities of two to six blades and single and dual rotation. The blade angle ranges from 15 degrees or 20 degrees to 60 degrees.

  16. 14 CFR 27.351 - Yawing conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) of this section, in unaccelerated flight with zero yaw, at forward speeds from zero up to 0.6 VNE— (1... required in paragraph (a) of this section, in unaccelerated flight with zero yaw, at forward speeds from 0... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Flight Loads § 27.351 Yawing conditions....

  17. 14 CFR 27.351 - Yawing conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) of this section, in unaccelerated flight with zero yaw, at forward speeds from zero up to 0.6 VNE— (1... required in paragraph (a) of this section, in unaccelerated flight with zero yaw, at forward speeds from 0... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Flight Loads § 27.351 Yawing conditions....

  18. 14 CFR 29.351 - Yawing conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... paragraph (a) of this section, in unaccelerated flight with zero yaw, at forward speeds from zero up to 0.6... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Flight Loads § 29.351 Yawing conditions. (a... produce the load required in paragraph (a) of the section, in unaccelerated flight with zero yaw,...

  19. 14 CFR 29.351 - Yawing conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... paragraph (a) of this section, in unaccelerated flight with zero yaw, at forward speeds from zero up to 0.6... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Flight Loads § 29.351 Yawing conditions. (a... produce the load required in paragraph (a) of the section, in unaccelerated flight with zero yaw,...

  20. 14 CFR 27.351 - Yawing conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) of this section, in unaccelerated flight with zero yaw, at forward speeds from zero up to 0.6 VNE— (1... required in paragraph (a) of this section, in unaccelerated flight with zero yaw, at forward speeds from 0... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Flight Loads § 27.351 Yawing conditions....

  1. 14 CFR 29.351 - Yawing conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... paragraph (a) of this section, in unaccelerated flight with zero yaw, at forward speeds from zero up to 0.6... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Flight Loads § 29.351 Yawing conditions. (a... produce the load required in paragraph (a) of the section, in unaccelerated flight with zero yaw,...

  2. 14 CFR 27.351 - Yawing conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) of this section, in unaccelerated flight with zero yaw, at forward speeds from zero up to 0.6 VNE— (1... required in paragraph (a) of this section, in unaccelerated flight with zero yaw, at forward speeds from 0... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Flight Loads § 27.351 Yawing conditions....

  3. 14 CFR 29.351 - Yawing conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... paragraph (a) of this section, in unaccelerated flight with zero yaw, at forward speeds from zero up to 0.6... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Flight Loads § 29.351 Yawing conditions. (a... produce the load required in paragraph (a) of the section, in unaccelerated flight with zero yaw,...

  4. 14 CFR 29.351 - Yawing conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... paragraph (a) of this section, in unaccelerated flight with zero yaw, at forward speeds from zero up to 0.6... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Flight Loads § 29.351 Yawing conditions. (a... produce the load required in paragraph (a) of the section, in unaccelerated flight with zero yaw,...

  5. 14 CFR 27.351 - Yawing conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) of this section, in unaccelerated flight with zero yaw, at forward speeds from zero up to 0.6 VNE— (1... required in paragraph (a) of this section, in unaccelerated flight with zero yaw, at forward speeds from 0... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Flight Loads § 27.351 Yawing conditions....

  6. Investigation of the transient aerodynamic phenomena associated with passing manoeuvres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noger, C.; Regardin, C.; Széchényi, E.

    2005-11-01

    Passing manoeuvres and crosswind can have significant effects on the stability of road vehicles. The transient aerodynamics, which interacts with suspension, steering geometry and driver reaction is not well understood. When two vehicles overtake or cross, they mutually influence the flow field around each other, and under certain conditions, can generate severe gust loads that act as additional forces on both vehicles. The transient forces acting on them are a function of the longitudinal and transverse spacings and of the relative velocity between the two vehicles. Wind tunnel experiments have been conducted in one of the automotive wind tunnels of the Institut Aérotechnique of Saint-Cyr l’École to simulate the transient overtaking process between two models of a simple generic automobile shape. The tests were designed to study the effects of various parameters such as the longitudinal and transverse spacing, the relative velocity and the crosswind on the aerodynamic forces and moments generated on the overtaken and overtaking vehicles. Test results characterize the transient aerodynamic side force as well as the yawing moment coefficients in terms of these parameters. Measurements of the drag force coefficient as well as the static pressure distribution around the overtaken vehicle complete the understanding. The main results indicate the aerodynamic coefficients of the overtaken vehicle to be velocity independent within the limit of the test parameters, while unsteady aerodynamic effects appear in the case of an overtaking vehicle. The mutual interference effects between the vehicles vary as a linear function of the transverse spacing and the crosswind does not really generate any new unsteady behaviour.

  7. An Aerodynamic Force Estimation Method for Winged Models at the JAXA 60cm Magnetic Suspension and Balance System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    澤田, 秀夫

    The aerodynamic performance of an AGARD-B model, as an example of a winged model, was measured in a low-speed wind tunnel equipped with the JAXA 60cm Magnetic Suspension and Balance System (MSBS). The flow speed was in the range between 25m/s and 35m/s, and the angle of attack and the yaw angle were in the range of [- 8, 4] and [- 3, 3] degrees, respectively. Six components of the aerodynamic force were evaluated by using the control coil currents of the MSBS. In evaluating the drag, the effect of the lift on the drag must be evaluated at MSBS when the lift is much larger than drag. A new evaluation method for drag and lift was proposed and was examined successfully by subjecting the model to the same loads as in the wind tunnel test. The drag coefficient at zero lift and the derivatives of the lift and pitching moment coefficient with respect to the angle of attack were evaluated and compared with other source data sets. The obtained data agreed well with the corresponding values of the other sources. The side force, yawing moment and rolling moment coefficients were also evaluated on the basis of corresponding calibration test results, and reasonable results were obtained, although they could not be compared due to the lack of reliable data sets.

  8. HAWT dynamic stall response asymmetries under yawed flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreck, S.; Robinson, M.; Hand, M.; Simms, D.

    2000-10-01

    Horizontal axis wind turbines can experience significant time-varying aerodynamic loads, potentially causing adverse effects on structures, mechanical components and power production. As designers attempt lighter and more flexible wind energy machines, greater accuracy and robustness will become even more critical in future aerodynamics models. Aerodynamics modelling advances, in turn, will rely on more thorough comprehension of the three-dimensional, unsteady, vortical flows that dominate wind turbine blade aerodynamics under high-load conditions. To experimentally characterize these flows, turbine blade surface pressures were acquired at multiple span locations via the NREL Phase IV Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment. Surface pressures and associated normal force histories were used to characterize dynamic stall vortex kinematics and normal force amplification. Dynamic stall vortices and normal force amplification were confirmed to occur in response to angle-of-attack excursions above the static stall threshold. Stall vortices occupied approximately one-half of the blade span and persisted for nearly one-fourth of the blade rotation cycle. Stall vortex convection varied along the blade, resulting in dramatic deformation of the vortex. Presence and deformation of the dynamic stall vortex produced corresponding amplification of normal forces. Analyses revealed consistent alterations to vortex kinematics in response to changes in reduced frequency, span location and yaw error. Finally, vortex structures and kinematics not previously documented for wind turbine blades were isolated. Published in 2000 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Yaw dynamics of horizontal axis wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, A.C. )

    1992-05-01

    Designers of a horizontal axis wind turbine yaw mechanism are faced with a difficult decision. They know that if they elect to use a yaw- controlled rotor then the system will suffer increased initial cost and increased inherent maintenance and reliability problems. On the other hand, if they elect to allow the rotor to freely yaw they known they will have to account for unknown and random, though bounded, yaw rates. They will have a higher-risk design to trade-off against the potential for cost savings and reliability improvement. The risk of a yaw-free system could be minimized if methods were available for analyzing and understanding yaw behavior. The complexity of yaw behavior has, until recently, discouraged engineers from developing a complete yaw analysis method. The objectives of this work are to (1) provide a fundamental understanding of free-yaw mechanics and the design concepts most effective at eliminating yaw problems, and (2) provide tested design tools and guidelines for use by free-yaw wind systems manufacturers. The emphasis is on developing practical and sufficiently accurate design methods.

  10. Analysis of Asymmetric Aircraft Aerodynamics Due to an Experimental Wing Glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartshorn, Fletcher

    2011-01-01

    Aerodynamic analysis on a business jet with a wing glove attached to one wing is presented and discussed. If a wing glove is placed over a portion of one wing, there will be asymmetries in the aircraft as well as overall changes in the forces and moments acting on the aircraft. These changes, referred to as deltas, need to be determined and quantified to make sure the wing glove does not have a drastic effect on the aircraft flight characteristics. TRANAIR, a non-linear full potential solver was used to analyze a full aircraft, with and without a glove, at a variety of flight conditions and angles of attack and sideslip. Changes in the aircraft lift, drag and side force, along with roll, pitch and yawing moment are presented. Span lift and moment distributions are also presented for a more detailed look at the effects of the glove on the aircraft. Aerodynamic flow phenomena due to the addition of the glove and its fairing are discussed. Results show that the glove used here does not present a drastic change in forces and moments on the aircraft, but an added torsional moment around the quarter-chord of the wing may be a cause for some structural concerns.

  11. 3-D Time-Accurate CFD Simulations of a Multi-Megawatt Slender Bladed HAWT under Yawed Inflow Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayed, M.; Lutz, Th.; Krämer, E.

    2016-09-01

    In the present study numerical investigations of a generic Multi-Megawatt slender bladed Horizontal-Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT) under yawed inflow conditions were conducted. A three-dimensional URANS flow solver based on structured overlapping meshes was used. The simulations were conducted at wind speeds of 7m/sec, 11 m/sec and 15 m/sec for different yaw angles ranging from +60° to -60°. It was concluded that, for below rated wind speeds, under small yaw angles (below ±15°) the magnitudes of the blade forces are slightly increased, while under high yaw angles (above ±15°) there is a significant decrease. Moreover, the load fluctuations, for the different yaw angles, have the same frequency but different amplitude and oscillation shape. It was concluded that at the above rated wind speed of 15 m/sec, the blade aerodynamic loads are significantly affected by the yaw inflow conditions and the magnitude values of the loads are decreased with increasing yaw angle. It can be concluded that the angle of attack and the tower interference are the utmost variables affecting the yawed turbines.

  12. Aerodynamic analysis of the aerospaceplane HyPlane in supersonic rarefied flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuppardi, Gennaro; Savino, Raffaele; Russo, Gennaro; Spano'Cuomo, Luca; Petrosino, Eliano

    2016-06-01

    HyPlane is the Italian aerospaceplane proposal targeting, at the same time, both the space tourism and point-to-point intercontinental hypersonic flights. Unlike other aerospaceplane projects, relying on boosters or mother airplanes that bring the vehicle to high altitude, HyPlane will take off and land horizontally from common runways. According to the current project, HyPlane will fly sub-orbital trajectories under high-supersonic/low-hypersonic continuum flow regimes. It can go beyond the von Karman line at 100 km altitude for a short time, then starting the descending leg of the trajectory. Its aerodynamic behavior up to 70 km have already been studied and the results published in previous works. In the present paper some aspects of the aerodynamic behavior of HyPlane have been analyzed at 80, 90 and 100 km. Computer tests, calculating the aerodynamic parameters, have been carried out by a Direct Simulation Monte Carlo code. The effects of the Knudsen, Mach and Reynolds numbers have been evaluated in clean configuration. The effects of the aerodynamic surfaces on the rolling, pitching and yawing moments, and therefore on the capability to control attitude, have been analyzed at 100 km altitude. The aerodynamic behavior has been compared also with that of another aerospaceplane at 100 km both in clean and flapped configuration.

  13. Comparison of Pitching Moments Produced by Plain Flaps and by Spoilers and Some Aerodynamic Characteristics of an NACA 23012 Airfoil with Various Types of Aileron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purser, Paul E.; Mckinney, Elizabeth G.

    1945-01-01

    Sectional characteristics of airfoil having retractable slotted flap with plain, slot-lip, or retractable ailerons are presented for a large range of aileron deflections. The analysis indicated that pitching moments produced by spoilers were less positive than those produced by plain flaps of equal effectiveness, also that pitching moments created by the spoiler increased less with the Mach number than similar moments produced by plain flaps. Positive values of pitching moment decreased as devices were located nearer airfoil leading edge.

  14. Reentry aerodynamics forces and moments on the engine nozzle of the 146-inch solid rocket booster model 473 tested in MSFC 14 by 14 inch trisonic wind tunnel (SA30F)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. D.; Braddock, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    A test of a model of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Boosters (SRB's) was performed in a 14 x 14 inch Trisonic Wind Tunnel to determine the aerodynamic forces and moments imposed on the nozzle of the SRB during reentry. The model, with scale dimensions equal to 0.5479 of the actual SRB dimensions, was instrumented with a six-component force balance attached to the model nozzle so that only forces and moments acting on the nozzle were measured. A total of 137 runs (20 deg pitch polars) were performed during this test. The angle of attack ranged from 60 to 185 deg, the Reynolds number from 5.2 million to 7.6 million. The Mach numbers investigated were 1.96, 2.74, and 3.48. Five external protuberances were simulated. The effective roll angle simulated was 180 deg. The effects of three different heat shield configurations were investigated.

  15. Yaw-Misalignment and its Impact on Wind Turbine Loads and Wind Farm Power Output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dijk, Mike T.; van Wingerden, Jan-Willem; Ashuri, Turaj; Li, Yaoyu; Rotea, Mario A.

    2016-09-01

    To make wind energy cost competitive with traditional resources, wind turbines are commonly placed in groups. Aerodynamic interaction between the turbines causes sub-optimal energy production. A control strategy to mitigate these losses is by redirecting the wake by yaw misalignment. This paper aims to assess the influence of load variations of the rotor due to partial wake overlap and presents a combined optimization of the power and loads using wake redirection. For this purpose, we design a computational framework which computes the wind farm power production and the wind turbine rotor loads based on the yaw settings. The simulation results show that partial wake overlap can significantly increase asymmetric loading of the rotor disk and that yaw misalignment is beneficial in situations where the wake can be sufficiently directed away from the downstream turbine.

  16. Supersonic aerodynamic characteristics of a maneuvering canard-controlled missile with fixed and free-rolling tail fins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, A. B., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Wind tunnel investigations were conducted on a generic cruciform canard-controlled missile configuration. The model featured fixed or free-rolling tail-fin afterbodies to provide an expanded aerodynamic data base with particular emphasis on alleviating large induced rolling moments and/or for providing canard roll control throughout the entire test angle-of-attack range. The tests were conducted in the NASA Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel at Mach numbers from 2.50 to 3.50 at a constant Reynolds number per foot of 2.00 x 10 to the 6th. Selected test results are presented to show the effects of a fixed or free-rolling tail-fin afterbody on the static longitudinal and lateral-directional aerodynamic characteristics of a canard-controlled missile with pitch, yaw, and roll control at model roll angles of 0 deg and 45 deg.

  17. Prediction of forces and moments for flight vehicle control effectors. Part 1: Validation of methods for predicting hypersonic vehicle controls forces and moments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maughmer, Mark D.; Ozoroski, L.; Ozoroski, T.; Straussfogel, D.

    1990-01-01

    Many types of hypersonic aircraft configurations are currently being studied for feasibility of future development. Since the control of the hypersonic configurations throughout the speed range has a major impact on acceptable designs, it must be considered in the conceptual design stage. The ability of the aerodynamic analysis methods contained in an industry standard conceptual design system, APAS II, to estimate the forces and moments generated through control surface deflections from low subsonic to high hypersonic speeds is considered. Predicted control forces and moments generated by various control effectors are compared with previously published wind tunnel and flight test data for three configurations: the North American X-15, the Space Shuttle Orbiter, and a hypersonic research airplane concept. Qualitative summaries of the results are given for each longitudinal force and moment and each control derivative in the various speed ranges. Results show that all predictions of longitudinal stability and control derivatives are acceptable for use at the conceptual design stage. Results for most lateral/directional control derivatives are acceptable for conceptual design purposes; however, predictions at supersonic Mach numbers for the change in yawing moment due to aileron deflection and the change in rolling moment due to rudder deflection are found to be unacceptable. Including shielding effects in the analysis is shown to have little effect on lift and pitching moment predictions while improving drag predictions.

  18. Unsteady aerodynamics modeling for flight dynamics application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qing; He, Kai-Feng; Qian, Wei-Qi; Zhang, Tian-Jiao; Cheng, Yan-Qing; Wu, Kai-Yuan

    2012-02-01

    In view of engineering application, it is practicable to decompose the aerodynamics into three components: the static aerodynamics, the aerodynamic increment due to steady rotations, and the aerodynamic increment due to unsteady separated and vortical flow. The first and the second components can be presented in conventional forms, while the third is described using a one-order differential equation and a radial-basis-function (RBF) network. For an aircraft configuration, the mathematical models of 6-component aerodynamic coefficients are set up from the wind tunnel test data of pitch, yaw, roll, and coupled yawroll large-amplitude oscillations. The flight dynamics of an aircraft is studied by the bifurcation analysis technique in the case of quasi-steady aerodynamics and unsteady aerodynamics, respectively. The results show that: (1) unsteady aerodynamics has no effect upon the existence of trim points, but affects their stability; (2) unsteady aerodynamics has great effects upon the existence, stability, and amplitudes of periodic solutions; and (3) unsteady aerodynamics changes the stable regions of trim points obviously. Furthermore, the dynamic responses of the aircraft to elevator deflections are inspected. It is shown that the unsteady aerodynamics is beneficial to dynamic stability for the present aircraft. Finally, the effects of unsteady aerodynamics on the post-stall maneuverability are analyzed by numerical simulation.

  19. Prediction of forces and moments for flight vehicle control effectors. Part 2: An analysis of delta wing aerodynamic control effectiveness in ground effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maughmer, Mark D.; Ozoroski, L.; Ozoroski, T.; Straussfogel, D.

    1990-01-01

    Many types of hypersonic aircraft configurations are currently being studied for feasibility of future development. Since the control of the hypersonic configurations throughout the speed range has a major impact on acceptable designs, it must be considered in the conceptual design stage. Here, an investigation of the aerodynamic control effectiveness of highly swept delta planforms operating in ground effect is presented. A vortex-lattice computer program incorporating a free wake is developed as a tool to calculate aerodynamic stability and control derivatives. Data generated using this program are compared to experimental data and to data from other vortex-lattice programs. Results show that an elevon deflection produces greater increments in C sub L and C sub M in ground effect than the same deflection produces out of ground effect and that the free wake is indeed necessary for good predictions near the ground.

  20. Yaws: towards the WHO eradication target

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In 2012 WHO declared a target to eradicate yaws by 2020. The cornerstone of this strategy is community mass treatment with azithromycin. Initial studies suggest this is a very effective tool that may be capable of interrupting transmission. Alongside this there has been progress in the development and validation of diagnostic tests for yaws. Several new challenges have also emerged, in particular, evidence that Haemophilus ducreyi can cause phenotypically similar ulcers in yaws endemic communities, and evidence for a possible non-human primate reservoir. The 2020 eradication target remains ambitious and more challenges should be expected on the journey. PMID:27268712

  1. Free-Flight Evaluation of Forebody Blowing for Yaw Control at High Angels of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiddy, Jason

    1995-01-01

    Forebody blowing is a concept developed to provide yaw control for aircraft flying at high angles of attack where a conventional rudder becomes ineffective. The basic concept is fairly simple. A small jet of air is forced out of the nose of the aircraft. This jet causes a repositioning of the forebody vortices in an asymmetrical fashion. The asymmetric forebody vortex flows develop a side force on the forebody which results in substantial yawing moments at high angles of attack. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the use of forebody blowing as a control device through free-flight evaluation. This unique type of testing was performed at the NASA-Langley 30- by 60-foot tunnel. From these tests, it could then be shown that forebody blowing is an effective method of maintaining yaw control at high angles of attack.

  2. Aerodynamics of an Axisymmetric Missile Concept Having Cruciform Strakes and In-Line Tail Fins From Mach 0.60 to 4.63

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Jerry M.

    2005-01-01

    An experimental study has been performed to develop a large force and moment aerodynamic data set on a slender axisymmetric missile configuration having cruciform strakes and in-line control tail fins. The data include six-component balance measurements of the configuration aerodynamics and three-component measurements on all four tail fins. The test variables include angle of attack, roll angle, Mach number, model buildup, strake length, nose size, and tail fin deflection angles to provide pitch, yaw, and roll control. Test Mach numbers ranged from 0.60 to 4.63. The entire data set is presented on a CD-ROM that is attached to this paper. The CD-ROM also includes extensive plots of both the six-component configuration data and the three-component tail fin data. Selected samples of these plots are presented in this paper to illustrate the features of the data and to investigate the effects of the test variables.

  3. Determination of aerodynamic parameters of a fighter airplane from flight data at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, V.; Batterson, J. G.; Abbasy, I.

    1983-01-01

    A procedure for the estimation of airplane model structure and parameters is applied to data from a modern fighter airplane operating within an angle of attack range of 5 to 60 deg. The paper briefly describes the airplane, flight and wind tunnel data available, and the estimation method. The results presented contain basic longitudinal characteristics of the airplane and the estimates of aerodynamic parameters in the yawing-moment equations. These estimates are obtained from small and large amplitude maneuvers. Because the latter set of data was not suitable for airplane identification, some of the large amplitude maneuvers were joined together and then partitioned into subsets according to the values of angle of attack. Each subset was then analyzed as a separate data set. Most of the estimated parameters and functions are in good agreement with the wind tunnel measurements. The estimated lateral parameters in the model equations also demonstrate good prediction capabilities.

  4. Unsteady aerodynamic analysis for offshore floating wind turbines under different wind conditions.

    PubMed

    Xu, B F; Wang, T G; Yuan, Y; Cao, J F

    2015-02-28

    A free-vortex wake (FVW) model is developed in this paper to analyse the unsteady aerodynamic performance of offshore floating wind turbines. A time-marching algorithm of third-order accuracy is applied in the FVW model. Owing to the complex floating platform motions, the blade inflow conditions and the positions of initial points of vortex filaments, which are different from the fixed wind turbine, are modified in the implemented model. A three-dimensional rotational effect model and a dynamic stall model are coupled into the FVW model to improve the aerodynamic performance prediction in the unsteady conditions. The effects of floating platform motions in the simulation model are validated by comparison between calculation and experiment for a small-scale rigid test wind turbine coupled with a floating tension leg platform (TLP). The dynamic inflow effect carried by the FVW method itself is confirmed and the results agree well with the experimental data of a pitching transient on another test turbine. Also, the flapping moment at the blade root in yaw on the same test turbine is calculated and compares well with the experimental data. Then, the aerodynamic performance is simulated in a yawed condition of steady wind and in an unyawed condition of turbulent wind, respectively, for a large-scale wind turbine coupled with the floating TLP motions, demonstrating obvious differences in rotor performance and blade loading from the fixed wind turbine. The non-dimensional magnitudes of loading changes due to the floating platform motions decrease from the blade root to the blade tip. PMID:25583859

  5. Unsteady aerodynamic analysis for offshore floating wind turbines under different wind conditions

    PubMed Central

    Xu, B. F.; Wang, T. G.; Yuan, Y.; Cao, J. F.

    2015-01-01

    A free-vortex wake (FVW) model is developed in this paper to analyse the unsteady aerodynamic performance of offshore floating wind turbines. A time-marching algorithm of third-order accuracy is applied in the FVW model. Owing to the complex floating platform motions, the blade inflow conditions and the positions of initial points of vortex filaments, which are different from the fixed wind turbine, are modified in the implemented model. A three-dimensional rotational effect model and a dynamic stall model are coupled into the FVW model to improve the aerodynamic performance prediction in the unsteady conditions. The effects of floating platform motions in the simulation model are validated by comparison between calculation and experiment for a small-scale rigid test wind turbine coupled with a floating tension leg platform (TLP). The dynamic inflow effect carried by the FVW method itself is confirmed and the results agree well with the experimental data of a pitching transient on another test turbine. Also, the flapping moment at the blade root in yaw on the same test turbine is calculated and compares well with the experimental data. Then, the aerodynamic performance is simulated in a yawed condition of steady wind and in an unyawed condition of turbulent wind, respectively, for a large-scale wind turbine coupled with the floating TLP motions, demonstrating obvious differences in rotor performance and blade loading from the fixed wind turbine. The non-dimensional magnitudes of loading changes due to the floating platform motions decrease from the blade root to the blade tip. PMID:25583859

  6. Unsteady aerodynamic analysis for offshore floating wind turbines under different wind conditions.

    PubMed

    Xu, B F; Wang, T G; Yuan, Y; Cao, J F

    2015-02-28

    A free-vortex wake (FVW) model is developed in this paper to analyse the unsteady aerodynamic performance of offshore floating wind turbines. A time-marching algorithm of third-order accuracy is applied in the FVW model. Owing to the complex floating platform motions, the blade inflow conditions and the positions of initial points of vortex filaments, which are different from the fixed wind turbine, are modified in the implemented model. A three-dimensional rotational effect model and a dynamic stall model are coupled into the FVW model to improve the aerodynamic performance prediction in the unsteady conditions. The effects of floating platform motions in the simulation model are validated by comparison between calculation and experiment for a small-scale rigid test wind turbine coupled with a floating tension leg platform (TLP). The dynamic inflow effect carried by the FVW method itself is confirmed and the results agree well with the experimental data of a pitching transient on another test turbine. Also, the flapping moment at the blade root in yaw on the same test turbine is calculated and compares well with the experimental data. Then, the aerodynamic performance is simulated in a yawed condition of steady wind and in an unyawed condition of turbulent wind, respectively, for a large-scale wind turbine coupled with the floating TLP motions, demonstrating obvious differences in rotor performance and blade loading from the fixed wind turbine. The non-dimensional magnitudes of loading changes due to the floating platform motions decrease from the blade root to the blade tip.

  7. Wing motion transformation to evaluate aerodynamic coupling in flapping wing flight.

    PubMed

    Faruque, Imraan A; Humbert, J Sean

    2014-12-21

    Whether the remarkable flight performance of insects is because the animals leverage inherent physics at this scale or because they employ specialized neural feedback mechanisms is an active research question. In this study, an empirically derived aerodynamics model is used with a transformation involving a delay and a rotation to identify a class of kinematics that provide favorable roll-yaw coupling. The transformation is also used to transform both synthetic and experimentally measured wing motions onto the manifold representing proverse yaw and to quantify the degree to which freely flying insects make use of passive aerodynamic mechanisms to provide proverse roll-yaw turn coordination. The transformation indicates that recorded insect kinematics do act to provide proverse yaw for a variety of maneuvers. This finding suggests that passive aerodynamic mechanisms can act to reduce the neural feedback demands of an insect׳s flight control strategy.

  8. Wing motion transformation to evaluate aerodynamic coupling in flapping wing flight.

    PubMed

    Faruque, Imraan A; Humbert, J Sean

    2014-12-21

    Whether the remarkable flight performance of insects is because the animals leverage inherent physics at this scale or because they employ specialized neural feedback mechanisms is an active research question. In this study, an empirically derived aerodynamics model is used with a transformation involving a delay and a rotation to identify a class of kinematics that provide favorable roll-yaw coupling. The transformation is also used to transform both synthetic and experimentally measured wing motions onto the manifold representing proverse yaw and to quantify the degree to which freely flying insects make use of passive aerodynamic mechanisms to provide proverse roll-yaw turn coordination. The transformation indicates that recorded insect kinematics do act to provide proverse yaw for a variety of maneuvers. This finding suggests that passive aerodynamic mechanisms can act to reduce the neural feedback demands of an insect׳s flight control strategy. PMID:25128237

  9. Lidar-Assisted Feedforward Individual Pitch Control to Compensate Wind Shear and Yawed Inflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wortmann, Svenja; Geisler, Jens; Konigorski, Ulrich

    2016-09-01

    Lidar-assisted individual pitch control (IPC) has been investigated occasionally in recent years, focusing on the compensation of (vertical) wind shear as the main disturbance. Since yawed inflow might cause significant load fluctuations too, it is worth to compensate. Load patterns caused by yawed inflow significantly differ from those caused by wind shear, requiring a more sophisticated control algorithm. In this paper a lidar-assisted cyclic pitch feedforward control to compensate wind shear and yawed inflow is presented. The main objective is the analysis of the load patterns through a simplified aerodynamic model, which among other things focuses on a reasonable representation of the skewed wake effect. Establishing a suitable structure of the feedforward controller follows. The paper concludes with a comparison of fatigue load reductions achieved by three different controllers. Firstly, a well-known feedback individual pitch control; secondly, a feedforward controller for pure wind shear compensation and thirdly, this new feedforward controller to compensate wind shear and yawed inflow. The last two controllers use ideal lidar measurement chains.

  10. Validation and comparison of aerodynamic modelling approaches for wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blondel, F.; Boisard, R.; Milekovic, M.; Ferrer, G.; Lienard, C.; Teixeira, D.

    2016-09-01

    The development of large capacity Floating Offshore Wind Turbines (FOWT) is an interdisciplinary challenge for the design solvers, requiring accurate modelling of both hydrodynamics, elasticity, servodynamics and aerodynamics all together. Floating platforms will induce low-frequency unsteadiness, and for large capacity turbines, the blade induced vibrations will lead to high-frequency unsteadiness. While yawed inflow conditions are still a challenge for commonly used aerodynamic methods such as the Blade Element Momentum method (BEM), the new sources of unsteadiness involved by large turbine scales and floater motions have to be tackled accurately, keeping the computational cost small enough to be compatible with design and certification purposes. In the light of this, this paper will focus on the comparison of three aerodynamic solvers based on BEM and vortex methods, on standard, yawed and unsteady inflow conditions. We will focus here on up-to-date wind tunnel experiments, such as the Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment (UAE) database and the MexNext international project.

  11. 14 CFR 25.351 - Yaw maneuver conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) With the airplane yawed to the static equilibrium sideslip angle, it is assumed that the cockpit rudder... in paragraph (a) of this section. (d) With the airplane yawed to the static equilibrium...

  12. 14 CFR 25.351 - Yaw maneuver conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) With the airplane yawed to the static equilibrium sideslip angle, it is assumed that the cockpit rudder... in paragraph (a) of this section. (d) With the airplane yawed to the static equilibrium...

  13. 14 CFR 25.351 - Yaw maneuver conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) With the airplane yawed to the static equilibrium sideslip angle, it is assumed that the cockpit rudder... in paragraph (a) of this section. (d) With the airplane yawed to the static equilibrium...

  14. 14 CFR 25.351 - Yaw maneuver conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) With the airplane yawed to the static equilibrium sideslip angle, it is assumed that the cockpit rudder... in paragraph (a) of this section. (d) With the airplane yawed to the static equilibrium...

  15. Low-speed wind-tunnel investigation of a porous forebody and nose strakes for yaw control of a multirole fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fears, Scott P.

    1995-01-01

    Low-speed wind-tunnel tests were conducted in the Langley 12-Foot Low-Speed Tunnel on a model of the Boeing Multirole Fighter (BMRF) aircraft. This single-seat, single-engine configuration was intended to be an F-16 replacement that would incorporate many of the design goals and advanced technologies of the F-22. Its mission requirements included supersonic cruise without afterburner, reduced observability, and the ability to attack both air-to-air and air-to-ground targets. So that it would be effective in all phases of air combat, the ability to maneuver at angles of attack up to and beyond maximum lift was also desired. Traditional aerodynamic yaw controls, such as rudders, are typically ineffective at these higher angles of attack because they are usually located in the wake from the wings and fuselage. For this reason, this study focused on investigating forebody-mounted controls that produces yawing moments by modifying the strong vortex flowfield being shed from the forebody at high angles of attack. Two forebody strakes were tested that varied in planform and chordwise location. Various patterns of porosity in the forebody skin were also tested that differed in their radial coverage and chordwise location. The tests were performed at a dynamic pressure of 4 lb/ft(exp 2) over an angle-of-attack range of -4 deg to 72 deg and a sideslip range of -10 deg to 10 deg. Static force data, static pressures on the surface of the forebody, and videotapes of flow-visualization using laser-illuminated smoke were obtained.

  16. Some important aspects of yaws eradication*

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, C. J.; Guthe, T.

    1956-01-01

    The purposes of a yaws mass campaign are to eradicate yaws and to improve the environmental sanitation and standard of living of the people so that its re-introduction will be impossible. In a mass treatment campaign the importance of latent cases and contacts in maintaining the disease must be taken into account. The treatment of this group of the population, in addition to all active cases, hastens the success of the campaign. Resurveys at regular intervals must be carried out until the prevalence of active yaws is low and there are adequate facilities to continue the consolidation phase of the campaign. All the population should be seen at each survey. Serological screening is used to guide public health activities. All campaigns and post-campaign activities should be planned and budgeted for before the activities start. Campaigns should expand as compact areas and should be co-ordinated with similar campaigns in adjacent countries. Adequate supervision of field staff, the intelligent co-operation of the people and their leaders and continuous project evaluation are essential for the eradication of yaws. PMID:13404465

  17. LDEF yaw and pitch angle estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Gebauer, Linda

    1992-01-01

    Quantification of the LDEF yaw and pitch misorientations is crucial to the knowledge of atomic oxygen exposure of samples placed on LDEF. Video camera documentation of the LDEF spacecraft prior to grapple attachment, atomic oxygen shadows on experiment trays and longerons, and a pinhole atomic oxygen camera placed on LDEF provided sources of documentation of the yaw and pitch misorientation. Based on uncertainty-weighted averaging of data, the LDEF yaw offset was found to be 8.1 plus or minus 0.6 degrees, allowing higher atomic oxygen exposure of row 12 than initially anticipated. The LDEF pitch angle offset was found to be 0.8 plus or minus 0.4 degrees, such that the space end was tipped forward toward the direction of travel. The resulting consequences of the yaw and pitch misorientation of LDEF on the atomic oxygen fluence is a factor of 2.16 increase for samples located on row 12, and a factor of 1.18 increase for samples located on the space end compared to that which would be expected for perfect orientation.

  18. A Hybrid Aerodynamic and Aeroacoustic Modeling for Small Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoica, C.; Dumitrescu, H.; Dumitrache, Al.

    2010-09-01

    Stall control and pitch control are the most commonly used methods of regulating power. However, through the opportunities presented by the flexible (or teetered) hub of a two-bladed teetered rotor one can also utilize yaw control to regulate power. This is achieved by adjusting the capture area of the rotor disk relative to the prevailing wind direction. This paper presents the aerodynamic and aeroacoustic results obtained from theoretical models for such a rotor when is yawed to the undisturbed flow. The non-axial flow operating conditions results in a variation in the power output and noise spectrum. Some comparisons between calculated and measured noise spectra of a yaw controlled wind turbine show good agreement over all angles up to 60 degrees of yaw.

  19. Static and dynamic force/moment measurements in the Eidetics water tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, Carlos J.; Malcolm, Gerald N.

    1994-01-01

    Water tunnels have been utilized in one form or another to explore fluid mechanics and aerodynamics phenomena since the days of Leonardo da Vinci. Water tunnel testing is attractive because of the relatively low cost and quick turn-around time to perform flow visualization experiments and evaluate the results. The principal limitation of a water tunnel is that the low flow speed, which provides for detailed visualization, also results in very small hydrodynamic (aerodynamic) forces on the model, which, in the past, have proven to be difficult to measure accurately. However, the advent of semi-conductor strain gage technology and devices associated with data acquisition such as low-noise amplifiers, electronic filters, and digital recording have made accurate measurements of very low strain levels feasible. The principal objective of this research effort was to develop a multi-component strain gage balance to measure forces and moments on models tested in flow visualization water tunnels. A balance was designed that allows measuring normal and side forces, and pitching, yawing and rolling moments (no axial force). The balance mounts internally in the model and is used in a manner typical of wind tunnel balances. The key differences between a water tunnel balance and a wind tunnel balance are the requirement for very high sensitivity since the loads are very low (typical normal force is 0.2 lbs), the need for water proofing the gage elements, and the small size required to fit into typical water tunnel models.

  20. The structure of the wake generated by a submarine model in yaw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashok, A.; Van Buren, T.; Smits, A. J.

    2015-06-01

    The turbulent wake of a submarine model in yaw was investigated using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry at The model (DARPA SUBOFF idealized submarine geometry) is mounted in a low-speed wind tunnel using a support that mimics the sail, and it is yawed so that the body moves in the plane normal to the support. The measurements reveal the formation of a pair of streamwise vortices that are asymmetric in strength. The weaker vortex quickly diffuses, and in the absence of further diffusion, the stronger vortex maintains its strength even at the furthest downstream location. It is suggested that the flow fields obtained here using a semi-infinite sail as a support will be similar to those obtained using a finite length sail since its tip vortex would not interact significantly with the body vortices present in the wake, at least for a considerable distance downstream of the stern Hence, a submarine in yaw is expected to generate wakes which are inherently more persistent than one in pitch, and the strong asymmetries in yaw are expected to produce a net rolling moment on the body.

  1. Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Flying-Boat Hull Having a Length-Beam Ratio of 15, TED No. NACA 2206

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riebe, John M.; Naeseth, Rodger L.

    1951-01-01

    An investigation was made in the Langley 300 MPH 7- by 10-foot tunnel to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of a flying-boat hull of a length-beam ratio of 15 in the presence of a wing. The investigation was an extension of previous tests made on hulls of length-beam ratios of 6, 9, and 12; these hulls were designed to have approximately the same hydrodynamic performance with respect to spray and resistance characteristics. Comparison with the previous investigation at lower length-beam ratios indicated a reduction in minimum drag coefficients of 0.0006 (10 peroent)with fixed transition when the length-beam ratio was extended from 12 to 15. As with the hulls of lower length-beam ratio, the drag reduction with a length-beam ratio of 15 occurred throughout the range of angle of attack tested and the angle of attack for minimum drag was in the range from 2deg to 3deg. Increasing the length-beam ratio from 12 to 15 reduced the hull longitudinal instability by an mount corresponding to an aerodynamic-center shift of about 1/2 percent of the mean aerodynamic chord of the hypothetical flying boat. At an angle of attack of 2deg, the value of the variation of yawing-moment coefficient with angle of yaw for a length-beam ratio of 15 was 0.00144, which was 0.00007 larger than the value for a length-beam ratio of 12.

  2. Extended moment arm anti-spin device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, R. D. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A device which corrects aerodynamic spin is provided in which a collapsible boom extends an aircraft moment arm and an anti-spin parachute force is exerted upon the end of the moment arm to correct intentional or inadvertent aerodynamic spin. This configuration effects spin recovery by means of a parachute whose required diameter decreases as an inverse function of the increasing length of the moment arm. The collapsible boom enables the parachute to avoid the aircraft wake without mechanical assistance, retracts to permit steep takeoff, and permits a parachute to correct spin while minimizing associated aerodynamic, structural and in-flight complications.

  3. Helicopter low-speed yaw control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John C. (Inventor); Kelley, Henry L. (Inventor); Crowell, Cynthia A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A system for improving yaw control at low speeds consists of one strake placed on the upper portion of the fuselage facing the retreating rotor blade and another strake placed on the lower portion of the fuselage facing the advancing rotor blade. These strakes spoil the airflow on the helicopter tail boom during hover, low speed flight, and right or left sidewards flight so that less side thrust is required from the tail rotor.

  4. Yaws Prevalence, Lessons from the Field and the Way Forward towards Yaws Eradication in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Kaitoo, Ekow; Agongo, Emmanuel Erasmus Akurugu; Bonsu, George; Kyei-Faried, Sadik; Amponsa-Achiano, Kwame; Ahmed, Kofi; Appiah-Denkyira, Ebenezer; Asiedu, Kingsley; Amankwa, Joseph; Bonsu, Frank Adae

    2014-01-01

    Despite past WHO/UNICEF led global yaws eradication efforts, the disease seems to persist. The true burden is however not known for comprehensive action. Ghana's data showed significant increase in notified cases since the 1970s. Recognizing limitations in routine data, we carried out a yaws treatment survey in 2008 in three purposively selected districts to establish the prevalence and learn lessons for renewed action. Of 208,413 school children examined, 4,006 were suspected yaws cases (prevalence 1.92 (95% CI: 1.86–1.98) percent). Of 547 schools surveyed, 13% had prevalence between 5% and 10% while 3% had prevalence above 10%. The highest school prevalence was 19.5%. Half of the schools had cases. The large sample allowed aggregating the school results by administrative levels. The lowest aggregated prevalences of 0.23%, 0.40%, and 0.64% were in the urban sub-districts of Asamankese, Oda, and Achiase, respectively, while the highest of 8.61%, 3.69%, and 1.4% were in rural Akroso, Mepom, and Aperade, respectively. In conclusion, the prevalence of yaws is high in some schools in rural, hard-to-reach areas of Ghana. Considering past global eradication efforts, our findings suggest yaws may be resurging for which programmatic action is needed. PMID:27437507

  5. Simulations of the Yawed MEXICO Rotor Using a Viscous-Inviscid Panel Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos-García, N.; Sørensen, J. N.; Shen, W. Z.

    2014-06-01

    In the present work the viscous-inviscid interactive model MIRAS is used to simulate flows past the MEXICO rotor in yawed conditions. The solver is based on an unsteady three-dimensional free wake panel method which uses a strong viscous-inviscid interaction technique to account for the viscous effects inside the boundary layer. Calculated wake velocities have been benchmarked against field PIV measurements, while computed blade aerodynamic characteristics are compared against the load calculated from pressure measurements at different locations along the blade span. Predicted and measured aerodynamic forces are in overall good agreement, however discrepancies appear in the root region which could be related to an underestimation of the rotational effects arising from Coriolis and centrifugal forces. The predicted wake velocities are generally in good agreement with measurements along the radial as well as the axial traverses performed during the experimental campaign.

  6. A fully unsteady prescribed wake model for HAWT performance prediction in yawed flow

    SciTech Connect

    Coton, F.N.; Tongguang, Wang; Galbraith, R.A.M.; Lee, D.

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the development of a fast, accurate, aerodynamic prediction scheme for yawed flow on horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWTs). The method is a fully unsteady three-dimensional model which has been developed over several years and is still being enhanced in a number of key areas. The paper illustrates the current ability of the method by comparison with field data from the NREL combined experiment and also describes the developmental work in progress. In particular, an experimental test programme designed to yield quantitative wake convection information is summarised together with modifications to the numerical model which are necessary for meaningful comparison with the experiments. Finally, current and future work on aspects such as tower-shadow and improved unsteady aerodynamic modelling are discussed.

  7. Serological study of yaws in Java

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huan-Ying; Soebekti, R.

    1955-01-01

    This report presents the results of serological analyses made by the laboratory of the Treponematoses Control Project, Indonesia, from its establishment in April 1951 until April 1953. All sera were tested quantitatively with the VDRL and Kline slide-tests or the Kahn test, or with all three. A study of the mean reagin titre in untreated yaws cases showed that the percentage of seronegative reactors among clinically positive cases was low. Less seronegativity was observed among females than males. Examination of decrease in mean reagin titre after treatment by clinical group showed maximum to minimum decrease in the following sequence: early contagious, early contagious plus hyperkeratosis, ulcerative plus osteo-articular, ulcerative, hyperkeratosis, and osteo-articular lesions. The decrease tended to be greater in females than males and in patients with high than with low titre; it also varied with the age of the patient. No significant variation in decrease was noted when four different PAM treatment schedules were tested comparatively. The percentage of serological cure and improvement with all schedules was highest in the cases with early lesions, and in the younger age-groups. A study of patients requiring re-treatment at the time of resurvey showed no important difference in mean reagin titre between clinically cured and uncured patients suffering from palmar or plantar hyperkeratosis and ulcerative or osteo-articular lesions. Serological testing of sera from clinically negative household contacts and non-contacts, with or without previous history of yaws, gave the following results: Among the household contacts, the number of seronegative reactors, while not affected by age-distribution, was significantly higher in the history-positive than in the history-negative groups. The percentage of seropositive reactors was in direct proportion to the prevalence of yaws, the seropositivity-rate being high in villages with a yaws incidence of 11%-30%. The report also

  8. Forebody Aerodynamics of the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle with Actuated Forebody Strakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, David F.; Murri, Daniel G.

    2001-01-01

    Extensive pressure measurements and off-surface flow visualization were obtained on the forebody and strakes of the NASA F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) equipped with actuated forebody strakes. Forebody yawing moments were obtained by integrating the circumferential pressures on the forebody and strakes. Results show that large yawing moments can be generated with forebody strakes. At a 50 deg-angle-of-attack, deflecting one strake at a time resulted in a forebody yawing moment control reversal for small strake deflection angles. However, deflecting the strakes differentially about a 20 deg symmetric strake deployment eliminated the control reversal and produced a near linear variation of forebody yawing moment with differential strake deflection. At an angle of attack of 50 deg and for 0 deg and 20 deg symmetric strake deployments, a larger forebody yawing moment was generated by the forward fuselage (between the radome and the apex of the leading-edge extensions) than on the radome where the actuated forebody strakes were located. Cutouts on the flight vehicle strakes that were not on the wind tunnel models are believed to be responsible for deficits in the suction peaks on the flight radome pressure distributions and differences in the forebody yawing moments.

  9. Effects of fluid behavior around low aspect ratio, low Reynolds number wings on aerodynamic stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, Matthew; Mohseni, Kamran

    2011-11-01

    The innovation of micro aerial vehicles (MAVs) has brought to attention the unique flow regime associated with low aspect ratio (LAR), low Reynolds number fliers. The dominant effects of developing tip vortices and leading edge vortices create a fundamentally different flow regime than that of conventional aircraft. An improved knowledge of low aspect ratio, low Reynolds number aerodynamics can be greatly beneficial for future MAV design. A little investigated but vital aspect of LAR aerodynamics is the behavior of the fluid as the wing yaws. Flow visualization experiments undertaken in the group for the canonical case of varying AR flat plates indicate that the propagation of the tip vortex keeps the flow attached over the upstream portion of the wing, while the downstream vortex is convected away from the wing. This induces asymmetric, destabilizing loading on the wing which has been observed to adversely affect MAV flight. In addition, experimental load measurements indicate significant nonlinearities in forces and moments which can be attributed to the development and propagation of these vortical structures. A non-dimensional analysis of the rigid body equations of motion indicates that these nonlinearities create dependencies which dramatically change the conventional linearization process. These flow phenomena are investigated with intent to apply to future MAV design.

  10. Advanced Aerodynamic Devices to Improve the Performance, Economics, Handling, and Safety of Heavy Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Robert J. Englar

    2001-05-14

    Research is being conducted at the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) to develop advanced aerodynamic devices to improve the performance, economics, stability, handling and safety of operation of Heavy Vehicles by using previously-developed and flight-tested pneumatic (blown) aircraft technology. Recent wind-tunnel investigations of a generic Heavy Vehicle model with blowing slots on both the leading and trailing edges of the trailer have been conducted under contract to the DOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies. These experimental results show overall aerodynamic drag reductions on the Pneumatic Heavy Vehicle of 50% using only 1 psig blowing pressure in the plenums, and over 80% drag reductions if additional blowing air were available. Additionally, an increase in drag force for braking was confirmed by blowing different slots. Lift coefficient was increased for rolling resistance reduction by blowing only the top slot, while downforce was produced for traction increase by blowing only the bottom. Also, side force and yawing moment were generated on either side of the vehicle, and directional stability was restored by blowing the appropriate side slot. These experimental results and the predicted full-scale payoffs are presented in this paper, as is a discussion of additional applications to conventional commercial autos, buses, motor homes, and Sport Utility Vehicles.

  11. Some epidemiological aspects of the eradication of yaws

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, C. J.

    1960-01-01

    Much has been learnt of the epidemiology of yaws during eradication campaigns in populations in which the prevalence of active yaws was high, but not all has been published. The recognition of the importance of latent cases in the maintenance of yaws has contributed to the effectiveness of these campaigns. Yaws eradication activities are extending into populations where at present active yaws is often not high. Planning of effective and economical eradication measures, especially in such populations, needs as complete a picture of the disease as possible, from its transmission and the factors that favour this until the death of the infected person, before or after cure of the infection either after chemotherapy or spontaneously. By revealing the many gaps that still remain in our knowledge of yaws, this summary may encourage those who have gathered valuable material during field work to study and prepare it for publication. PMID:13710280

  12. Serological studies of yaws in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    D'Mello, Joseph M. F.; Krag, P.

    1955-01-01

    The serological aspects of anti-yaws campaigns are discussed. Serological reactions in untreated yaws are considered according to each type of lesion and by age-groups; the serological pattern in types I and II show much similarity in that the majority of cases fall in the high titre levels while with types IV and V there appears to be a more even distribution of cases at all titre levels. A uniform serological response is seen in the early lesions for all age-groups and this is also true of hyperkeratosis cases. There are more type IV cases among the younger age-groups showing high titres, while in the older groups there is an upward trend towards the negative side. Type V also shows a regressive serology. The serological response to treatment with penicillin in three different schedules (4 ml × 2, 2 ml × 2, and a single injection of 4 ml) is then compared. There was no marked difference between the response at the end of one year with all three schedules; with a larger amount of material, however, it is likely that the 2 ml × 2 dosage would be seen to be less effective than the other two schedules. Serological response to treatment with any schedule would be governed by the number of cases having a high initial titre among the group under consideration. The decrease in titre, after being comparatively rapid in the first six months after treatment, is slow, and reversal to seronegativity at the end of a year occurs only in a small number of cases. The role of mass serological examinations in large-scale campaigns is considered. While the serological approach is shown to be the only scientific one, the impracticability of mass serological investigation is brought out. It is stressed, however, that in a mass campaign a serological service is essential for pilot studies, orientation of incidence of latent yaws, check on diagnosis, and assessment of dosage and of the necessity for re-treatment. The possible reasons for prozone phenomena in slide flocculation tests

  13. Flow field studies on yawed, stranded cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batill, S. M.; Nelson, R. C.; Nebres, J. V.

    A study of the flowfield near yawed, stranded cables was conducted in order to investigate the mechanisms associated with the generation of both steady and unsteady fluid forces on the cables. Rigid cable models and a circular cylinder were tested in a wind tunnel at four different cable angles over a Reynolds number range from 6000 to 14,600 based on the nominal cable diameter. The smoke-wire and the kerosene smoke flow visualization techniques were used to qualitatively evaluate the flowfields associated with each cable geometry.

  14. Fuzzy regulator design for wind turbine yaw control.

    PubMed

    Theodoropoulos, Stefanos; Kandris, Dionisis; Samarakou, Maria; Koulouras, Grigorios

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes the development of an advanced fuzzy logic controller which aims to perform intelligent automatic control of the yaw movement of wind turbines. The specific fuzzy controller takes into account both the wind velocity and the acceptable yaw error correlation in order to achieve maximum performance efficacy. In this way, the proposed yaw control system is remarkably adaptive to the existing conditions. In this way, the wind turbine is enabled to retain its power output close to its nominal value and at the same time preserve its yaw system from pointless movement. Thorough simulation tests evaluate the proposed system effectiveness.

  15. Fuzzy regulator design for wind turbine yaw control.

    PubMed

    Theodoropoulos, Stefanos; Kandris, Dionisis; Samarakou, Maria; Koulouras, Grigorios

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes the development of an advanced fuzzy logic controller which aims to perform intelligent automatic control of the yaw movement of wind turbines. The specific fuzzy controller takes into account both the wind velocity and the acceptable yaw error correlation in order to achieve maximum performance efficacy. In this way, the proposed yaw control system is remarkably adaptive to the existing conditions. In this way, the wind turbine is enabled to retain its power output close to its nominal value and at the same time preserve its yaw system from pointless movement. Thorough simulation tests evaluate the proposed system effectiveness. PMID:24693237

  16. Fuzzy Regulator Design for Wind Turbine Yaw Control

    PubMed Central

    Koulouras, Grigorios

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes the development of an advanced fuzzy logic controller which aims to perform intelligent automatic control of the yaw movement of wind turbines. The specific fuzzy controller takes into account both the wind velocity and the acceptable yaw error correlation in order to achieve maximum performance efficacy. In this way, the proposed yaw control system is remarkably adaptive to the existing conditions. In this way, the wind turbine is enabled to retain its power output close to its nominal value and at the same time preserve its yaw system from pointless movement. Thorough simulation tests evaluate the proposed system effectiveness. PMID:24693237

  17. Theoretical span loading and moments of tapered wings produced by aileron deflection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, H A

    1937-01-01

    The effect of tapered ailerons on linearly tapered wings is theoretically determined. Four different aileron spans are considered for each of three wing aspect ratios and each of four wing taper ratios. The change in lift on one half of the wing, the rolling moment, the additional induced drag, and the yawing moment, due to aileron deflection, are represented by non dimensional coefficients. Similar coefficients are given for the damping and yawing moments, the additional drag, and the change in lift, due to rolling. It was found possible to effect a fairly close agreement between the theoretical and experimental rolling moments by introducing into the theoretical expression for the rolling moment an effective change in angle of attack obtained from an analysis of flap data. The theoretical curves show that the highly tapered wing with long ailerons has a lower ratio of yawing to rolling moment and a lower additional induced drag than wings with less taper.

  18. Missile Aerodynamics for Ascent and Re-entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Gaines L.; McCarter, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Aerodynamic force and moment equations are developed for 6-DOF missile simulations of both the ascent phase of flight and a tumbling re-entry. The missile coordinate frame (M frame) and a frame parallel to the M frame were used for formulating the aerodynamic equations. The missile configuration chosen as an example is a cylinder with fixed fins and a nose cone. The equations include both the static aerodynamic coefficients and the aerodynamic damping derivatives. The inclusion of aerodynamic damping is essential for simulating a tumbling re-entry. Appended information provides insight into aerodynamic damping.

  19. TAD- THEORETICAL AERODYNAMICS PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrowman, J.

    1994-01-01

    This theoretical aerodynamics program, TAD, was developed to predict the aerodynamic characteristics of vehicles with sounding rocket configurations. These slender, axisymmetric finned vehicle configurations have a wide range of aeronautical applications from rockets to high speed armament. Over a given range of Mach numbers, TAD will compute the normal force coefficient derivative, the center-of-pressure, the roll forcing moment coefficient derivative, the roll damping moment coefficient derivative, and the pitch damping moment coefficient derivative of a sounding rocket configured vehicle. The vehicle may consist of a sharp pointed nose of cone or tangent ogive shape, up to nine other body divisions of conical shoulder, conical boattail, or circular cylinder shape, and fins of trapezoid planform shape with constant cross section and either three or four fins per fin set. The characteristics computed by TAD have been shown to be accurate to within ten percent of experimental data in the supersonic region. The TAD program calculates the characteristics of separate portions of the vehicle, calculates the interference between separate portions of the vehicle, and then combines the results to form a total vehicle solution. Also, TAD can be used to calculate the characteristics of the body or fins separately as an aid in the design process. Input to the TAD program consists of simple descriptions of the body and fin geometries and the Mach range of interest. Output includes the aerodynamic characteristics of the total vehicle, or user-selected portions, at specified points over the mach range. The TAD program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on an IBM 360 computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 123K of 8 bit bytes. The TAD program was originally developed in 1967 and last updated in 1972.

  20. Theoretical Evaluation of the Pressures, Forces, and Moments at Hypersonic Speeds Acting on Arbitrary Bodies of Revolution Undergoing Separate and Combined Angle-of-attack and Pitching Motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolis, Kenneth

    1961-01-01

    Equations based on Newtonian impact theory have been derived and a computational procedure developed with the aid of several design-type charts which enable the determination of the aerodynamic forces and moments acting on arbitrary bodies of revolution undergoing either separate or combined angle-of-attack and pitching motions. Bodies with axially increasing and decreasing cross-sectional area distributions are considered; nose shapes may be sharp, blunt, or flat faced. The analysis considers variations in angle of attack from -90 degrees to 90 degrees and allows for both positive and negative pitching rates of arbitrary magnitude. The results are also directly applicable to bodies in either separate or combined sideslip and yawing maneuvers.

  1. 14 CFR 25.351 - Yaw maneuver conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) With the airplane in unaccelerated flight at zero yaw, it is assumed that the cockpit rudder control is... to VD/MD, with a linear variation between VA and VC/MC. (b) With the cockpit rudder control deflected...) With the airplane yawed to the static equilibrium sideslip angle, it is assumed that the cockpit...

  2. 14 CFR 25.497 - Tail-wheel yawing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Tail-wheel yawing. 25.497 Section 25.497... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Ground Loads § 25.497 Tail-wheel yawing. (a) A vertical ground reaction equal to the static load on the tail wheel, in combination with a side component of...

  3. 14 CFR 25.497 - Tail-wheel yawing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Tail-wheel yawing. 25.497 Section 25.497... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Ground Loads § 25.497 Tail-wheel yawing. (a) A vertical ground reaction equal to the static load on the tail wheel, in combination with a side component of...

  4. 14 CFR 25.497 - Tail-wheel yawing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Tail-wheel yawing. 25.497 Section 25.497... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Ground Loads § 25.497 Tail-wheel yawing. (a) A vertical ground reaction equal to the static load on the tail wheel, in combination with a side component of...

  5. 14 CFR 25.497 - Tail-wheel yawing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Tail-wheel yawing. 25.497 Section 25.497... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Ground Loads § 25.497 Tail-wheel yawing. (a) A vertical ground reaction equal to the static load on the tail wheel, in combination with a side component of...

  6. 14 CFR 25.497 - Tail-wheel yawing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tail-wheel yawing. 25.497 Section 25.497... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Ground Loads § 25.497 Tail-wheel yawing. (a) A vertical ground reaction equal to the static load on the tail wheel, in combination with a side component of...

  7. Wind tunnel investigations of forebody strakes for yaw control on F/A-18 model at subsonic and transonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary E.; Murri, Daniel G.

    1993-01-01

    Wind tunnel investigations have been conducted of forebody strakes for yaw control on 0.06-scale models of the F/A-18 aircraft at free-stream Mach numbers of 0.20 to 0.90. The testing was conducted in the 7- by 10-Foot Transonic Tunnel at the David Taylor Research Center and the Langley 7- by 10-Foot High-Speed Tunnel. The principal objectives of the testing were to determine the effects of the Mach number and the strake plan form on the strake yaw control effectiveness and the corresponding strake vortex induced flow field. The wind tunnel model configurations simulated an actuated conformal strake deployed for maximum yaw control at high angles of attack. The test data included six-component forces and moments on the complete model, surface static pressure distributions on the forebody and wing leading-edge extensions, and on-surface and off-surface flow visualizations. The results from these studies show that the strake produces large yaw control increments at high angles of attack that exceed the effect of conventional rudders at low angles of attack. The strake yaw control increments diminish with increasing Mach number but continue to exceed the effect of rudder deflection at angles of attack greater than 30 degrees. The character of the strake vortex induced flow field is similar at subsonic and transonic speeds. Cropping the strake planform to account for geometric and structural constraints on the F-18 aircraft has a small effect on the yaw control increments at subsonic speeds and no effect at transonic speeds.

  8. Rotor/body aerodynamic interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betzina, M. D.; Smith, C. A.; Shinoda, P.

    1983-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was conducted in which independent, steady state aerodynamic forces and moments were measured on a 2.24 m diam. two bladed helicopter rotor and on several different bodies. The mutual interaction effects for variations in velocity, thrust, tip-path-plane angle of attack, body angle of attack, rotor/body position, and body geometry were determined. The results show that the body longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics are significantly affected by the presence of a rotor and hub, and that the hub interference may be a major part of such interaction. The effects of the body on the rotor performance are presented.

  9. Rotor/body aerodynamic interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betzina, M. D.; Smith, C. A.; Shinoda, P.

    1985-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was conducted in which independent, steady state aerodynamic forces and moments were measured on a 2.24 m diam. two bladed helicopter rotor and on several different bodies. The mutual interaction effects for variations in velocity, thrust, tip-path-plane angle of attack, body angle of attack, rotor/body position, and body geometry were determined. The results show that the body longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics are significantly affected by the presence of a rotor and hub, and that the hub interference may be a major part of such interaction. The effects of the body on the rotor performance are presented.

  10. Time-accurate aeroelastic simulations of a wind turbine in yaw and shear using a coupled CFD-CSD method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, D. O.; Kwon, O. J.

    2014-06-01

    In the present study, aeroelastic simulations of horizontal-axis wind turbine rotor blades were conducted using a coupled CFD-CSD method. The unsteady blade aerodynamic loads and the dynamic blade response due to yaw misalignment and non-uniform sheared wind were investigated. For this purpose, a CFD code solving the RANS equations on unstructured meshes and a FEM-based CSD beam solver were used. The coupling of the CFD and CSD solvers was made by exchanging the data between the two solvers in a loosely coupled manner. The present coupled CFD-CSD method was applied to the NREL 5MW reference wind turbine rotor, and the results were compared with those of CFD-alone rigid blade calculations. It was found that aeroelastic blade deformation leads to a significant reduction of blade aerodynamic loads, and alters the unsteady load behaviours, mainly due to the torsional deformation. The reduction of blade aerodynamic loads is particularly significant at the advancing rotor blade side for yawed flow conditions, and at the upper half of rotor disk where wind velocity is higher due to wind shear.

  11. Aerodynamics of the Fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Multhopp, H.

    1942-01-01

    The present report deals with a number of problems, particularly with the interaction of the fuselage with the wing and tail, on the basis of simple calculating method's derived from greatly idealized concepts. For the fuselage alone it affords, in variance with potential theory, a certain frictional lift in yawed flow, which, similar to the lift of a wing of small aspect ratio, is no longer linearly related to the angle of attack. Nevertheless there exists for this frictional lift something like a neutral stability point the position of which on oblong fuselages appears to be associated with the lift increase of the fuselage in proximity to the zero lift, according to the present experiments. The Pitching moments of the fuselage can be determined with comparatively great reliability so far as the flow conditions in the neighborhood of the axis of the fuselage can be approximated if the fuselage were absent, which, in general, is not very difficult. For the unstable contribution of the fuselage to the static longitudinal stability of the airplane it affords comparatively simple formulas, the evaluation of which offers little difficulty. On the engine nacelles there is, in addition a very substantial wing moment contribution induced by the nonuniform distribution of the transverse displacement flow of the nacelle along the wing chord; this also can be represented by a simple formula. A check on a large number of dissimilar aircraft types regarding the unstable fuselage and nacelle moments disclosed an agreement with the wind-tunnel tests, which should be sufficient for practical requirements. The errors remained throughout within the scope of instrumental accuracy.

  12. Informatics Moments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Kate

    2012-01-01

    The informatics moment is the moment when a person seeks help in using some digital technology that is new to him or her. This article examines the informatics moment in people's everyday lives as they sought help at a branch public library. Four types of literacy were involved: basic literacy (reading and writing), computer literacy (use of a…

  13. Uniaxial aerodynamic attitude control of artificial satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sazonov, V. V.

    1983-01-01

    Within the context of a simple mechanical model the paper examines the movement of a satellite with respect to the center of masses under conditions of uniaxial aerodynamic attitude control. The equations of motion of the satellite take account of the gravitational and restorative aerodynamic moments. It is presumed that the aerodynamic moment is much larger than the gravitational, and the motion equations contain a large parameter. A two-parameter integrated surface of these equations is constructed in the form of formal series in terms of negative powers of the large parameter, describing the oscillations and rotations of the satellite about its lengthwise axis, approximately oriented along the orbital tangent. It is proposed to treat such movements as nominal undisturbed motions of the satellite under conditions of aerodynamic attitude control. A numerical investigation is made for the above integrated surface.

  14. Wind turbine design codes: A preliminary comparison of the aerodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Buhl, M.L. Jr.; Wright, A.D.; Tangler, J.L.

    1997-12-01

    The National Wind Technology Center of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory is comparing several computer codes used to design and analyze wind turbines. The first part of this comparison is to determine how well the programs predict the aerodynamic behavior of turbines with no structural degrees of freedom. Without general agreement on the aerodynamics, it is futile to try to compare the structural response due to the aerodynamic input. In this paper, the authors compare the aerodynamic loads for three programs: Garrad Hassan`s BLADED, their own WT-PERF, and the University of Utah`s YawDyn. This report documents a work in progress and compares only two-bladed, downwind turbines.

  15. Field Test Results from Lidar Measured Yaw Control for Improved Yaw Alignment with the NREL Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Scholbrock, A.; Fleming, P.; Wright, A.; Slinger, C.; Medley, J.; Harris, M.

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes field tests of a light detection and ranging (lidar) device placed forward looking on the nacelle of a wind turbine and used as a wind direction measurement to directly control the yaw position of a wind turbine. Conventionally, a wind turbine controls its yaw direction using a nacelle-mounted wind vane. If there is a bias in the measurement from the nacelle-mounted wind vane, a reduction in power production will be observed. This bias could be caused by a number of issues such as: poor calibration, electromagnetic interference, rotor wake, or other effects. With a lidar mounted on the nacelle, a measurement of the wind could be made upstream of the wind turbine where the wind is not being influenced by the rotor's wake or induction zone. Field tests were conducted with the lidar measured yaw system and the nacelle wind vane measured yaw system. Results show that a lidar can be used to effectively measure the yaw error of the wind turbine, and for this experiment, they also showed an improvement in power capture because of reduced yaw misalignment when compared to the nacelle wind vane measured yaw system.

  16. NASP aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, Allen H., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the critical aerodynamic technologies needed to support the development of a class of aircraft represented by the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP). The air-breathing, single-stage-to-orbit mission presents a severe challenge to all of the aeronautical disciplines and demands an extension of the state-of-the-art in each technology area. While the largest risk areas are probably advanced materials and the development of the scramjet engine, there remains a host of design issues and technology problems in aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics, and propulsion integration. The paper presents an overview of the most significant propulsion integration problems, and defines the most critical fluid flow phenomena that must be evaluated, defined, and predicted for the class of aircraft represented by the Aero-Space Plane.

  17. Aerodynamic Parameter Identification of a Venus Lander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sykes, Robert A.

    An analysis was conducted to identify the parameters of an aerodynamic model for a Venus lander based on experimental free-flight data. The experimental free-flight data were collected in the NASA Langley 20-ft Vertical Spin Tunnel with a 25-percent Froude-scaled model. The experimental data were classified based on the wind tunnel run type: runs where the lander model was unperturbed over the course of the run, and runs were the model was perturbed (principally in pitch, yaw, and roll) by the wind tunnel operator. The perturbations allow for data to be obtained at higher wind angles and rotation rates than those available from the unperturbed data. The model properties and equations of motion were used to determine experimental values for the aerodynamic coefficients. An aerodynamic model was selected using a priori knowledge of axisymmetric blunt entry vehicles. The least squares method was used to estimate the aerodynamic parameters. Three sets of results were obtained from the following data sets: perturbed, unperturbed, and the combination of both. The combined data set was selected for the final set of aerodynamic parameters based on the quality of the results. The identified aerodynamic parameters are consistent with that of the static wind tunnel data. Reconstructions, of experimental data not used in the parameter identification analyses, achieved similar residuals as those with data used to identify the parameters. Simulations of the experimental data, using the identified parameters, indicate that the aerodynamic model used is incapable of replicating the limit cycle oscillations with stochastic peak amplitudes observed during the test.

  18. Sources of fatigue damage to passive yaw wind turbine blades

    SciTech Connect

    Laino, D.J.

    1997-12-31

    Using an integrated computer analysis approach developed at the University of Utah, fatigue damage sources to passive yaw wind turbine blades have been investigated. Models of a rigid hub and teetering hub machine reveal the parameters important to the fatigue design of each type. The teetering hub proved much less susceptible to fatigue damage from normal operation loads. As a result, extreme events were critical to the teetering hub fatigue life. The rigid hub blades experienced extremely large gyroscopic load cycles induced by rapid yaw rates during normal operation. These yaw rates stem from turbulence activity which is shown to be dependent upon atmospheric stability. Investigation revealed that increasing yaw damping is an effective way of significantly reducing these gyroscopic fatigue loads.

  19. Detailed field test of yaw-based wake steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, P.; Churchfield, M.; Scholbrock, A.; Clifton, A.; Schreck, S.; Johnson, K.; Wright, A.; Gebraad, P.; Annoni, J.; Naughton, B.; Berg, J.; Herges, T.; White, J.; Mikkelsen, T.; Sjöholm, M.; Angelou, N.

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes a detailed field-test campaign to investigate yaw-based wake steering. In yaw-based wake steering, an upstream turbine intentionally misaligns its yaw with respect to the inflow to deflect its wake away from a downstream turbine, with the goal of increasing total power production. In the first phase, a nacelle-mounted scanning lidar was used to verify wake deflection of a misaligned turbine and calibrate wake deflection models. In the second phase, these models were used within a yaw controller to achieve a desired wake deflection. This paper details the experimental design and setup. All data collected as part of this field experiment will be archived and made available to the public via the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmosphere to Electrons Data Archive and Portal.

  20. Challenges and key research questions for yaws eradication.

    PubMed

    Marks, Michael; Mitjà, Oriol; Vestergaard, Lasse S; Pillay, Allan; Knauf, Sascha; Chen, Cheng-Yen; Bassat, Quique; Martin, Diana L; Fegan, David; Taleo, Fasihah; Kool, Jacob; Lukehart, Sheila; Emerson, Paul M; Solomon, Anthony W; Ye, Tun; Ballard, Ronald C; Mabey, David C W; Asiedu, Kingsley B

    2015-10-01

    Yaws is endemic in west Africa, southeast Asia, and the Pacific region. To eradicate yaws by 2020, WHO has launched a campaign of mass treatment with azithromycin. Progress has been made towards achievement of this ambitious goal, including the validation of point-of-care and molecular diagnostic tests and piloting of the strategy in several countries, including Ghana, Vanuatu, and Papua New Guinea. Gaps in knowledge need to be addressed to allow refinement of the eradication strategy. Studies exploring determinants of the spatial distribution of yaws are needed to help with the completion of baseline mapping. The finding that Haemophilus ducreyi causes lesions similar to yaws is particularly important and further work is needed to assess the effect of azithromycin on these lesions. The integration of diagnostic tests into different stages of the eradication campaign needs investigation. Finally, studies must be done to inform the optimum mass-treatment strategy for sustainable interruption of transmission.

  1. The GLONASS-M satellite yaw-attitude model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilssner, F.; Springer, T.; Gienger, G.; Dow, J.

    2011-01-01

    The proper modeling of the satellites’ yaw-attitude is a prerequisite for high-precision Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) positioning and poses a particular challenge during periods when the satellite orbital planes are partially eclipsed. Whereas a lot of effort has been put in to examine the yaw-attitude control of GPS satellites that are in eclipsing orbits, hardly anything is known about the yaw-attitude behavior of eclipsing GLONASS-M satellites. However, systematic variations of the carrier phase observation residuals in the vicinity of the orbit’s noon and midnight points of up to ±27 cm indicate significant attitude-related modeling issues. In order to explore the GLONASS-M attitude laws during eclipse seasons, we have studied the evolution of the horizontal satellite antenna offset estimates during orbit noon and orbit midnight using a technique that we refer to as “reverse kinematic precise point positioning”. In this approach, we keep all relevant global geodetic parameters fixed and estimate the satellite clock and antenna phase center positions epoch-by-epoch using 30-second observation and clock data from a global multi-GNSS ground station network. The estimated horizontal antenna phase center offsets implicitly provide the spacecraft’s yaw-attitude. The insights gained from studying the yaw angle behavior have led to the development of the very first yaw-attitude model for eclipsing GLONASS-M satellites. The derived yaw-attitude model proves to be much better than the nominal yaw-attitude model commonly being used by today’s GLONASS-capable GNSS software packages as it reduces the observation residuals of eclipsing satellites down to the normal level of non-eclipsing satellites and thereby prevents a multitude of measurements from being incorrectly identified as outliers. It facilitates continuous satellite clock estimation during eclipse and improves in particular the results of kinematic precise point positioning of ground

  2. Theoretical and Experimental Aerodynamic Analysis for High-Speed Ground Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhan, Ismail Haider

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. This thesis investigates the air flow around a proposed geometry for a high-speed electromagnetic suspension (EMS) train. A numerical technique called the panel method has been applied to the representation of the body shape and the prediction of the potential flow and pressure distribution. Two computer programmes have been written, one for a single vehicle in the presence of the ground at different yaw angles, and the second for two-body problems, e.g. a train passing a railway station or a train passing the central part of another train. Two methods based on the momentum integral equations for three-dimensional boundary layer flow have been developed for use with the potential flow analysis; these predict the development of the three-dimensional turbulent boundary layer on the central section (for the analysis of crosswind conditions) and on the nose of the train. Extensive wind tunnel tests were performed on four models of the high-speed train to measure aerodynamic forces, moments and pressures to establish ground effect characteristics. Flow visualisation showed that the wake vortices were stronger and larger in the presence of a ground. At small yaw angles ground clearance had little effect, but as yaw increased, larger ground clearance led to substantial increase in lift and side force coefficients. The tests also identified the differences between a moving and a fixed ground plane. Data showed that the type of ground simulation was significant only in the separated region. A comparison of the results predicted using potential flow theory for an EMS train model and the corresponding results from wind tunnel tests indicated good agreement in regions where the flow is attached. The turbulent boundary layer calculations for the train in a crosswind condition showed that the momentum thickness along the crosswind surface distance co-ordinate increased slowly at the beginning of the development of the

  3. Computational aerodynamics and supercomputers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballhaus, W. F., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Some of the progress in computational aerodynamics over the last decade is reviewed. The Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Program objectives, computational goals, and implementation plans are described.

  4. Study of aerodynamic technology for VSTOL fighter/attack aircraft: Horizontal attitude concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, S. H.

    1978-01-01

    A horizontal attitude VSTOL (HAVSTOL) supersonic fighter attack aircraft powered by RALS turbofan propulsion system is analyzed. Reaction control for subaerodynamic flight is obtained in pitch and yaw from the RALS and roll from wingtip jets powered by bleed air from the RALS duct. Emphasis is placed on the development of aerodynamic characteristics and the identification of aerodynamic uncertainties. A wind tunnel program is shown to resolve some of the uncertainties. Aerodynamic data developed are static characteristics about all axes, control effectiveness, drag, propulsion induced effects and reaction control characteristics.

  5. Space Launch System Booster Separation Aerodynamic Testing in the NASA Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Floyd J., Jr.; Pinier, Jeremy T.; Chan, David T.; Crosby, William A.

    2016-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation of a 0.009 scale model of the Space Launch System (SLS) was conducted in the NASA Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel to characterize the aerodynamics of the core and solid rocket boosters (SRBs) during booster separation. High-pressure air was used to simulate plumes from the booster separation motors (BSMs) located on the nose and aft skirt of the SRBs. Force and moment data were acquired on the core and SRBs. These data were used to corroborate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations that were used in developing a booster separation database. The SRBs could be remotely positioned in the x-, y-, and z-direction relative to the core. Data were acquired continuously while the SRBs were moved in the axial direction. The primary parameters varied during the test were: core pitch angle; SRB pitch and yaw angles; SRB nose x-, y-, and z-position relative to the core; and BSM plenum pressure. The test was conducted at a free-stream Mach number of 4.25 and a unit Reynolds number of 1.5 million per foot.

  6. AIAA Applied Aerodynamics Conference, 9th, Baltimore, MD, Sept. 23-25, 1991, Technical Papers. Vols. 1 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The present conference on aplied aerodynamics encompasses computational fluid dynamics, drag prediction/analysis, experimental aerodynamics, high angles of attack, rotor/propeller aerodynamics, super/hypersonic aerodynamics, unsteady aerodynamics, vortex physics, high-speed civil-transport aeroacoustics, and airfoil/wing aerodynamics. Specific issues addressed include high-speed civil-transport air-breathing propulsion, generic hypersonic inlet-module analysis, an investigation on spoiler effects, high-alpha vehicle dynamics, space-station resource node flow-field analysis, a numerical simulation of sabot discard aerodynamics, and vortex control using pneumatic blowing. Also addressed are Navier-Stokes solutions for the F/A-18 Wing-LEX fuselage, tail venting for enhanced yaw damping at spinning conditions, an investigation of rotor wake interactions with a body in low-speed forward flight, and multigrid calculations of 3D viscous cascade flows.

  7. Study of the single body yawed-wing aircraft concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulfan, R. M.; Nisbet, J. W.; Neuman, F. D.; Hamilton, E. J.; Murakami, J. K.; Mcbarron, J. P.; Kumasaka, K.

    1974-01-01

    Areas relating to the development and improvement of the single-fuselage, yawed-wing transonic transport concept were investigated. These included: (1) developing an alternate configuration with a simplified engine installation;(2) determining a structural design speed placard that would allow the engine-airframe match for optimum airplane performance; and (3) conducting an aeroelastic stability and control analysis of the yawed-wing configuration with a flexible wing. A two-engine, single-fuselage, yawed-wing configuration was developed that achieved the Mach 1.2 design mission at 5560 km (3000 nmi) and payload of 18,140 kg (40,000 lb) with a gross weight of 217,700 kg (480,000 lb). This airplane was slightly heavier than the aft-integrated four-engine configuration that had been developed in a previous study. A modified structural design speed placard, which was determined, resulted in a 6% to 8% reduction in the gross weight of the yawed-wing configurations. The dynamic stability characteristics of the single-fuselage yawed-wing configuration were found to be very dependent on the magnitude of the pitch/roll coupling, the static longitudinal stability, and the dihedral effect.

  8. Fourier functional analysis for unsteady aerodynamic modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. Edward; Chin, Suei

    1991-01-01

    A method based on Fourier analysis is developed to analyze the force and moment data obtained in large amplitude forced oscillation tests at high angles of attack. The aerodynamic models for normal force, lift, drag, and pitching moment coefficients are built up from a set of aerodynamic responses to harmonic motions at different frequencies. Based on the aerodynamic models of harmonic data, the indicial responses are formed. The final expressions for the models involve time integrals of the indicial type advocated by Tobak and Schiff. Results from linear two- and three-dimensional unsteady aerodynamic theories as well as test data for a 70-degree delta wing are used to verify the models. It is shown that the present modeling method is accurate in producing the aerodynamic responses to harmonic motions and the ramp type motions. The model also produces correct trend for a 70-degree delta wing in harmonic motion with different mean angles-of-attack. However, the current model cannot be used to extrapolate data to higher angles-of-attack than that of the harmonic motions which form the aerodynamic model. For linear ramp motions, a special method is used to calculate the corresponding frequency and phase angle at a given time. The calculated results from modeling show a higher lift peak for linear ramp motion than for harmonic ramp motion. The current model also shows reasonably good results for the lift responses at different angles of attack.

  9. Aerodynamic tests of Darrieus wind turbine blades

    SciTech Connect

    Migliore, P.G.; Walters, R.E.; Wolfe, W.P.

    1983-03-01

    An indoor facility for the aerodynamic testing of Darrieus turbine blades was developed. Lift, drag, and moment coefficients were measured for two blades whose angle of attack and chord-to-radius ratio were varied. The first blade used an NACA 0015 airfoil section; the second used a 15% elliptical cross section with a modified circular arc trailing edge. Blade aerodynamic coefficients were corrected to section coefficients for comparison to published rectilinear flow data. Although the airfoil sections were symmetrical, moment coefficients were not zero and the lift and drag curves were asymmetrical about zero lift coefficient and angle of attack. These features verified the predicted virtual camber and incidence phenomena. Boundary-layer centrifugal effects were manifested by discontinuous lift curves and large differences in the angle of zero lift between th NACA 0015 and elliptical airfoils. It was concluded that rectilinear flow aerodynamic data are not applicable to Darrieus turbine blades, even for small chord-to-radius ratios.

  10. An aerodynamic load criterion for airships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, D. E.

    1975-01-01

    A simple aerodynamic bending moment envelope is derived for conventionally shaped airships. This criterion is intended to be used, much like the Naval Architect's standard wave, for preliminary estimates of longitudinal strength requirements. It should be useful in tradeoff studies between speed, fineness ratio, block coefficient, structure weight, and other such general parameters of airship design.

  11. An experimental study of an aerodynamically optimum windmill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Y.; Toda, N.; Hoshino, H.; Noguchi, M.

    1982-08-01

    Aerodynamic characteristics of an optimum horizontal axis windmill are described. The windmill, rated at 20 KW at 8 m/s with a two bladed rotor of 14m diameter, is designed so as to vary the geometry of the blade in such a way that the aerodynamic efficiency becomes maximum. The combined blade element momentum theory is used as an analytical tool. To check the design method and get some useful aerodynamic data, a wind tunnel test of a 1/7th scale model (2m diameter) is performed in a low speed tunnel, whose test section is 35.75 sq m. Two models, whose blades have the same optimum chord distribution but have different planforms, are tested. Measurements are made of the efficiency, torque, axial drag force and initial torque for various combinations of the pitch angle and the tip speed ratio. The yaw characteristics of the windmill are also measured.

  12. Wind tunnel tests of a free yawing downwind wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verelst, D. R. S.; Larsen, T. J.; van Wingerden, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    This research paper presents preliminary results on a behavioural study of a free yawing downwind wind turbine. A series of wind tunnel tests was performed at the TU Delft Open Jet Facility with a three bladed downwind wind turbine and a rotor radius of 0.8 meters. The setup includes an off the shelf three bladed hub, nacelle and generator on which relatively flexible blades are mounted. The tower support structure has free yawing capabilities provided at the base. A short overview on the technical details of the experiment is given as well as a brief summary of the design process. The discussed test cases show that the turbine is stable while operating in free yawing conditions. Further, the effect of the tower shadow passage on the blade flapwise strain measurement is evaluated. Finally, data from the experiment is compared with preliminary simulations using DTU Wind Energy's aeroelastic simulation program HAWC2.

  13. Enhancing vehicle cornering limit through sideslip and yaw rate control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qian; Gentile, Pierangelo; Tota, Antonio; Sorniotti, Aldo; Gruber, Patrick; Costamagna, Fabio; De Smet, Jasper

    2016-06-01

    Fully electric vehicles with individually controlled drivetrains can provide a high degree of drivability and vehicle safety, all while increasing the cornering limit and the 'fun-to-drive' aspect. This paper investigates a new approach on how sideslip control can be integrated into a continuously active yaw rate controller to extend the limit of stable vehicle cornering and to allow sustained high values of sideslip angle. The controllability-related limitations of integrated yaw rate and sideslip control, together with its potential benefits, are discussed through the tools of multi-variable feedback control theory and non-linear phase-plane analysis. Two examples of integrated yaw rate and sideslip control systems are presented and their effectiveness is experimentally evaluated and demonstrated on a four-wheel-drive fully electric vehicle prototype. Results show that the integrated control system allows safe operation at the vehicle cornering limit at a specified sideslip angle independent of the tire-road friction conditions.

  14. Roll and Yaw of Paramecium swimming in a viscous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sunghwan; Jana, Saikat; Giarra, Matt; Vlachos, Pavlos

    2012-11-01

    Many free-swimming microorganisms like ciliates, flagellates, and invertebrates exhibit helical trajectories. In particular, the Paramecium spirally swims along its anterior direction by the beating of cilia. Due to the oblique beating stroke of cilia, the Paramecium rotates along its long axis as it swims forward. Simultaneously, this long axis turns toward the oral groove side. Combined roll and yaw motions of Paramecium result in swimming along a spiral course. Using Particle Image Velocimetry, we measure and quantify the flow field and fluid stress around Paramecium. We will discuss how the non-uniform stress distribution around the body induces this yaw motion.

  15. Wind turbine wake structure and yawed effect analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Yuntian

    In this research, the three-dimensional CFD simulation of the complex flow around a two-bladed rotor based on NREL Phase VI Experiment is presented. Its accuracy is demonstrated by comparing torque, thrust, power and power coefficient with experimental data. Then the wake structure behind the rotor is analyzed by showing the vorticity contour and comparing the velocity distribution behind the rotor with previous studies. Furthermore, a triangle relationship among power, upstream wind speed and yaw angle is given by setting control groups simulation. Reasonable explanations to the simulation results are presented. Finally, a linear relationship between power output and cosine value of yaw angle is found and analyzed.

  16. Flight Test Analysis of the Forces and Moments Imparted on a B737-100 Airplane During Wake Vortex Encounters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Chistopher L.

    2001-01-01

    Aircraft travel has become a major form of transportation. Several of our major airports are operating near their capacity limit, increasing congestion and delays for travelers. As a result, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been working in conjunction with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), airline operators, and the airline industry to increase airport capacity without sacrificing public safety. One solution to the problem is to increase the number of airports and build new. runways; yet, this solution is becoming increasingly difficult due to limited space. A better solution is to increase the production per runway. This solution increases the possibility that one aircraft will encounter the trailing wake of another aircraft. Hazardous wake vortex encounters occur when an aircraft encounters the wake produced by a heavier aircraft. This heavy-load aircraft produces high-intensity wake turbulence that redistributes the aerodynamic loads of trailing smaller aircraft. This situation is particularly hazardous for smaller aircraft during takeoffs and landings. In order to gain a better understanding of the wake-vortex/aircraft encounter phenomena, NASA Langley Research Center conducted a series of flight tests from 1995 through 1997. These tests were designed to gather data for the development a wake encounter and wake-measurement data set with the accompanying atmospheric state information. This data set is being compiled into a database that can be used by wake vortex researchers to compare with experimental and computational results. The purpose of this research is to derive and implement a procedure for calculating the wake-vortex/aircraft interaction portion of that database by using the data recorded during those flight tests. There were three objectives to this research. Initially, the wake-induced forces and moments from each flight were analyzed based on varying flap deflection angles. The flap setting alternated between 15

  17. GPS IIF yaw attitude control during eclipse season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilssner, F.; Springer, T.; Enderle, W.

    2011-12-01

    On May 27, 2010, the first satellite of the Block II "follow-on" (Block IIF) series, the fourth generation of Global Positioning System (GPS) spacecraft, has been successfully placed into orbit. GPS IIF-1, also referred to as space vehicle number (SVN) 62, has been injected into orbital plane B, slot position 2 of the GPS constellation. After completing three months of comprehensive in-orbit testing, the satellite entered service for the US Air Force (USAF) on August 26, 2010. A little over a year after the inaugural launch of GPS IIF-1, the USAF has now launched the second spacecraft of the IIF series (SVN-63). The IIF series includes a total of 12 satellites: SVN-62 through SVN-73. Despite having many technical advances over their predecessors such as enhanced rubidium frequency standards, more precise and powerful signals and an extended design life, the three-axis stabilized Block IIF satellites follow a completely different yaw attitude scheme, when passing through the Earth's shadow, to the Block IIA and IIR spacecraft. We will describe how high-rate carrier phase and pseudo-range measurements from a global GPS tracking network can be exploited to precisely monitor the yaw attitude behavior of SVN-62 and SVN-63 during their solar eclipse phases. The insights gained from this study have led to the development of a new GPS Block IIF yaw attitude model. We will show that the yaw rate of a Block IIF space vehicle is kept constant to the value needed to get the satellite back to near its nominal attitude when leaving the Earth's shadow and that a IIF satellite being in deep eclipse therefore needs to yaw significantly faster than an eclipsing IIF space vehicle passing only partly through the Earth's shadow. How the satellites' attitude control system (ACS) exactly computes this dynamical yaw rate parameter will be discussed here as well. Moreover, we will report on yaw attitude anomalies occurring when the GPS Block IIF satellites are shaded from the Sun by the

  18. Aerodynamic control of fighter aircraft by manipulation of forebody vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malcolm, Gerald N.; Ng, T. Terry

    1991-01-01

    Methods of enhancing aircraft controllability and maneuverability at high angles of attack by manipulating the forebody vortices are discussed. Pneumatic control methods including jet blowing, slot blowing, and suction, and mechanical control methods using forebody and nose tip strakes are reviewed. The potential of various control devices in controlling the forebody flow, and thus, providing controlled yawing moments at high angles of attack are illustrated using wind tunnel results from a generic fighter and water tunnel results from an F/A-18.

  19. Aerodynamic resistance reduction of electric and hybrid vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The generation of an EHV aerodynamic data base was initiated by conducting full-scale wind tunnel tests on 16 vehicles. Zero-yaw drag coefficients ranged from a high of 0.58 for a boxey delivery van and an open roadster to a low of about 0.34 for a current 4-passenger prototype automobile which was designed with aerodynamics as an integrated parameter. Characteristic effects of aspect ratio or fineness ratio which might appear if electric vehicle shape proportions were to vary significantly from current automobiles were identified. Some preliminary results indicate a 5 to 10% variation in drag over the range of interest. Effective drag coefficient wind-weighting factors over J227a driving cycles in the presence of annual mean wind fields were identified. Such coefficients, when properly weighted, were found to be from 5 to 65% greater than the zero-yaw drag coefficient in the cases presented. A vehicle aerodynamics bibliography of over 160 entries, in six general categories is included.

  20. Aerodynamics model for a generic ASTOVL lift-fan aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birckelbaw, Lourdes G.; Mcneil, Walter E.; Wardwell, Douglas A.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the aerodynamics model used in a simulation model of an advanced short takeoff and vertical landing (ASTOVL) lift-fan fighter aircraft. The simulation model was developed for use in piloted evaluations of transition and hover flight regimes, so that only low speed (M approximately 0.2) aerodynamics are included in the mathematical model. The aerodynamic model includes the power-off aerodynamic forces and moments and the propulsion system induced aerodynamic effects, including ground effects. The power-off aerodynamics data were generated using the U.S. Air Force Stability and Control Digital DATCOM program and a NASA Ames in-house graphics program called VORVIEW which allows the user to easily analyze arbitrary conceptual aircraft configurations using the VORLAX program. The jet-induced data were generated using the prediction methods of R. E. Kuhn et al., as referenced in this report.

  1. Low speed aerodynamic characteristics of NACA 6716 and NACA 4416 airfoils with 35 percent-chord single-slotted flaps. [low turbulence pressure tunnel tests to determine two dimensional lift and pitching moment characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bingham, G. J.; Noonan, K. W.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in a low-turbulence pressure tunnel to determine the two-dimensional lift and pitching-moment characteristics of an NACA 6716 and an NACA 4416 airfoil with 35-percent-chord single-slotted flaps. Both models were tested with flaps deflected from 0 deg to 45 deg, at angles of attack from minus 6 deg to several degrees past stall, at Reynolds numbers from 3.0 million to 13.8 million, and primarily at a Mach number of 0.23. Tests were also made to determine the effect of several slot entry shapes on performance.

  2. Aerodynamics of Shuttle Orbiter at high altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rault, Didier F. G.

    1993-01-01

    The high-altitude/high-Knudsen number aerodynamics of the Shuttle Orbiter are computed from Low-Earth Orbit down to 100 km using three-dimensional direct simulation Monte Carlo and free molecule codes. Results are compared with Blanchard's latest Shuttle aerodynamic model, which is based on in-flight accelerometer measurements, and bridging formula models. Good comparison is observed, except for the normal force and pitching moment coefficients. The present results were obtained for a generic Shuttle geometry configuration corresponding to a zero deflection for all control surfaces.

  3. Classical Aerodynamic Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T. (Compiler)

    1979-01-01

    A collection of papers on modern theoretical aerodynamics is presented. Included are theories of incompressible potential flow and research on the aerodynamic forces on wing and wing sections of aircraft and on airship hulls.

  4. Incremental Aerodynamic Coefficient Database for the USA2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Annie Catherine

    2016-01-01

    In March through May of 2016, a wind tunnel test was conducted by the Aerosciences Branch (EV33) to visually study the unsteady aerodynamic behavior over multiple transition geometries for the Universal Stage Adapter 2 (USA2) in the MSFC Aerodynamic Research Facility's Trisonic Wind Tunnel (TWT). The purpose of the test was to make a qualitative comparison of the transonic flow field in order to provide a recommended minimum transition radius for manufacturing. Additionally, 6 Degree of Freedom force and moment data for each configuration tested was acquired in order to determine the geometric effects on the longitudinal aerodynamic coefficients (Normal Force, Axial Force, and Pitching Moment). In order to make a quantitative comparison of the aerodynamic effects of the USA2 transition geometry, the aerodynamic coefficient data collected during the test was parsed and incorporated into a database for each USA2 configuration tested. An incremental aerodynamic coefficient database was then developed using the generated databases for each USA2 geometry as a function of Mach number and angle of attack. The final USA2 coefficient increments will be applied to the aerodynamic coefficients of the baseline geometry to adjust the Space Launch System (SLS) integrated launch vehicle force and moment database based on the transition geometry of the USA2.

  5. NASA aerodynamics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Louis J.; Hessenius, Kristin A.; Corsiglia, Victor R.; Hicks, Gary; Richardson, Pamela F.; Unger, George; Neumann, Benjamin; Moss, Jim

    1992-01-01

    The annual accomplishments is reviewed for the Aerodynamics Division during FY 1991. The program includes both fundamental and applied research directed at the full spectrum of aerospace vehicles, from rotorcraft to planetary entry probes. A comprehensive review is presented of the following aerodynamics elements: computational methods and applications; CFD validation; transition and turbulence physics; numerical aerodynamic simulation; test techniques and instrumentation; configuration aerodynamics; aeroacoustics; aerothermodynamics; hypersonics; subsonics; fighter/attack aircraft and rotorcraft.

  6. NASA aerodynamics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Bruce J.; Schairer, Edward; Hicks, Gary; Wander, Stephen; Blankson, Isiaiah; Rose, Raymond; Olson, Lawrence; Unger, George

    1990-01-01

    Presented here is a comprehensive review of the following aerodynamics elements: computational methods and applications, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation, transition and turbulence physics, numerical aerodynamic simulation, drag reduction, test techniques and instrumentation, configuration aerodynamics, aeroacoustics, aerothermodynamics, hypersonics, subsonic transport/commuter aviation, fighter/attack aircraft and rotorcraft.

  7. Pressures, forces, moments and shock shapes for a geometrically matched sphere-cone and hyperboloid at Mach 20.3 in helium. [22-inch aerodynamics leg of the Langley hypersonic helium tunnel facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calloway, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to compare measured and predicted pressure distributions, forces and moments, and shock shapes on a geometrically matched sphere-cone and hyperboloid. A hyperboloid with a nose radius of 0.5276 in. and an asymptotic angle of 39.9871 deg was matched to a sphere-cone with a nose radius of 0.750 in. and a cone half-angle of 45 deg. Experimental results in helium at a free-stream Mach number of 20.3 and a free-stream unit Reynolds number of 6.83 x 10 to the 6th power per foot were combined with predicted results from a theoretical method to compare the two shapes. Comparisons of experimental results showed small differences in the two shapes, but the prediction method provided better results for the hyperboloid than for the sphere-cone.

  8. Exploring bird aerodynamics using radio-controlled models.

    PubMed

    Hoey, Robert G

    2010-12-01

    A series of radio-controlled glider models was constructed by duplicating the aerodynamic shape of soaring birds (raven, turkey vulture, seagull and pelican). Controlled tests were conducted to determine the level of longitudinal and lateral-directional static stability, and to identify the characteristics that allowed flight without a vertical tail. The use of tail-tilt for controlling small bank-angle changes, as observed in soaring birds, was verified. Subsequent tests, using wing-tip ailerons, inferred that birds use a three-dimensional flow pattern around the wing tip (wing tip vortices) to control adverse yaw and to create a small amount of forward thrust in gliding flight.

  9. An aerodynamic model for one and two degree of freedom wing rock of slender delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, John

    1993-01-01

    The unsteady aerodynamic effects due to the separated flow around slender delta wings in motion were analyzed. By combining the unsteady flow field solution with the rigid body Euler equations of motion, self-induced wing rock motion is simulated. The aerodynamic model successfully captures the qualitative characteristics of wing rock observed in experiments. For the one degree of freedom in roll case, the model is used to look into the mechanisms of wing rock and to investigate the effects of various parameters, like angle of attack, yaw angle, displacement of the separation point, and wing inertia. To investigate the roll and yaw coupling for the delta wing, an additional degree of freedom is added. However, no limit cycle was observed in the two degree of freedom case. Nonetheless, the model can be used to apply various control laws to actively control wing rock using, for example, the displacement of the leading edge vortex separation point by inboard span wise blowing.

  10. Yaws in the Western Pacific Region: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Capuano, Corinne; Ozaki, Masayo

    2011-01-01

    Until the middle of the 20th century, yaws was highly endemic and considered a serious public health problem in the Western Pacific Region (WPR), leading to intensive control efforts in the 1950s–1960s. Since then, little attention has been paid to its reemergence. Its current burden is unknown. This paper presents the results of an extensive literature review, focusing on yaws in the South Pacific. Available records suggest that the region remains largely free of yaws except for Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, and Vanuatu. Many clinical cases reported recently were described as “attenuated”; advanced stages are rare. A single intramuscular injection of benzathine penicillin is still effective in curing yaws. In the Pacific, yaws may be amenable to elimination if adequate resources are provided and political commitment revived. A mapping of yaws prevalence in PNG, Solomon, and Vanuatu is needed before comprehensive country-tailored strategies towards yaws elimination can be developed. PMID:22235208

  11. Yaws, a non-venereal treponemal infection. Still endemic in some parts of the world.

    PubMed

    2012-09-01

    Yaws is an infection that mainly affects the poorest populations living in humid tropical areas. We reviewed the literature on yaws, the most common non-venereal treponemal infection, using the standard Prescrire methodology. Yaws is often transmitted directly from person to person. It starts as a single lesion, later leading to multiple contagious lesions. Yaws mainly affects children. The infection remains asymptomatic for several years. In about 10% of cases, late reactivation leads to bone lesions, deformities and disability. Diagnosis of yaws is based on the clinical and epidemiological context. Serological tests cannot distinguish between yaws and syphilis or other non-venereal treponematoses. Curative treatment consists of a single injection of benzathine benzylpenicillin. The results of a randomised trial suggest that a single oral dose of azithromycin is as effective as penicillin. In India, yaws was successfully eradicated through a programme based on providing information to the population at risk, screening and treatment. PMID:23016260

  12. Yaws in the Western pacific region: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Capuano, Corinne; Ozaki, Masayo

    2011-01-01

    Until the middle of the 20th century, yaws was highly endemic and considered a serious public health problem in the Western Pacific Region (WPR), leading to intensive control efforts in the 1950s-1960s. Since then, little attention has been paid to its reemergence. Its current burden is unknown. This paper presents the results of an extensive literature review, focusing on yaws in the South Pacific. Available records suggest that the region remains largely free of yaws except for Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, and Vanuatu. Many clinical cases reported recently were described as "attenuated"; advanced stages are rare. A single intramuscular injection of benzathine penicillin is still effective in curing yaws. In the Pacific, yaws may be amenable to elimination if adequate resources are provided and political commitment revived. A mapping of yaws prevalence in PNG, Solomon, and Vanuatu is needed before comprehensive country-tailored strategies towards yaws elimination can be developed.

  13. Bifurcations in unsteady aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobak, M.; Unal, A.

    1986-01-01

    Nonlinear algebraic functional expansions are used to create a form for the unsteady aerodynamic response that is consistent with solutions of the time dependent Navier-Stokes equations. An enumeration of means of invalidating Frechet differentiability of the aerodynamic response, one of which is aerodynamic bifurcation, is proposed as a way of classifying steady and unsteady aerodynamic phenomena that are important in flight dynamics applications. Accomodating bifurcation phenomena involving time dependent equilibrium states within a mathematical model of the aerodynamic response raises an issue of memory effects that becomes more important with each successive bifurcation.

  14. Effects of yaw and pitch motion on model attitude measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Tripp, John S.; Finley, Tom D.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents a theoretical analysis of the dynamic effects of angular motion in yaw and pitch on model attitude measurements in which inertial sensors were used during wind tunnel tests. A technique is developed to reduce the error caused by these effects. The analysis shows that a 20-to-1 reduction in model attitude measurement error caused by angular motion is possible with this technique.

  15. Aerodynamically stabilized instrument platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bland, Geoffrey L. (Inventor); Miles, Ted K. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A suspension apparatus for suspending instrumentation from an airborne platform may include a generally longitudinal boom having a payload end and a tail end. Yaw and pitch stabilizers may be disposed at the tail end of the boom. A mast that may be selectively translatable on the boom may connect the boom to a tether line of the airborne platform. The payload may be attached to the payload end of the boom. The mast may be positioned axially along the boom at the center of gravity of the combination of the payload, boom, pitch stabilizer, and yaw stabilizer.

  16. Analytical modeling of turbine wakes in yawed conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastankhah, Majid; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Increasing wind energy production has become a unanimous plan for virtually all the developed countries. In addition to constructing new wind farms, this goal can be achieved by making wind farms more efficient. Control strategies in wind farms, such as manipulating the yaw angle of the turbines, have the potential to make wind farms more efficient. Costly numerical simulations or measurements cannot be, however, employed to assess the viability of this strategy in the numerous different scenarios happening in real wind farms. In this study, we aim to develop an inexpensive and simple analytical model that is able for the first time to predict the whole wake of a yawed turbine with an acceptable accuracy. The proposed analytical model is built upon the simplified version of the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. Apart from the ability of the model to predict wake flows in yawed conditions, it can provide a better understanding of turbine wakes in this complex situation. For example, it can give valuable insights on how the wake deflection varies by changing turbine and incoming flow characteristics, such as the thrust coefficient of the turbine or the ambient turbulence.

  17. Computational Aerodynamic Analysis of Offshore Upwind and Downwind Turbines

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, Qiuying; Sheng, Chunhua; Afjeh, Abdollah

    2014-01-01

    Aerodynamic interactions of the model NREL 5 MW offshore horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWT) are investigated using a high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. Four wind turbine configurations are considered; three-bladed upwind and downwind and two-bladed upwind and downwind configurations, which operate at two different rotor speeds of 12.1 and 16 RPM. In the present study, both steady and unsteady aerodynamic loads, such as the rotor torque, blade hub bending moment, and base the tower bending moment of the tower, are evaluated in detail to provide overall assessment of different wind turbine configurations. Aerodynamic interactions between the rotor and tower are analyzed,more » including the rotor wake development downstream. The computational analysis provides insight into aerodynamic performance of the upwind and downwind, two- and three-bladed horizontal axis wind turbines.« less

  18. Aerodynamic Characteristics of High Speed Trains under Cross Wind Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W.; Wu, S. P.; Zhang, Y.

    2011-09-01

    Numerical simulation for the two models in cross-wind was carried out in this paper. The three-dimensional compressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations(RANS), combined with the standard k-ɛ turbulence model, were solved on multi-block hybrid grids by second order upwind finite volume technique. The impact of fairing on aerodynamic characteristics of the train models was analyzed. It is shown that, the flow separates on the fairing and a strong vortex is generated, the pressure on the upper middle car decreases dramatically, which leads to a large lift force. The fairing changes the basic patterns around the trains. In addition, formulas of the coefficient of aerodynamic force at small yaw angles up to 24° were expressed.

  19. Joint computational and experimental aerodynamics research on a hypersonic vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Oberkampf, W.L.; Aeschliman, D.P.; Walker, M.M.

    1992-01-01

    A closely coupled computational and experimental aerodynamics research program was conducted on a hypersonic vehicle configuration at Mach 8. Aerodynamic force and moment measurements and flow visualization results were obtained in the Sandia National Laboratories hypersonic wind tunnel for laminar boundary layer conditions. Parabolized and iterative Navier-Stokes simulations were used to predict flow fields and forces and moments on the hypersonic configuration. The basic vehicle configuration is a spherically blunted 10{degrees} cone with a slice parallel with the axis of the vehicle. On the slice portion of the vehicle, a flap can be attached so that deflection angles of 10{degrees}, 20{degrees}, and 30{degrees} can be obtained. Comparisons are made between experimental and computational results to evaluate quality of each and to identify areas where improvements are needed. This extensive set of high-quality experimental force and moment measurements is recommended for use in the calibration and validation of computational aerodynamics codes. 22 refs.

  20. A flight experiment to measure rarefied-flow aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    A flight experiment to measure rarefied-flow aerodynamics of a blunt lifting body is being developed by NASA. This experiment, called the Rarefied-Flow Aerodynamic Measurement Experiment (RAME), is part of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) mission, which is a Pathfinder design tool for aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles. The RAME will use flight measurements from accelerometers, rate gyros, and pressure transducers, combined with knowledge of AFE in-flight mass properties and trajectory, to infer aerodynamic forces and moments in the rarefied-flow environment, including transition into the hypersonic continuum regime. Preflight estimates of the aerodynamic measurements are based upon environment models, existing computer simulations, and ground test results. Planned maneuvers at several altitudes will provide a first-time opportunity to examine gas-surface accommondation effects on aerodynamic coefficients in an environment of changing atmospheric composition. A description is given of the RAME equipment design.

  1. Modeling of aircraft unsteady aerodynamic characteristics. Part 1: Postulated models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, Vladislav; Noderer, Keith D.

    1994-01-01

    A short theoretical study of aircraft aerodynamic model equations with unsteady effects is presented. The aerodynamic forces and moments are expressed in terms of indicial functions or internal state variables. The first representation leads to aircraft integro-differential equations of motion; the second preserves the state-space form of the model equations. The formulations of unsteady aerodynamics is applied in two examples. The first example deals with a one-degree-of-freedom harmonic motion about one of the aircraft body axes. In the second example, the equations for longitudinal short-period motion are developed. In these examples, only linear aerodynamic terms are considered. The indicial functions are postulated as simple exponentials and the internal state variables are governed by linear, time-invariant, first-order differential equations. It is shown that both approaches to the modeling of unsteady aerodynamics lead to identical models.

  2. Measurement of Unsteady Aerodynamics Load on the Blade of Field Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamada, Yasunari; Maeda, Takao; Naito, Keita; Ouchi, Yuu; Kozawa, Masayoshi

    This paper describes an experimental field study of the rotor aerodynamics of wind turbines. The test wind turbine is a horizontal axis wind turbine, or: HAWT with a diameter of 10m. The pressure distributions on the rotating blade are measured with multi point pressure transducers. Sectional aerodynamic forces are analyzed from pressure distribution. Blade root moments are measured simultaneously by a pair of strain gauges. The inflow wind is measured by a three component sonic anemometer, the local inflow of the blade section are measured by a pair of 7 hole Pitot tubes. The relation between the aerodynamic moments on the blade root from pressure distribution and the mechanical moment from strain gauges is discussed. The aerodynamic moments are estimated from the sectional aerodynamic forces and show oscillation caused by local wind speed and direction change. The mechanical moment shows similar oscillation to the aerodynamic excepting the short period oscillation of the blade first mode frequency. The fluctuation of the sectional aerodynamic force triggers resonant blade oscillations. Where stall is present along the blade section, the blade's first mode frequency is dominant. Without stall, the rotating frequency is dominant in the blade root moment.

  3. Prediction of Aerodynamic Coefficients using Neural Networks for Sparse Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajkumar, T.; Bardina, Jorge; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Basic aerodynamic coefficients are modeled as functions of angles of attack and sideslip with vehicle lateral symmetry and compressibility effects. Most of the aerodynamic parameters can be well-fitted using polynomial functions. In this paper a fast, reliable way of predicting aerodynamic coefficients is produced using a neural network. The training data for the neural network is derived from wind tunnel test and numerical simulations. The coefficients of lift, drag, pitching moment are expressed as a function of alpha (angle of attack) and Mach number. The results produced from preliminary neural network analysis are very good.

  4. Aerodynamic database development of the ESA intermediate experimental vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzella, Giuseppe; Marino, Giuliano; Rufolo, Giuseppe C.

    2014-01-01

    This work deals with the aerodynamic database development of the Intermediate Experiment Vehicle. The aerodynamic analysis, carried out for the whole flight scenario, relies on computational fluid dynamics, wind tunnel test, and engineering-based design data generated during the project phases, from rarefied flow conditions, to hypersonic continuum flow up to reach subsonic speeds regime. Therefore, the vehicle aerodynamic database covers the range of Mach number, angle of attack, sideslip and control surface deflections foreseen for the vehicle nominal re-entry. In particular, the databasing activities are developed in the light of build-up approach. This means that all aerodynamic force and moment coefficients are provided by means of a linear summation over certain number of incremental contributions such as, for example, effect of sideslip angle, aerodynamic control surface effectiveness, etc. Each force and moment coefficient is treated separately and appropriate equation is provided, in which all the pertinent contributions for obtaining the total coefficient for any selected flight conditions appear. To this aim, all the available numerical and experimental aerodynamic data are gathered in order to explicit the functional dependencies from each aerodynamic model addend through polynomial expressions obtained with the least squares method. These polynomials are function of the primary variable that drives the phenomenon whereas secondary dependencies are introduced directly into its unknown coefficients which are determined by means of best-fitting algorithms.

  5. An Improved Theoretical Aerodynamic Derivatives Computer Program for Sounding Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrowman, J. S.; Fan, D. N.; Obosu, C. B.; Vira, N. R.; Yang, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    The paper outlines a Theoretical Aerodynamic Derivatives (TAD) computer program for computing the aerodynamics of sounding rockets. TAD outputs include normal force, pitching moment and rolling moment coefficient derivatives as well as center-of-pressure locations as a function of the flight Mach number. TAD is applicable to slender finned axisymmetric vehicles at small angles of attack in subsonic and supersonic flows. TAD improvement efforts include extending Mach number regions of applicability, improving accuracy, and replacement of some numerical integration algorithms with closed-form integrations. Key equations used in TAD are summarized and typical TAD outputs are illustrated for a second-stage Tomahawk configuration.

  6. Yaw and pitch visual-vestibular interaction in weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, G.; Wood, S. J.; Reschke, M. F.; Berthoz, A.; Igarashi, M.

    1999-01-01

    Both yaw and pitch visual-vestibular interactions at two separate frequencies of chair rotation (0.2 and 0.8 Hz) in combination with a single velocity of optokinetic stimulus (36 degrees/s) were used to investigate the effects of sustained weightlessness on neural strategies adopted by astronaut subjects to cope with the stimulus rearrangement of spaceflight. Pitch and yaw oscillation in darkness at 0.2 and 0.8 Hz without optokinetic stimulation, and constant velocity linear optokinetic stimulation at 18, 36, and 54 degrees/s presented relative to the head with the subject stationary, were used as controls for the visual-vestibular interactions. The results following 8 days of space flight showed no significant changes in: (1) either the horizontal and vertical vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) gain, phase, or bias; (2) the yaw visual-vestibular response (VVR); or (3) the horizontal or vertical optokinetic (OKN) slow phase velocity (SPV). However, significant changes were observed: (1) when during pitch VVR at 0.2 Hz late inflight, the contribution of the optokinetic input to the combined oculomotor response was smaller than during the stationary OKN SPV measurements, followed by an increased contribution during the immediate postflight testing; and (2) when during pitch VVR at 0.8 Hz, the component of the combined oculomotor response due to the underlying vertical VOR was more efficiently suppressed early inflight and less suppressed immediately postflight compared with preflight observations. The larger OKN response during pitch VVR at 0.2 Hz and the better suppression of VOR during pitch VVR at 0.8 Hz postflight are presumably due to the increased role of vision early inflight and immediately after spaceflight, as previously observed in various studies. These results suggest that the subjects adopted a neural strategy to structure their spatial orientation in weightlessness by reweighting visual, otolith, and perhaps tactile/somatic signals.

  7. Techniques for monitoring and controlling yaw attitude of a GPS satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichten, Stephen M. (Inventor); Bar-Sever, Yoaz (Inventor); Zumberge, James (Inventor); Bertiger, William I. (Inventor); Muellerschoen, Ronald J. (Inventor); Wu, Sien-Chong (Inventor); Hurst, Kenneth (Inventor); Blewitt, Geoff (Inventor); Yunck, Thomas (Inventor); Thornton, Catherine (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Techniques for monitoring and controlling yawing of a GPS satellite in an orbit that has an eclipsing portion out of the sunlight based on the orbital conditions of the GPS satellite. In one embodiment, a constant yaw bias is generated in the attitude control system of the GPS satellite to control the yawing of the GPS satellite when it is in the shadow of the earth.

  8. Yaw rate control of an air bearing vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walcott, Bruce L.

    1989-01-01

    The results of a 6 week project which focused on the problem of controlling the yaw (rotational) rate the air bearing vehicle used on NASA's flat floor facility are summarized. Contained within is a listing of the equipment available for task completion and an evaluation of the suitability of this equipment. The identification (modeling) process of the air bearing vehicle is detailed as well as the subsequent closed-loop control strategy. The effectiveness of the solution is discussed and further recommendations are included.

  9. The response of a 38m horizontal axis teetered rotor to yaw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasgow, J. C.; Pfanner, H. G.; Westerkamp, E. J.

    Recent tests on the 38m Mod-0 100 kW horizontal axis experimental wind turbine yielded quantative data on the teeter response of a rotor to yaw. The test results indicate that yaw rates as high as 5 deg/s could be used in emergency situations to unload and slow a rotor for intermediate sized (500 kW) wind turbines. The results also show that teeter response is sensitive to the direction of yaw, and that teeter response to yaw is reduced as either the rotor speed or the blade lock number is increased.

  10. Quasi-steady state aerodynamics of the cheetah tail.

    PubMed

    Patel, Amir; Boje, Edward; Fisher, Callen; Louis, Leeann; Lane, Emily

    2016-01-01

    During high-speed pursuit of prey, the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) has been observed to swing its tail while manoeuvring (e.g. turning or braking) but the effect of these complex motions is not well understood. This study demonstrates the potential of the cheetah's long, furry tail to impart torques and forces on the body as a result of aerodynamic effects, in addition to the well-known inertial effects. The first-order aerodynamic forces on the tail are quantified through wind tunnel testing and it is observed that the fur nearly doubles the effective frontal area of the tail without much mass penalty. Simple dynamic models provide insight into manoeuvrability via simulation of pitch, roll and yaw tail motion primitives. The inertial and quasi-steady state aerodynamic effects of tail actuation are quantified and compared by calculating the angular impulse imparted onto the cheetah's body and its shown aerodynamic effects contribute to the tail's angular impulse, especially at the highest forward velocities. PMID:27412267

  11. Quasi-steady state aerodynamics of the cheetah tail

    PubMed Central

    Boje, Edward; Fisher, Callen; Louis, Leeann; Lane, Emily

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT During high-speed pursuit of prey, the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) has been observed to swing its tail while manoeuvring (e.g. turning or braking) but the effect of these complex motions is not well understood. This study demonstrates the potential of the cheetah's long, furry tail to impart torques and forces on the body as a result of aerodynamic effects, in addition to the well-known inertial effects. The first-order aerodynamic forces on the tail are quantified through wind tunnel testing and it is observed that the fur nearly doubles the effective frontal area of the tail without much mass penalty. Simple dynamic models provide insight into manoeuvrability via simulation of pitch, roll and yaw tail motion primitives. The inertial and quasi-steady state aerodynamic effects of tail actuation are quantified and compared by calculating the angular impulse imparted onto the cheetah's body and its shown aerodynamic effects contribute to the tail's angular impulse, especially at the highest forward velocities. PMID:27412267

  12. Quasi-steady state aerodynamics of the cheetah tail.

    PubMed

    Patel, Amir; Boje, Edward; Fisher, Callen; Louis, Leeann; Lane, Emily

    2016-08-15

    During high-speed pursuit of prey, the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) has been observed to swing its tail while manoeuvring (e.g. turning or braking) but the effect of these complex motions is not well understood. This study demonstrates the potential of the cheetah's long, furry tail to impart torques and forces on the body as a result of aerodynamic effects, in addition to the well-known inertial effects. The first-order aerodynamic forces on the tail are quantified through wind tunnel testing and it is observed that the fur nearly doubles the effective frontal area of the tail without much mass penalty. Simple dynamic models provide insight into manoeuvrability via simulation of pitch, roll and yaw tail motion primitives. The inertial and quasi-steady state aerodynamic effects of tail actuation are quantified and compared by calculating the angular impulse imparted onto the cheetah's body and its shown aerodynamic effects contribute to the tail's angular impulse, especially at the highest forward velocities.

  13. Unsteady transonic aerodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Nixon, D.

    1989-01-01

    Various papers on unsteady transonic aerodynamics are presented. The topics addressed include: physical phenomena associated with unsteady transonic flows, basic equations for unsteady transonic flow, practical problems concerning aircraft, basic numerical methods, computational methods for unsteady transonic flows, application of transonic flow analysis to helicopter rotor problems, unsteady aerodynamics for turbomachinery aeroelastic applications, alternative methods for modeling unsteady transonic flows.

  14. Uncertainty in Computational Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, J. M.; Hemsch, M. J.; Morrison, J. H.

    2003-01-01

    An approach is presented to treat computational aerodynamics as a process, subject to the fundamental quality assurance principles of process control and process improvement. We consider several aspects affecting uncertainty for the computational aerodynamic process and present a set of stages to determine the level of management required to meet risk assumptions desired by the customer of the predictions.

  15. Pitched and Yawed Circular Jets in Cross-Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milanovic, Ivana M.; Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Reddy, D. R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Results from an experimental investigation of flow field generated by pitched and yawed jets discharging from a flat plate into a cross-flow are presented. The circular jet was pitched at alpha = 20 degrees and 45 degrees and yawed between beta = 0 degrees and 90 degrees in increments of 15 degrees. The measurements were performed with two X-wires providing all three components of velocity and turbulence intensity. These data were obtained at downstream locations of x = 3, 5, 10 and 20, where the distance x normalized by the jet diameter, is measured from the center of the orifice. Data for all configurations were acquired at a momentum-flux ratio J = 8. Additionally, for selected angles and locations, surveys were conducted for J = 1.5, 4, and 20. As expected, the jet penetration is found to be higher at larger alpha. With increasing beta the jet spreads more. The rate of reduction of peak streamwise vorticity, with the downstream distance is significantly lessened at higher alpha but is found to be practically independent of alpha. Thus, at the farthest measurement station x = 20, omega(sub xmax) is about five times larger for beta = 0 degrees compared to the levels at beta = 0 degrees. Streamwise velocity within the jet-vortex structure is found to depend on the parameter J. At J = 1.5 and 4, 'wake-like' velocity profiles are observed. In comparison, a 'jet-like' overshoot is present at higher J.

  16. Yaw sensory rearrangement alters pitch vestibulo-ocular reflex responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petropoulos, A. E.; Wall, C. 3rd; Oman, C. M.

    1997-01-01

    Ten male subjects underwent two types of adaptation paradigm designed either to enhance or to attenuate the gain of the canal-ocular reflex (COR), before undergoing otolith-ocular reflex (OOR) testing with constant velocity, earth horizontal axis and pitch rotation. The adaptation paradigm paired a 0.2 Hz sinusoidal rotation about an earth vertical axis with a 0.2 Hz optokinetic stimulus that was deliberately mismatched in peak velocity or phase and was designed to produce short-term changes in the COR. Preadaptation and postadaptation OOR tests occurred at a constant velocity of 60 degrees/sec in the dark and produced a modulation component of the slow phase velocity with a frequency of 0.16 Hz due to otolithic stimulation by the sinusoidally changing gravity vector. Of the seven subjects who showed enhancement of the COR gain, six also showed enhancement of the OOR modulation component. Of the seven subjects who showed attenuation of the COR gain, five also showed attenuation of the OOR modulation component. The probability that these two cross-axis adaptation effects would occur by chance is less than 0.02. This suggests that visual-vestibular conditioning of the yaw axis COR also induced changes in the pitch axis OOR. We thus postulate that the central nervous system pathways that process horizontal canal yaw stimuli have elements in common with those processing otolithic stimuli about the pitch axis.

  17. Post-Flight Aerodynamic and Aerothermal Model Validation of a Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Chun; Muppidi, Suman; Bose, Deepak; Van Norman, John W.; Tanimoto, Rebekah; Clark, Ian

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Low Density Supersonic Decelerator Program is developing new technologies that will enable the landing of heavier payloads in low density environments, such as Mars. A recent flight experiment conducted high above the Hawaiian Islands has demonstrated the performance of several decelerator technologies. In particular, the deployment of the Robotic class Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD-R) was highly successful, and valuable data were collected during the test flight. This paper outlines the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis used to estimate the aerodynamic and aerothermal characteristics of the SIAD-R. Pre-flight and post-flight predictions are compared with the flight data, and a very good agreement in aerodynamic force and moment coefficients is observed between the CFD solutions and the reconstructed flight data.

  18. Tail contribution to the directional aerodynamic characteristics of a 1/6-scale model of the rotor systems research aircraft with a tail rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    The results are presented of a wind tunnel investigation to determine the tail contribution to the directional aerodynamic characteristics of a 1/6-scale model of the rotor systems research aircraft (RSRA) with a tail rotor. No main rotor was used during the investigation. Data were obtained with and without the tail rotor over a range of sideslip angle and over a range of rotor collective pitch angle. The model with the tail rotor was tested at several advance ratios with and without thrust from the auxiliary thrust engines on the RSRA fuselage. Increasing the space between the tail-rotor hub and the vertical tail reduced the tail-rotor torque required at moderate to high rotor thrust. Increasing the exit dynamic pressure of the auxiliary thrust engines decreases the tail contribution to the static directional stability. The tail-rotor thrust and its interference provide a positive increment to the static directional stability. The tail contribution increases with forward speed. The adverse yawing moment of the airframe would strongly affect the thrust required of the tail rotor when the helicopter is hovering in a crosswind.

  19. A Feasibility Study on the Control of a Generic Air Vehicle Using Control Moment Gyros

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Kyong B.; Moerder, Daniel D.

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines feasibility and performance issues in using Control Moment Gyroscopes (CMGs) to control the attitude of a fixed-wing aircraft. The paper describes a control system structure that permits allocating control authority and bandwidth between a CMG system and conventional aerodynamic control surfaces to stabilize a vehicle with neutral aerodynamic stability. A simulation study explores the interplay between aerodynamic and CMG effects, and indicates desirable physical characteristics for a CMG system to be used for aircraft attitude control.

  20. Mapping the Epidemiology of Yaws in the Solomon Islands: A Cluster Randomized Survey

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Michael; Vahi, Ventis; Sokana, Oliver; Puiahi, Elliot; Pavluck, Alex; Zhang, Zaixing; Dalipanda, Tenneth; Bottomley, Christian; Mabey, David C.; Solomon, Anthony W.

    2015-01-01

    Yaws, a non-venereal treponemal disease, is targeted for eradication by 2020 but accurate epidemiological data to guide control programs remain sparse. The Solomon Islands reports the second highest number of cases of yaws worldwide. We conducted a cluster randomized survey of yaws in two provinces of the Solomon Islands. One thousand four hundred and ninety-seven (1,497) children 5–14 years of age were examined. Clinical signs of active yaws were found in 79 children (5.5%), whereas 140 children (9.4%) had evidence of healed yaws lesions. Four hundred and seventy (470) (31.4%) children had a positive Treponema pallidum particle agglutination assay (TPPA). Two hundred and eighty-five (285) children (19%) had a positive TPPA and rapid plasma regain assay. Risk of yaws increased with age and was more common in males. The prevalence of yaws at village level was the major risk factor for infection. Our findings suggest the village, not the household, should be the unit of treatment in the World Health Organization (WHO) yaws eradication strategy. PMID:25422395

  1. Mapping the epidemiology of yaws in the Solomon Islands: a cluster randomized survey.

    PubMed

    Marks, Michael; Vahi, Ventis; Sokana, Oliver; Puiahi, Elliot; Pavluck, Alex; Zhang, Zaixing; Dalipanda, Tenneth; Bottomley, Christian; Mabey, David C; Solomon, Anthony W

    2015-01-01

    Yaws, a non-venereal treponemal disease, is targeted for eradication by 2020 but accurate epidemiological data to guide control programs remain sparse. The Solomon Islands reports the second highest number of cases of yaws worldwide. We conducted a cluster randomized survey of yaws in two provinces of the Solomon Islands. One thousand four hundred and ninety-seven (1,497) children 5-14 years of age were examined. Clinical signs of active yaws were found in 79 children (5.5%), whereas 140 children (9.4%) had evidence of healed yaws lesions. Four hundred and seventy (470) (31.4%) children had a positive Treponema pallidum particle agglutination assay (TPPA). Two hundred and eighty-five (285) children (19%) had a positive TPPA and rapid plasma regain assay. Risk of yaws increased with age and was more common in males. The prevalence of yaws at village level was the major risk factor for infection. Our findings suggest the village, not the household, should be the unit of treatment in the World Health Organization (WHO) yaws eradication strategy. PMID:25422395

  2. The Aerodynamics of a Flying Sports Disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potts, Jonathan R.; Crowther, William J.

    2001-11-01

    The flying sports disc is a spin-stabilised axi-symmetric wing of quite remarkable design. A typical disc has an approximate elliptical cross-section and hollowed out under-side cavity, such as the Frisbee(TM) disc. An experimental study of flying disc aerodynamics, including both spinning and non-spinning tests, has been carried out in the wind tunnel. Load measurements, pressure data and flow visualisation techniques have enabled an explanation of the flow physics and provided data for free-flight simulations. A computer simulation that predicts free-flight trajectories from a given set of initial conditions was used to investigate the dynamics of a flying disc. This includes a six-degree of freedom mathematical model of disc flight mechanics, with aerodynamic coefficients derived from experimental data. A flying sports disc generates lift through forward velocity just like a conventional wing. The lift contributed by spin is insignificant and does not provide nearly enough down force to support hover. Without spin, the disc tumbles ground-ward under the influence of an unstable aerodynamic pitching moment. From a backhand throw however, spin is naturally given to the disc. The unchanged pitching moment now results in roll, due to gyroscopic precession, stabilising the disc in free-flight.

  3. Aerodynamic Analysis of Simulated Heat Shield Recession for the Orion Command Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bibb, Karen L.; Alter, Stephen J.; Mcdaniel, Ryan D.

    2008-01-01

    The aerodynamic effects of the recession of the ablative thermal protection system for the Orion Command Module of the Crew Exploration Vehicle are important for the vehicle guidance. At the present time, the aerodynamic effects of recession being handled within the Orion aerodynamic database indirectly with an additional safety factor placed on the uncertainty bounds. This study is an initial attempt to quantify the effects for a particular set of recessed geometry shapes, in order to provide more rigorous analysis for managing recession effects within the aerodynamic database. The aerodynamic forces and moments for the baseline and recessed geometries were computed at several trajectory points using multiple CFD codes, both viscous and inviscid. The resulting aerodynamics for the baseline and recessed geometries were compared. The forces (lift, drag) show negligible differences between baseline and recessed geometries. Generally, the moments show a difference between baseline and recessed geometries that correlates with the maximum amount of recession of the geometry. The difference between the pitching moments for the baseline and recessed geometries increases as Mach number decreases (and the recession is greater), and reach a value of -0.0026 for the lowest Mach number. The change in trim angle of attack increases from approx. 0.5deg at M = 28.7 to approx. 1.3deg at M = 6, and is consistent with a previous analysis with a lower fidelity engineering tool. This correlation of the present results with the engineering tool results supports the continued use of the engineering tool for future work. The present analysis suggests there does not need to be an uncertainty due to recession in the Orion aerodynamic database for the force quantities. The magnitude of the change in pitching moment due to recession is large enough to warrant inclusion in the aerodynamic database. An increment in the uncertainty for pitching moment could be calculated from these results and

  4. The Aerodynamics of Axisymmetric Blunt Bodies Flying at Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenenberger, Mark; Kutty, Prasad; Queen, Eric; Karlgaard, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory entry capsule is used as an example to demonstrate how a blunt body of revolution must be treated as asymmetric in some respects when flying at a non-zero trim angle of attack. A brief description of the axisymmetric moment equations are provided before solving a system of equations describing the lateral-directional moment equations for a blunt body trimming at an angle of attack. Simplifying assumptions are made which allow the solution to the equations to be rearranged to relate the roll and yaw stability with sideslip angle to the frequency of oscillation of the vehicle body rates. The equations show that for a blunt body the roll and yaw rates are in phase and proportional to each other. The ratio of the rates is determined by the static stability coefficients and mass properties about those axes. A trajectory simulation is used to validate the static yaw stability parameter identification equation and a simple method of identifying the oscillation frequency from the body rates. The approach is shown to successfully extract the modeled yaw stability coefficient along a simulated Mars entry in agreement with data earlier analysis of MSL flight data.

  5. Aerodynamic and Aeroelastic Characteristics of a Tension Cone Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Ian G.; Cruz, Juan R.; Hughes, Monica F.; Ware, Joanne S.; Madlangbayan, Albert; Braun, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    The supersonic aerodynamic and aeroelastic characteristics of a tension cone inflatable aerodynamic decelerator were investigated by wind tunnel testing. Two sets of tests were conducted: one using rigid models and another using textile models. Tests using rigid models were conducted over a Mach number range from 1.65 to 4.5 at angles of attack from -12 to 20 degrees. The axial, normal, and pitching moment coefficients were found to be insensitive to Mach number over the tested range. The axial force coefficient was nearly constant (C(sub A) = 1.45 +/- 0.05) with respect to angle of attack. Both the normal and pitching moment coefficients were nearly linear with respect to angle of attack. The pitching moment coefficient showed the model to be statically stable about the reference point. Schlieren images and video showed a detached bow shock with no evidence of large regions of separated flow and/or embedded shocks at all Mach numbers investigated. Qualitatively similar static aerodynamic coefficient and flow visualization results were obtained using textile models at a Mach number of 2.5. Using inflatable textile models the torus pressure required to maintain the model in the fully-inflated configuration was determined. This pressure was found to be sensitive to details in the structural configuration of the inflatable models. Additional tests included surface pressure measurements on rigid models and deployment and inflation tests with inflatable models.

  6. Fluidic Control of Aerodynamic Forces on an Axisymmetric Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramson, Philip; Vukasinovic, Bojan; Glezer, Ari

    2007-11-01

    The aerodynamic forces and moments on a wind tunnel model of an axisymmetric bluff body are modified by induced local vectoring of the separated base flow. Control is effected by an array of four integrated aft-facing synthetic jets that emanate from narrow, azimuthally-segmented slots, equally distributed around the perimeter of the circular tail end within a small backward facing step that extends into a Coanda surface. The model is suspended in the wind tunnel by eight thin wires for minimal support interference with the wake. Fluidic actuation results in a localized, segmented vectoring of the separated base flow along the rear Coanda surface and induces asymmetric aerodynamic forces and moments to effect maneuvering during flight. The aerodynamic effects associated with quasi-steady and transitory differential, asymmetric activation of the Coanda effect are characterized using direct force and PIV measurements.

  7. Wing-alone aerodynamic characteristics at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallings, R. L., Jr.; Lamb, M.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted to determine wing-alone supersonic aerodynamic characteristics at high angles of attack. The family of wings tested varied in aspect ratio from 0.5 to 4.0 and taper ratio from 0.0 to 1.0. The wings were tested at angles of attack ranging from 0 to 60 deg and Mach numbers from 1.6 to 4.6. The aerodynamic characteristics were obtained by integrating local pressures measured over the wing surface. Comparison of these data with the limited available data from the literature indicate the present data are free of sting interference effects through the test range of angle of attack. Presented and discussed are results showing the effects of model geometry, Mach number and angle of attack on aerodynamic characteristics consisting of normal force, pitching moment, bending moment, longitudinal center-of-pressure locations, and lateral center-of-pressure locations.

  8. Parachute Aerodynamics From Video Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenenberger, Mark; Queen, Eric M.; Cruz, Juan R.

    2005-01-01

    A new data analysis technique for the identification of static and dynamic aerodynamic stability coefficients from wind tunnel test video data is presented. This new technique was applied to video data obtained during a parachute wind tunnel test program conducted in support of the Mars Exploration Rover Mission. Total angle-of-attack data obtained from video images were used to determine the static pitching moment curve of the parachute. During the original wind tunnel test program the static pitching moment curve had been determined by forcing the parachute to a specific total angle-of -attack and measuring the forces generated. It is shown with the new technique that this parachute, when free to rotate, trims at an angle-of-attack two degrees lower than was measured during the forced-angle tests. An attempt was also made to extract pitch damping information from the video data. Results suggest that the parachute is dynamically unstable at the static trim point and tends to become dynamically stable away from the trim point. These trends are in agreement with limit-cycle-like behavior observed in the video. However, the chaotic motion of the parachute produced results with large uncertainty bands.

  9. Efficient Global Aerodynamic Modeling from Flight Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    2012-01-01

    A method for identifying global aerodynamic models from flight data in an efficient manner is explained and demonstrated. A novel experiment design technique was used to obtain dynamic flight data over a range of flight conditions with a single flight maneuver. Multivariate polynomials and polynomial splines were used with orthogonalization techniques and statistical modeling metrics to synthesize global nonlinear aerodynamic models directly and completely from flight data alone. Simulation data and flight data from a subscale twin-engine jet transport aircraft were used to demonstrate the techniques. Results showed that global multivariate nonlinear aerodynamic dependencies could be accurately identified using flight data from a single maneuver. Flight-derived global aerodynamic model structures, model parameter estimates, and associated uncertainties were provided for all six nondimensional force and moment coefficients for the test aircraft. These models were combined with a propulsion model identified from engine ground test data to produce a high-fidelity nonlinear flight simulation very efficiently. Prediction testing using a multi-axis maneuver showed that the identified global model accurately predicted aircraft responses.

  10. Identification of aerodynamic models for maneuvering aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Suei; Lan, C. Edward

    1990-01-01

    Due to the requirement of increased performance and maneuverability, the flight envelope of a modern fighter is frequently extended to the high angle-of-attack regime. Vehicles maneuvering in this regime are subjected to nonlinear aerodynamic loads. The nonlinearities are due mainly to three-dimensional separated flow and concentrated vortex flow that occur at large angles of attack. Accurate prediction of these nonlinear airloads is of great importance in the analysis of a vehicle's flight motion and in the design of its flight control system. A satisfactory evaluation of the performance envelope of the aircraft may require a large number of coupled computations, one for each change in initial conditions. To avoid the disadvantage of solving the coupled flow-field equations and aircraft's motion equations, an alternate approach is to use a mathematical modeling to describe the steady and unsteady aerodynamics for the aircraft equations of motion. Aerodynamic forces and moments acting on a rapidly maneuvering aircraft are, in general, nonlinear functions of motion variables, their time rate of change, and the history of maneuvering. A numerical method was developed to analyze the nonlinear and time-dependent aerodynamic response to establish the generalized indicial function in terms of motion variables and their time rates of change.

  11. Aerodynamic analysis of an isolated vehicle wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leśniewicz, P.; Kulak, M.; Karczewski, M.

    2014-08-01

    Increasing fuel prices force the manufacturers to look into all aspects of car aerodynamics including wheels, tyres and rims in order to minimize their drag. By diminishing the aerodynamic drag of vehicle the fuel consumption will decrease, while driving safety and comfort will improve. In order to properly illustrate the impact of a rotating wheel aerodynamics on the car body, precise analysis of an isolated wheel should be performed beforehand. In order to represent wheel rotation in contact with the ground, presented CFD simulations included Moving Wall boundary as well as Multiple Reference Frame should be performed. Sliding mesh approach is favoured but too costly at the moment. Global and local flow quantities obtained during simulations were compared to an experiment in order to assess the validity of the numerical model. Results of investigation illustrates dependency between type of simulation and coefficients (drag and lift). MRF approach proved to be a better solution giving result closer to experiment. Investigation of the model with contact area between the wheel and the ground helps to illustrate the impact of rotating wheel aerodynamics on the car body.

  12. Advanced turboprop installation aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    The expected aerodynamic effects of a propfan installed on a thick supercritical wing are summarized qualitatively. Nacelle/wing and jet interactions, slipstream incremental velocity, nonuniform inflow, and swirl loss recovery are discussed.

  13. Aerodynamic Lifting Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weltner, Klaus

    1990-01-01

    Describes some experiments showing both qualitatively and quantitatively that aerodynamic lift is a reaction force. Demonstrates reaction forces caused by the acceleration of an airstream and the deflection of an airstream. Provides pictures of demonstration apparatus and mathematical expressions. (YP)

  14. Transonic and supersonic ground effect aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doig, G.

    2014-08-01

    A review of recent and historical work in the field of transonic and supersonic ground effect aerodynamics has been conducted, focussing on applied research on wings and aircraft, present and future ground transportation, projectiles, rocket sleds and other related bodies which travel in close ground proximity in the compressible regime. Methods for ground testing are described and evaluated, noting that wind tunnel testing is best performed with a symmetry model in the absence of a moving ground; sled or rail testing is ultimately preferable, though considerably more expensive. Findings are reported on shock-related ground influence on aerodynamic forces and moments in and accelerating through the transonic regime - where force reversals and the early onset of local supersonic flow is prevalent - as well as more predictable behaviours in fully supersonic to hypersonic ground effect flows.

  15. CFD research, parallel computation and aerodynamic optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, James S.

    1995-01-01

    Over five years of research in Computational Fluid Dynamics and its applications are covered in this report. Using CFD as an established tool, aerodynamic optimization on parallel architectures is explored. The objective of this work is to provide better tools to vehicle designers. Submarine design requires accurate force and moment calculations in flow with thick boundary layers and large separated vortices. Low noise production is critical, so flow into the propulsor region must be predicted accurately. The High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) has been the subject of recent work. This vehicle is to be a passenger vehicle with the capability of cutting overseas flight times by more than half. A successful design must surpass the performance of comparable planes. Fuel economy, other operational costs, environmental impact, and range must all be improved substantially. For all these reasons, improved design tools are required, and these tools must eventually integrate optimization, external aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, heat transfer and other disciplines.

  16. Aerodynamics of Heavy Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Haecheon; Lee, Jungil; Park, Hyungmin

    2014-01-01

    We present an overview of the aerodynamics of heavy vehicles, such as tractor-trailers, high-speed trains, and buses. We introduce three-dimensional flow structures around simplified model vehicles and heavy vehicles and discuss the flow-control devices used for drag reduction. Finally, we suggest important unsteady flow structures to investigate for the enhancement of aerodynamic performance and future directions for experimental and numerical approaches.

  17. Aerodynamic Shutoff Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horstman, Raymond H.

    1992-01-01

    Aerodynamic flow achieved by adding fixed fairings to butterfly valve. When valve fully open, fairings align with butterfly and reduce wake. Butterfly free to turn, so valve can be closed, while fairings remain fixed. Design reduces turbulence in flow of air in internal suction system. Valve aids in development of improved porous-surface boundary-layer control system to reduce aerodynamic drag. Applications primarily aerospace. System adapted to boundary-layer control on high-speed land vehicles.

  18. Ares I Aerodynamic Testing at the Boeing Polysonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinier, Jeremy T.; Niskey, Charles J.; Hanke, Jeremy L.; Tomek, William G.

    2011-01-01

    Throughout three full design analysis cycles, the Ares I project within the Constellation program has consistently relied on the Boeing Polysonic Wind Tunnel (PSWT) for aerodynamic testing of the subsonic, transonic and supersonic portions of the atmospheric flight envelope (Mach=0.5 to 4.5). Each design cycle required the development of aerodynamic databases for the 6 degree-of-freedom (DOF) forces and moments, as well as distributed line-loads databases covering the full range of Mach number, total angle-of-attack, and aerodynamic roll angle. The high fidelity data collected in this facility has been consistent with the data collected in NASA Langley s Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) at the overlapping condition ofMach=1.6. Much insight into the aerodynamic behavior of the launch vehicle during all phases of flight was gained through wind tunnel testing. Important knowledge pertaining to slender launch vehicle aerodynamics in particular was accumulated. In conducting these wind tunnel tests and developing experimental aerodynamic databases, some challenges were encountered and are reported as lessons learned in this paper for the benefit of future crew launch vehicle aerodynamic developments.

  19. The aerodynamics of hovering flight in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Fry, Steven N; Sayaman, Rosalyn; Dickinson, Michael H

    2005-06-01

    Using 3D infrared high-speed video, we captured the continuous wing and body kinematics of free-flying fruit flies, Drosophila melanogaster, during hovering and slow forward flight. We then 'replayed' the wing kinematics on a dynamically scaled robotic model to measure the aerodynamic forces produced by the wings. Hovering animals generate a U-shaped wing trajectory, in which large drag forces during a downward plunge at the start of each stroke create peak vertical forces. Quasi-steady mechanisms could account for nearly all of the mean measured force required to hover, although temporal discrepancies between instantaneous measured forces and model predictions indicate that unsteady mechanisms also play a significant role. We analyzed the requirements for hovering from an analysis of the time history of forces and moments in all six degrees of freedom. The wing kinematics necessary to generate sufficient lift are highly constrained by the requirement to balance thrust and pitch torque over the stroke cycle. We also compare the wing motion and aerodynamic forces of free and tethered flies. Tethering causes a strong distortion of the stroke pattern that results in a reduction of translational forces and a prominent nose-down pitch moment. The stereotyped distortion under tethered conditions is most likely due to a disruption of sensory feedback. Finally, we calculated flight power based directly on the measurements of wing motion and aerodynamic forces, which yielded a higher estimate of muscle power during free hovering flight than prior estimates based on time-averaged parameters. This discrepancy is mostly due to a two- to threefold underestimate of the mean profile drag coefficient in prior studies. We also compared our values with the predictions of the same time-averaged models using more accurate kinematic and aerodynamic input parameters based on our high-speed videography measurements. In this case, the time-averaged models tended to overestimate flight

  20. Dynamic stability of an aerodynamically efficient motorcycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Amrit; Limebeer, David J. N.

    2012-08-01

    Motorcycles exhibit two potentially dangerous oscillatory modes known as 'wobble' and 'weave'. The former is reminiscent of supermarket castor shimmy, while the latter is a low frequency 'fish-tailing' motion that involves a combination of rolling, yawing, steering and side-slipping motions. These unwanted dynamic features, which can occur when two-wheeled vehicles are operated at speed, have been studied extensively. The aim of this paper is to use mathematical analysis to identify important stability trends in the on-going design of a novel aerodynamically efficient motorcycle known as the ECOSSE Spirit ES1. A mathematical model of the ES1 is developed using a multi-body dynamics software package called VehicleSim [Anon, VehicleSim Lisp Reference Manual Version 1.0, Mechanical Simulation Corporation, 2008. Available at http://www.carsim.com]. This high-fidelity motorcycle model includes realistic tyre-road contact geometry, a comprehensive tyre model, tyre relaxation and a flexible frame. A parameter set representative of a modern high-performance machine and rider is used. Local stability is investigated via the eigenvalues of the linearised models that are associated with equilibrium points of interest. A comprehensive study of the effects of frame flexibilities, acceleration, aerodynamics and tyre variations is presented, and an optimal passive steering compensator is derived. It is shown that the traditional steering damper cannot be used to stabilise the ES1 over its entire operating speed range. A simple passive compensator, involving an inerter is proposed. Flexibility can be introduced deliberately into various chassis components to change the stability characteristics of the vehicle; the implications of this idea are studied.

  1. Free yaw performance of the Mod-0 large horizontal axis 100 kW wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrigan, R. D.; Viterna, L. A.

    The NASA Mod-0 Large Horizontal Axis 100 kW Wind Turbine was operated in free yaw with an unconed teetered, downwind rotor mounted on a nacelle having 8-1/2 deg tilt. Two series of tests were run, the first series with 19 meter twisted aluminum blades and the second series with 19 meter untwisted steel spar blades with tip control. Rotor speed were nominally 20, 26 and 31 rpm. It was found the nacelle stabilized in free yaw at a yaw angle of between -55 deg to -45 deg was relatively independent of wind speed and was well damped to short term variations in wind direction. Power output of the wind turbine in free yaw, aligned at a large yaw angle, was considerably less than that if the wind turbine were aligned with the wind. For the Mod-0 wind turbine at 26 rpm, the MOSTAB computer code calculations of the free yaw alignment angle and power output compare reasonably well with experimental data. MOSTAB calculations indicate that elimination of tilt and adding coning will improve wind turbine alignment with the wind and that wind shear has a slight detrimental effect on the free yaw alignment angle.

  2. Asymptotic sideslip angle and yaw rate decoupling control in four-wheel steering vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Riccardo; Scalzi, Stefano

    2010-09-01

    This paper shows that, for a four-wheel steering vehicle, a proportional-integral (PI) active front steering control and a PI active rear steering control from the yaw rate error together with an additive feedforward reference signal for the vehicle sideslip angle can asymptotically decouple the lateral velocity and the yaw rate dynamics; that is the control can set arbitrary steady state values for lateral speed and yaw rate at any longitudinal speed. Moreover, the PI controls can suppress oscillatory behaviours by assigning real stable eigenvalues to a widely used linearised model of the vehicle steering dynamics for any value of longitudinal speed in understeering vehicles. In particular, the four PI control parameters are explicitly expressed in terms of the three real eigenvalues to be assigned. No lateral acceleration and no lateral speed measurements are required. The controlled system maintains the well-known advantages of both front and rear active steering controls: higher controllability, enlarged bandwidth for the yaw rate dynamics, suppressed resonances, new stable cornering manoeuvres and improved manoeuvrability. In particular, zero lateral speed may be asymptotically achieved while controlling the yaw rate: in this case comfort is improved since the phase lag between lateral acceleration and yaw rate is reduced. Also zero yaw rate can be asymptotically achieved: in this case additional stable manoeuvres are obtained in obstacle avoidance. Several simulations, including step references and moose tests, are carried out on a standard small SUV CarSim model to explore the robustness with respect to unmodelled effects such as combined lateral and longitudinal tyre forces, pitch, roll and driver dynamics. The simulations confirm the decoupling between the lateral velocity and the yaw rate and show the advantages obtained by the proposed control: reduced lateral speed or reduced yaw rate, suppressed oscillations and new stable manoeuvres.

  3. Cross-axis adaptation of torsional components in the yaw-axis vestibulo-ocular reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trillenberg, P.; Shelhamer, M.; Roberts, D. C.; Zee, D. S.

    2003-01-01

    The three pairs of semicircular canals within the labyrinth are not perfectly aligned with the pulling directions of the six extraocular muscles. Therefore, for a given head movement, the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) depends upon central neural mechanisms that couple the canals to the muscles with the appropriate functional gains in order to generate a response that rotates the eye the correct amount and around the correct axis. A consequence of these neural connections is a cross-axis adaptive capability, which can be stimulated experimentally when head rotation is around one axis and visual motion about another. From this visual-vestibular conflict the brain infers that the slow-phase eye movement is rotating around the wrong axis. We explored the capability of human cross-axis adaptation, using a short-term training paradigm, to determine if torsional eye movements could be elicited by yaw (horizontal) head rotation (where torsion is normally inappropriate). We applied yaw sinusoidal head rotation (+/-10 degrees, 0.33 Hz) and measured eye movement responses in the dark, and before and after adaptation. The adaptation paradigm lasted 45-60 min, and consisted of the identical head motion, coupled with a moving visual scene that required one of several types of eye movements: (1) torsion alone (-Roll); (2) horizontal/torsional, head right/CW torsion (Yaw-Roll); (3) horizontal/torsional, head right/CCW torsion (Yaw+Roll); (4) horizontal, vertical, torsional combined (Yaw+Pitch-Roll); and (5) horizontal and vertical together (Yaw+Pitch). The largest and most significant changes in torsional amplitude occurred in the Yaw-Roll and Yaw+Roll conditions. We conclude that short-term, cross-axis adaptation of torsion is possible but constrained by the complexity of the adaptation task: smaller torsional components are produced if more than one cross-coupling component is required. In contrast, vertical cross-axis components can be easily trained to occur with yaw head

  4. Sensor Systems Collect Critical Aerodynamics Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    With the support of Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts with Dryden Flight Research Center, Tao of Systems Integration Inc. developed sensors and other components that will ultimately form a first-of-its-kind, closed-loop system for detecting, measuring, and controlling aerodynamic forces and moments in flight. The Hampton, Virginia-based company commercialized three of the four planned components, which provide sensing solutions for customers such as Boeing, General Electric, and BMW and are used for applications such as improving wind turbine operation and optimizing air flow from air conditioning systems. The completed system may one day enable flexible-wing aircraft with flight capabilities like those of birds.

  5. A new model for yaw attitude of Global Positioning System satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Sever, Y. E.

    1995-01-01

    Proper modeling of the Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite yaw attitude is important in high-precision applications. A new model for the GPS satellite yaw attitude is introduced that constitutes a significant improvement over the previously available model in terms of efficiency, flexibility, and portability. The model is described in detail, and implementation issues, including the proper estimation strategy, are addressed. The performance of the new model is analyzed, and an error budget is presented. This is the first self-contained description of the GPS yaw attitude model.

  6. Modular multimorphic kinematic arm structure and pitch and yaw joint for same

    DOEpatents

    Martin, H. Lee; Williams, Daniel M.; Holt, W. Eugene

    1989-01-01

    A multimorphic kinematic manipulator arm is provided with seven degrees of freedom and modular kinematic redundancy through identical pitch/yaw, shoulder, elbow and wrist joints and a wrist roll device at the wrist joint, which further provides to the manipulator arm an obstacle avoidance capability. The modular pitch/yaw joints are traction drive devices which provide backlash free operation with smooth torque transmission and enhanced rigidity. A dual input drive arrangement is provided for each joint resulting in a reduction of the load required to be assumed by each drive and providing selective pitch and yaw motions by control of the relative rotational directions of the input drive.

  7. Moment-to-Moment Emotions during Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graesser, Arthur C.; D'Mello, Sidney

    2012-01-01

    Moment-to-moment emotions are affective states that dynamically change during reading and potentially influence comprehension. Researchers have recently identified these emotions and the emotion trajectories in reading, tutoring, and problem solving. The primary learning-centered emotions are boredom, frustration, confusion, flow (engagement),…

  8. Aerodynamic control of NASP-type vehicles through Vortex manipulation. Volume 1: Static water tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, Carlos J.; Ng, T. Terry; Ong, Lih-Yenn; Malcolm, Gerald N.

    1993-01-01

    Water tunnel tests were conducted on a NASP-type configuration to evaluate different pneumatic Forebody Vortex Control (FVC) methods. Flow visualization and yawing moment measurements were performed at angles of attack from 0 deg to 30 deg. The pneumatic techniques tested included jet and slot blowing. In general, blowing can be used efficiently to manipulate the forebody vortices at angles of attack greater than 20 deg. These vortices are naturally symmetric up to alpha = 25 deg and asymmetric between 25 deg and 30 deg angle of attack. Results indicate that tangential aft jet blowing is the most promising method for this configuration. Aft jet blowing produces a yawing moment towards the blowing side and the trends with blowing rate are well behaved. The size of the nozzle is not the dominant factor in the blowing process; the change in the blowing 'momentum,' i.e., the product of the mass flow rate and the velocity of the jet, appears to be the important parameter in the water tunnel (incompressible and unchoked flow at the nozzle exit). Forward jet blowing is very unpredictable and sensitive to mass flow rate changes. Slot blowing (with the exception of very low blowing rates) acts as a flow 'separator'; it promotes early separation on the blow side, producing a yawing moment toward the non-blowing side for the C(sub mu) range investigated.

  9. The execution of wind energy projects 1986 - 1992 between China Aerodynamics Research and Development Centre (CARDC) and The Aeronautical Research Institute of Sweden (FFA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dexin, He; Thor, Sven-Erik

    1993-06-01

    The execution of the first phase agreement on wind energy projects, covering the period from 1986 to 1992, is summarized. The following are addressed: wind tunnel tests of a 2.2 m and 2.8 m diameter turbine, a 5.35 m turbine in stationary yaw operation, pressure measurements, wall interference correction, a 5.35 m diameter turbine under yaw control, visualization of the flow on the rotating blade. It was concluded that the yaw characteristics (including aerodynamic performance and control characteristics) and three dimensional flow of the wind turbine chosen as cooperation items have significant engineering application background and academic value. The results are applicable for medium as well as large size wind turbines and has a positive effect on the development of wind energy technology.

  10. Description of a Computer Program Written for Approach and Landing Test Post Flight Data Extraction of Proximity Separation Aerodynamic Coefficients and Aerodynamic Data Base Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homan, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    A computer program written to calculate the proximity aerodynamic force and moment coefficients of the Orbiter/Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) vehicles based on flight instrumentation is described. The ground reduced aerodynamic coefficients and instrumentation errors (GRACIE) program was developed as a tool to aid in flight test verification of the Orbiter/SCA separation aerodynamic data base. The program calculates the force and moment coefficients of each vehicle in proximity to the other, using the load measurement system data, flight instrumentation data and the vehicle mass properties. The uncertainty in each coefficient is determined, based on the quoted instrumentation accuracies. A subroutine manipulates the Orbiter/747 Carrier Separation Aerodynamic Data Book to calculate a comparable set of predicted coefficients for comparison to the calculated flight test data.

  11. Exploring bird aerodynamics using radio-controlled models.

    PubMed

    Hoey, Robert G

    2010-12-01

    A series of radio-controlled glider models was constructed by duplicating the aerodynamic shape of soaring birds (raven, turkey vulture, seagull and pelican). Controlled tests were conducted to determine the level of longitudinal and lateral-directional static stability, and to identify the characteristics that allowed flight without a vertical tail. The use of tail-tilt for controlling small bank-angle changes, as observed in soaring birds, was verified. Subsequent tests, using wing-tip ailerons, inferred that birds use a three-dimensional flow pattern around the wing tip (wing tip vortices) to control adverse yaw and to create a small amount of forward thrust in gliding flight. PMID:21098962

  12. Powered-Lift Aerodynamics and Acoustics. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Powered lift technology is reviewed. Topics covered include: (1) high lift aerodynamics; (2) high speed and cruise aerodynamics; (3) acoustics; (4) propulsion aerodynamics and acoustics; (5) aerodynamic and acoustic loads; and (6) full-scale and flight research.

  13. Applied computational aerodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Henne, P.A.

    1990-01-01

    The present volume discusses the original development of the panel method, the mapping solutions and singularity distributions of linear potential schemes, the capabilities of full-potential, Euler, and Navier-Stokes schemes, the use of the grid-generation methodology in applied aerodynamics, subsonic airfoil design, inverse airfoil design for transonic applications, the divergent trailing-edge airfoil innovation in CFD, Euler and potential computational results for selected aerodynamic configurations, and the application of CFD to wing high-lift systems. Also discussed are high-lift wing modifications for an advanced-capability EA-6B aircraft, Navier-Stokes methods for internal and integrated propulsion system flow predictions, the use of zonal techniques for analysis of rotor-stator interaction, CFD applications to complex configurations, CFD applications in component aerodynamic design of the V-22, Navier-Stokes computations of a complete F-16, CFD at supersonic/hypersonic speeds, and future CFD developments.

  14. Development of Nonlinear Aerodynamic Models for Unsteady Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Suei

    In the current study, a method based on Fourier analysis is developed to analyze the force and moment data obtained in large amplitude forced oscillation tests at high angles of attack. The aerodynamic models for normal force, lift, drag and pitching moment coefficients are built up from a set of aerodynamic responses to harmonic motions at different frequencies. Based on the aerodynamic models of harmonic data, the indicial responses are formed. The final expressions for the models involve time integrals of the indicial type advocated by Tobak and Schiff. Results from linear two- and three-dimensional unsteady aerodynamic theories as well as test data for a 70-deg delta wing are used to verify the models. It is shown that the present modeling method is accurate in producing the aerodynamic responses to harmonic motions and the ramp type motions. The model also produces correct trend for a 70-deg delta wing in harmonic motion with different mean angles-of-attack. However, the current model cannot be used to extrapolate data to higher angles-of-attack than that of the harmonic motions which form the aerodynamic model. For linear ramp motions, a special method is used to calculate the corresponding frequency and phase angle at a given time. The calculated results from modeling show higher lift peak for linear ramp motion than for harmonic ramp motion. The current model also shows reasonably good results for the lift responses at different mean angles of attack. To the author's knowledge, the current methodology of aerodynamic modeling is the first to produce the harmonic oscillation responses at high angle-of-attack and the ramp type motions.

  15. Compressible Laminar Boundary Layer over a Yawed Infinite Cylinder with Heat Transfer and Arbitrary Prandtl Number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reshotko, Eli; Beckwith, Ivan E

    1958-01-01

    The equations are presented for the development of the compressible laminar boundary layer over a yawed infinite cylinder. For compressible flow with a pressure gradient the chordwise and spanwise flows are not independent. Using the Stewartson transformation and a linear viscosity-temperature relation yields a set of three simultaneous ordinary differential equations in a form yielding similar solutions. These equations are solved for stagnation-line flow for surface temperatures from zero to twice the free-stream stagnation temperature and for a wide range of yaw angle and free-stream Mach number. The results indicate that the effect of yaw on the heat-transfer coefficient at the stagnation line depends markedly on the free-stream Mach number. An unusual result of the solutions is that for large yaw angles and stream Mach numbers the chordwise velocity within the boundary layer exceeds the local external chordwise velocity, even for a highly cooled wall.

  16. Motion transitions of falling plates via quasisteady aerodynamics.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ruifeng; Wang, Lifeng

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we study the dynamics of freely falling plates based on the Kirchhoff equation and the quasisteady aerodynamic model. Motion transitions among fluttering, tumbling along a cusp-like trajectory, irregular, and tumbling along a straight trajectory are obtained by solving the dynamical equations. Phase diagrams spanning between the nondimensional moment of inertia and aerodynamic coefficients or aspect ratio are built to identify regimes for these falling styles. We also investigate the stability of fixed points and bifurcation scenarios. It is found that the transitions are all heteroclinic bifurcations and the influence of the fixed-point stability is local.

  17. Nonlinear aerodynamic wing design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, Ellwood

    1985-01-01

    The applicability of new nonlinear theoretical techniques is demonstrated for supersonic wing design. The new technology was utilized to define outboard panels for an existing advanced tactical fighter model. Mach 1.6 maneuver point design and multi-operating point compromise surfaces were developed and tested. High aerodynamic efficiency was achieved at the design conditions. A corollary result was that only modest supersonic penalties were incurred to meet multiple aerodynamic requirements. The nonlinear potential analysis of a practical configuration arrangement correlated well with experimental data.

  18. Computational aerodynamics and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballhaus, W. F., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The role of computational aerodynamics in design is reviewed with attention given to the design process; the proper role of computations; the importance of calibration, interpretation, and verification; the usefulness of a given computational capability; and the marketing of new codes. Examples of computational aerodynamics in design are given with particular emphasis on the Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology. Finally, future prospects are noted, with consideration given to the role of advanced computers, advances in numerical solution techniques, turbulence models, complex geometries, and computational design procedures. Previously announced in STAR as N82-33348

  19. Investigation of passive blade cyclic pitch variation using an automatic yaw control system. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hohenemser, K.H.; Swift, A.H.P.

    1982-08-01

    The investigation of passive cyclic pitch variation using an automatic yaw control system made use of the test equipment and of the results of an earlier study. The atmospheric test equipment consisted of a horizontal axis wind turbine with vane controlled upwind two-bladed rotor of 7.6 m (25 ft) diameter having passive cyclic pitch variation. An automatically triggered electric furl actuator prevented over-speeds and over-torques by furling the rotor which means yawing the rotor out of the winds. The atmospheric test equipment was modified to accept two alternative fully automatic yaw or furl control systems. The first system was of the active type and included a hydraulic single acting constant speed governor as it is used for aircraft propeller controls. Upon reaching the rotor speed limit, the governor delivered pressurized oil to a hydraulic furl actuator which then overcame the unfurling spring force and furled the rotor. When the rotor speed fell below the set value, the governor admitted oil flow from the hydraulic actuator into the oil reservoir and the rotor was unfurled by the spring. The second automatic control system was of a purely mechanical passive type. The rotor thrust, which was laterally off-set from the yaw axis, in combination with a yawing component of the rotor torque due to uptilt of the rotor axis overcame at rated power the unfurling spring and furled the rotor. The analytically predicted and experimentally substantiated negative rotor yaw damping would cause excessive furling rates unless alleviated by a furl damper. The tests were supported by a specially developed dynamic yawing analysis. Both analysis and tests indicated that the two-bladed passive cyclic pitch wind rotor can be effectively torque or speed limited by rotor yaw control systems which are less costly and more reliable than the conventional blade feathering control systems.

  20. A new yaw-attitude model for eclipsing GLONASS-M satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilssner, Florian; Springer, Tim; Dow, John M.

    A proper modeling of the satellite yaw-attitude is a prerequisite for high-precision Global Nav-igation Satellite System (GNSS) positioning and poses a particular challenge during periods when the satellite orbital planes are partially eclipsed. Whereas a lot of effort has been put in to examine the yaw-attitude control of GPS satellites that are in eclipsing orbits, hardly anything is known so far about the yaw-attitude behavior of eclipsing GLONASS-M satellites. In order to explore the GLONASS-M attitude laws during eclipse seasons, we have studied the evolution of the horizontal satellite antenna offset estimates in the vicinity of the orbit's noon and midnight points using a technique that we refer to as "reverse kinematic point position-ing". In this approach, we keep all relevant global geodetic parameters fixed and estimate the satellite clock and antenna phase center positions epoch-by-epoch using 30-second observation and clock data from a global multi-GNSS ground station network. The estimated horizon-tal antenna phase center offsets implicitly provide the spacecraft's yaw-attitude. The insights gained from studying the yaw-angle behavior have led to the development of the very first yaw-attitude model for eclipsing GLONASS-M satellites. The derived yaw-attitude model proves to be much better than the nominal yaw-attitude standard model commonly being used by today's GLONASS-capable GNSS software packages as it reduces the observation residuals of eclipsing satellites down to the normal level of non-eclipsing satellites and thereby prevents a multitude of measurements from being incorrectly identified as outliers. It facilitates continu-ous satellite clock estimation during eclipse and improves in particular the results of kinematic point positioning of ground-based receivers.

  1. Comparison of selected lift and sideslip characteristics of the Ayres Thrush S2R-800, winglets off and winglets on, to full-scale wind-tunnel data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roskam, J.; Williams, M.

    1981-01-01

    All calculations were done in the stability axes system. The winglets used were constructed of modified GA(w)-2 airfoils. Aerodynamic characteristics discussed include: angle of attack; lift-curve slope; side force; yawing moments; rolling moments.

  2. Supersonic Aerodynamic Characteristics of Blunt Body Trim Tab Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korzun, Ashley M.; Murphy, Kelly J.; Edquist, Karl T.

    2013-01-01

    Trim tabs are aerodynamic control surfaces that can allow an entry vehicle to meet aerodynamic performance requirements while reducing or eliminating the use of ballast mass and providing a capability to modulate the lift-to-drag ratio during entry. Force and moment data were obtained on 38 unique, blunt body trim tab configurations in the NASA Langley Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. The data were used to parametrically assess the supersonic aerodynamic performance of trim tabs and to understand the influence of tab area, cant angle, and aspect ratio. Across the range of conditions tested (Mach numbers of 2.5, 3.5, and 4.5; angles of attack from -4deg to +20deg; angles of sideslip from 0deg to +8deg), the effects of varying tab area and tab cant angle were found to be much more significant than effects from varying tab aspect ratio. Aerodynamic characteristics exhibited variation with Mach number and forebody geometry over the range of conditions tested. Overall, the results demonstrate that trim tabs are a viable approach to satisfy aerodynamic performance requirements of blunt body entry vehicles with minimal ballast mass. For a 70deg sphere-cone, a tab with 3% area of the forebody and canted approximately 35deg with no ballast mass was found to give the same trim aerodynamics as a baseline model with ballast mass that was 5% of the total entry mass.

  3. Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test: Trajectory, Atmosphere, and Aerodynamics Reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutty, Prasad; Karlgaard, Christopher D.; Blood, Eric M.; O'Farrell, Clara; Ginn, Jason M.; Shoenenberger, Mark; Dutta, Soumyo

    2015-01-01

    The Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test is a full-scale flight test of a Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator, which is part of the Low Density Supersonic Decelerator technology development project. The purpose of the project is to develop and mature aerodynamic decelerator technologies for landing large mass payloads on the surface of Mars. The technologies include a Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator and Supersonic Parachutes. The first Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test occurred on June 28th, 2014 at the Pacific Missile Range Facility. This test was used to validate the test architecture for future missions. The flight was a success and, in addition, was able to acquire data on the aerodynamic performance of the supersonic inflatable decelerator. This paper describes the instrumentation, analysis techniques, and acquired flight test data utilized to reconstruct the vehicle trajectory, atmosphere, and aerodynamics. The results of the reconstruction show significantly higher lofting of the trajectory, which can partially be explained by off-nominal booster motor performance. The reconstructed vehicle force and moment coefficients fall well within pre-flight predictions. A parameter identification analysis indicates that the vehicle displayed greater aerodynamic static stability than seen in pre-flight computational predictions and ballistic range tests.

  4. Static performance of nonaxisymmetric nozzles with yaw thrust-vectoring vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Mary L.; Berrier, Bobby L.

    1988-01-01

    A static test was conducted in the static test facility of the Langley 16 ft Transonic Tunnel to evaluate the effects of post exit vane vectoring on nonaxisymmetric nozzles. Three baseline nozzles were tested: an unvectored two dimensional convergent nozzle, an unvectored two dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle, and a pitch vectored two dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle. Each nozzle geometry was tested with 3 exit aspect ratios (exit width divided by exit height) of 1.5, 2.5 and 4.0. Two post exit yaw vanes were externally mounted on the nozzle sidewalls at the nozzle exit to generate yaw thrust vectoring. Vane deflection angle (0, -20 and -30 deg), vane planform and vane curvature were varied during the test. Results indicate that the post exit vane concept produced resultant yaw vector angles which were always smaller than the geometric yaw vector angle. Losses in resultant thrust ratio increased with the magnitude of resultant yaw vector angle. The widest post exit vane produced the largest degree of flow turning, but vane curvature had little effect on thrust vectoring. Pitch vectoring was independent of yaw vectoring, indicating that multiaxis thrust vectoring is feasible for the nozzle concepts tested.

  5. Aerodynamics for the Mars Phoenix Entry Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edquist, Karl T.; Desai, Prasun N.; Schoenenberger, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Pre-flight aerodynamics data for the Mars Phoenix entry capsule are presented. The aerodynamic coefficients were generated as a function of total angle-of-attack and either Knudsen number, velocity, or Mach number, depending on the flight regime. The database was constructed using continuum flowfield computations and data from the Mars Exploration Rover and Viking programs. Hypersonic and supersonic static coefficients were derived from Navier-Stokes solutions on a pre-flight design trajectory. High-altitude data (free-molecular and transitional regimes) and dynamic pitch damping characteristics were taken from Mars Exploration Rover analysis and testing. Transonic static coefficients from Viking wind tunnel tests were used for capsule aerodynamics under the parachute. Static instabilities were predicted at two points along the reference trajectory and were verified by reconstructed flight data. During the hypersonic instability, the capsule was predicted to trim at angles as high as 2.5 deg with an on-axis center-of-gravity. Trim angles were predicted for off-nominal pitching moment (4.2 deg peak) and a 5 mm off-axis center-ofgravity (4.8 deg peak). Finally, hypersonic static coefficient sensitivities to atmospheric density were predicted to be within uncertainty bounds.

  6. Aerodynamics of Race Cars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Race car performance depends on elements such as the engine, tires, suspension, road, aerodynamics, and of course the driver. In recent years, however, vehicle aerodynamics gained increased attention, mainly due to the utilization of the negative lift (downforce) principle, yielding several important performance improvements. This review briefly explains the significance of the aerodynamic downforce and how it improves race car performance. After this short introduction various methods to generate downforce such as inverted wings, diffusers, and vortex generators are discussed. Due to the complex geometry of these vehicles, the aerodynamic interaction between the various body components is significant, resulting in vortex flows and lifting surface shapes unlike traditional airplane wings. Typical design tools such as wind tunnel testing, computational fluid dynamics, and track testing, and their relevance to race car development, are discussed as well. In spite of the tremendous progress of these design tools (due to better instrumentation, communication, and computational power), the fluid dynamic phenomenon is still highly nonlinear, and predicting the effect of a particular modification is not always trouble free. Several examples covering a wide range of vehicle shapes (e.g., from stock cars to open-wheel race cars) are presented to demonstrate this nonlinear nature of the flow field.

  7. Self-motion sensitivity to visual yaw rotations in humans.

    PubMed

    Nesti, Alessandro; Beykirch, Karl A; Pretto, Paolo; Bülthoff, Heinrich H

    2015-03-01

    While moving through the environment, humans use vision to discriminate different self-motion intensities and to control their actions (e.g. maintaining balance or controlling a vehicle). How the intensity of visual stimuli affects self-motion perception is an open, yet important, question. In this study, we investigate the human ability to discriminate perceived velocities of visually induced illusory self-motion (vection) around the vertical (yaw) axis. Stimuli, generated using a projection screen (70 × 90 deg field of view), consist of a natural virtual environment (360 deg panoramic colour picture of a forest) rotating at constant velocity. Participants control stimulus duration to allow for a complete vection illusion to occur in every single trial. In a two-interval forced-choice task, participants discriminate a reference motion from a comparison motion, adjusted after every presentation, by indicating which rotation feels stronger. Motion sensitivity is measured as the smallest perceivable change in stimulus intensity (differential threshold) for eight participants at five rotation velocities (5, 15, 30, 45 and 60 deg/s). Differential thresholds for circular vection increase with stimulus velocity, following a trend well described by a power law with an exponent of 0.64. The time necessary for complete vection to arise is slightly but significantly longer for the first stimulus presentation (average 11.56 s) than for the second (9.13 s) and does not depend on stimulus velocity. Results suggest that lower differential thresholds (higher sensitivity) are associated with smaller rotations, because they occur more frequently during everyday experience. Moreover, results also suggest that vection is facilitated by a recent exposure, possibly related to visual motion after-effect. PMID:25511163

  8. Modeling of Aerodynamic Force Acting in Tunnel for Analysis of Riding Comfort in a Train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikko, Satoshi; Tanifuji, Katsuya; Sakanoue, Kei; Nanba, Kouichiro

    In this paper, we aimed to model the aerodynamic force that acts on a train running at high speed in a tunnel. An analytical model of the aerodynamic force is developed from pressure data measured on car-body sides of a test train running at the maximum revenue operation speed. The simulation of an 8-car train running while being subjected to the modeled aerodynamic force gives the following results. The simulated car-body vibration corresponds to the actual vibration both qualitatively and quantitatively for the cars at the rear of the train. The separation of the airflow at the tail-end of the train increases the yawing vibration of the tail-end car while it has little effect on the car-body vibration of the adjoining car. Also, the effect of the moving velocity of the aerodynamic force on the car-body vibration is clarified that the simulation under the assumption of a stationary aerodynamic force can markedly increase the car-body vibration.

  9. Aerodynamic Simulation of Runback Ice Accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Whalen, Edward A.; Busch, Greg T.; Bragg, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    This report presents the results of recent investigations into the aerodynamics of simulated runback ice accretion on airfoils. Aerodynamic tests were performed on a full-scale model using a high-fidelity, ice-casting simulation at near-flight Reynolds (Re) number. The ice-casting simulation was attached to the leading edge of a 72-in. (1828.8-mm ) chord NACA 23012 airfoil model. Aerodynamic performance tests were conducted at the ONERA F1 pressurized wind tunnel over a Reynolds number range of 4.7?10(exp 6) to 16.0?10(exp 6) and a Mach (M) number ran ge of 0.10 to 0.28. For Re = 16.0?10(exp 6) and M = 0.20, the simulated runback ice accretion on the airfoil decreased the maximum lift coe fficient from 1.82 to 1.51 and decreased the stalling angle of attack from 18.1deg to 15.0deg. The pitching-moment slope was also increased and the drag coefficient was increased by more than a factor of two. In general, the performance effects were insensitive to Reynolds numb er and Mach number changes over the range tested. Follow-on, subscale aerodynamic tests were conducted on a quarter-scale NACA 23012 model (18-in. (457.2-mm) chord) at Re = 1.8?10(exp 6) and M = 0.18, using low-fidelity, geometrically scaled simulations of the full-scale castin g. It was found that simple, two-dimensional simulations of the upper- and lower-surface runback ridges provided the best representation of the full-scale, high Reynolds number iced-airfoil aerodynamics, whereas higher-fidelity simulations resulted in larger performance degrada tions. The experimental results were used to define a new subclassification of spanwise ridge ice that distinguishes between short and tall ridges. This subclassification is based upon the flow field and resulting aerodynamic characteristics, regardless of the physical size of the ridge and the ice-accretion mechanism.

  10. Investigation of the Stability of Very Flat Spins and Analysis of Effects of Applying various Moments Utilizing the Three Moment Equations of Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klinar, Walter J.; Grantham, William D.

    1959-01-01

    Based on linearized equations of motion utilizing only the three moment equations and assuming only flat-spin conditions, it appears that contemporary designs (with the moment of inertia about the wing axis I(sub Y) considerably greater than the moment of inertia about the fuselage axis I(sub X) having positive values of C(sub l, sub p) (rolling-moment coefficient due to rolling) or positive values of C(sub l, sub beta) (rolling-moment coefficient due to sideslip) will probably not have a stable spin in the flat-spin region near an angle of attack of 90 deg. If the damping in pitch in flat-spin attitudes is zero, stable flat-spin conditions may not be possible on an airplane having the mass primarily distributed along the wings. The effect of moving ailerons with the spin or the effect of applying a positive pitching moment producing recovery for contemporary fighter designs will be greatest for large negative values of C(sub n, sub beta) (yawing-moment coefficient due to sideslip). In addition, for a certain critical value of positive C(sub n, sub beta), the rolling moment applied by moving ailerons with the spin or the application of a positive pitching moment will have no effect on reducing the spin rate.

  11. Global Nonlinear Parametric Modeling with Application to F-16 Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    1997-01-01

    A global nonlinear parametric modeling technique is described and demonstrated. The technique uses multivariate orthogonal modeling functions generated from the data to determine nonlinear model structure, then expands each retained modeling function into an ordinary multivariate polynomial. The final model form is a finite multivariate power series expansion for the dependent variable in terms of the independent variables. Partial derivatives of the identified models can be used to assemble globally valid linear parameter varying models. The technique is demonstrated by identifying global nonlinear parametric models for nondimensional aerodynamic force and moment coefficients from a subsonic wind tunnel database for the F-16 fighter aircraft. Results show less than 10% difference between wind tunnel aerodynamic data and the nonlinear parameterized model for a simulated doublet maneuver at moderate angle of attack. Analysis indicated that the global nonlinear parametric models adequately captured the multivariate nonlinear aerodynamic functional dependence.

  12. Global Nonlinear Parametric Modeling with Application to F-16 Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    1998-01-01

    A global nonlinear parametric modeling technique is described and demonstrated. The technique uses multivariate orthogonal modeling functions generated from the data to determine nonlinear model structure, then expands each retained modeling function into an ordinary multivariate polynomial. The final model form is a finite multivariate power series expansion for the dependent variable in terms of the independent variables. Partial derivatives of the identified models can be used to assemble globally valid linear parameter varying models. The technique is demonstrated by identifying global nonlinear parametric models for nondimensional aerodynamic force and moment coefficients from a subsonic wind tunnel database for the F-16 fighter aircraft. Results show less than 10% difference between wind tunnel aerodynamic data and the nonlinear parameterized model for a simulated doublet maneuver at moderate angle of attack. Analysis indicated that the global nonlinear parametric models adequately captured the multivariate nonlinear aerodynamic functional dependence.

  13. Investigation of Aerodynamic Capabilities of Flying Fish in Gliding Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, H.; Choi, H.

    In the present study, we experimentally investigate the aerodynamic capabilities of flying fish. We consider four different flying fish models, which are darkedged-wing flying fishes stuffed in actual gliding posture. Some morphological parameters of flying fish such as lateral dihedral angle of pectoral fins, incidence angles of pectoral and pelvic fins are considered to examine their effect on the aerodynamic performance. We directly measure the aerodynamic properties (lift, drag, and pitching moment) for different morphological parameters of flying fish models. For the present flying fish models, the maximum lift coefficient and lift-to-drag ratio are similar to those of medium-sized birds such as the vulture, nighthawk and petrel. The pectoral fins are found to enhance the lift-to-drag ratio and the longitudinal static stability of gliding flight. On the other hand, the lift coefficient and lift-to-drag ratio decrease with increasing lateral dihedral angle of pectoral fins.

  14. Wind turbine with automatic pitch and yaw control

    DOEpatents

    Cheney, Jr., Marvin Chapin; Spierings, Petrus A. M.

    1978-01-01

    A wind turbine having a flexible central beam member supporting aerodynamic blades at opposite ends thereof and fabricated of uni-directional high tensile strength material bonded together into beam form so that the beam is lightweight, and has high tensile strength to carry the blade centrifugal loads, low shear modulus to permit torsional twisting thereof for turbine speed control purposes, and adequate bending stiffness to permit out-of-plane deflection thereof for turbine yard control purposes. A selectively off-set weighted pendulum member is pivotally connected to the turbine and connected to the beam or blade so as to cause torsional twisting thereof in response to centrifugal loading of the pendulum member for turbine speed control purposes.

  15. Identification of aerodynamic indicial functions using flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, N. K.; Iliff, K. W.

    1982-01-01

    It is pointed out that the use of indicial function representation provides a model superior to the aerodynamic derivative model. Specific derivatives can be approximated from the indicial models. The model can also be used to compute equivalent stability and control parameters not usually available from flight data. It is shown that derivatives regarding the angle-of-attack and the side slip angle can be derived directly from the indicial functions without any identifiability problem. Attention is given to the pitch moment coefficient, linear indicial function representation, the identification problem for the pitch moment equation, the identifiability of linear systems, parametric representations of the indicial functions, an identification technique, angle-of-attack and pitch rate dynamics in the pitch plane, multivariate linear models, nonlinear aerodynamic indicial functions, measurement system accuracy, and poststall and spin-entry data from a scaled research vehicle.

  16. Assessment of 3D aerodynamic effects on the behaviour of floating wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manolas, D.; Riziotis, V.; Voutsinas, S.

    2014-12-01

    Current state-of-art models for floating wind turbines are built by merging separate modules addressing the four basic aspects leading to a compound hydro-servo-aero-elastic time domain solver. While current state-of-the-art models differ in many aspects, they all use the blade element momentum (BEM) aerodynamic modelling. Due to its low cost, BEM is the standard choice for design purposes. However the use of BEM entails several semi-empirical corrections and add-ons that need reconsideration and recalibration when new features appear. For floating wind turbines, the effect of the floater motions is such a new feature. In the present paper, this aspect is investigated by comparing BEM based results against 3D free-wake simulations. Deterministic as well as stochastic simulations are presented in pure aerodynamic and full aeroelastic context. It is confirmed that asymmetric inflow originating from yaw misalignment and shear give significant differences reflected on mean values and amplitudes.

  17. Winglet and long duct nacelle aerodynamic development for DC-10 derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, A. B.

    1978-01-01

    Advanced technology for application to the Douglas DC-10 transport is discussed. Results of wind tunnel tests indicate that the winglet offers substantial cruise drag reduction with less wing root bending moment penalty than a wing-tip extension of the same effectiveness and that the long duct nacelle offers substantial drag reduction potential as a result of aerodynamic and propulsion improvements. The aerodynamic design and test of the nacelle and pylon installation are described.

  18. HYSHOT-2 Aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, T.; Owen, R.; Walton, C.

    2005-02-01

    The scramjet flight test Hyshot-2, flew on the 30 July 2002. The programme, led by the University of Queensland, had the primary objective of obtaining supersonic combustion data in flight for comparison with measurements made in shock tunnels. QinetiQ was one of the sponsors, and also provided aerodynamic data and trajectory predictions for the ballistic re-entry of the spinning sounding rocket. The unconventional missile geometry created by the nose-mounted asymmetric-scramjet in conjunction with the high angle of attack during re-entry makes the problem interesting. This paper presents the wind tunnel measurements and aerodynamic calculations used as input for the trajectory prediction. Indirect comparison is made with data obtained in the Hyshot-2 flight using a 6 degree-of-freedom trajectory simulation.

  19. Rarefied-flow aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, J. Leith

    1992-01-01

    Means for relatively simple and quick procedures are examined for estimating aerodynamic coefficients of lifting reentry vehicles. The methods developed allow aerospace designers not only to evaluate the aerodynamics of specific shapes but also to optimize shapes under given constraints. The analysis was also studied of the effect of thermomolecular flow on pressures measured by an orifice near the nose of a Space Shuttle Orbiter at altitudes above 75 km. It was shown that pressures corrected for thermomolecular flow effect are in good agreement with values predicted by independent theoretical methods. An incidental product was the insight gained about the free molecular thermal accommodation coefficient applicable under 'real' conditions of high speed flow in the Earth's atmosphere. The results are presented as abstracts of referenced papers. One reference paper is presented in its entirety.

  20. Advanced Aerodynamic Control Effectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    1999-01-01

    A 1990 research program that focused on the development of advanced aerodynamic control effectors (AACE) for military aircraft has been reviewed and summarized. Data are presented for advanced planform, flow control, and surface contouring technologies. The data show significant increases in lift, reductions in drag, and increased control power, compared to typical aerodynamic designs. The results presented also highlighted the importance of planform selection in the design of a control effector suite. Planform data showed that dramatic increases in lift (greater than 25%) can be achieved with multiple wings and a sawtooth forebody. Passive porosity and micro drag generator control effector data showed control power levels exceeding that available from typical effectors (moving surfaces). Application of an advanced planform to a tailless concept showed benefits of similar magnitude as those observed in the generic studies.

  1. Unsteady Aerodynamic Flow Control of a Suspended Axisymmetric Moving Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Thomas; Vukasinovic, Bojan; Glezer, Ari

    2011-11-01

    The aerodynamic forces on an axisymmetric wind tunnel model are altered by fluidic interaction of an azimuthal array of integrated synthetic jet actuators with the cross flow. Four-quadrant actuators are integrated into a Coanda surface on the aft section of the body, and the jets emanate from narrow, azimuthally segmented slots equally distributed around the model's perimeter. The model is suspended in the tunnel using eight wires each comprising miniature in-line force sensors and shape-memory-alloy (SMA) strands that are used to control the instantaneous forces and moments on the model and its orientation. The interaction of the actuation jets with the flow over the moving model is investigated using PIV and time-resolved force measurements to assess the transitory aerodynamic loading effected by coupling between the induced motion of the aerodynamic surface and the fluid dynamics that is driven by the actuation. It is shown that these interactions can lead to effective control of the aerodynamic forces and moments, and thereby of the model's motion. Supported by ARO.

  2. Aerodynamic noise sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munin, A. G.; Kuznetsov, V. M.; Leontev, E. A.

    A general theory is developed for aerodynamic sound generation and its propagation in an inhomogeneous medium. Results of theoretical and experimental studies of the acoustic characteristics of jets are discussed, and a solution is presented to the problem concerning the noise from a section, free rotor, and a rotor located inside a channel. Sound propagation in a channel with flow and selection of soundproofing liners for the channel walls are also discussed.

  3. Aerodynamic forces induced by controlled transitory flow on a body of revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinehart, Christopher S.

    The aerodynamic forces and moments on an axisymmetric body of revolution are controlled in a low-speed wind tunnel by induced local flow attachment. Control is effected by an array of aft-facing synthetic jets emanating from narrow, azimuthally segmented slots embedded within an axisymmetric backward facing step. The actuation results in a localized, segmented vectoring of the separated base flow along a rear Coanda surface and induced asymmetric aerodynamic forces and moments. The observed effects are investigated in both quasi-steady and transient states, with emphasis on parametric dependence. It is shown that the magnitude of the effected forces can be substantially increased by slight variations of the Coanda surface geometry. Force and velocity measurements are used to elucidate the mechanisms by which the synthetic jets produce asymmetric aerodynamic forces and moments, demonstrating a novel method to steer axisymmetric bodies during flight.

  4. GASP- General Aviation Synthesis Program. Volume 3: Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hague, D.

    1978-01-01

    Aerodynamics calculations are treated in routines which concern moments as they vary with flight conditions and attitude. The subroutines discussed: (1) compute component equivalent flat plate and wetted areas and profile drag; (2) print and plot low and high speed drag polars; (3) determine life coefficient or angle of attack; (4) determine drag coefficient; (5) determine maximum lift coefficient and drag increment for various flap types and flap settings; and (6) determine required lift coefficient and drag coefficient in cruise flight.

  5. The face inversion effect following pitch and yaw rotations: investigating the boundaries of holistic processing.

    PubMed

    Favelle, Simone K; Palmisano, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Upright faces are thought to be processed holistically. However, the range of views within which holistic processing occurs is unknown. Recent research by McKone (2008) suggests that holistic processing occurs for all yaw-rotated face views (i.e., full-face through to profile). Here we examined whether holistic processing occurs for pitch, as well as yaw, rotated face views. In this face recognition experiment: (i) participants made same/different judgments about two sequentially presented faces (either both upright or both inverted); (ii) the test face was pitch/yaw rotated by between 0° and 75° from the encoding face (always a full-face view). Our logic was as follows: if a particular pitch/yaw-rotated face view is being processed holistically when upright, then this processing should be disrupted by inversion. Consistent with previous research, significant face inversion effects (FIEs) were found for all yaw-rotated views. However, while FIEs were found for pitch rotations up to 45°, none were observed for 75° pitch rotations (rotated either above or below the full face). We conclude that holistic processing does not occur for all views of upright faces (e.g., not for uncommon pitch rotated views), only those that can be matched to a generic global representation of a face.

  6. Inversion of triton moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clare, R. B.; Levinger, J. S.

    1981-02-01

    We use the formalism of hyperspherical harmonics to calculate several moments for the triton photoeffect, for a Volkov spin-independent potential. First, we improve the accuracy of Maleki's calculations of the moments σ2 and σ3 by including more terms in the hyperspherical expansion. We also calculate moments σ0 and σ1 for a Serber mixture. We find reasonable agreement between our moments found by sum rules and those found from the cross sections calculated by Fang et al. and Levinger-Fitzgibbon. We then develop a technique of inversion of a finite number of moments by making the assumption that the cross section can be written as a sum of several Laguerre polynomials multiplied by a decreasing exponential. We test our inversion technique successfully on several model potentials. We then modify it and apply it to the five moments (σ-1 to σ3) for a force without exchange, and find fair agreement with Fang's values of the cross section. Finally, we apply the inversion technique to our three moments (σ-1,σ0,and σ1) for a Serber mixture, and find reasonable agreement with Gorbunov's measurements of the 3He photoeffect. NUCLEAR REACTIONS Triton photoeffects, hyperspherical harmonics, moments of photoeffect, inversion of moments.

  7. Design, aerodynamics and autonomy of the DelFly.

    PubMed

    de Croon, G C H E; Groen, M A; De Wagter, C; Remes, B; Ruijsink, R; van Oudheusden, B W

    2012-06-01

    One of the major challenges in robotics is to develop a fly-like robot that can autonomously fly around in unknown environments. In this paper, we discuss the current state of the DelFly project, in which we follow a top-down approach to ever smaller and more autonomous ornithopters. The presented findings concerning the design, aerodynamics and autonomy of the DelFly illustrate some of the properties of the top-down approach, which allows the identification and resolution of issues that also play a role at smaller scales. A parametric variation of the wing stiffener layout produced a 5% more power-efficient wing. An experimental aerodynamic investigation revealed that this could be associated with an improved stiffness of the wing, while further providing evidence of the vortex development during the flap cycle. The presented experiments resulted in an improvement in the generated lift, allowing the inclusion of a yaw rate gyro, pressure sensor and microcontroller onboard the DelFly. The autonomy of the DelFly is expanded by achieving (1) an improved turning logic to obtain better vision-based obstacle avoidance performance in environments with varying texture and (2) successful onboard height control based on the pressure sensor. PMID:22617112

  8. Design, aerodynamics and autonomy of the DelFly.

    PubMed

    de Croon, G C H E; Groen, M A; De Wagter, C; Remes, B; Ruijsink, R; van Oudheusden, B W

    2012-06-01

    One of the major challenges in robotics is to develop a fly-like robot that can autonomously fly around in unknown environments. In this paper, we discuss the current state of the DelFly project, in which we follow a top-down approach to ever smaller and more autonomous ornithopters. The presented findings concerning the design, aerodynamics and autonomy of the DelFly illustrate some of the properties of the top-down approach, which allows the identification and resolution of issues that also play a role at smaller scales. A parametric variation of the wing stiffener layout produced a 5% more power-efficient wing. An experimental aerodynamic investigation revealed that this could be associated with an improved stiffness of the wing, while further providing evidence of the vortex development during the flap cycle. The presented experiments resulted in an improvement in the generated lift, allowing the inclusion of a yaw rate gyro, pressure sensor and microcontroller onboard the DelFly. The autonomy of the DelFly is expanded by achieving (1) an improved turning logic to obtain better vision-based obstacle avoidance performance in environments with varying texture and (2) successful onboard height control based on the pressure sensor.

  9. Modeling the High Speed Research Cycle 2B Longitudinal Aerodynamic Database Using Multivariate Orthogonal Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, E. A.; Proffitt, M. S.

    1999-01-01

    The data for longitudinal non-dimensional, aerodynamic coefficients in the High Speed Research Cycle 2B aerodynamic database were modeled using polynomial expressions identified with an orthogonal function modeling technique. The discrepancy between the tabular aerodynamic data and the polynomial models was tested and shown to be less than 15 percent for drag, lift, and pitching moment coefficients over the entire flight envelope. Most of this discrepancy was traced to smoothing local measurement noise and to the omission of mass case 5 data in the modeling process. A simulation check case showed that the polynomial models provided a compact and accurate representation of the nonlinear aerodynamic dependencies contained in the HSR Cycle 2B tabular aerodynamic database.

  10. AEROX: Computer program for transonic aircraft aerodynamics to high angles of attack. Volume 1: Aerodynamic methods and program users' guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axelson, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The AEROX program estimates lift, induced-drag and pitching moments to high angles (typ. 60 deg) for wings and for wingbody combinations with or without an aft horizontal tail. Minimum drag coefficients are not estimated, but may be input for inclusion in the total aerodynamic parameters which are output in listed and plotted formats. The theory, users' guide, test cases, and program listing are presented.

  11. Aerodynamic Indicial Functions and Their Use in Aeroelastic Formulation of Lifting Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzocca, Piergiovanni; Librescu, Liviu; Silva, Walter A.

    2000-01-01

    An investigation related to the use of linear indicial functions in the time and frequency domains, enabling one to derive the proper aerodynamic loads as to study the subcritical response and flutter of swept lifting surfaces, respectively, of the open/closed loop aeroelastic system is presented. The expressions of the lift and aerodynamic moment in the frequency domain are given in terms of the Theodorsen's function, while, in the time domain, these are obtained directly with the help of the Wagner's function. Closed form solutions of aerodynamic derivatives are obtained, graphical representations are supplied and conclusions and prospects for further developments are outlined.

  12. Intermediate Experimental Vehicle, ESA Programme Supersonic Transonic Aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjors, Karin; Olsson, Jorgen; Maseland, Hans; de Cock, Koen; Dutheil, Sylvain; Bouleuc, Laurent; Cantinaud, Olivier; Tribot, Jean-Pierre; Mareschi, Vincenzo; Ferrarella, Daniella, Rufolo, Giuseppe

    2011-05-01

    The IXV project objectives are the design, development, manufacture and on ground and in flight verification of an autonomous European lifting and aerodynamically controlled re-entry system, which is highly flexible and manoeuvrable. The IXV vehicle is planned to be recovered in supersonic regime by means of a Descent and Recovery System (DRS). In that context, a specific aerodynamic identification was carried in order to provide data to be used for consolidating the AEDB (AErodynamic Data Base) and as inputs for the DRS sub-system activities. During the phase C2, a wind tunnel campaign was carried out at for the Mach number range M=1.7 to M=0.3 together with computational fluid dynamics simulation. The main objectives were to assess the aerodynamic forces and moments assuming high aileron setting in supersonic regime and to get preliminary aerodynamic data in subsonic regime to be used as input by the DRS team. The logic and the main results of these activities are presented and discussed in this paper.

  13. Measured Aerodynamic Interaction of Two Tiltrotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, Gloria K.; Wadcock, Alan J.; Derby, Michael R.

    2003-01-01

    The aerodynamic interaction of two model tilrotors in helicopter-mode formation flight is investigated. Three cenarios representing tandem level flight, tandem operations near the ground, and a single tiltrotor operating above thc ground for varying winds are examined. The effect of aircraft separation distance on the thrust and rolling moment of the trailing aircraft with and without the presence of a ground plane are quantified. Without a ground plane, the downwind aircraft experiences a peak rolling moment when the right (left) roto- of the upwind aircraft is laterally aligned with the left (right) rotor of the downwind aircraft. The presence of the ground plane causes the peak rolling moment on the downwind aircraft to occur when the upwind aircraft is further outboard of the downwind aircraft. Ground plane surface flow visualization images obtained using rufts and oil are used to understand mutual interaction between the two aircraft. These data provide guidance in determining tiltrotor flight formations which minimize disturbance to the trailing aircraft.

  14. Modular multimorphic kinematic arm structure and pitch and yaw joint for same

    DOEpatents

    Martin, H.L.; Williams, D.M.; Holt, W.E.

    1987-04-21

    A multimorphic kinematic manipulator arm is provided with seven degrees of freedom and modular kinematic redundancy through identical pitch/yaw, shoulder, elbow and wrist joints and a wrist roll device at the wrist joint, which further provides to the manipulator arm an obstacle avoidance capability. The modular pitch/yaw joints are traction drive devices which provide backlash free operation with smooth torque transmission and enhanced rigidity. A dual input drive arrangement is provided for each joint resulting in a reduction of the load required to be assumed by each drive means and providing selective pitch and yaw motions by control of the relative rotational directions of the input drive means. 12 figs.

  15. Nuclear Anapole Moments

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Ramsey-Musolf; Wick Haxton; Ching-Pang Liu

    2002-03-29

    Nuclear anapole moments are parity-odd, time-reversal-even E1 moments of the electromagnetic current operator. Although the existence of this moment was recognized theoretically soon after the discovery of parity nonconservation (PNC), its experimental isolation was achieved only recently, when a new level of precision was reached in a measurement of the hyperfine dependence of atomic PNC in 133Cs. An important anapole moment bound in 205Tl also exists. In this paper, we present the details of the first calculation of these anapole moments in the framework commonly used in other studies of hadronic PNC, a meson exchange potential that includes long-range pion exchange and enough degrees of freedom to describe the five independent S-P amplitudes induced by short-range interactions. The resulting contributions of pi-, rho-, and omega-exchange to the single-nucleon anapole moment, to parity admixtures in the nuclear ground state, and to PNC exchange currents are evaluated, using configuration-mixed shell-model wave functions. The experimental anapole moment constraints on the PNC meson-nucleon coupling constants are derived and compared with those from other tests of the hadronic weak interaction. While the bounds obtained from the anapole moment results are consistent with the broad ''reasonable ranges'' defined by theory, they are not in good agreement with the constraints from the other experiments. We explore possible explanations for the discrepancy and comment on the potential importance of new experiments.

  16. Effects of Positive versus Negative Yaw Angles on Wind-Turbine Performance: An Application of BEM Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastankhah, Majid; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2014-05-01

    Wind-turbine wakes have negative effects on wind-farm performance. They are associated with: (a) the velocity deficit, which reduces the generated power of downwind turbines; and (b) the turbulence level, which increases the fatigue loads on downwind turbines. Controlling the yaw angle of turbines can potentially improve the performance of wind farms by deflecting the wake away from downwind turbines. However, yawed conditions induce unsteady loads on turbine blades which affect the generated power quality and fatigue life. To better understand these effects, the blade element momentum (BEM) theory, which is modified to take into account the unsteadiness of yawed conditions, is used in the present work. The comparison between the BEM results and the wind-tunnel measurements of a yawed model turbine in the uniform flow shows reasonable agreement for yaw angles smaller than 30 degrees. Special emphasis is placed on the use of BEM to investigate the difference between the effect of positive and negative yaw angles on the performance of turbines in uniform and boundary-layer flows. In general, it is found that for a yawed turbine in uniform flows, the thrust force and the generated power corresponding with each turbine blade vary as the blade rotates. This variation is, however, similar for both positive and negative yaw angles with just a shift in time with respect to each other. On the other hand, it is found that turbines in boundary-layer flows do not behave in the same way for positive and negative yaw angles. Although the time-averaged thrust force and generated power are approximately the same for positive and negative yaw angles, the variation of forces acting on blades is lower in one of these cases compared to the other one. In fact, the rotational direction of turbine blades determines which case introduces smoother variation of forces acting on blades. This finding is of great importance to increase the life-time of turbines working in yawed conditions.

  17. Human comfort response to random motions with combined yawing and rolling motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. W., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of random yawing and rolling velocities on passenger ride comfort responses were examined on a visual motion simulator. The effects of power spectral density shape and frequency ranges of peak power from 0 to 2 Hz were studied. The subjective rating data and the physical motion data obtained are presented. No attempt at interpretation or detailed analysis of the data is made. There existed during this study motions in all other degrees of freedom as well as the yawing and rolling motions, because of the characteristics of the simulator. These unwanted motions may have introduced some interactive effects on passenger responses which should be considered in any analysis of the data.

  18. Numerical calculation of the three dimensional transonic flow over a yawed wing.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, A.

    1973-01-01

    Results are presented of calculations of the three dimensional steady transonic flow over a finite yawed wing. The full potential flow equation is solved in a transformed coordinate system which permits the boundary conditions to be satisfied exactly. The correct differential properties are enforced by rotating the difference scheme to conform with the flow direction, and fast convergence is assured by simulating a time dependent equation designed to settle quickly to a steady state. Computed lift drag ratios are consistent with the results of wind tunnel tests of a yawed wing conducted by R. T. Jones (1972).-

  19. Controlled Reduction of a Five-Link 3D Biped with Unactuated Yaw

    PubMed Central

    Gregg, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a formulation of controlled geometric reduction with one degree of underactuation for mechanical systems with an unactuated cyclic variable subject to passive damping. We show that the first control term in the fully actuated case reduces to passive joint-velocity feedback, which can be equivalently provided by viscous friction. The underactuated control strategy is applied to a five-link 3D biped with a hip, torso, knees, and unactuated yaw at the foot contact point. We show asymptotically stable walking in the presence of passive yawing for realistic friction coefficients. PMID:25663742

  20. Controlled Reduction with Unactuated Cyclic Variables: Application to 3D Bipedal Walking with Passive Yaw Rotation

    PubMed Central

    Righetti, Ludovic

    2014-01-01

    This paper shows that viscous damping can shape momentum conservation laws in a manner that stabilizes yaw rotation and enables steering for underactuated 3D walking. We first show that unactuated cyclic variables can be controlled by passively shaped conservation laws given a stabilizing controller in the actuated coordinates. We then exploit this result to realize controlled geometric reduction with multiple unactuated cyclic variables. We apply this underactuated control strategy to a five-link 3D biped to produce exponentially stable straight-ahead walking and steering in the presence of passive yawing. PMID:25554709

  1. Effect of yaw angle on steering forces for the lunar roving vehicle wheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    A series of tests was conducted with a Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) wheel operating at yaw angles ranging from -5 to +90 deg. The load was varied from 42 to 82 lb (187 to 365 N), and the speed was varied from 3.5 to 10.0 ft/sec (1.07 to 3.05 m/sec). It was noted that speed had an effect on side thrust and rut depth. Side thrust, rut depth, and skid generally increased as the yaw angle increased. For the range of loads used, the effect of load on performance was not significant.

  2. Where the Road Ends, Yaws Begins? The Cost-effectiveness of Eradication versus More Roads

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Christopher; Asiedu, Kingsley; Jannin, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A disabling and disfiguring disease that “begins where the road ends”, yaws is targeted by WHO for eradication by the year 2020. The global campaign is not yet financed. To evaluate yaws eradication within the context of the post-2015 development agenda, we perform a somewhat allegorical cost-effectiveness analysis of eradication, comparing it to a counterfactual in which we simply wait for more roads (the end of poverty). Methods We use evidence from four yaws eradication pilot sites and other mass treatment campaigns to set benchmarks for the cost of eradication in 12 known endemic countries. We construct a compartmental model of long-term health effects to 2050. Conservatively, we attribute zero cost to the counterfactual and allow for gradual exit of the susceptible (at risk) population by road (poverty reduction). We report mean, 5th and 95th centile estimates to reflect uncertainty about costs and effects. Results Our benchmark for the economic cost of yaws eradication is uncertain but not high –US$ 362 (75–1073) million in 12 countries. Eradication would cost US$ 26 (4.2–78) for each year of life lived without disability or disfigurement due to yaws, or US$ 324 (47–936) per disability-adjusted life year (DALY). Excluding drugs, existing staff and assets, the financial cost benchmark is US$ 213 (74–522) million. The real cost of waiting for more roads (poverty reduction) would be 13 (7.3–20) million years of life affected by early-stage yaws and 2.3 (1.1–4.2) million years of life affected by late-stage yaws. Discussion Endemic countries need financing to begin implementing and adapting global strategy to local conditions. Donations of drugs and diagnostics could reduce cost to the public sector and catalyze financing. Resources may be harnessed from the extractive industries. Yaws eradication should be seen as complementary to universal health coverage and shared prosperity on the post-2015 development agenda. PMID:25255131

  3. Freight Wing Trailer Aerodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Sean; Bigatel, Patrick

    2004-10-17

    Freight Wing Incorporated utilized the opportunity presented by this DOE category one Inventions and Innovations grant to successfully research, develop, test, patent, market, and sell innovative fuel and emissions saving aerodynamic attachments for the trucking industry. A great deal of past scientific research has demonstrated that streamlining box shaped semi-trailers can significantly reduce a truck's fuel consumption. However, significant design challenges have prevented past concepts from meeting industry needs. Market research early in this project revealed the demands of truck fleet operators regarding aerodynamic attachments. Products must not only save fuel, but cannot interfere with the operation of the truck, require significant maintenance, add significant weight, and must be extremely durable. Furthermore, SAE/TMC J1321 tests performed by a respected independent laboratory are necessary for large fleets to even consider purchase. Freight Wing used this information to create a system of three practical aerodynamic attachments for the front, rear and undercarriage of standard semi trailers. SAE/TMC J1321 Type II tests preformed by the Transportation Research Center (TRC) demonstrated a 7% improvement to fuel economy with all three products. If Freight Wing is successful in its continued efforts to gain market penetration, the energy and environmental savings would be considerable. Each truck outfitted saves approximately 1,100 gallons of fuel every 100,000 miles, which prevents over 12 tons of CO2 from entering the atmosphere. If all applicable trailers used the technology, the country could save approximately 1.8 billion gallons of diesel fuel, 18 million tons of emissions and 3.6 billion dollars annually.

  4. Moment inference from tomograms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Day-Lewis, F. D.; Chen, Y.; Singha, K.

    2007-01-01

    Time-lapse geophysical tomography can provide valuable qualitative insights into hydrologic transport phenomena associated with aquifer dynamics, tracer experiments, and engineered remediation. Increasingly, tomograms are used to infer the spatial and/or temporal moments of solute plumes; these moments provide quantitative information about transport processes (e.g., advection, dispersion, and rate-limited mass transfer) and controlling parameters (e.g., permeability, dispersivity, and rate coefficients). The reliability of moments calculated from tomograms is, however, poorly understood because classic approaches to image appraisal (e.g., the model resolution matrix) are not directly applicable to moment inference. Here, we present a semi-analytical approach to construct a moment resolution matrix based on (1) the classic model resolution matrix and (2) image reconstruction from orthogonal moments. Numerical results for radar and electrical-resistivity imaging of solute plumes demonstrate that moment values calculated from tomograms depend strongly on plume location within the tomogram, survey geometry, regularization criteria, and measurement error. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. A semi-empirical method for calculating the pitching moment of bodies of revolution at low Mach numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, Edward J

    1951-01-01

    A semiempirical method, in which potential theory is arbitrarily combined with an approximate viscous theory, for calculating the aerodynamic pitching moments for bodies of revolution is presented. The method can also be used for calculating the lift and drag forces. The calculated and experimental force and moment characteristics of 15 bodies of revolution are compared.

  6. Aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils with ice accretions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, M. B.; Gregorek, G. M.

    1982-01-01

    Results of a wind tunnel test to evaluate the performance of an airfoil with simulated rime ice are presented with theoretical comparisons. A NACA 65A413 airfoil was tested in the OSU 6 x 22 inch Transonic Airfoil Wind Tunnel at a Reynolds number near three million and Mach numbers from 0.20 to 0.80. The model was tested in four configurations to determine the aero-dynamic effects of the roughness and shape of a rime ice accretion. The simulated rime ice shape was obtained analytically using a time-stepping dry ice accretion computer code. Lift, drag, moment coefficients, and pressure distributions for the clean and simulated rime ice cases are reported. The measured degradation in airfoil performance is compared to an analytical method which uses existing airfoil analysis computer codes with empirical corrections for the surface roughness. A discussion of the empirical surface roughness correction and uses of other airfoil computer methods is included.

  7. Aerodynamics of sports balls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    Research data on the aerodynamic behavior of baseballs and cricket and golf balls are summarized. Cricket balls and baseballs are roughly the same size and mass but have different stitch patterns. Both are thrown to follow paths that avoid a batter's swing, paths that can curve if aerodynamic forces on the balls' surfaces are asymmetric. Smoke tracer wind tunnel tests and pressure taps have revealed that the unbalanced side forces are induced by tripping the boundary layer on the seam side and producing turbulence. More particularly, the greater pressures are perpendicular to the seam plane and only appear when the balls travel at velocities high enough so that the roughness length matches the seam heigh. The side forces, once tripped, will increase with spin velocity up to a cut-off point. The enhanced lift coefficient is produced by the Magnus effect. The more complex stitching on a baseball permits greater variations in the flight path curve and, in the case of a knuckleball, the unsteady flow effects. For golf balls, the dimples trip the boundary layer and the high spin rate produces a lift coefficient maximum of 0.5, compared to a baseball's maximum of 0.3. Thus, a golf ball travels far enough for gravitational forces to become important.

  8. Aerodynamics of sports balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, R. D.

    Research data on the aerodynamic behavior of baseballs and cricket and golf balls are summarized. Cricket balls and baseballs are roughly the same size and mass but have different stitch patterns. Both are thrown to follow paths that avoid a batter's swing, paths that can curve if aerodynamic forces on the balls' surfaces are asymmetric. Smoke tracer wind tunnel tests and pressure taps have revealed that the unbalanced side forces are induced by tripping the boundary layer on the seam side and producing turbulence. More particularly, the greater pressures are perpendicular to the seam plane and only appear when the balls travel at velocities high enough so that the roughness length matches the seam heigh. The side forces, once tripped, will increase with spin velocity up to a cut-off point. The enhanced lift coefficient is produced by the Magnus effect. The more complex stitching on a baseball permits greater variations in the flight path curve and, in the case of a knuckleball, the unsteady flow effects. For golf balls, the dimples trip the boundary layer and the high spin rate produces a lift coefficient maximum of 0.5, compared to a baseball's maximum of 0.3. Thus, a golf ball travels far enough for gravitational forces to become important.

  9. Aerodynamic challenges of ALT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooks, I.; Homan, D.; Romere, P. O.

    1985-01-01

    The approach and landing test (ALT) of the Space Shuttle Orbiter presented a number of unique challenges in the area of aerodynamics. The purpose of the ALT program was both to confirm the use of the Boeing 747 as a transport vehicle for ferrying the Orbiter across the country and to demonstrate the flight characteristics of the Orbiter in its approach and landing phase. Concerns for structural fatigue and performance dictated a tailcone be attached to the Orbiter for ferry and for the initial landing tests. The Orbiter with a tailcone attached presented additional challenges to the normal aft sting concept of wind tunnel testing. The landing tests required that the Orbiter be separated from the 747 at approximately 20,000 feet using aerodynamic forces to fly the vehicles apart. The concept required a complex test program to determine the relative effects of the two vehicles on each other. Also of concern, and tested, was the vortex wake created by the 747 and the means for the Orbiter to avoid it following separation.

  10. The Aerodynamic Plane Table

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahm, A F

    1924-01-01

    This report gives the description and the use of a specially designed aerodynamic plane table. For the accurate and expeditious geometrical measurement of models in an aerodynamic laboratory, and for miscellaneous truing operations, there is frequent need for a specially equipped plan table. For example, one may have to measure truly to 0.001 inch the offsets of an airfoil at many parts of its surface. Or the offsets of a strut, airship hull, or other carefully formed figure may require exact calipering. Again, a complete airplane model may have to be adjusted for correct incidence at all parts of its surfaces or verified in those parts for conformance to specifications. Such work, if but occasional, may be done on a planing or milling machine; but if frequent, justifies the provision of a special table. For this reason it was found desirable in 1918 to make the table described in this report and to equip it with such gauges and measures as the work should require.

  11. Aerodynamic design using numerical optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murman, E. M.; Chapman, G. T.

    1983-01-01

    The procedure of using numerical optimization methods coupled with computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes for the development of an aerodynamic design is examined. Several approaches that replace wind tunnel tests, develop pressure distributions and derive designs, or fulfill preset design criteria are presented. The method of Aerodynamic Design by Numerical Optimization (ADNO) is described and illustrated with examples.

  12. Aerodynamic coefficients and transformation tables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ames, Joseph S

    1918-01-01

    The problem of the transformation of numerical values expressed in one system of units into another set or system of units frequently arises in connection with aerodynamic problems. Report contains aerodynamic coefficients and conversion tables needed to facilitate such transformation. (author)

  13. Aerodynamics of a Party Balloon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod

    2007-01-01

    It is well-known that a party balloon can be made to fly erratically across a room, but it can also be used for quantitative measurements of other aspects of aerodynamics. Since a balloon is light and has a large surface area, even relatively weak aerodynamic forces can be readily demonstrated or measured in the classroom. Accurate measurements…

  14. On Wings: Aerodynamics of Eagles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millson, David

    2000-01-01

    The Aerodynamics Wing Curriculum is a high school program that combines basic physics, aerodynamics, pre-engineering, 3D visualization, computer-assisted drafting, computer-assisted manufacturing, production, reengineering, and success in a 15-hour, 3-week classroom module. (JOW)

  15. Techniques for estimating Space Station aerodynamic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Richard E.

    1993-01-01

    A method was devised and calculations were performed to determine the effects of reflected molecules on the aerodynamic force and moment coefficients for a body in free molecule flow. A procedure was developed for determining the velocity and temperature distributions of molecules reflected from a surface of arbitrary momentum and energy accommodation. A system of equations, based on momentum and energy balances for the surface, incident, and reflected molecules, was solved by a numerical optimization technique. The minimization of a 'cost' function, developed from the set of equations, resulted in the determination of the defining properties of the flow reflected from the arbitrary surface. The properties used to define both the incident and reflected flows were: average temperature of the molecules in the flow, angle of the flow with respect to a vector normal to the surface, and the molecular speed ratio. The properties of the reflected flow were used to calculate the contribution of multiply reflected molecules to the force and moments on a test body in the flow. The test configuration consisted of two flat plates joined along one edge at a right angle to each other. When force and moment coefficients of this 90 deg concave wedge were compared to results that did not include multiple reflections, it was found that multiple reflections could nearly double lift and drag coefficients, with nearly a 50 percent increase in pitching moment for cases with specular or nearly specular accommodation. The cases of diffuse or nearly diffuse accommodation often had minor reductions in axial and normal forces when multiple reflections were included. There were several cases of intermediate accommodation where the addition of multiple reflection effects more than tripled the lift coefficient over the convex technique.

  16. Unsteady aerodynamics of blade rows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verdon, Joseph M.

    1989-01-01

    The requirements placed on an unsteady aerodynamic theory intended for turbomachinery aeroelastic or aeroacoustic applications are discussed along with a brief description of the various theoretical models that are available to address these requirements. The major emphasis is placed on the description of a linearized inviscid theory which fully accounts for the affects of a nonuniform mean or steady flow on unsteady aerodynamic response. Although this linearization was developed primarily for blade flutter prediction, more general equations are presented which account for unsteady excitations due to incident external aerodynamic disturbances as well as those due to prescribed blade motions. The motivation for this linearized unsteady aerodynamic theory is focused on, its physical and mathematical formulation is outlined and examples are presented to illustrate the status of numerical solution procedures and several effects of mean flow nonuniformity on unsteady aerodynamic response.

  17. Low-Speed Yawed-Rolling Characteristics of a Pair of 56-Inch-Diameter, 32-Ply-Rating, Type 7 Aircraft Tires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Wilbur E.; Horne, Walter B.

    1959-01-01

    The low-speed (up to 4 miles per hour) yawed-rolling characteristics of two 56 x 16 32-ply-rating, type 7 aircraft tires under straight-yawed rolling were determined over a range of inflation pressures and yaw angles for a vertical load approximately equal to 75 percent of the rated vertical load. The quantities measured or determined included cornering force, drag force self-alining torque, pneumatic caster vertical tire deflection, yaw angle, and relaxation length. During straight-yawed rolling the normal force generally increased with increasing yaw angle within the test range. The self-alining torque increased to a maximum value and then decreased with increasing angle of yaw. The pneumatic caster tended to decrease with increasing yaw angle.

  18. A wind-tunnel investigation of wind-turbine wakes in different yawed and loading conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastankhah, Majid; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2015-04-01

    Wind-turbine wakes have negative effects on wind-farm performance. They are associated with: (a) the velocity deficit, which reduces the generated power of downwind turbines; and (b) the turbulence level, which increases the fatigue loads on downwind turbines. Controlling the yaw angle of turbines can potentially improve the performance of wind farms by deflecting the wake away from downwind turbines. However, except for few studies, wakes of yawed turbines still suffer from the lack of systematic research. To fill this research gap, we performed wind-tunnel experiments in the recirculating boundary-layer wind tunnel at the WIRE Laboratory of EPFL to better understand the wakes of yawed turbines. High-resolution stereoscopic particle image-velocimetry (S-PIV) was used to measure three velocity components in a horizontal plane located downwind of a horizontal-axis, three-blade model turbine. A servo-controller was connected to the DC generator of the turbine, which allowed us to apply different loadings. The power and thrust coefficients of the turbine were also measured for each case. These power and thrust measurements together with the highly-resolved flow measurements enabled us to study different wake characteristics such as the energy entrainment from the outer flow into the wake, the wake deflection and the helicoidal tip vortices for yawed turbines.

  19. A new formulation of the understeer coefficient to relate yaw torque and vehicle handling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucchi, F.; Frendo, F.

    2016-06-01

    The handling behaviour of vehicles is an important property for its relation to performance and safety. In 1970s, Pacejka did the groundwork for an objective analysis introducing the handling diagram and the understeer coefficient. In more recent years, the understeer concept is still mentioned but the handling is actively managed by direct yaw control (DYC). In this paper an accurate analysis of the vehicle handling is carried out, considering also the effect of drive forces. This analysis brings to a new formulation of the understeer coefficient, which is almost equivalent to the classical one, but it can be obtained by quasi-steady-state manoeuvres. In addition, it relates the vehicle yaw torque to the understeer coefficient, filling up the gap between the classical handling approach and DYC. A multibody model of a Formula SAE car is then used to perform quasi-steady-state simulations in order to verify the effectiveness of the new formulation. Some vehicle set-ups and wheel drive arrangements are simulated and the results are discussed. In particular, the handling behaviours of the rear wheel drive (RWD) and the front wheel drive (FWD) architectures are compared, finding an apparently surprising result: for the analysed vehicle the FWD is less understeering than for RWD. The relation between the yaw torque and the understeer coefficient allows to understand this behaviour and opens-up the possibility for different yaw control strategies.

  20. Yaw feedback control of a bio-inspired flapping wing vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gremillion, Gregory; Samuel, Paul; Humbert, J. Sean

    2012-06-01

    A 12 gram fly-inspired flapping wing micro air vehicle was stabilized in the yaw degree of freedom using insectbased wing kinematic for lift generation and control actuation. The characteristic parameters of biological insect flapping flight are described. The integration of this parametric understanding of biological flight into the design of the vehicle is also discussed.

  1. Application Program Interface for the Orion Aerodynamics Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Philip E.; Thompson, James

    2013-01-01

    The Application Programming Interface (API) for the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) Aerodynamic Database has been developed to provide the developers of software an easily implemented, fully self-contained method of accessing the CEV Aerodynamic Database for use in their analysis and simulation tools. The API is programmed in C and provides a series of functions to interact with the database, such as initialization, selecting various options, and calculating the aerodynamic data. No special functions (file read/write, table lookup) are required on the host system other than those included with a standard ANSI C installation. It reads one or more files of aero data tables. Previous releases of aerodynamic databases for space vehicles have only included data tables and a document of the algorithm and equations to combine them for the total aerodynamic forces and moments. This process required each software tool to have a unique implementation of the database code. Errors or omissions in the documentation, or errors in the implementation, led to a lengthy and burdensome process of having to debug each instance of the code. Additionally, input file formats differ for each space vehicle simulation tool, requiring the aero database tables to be reformatted to meet the tool s input file structure requirements. Finally, the capabilities for built-in table lookup routines vary for each simulation tool. Implementation of a new database may require an update to and verification of the table lookup routines. This may be required if the number of dimensions of a data table exceeds the capability of the simulation tools built-in lookup routines. A single software solution was created to provide an aerodynamics software model that could be integrated into other simulation and analysis tools. The highly complex Orion aerodynamics model can then be quickly included in a wide variety of tools. The API code is written in ANSI C for ease of portability to a wide variety of systems. The

  2. Flight Dynamics of an Aeroshell Using an Attached Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruz, Juan R.; Schoenenberger, Mark; Axdahl, Erik; Wilhite, Alan

    2009-01-01

    An aeroelastic analysis of the behavior of an entry vehicle utilizing an attached inflatable aerodynamic decelerator during supersonic flight is presented. The analysis consists of a planar, four degree of freedom simulation. The aeroshell and the IAD are assumed to be separate, rigid bodies connected with a spring-damper at an interface point constraining the relative motion of the two bodies. Aerodynamic forces and moments are modeled using modified Newtonian aerodynamics. The analysis includes the contribution of static aerodynamic forces and moments as well as pitch damping. Two cases are considered in the analysis: constant velocity flight and planar free flight. For the constant velocity and free flight cases with neutral pitch damping, configurations with highly-stiff interfaces exhibit statically stable but dynamically unstable aeroshell angle of attack. Moderately stiff interfaces exhibit static and dynamic stability of aeroshell angle of attack due to damping induced by the pitch angle rate lag between the aeroshell and IAD. For the free-flight case, low values of both the interface stiffness and damping cause divergence of the aeroshell angle of attack due to the offset of the IAD drag force with respect to the aeroshell center of mass. The presence of dynamic aerodynamic moments was found to influence the stability characteristics of the vehicle. The effect of gravity on the aeroshell angle of attack stability characteristics was determined to be negligible for the cases investigated.

  3. PN/S calculations for a fighter W/F at high-lift yaw conditions. [parabolized Navier-Stokes computer code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wai, J. C.; Blom, G.; Yoshihara, H.; Chaussee, D.

    1986-01-01

    The NASA/Ames parabolized Navier/Stokes computer code was used to calculate the turbulent flow over the wing/fuselage for a generic fighter at M = 2.2. 18 deg angle-of-attack, and 0 and 5 deg yaw. Good test/theory agreement was achieved in the zero yaw case. No test data were available for the yaw case.

  4. Aerodynamics of Small Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Thomas J.

    In this review we describe the aerodynamic problems that must be addressed in order to design a successful small aerial vehicle. The effects of Reynolds number and aspect ratio (AR) on the design and performance of fixed-wing vehicles are described. The boundary-layer behavior on airfoils is especially important in the design of vehicles in this flight regime. The results of a number of experimental boundary-layer studies, including the influence of laminar separation bubbles, are discussed. Several examples of small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) in this regime are described. Also, a brief survey of analytical models for oscillating and flapping-wing propulsion is presented. These range from the earliest examples where quasi-steady, attached flow is assumed, to those that account for the unsteady shed vortex wake as well as flow separation and aeroelastic behavior of a flapping wing. Experiments that complemented the analysis and led to the design of a successful ornithopter are also described.

  5. Reciprocity relations in aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaslet, Max A; Spreiter, John R

    1953-01-01

    Reverse flow theorems in aerodynamics are shown to be based on the same general concepts involved in many reciprocity theorems in the physical sciences. Reciprocal theorems for both steady and unsteady motion are found as a logical consequence of this approach. No restrictions on wing plan form or flight Mach number are made beyond those required in linearized compressible-flow analysis. A number of examples are listed, including general integral theorems for lifting, rolling, and pitching wings and for wings in nonuniform downwash fields. Correspondence is also established between the buildup of circulation with time of a wing starting impulsively from rest and the buildup of lift of the same wing moving in the reverse direction into a sharp-edged gust.

  6. Vortex flow aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. H. B.; Campbell, J. F.; Young, A. D. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The principal emphasis of the meeting was to be on the understanding and prediction of separation-induced vortex flows and their effects on vehicle performance, stability, control, and structural design loads. This report shows that a substantial amount of the papers covering this area were received from a wide range of countries, together with an attendance that was even more diverse. In itself, this testifies to the current interest in the subject and to the appropriateness of the Panel's choice of topic and approach. An attempt is made to summarize each paper delivered, and to relate the contributions made in the papers and in the discussions to some of the important aspects of vortex flow aerodynamics. This reveals significant progress and important clarifications, but also brings out remaining weaknesses in predictive capability and gaps in understanding. Where possible, conclusions are drawn and areas of continuing concern are identified.

  7. Micro air vehicle motion tracking and aerodynamic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlig, Daniel V.

    Aerodynamic performance of small-scale fixed-wing flight is not well understood, and flight data are needed to gain a better understanding of the aerodynamics of micro air vehicles (MAVs) flying at Reynolds numbers between 10,000 and 30,000. Experimental studies have shown the aerodynamic effects of low Reynolds number flow on wings and airfoils, but the amount of work that has been conducted is not extensive and mostly limited to tests in wind and water tunnels. In addition to wind and water tunnel testing, flight characteristics of aircraft can be gathered through flight testing. The small size and low weight of MAVs prevent the use of conventional on-board instrumentation systems, but motion tracking systems that use off-board triangulation can capture flight trajectories (position and attitude) of MAVs with minimal onboard instrumentation. Because captured motion trajectories include minute noise that depends on the aircraft size, the trajectory results were verified in this work using repeatability tests. From the captured glide trajectories, the aerodynamic characteristics of five unpowered aircraft were determined. Test results for the five MAVs showed the forces and moments acting on the aircraft throughout the test flights. In addition, the airspeed, angle of attack, and sideslip angle were also determined from the trajectories. Results for low angles of attack (less than approximately 20 deg) showed the lift, drag, and moment coefficients during nominal gliding flight. For the lift curve, the results showed a linear curve until stall that was generally less than finite wing predictions. The drag curve was well described by a polar. The moment coefficients during the gliding flights were used to determine longitudinal and lateral stability derivatives. The neutral point, weather-vane stability and the dihedral effect showed some variation with different trim speeds (different angles of attack). In the gliding flights, the aerodynamic characteristics

  8. Supersonic aerodynamic characteristics of a circular body Earth-to-Orbit vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ware, George M.; Engelund, Walter C.; Macconochie, Ian O.

    1994-01-01

    The circular body configuration is a generic single- or multi-stage reusable Earth-to-orbit transport. A thick clipped-delta wing is the major lifting surface. For directional control, three different vertical fin arrangements were investigated: a conventional aft-mounted center fin, wingtip fins, and a nose-mounted fin. The tests were conducted in the Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. The configuration is longitudinally stable about the estimated center of gravity of 0.72 body length up to a Mach number of about 3.0. Above Mach 3.0, the model is longitudinally unstable at low angles of attack but has a stable secondary trim point at angles of attack above 30 deg. The model has sufficient pitch control authority with elevator and body flap to produce stable trim over the test range. The model with the center fin is directionally stable at low angles of attack up to a Mach number of 3.90. The rudder-like surfaces on the tip fins and the all-movable nose fin are designed as active controls to produce artificial directional stability and are effective in producing yawing moment. The wing trailing-edge aileron surfaces are effective in producing rolling moment, but they also produce large adverse yawing moment.

  9. Computational fluid dynamics framework for aerodynamic model assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallespin, D.; Badcock, K. J.; Da Ronch, A.; White, M. D.; Perfect, P.; Ghoreyshi, M.

    2012-07-01

    This paper reviews the work carried out at the University of Liverpool to assess the use of CFD methods for aircraft flight dynamics applications. Three test cases are discussed in the paper, namely, the Standard Dynamic Model, the Ranger 2000 jet trainer and the Stability and Control Unmanned Combat Air Vehicle. For each of these, a tabular aerodynamic model based on CFD predictions is generated along with validation against wind tunnel experiments and flight test measurements. The main purpose of the paper is to assess the validity of the tables of aerodynamic data for the force and moment prediction of realistic aircraft manoeuvres. This is done by generating a manoeuvre based on the tables of aerodynamic data, and then replaying the motion through a time-accurate computational fluid dynamics calculation. The resulting forces and moments from these simulations were compared with predictions from the tables. As the latter are based on a set of steady-state predictions, the comparisons showed perfect agreement for slow manoeuvres. As manoeuvres became more aggressive some disagreement was seen, particularly during periods of large rates of change in attitudes. Finally, the Ranger 2000 model was used on a flight simulator.

  10. Transitory Aerodynamic Forces on a Body of Revolution using Synthetic Jet Actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinehart, Christopher; McMichael, James; Glezer, Ari

    2002-11-01

    The aerodynamic forces and moments on axisymmetric bodies at subsonic speeds are controlled by exploiting local flow attachment using fluidic (synthetic jet) actuation and thereby altering the apparent aerodynamic shape of the surface. Control is effected upstream of the base of the body by an azimuthal array of individually-controlled, aft-facing synthetic jets emanating along an azimuthal Coanda surface. Actuation produces asymmetric aerodynamic forces and moments, with ratios of lift to average jet momentum approaching values typical of conventional jet-based circulation control on two-dimensional airfoils. Momentary forces are achieved using transient (pulsed) actuation and are accompanied by the formation and shedding of vorticity concentrations as a precursor to the turning of the outer flow into the wake region.

  11. Experimental investigation of aerodynamic devices for wind turbine rotational speed control: Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S L

    1996-02-01

    An experimental investigation was undertaken to further evaluate and enhance the performance of an aerodynamic device for wind turbine overspeed protection and power modulation applications. The trailing-edge device, known as the Spoiler-Flap, was examined in detail during wind tunnel tests. The impact of hp length, vent angle, pivot point and chord variations on aerodynamic and hinge moment characteristics were evaluated and a best overall configuration was identified. Based on this effort, a 40% chord device with a 1% hp length and 40 degree vent angle offers improved performance potential for wind turbine applications. This specific configuration appears to offer good suction coefficient performance for both turbine power modulation and overspeed (i.e., aerodynamic braking) applications. Device hinge moment loads improved (compared to other devices investigated) in magnitude and the impact of surface roughness was found to be minimal.

  12. Aerodynamic Flow Control of a Maneuvering Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzozowski, Daniel P.; Culp, John; Glezer, Ari

    2010-11-01

    The unsteady aerodynamic forces and moments on a maneuvering, free-moving airfoil are varied in wind tunnel experiments by controlling vorticity generation/accumulation near the surface using hybrid synthetic jet actuators. The dynamic characteristics of the airfoil that is mounted on a 2-DOF traverse are controlled using position and attitude feedback loops that are actuated by servo motors. Bi-directional changes in the pitching moment are induced using controllable trapped vorticity concentrations on the suction and pressure surfaces near the trailing edge. The dynamic coupling between the actuation and the time-dependent flow field is characterized using simultaneous force and velocity measurements that are taken phase-locked to the commanded actuation waveform. The time scales associated with the actuation process is determined from PIV measurements of vorticity flux downstream of the trailing edge. Circulation time history shows that the entire flow over the airfoil readjusts within about 1.5 TCONV, which is about two orders of magnitude shorter than the characteristic time associated with the controlled maneuver of the wind tunnel model. This illustrates that flow-control actuation can be typically effected on time scales commensurate with the flow's convective time scale, and that the maneuver response is only limited by the inertia of the platform. Supported by AFSOR.

  13. Orion Aerodynamics for Hypersonic Free Molecular to Continuum Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, James N.; Greene, Francis A.; Boyles, Katie A.

    2006-01-01

    Numerical simulations are performed for the Orion Crew Module, previously known as the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) Command Module, to characterize its aerodynamics during the high altitude portion of its reentry into the Earth's atmosphere, that is, from free molecular to continuum hypersonic conditions. The focus is on flow conditions similar to those that the Orion Crew Module would experience during a return from the International Space Station. The bulk of the calculations are performed with two direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) codes, and these data are anchored with results from both free molecular and Navier-Stokes calculations. Results for aerodynamic forces and moments are presented that demonstrate their sensitivity to rarefaction, that is, for free molecular to continuum conditions (Knudsen numbers of 111 to 0.0003). Also included are aerodynamic data as a function of angle of attack for different levels of rarefaction and results that demonstrate the aerodynamic sensitivity of the Orion CM to a range of reentry velocities (7.6 to 15 km/s).

  14. On-orbit free molecular flow aerodynamic characteristics of a proposal space operations center configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romere, P. O.

    1982-01-01

    A proposed configuration for a Space Operations Center is presented in its eight stages of buildup. The on orbit aerodynamic force and moment characteristics were calculated for each stage based upon free molecular flow theory. Calculation of the aerodynamic characteristics was accomplished through the use of an orbital aerodynamic computer program, and the computation method is described with respect to the free molecular theory used. The aerodynamic characteristics are presented in tabulated form for each buildup stage at angles of attack from 0 to 360 degrees and roll angles from -60 to +60 degrees. The reference altitude is 490 kilometers, however, the data should be applicable for altitudes below 490 kilometers down to approximately 185 kilometers.

  15. Ground-based phase wind-up and its application in yaw angle determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, M.; Chen, W.; Dong, D.; Yu, C.; Zheng, Z.; Zhou, F.; Wang, M.; Yue, W.

    2016-08-01

    Ground-based phase wind-up effect (GPWU) is caused by the rotation of receiving antenna. It had been studied and applied in rapidly rotation platforms, such as sounding rocket, guided missile and deep space exploration. In Global Navigation Satellite System high accuracy positioning applications, however, most studies treated it as an error source and focused on eliminating this effect in Precision Point Positioning and Real Time Kinematic (RTK) positioning. The GPWU effect is also sensitive to the rotational status of the antenna, in particular the yaw angle variations. In this paper we explore the feasibility of yaw angle determination of relatively slow rotation platforms based on the GPWU effect. We use the geometry-free carrier phase observations from a RTK base and a moving station receivers to estimate the cumulative yaw angle of the moving platform. Several experiments, including rotating platform tests, vehicle and shipborne tests were carried out. The cumulative errors of rotating platform tests are under 0.38°, indicating good long-term accuracy of the GPWU determined yaw angle. But the RMS are in a range of 11.98° and 17.39°, indicating the errors, such as multipath effect, are not negligible and should be further investigated. The RMS of vehicle and shipborne tests using a base station of 9-11 km are 24.77° and 23.66°. In order to evaluate the influence of the differential ionospheric delay, another vehicle test was carried out using a base station located less than 1 km to the vehicle. The RMS reduces to 15.11°, which gains 39.00 % improvement than before, and demonstrates that the differential ionospheric delay even from a few kilometers long baseline still cannot be neglected. These tests validate the feasibility of GPWU for real-time yaw angle determination. Since this method is able to determine the yaw angle with a minimum one satellite, such a unique feature provides potential applications for attitude determination in the environment with

  16. Computational aerodynamics and artificial intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutler, P.; Mehta, U. B.

    1984-01-01

    Some aspects of artificial intelligence are considered and questions are speculated on, including how knowledge-based systems can accelerate the process of acquiring new knowledge in aerodynamics, how computational fluid dynamics may use 'expert' systems and how expert systems may speed the design and development process. The anatomy of an idealized expert system called AERODYNAMICIST is discussed. Resource requirements are examined for using artificial intelligence in computational fluid dynamics and aerodynamics. Considering two of the essentials of computational aerodynamics - reasoniing and calculating - it is believed that a substantial part of the reasoning can be achieved with artificial intelligence, with computers being used as reasoning machines to set the stage for calculating. Expert systems will probably be new assets of institutions involved in aeronautics for various tasks of computational aerodynamics.

  17. Computational aerodynamics and artificial intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, U. B.; Kutler, P.

    1984-01-01

    The general principles of artificial intelligence are reviewed and speculations are made concerning how knowledge based systems can accelerate the process of acquiring new knowledge in aerodynamics, how computational fluid dynamics may use expert systems, and how expert systems may speed the design and development process. In addition, the anatomy of an idealized expert system called AERODYNAMICIST is discussed. Resource requirements for using artificial intelligence in computational fluid dynamics and aerodynamics are examined. Three main conclusions are presented. First, there are two related aspects of computational aerodynamics: reasoning and calculating. Second, a substantial portion of reasoning can be achieved with artificial intelligence. It offers the opportunity of using computers as reasoning machines to set the stage for efficient calculating. Third, expert systems are likely to be new assets of institutions involved in aeronautics for various tasks of computational aerodynamics.

  18. Turbine Aerodynamics Design Tool Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Frank W.; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the Marshal Space Flight Center Fluids Workshop on Turbine Aerodynamic design tool development. The topics include: (1) Meanline Design/Off-design Analysis; and (2) Airfoil Contour Generation and Analysis. This paper is in viewgraph form.

  19. DSMC Simulations of Apollo Capsule Aerodynamics for Hypersonic Rarefied Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, James N.; Glass, Christopher E.; Greene, Francis A.

    2006-01-01

    Direct simulation Monte Carlo DSMC simulations are performed for the Apollo capsule in the hypersonic low density transitional flow regime. The focus is on ow conditions similar to that experienced by the Apollo Command Module during the high altitude portion of its reentry Results for aerodynamic forces and moments are presented that demonstrate their sensitivity to rarefaction that is for free molecular to continuum conditions. Also aerodynamic data are presented that shows their sensitivity to a range of reentry velocity encompasing conditions that include reentry from low Earth orbit lunar return and Mars return velocities to km/s. The rarefied results are anchored in the continuum regime with data from Navier Stokes simulations

  20. Aerodynamics of slender finned bodies at large angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agnone, A. M.; Zakkay, V.; Tory, E.; Stallings, R.

    1977-01-01

    In certain missions finned missiles perform slewing maneuvers. Here, large angles of attack are attained. Experimental data needed to understand the aerodynamics of such vehicles are presented. The purpose of this investigation was to study the interaction of the body flow field with that produced by the fins and the resulting effects on the aerodynamic forces and moments. The experiments were conducted at a nominal Mach number of 2.7 and angles of attack from 0 to 50 deg, with two different models. The tests were performed in a range of Reynolds number from 1.5 x 10 to the 6th to 4 x 10 to the 7th per foot (to cover both the laminar and fully turbulent regimes.) Several fin roll angles were investigated. Static pressures on both body and fin surfaces are reported.

  1. Transonic unsteady aerodynamics in the vicinity of shock-buffet instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iovnovich, M.; Raveh, D. E.

    2012-02-01

    A study of transonic unsteady aerodynamic responses in the vicinity of shock-buffet is presented. Navier-Stokes simulations of a NACA 0012 airfoil with a fitted 20% trailing edge flap are performed to compute the aerodynamic responses to prescribed pitch and flap motions, about mean flow conditions at shock-buffet onset, and while exhibiting shock buffet. The unsteady aerodynamic response is found to be fundamentally different from the response predicted by the linear aerodynamic theory. At mean angles of attack close to buffet onset noticeable damped resonance responses are observed at frequencies close to the buffet frequency. The responses grow as the mean angle of attack is increased towards buffet onset. Also, a phase lead is observed for the aerodynamic coefficients, for some range of frequencies. The large aerodynamic responses and phase lead appear in frequencies that are typical of structural elastic frequencies, suggesting that they may be responsible for transonic aeroelastic instabilities. At shock buffet conditions, prescribing sufficiently large pitch or flap harmonic motions results in synchronization of the buffet frequency with the excitation frequencies. At these conditions, the lift and pitching moment responses to prescribed pitch motion also result in resonance and phase lead, as in the pre-buffet case. Large prescribed flap motions eliminate the lift resonance response, and significantly reduce the lift coefficient amplitudes, indicating that the aerodynamic coefficients at these conditions can be controlled by prescribed structural motions.

  2. Aerodynamic Control of a Pitching Airfoil by Distributed Bleed Actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, John; Glezer, Ari

    2013-11-01

    The aerodynamic forces and moments on a dynamically pitching 2-D airfoil model are controlled in wind tunnel experiments using distributed active bleed. Bleed flow on the suction surface downstream of the leading edge is driven by pressure differences across the airfoil and is regulated by low-power louver actuators. The bleed interacts with cross flows to effect time-dependent variations of the vorticity flux and thereby alters the local flow attachment, resulting in significant changes in pre- and post-stall lift and pitching moment (over 50% increase in baseline post-stall lift). The flow field over the airfoil is measured using high-speed (2000 fps) PIV, resolving the dynamics and characteristic time-scales of production and advection of vorticity concentrations that are associated with transient variations in the aerodynamic forces and moments. In particular, it is shown that the actuation improves the lift hysteresis and pitch stability during the oscillatory pitching by altering the evolution of the dynamic stall vortex and the ensuing flow attachment during the downstroke. Supported by the Rotorcraft Center (VLRCOE) at Georgia Tech.

  3. The Teachable Moment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodrow, Mary Ellen

    2000-01-01

    Details how an unplanned activity involving spinning wool presented a teachable moment for children in a family child care setting. Notes how activities related to farming, spinning wool, and using wool cloth resulted from following the children's lead. Concludes that everyday activities provide opportunities to listen to children, learn about…

  4. The Humanist Moment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Chris

    2014-01-01

    In "The Humanist Moment," Chris Higgins sets out to recover a tenable, living humanism, rejecting both the version vilified by the anti-humanists and the one sentimentalized by the reactionary nostalgists. Rescuing humanism from such polemics is only the first step, as we find at least nine rival, contemporary definitions of humanism.…

  5. Moments with Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child & Youth Services, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This chapter presents additional stories and interpretations by John Korsmo, Molly Weingrod, Joseph Stanley, Quinn Wilder, Amy Evans, Rick Flowers, Arcelia Martinez, and Pam Ramsey. The stories and interpretations are presented as teachable moments that are examples of how people are learning to understand youthwork and, as such, are open to…

  6. Aerodynamics of badminton shuttlecocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Aekaansh; Desai, Ajinkya; Mittal, Sanjay

    2013-08-01

    A computational study is carried out to understand the aerodynamics of shuttlecocks used in the sport of badminton. The speed of the shuttlecock considered is in the range of 25-50 m/s. The relative contribution of various parts of the shuttlecock to the overall drag is studied. It is found that the feathers, and the net in the case of a synthetic shuttlecock, contribute the maximum. The gaps, in the lower section of the skirt, play a major role in entraining the surrounding fluid and causing a difference between the pressure inside and outside the skirt. This pressure difference leads to drag. This is confirmed via computations for a shuttlecock with no gaps. The synthetic shuttle experiences more drag than the feather model. Unlike the synthetic model, the feather shuttlecock is associated with a swirling flow towards the end of the skirt. The effect of the twist angle of the feathers on the drag as well as the flow has also been studied.

  7. Aerodynamics of bird flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvořák, Rudolf

    2016-03-01

    Unlike airplanes birds must have either flapping or oscillating wings (the hummingbird). Only such wings can produce both lift and thrust - two sine qua non attributes of flying.The bird wings have several possibilities how to obtain the same functions as airplane wings. All are realized by the system of flight feathers. Birds have also the capabilities of adjusting the shape of the wing according to what the immediate flight situation demands, as well as of responding almost immediately to conditions the flow environment dictates, such as wind gusts, object avoidance, target tracking, etc. In bird aerodynamics also the tail plays an important role. To fly, wings impart downward momentum to the surrounding air and obtain lift by reaction. How this is achieved under various flight situations (cruise flight, hovering, landing, etc.), and what the role is of the wing-generated vortices in producing lift and thrust is discussed.The issue of studying bird flight experimentally from in vivo or in vitro experiments is also briefly discussed.

  8. Aerodynamics of Laminar Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Chung K.

    2000-11-01

    The presentation will review recent advances in the understanding of the structure, dynamics, and geometry of stretched, nonequidiffusive, laminar premixed flames, as exemplified by the unsteady propagation of wrinkled flames in nonuniform flow fields. It is first shown that by considering the effects of aerodynamic stretch on the flame structure, and by allowing for mixture nonequidiffusion, the flame responses, especially the flame propagation speed, can be quantitatively as well as qualitatively modified from the idealized planar limit. Subsequently, by treating the flame as a level surface propagating with the stretch-affected flame speed, problems of increasing complexity are presented to illustrate various features of flame propagation. The illustration first treats the flame as a structureless surface propagating into a constant-density combustible with a constant velocity * the laminar flame speed, and demonstrates the phenomena of cusp formation and volumetric burning rate augmentation through flame wrinkling. By using the stretch-affected flame speed, we then describe the phenomena of cusp broadening as well as tip opening of the Bunsen flame. Finally, by allowing for the density jump across the flame surface, a unified dispersion relation is derived for the intrinsic hydrodynamic, body-force, and nonequidiffusive modes of flame

  9. Introduction. Computational aerodynamics.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Paul G

    2007-10-15

    The wide range of uses of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for aircraft design is discussed along with its role in dealing with the environmental impact of flight. Enabling technologies, such as grid generation and turbulence models, are also considered along with flow/turbulence control. The large eddy simulation, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes and hybrid turbulence modelling approaches are contrasted. The CFD prediction of numerous jet configurations occurring in aerospace are discussed along with aeroelasticity for aeroengine and external aerodynamics, design optimization, unsteady flow modelling and aeroengine internal and external flows. It is concluded that there is a lack of detailed measurements (for both canonical and complex geometry flows) to provide validation and even, in some cases, basic understanding of flow physics. Not surprisingly, turbulence modelling is still the weak link along with, as ever, a pressing need for improved (in terms of robustness, speed and accuracy) solver technology, grid generation and geometry handling. Hence, CFD, as a truly predictive and creative design tool, seems a long way off. Meanwhile, extreme practitioner expertise is still required and the triad of computation, measurement and analytic solution must be judiciously used.

  10. Vestibular thresholds for yaw rotation about an earth-vertical axis as a function of frequency.

    PubMed

    Grabherr, Luzia; Nicoucar, Keyvan; Mast, Fred W; Merfeld, Daniel M

    2008-04-01

    Perceptual direction detection thresholds for yaw rotation about an earth-vertical axis were measured at seven frequencies (0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 2, and 5 Hz) in seven subjects in the dark. Motion stimuli consisted of single cycles of sinusoidal acceleration and were generated by a motion platform. An adaptive two-alternative categorical forced-choice procedure was used. The subjects had to indicate by button presses whether they perceived yaw rotation to the left or to the right. Thresholds were measured using a 3-down, 1-up staircase paradigm. Mean yaw rotation velocity thresholds were 2.8 deg s(-1) for 0.05 Hz, 2.5 deg s(-1) for 0.1 Hz, 1.7 deg s(-1) for 0.2 Hz, 0.7 deg s(-1) for 0.5 Hz, 0.6 deg s(-1) for 1 Hz, 0.4 deg s(-1) for 2 Hz, and 0.6 deg s(-1) for 5 Hz. The results show that motion thresholds increase at 0.2 Hz and below and plateau at 0.5 Hz and above. Increasing velocity thresholds at lower frequencies qualitatively mimic the high-pass characteristics of the semicircular canals, since the increase at 0.2 Hz and below would be consistent with decreased gain/sensitivity observed in the VOR at lower frequencies. In fact, the measured dynamics are consistent with a high pass filter having a threshold plateau of 0.71 deg s(-1) and a cut-off frequency of 0.23 Hz, which corresponds to a time constant of approximately 0.70 s. These findings provide no evidence for an influence of velocity storage on perceptual yaw rotation thresholds.

  11. Wind Turbine Design Guideline DG03: Yaw and Pitch Rolling Bearing Life

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, T.; Rumbarger, J. H.; Butterfield, C. P.

    2009-12-01

    This report describes the design criteria, calculation methods, and applicable standards recommended for use in performance and life analyses of ball and roller (rolling) bearings for yaw and pitch motion support in wind turbine applications. The formulae presented here for rolling bearing analytical methods and bearing-life ratings are consistent with methods in current use by wind turbine designers and rolling-bearing manufacturers.

  12. The Practical Calculation of the Aerodynamic Characteristics of Slender Finned Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrowman, James S.

    1967-01-01

    The basic objective of this thesis is to provide a practical method of computing the aerodynamic characteristics of slender finned vehicles such as sounding rockets, high speed bombs, and guided missiles. The aerodynamic characteristics considered are the normal force coefficient derivative, c(sub N(sub alpha)); center of pressure, bar-X; roll forcing moment coefficient derivative, c(sub l(sub delta)); roll damping moment coefficient derivative, c(sub l(sub p)); pitch damping moment coefficient derivative, c(sub mq); and the drag coefficient, c (sub D). Equations are determined for both subsonic and supersonic flow. No attempts is made to analyze the transonic region. The general configuration to which the relations are applicable is a slender axisymmetric body having three or four fins.

  13. Aerodynamic performance of a drag reduction device on a full-scale tractor/trailer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanser, Wendy R.; Ross, James C.; Kaufman, Andrew E.

    1991-09-01

    The effectiveness of an aerodynamic boattail on a tractor/trailer road vehicle was measured in the NASA Ames Research Center 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel. Results are examined for the tractor/trailer with and without the drag reduction device. Pressure measurements and flow visualization show that the aerodynamic boattail traps a vortex or eddy in the corner formed between the device and the rear corner of the trailer. This recirculating flow turns the flow inward as it separates from the edges of the base of the trailer. This modified flow behavior increases the pressure acting over the base area of the truck, thereby reducing the net aerodynamic drag of the vehicle. Drag measurements and pressure distributions in the region of the boattail device are presented for selected configurations. The optimum configuration reduces the overall drag of the tractor/trailer combination by about 10 percent at a zero yaw angle. Unsteady pressure measurements do not indicate strong vortex shedding, although the addition of the boattail plates increases high frequency content of the fluctuating pressure.

  14. Aerodynamic performance of a drag reduction device on a full-scale tractor/trailer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanser, Wendy R.; Ross, James C.; Kaufman, Andrew E.

    1991-01-01

    The effectiveness of an aerodynamic boattail on a tractor/trailer road vehicle was measured in the NASA Ames Research Center 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel. Results are examined for the tractor/trailer with and without the drag reduction device. Pressure measurements and flow visualization show that the aerodynamic boattail traps a vortex or eddy in the corner formed between the device and the rear corner of the trailer. This recirculating flow turns the flow inward as it separates from the edges of the base of the trailer. This modified flow behavior increases the pressure acting over the base area of the truck, thereby reducing the net aerodynamic drag of the vehicle. Drag measurements and pressure distributions in the region of the boattail device are presented for selected configurations. The optimum configuration reduces the overall drag of the tractor/trailer combination by about 10 percent at a zero yaw angle. Unsteady pressure measurements do not indicate strong vortex shedding, although the addition of the boattail plates increases high frequency content of the fluctuating pressure.

  15. The influence of sensory delay on the yaw dynamics of a flapping insect

    PubMed Central

    Elzinga, Michael J.; Dickson, William B.; Dickinson, Michael H.

    2012-01-01

    In closed-loop systems, sensor feedback delays may have disastrous implications for performance and stability. Flies have evolved multiple specializations to reduce this latency, but the fastest feedback during flight involves a delay that is still significant on the timescale of body dynamics. We explored the effect of sensor delay on flight stability and performance for yaw turns using a dynamically scaled robotic model of the fruitfly, Drosophila. The robot was equipped with a real-time feedback system that performed active turns in response to measured torque about the functional yaw axis. We performed system response experiments for a proportional controller in yaw velocity for a range of feedback delays, similar in dimensionless timescale to those experienced by a fly. The results show a fundamental trade-off between sensor delay and permissible feedback gain, and suggest that fast mechanosensory feedback in flies, and most probably in other insects, provide a source of active damping which compliments that contributed by passive effects. Presented in the context of these findings, a control architecture whereby a haltere-mediated inner-loop proportional controller provides damping for slower visually mediated feedback is consistent with tethered-flight measurements, free-flight observations and engineering design principles. PMID:22188766

  16. Estimating the yaw-attitude of BDS IGSO and MEO satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xiaolei; Ge, Maorong; Lou, Yidong; Shi, Chuang; Wickert, Jens; Schuh, Harald

    2015-10-01

    Precise knowledge and consistent modeling of the yaw-attitude of GNSS satellites are essential for high-precision data processing and applications. As the exact attitude control mechanism for the satellites of the BeiDou Satellite Navigation System (BDS) is not yet released, the reverse kinematic precise point positioning (PPP) method was applied in our study. However, we confirm that the recent precise orbit determination (POD) processing for GPS satellites could not provide suitable products for estimating BDS attitude using the reverse PPP because of the special attitude control switching between the nominal and the orbit-normal mode. In our study, we propose a modified processing schema for studying the attitude behavior of the BDS satellites. In this approach, the observations of the satellites during and after attitude switch are excluded in the POD processing, so that the estimates, which are needed in the reverse PPP, are not contaminated by the inaccurate initial attitude mode. The modified process is validated by experimental data sets and the attitude yaw-angles of the BDS IGSO and MEO satellites are estimated with an accuracy of better than . Furthermore, the results confirm that the switch is executed when the Sun elevation is about and the actual orientation is very close to its target one. Based on the estimated yaw-angles, a preliminary attitude switch model was established and reintroduced into the POD, yielding to a substantial improvement in the orbit overlap RMS.

  17. Laboratory-Confirmed Case of Yaws in a 10-Year-Old Boy from the Republic of the Congo ▿

    PubMed Central

    Pillay, Allan; Chen, Cheng-Yen; Reynolds, Mary G.; Mombouli, Jean V.; Castro, Arnold C.; Louvouezo, Davy; Steiner, Bret; Ballard, Ronald C.

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of yaws in a patient with puritic cutaneous eruption who was initially suspected of infection with monkeypox. The diagnosis was established by real-time PCR and sequencing of specific treponemal DNA sequences. This is the first report describing the use of DNA sequencing to identify Treponema pallidum subsp. pertenue-specific sequences in a patient with active yaws. PMID:21918034

  18. Field Test Results of Using a Nacelle-Mounted Lidar for Improving Wind Energy Capture by Reducing Yaw Misalignment (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, P.; Scholbrock, A.; Wright, A.

    2014-11-01

    Presented at the Nordic Wind Power Conference on November 5, 2014. This presentation describes field-test campaigns performed at the National Wind Technology Center in which lidar technology was used to improve the yaw alignment of the Controls Advanced Research Turbine (CART) 2 and CART3 wind turbines. The campaigns demonstrated that whether by learning a correction function to the nacelle vane, or by controlling yaw directly with the lidar signal, a significant improvement in power capture was demonstrated.

  19. Aerodynamics and vortical structures in hovering fruitflies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xue Guang; Sun, Mao

    2015-03-01

    We measure the wing kinematics and morphological parameters of seven freely hovering fruitflies and numerically compute the flows of the flapping wings. The computed mean lift approximately equals to the measured weight and the mean horizontal force is approximately zero, validating the computational model. Because of the very small relative velocity of the wing, the mean lift coefficient required to support the weight is rather large, around 1.8, and the Reynolds number of the wing is low, around 100. How such a large lift is produced at such a low Reynolds number is explained by combining the wing motion data, the computed vortical structures, and the theory of vorticity dynamics. It has been shown that two unsteady mechanisms are responsible for the high lift. One is referred as to "fast pitching-up rotation": at the start of an up- or downstroke when the wing has very small speed, it fast pitches down to a small angle of attack, and then, when its speed is higher, it fast pitches up to the angle it normally uses. When the wing pitches up while moving forward, large vorticity is produced and sheds at the trailing edge, and vorticity of opposite sign is produced near the leading edge and on the upper surface, resulting in a large time rate of change of the first moment of vorticity (or fluid impulse), hence a large aerodynamic force. The other is the well known "delayed stall" mechanism: in the mid-portion of the up- or downstroke the wing moves at large angle of attack (about 45 deg) and the leading-edge-vortex (LEV) moves with the wing; thus, the vortex ring, formed by the LEV, the tip vortices, and the starting vortex, expands in size continuously, producing a large time rate of change of fluid impulse or a large aerodynamic force.

  20. [A description of the yaws infection and prevention conditions in the health district of Adzopé].

    PubMed

    Konan, Yao Eugène; M'Bea, Kouassi Jean-jacques; Coulibaly, Amed; Tetchi, Ekissi Orsot; Kpébo, Djoukou Olga Denise; Aké, Odile; Angbo-Effi, Odile; Gohou-Kouassi, Valerie; Konan, Kouakou Michel; Assi, Poquelin; Koffi, Kouamé

    2007-01-01

    This article reports on a cross-sectional study which aims to describe the situation of yaws in the boroughs of Asseudji located in the health district of Adzopé. The study's population group consisted of 206 household heads, and 2182 subjects who were tested and examined for yaws. The primary sources of pollution levels for a household were domestic animal waste (100%) and garbage stored in close proximity to the household's dwelling (49%). Signs of over-crowding were found in 43.7% of households. The sore "mother yaw" is the most common manifestation of yaws (81.5%). However, the majority of household heads were ignorant of the supporting causes and risk factors (64.1%) and the contagious natures of the infection (52.9%). Among the 2182 subjects examined, 11 (5%) had contracted yaws. The proportion of households with at least one case of yaws was 3.4%. The results of this census demonstrate that swift and strong action should be taken in these towns to prevent the outbreak of an epidemic.

  1. Wingbeat kinematics and motor control of yaw turns in Anna's hummingbirds (Calypte anna).

    PubMed

    Altshuler, Douglas L; Quicazán-Rubio, Elsa M; Segre, Paolo S; Middleton, Kevin M

    2012-12-01

    The biomechanical and neuromuscular mechanisms used by different animals to generate turns in flight are highly variable. Body size and body plan exert some influence, e.g. birds typically roll their body to orient forces generated by the wings whereas insects are capable of turning via left-right wingbeat asymmetries. Turns are also relatively brief and have low repeatability, with almost every wingbeat serving a different function throughout the change in heading. Here we present an analysis of Anna's hummingbirds (Calypte anna) as they fed continuously from an artificial feeder revolving around the outside of the animal. This setup allowed for examination of sustained changes in yaw without requiring any corresponding changes in pitch, roll or body position. Hummingbirds sustained yaw turns by expanding the wing stroke amplitude of the outer wing during the downstroke and by altering the deviation of the wingtip path during both downstroke and upstroke. The latter led to a shift in the inner-outer stroke plane angle during the upstroke and shifts in the elevation of the stroke plane and in the deviation of the wingtip path during both strokes. These features are generally more similar to how insects, as opposed to birds, turn. However, time series analysis also revealed considerable stroke-to-stroke variation. Changes in the stroke amplitude and the wingtip velocity were highly cross-correlated, as were changes in the stroke deviation and the elevation of the stroke plane. As was the case for wingbeat kinematics, electromyogram recordings from pectoral and wing muscles were highly variable, but no correlations were found between these two features of motor control. The high variability of both kinematic and muscle activation features indicates a high level of wingbeat-to-wingbeat adjustments during sustained yaw. The activation timing of the muscles was more repeatable than the activation intensity, which suggests that the former may be constrained by harmonic

  2. Additional calculations of triton moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lally, D. F.; Levinger, J. S.

    1982-02-01

    The formalism of hyperspherical harmonics is used to calculate several moments of the triton photoeffect for a Volkov potential with Serber exchange. The accuracy of Clare's calculations of moments σ0 and σ1 is improved by including more terms in the hyperspherical harmonic expansion of the potential and of the ground state wave function. The moment σ2=8.9×104 MeV3 mb is calculated using one term in the hyperspherical harmonic expansions of the potential and wave function. We invert four moments and find reasonable agreement with Gorbunov's measurements of the 3He photoeffect. NUCLEAR REACTIONS Triton photoeffect, hyperspherical harmonics, moments of photoeffect, inversion of moments.

  3. Moments of Inertia: Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Dryden Remotely Operated Integrated Drone (DROID)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haro, Helida C.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this research effort is to determine the most appropriate, cost efficient, and effective method to utilize for finding moments of inertia for the Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Dryden Remotely Operated Integrated Drone (DROID). A moment is a measure of the body's tendency to turn about its center of gravity (CG) and inertia is the resistance of a body to changes in its momentum. Therefore, the moment of inertia (MOI) is a body's resistance to change in rotation about its CG. The inertial characteristics of an UAV have direct consequences on aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, and control. Therefore, it is imperative to determine the precise inertial characteristics of the DROID.

  4. Moments of Inertia - Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Dryden Remotely Operated Integrated Drone (DROID)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haro, Helida C.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this research effort is to determine the most appropriate, cost efficient, and effective method to utilize for finding moments of inertia for the Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Dryden Remotely Operated Integrated Drone (DROID). A moment is a measure of the body's tendency to turn about its center of gravity (CG) and inertia is the resistance of a body to changes in its momentum. Therefore, the moment of inertia (MOI) is a body's resistance to change in rotation about its CG. The inertial characteristics of an UAV have direct consequences on aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, and control. Therefore, it is imperative to determine the precise inertial characteristics of the DROID.

  5. Configuration Aerodynamics: Past - Present - Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Agrawal, Shreekant; Bencze, Daniel P.; Kulfan, Robert M.; Wilson, Douglas L.

    1999-01-01

    The Configuration Aerodynamics (CA) element of the High Speed Research (HSR) program is managed by a joint NASA and Industry team, referred to as the Technology Integration Development (ITD) team. This team is responsible for the development of a broad range of technologies for improved aerodynamic performance and stability and control characteristics at subsonic to supersonic flight conditions. These objectives are pursued through the aggressive use of advanced experimental test techniques and state of the art computational methods. As the HSR program matures and transitions into the next phase the objectives of the Configuration Aerodynamics ITD are being refined to address the drag reduction needs and stability and control requirements of High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) aircraft. In addition, the experimental and computational tools are being refined and improved to meet these challenges. The presentation will review the work performed within the Configuration Aerodynamics element in 1994 and 1995 and then discuss the plans for the 1996-1998 time period. The final portion of the presentation will review several observations of the HSR program and the design activity within Configuration Aerodynamics.

  6. Aerodynamic drag on intermodal railcars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinghorn, Philip; Maynes, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    The aerodynamic drag associated with transport of commodities by rail is becoming increasingly important as the cost of diesel fuel increases. This study aims to increase the efficiency of intermodal cargo trains by reducing the aerodynamic drag on the load carrying cars. For intermodal railcars a significant amount of aerodynamic drag is a result of the large distance between loads that often occurs and the resulting pressure drag resulting from the separated flow. In the present study aerodynamic drag data have been obtained through wind tunnel testing on 1/29 scale models to understand the savings that may be realized by judicious modification to the size of the intermodal containers. The experiments were performed in the BYU low speed wind tunnel and the test track utilizes two leading locomotives followed by a set of five articulated well cars with double stacked containers. The drag on a representative mid-train car is measured using an isolated load cell balance and the wind tunnel speed is varied from 20 to 100 mph. We characterize the effect that the gap distance between the containers and the container size has on the aerodynamic drag of this representative rail car and investigate methods to reduce the gap distance.

  7. A review of preflight estimates of real-gas effects on space shuttle aerodynamic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, W. C.; Arrington, J. P.; Hamilton, H. H., II

    1983-01-01

    Preflight estimates of the hypersonic aerodynamic characteristics of the Shuttle orbiter were based on a diverse series of research studies using state of the art techniques developed by basic research in the 60's and 70's. Real-gas viscous calculations on simple shapes that were used to evaluate correlation parameters indicated that real-gas effects reduce aerodynamic forces and moments. Inviscid calculations on winged lifting shapes indicated reduced forces and a slight nose-up pitch resulted because of real-gas effects. Analysis of the extensive wind tunnel data base indicated viscous correlation parameters provided the most appropriate extrapolation technique for estimating flight aerodynamics. Variations because of changes in the ratio of specific heats, which was the only available experimental tool for evaluating real-gas effects, indicated that reduced loads and nose-up pitching moments would occur at high altitudes and Mach numbers but that the values would not exceed the tolerances and variations established about the aerodynamic design data book values derived from viscous correlations. During STS-1, nose-up pitching moments exceeded the established variations.

  8. Effects of internal yaw-vectoring devices on the static performance of a pitch-vectoring nonaxisymmetric convergent-divergent nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asbury, Scott C.

    1993-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the static test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to evaluate the internal performance of a nonaxisymmetric convergent divergent nozzle designed to have simultaneous pitch and yaw thrust vectoring capability. This concept utilized divergent flap deflection for thrust vectoring in the pitch plane and flow-turning deflectors installed within the divergent flaps for yaw thrust vectoring. Modifications consisting of reducing the sidewall length and deflecting the sidewall outboard were investigated as means to increase yaw-vectoring performance. This investigation studied the effects of multiaxis (pitch and yaw) thrust vectoring on nozzle internal performance characteristics. All tests were conducted with no external flow, and nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 2.0 to approximately 13.0. The results indicate that this nozzle concept can successfully generate multiaxis thrust vectoring. Deflection of the divergent flaps produced resultant pitch vector angles that, although dependent on nozzle pressure ratio, were nearly equal to the geometric pitch vector angle. Losses in resultant thrust due to pitch vectoring were small or negligible. The yaw deflectors produced resultant yaw vector angles up to 21 degrees that were controllable by varying yaw deflector rotation. However, yaw deflector rotation resulted in significant losses in thrust ratios and, in some cases, nozzle discharge coefficient. Either of the sidewall modifications generally reduced these losses and increased maximum resultant yaw vector angle. During multiaxis (simultaneous pitch and yaw) thrust vectoring, little or no cross coupling between the thrust vectoring processes was observed.

  9. Aerodynamic control of NASP-type vehicles through Vortex manipulation. Volume 2: Static wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, Carlos J.; Kramer, Brian R.; Smith, Brooke C.; Malcolm, Gerald N.

    1993-01-01

    Forebody Vortex Control (FVC) was explored in this research program for potential application to a NASP-type configuration. Wind tunnel tests were conducted to evaluate a number of jet blowing schemes. The configuration tested has a slender forebody and a 78 deg swept delta wing. Blowing jets were implemented on the leeward side of the forebody with small circular tubes tangential to the surface that could be directed aft, forward, or at angles in between. The effects of blowing are observed primarily in the yawing and rolling moments and are highly dependent on the jet configuration and the angle of attack. Results show that the baseline flow field, without blowing activated, is quite sensitive to the geometry differences of the various protruding jets, as well as being sensitive to the blowing, particularly in the angle of attack range where the forebody vortices are naturally asymmetric. The time lag of the flow field response to the initiation of blowing was also measured. The time response was very short, on the order of the time required for the flow disturbance to travel the distance from the nozzle to the specific airframe location of interest at the free stream velocity. Overall, results indicate that sizable yawing and rolling moments can be induced with modest blowing levels. However, direct application of this technique on a very slender forebody would require thorough wind tunnel testing to optimize the jet location and configuration.

  10. Experimental aerodynamic characteristics of missiles with square cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zollars, G. J.; Yechout, R. T.; Daniel, D. C.; Lijewski, L. E.

    1983-05-01

    A series of quantitative and qualitative tests were conducted to expand the aerodynamic data base of square cross-section missiles. Quantitative tests included measuring forces and moments acting on square missiles, and measuring flowfield pressures on the leeward side of square missiles at various configurations and orientations in a subsonic wind tunnel. Force and moment data is presented showing the effects of variation in body corner radius, nose and fin shapes, pitch angle, and roll angle. Flowfield pressure and crossflow velocity data are presented for missiles of various pitch angles, roll angles, body corner radii, and fineness ratios (length to width ratio). In addition, flowfield data is shown along the axial length of a square missile. Qualitative tests included photographic tuft grids in the flowfield and photographing oil shear stress patterns on the surface of various missiles. These qualitative photographs are presented for various missile configurations and orientations.

  11. Recent Dynamic Measurements and Considerations for Aerodynamic Modeling of Fighter Airplane Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, Jay M.; Foster, John V.

    1998-01-01

    As airplane designs have trended toward the expansion of flight envelopes into the high angle of attack and high angular rate regimes, concerns regarding modeling the complex unsteady aerodynamics for simulation have arisen. Most current modeling methods still rely on traditional body axis damping coefficients that are measured using techniques which were intended for relatively benign flight conditions. This paper presents recent wind tunnel results obtained during large-amplitude pitch, roll and yaw testing of several fighter airplane configurations. A review of the similitude requirements for applying sub-scale test results to full-scale conditions is presented. Data is then shown to be a strong function of Strouhal number - both the traditional damping terms, but also the associated static stability terms. Additionally, large effects of sideslip are seen in the damping parameter that should be included in simulation math models. Finally, an example of the inclusion of frequency effects on the data in a simulation is shown.

  12. New technology in turbine aerodynamics.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, A. J.; Moffitt, T. P.

    1972-01-01

    Cursory review of some recent work that has been done in turbine aerodynamic research. Topics discussed include the aerodynamic effect of turbine coolant, high work-factor (ratio of stage work to square of blade speed) turbines, and computer methods for turbine design and performance prediction. Experimental cooled-turbine aerodynamics programs using two-dimensional cascades, full annular cascades, and cold rotating turbine stage tests are discussed with some typical results presented. Analytically predicted results for cooled blade performance are compared to experimental results. The problems and some of the current programs associated with the use of very high work factors for fan-drive turbines of high-bypass-ratio engines are discussed. Computer programs have been developed for turbine design-point performance, off-design performance, supersonic blade profile design, and the calculation of channel velocities for subsonic and transonic flowfields. The use of these programs for the design and analysis of axial and radial turbines is discussed.

  13. Recent advances in computational aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Ramesh K.; Desse, Jerry E.

    1991-04-01

    The current state of the art in computational aerodynamics is described. Recent advances in the discretization of surface geometry, grid generation, and flow simulation algorithms have led to flowfield predictions for increasingly complex and realistic configurations. As a result, computational aerodynamics is emerging as a crucial enabling technology for the development and design of flight vehicles. Examples illustrating the current capability for the prediction of aircraft, launch vehicle and helicopter flowfields are presented. Unfortunately, accurate modeling of turbulence remains a major difficulty in the analysis of viscosity-dominated flows. In the future inverse design methods, multidisciplinary design optimization methods, artificial intelligence technology and massively parallel computer technology will be incorporated into computational aerodynamics, opening up greater opportunities for improved product design at substantially reduced costs.

  14. Validation of engineering methods for predicting hypersonic vehicle controls forces and moments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maughmer, M.; Straussfogel, D.; Long, L.; Ozoroski, L.

    1991-01-01

    This work examines the ability of the aerodynamic analysis methods contained in an industry standard conceptual design code, the Aerodynamic Preliminary Analysis System (APAS II), to estimate the forces and moments generated through control surface deflections from low subsonic to high hypersonic speeds. Predicted control forces and moments generated by various control effectors are compared with previously published wind-tunnel and flight-test data for three vehicles: the North American X-15, a hypersonic research airplane concept, and the Space Shuttle Orbiter. Qualitative summaries of the results are given for each force and moment coefficient and each control derivative in the various speed ranges. Results show that all predictions of longitudinal stability and control derivatives are acceptable for use at the conceptual design stage.

  15. Baseball Aerodynamics: What do we know and how do we know it?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathan, Alan

    2009-11-01

    Baseball aerodynamics is governed by three phenomenological quantities: the coefficients of drag, lift, and moment, the latter determining the spin decay time constant. In past years, these quantities were studied mainly in wind tunnel experiments, whereby the forces on the baseball are measured directly. More recently, new tools are being used that focus on measuring accurate baseball trajectories, from which the forces can be inferred. These tools include high-speed motion analysis, video tracking of pitched baseballs (the PITCHf/x system), and Doppler radar tracking. In this contribution, I will discuss what these new tools are teaching us about baseball aerodynamics.

  16. Aerodynamics Research Revolutionizes Truck Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    During the 1970s and 1980s, researchers at Dryden Flight Research Center conducted numerous tests to refine the shape of trucks to reduce aerodynamic drag and improved efficiency. During the 1980s and 1990s, a team based at Langley Research Center explored controlling drag and the flow of air around a moving body. Aeroserve Technologies Ltd., of Ottawa, Canada, with its subsidiary, Airtab LLC, in Loveland, Colorado, applied the research from Dryden and Langley to the development of the Airtab vortex generator. Airtabs create two counter-rotating vortices to reduce wind resistance and aerodynamic drag of trucks, trailers, recreational vehicles, and many other vehicles.

  17. Mathematical modeling of the aerodynamics of high-angle-of-attack maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiff, L. B.; Tobak, M.; Malcolm, G. N.

    1980-01-01

    This paper is a review of the current state of aerodynamic mathematical modeling for aircraft motions at high angles of attack. The mathematical model serves to define a set of characteristic motions from whose known aerodynamic responses the aerodynamic response to an arbitrary high angle-of-attack flight maneuver can be predicted. Means are explored of obtaining stability parameter information in terms of the characteristic motions, whether by wind-tunnel experiments, computational methods, or by parameter-identification methods applied to flight-test data. A rationale is presented for selecting and verifying the aerodynamic mathematical model at the lowest necessary level of complexity. Experimental results describing the wing-rock phenomenon are shown to be accommodated within the most recent mathematical model by admitting the existence of aerodynamic hysteresis in the steady-state variation of the rolling moment with roll angle. Interpretation of the experimental results in terms of bifurcation theory reveals the general conditions under which aerodynamic hysteresis must exist.

  18. STEP and STEPSPL: Computer programs for aerodynamic model structure determination and parameter estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batterson, J. G.

    1986-01-01

    The successful parametric modeling of the aerodynamics for an airplane operating at high angles of attack or sideslip is performed in two phases. First the aerodynamic model structure must be determined and second the associated aerodynamic parameters (stability and control derivatives) must be estimated for that model. The purpose of this paper is to document two versions of a stepwise regression computer program which were developed for the determination of airplane aerodynamic model structure and to provide two examples of their use on computer generated data. References are provided for the application of the programs to real flight data. The two computer programs that are the subject of this report, STEP and STEPSPL, are written in FORTRAN IV (ANSI l966) compatible with a CDC FTN4 compiler. Both programs are adaptations of a standard forward stepwise regression algorithm. The purpose of the adaptation is to facilitate the selection of a adequate mathematical model of the aerodynamic force and moment coefficients of an airplane from flight test data. The major difference between STEP and STEPSPL is in the basis for the model. The basis for the model in STEP is the standard polynomial Taylor's series expansion of the aerodynamic function about some steady-state trim condition. Program STEPSPL utilizes a set of spline basis functions.

  19. In-Flight Aerodynamic Measurements of an Iced Horizontal Tailplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratvasky, Thomas P.; VanZante, Judith Foss

    1999-01-01

    The effects of tailplane icing on aircraft dynamics and tailplane aerodynamics were investigated using, NASA's modified DHC-6 Twin Otter icing research aircraft. This flight program was a major element of the four-year NASA/FAA research program that also included icing wind tunnel testing, dry-air aerodynamic wind tunnel testing, and analytical code development. Flight tests were conducted to obtain aircraft dynamics and tailplane aerodynamics of the DHC-6 with four tailplane leading-edge configurations. These configurations included a clean (baseline) and three different artificial ice shapes. Quasi-steady and various dynamic flight maneuvers were performed over the full range of angles of attack and wing flap settings with each iced tailplane configuration. This paper presents results from the quasi-steady state flight conditions and describes the range of flow fields at the horizontal tailplane, the aeroperformance effect of various ice shapes on tailplane lift and elevator hinge moment, and suggests three paths that can lead toward ice-contaminated tailplane stall. It was found that wing, flap deflection was the most significant factor in driving the tailplane angle of attack toward alpha(tail stall). However, within a given flap setting, an increase in airspeed also drove the tailplane angle of attack toward alpha(tail stall). Moreover, increasing engine thrust setting also pushed the tailplane to critical performance limits, which resulted in premature tailplane stall.

  20. Blunt Body Aerodynamics for Hypersonic Low Density Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, James N.; Glass, Christopher E.; Greene, Francis A.

    2006-01-01

    Numerical simulations are performed for the Apollo capsule from the hypersonic rarefied to the continuum regimes. The focus is on flow conditions similar to those experienced by the Apollo 6 Command Module during the high altitude portion of its reentry. The present focus is to highlight some of the current activities that serve as a precursor for computational tool assessments that will be used to support the development of aerodynamic data bases for future capsule flight environments, particularly those for the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). Results for aerodynamic forces and moments are presented that demonstrate their sensitivity to rarefaction; that is, free molecular to continuum conditions. Also, aerodynamic data are presented that shows their sensitivity to a range of reentry velocities, encompassing conditions that include reentry from low Earth orbit, lunar return, and Mars return velocities (7.7 to 15 km/s). The rarefied results obtained with direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) codes are anchored in the continuum regime with data from Navier-Stokes simulations.

  1. Atmospheric tests of trailing-edge aerodynamic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, L S; Huang, S; Quandt, G A

    1998-01-01

    An experiment was conducted at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory`s (NREL`s) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) using an instrumented horizontal-axis wind turbine that incorporated variable-span, trailing-edge aerodynamic brakes. The goal of the investigation was to directly compare results with (infinite-span) wind tunnel data and to provide information on how to account for device span effects during turbine design or analysis. Comprehensive measurements were used to define effective changes in the aerodynamic and hinge-moment coefficients, as a function of angle of attack and control deflection, for three device spans (7.5%, 15%, and 22.5%) and configurations (Spoiler-Flap, vented sileron, and unvented aileron). Differences in the lift and drag behavior are most pronounced near stall and for device spans of less than 15%. Drag performance is affected only minimally (about a 30% reduction from infinite-span) for 15% or larger span devices. Interestingly, aerodynamic controls with vents or openings appear most affected by span reductions and three-dimensional flow.

  2. Langley Symposium on Aerodynamics, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stack, Sharon H. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to present current work and results of the Langley Aeronautics Directorate covering the areas of computational fluid dynamics, viscous flows, airfoil aerodynamics, propulsion integration, test techniques, and low-speed, high-speed, and transonic aerodynamics. The following sessions are included in this volume: theoretical aerodynamics, test techniques, fluid physics, and viscous drag reduction.

  3. Moments in Time

    PubMed Central

    Wittmann, Marc

    2011-01-01

    It has been suggested that perception and action can be understood as evolving in temporal epochs or sequential processing units. Successive events are fused into units forming a unitary experience or “psychological present.” Studies have identified several temporal integration levels on different time scales which are fundamental for our understanding of behavior and subjective experience. In recent literature concerning the philosophy and neuroscience of consciousness these separate temporal processing levels are not always precisely distinguished. Therefore, empirical evidence from psychophysics and neuropsychology on these distinct temporal processing levels is presented and discussed within philosophical conceptualizations of time experience. On an elementary level, one can identify a functional moment, a basic temporal building block of perception in the range of milliseconds that defines simultaneity and succession. Below a certain threshold temporal order is not perceived, individual events are processed as co-temporal. On a second level, an experienced moment, which is based on temporal integration of up to a few seconds, has been reported in many qualitatively different experiments in perception and action. It has been suggested that this segmental processing mechanism creates temporal windows that provide a logistical basis for conscious representation and the experience of nowness. On a third level of integration, continuity of experience is enabled by working memory in the range of multiple seconds allowing the maintenance of cognitive operations and emotional feelings, leading to mental presence, a temporal window of an individual’s experienced presence. PMID:22022310

  4. Encoding of yaw in the presence of distractor motion: studies in a fly motion sensitive neuron.

    PubMed

    Roy, Suva; Sinha, Shiva R; de Ruyter van Steveninck, Rob

    2015-04-22

    Motion estimation is crucial for aerial animals such as the fly, which perform fast and complex maneuvers while flying through a 3-D environment. Motion-sensitive neurons in the lobula plate, a part of the visual brain, of the fly have been studied extensively for their specialized role in motion encoding. However, the visual stimuli used in such studies are typically highly simplified, often move in restricted ways, and do not represent the complexities of optic flow generated during actual flight. Here, we use combined rotations about different axes to study how H1, a wide-field motion-sensitive neuron, encodes preferred yaw motion in the presence of stimuli not aligned with its preferred direction. Our approach is an extension of "white noise" methods, providing a framework that is readily adaptable to quantitative studies into the coding of mixed dynamic stimuli in other systems. We find that the presence of a roll or pitch ("distractor") stimulus reduces information transmitted by H1 about yaw, with the amount of this reduction depending on the variance of the distractor. Spike generation is influenced by features of both yaw and the distractor, where the degree of influence is determined by their relative strengths. Certain distractor features may induce bidirectional responses, which are indicative of an imbalance between global excitation and inhibition resulting from complex optic flow. Further, the response is shaped by the dynamics of the combined stimulus. Our results provide intuition for plausible strategies involved in efficient coding of preferred motion from complex stimuli having multiple motion components.

  5. Formulation for Time-resolved Aerodynamic Damping in Dynamic Stall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corke, Thomas; Bowles, Patrick; Coleman, Dusty; Thomas, Flint

    2012-11-01

    A new Hilbert transform formulation of the equation of motion for a pitching airfoil in a uniform stream yields a time resolved aerodynamic damping factor, Ξ (t) = (√{ (Cm2 (t) +C m2 } /αmax) sinψ (t) , where Cm (t) is the instantaneous pitch moment coefficient, and C m (t) is the Hilbert transform of Cm (t) , αmax is the pitching amplitude, and ψ (t) is the time-resolved phase difference between the aerodynamic pitch moment and the instantaneous angle of attack. A Ξ (t) < 0 indicates unstable pressure loading that can be considered a necessary condition to excite stall flutter in an elastic airfoil. This will be illustrated in experiments with conditions producing ``light'' dynamic stall for a range of Mach numbers from 0.3-0.6. These reveal large negative excursions of Ξ (t) during the pitch-up portion of the cycle that correlates with the formation and convection of the dynamic stall vortex. The fact that the cycle-integrated damping coefficient is positive in all these cases underscores how the traditional diagnostic masks much of the physics that underlies the destabilizing effect of the dynamic stall process. This new insight can explain instances of transient limit-cycle growth of helicopter rotor vibrations. Supported by Bell Helicopter.

  6. Recent CFD Simulations of Shuttle Orbiter Contingency Abort Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadopoulos, Periklis; Prabhu, Dinesh; Wright, Michael; Davies, Carol; McDaniel, Ryan; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Wersinski, Paul; Gomez, Reynaldo; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Modern Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques were used to compute aerodynamic forces and moments of the Space Shuttle Orbiter in specific portions of contingency abort trajectory space. The trajectory space covers a Mach number range of 3.5-15, an angle-of-attack range of 20-60 degrees, an altitude range of 100-190 kft, and several different settings of the control surfaces (elevons, body flap, and speed brake). While approximately 40 cases have been computed, only a sampling of the results is presented here. The computed results, in general, are in good agreement with the Orbiter Operational Aerodynamic Data Book (OADB) data (i.e., within the uncertainty bands) for almost all the cases. However, in a limited number of high angle-of-attack cases (at Mach 15), there are significant differences between the computed results, especially the vehicle pitching moment, and the OADB data. A preliminary analysis of the data from the CFD simulations at Mach 15 shows that these differences can be attributed to real-gas/Mach number effects.

  7. New technology in turbine aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, A. J.; Moffitt, T. P.

    1972-01-01

    A cursory review is presented of some of the recent work that has been done in turbine aerodynamic research at NASA-Lewis Research Center. Topics discussed include the aerodynamic effect of turbine coolant, high work-factor (ratio of stage work to square of blade speed) turbines, and computer methods for turbine design and performance prediction. An extensive bibliography is included. Experimental cooled-turbine aerodynamics programs using two-dimensional cascades, full annular cascades, and cold rotating turbine stage tests are discussed with some typical results presented. Analytically predicted results for cooled blade performance are compared to experimental results. The problems and some of the current programs associated with the use of very high work factors for fan-drive turbines of high-bypass-ratio engines are discussed. Turbines currently being investigated make use of advanced blading concepts designed to maintain high efficiency under conditions of high aerodynamic loading. Computer programs have been developed for turbine design-point performance, off-design performance, supersonic blade profile design, and the calculation of channel velocities for subsonic and transonic flow fields. The use of these programs for the design and analysis of axial and radial turbines is discussed.

  8. Sensitivity analysis in computational aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bristow, D. R.

    1984-01-01

    Information on sensitivity analysis in computational aerodynamics is given in outline, graphical, and chart form. The prediction accuracy if the MCAERO program, a perturbation analysis method, is discussed. A procedure for calculating perturbation matrix, baseline wing paneling for perturbation analysis test cases and applications of an inviscid sensitivity matrix are among the topics covered.

  9. Aerodynamic laboratory at Cuatro Vientos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    JUBERA

    1922-01-01

    This report presents a listing of the many experiments in aerodynamics taking place at Cuatro Vientos. Some of the studies include: testing spheres, in order to determine coefficients; mechanical and chemical tests of materials; and various tests of propeller strength and flexibility.

  10. Shuttle reentry aerodynamic heating test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pond, J. E.; Mccormick, P. O.; Smith, S. D.

    1971-01-01

    The research for determining the space shuttle aerothermal environment is reported. Brief summaries of the low Reynolds number windward side heating test, and the base and leeward heating and high Reynolds number heating test are included. Also discussed are streamline divergence and the resulting effect on aerodynamic heating, and a thermal analyzer program that is used in the Thermal Environment Optimization Program.

  11. Dynamic Soaring: Aerodynamics for Albatrosses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denny, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Albatrosses have evolved to soar and glide efficiently. By maximizing their lift-to-drag ratio "L/D", albatrosses can gain energy from the wind and can travel long distances with little effort. We simplify the difficult aerodynamic equations of motion by assuming that albatrosses maintain a constant "L/D". Analytic solutions to the simplified…

  12. POEMS in Newton's Aerodynamic Frustum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampedro, Jaime Cruz; Tetlalmatzi-Montiel, Margarita

    2010-01-01

    The golden mean is often naively seen as a sign of optimal beauty but rarely does it arise as the solution of a true optimization problem. In this article we present such a problem, demonstrating a close relationship between the golden mean and a special case of Newton's aerodynamical problem for the frustum of a cone. Then, we exhibit a parallel…

  13. Rotary wing aerodynamically generated noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F. J.; Morse, H. A.

    1982-01-01

    The history and methodology of aerodynamic noise reduction in rotary wing aircraft are presented. Thickness noise during hover tests and blade vortex interaction noise are determined and predicted through the use of a variety of computer codes. The use of test facilities and scale models for data acquisition are discussed.

  14. Aerodynamic design via control theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, Antony

    1988-01-01

    The question of how to modify aerodynamic design in order to improve performance is addressed. Representative examples are given to demonstrate the computational feasibility of using control theory for such a purpose. An introduction and historical survey of the subject is included.

  15. An improved quasi-steady aerodynamic model for insect wings that considers movement of the center of pressure.

    PubMed

    Han, Jong-Seob; Kim, Joong-Kwan; Chang, Jo Won; Han, Jae-Hung

    2015-07-30

    A quasi-steady aerodynamic model in consideration of the center of pressure (C.P.) was developed for insect flight. A dynamically scaled-up robotic hawkmoth wing was used to obtain the translational lift, drag, moment and rotational force coefficients. The translational force coefficients were curve-fitted with respect to the angles of attack such that two coefficients in the Polhamus leading-edge suction analogy model were obtained. The rotational force coefficient was also compared to that derived by the standard Kutta-Joukowski theory. In order to build the accurate pitching moment model, the locations of the C.Ps. and its movements depending on the pitching velocity were investigated in detail. We found that the aerodynamic moment model became suitable when the rotational force component was assumed to act on the half-chord. This implies that the approximation borrowed from the conventional airfoil concept, i.e., the 'C.P. at the quarter-chord' may lead to an incorrect moment prediction. In the validation process, the model showed excellent time-course force and moment estimations in comparison with the robotic wing measurement results. A fully nonlinear multibody flight dynamic simulation was conducted to check the effect of the traveling C.P. on the overall flight dynamics. This clearly showed the importance of an accurate aerodynamic moment model.

  16. An improved quasi-steady aerodynamic model for insect wings that considers movement of the center of pressure.

    PubMed

    Han, Jong-Seob; Kim, Joong-Kwan; Chang, Jo Won; Han, Jae-Hung

    2015-08-01

    A quasi-steady aerodynamic model in consideration of the center of pressure (C.P.) was developed for insect flight. A dynamically scaled-up robotic hawkmoth wing was used to obtain the translational lift, drag, moment and rotational force coefficients. The translational force coefficients were curve-fitted with respect to the angles of attack such that two coefficients in the Polhamus leading-edge suction analogy model were obtained. The rotational force coefficient was also compared to that derived by the standard Kutta-Joukowski theory. In order to build the accurate pitching moment model, the locations of the C.Ps. and its movements depending on the pitching velocity were investigated in detail. We found that the aerodynamic moment model became suitable when the rotational force component was assumed to act on the half-chord. This implies that the approximation borrowed from the conventional airfoil concept, i.e., the 'C.P. at the quarter-chord' may lead to an incorrect moment prediction. In the validation process, the model showed excellent time-course force and moment estimations in comparison with the robotic wing measurement results. A fully nonlinear multibody flight dynamic simulation was conducted to check the effect of the traveling C.P. on the overall flight dynamics. This clearly showed the importance of an accurate aerodynamic moment model. PMID:26226478

  17. STAYLAM: A FORTRAN program for the suction transition analysis of a yawed wing laminar boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    A computer program called STAYLAM is presented for the computation of the compressible laminar boundary-layer flow over a yawed infinite wing including distributed suction. This program is restricted to the transonic speed range or less due to the approximate treatment of the compressibility effects. The prescribed suction distribution is permitted to change discontinuously along the chord measured perpendicular to the wing leading edge. Estimates of transition are made by considering leading edge contamination, cross flow instability, and instability of the Tollmien-Schlichting type. A program listing is given in addition to user instructions and a sample case.

  18. Cat vestibular neurons that exhibit different responses to active and passive yaw head rotations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, F. R.; Tomko, D. L.

    1987-01-01

    Neurons in the vestibular nuclei were recorded in alert cats during voluntary yaw rotations of the head and during the same rotations delivered with a turntable driven from a record of previous voluntary movements. During both voluntary and passive rotations, 35 percent (6/17) of neurons tested responded at higher rates or for a larger part of the movement during voluntary movements than during the same rotations delivered with the turntable. Neck sensory input was evaluated separately in many of these cells and can account qualitatively for the extra firing present during active movement.

  19. A compact roller-gear pitch-yaw joint module: Design and control issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dohring, Mark E.; Anderson, William J.; Newman, Wyatt S.; Rohn, Douglas A.

    1993-01-01

    Robotic systems have been proposed as a means of accomplishing assembly and maintenance tasks in space. The desirable characteristics of these systems include compact size, low mass, high load capacity, and programmable compliance to improve assembly performance. In addition, the mechanical system must transmit power in such a way as to allow high performance control of the system. Efficiency, linearity, low backlash, low torque ripple, and low friction are all desirable characteristics. This work presents a pitch-yaw joint module designed and built to address these issues. Its effectiveness as a two degree-of-freedom manipulator using natural admittance control, a method of force control, is demonstrated.

  20. A static investigation of a simultaneous pitch and yaw thrust vectoring 2-D C-D nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, John G.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the static test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the internal performance and flow-turning capability of a two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle. Thrust vectoring in the pitch plane was provided by rotation of the divergent flaps. The exhaust stream was turned in the yaw direction by deflection of yaw flaps hinged at the end of the nozzle sidewalls. The yaw flap hinge location was varied along the divergent region of the nozzle at four locations including the exit plane and the throat plane. The three hinge locations upstream of the nozzle exit plane required the downstream corners of both upper and lower divergent flaps to be cut off to eliminate interference when the yaw flaps were deflected. Three different lengths of yaw flaps were tested at several angles of deflection. The nozzle simulated a dry power setting with an expansion ratio typical of subsonic cruise and was tested at nozzle pressure ratios from 2.0 to 7.0.

  1. Differential Pressures on a Pitot-venturi and a Pitot-static Nozzle over 360 Degrees Pitch and Yaw

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bear, R M

    1928-01-01

    Measurements of the differential pressures on two navy air-speed nozzles, consisting of a Zahm type Pitot-Venturi tube and a SQ-16 two-pronged Pitot-static tube, in a tunnel air stream of fixed speed at various angles of pitch and yaw between 0 degrees and plus or minus 180 degrees. This shows for a range over -20 degrees to +20 degrees pitch and yaw, indicated air speeds varying very slightly over 2 per cent for the Zahm type and a maximum of about 5 per cent for the SQ-16 type from the calibrated speed at 0 degree. For both types of air-speed nozzle the indicated air speed increases slightly as the tubes are pitched or yawed several degrees from their normal 0 degrees altitude, attains a maximum around plus or minus 15 degrees to 25 degrees, declines rapidly therefrom as plus or minus 40 degrees is passed, to zero in the vicinity of plus or minus 70 degrees to 100 degrees, and thence fluctuates irregular from thereabouts to plus or minus 180 degrees. The complete variation in indicated air speed for the two tubes over 360 degree pitch and yaw is graphically portrayed in figures 9 and 10. For the same air speed and 0 degree pitch and yaw the differential pressure of the Zahm type Pitot-Venturi nozzle is about seven times that of the SQ-16 type two-prolonged Pitot-static nozzle.

  2. Theoretical Calculations of the Pressures, Forces, and Moments Due to Various Lateral Motions Acting on Tapered Sweptback Vertical Tails with Supersonic Leading and Trailing Edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolis, Kenneth; Elliott, Miriam H.

    1960-01-01

    Based on expressions for the linearized velocity potentials and pressure distributions given in NACA Technical Report 1268, formulas for the span load distribution, forces, and moments are derived for families of thin isolated vertical tails with arbitrary aspect ratio, taper ratio, and sweepback performing the motions constant sideslip, steady rolling, steady yawing, and constant lateral acceleration. The range of Mach number considered corresponds, in general, to the condition that the tail leading and trailing edges are supersonic. To supplement the analytical results, design-type charts are presented which enable rapid estimation of the forces and moments (expressed as stability derivatives) for given combinations of geometry parameters and Mach number.

  3. Aerodynamics of a linear oscillating cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffum, Daniel H.; Fleeter, Sanford

    1990-01-01

    The steady and unsteady aerodynamics of a linear oscillating cascade are investigated using experimental and computational methods. Experiments are performed to quantify the torsion mode oscillating cascade aerodynamics of the NASA Lewis Transonic Oscillating Cascade for subsonic inlet flowfields using two methods: simultaneous oscillation of all the cascaded airfoils at various values of interblade phase angle, and the unsteady aerodynamic influence coefficient technique. Analysis of these data and correlation with classical linearized unsteady aerodynamic analysis predictions indicate that the wind tunnel walls enclosing the cascade have, in some cases, a detrimental effect on the cascade unsteady aerodynamics. An Euler code for oscillating cascade aerodynamics is modified to incorporate improved upstream and downstream boundary conditions and also the unsteady aerodynamic influence coefficient technique. The new boundary conditions are shown to improve the unsteady aerodynamic influence coefficient technique. The new boundary conditions are shown to improve the unsteady aerodynamic predictions of the code, and the computational unsteady aerodynamic influence coefficient technique is shown to be a viable alternative for calculation of oscillating cascade aerodynamics.

  4. A Free-flight Wind Tunnel for Aerodynamic Testing at Hypersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiff, Alvin

    1954-01-01

    The supersonic free-flight wind tunnel is a facility at the Ames Laboratory of the NACA in which aerodynamic test models are gun-launched at high speed and directed upstream through the test section of a supersonic wind tunnel. In this way, test Mach numbers up to 10 have been attained and indications are that still higher speeds will be realized. An advantage of this technique is that the air and model temperatures simulate those of flight through the atmosphere. Also the Reynolds numbers are high. Aerodynamic measurements are made from photographic observation of the model flight. Instruments and techniques have been developed for measuring the following aerodynamic properties: drag, initial lift-curve slope, initial pitching-moment-curve slope, center of pressure, skin friction, boundary-layer transition, damping in roll, and aileron effectiveness. (author)

  5. Evaluation of Three-Dimensional Low-Speed Aerodynamic Performance for a Supersonic Biplane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, Shuichi; Ogawa, Toshihiro; Obayashi, Shigeru; Matsuno, Takashi; Kawazoe, Hiromitsu

    This study focuses on the aerodynamic performance of the supersonic biplane at the low-speed region. The performance was evaluated and discussed through Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and Experimental Fluid Dynamics (EFD). The result of the CFD simulation was compared with the experimental result to validate the simulation and confirmed to be reliable. Therefore, the CFD results were employed to derive the aerodynamic performance coupled with the theoretical equations. In the wind tunnel experiment, the three-component force measurement was conducted to obtain lift, drag and pitching moment coefficients. The wake survey was conducted to measure the drag in detail. The results proved the low-speed aerodynamic performance of the supersonic biplane can be described by the classical ``general biplane theory'' reasonably well.

  6. Aerodynamic interactions between a 1/6-scale helicopter rotor and a body of revolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betzina, M. D.; Shinoda, P.

    1982-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation was conducted in which independent, steady-state aerodynamic forces and moments were measured on a 2.24-m-diam, two-bladed helicopter rotor and a body of revolution. The objective was to determine the interaction of the body on the rotor performance and the effect of the rotor on the body aerodynamics for variations in velocity, thrust, tip-path-plane angle of attack, rotor/body position, and body nose geometry. Results show that a body of revolution near the rotor can produce significant favorable or unfavorable effects on rotor performance, depending on the operating condition. Body longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics are significantly modified by the presence of an operating rotor and hub.

  7. Aerodynamic interactions between a 1/6 scale helicopter rotor and a body of revolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betzina, M. D.; Shinoda, P.

    1982-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation was conducted in which independent, steady state aerodynamic forces and moments were measured on a 2.24-m-diam, two bladed helicopter rotor and a body of revolution. The objective was to determine the interaction of the body on the rotor performance and the effect of the rotor on the body aerodynamics for variations in velocity, thrust, tip-path-plane angle of attack, body angle of attack, rotor/body position, and body nose geometry. Results show that a body of revolution near the rotor can produce significant favorable or unfavorable effects on rotor performance, depending on the operating condition. Body longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics are significantly modified by the presence of an operating rotor and hub.

  8. Prediction of Aerodynamic Coefficients for Wind Tunnel Data using a Genetic Algorithm Optimized Neural Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajkumar, T.; Aragon, Cecilia; Bardina, Jorge; Britten, Roy

    2002-01-01

    A fast, reliable way of predicting aerodynamic coefficients is produced using a neural network optimized by a genetic algorithm. Basic aerodynamic coefficients (e.g. lift, drag, pitching moment) are modelled as functions of angle of attack and Mach number. The neural network is first trained on a relatively rich set of data from wind tunnel tests of numerical simulations to learn an overall model. Most of the aerodynamic parameters can be well-fitted using polynomial functions. A new set of data, which can be relatively sparse, is then supplied to the network to produce a new model consistent with the previous model and the new data. Because the new model interpolates realistically between the sparse test data points, it is suitable for use in piloted simulations. The genetic algorithm is used to choose a neural network architecture to give best results, avoiding over-and under-fitting of the test data.

  9. Aircraft aerodynamic prediction method for V/STOL transition including flow separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilmer, B. R.; Miner, G. A.; Bristow, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    A numerical procedure was developed for the aerodynamic force and moment analysis of V/STOL aircraft operating in the transition regime between hover and conventional forward flight. The trajectories, cross sectional area variations, and mass entrainment rates of the jets are calculated by the Adler-Baron Jet-in-Crossflow Program. The inviscid effects of the interaction between the jets and airframe on the aerodynamic properties are determined by use of the MCAIR 3-D Subsonic properties are determined by use of the MCAIR 3-D Subsonic Potential Flow Program, a surface panel method. In addition, the MCAIR 3-D Geometry influence Coefficient Program is used to calculate a matrix of partial derivatives that represent the rate of change of the inviscid aerodynamic properties with respect to arbitrary changes in the effective wing shape.

  10. Integration of vehicle yaw stabilisation and rollover prevention through nonlinear hierarchical control allocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberding, Matthäus B.; Tjønnås, Johannes; Johansen, Tor A.

    2014-12-01

    This work presents an approach to rollover prevention that takes advantage of the modular structure and optimisation properties of the control allocation paradigm. It eliminates the need for a stabilising roll controller by introducing rollover prevention as a constraint on the control allocation problem. The major advantage of this approach is the control authority margin that remains with a high-level controller even during interventions for rollover prevention. In this work, the high-level control is assigned to a yaw stabilising controller. It could be replaced by any other controller. The constraint for rollover prevention could be replaced by or extended to different control objectives. This work uses differential braking for actuation. The use of additional or different actuators is possible. The developed control algorithm is computationally efficient and suitable for low-cost automotive electronic control units. The predictive design of the rollover prevention constraint does not require any sensor equipment in addition to the yaw controller. The method is validated using an industrial multi-body vehicle simulation environment.

  11. Yaws, syphilis, sexuality, and the circulation of medical knowledge in the British Caribbean and the Atlantic world.

    PubMed

    Paugh, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    This history of the disease categories "yaws" and "syphilis" explores the interplay between European and African medical cultures in the early modern Atlantic world. The assertion made by both early modern and modern medical authorities, that yaws and syphilis are the same disease, prompts a case study of the history of disease that reflects on a variety of issues in the history of medicine: the use of ideas about contagion to demarcate racial and sexual difference at sites around the British Empire; the contrast between persistently holistic ideas about disease causation in the Black Atlantic and the growth of ontological theories of disease among Europeans and Euro-Americans; and the controversy over the African practice of yaws inoculation, which may once have been an effective treatment but was stamped out by plantation owners who viewed it as a waste of their enslaved laborers' valuable time.

  12. Yaws, syphilis, sexuality, and the circulation of medical knowledge in the British Caribbean and the Atlantic world.

    PubMed

    Paugh, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    This history of the disease categories "yaws" and "syphilis" explores the interplay between European and African medical cultures in the early modern Atlantic world. The assertion made by both early modern and modern medical authorities, that yaws and syphilis are the same disease, prompts a case study of the history of disease that reflects on a variety of issues in the history of medicine: the use of ideas about contagion to demarcate racial and sexual difference at sites around the British Empire; the contrast between persistently holistic ideas about disease causation in the Black Atlantic and the growth of ontological theories of disease among Europeans and Euro-Americans; and the controversy over the African practice of yaws inoculation, which may once have been an effective treatment but was stamped out by plantation owners who viewed it as a waste of their enslaved laborers' valuable time. PMID:24976161

  13. Evaluation of Multiplex-Based Antibody Testing for Use in Large-Scale Surveillance for Yaws: a Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Cooley, Gretchen M.; Mitja, Oriol; Goodhew, Brook; Pillay, Allan; Lammie, Patrick J.; Castro, Arnold; Moses, Penias; Chen, Cheng; Ye, Tun; Ballard, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    WHO has targeted yaws for global eradication by 2020. The program goals are to interrupt the transmission in countries where yaws is endemic and to certify countries as yaws free where yaws was endemic in the past. No new rapid plasmin reagin (RPR) seroreactivity in young children is required for certification of elimination at a country level. We sought to evaluate whether antibody responses to specific treponemal antigens measured in a high-throughput multiplex bead array (MBA) assay differentiate past versus current infection and whether a nontreponemal lipoidal antigen test can be incorporated into the MBA. Serum and dried blood spot specimens collected for yaws surveillance projects in Ghana, Vanuatu, and Papua New Guinea (PNG) were run on MBA to measure antibodies against recombinant p17 (rp17) and treponemal membrane protein A (TmpA) treponemal antigens. Results were compared to standard treponemal laboratory (TPPA or TPHA [TPP(H)A]) and quantitative RPR test data. Of 589 specimens, 241 were TPP(H)A+/RPR+, 88 were TPP(H)A+/RPR−, 6 were TPP(H)A−/RPR+, and 254 were negative for both tests. Compared to TPP(H)A, reactive concordance of rp17 was 93.7%, while reactive concordance of TmpA was only 81.9%. TmpA-specific reactivity showed good correlation with RPR titers (R2 = 0.41; P < 0.0001). IgG responses to the lipoidal antigen used in RPR testing (cardiolipin) were not detected in the MBA. Our results suggest that TmpA can be used as a treponemal antigen marker for recent or active infection and potentially replace RPR in a high-throughput multiplex tool for large-scale yaws surveillance. PMID:26962086

  14. Direct measurements of controlled aerodynamic forces on a wire-suspended axisymmetric body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramson, Philip; Vukasinovic, Bojan; Glezer, Ari

    2011-06-01

    A novel in-line miniature force transducer is developed for direct measurements of the net aerodynamic forces and moments on a bluff body. The force transducers are integrated into each of the eight mounting wires that are utilized for suspension of an axisymmetric model in a wind tunnel having minimal wake interference. The aerodynamic forces and moments on the model are altered by induced active local attachment of the separated base flow. Fluidic control is effected by an array of four integrated aft-facing synthetic jet actuators that emanate from narrow, azimuthally segmented slots, equally distributed around the perimeter of the circular tail end. The jet orifices are embedded within a small backward-facing step that extends into a Coanda surface. The altered flow dynamics associated with both quasi-steady and transitory asymmetric activation of the flow control effect is characterized by direct force and PIV measurements.

  15. Experimental investigation into the interference aerodynamics of two slender bodies in close proximity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaplin, R.; MacManus, D.; Leopold, F.; Gauthier, T.; Martinez, B.; Birch, T.

    2011-02-01

    Aerodynamic interference between high-speed slender bodies can detrimentally affect the force and moment characteristics. This is investigated through a wind tunnel study using pressure sensitive paint and force measurements on a receiver body placed adjacent to a generator body. The aim of this paper is to understand both the force and moment changes as well as the underlying aerodynamics of the interference loads which are induced by the disturbance flowfield. The impact of receiver incidence and the strength of the disturbance field are also assessed. The observed interference loads primarily depend on a complex balance of static pressure footprints and tend to be bespoke to each configuration. As a result, overall trends are difficult to extract, but in general the magnitude of the interference loads increases when the receiver is at incidence and also when the strength of the imposed disturbance flowfield increases.

  16. Wing kinematics measurement and aerodynamics of hovering droneflies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanpeng; Sun, Mao

    2008-07-01

    The time courses of wing and body kinematics of three freely hovering droneflies (Eristalis tenax) were measured using 3D high-speed video, and the morphological parameters of the wings and body of the insects were also measured. The measured wing kinematics was used in a Navier-Stokes solver to compute the aerodynamic forces and moments acting on the insects. The time courses of the geometrical angle of attack and the deviation angle of the wing are considerably different from that of fruit flies recently measured using the same approach. The angle of attack is approximately constant in the mid portions of a half-stroke (a downstroke or upstroke) and varies rapidly during the stroke reversal. The deviation angle is relatively small and is higher at the beginning and the end of a half-stroke and lower at the middle of the half-stroke, giving a shallow U-shaped wing-tip trajectory. For all three insects considered, the computed vertical force is approximately equal to the insect weight (the difference is less than 6% of the weight) and the computed horizontal force and pitching moment about the center of mass of the insect are approximately zero. The computed results satisfying the equilibrium flight conditions, especially the moment balance condition, validate the computation model. The lift principle is mainly used to produce the weight-supporting vertical force, unlike the fruit flies who use both lift and drag principles to generate the vertical force; the vertical force is mainly due to the delayed stall mechanism. The magnitude of the inertia power is larger than that of the aerodynamic power, and the largest possible effect of elastic storage amounts to a reduction of flight power by around 40%, much larger than in the case of the fruit fly. PMID:18552290

  17. Wing kinematics measurement and aerodynamics of hovering droneflies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanpeng; Sun, Mao

    2008-07-01

    The time courses of wing and body kinematics of three freely hovering droneflies (Eristalis tenax) were measured using 3D high-speed video, and the morphological parameters of the wings and body of the insects were also measured. The measured wing kinematics was used in a Navier-Stokes solver to compute the aerodynamic forces and moments acting on the insects. The time courses of the geometrical angle of attack and the deviation angle of the wing are considerably different from that of fruit flies recently measured using the same approach. The angle of attack is approximately constant in the mid portions of a half-stroke (a downstroke or upstroke) and varies rapidly during the stroke reversal. The deviation angle is relatively small and is higher at the beginning and the end of a half-stroke and lower at the middle of the half-stroke, giving a shallow U-shaped wing-tip trajectory. For all three insects considered, the computed vertical force is approximately equal to the insect weight (the difference is less than 6% of the weight) and the computed horizontal force and pitching moment about the center of mass of the insect are approximately zero. The computed results satisfying the equilibrium flight conditions, especially the moment balance condition, validate the computation model. The lift principle is mainly used to produce the weight-supporting vertical force, unlike the fruit flies who use both lift and drag principles to generate the vertical force; the vertical force is mainly due to the delayed stall mechanism. The magnitude of the inertia power is larger than that of the aerodynamic power, and the largest possible effect of elastic storage amounts to a reduction of flight power by around 40%, much larger than in the case of the fruit fly.

  18. Mechanics and aerodynamics of insect flight control.

    PubMed

    Taylor, G K

    2001-11-01

    Insects have evolved sophisticated fight control mechanisms permitting a remarkable range of manoeuvres. Here, I present a qualitative analysis of insect flight control from the perspective of flight mechanics, drawing upon both the neurophysiology and biomechanics literatures. The current literature does not permit a formal, quantitative analysis of flight control, because the aerodynamic force systems that biologists have measured have rarely been complete and the position of the centre of gravity has only been recorded in a few studies. Treating the two best-known insect orders (Diptera and Orthoptera) separately from other insects, I discuss the control mechanisms of different insects in detail. Recent experimental studies suggest that the helicopter model of flight control proposed for Drosophila spp. may be better thought of as a facultative strategy for flight control, rather than the fixed (albeit selected) constraint that it is usually interpreted to be. On the other hand, the so-called 'constant-lift reaction' of locusts appears not to be a reflex for maintaining constant lift at varying angles of attack, as is usually assumed, but rather a mechanism to restore the insect to pitch equilibrium following a disturbance. Differences in the kinematic control mechanisms used by the various insect orders are related to differences in the arrangement of the wings, the construction of the flight motor and the unsteady mechanisms of lift production that are used. Since the evolution of insect flight control is likely to have paralleled the evolutionary refinement of these unsteady aerodynamic mechanisms, taxonomic differences in the kinematics of control could provide an assay of the relative importance of different unsteady mechanisms. Although the control kinematics vary widely between orders, the number of degrees of freedom that different insects can control will always be limited by the number of independent control inputs that they use. Control of the moments

  19. Computer Simulation of Aircraft Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inouye, Mamoru

    1989-01-01

    The role of Ames Research Center in conducting basic aerodynamics research through computer simulations is described. The computer facilities, including supercomputers and peripheral equipment that represent the state of the art, are described. The methodology of computational fluid dynamics is explained briefly. Fundamental studies of turbulence and transition are being pursued to understand these phenomena and to develop models that can be used in the solution of the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. Four applications of computer simulations for aerodynamics problems are described: subsonic flow around a fuselage at high angle of attack, subsonic flow through a turbine stator-rotor stage, transonic flow around a flexible swept wing, and transonic flow around a wing-body configuration that includes an inlet and a tail.

  20. Control of helicopter rotorblade aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabunmi, James A.

    1991-01-01

    The results of a feasibility study of a method for controlling the aerodynamics of helicopter rotorblades using stacks of piezoelectric ceramic plates are presented. A resonant mechanism is proposed for the amplification of the displacements produced by the stack. This motion is then converted into linear displacement for the actuation of the servoflap of the blades. A design which emulates the actuation of the servoflap on the Kaman SH-2F is used to demonstrate the fact that such a system can be designed to produce the necessary forces and velocities needed to control the aerodynamics of the rotorblades of such a helicopter. Estimates of the electrical power requirements are also presented. A Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase 2 Program is suggested, whereby a bench-top prototype of the device can be built and tested. A collaborative effort between AEDAR Corporation and Kaman Aerospace Corporation is anticipated for future effort on this project.

  1. Viking entry aerodynamics and heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polutchko, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    The characteristics of the Mars entry including the mission sequence of events and associated spacecraft weights are described along with the Viking spacecraft. Test data are presented for the aerodynamic characteristics of the entry vehicle showing trimmed alpha, drag coefficient, and trimmed lift to drag ratio versus Mach number; the damping characteristics of the entry configuration; the angle of attack time history of Viking entries; stagnation heating and pressure time histories; and the aeroshell heating distribution as obtained in tests run in a shock tunnel for various gases. Flight tests which demonstrate the aerodynamic separation of the full-scale aeroshell and the flying qualities of the entry configuration in an uncontrolled mode are documented. Design values selected for the heat protection system based on the test data and analysis performed are presented.

  2. Aerodynamic investigation by infrared imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, A. Sidney, Jr.; Mcree, Griffith J.; Gartenberg, Ehud

    1988-01-01

    Infrared imaging systems can be used to measure temperatures of actively heated bodies immersed in an airstream. This monitoring of the convective heat transfer process, provides also information about the interaction between the body and the flow. The concept appeals to Nusselt/Reynolds numbers relations in order to produce data of interest from surface temperatures. Two test cases are presented and reference is made to analytical results: the mapping of a laminar jet and the temperature distribution along a constant power heated flat plate in laminar boundary layer regime. Although this research is currently focused on low speed aerodynamics, the extension to high speed aerodynamics, where the body undergoes frictional heating is of interest in this context, too.

  3. Yawed-Landing Investigation of a Model of the Convair Y2-2 Airplane, TED No. NACA DE 363

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Edward L.; Fisher, Lloyd J.

    1950-01-01

    A model of the Convair Y2-2 airplane was tested in Langley tank no. 2 to determine whether satisfactory stability in yawed landings was possible with a certain ventral fin. Free-body landings were made in smooth and rough water at two speeds and two rates of descent with the model yawed 15deg. The behavior of the model was determined by visual observations and from motion-picture re.cords. It was concluded that satisfactory stability was possible with the ventral fin as tested but that the characteristics of the model shock absorbers and the settings of the elevon control surfaces had an appreciable influence on behavior.

  4. Analysis of aerodynamic coefficients using gradient data: Spanwise turbulence effects on airplane response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ringnes, E. A.; Frost, W.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of spanwise turbulence on airplane dynamic behavior is determined. Calculations are based on data collected from test flights with the NASA B-57 research aircraft. The approach is to first compute aerodynamic forces and moments due to a spanwise distribution of angle of attack and airspeed. Secondly, these quantities are incorporated into the equations of motion. Simulation of flights done with the effects of spanwise turbulence included are compared to simulations without any spanwise turbulence. The findings of the study are that the moments developed by turbulence along the span are significant and that more realistic flight simulation can be achieved by including the spanwise turbulence terms.

  5. CFD Simulations in Support of Shuttle Orbiter Contingency Abort Aerodynamic Database Enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadopoulos, Periklis E.; Prabhu, Dinesh; Wright, Michael; Davies, Carol; McDaniel, Ryan; Venkatapathy, E.; Wercinski, Paul; Gomez, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    Modern Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques were used to compute aerodynamic forces and moments of the Space Shuttle Orbiter in specific portions of contingency abort trajectory space. The trajectory space covers a Mach number range of 3.5-15, an angle-of-attack range of 20deg-60deg, an altitude range of 100-190 kft, and several different settings of the control surfaces (elevons, body flap, and speed brake). Presented here are details of the methodology and comparisons of computed aerodynamic coefficients against the values in the current Orbiter Operational Aerodynamic Data Book (OADB). While approximately 40 cases have been computed, only a sampling of the results is provided here. The computed results, in general, are in good agreement with the OADB data (i.e., within the uncertainty bands) for almost all the cases. However, in a limited number of high angle-of-attack cases (at Mach 15), there are significant differences between the computed results, especially the vehicle pitching moment, and the OADB data. A preliminary analysis of the data from the CFD simulations at Mach 15 shows that these differences can be attributed to real-gas/Mach number effects. The aerodynamic coefficients and detailed surface pressure distributions of the present simulations are being used by the Shuttle Program in the evaluation of the capabilities of the Orbiter in contingency abort scenarios.

  6. Dynamic control of aerodynamic forces on a moving platform using active flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzozowski, Daniel P.

    The unsteady interaction between trailing edge aerodynamic flow control and airfoil motion in pitch and plunge is investigated in wind tunnel experiments using a two degree-of-freedom traverse which enables application of time-dependent external torque and forces by servo motors. The global aerodynamic forces and moments are regulated by controlling vorticity generation and accumulation near the trailing edge of the airfoil using hybrid synthetic jet actuators. The dynamic coupling between the actuation and the time-dependent flow field is characterized using simultaneous force and particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements that are taken phase-locked to the commanded actuation waveform. The effect of the unsteady motion on the model-embedded flow control is assessed in both trajectory tracking and disturbance rejection maneuvers. The time-varying aerodynamic lift and pitching moment are estimated from a PIV wake survey using a reduced order model based on classical unsteady aerodynamic theory. These measurements suggest that the entire flow over the airfoil readjusts within 2--3 convective time scales, which is about two orders of magnitude shorter than the characteristic time associated with the controlled maneuver of the wind tunnel model. This illustrates that flow-control actuation can be typically effected on time scales that are commensurate with the flow's convective time scale, and that the maneuver response is primarily limited by the inertia of the platform.

  7. Aerodynamic instability: A case history

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisenmann, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    The identification, diagnosis, and final correction of complex machinery malfunctions typically require the correlation of many parameters such as mechanical construction, process influence, maintenance history, and vibration response characteristics. The progression is reviewed of field testing, diagnosis, and final correction of a specific machinery instability problem. The case history presented addresses a unique low frequency instability problem on a high pressure barrel compressor. The malfunction was eventually diagnosed as a fluidic mechanism that manifested as an aerodynamic disturbance to the rotor assembly.

  8. Aerodynamic Design Using Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, Man Mohan; Madavan, Nateri K.

    2003-01-01

    The design of aerodynamic components of aircraft, such as wings or engines, involves a process of obtaining the most optimal component shape that can deliver the desired level of component performance, subject to various constraints, e.g., total weight or cost, that the component must satisfy. Aerodynamic design can thus be formulated as an optimization problem that involves the minimization of an objective function subject to constraints. A new aerodynamic design optimization procedure based on neural networks and response surface methodology (RSM) incorporates the advantages of both traditional RSM and neural networks. The procedure uses a strategy, denoted parameter-based partitioning of the design space, to construct a sequence of response surfaces based on both neural networks and polynomial fits to traverse the design space in search of the optimal solution. Some desirable characteristics of the new design optimization procedure include the ability to handle a variety of design objectives, easily impose constraints, and incorporate design guidelines and rules of thumb. It provides an infrastructure for variable fidelity analysis and reduces the cost of computation by using less-expensive, lower fidelity simulations in the early stages of the design evolution. The initial or starting design can be far from optimal. The procedure is easy and economical to use in large-dimensional design space and can be used to perform design tradeoff studies rapidly. Designs involving multiple disciplines can also be optimized. Some practical applications of the design procedure that have demonstrated some of its capabilities include the inverse design of an optimal turbine airfoil starting from a generic shape and the redesign of transonic turbines to improve their unsteady aerodynamic characteristics.

  9. Unsteady aerodynamics of insect flight.

    PubMed

    Ellington, C P

    1995-01-01

    Over the past decade, the importance of unsteady aerodynamic mechanisms for flapping insect flight has become widely recognised. Even at the fastest flight speeds, the old quasi-steady aerodynamic interpretation seems inadequate to explain the extra lift produced by the wings. Recent experiments on rigid model wings have confirmed the effectiveness of several postulated high-lift mechanisms. Delayed stall can produce extra lift for several chords of travel during the translational phases of the wingbeat. Lift can also be enhanced by circulation created during pronation and supination by rotational mechanisms: the fling/peel, the near fling/peel and isolated rotation. These studies have revealed large leading-edge vortices which contribute to the circulation around the wing, augmenting the lift. The mechanisms show distinctive patterns of vortex shedding from leading and trailing edges. The results of flow visualization experiments on tethered insects are reviewed in an attempt to identify the high-lift mechanisms actually employed. The fling/peel mechanism is clearly used by some insects. The near fling/peel is the wing motion most commonly observed, but evidence for the production of high lift remains indirect. For many insects, lift on the upstroke probably results from delayed stall instead of the flex mechanism of isolated rotation. The large leading-edge vortices from experiments on rigid model wings are greatly reduced or missing around the real insect wings, often making the identification of aerodynamic mechanisms inconclusive. A substantial spanwise flow component has been detected over the aerodynamic upper wing surface, which should transport leading-edge vorticity towards the wingtip before it has much time to roll up. This spanwise transport, arising from centrifugal acceleration, is probably a general phenomenon for flapping insect flight. It should reduce and stabilise any leading-edge vortices that are present, which is essential for preventing

  10. Inquiry-Based Science: Turning Teachable Moments into Learnable Moments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haug, Berit S.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines how an inquiry-based approach to teaching and learning creates teachable moments that can foster conceptual understanding in students, and how teachers capitalize upon these moments. Six elementary school teachers were videotaped as they implemented an integrated inquiry-based science and literacy curriculum in their…

  11. Aerodynamic characteristics of the standard dynamics model in coning motion at Mach 0.6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jermey, C.; Schiff, L. B.

    1985-01-01

    A wind tunnel test was conducted on the Standard Dynamics Model (a simplified generic fighter aircraft shape) undergoing coning motion at Mach 0.6. Six component force and moment data are presented for a range of angle of attack, sideslip, and coning rates. At the relatively low non-dimensional coning rate employed (omega b/2V less than or equal to 0.04), the lateral aerodynamic characteristics generally show a linear variation with coning rate.

  12. Effects of vortex flaps on the low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of an arrow wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yip, L. P.; Murri, D. G.

    1981-01-01

    Tests were conducted in the Langley 12-foot low-speed wind-tunnel to determine the longitudinal and lateral-directional aerodynamic effects of plain and tabbed vortex flaps on a flat-plate, highly swept arrow-wing model. Flow-visualization studies were made using a helium-bubble technique. Static forces and moments were measured over an angle-of-attack range from 0 deg to 50deg for sideslip angles of 0 deg and + or - 4 deg.

  13. Integration of dynamic, aerodynamic, and structural optimization of helicopter rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, David A.

    1991-01-01

    Summarized here is the first six years of research into the integration of structural, dynamic, and aerodynamic considerations in the design-optimization process for rotor blades. Specifically discussed here is the application of design optimization techniques for helicopter rotor blades. The reduction of vibratory shears and moments at the blade root, aeroelastic stability of the rotor, optimum airframe design, and an efficient procedure for calculating system sensitivities with respect to the design variables used are discussed.

  14. Applied aerodynamics: Challenges and expectations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Victor L.; Smith, Charles A.

    1993-01-01

    Aerospace is the leading positive contributor to this country's balance of trade, derived largely from the sale of U.S. commercial aircraft around the world. This powerfully favorable economic situation is being threatened in two ways: (1) the U.S. portion of the commercial transport market is decreasing, even though the worldwide market is projected to increase substantially; and (2) expenditures are decreasing for military aircraft, which often serve as proving grounds for advanced aircraft technology. To retain a major share of the world market for commercial aircraft and continue to provide military aircraft with unsurpassed performance, the U.S. aerospace industry faces many technological challenges. The field of applied aerodynamics is necessarily a major contributor to efforts aimed at meeting these technological challenges. A number of emerging research results that will provide new opportunities for applied aerodynamicists are discussed. Some of these have great potential for maintaining the high value of contributions from applied aerodynamics in the relatively near future. Over time, however, the value of these contributions will diminish greatly unless substantial investments continue to be made in basic and applied research efforts. The focus: to increase understanding of fluid dynamic phenomena, identify new aerodynamic concepts, and provide validated advanced technology for future aircraft.

  15. X-34 Vehicle Aerodynamic Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brauckmann, Gregory J.

    1998-01-01

    The X-34, being designed and built by the Orbital Sciences Corporation, is an unmanned sub-orbital vehicle designed to be used as a flying test bed to demonstrate key vehicle and operational technologies applicable to future reusable launch vehicles. The X-34 will be air-launched from an L-1011 carrier aircraft at approximately Mach 0.7 and 38,000 feet altitude, where an onboard engine will accelerate the vehicle to speeds above Mach 7 and altitudes to 250,000 feet. An unpowered entry will follow, including an autonomous landing. The X-34 will demonstrate the ability to fly through inclement weather, land horizontally at a designated site, and have a rapid turn-around capability. A series of wind tunnel tests on scaled models was conducted in four facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of the X-34. Analysis of these test results revealed that longitudinal trim could be achieved throughout the design trajectory. The maximum elevon deflection required to trim was only half of that available, leaving a margin for gust alleviation and aerodynamic coefficient uncertainty. Directional control can be achieved aerodynamically except at combined high Mach numbers and high angles of attack, where reaction control jets must be used. The X-34 landing speed, between 184 and 206 knots, is within the capabilities of the gear and tires, and the vehicle has sufficient rudder authority to control the required 30-knot crosswind.

  16. Aerodynamic Loads on Tails at High Angles of Attack and Sideslip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polhamus, E. C.; Spahr, J. R.

    1957-01-01

    Results are presented for the loads and moments acting on the individual tail surfaces of a body-tail combination over a wide range of angles of attack and sideslip. The effects of forebody length and panel-panel interference on the characteristics are included. It is shown that large nonlinear variations in these loads and moments, which occur at some combinations of angle of attack and sideslip, cannot be predicted by low-angle theory. A relatively simple, but general, theoretical method for calculating these load and moment characteristics is described, and the results from this method are found to be in good agreement with experiment provided the initial positions of the forebody vortices are known. It is shown that a simple application of slender-body theory can be used to predict the side loads due to sideslip that are contributed by a vertical tail on a wide variety of wing-body-tail combinations at low angles of attack. For several configurations, changes are indicated which reduced the vertical-tail loads per unit yawing moment of each complete configuration at large angles of attack. Some results are presented on the effect of high angle of attack on the induced-flow field and tail loads due to a wing at supersonic speed.

  17. Prevalence of Active and Latent Yaws in the Solomon Islands 18 Months after Azithromycin Mass Drug Administration for Trachoma

    PubMed Central

    Sokana, Oliver; Nachamkin, Eli; Puiahi, Elliot; Kilua, Georgina; Pillay, Allan; Bottomley, Christian; Solomon, Anthony W.; Mabey, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Both yaws and trachoma are endemic in the Pacific. Mass treatment with azithromycin is the mainstay of the WHO strategy for both the eradication of yaws and the elimination of trachoma as a public health problem, but the dose recommended for trachoma is lower than that for yaws. In countries where both diseases are endemic, there is a potential for synergy between yaws and trachoma control programs if mass treatment with the lower dose of azithromycin was shown to be effective for the treatment of yaws. In an earlier study, we demonstrated a profound reduction in the clinical and serological prevalence of yaws following a single round of mass treatment with azithromycin 20 mg/kg undertaken for the purposes of trachoma elimination. Methods This survey was conducted 18 months following a single round of azithromycin mass treatment in the same communities in which we had conducted our previous six-month follow-up survey. We examined children aged 1–14 years and took blood and lesion samples for yaws diagnosis using the Treponema pallidum particle agglutination assay (TPPA) and the non-treponemal Rapid Plasma Reagin (RPR) test. Results A total of 1,284 children were enrolled in the study. Amongst children aged 5–14 years, 223 had a positive TPPA (27.5%, 95% CI 13.6–47.7%). The TPPA seroprevalence amongst this age group did not differ significantly from either our pre-mass treatment survey or our initial follow-up survey. Thirty-five children had positive TPPA and positive RPR (4.3%, 95% CI 2.1–8.7%), and this did not differ significantly from our initial post-mass drug administration (MDA) follow-up survey (4.3% versus 3.5%, p = 0.43) but remained significantly lower than our initial pre-MDA survey (4.3% vs 21.7%, p <0.0001). Village-level MDA coverage was strongly associated with dual-seropositivity (p = 0.005). Amongst children aged 1–4 years, 16 had a positive TPPA (3.5%, 95% CI 1.6–7.1%). This did not differ significantly from the

  18. F-18 HARV yaw rate expansion flight #125 with Inverted Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, CA, used an F-18 Hornet fighter aircraft as its High Angle-of-Attack (Alpha) Research Vehicle (HARV) in a three-phased flight research program lasting from April 1987 until September 1996. The aircraft completed 385 research flights and demonstrated stabilized flight at angles of attack between 65 and 70 degrees using thrust vectoring vanes, a research flight control system, and (eventually) forebody strakes (hinged structures on the forward side of the fuselage to provide control by interacting with vortices, generated at high angles of attack, to create side forces). This combination of technologies provided carefree handling of a fighter aircraft in a part of the flight regime that was otherwise very dangerous. Flight research with the HARV increased our understanding of flight at high angles of attack (angle of the wings with respect to the direction in which the aircraft was heading), enabling designers of U.S. fighter aircraft to design airplanes that will fly safely in portions of the flight envelope that pilots previously had to avoid. Flight 125 with the HARV involved yaw rate expansion up to 50 degrees per second (moving the nose to the left or right at that rate). NASA research pilot Ed Schneider was the pilot, and the purpose of the flight was to look at the spin characteristics of the HARV. The sequence in this particular video clip includes the first and second maneuvers in the flight. On the first maneuver, the pilot attempted to achieve a yaw rate of 40 degrees per second and actually went to 47 degrees. The spin was oscillatory in pitch (up and down) and roll (rotating around the longitudinal axis). Recovery was normal. On the second maneuver of the flight in which Schneider tried to achieve a yaw rate of 40 degrees per second, the aircraft overshot to 54 degrees per second during an oscillatory spin. In the course of the recovery, the aircraft rolled after a large sideslip buildup. Moderate aft stick

  19. Assessment of the Reconstructed Aerodynamics of the Mars Science Laboratory Entry Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenenberger, Mark; Van Norman, John W.; Dyakonov, Artem A.; Karlgaard, Christopher D.; Way, David W.; Kutty, Prasad

    2013-01-01

    On August 5, 2012, the Mars Science Laboratory entry vehicle successfully entered Mars atmosphere, flying a guided entry until parachute deploy. The Curiosity rover landed safely in Gale crater upon completion of the Entry Descent and Landing sequence. This paper compares the aerodynamics of the entry capsule extracted from onboard flight data, including Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) accelerometer and rate gyro information, and heatshield surface pressure measurements. From the onboard data, static force and moment data has been extracted. This data is compared to preflight predictions. The information collected by MSL represents the most complete set of information collected during Mars entry to date. It allows the separation of aerodynamic performance from atmospheric conditions. The comparisons show the MSL aerodynamic characteristics have been identified and resolved to an accuracy better than the aerodynamic database uncertainties used in preflight simulations. A number of small anomalies have been identified and are discussed. This data will help revise aerodynamic databases for future missions and will guide computational fluid dynamics (CFD) development to improved prediction codes.

  20. Unstructured CFD Aerodynamic Analysis of a Generic UCAV Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frink, Neal T.; Tormalm, Magnus; Schmidt, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Three independent studies from the United States (NASA), Sweden (FOI), and Australia (DSTO) are analyzed to assess the state of current unstructured-grid computational fluid dynamic tools and practices for predicting the complex static and dynamic aerodynamic and stability characteristics of a generic 53-degree swept, round-leading-edge uninhabited combat air vehicle configuration, called SACCON. NASA exercised the USM3D tetrahedral cell-centered flow solver, while FOI and DSTO applied the FOI/EDGE general-cell vertex-based solver. The authors primarily employ the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) assumption, with a limited assessment of the EDGE Detached Eddy Simulation (DES) extension, to explore sensitivities to grids and turbulence models. Correlations with experimental data are provided for force and moments, surface pressure, and off-body flow measurements. The vortical flow field over SACCON proved extremely difficult to model adequately. As a general rule, the prospect of obtaining reasonable correlations of SACCON pitching moment characteristics with the RANS formulation is not promising, even for static cases. Yet, dynamic pitch oscillation results seem to produce a promising characterization of shapes for the lift and pitching moment hysteresis curves. Future studies of this configuration should include more investigation with higher-fidelity turbulence models, such as DES.

  1. Computational Aerodynamics of Shuttle Orbiter Damage Scenarios in Support of the Columbia Accident Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bibb, Karen L.; Prabhu, Ramadas K.

    2004-01-01

    In support of the Columbia Accident Investigation, inviscid computations of the aerodynamic characteristics for various Shuttle Orbiter damage scenarios were performed using the FELISA unstructured CFD solver. Computed delta aerodynamics were compared with the reconstructed delta aerodynamics in order to postulate a progression of damage through the flight trajectory. By performing computations at hypervelocity flight and CF4 tunnel conditions, a bridge was provided between wind tunnel testing in Langley's 20-Inch CF4 facility and the flight environment experienced by Columbia during re-entry. The rapid modeling capability of the unstructured methodology allowed the computational effort to keep pace with the wind tunnel and, at times, guide the wind tunnel efforts. These computations provided a detailed view of the flowfield characteristics and the contribution of orbiter components (such as the vertical tail and wing) to aerodynamic forces and moments that were unavailable from wind tunnel testing. The damage scenarios are grouped into three categories. Initially, single and multiple missing full RCC panels were analyzed to determine the effect of damage location and magnitude on the aerodynamics. Next is a series of cases with progressive damage, increasing in severity, in the region of RCC panel 9. The final group is a set of wing leading edge and windward surface deformations that model possible structural deformation of the wing skin due to internal heating of the wing structure. By matching the aerodynamics from selected damage scenarios to the reconstructed flight aerodynamics, a progression of damage that is consistent with the flight data, debris forensics, and wind tunnel data is postulated.

  2. 14 CFR 23.371 - Gyroscopic and aerodynamic loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... prescribed in § 23.351 and § 23.423; or (2) All possible combinations of the following— (i) A yaw velocity of 2.5 radians per second; (ii) A pitch velocity of 1.0 radian per second; (iii) A normal load factor... be designed to withstand the load factors expected during combined maximum yaw and pitch...

  3. 14 CFR 23.371 - Gyroscopic and aerodynamic loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... prescribed in § 23.351 and § 23.423; or (2) All possible combinations of the following— (i) A yaw velocity of 2.5 radians per second; (ii) A pitch velocity of 1.0 radian per second; (iii) A normal load factor... be designed to withstand the load factors expected during combined maximum yaw and pitch...

  4. 14 CFR 23.371 - Gyroscopic and aerodynamic loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... prescribed in § 23.351 and § 23.423; or (2) All possible combinations of the following— (i) A yaw velocity of 2.5 radians per second; (ii) A pitch velocity of 1.0 radian per second; (iii) A normal load factor... be designed to withstand the load factors expected during combined maximum yaw and pitch...

  5. 14 CFR 23.371 - Gyroscopic and aerodynamic loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... prescribed in § 23.351 and § 23.423; or (2) All possible combinations of the following— (i) A yaw velocity of 2.5 radians per second; (ii) A pitch velocity of 1.0 radian per second; (iii) A normal load factor... be designed to withstand the load factors expected during combined maximum yaw and pitch...

  6. 14 CFR 23.371 - Gyroscopic and aerodynamic loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... prescribed in § 23.351 and § 23.423; or (2) All possible combinations of the following— (i) A yaw velocity of 2.5 radians per second; (ii) A pitch velocity of 1.0 radian per second; (iii) A normal load factor... be designed to withstand the load factors expected during combined maximum yaw and pitch...

  7. Control-surface hinge-moment calculations for a high-aspect-ratio supercritical wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, B., III

    1978-01-01

    The hinge moments, at selected flight conditions, resulting from deflecting two trailing edge control surfaces (one inboard and one midspan) on a high aspect ratio, swept, fuel conservative wing with a supercritical airfoil are estimated. Hinge moment results obtained from procedures which employ a recently developed transonic analysis are given. In this procedure a three dimensional inviscid transonic aerodynamics computer program is combined with a two dimensional turbulent boundary layer program in order to obtain an interacted solution. These results indicate that trends of the estimated hinge moment as a function of deflection angle are similar to those from experimental hinge moment measurements made on wind tunnel models with swept supercritical wings tested at similar values of free stream Mach number and angle of attack.

  8. Lift, Drag, and Elevator Hinge Moments of Handley Page Control Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R H

    1928-01-01

    This report combines the wind tunnel results of tests on four control surface models made in the two wind tunnels of the Navy Aerodynamic Laboratory, Washington Navy Yard, during the years of 1922 and 1924, and submitted for publication to the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics May 7, 1927. The purpose of the tests was to compare, first, the lifts and the aerodynamic efficiencies of the control surfaces from which their relative effectiveness as tail planes could be determined; then the elevator hinge moments upon which their relative ease of operation depended. The lift and drag forces on the control surface models were obtained for various stabilizer angles and elevator settings in the 8 by 8 foot tunnel by the writer in 1922; the corresponding hinge moments were found in the 4 by 4 foot tunnel by Mr. R. M. Bear in 1924. (author)

  9. The Effect of Yaw Coupling in Turning Maneuvers of Large Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNeill, Walter E.; Innis, Robert C.

    1965-01-01

    A study has been made, using a piloted moving simulator, of the effects of the yaw-coupling parameters N(sub p) and N(sub delta(sub a) on the lateral-directional handling qualities of a large transport airplane at landing-approach airspeed. It is shown that the desirable combinations of these parameters tend to be more proverse when compared with values typical of current aircraft. Results of flight tests in a large variable-stability jet transport showed trends which were similar to those of the simulator data. Areas of minor disagreement, which were traced to differences in airplane geometry, indicate that pilot consciousness of side acceleration forces can be an important factor in handling qualities of future long-nosed transport aircraft.

  10. Treatment of herpes zoster with Clinacanthus nutans (bi phaya yaw) extract.

    PubMed

    Sangkitporn, S; Chaiwat, S; Balachandra, K; Na-Ayudhaya, T D; Bunjob, M; Jayavasu, C

    1995-11-01

    A randomized, placebo-controlled trial of the efficacy of topical formulation of Clinacanthus nutans (Bi Phaya Yaw) extract was carried out in 51 patients with varicella-zoster virus infection. The study medication was applied five times daily for 7-14 days until the lesions were healed. The number of patients with lesion crusting within 3 days and with lesion healing within 7 days and 10 days were significantly greater in the C. nutans extract-treated group than the placebo group (p < 0.01). Pain scores were reduced more rapidly in the C. nutans extract-treated group than in the placebo group. There were no side effects of the study medication.

  11. Static and yawed-rolling mechanical properties of two type 7 aircraft tires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, J. A.; Stubbs, S. M.; Mccarty, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    Selected mechanical properties of 18 x 5.5 and 49 x 17 size, type 7 aircraft tires were evaluated. The tires were subjected to pure vertical loads and to combined vertical and lateral loads under both static and rolling conditions. Parameters for the static tests consisted of tire load in the vertical and lateral directions, and parameters for the rolling tests included tire vertical load, yaw angle, and ground speed. Effects of each of these parameters on the measured tire characteristics are discussed and, where possible, compared with previous work. Results indicate that dynamic tire properties under investigation were generally insensitive to speed variations and therefore tend to support the conclusion that many tire dynamic characteristics can be obtained from static and low speed rolling tests. Furthermore, many of the tire mechanical properties are in good agreement with empirical predictions based on earlier research.

  12. MESA 3-D calculations of armor penetration by projectiles with combined obliquity and yaw

    SciTech Connect

    Cagliostro, D.J.; Mandell, D.A.; Schwalbe, L.A.; Adams, T.F.; Chapyak, E.J. )

    1989-01-01

    We introduce and briefly describe MESA, a new 3-D hydrodynamic code, developed specifically for simulations of armor and anti-armor systems. The code's current capabilities an its planned model improvements and additions are discussed. An Eulerian code using state-of-the-art numerical methods, MESA runs faster and is less affected by spurious numerical diffusion than older codes. It models hydrodynamic flow and the dynamic deformation of solid materials. It uses simple elastic-perfectly plastic material strength models as well as models with strain and strainrate hardening and thermal softening. Future versions will incorporate advanced fracture models. It treats detonations in explosives using a programmed burn. The code's current capabilities are illustrated with simulations of experiments on yawed rods obliquely impacting armor plates at 1.29 km/s. 12 refs., 14 figs.

  13. Aerodynamic lift effect on satellite orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, G. R.; Cleland, J. G.; Devries, L. L.

    1975-01-01

    Numerical quadrature is employed to obtain orbit perturbation results from the general perturbation equations. Both aerodynamic lift and drag forces are included in the analysis of the satellite orbit. An exponential atmosphere with and without atmospheric rotation is used. A comparison is made of the perturbations which are caused by atmospheric rotation with those caused by satellite aerodynamic effects. Results indicate that aerodynamic lift effects on the semi-major axis and orbit inclination can be of the same order as the effects of atmosphere rotation depending upon the orientation of the lift vector. The results reveal the importance of including aerodynamic lift effects in orbit perturbation analysis.

  14. HIAD-2 (Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator)

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) project is a disruptive technology that will accommodate the atmospheric entry of heavy payloads to planetary bodies such as Mars. HIAD over...

  15. Aerodynamic characteristics of a distinct wing-body configuration at Mach 6: Experiment, theory, and the hypersonic isolation principle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penland, J. A.; Pittman, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted to determine the effect of wing leading edge sweep and wing translation on the aerodynamic characteristics of a wing body configuration at a free stream Mach number of about 6 and Reynolds number (based on body length) of 17.9 x 10 to the 6th power. Seven wings with leading edge sweep angles from -20 deg to 60 deg were tested on a common body over an angle of attack range from -12 deg to 10 deg. All wings had a common span, aspect ratio, taper ratio, planform area, and thickness ratio. Wings were translated longitudinally on the body to make tests possible with the total and exposed mean aerodynamic chords located at a fixed body station. Aerodynamic forces were found to be independent of wing sweep and translation, and pitching moments were constant when the exposed wing mean aerodynamic chord was located at a fixed body station. Thus, the Hypersonic Isolation Principle was verified. Theory applied with tangent wedge pressures on the wing and tangent cone pressures on the body provided excellent predictions of aerodynamic force coefficients but poor estimates of moment coefficients.

  16. Progress in computational unsteady aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obayashi, Shigeru

    1993-01-01

    After vigorous development for over twenty years, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) in the field of aerospace engineering has arrived at a turning point toward maturity. This paper discusses issues related to algorithm development for the Euler/Navier Stokes equations, code validation and recent applications of CFD for unsteady aerodynamics. Algorithm development is a fundamental element for a good CFD program. Code validation tries to bridge the reliability gap between CFD and experiment. Many of the recent applications also take a multidisciplinary approach, which is a future trend for CFD applications. As computers become more affordable, CFD is expected to be a better scientific and engineering tool.

  17. The basic aerodynamics of floatation

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, M.J.; Wood, D.H.

    1983-09-01

    The original derivation of the basic theory governing the aerodynamics of both hovercraft and modern floatation ovens, requires the validity of some extremely crude assumptions. However, the basic theory is surprisingly accurate. It is shown that this accuracy occurs because the final expression of the basic theory can be derived by approximating the full Navier-Stokes equations in a manner that clearly shows the limitations of the theory. These limitations are used in discussing the relatively small discrepancies between the theory and experiment, which may not be significant for practical purposes.

  18. Aerodynamics. [numerical simulation using supercomputers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Randolph A., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A projection is made of likely improvements in the economics of commercial aircraft operation due to developments in aerodynamics in the next half-century. Notable among these improvements are active laminar flow control techniques' application to third-generation SSTs, in order to achieve an L/D value of about 20; this is comparable to current subsonic transports, and has the further consequence of reducing cabin noise. Wave-cancellation systems may also be used to eliminate sonic boom overpressures, and rapid-combustion systems may be able to eliminate all pollutants from jet exhausts other than CO2.

  19. Aerodynamics. [Numerical simulation using supercomputers

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, R.A. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A projection is made of likely improvements in the economics of commercial aircraft operation due to developments in aerodynamics in the next half-century. Notable among these improvements are active laminar flow control techniques' application to third-generation SSTs, in order to achieve an L/D value of about 20; this is comparable to current subsonic transports, and has the further consequence of reducing cabin noise. Wave-cancellation systems may also be used to eliminate sonic boom overpressures, and rapid-combustion systems may be able to eliminate all pollutants from jet exhausts other than CO/sub 2/.

  20. Point estimates for probability moments

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblueth, Emilio

    1975-01-01

    Given a well-behaved real function Y of a real random variable X and the first two or three moments of X, expressions are derived for the moments of Y as linear combinations of powers of the point estimates y(x+) and y(x-), where x+ and x- are specific values of X. Higher-order approximations and approximations for discontinuous Y using more point estimates are also given. Second-moment approximations are generalized to the case when Y is a function of several variables. PMID:16578731

  1. Computational study of the aerodynamics and control by blowing of asymmetric vortical flows over delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Ken

    1991-01-01

    Some of the work is described which was done in a study of the flow field produced by tangential leading edge blowing on a 60 deg. delta wing. The flow is studied computationally by solving the Thin Layer Navier-Stokes equations. Steady state flow fields are calculated for various angles of attack and yaw, with and without the presence of tangential leading edge blowing. The effectiveness of blowing as a rolling moment control mechanism to extend the envelope of controllability is illustrated at pre- and post-stall angles of attack. The numerical grid is generated using algebraic grid generation and various interpolation and blending techniques. The jet emanates from a slot with linearly varying thickness and is introduced into the flow field using the concept of an actuator plane, thereby not requiring resolution of the jet slot geometry. The Baldwin-Lomax algebraic turbulence model is used to provide turbulent closure. The computational results are compared with those of experiments.

  2. Aerodynamic pitching damping of vehicle-inspired bluff bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubokura, Makoto; Cheng, Seeyuan; Nakashima, Takuji; Nouzawa, Takahide; Okada, Yoshihiro

    2010-11-01

    Aerodynamic damping mechanism of road vehicles subjected to pitching oscillation was investigated by using large-eddy simulation technique. The study was based on two kinds of simplified vehicle models, which represent real sedan-type vehicles with different pitching stability in the on-road test. The simplified vehicle modes were developed so as to reproduce the characteristic flow structures above the trunk deck of the real vehicles measured in a wind-tunnel at the static case without oscillation. The forced sinusoidal pitching oscillation was imposed on the models and their pitching damping factors were evaluated through the phase-averaged pitching moment. Then flow structures in the wake of the models were extracted and its contribution to the damping mechanism was discussed. It was found that slight difference of the front and rear pillars' shape drastically affects the flow structures in the wake of the models, which enhance or restrain the vehicles' pitching instability.

  3. Forward flight of birds revisited. Part 1: aerodynamics and performance.

    PubMed

    Iosilevskii, G

    2014-10-01

    This paper is the first part of the two-part exposition, addressing performance and dynamic stability of birds. The aerodynamic model underlying the entire study is presented in this part. It exploits the simplicity of the lifting line approximation to furnish the forces and moments acting on a single wing in closed analytical forms. The accuracy of the model is corroborated by comparison with numerical simulations based on the vortex lattice method. Performance is studied both in tethered (as on a sting in a wind tunnel) and in free flights. Wing twist is identified as the main parameter affecting the flight performance-at high speeds, it improves efficiency, the rate of climb and the maximal level speed; at low speeds, it allows flying slower. It is demonstrated that, under most circumstances, the difference in performance between tethered and free flights is small. PMID:26064548

  4. Forward flight of birds revisited. Part 1: aerodynamics and performance

    PubMed Central

    Iosilevskii, G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper is the first part of the two-part exposition, addressing performance and dynamic stability of birds. The aerodynamic model underlying the entire study is presented in this part. It exploits the simplicity of the lifting line approximation to furnish the forces and moments acting on a single wing in closed analytical forms. The accuracy of the model is corroborated by comparison with numerical simulations based on the vortex lattice method. Performance is studied both in tethered (as on a sting in a wind tunnel) and in free flights. Wing twist is identified as the main parameter affecting the flight performance—at high speeds, it improves efficiency, the rate of climb and the maximal level speed; at low speeds, it allows flying slower. It is demonstrated that, under most circumstances, the difference in performance between tethered and free flights is small. PMID:26064548

  5. Forward flight of birds revisited. Part 1: aerodynamics and performance.

    PubMed

    Iosilevskii, G

    2014-10-01

    This paper is the first part of the two-part exposition, addressing performance and dynamic stability of birds. The aerodynamic model underlying the entire study is presented in this part. It exploits the simplicity of the lifting line approximation to furnish the forces and moments acting on a single wing in closed analytical forms. The accuracy of the model is corroborated by comparison with numerical simulations based on the vortex lattice method. Performance is studied both in tethered (as on a sting in a wind tunnel) and in free flights. Wing twist is identified as the main parameter affecting the flight performance-at high speeds, it improves efficiency, the rate of climb and the maximal level speed; at low speeds, it allows flying slower. It is demonstrated that, under most circumstances, the difference in performance between tethered and free flights is small.

  6. LTSTAR- SUPERSONIC WING NON-LINEAR AERODYNAMICS PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, H. W.

    1994-01-01

    The Supersonic Wing Nonlinear Aerodynamics computer program, LTSTAR, was developed to provide for the estimation of the nonlinear aerodynamic characteristics of a wing at supersonic speeds. This corrected linearized-theory method accounts for nonlinearities in the variation of basic pressure loadings with local surface slopes, predicts the degree of attainment of theoretical leading-edge thrust forces, and provides an estimate of detached leading-edge vortex loadings that result when the theoretical thrust forces are not fully realized. Comparisons of LTSTAR computations with experimental results show significant improvements in detailed wing pressure distributions, particularly for large angles of attack and for regions of the wing where the flow is highly three-dimensional. The program provides generally improved predictions of the wing overall force and moment coefficients. LTSTAR could be useful in design studies aimed at aerodynamic performance optimization and for providing more realistic trade-off information for selection of wing planform geometry and airfoil section parameters. Input to the LTSTAR program includes wing planform data, freestream conditions, wing camber, wing thickness, scaling options, and output options. Output includes pressure coefficients along each chord, section normal and axial force coefficients, and the spanwise distribution of section force coefficients. With the chordwise distributions and section coefficients at each angle of attack, three sets of polars are output. The first set is for linearized theory with and without full leading-edge thrust, the second set includes nonlinear corrections, and the third includes estimates of attainable leading-edge thrust and vortex increments along with the nonlinear corrections. The LTSTAR program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on a CDC 6000 series computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 150K (octal) of 60 bit words. The LTSTAR

  7. Investigation of space shuttle orbiter subsonic stability and control characteristics and determination of control surface hinge moments in the Rockwell International low speed wind tunnel (OA37)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, T.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations were conducted on a string-mounted 0.030 scale representation of the 140A/B space shuttle orbiter in the 7.75- by 11-foot low speed wind tunnel. The primary test objectives were to establish basic longitudinal and lateral directional stability and control characteristics for the basic configuration plus control surface hinge moments. Aerodynamic force and moment data were measured in the body axis system by an internally mounted, six-component strain gage balance. Additional configurations investigated were sealed rudder hingeline gaps, sealed elevon gaps and compartmentized speedbrakes.

  8. Differential elevon effectiveness lateral control optimization and elevon hinge moment investigation on a 0.015 scale space shuttle orbiter model 49-0 (140A/B/C modified) in the AECD VKF wind tunnel A (0A115)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esparza, V.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations were conducted in the Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) Von Karman Facility Tunnel A on a scale model of the space shuttle orbiter. The objectives of this test were: (1) determine supersonic differential elevon/aileron lateral control optimization, (2) determine supersonic elevon hinge moments, (3) determine the supersonic effects of the new baseline 6-inch elevon/elevon and elevon/fuselage gaps, and 4) determine the supersonic effects of the new short (VL70-008410) OMS pods. Six-component aerodynamic force, moment, and elevon hinge moment data were recorded.

  9. Aerodynamic load distributions at transonic speeds for a close-coupled wing-canard configuration: Tabulated pressure data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washburn, K. E.; Gloss, B. B.

    1978-01-01

    Wind tunnel studies are reported on both the canard and wing surfaces of a model that is geometrically identical to one used in several force and moment tests to provide insight into the various aerodynamic interference effects. In addition to detailed pressures measurements, the pressures were integrated to illustrate the effects of Mach number, canard location, and canard-wing interference on various aerodynamic parameters. Transonic pressure tunnel Mach numbers ranged from 0.70 to 1.20 for data taken from 0 deg to approximately 16 deg angle-of-attack at 0 deg sideslip.

  10. Some Advanced Concepts in Discrete Aerodynamic Sensitivity Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Arthur C., III; Green, Lawrence L.; Newman, Perry A.; Putko, Michele M.

    2003-01-01

    An efficient incremental iterative approach for differentiating advanced flow codes is successfully demonstrated on a two-dimensional inviscid model problem. The method employs the reverse-mode capability of the automatic differentiation software tool ADIFOR 3.0 and is proven to yield accurate first-order aerodynamic sensitivity derivatives. A substantial reduction in CPU time and computer memory is demonstrated in comparison with results from a straightforward, black-box reverse-mode applicaiton of ADIFOR 3.0 to the same flow code. An ADIFOR-assisted procedure for accurate second-rder aerodynamic sensitivity derivatives is successfully verified on an inviscid transonic lifting airfoil example problem. The method requires that first-order derivatives are calculated first using both the forward (direct) and reverse (adjoinct) procedures; then, a very efficient noniterative calculation of all second-order derivatives can be accomplished. Accurate second derivatives (i.e., the complete Hesian matrices) of lift, wave drag, and pitching-moment coefficients are calculated with respect to geometric shape, angle of attack, and freestream Mach number.

  11. Design Exploration of Aerodynamic Wing Shape for RLV Flyback Booster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Kazuhisa; Obayashi, Shigeru; Nakahashi, Kazuhiro

    The wing shape of flyback booster for a Two-Stage-To-Orbit reusable launch vehicle has been optimized considering four objectives. The objectives are to minimize the shift of aerodynamic center between supersonic and transonic conditions, transonic pitching moment and transonic drag coefficient, as well as to maximize subsonic lift coefficient. The three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes computation using the modified Spalart-Allmaras one-equation model is used in aerodynamic evaluation accounting for possible flow separations. Adaptive range multi-objective genetic algorithm is used for the present study because tradeoff can be obtained using a smaller number of individuals than conventional multi-objective genetic algorithms. Consequently, four-objective optimization has produced 102 non-dominated solutions, which represent tradeoff information among four objective functions. Moreover, Self-Organizing Maps have been used to analyze the present non-dominated solutions and to visualize tradeoffs and influence of design variables to the four objectives. Self-Organizing Maps contoured by the four objective functions and design variables are found to visualize tradeoffs and effects of each design variable.

  12. An experimental study of airfoil-spoiler aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclachlan, B. G.; Karamcheti, K.

    1985-01-01

    The steady/unsteady flow field generated by a typical two dimensional airfoil with a statically deflected flap type spoiler was investigated. Subsonic wind tunnel tests were made over a range of parameters: spoiler deflection, angle of attack, and two Reynolds numbers; and comprehensive measurements of the mean and fluctuating surface pressures, velocities in the boundary layer, and velocities in the wake. Schlieren flow visualization of the near wake structure was performed. The mean lift, moment, and surface pressure characteristics are in agreement with previous investigations of spoiler aerodynamics. At large spoiler deflections, boundary layer character affects the static pressure distribution in the spoiler hingeline region; and, the wake mean velocity fields reveals a closed region of reversed flow aft of the spoiler. It is shown that the unsteady flow field characteristics are as follows: (1) the unsteady nature of the wake is characterized by vortex shedding; (2) the character of the vortex shedding changes with spoiler deflection; (3) the vortex shedding characteristics are in agreement with other bluff body investigations; and (4) the vortex shedding frequency component of the fluctuating surface pressure field is of appreciable magnitude at large spoiler deflections. The flow past an airfoil with deflected spoiler is a particular problem in bluff body aerodynamics is considered.

  13. Closed-Loop Aerodynamic Flow Control of a Maneuvering Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzozowski, Daniel P.; Culp, John R.; Glezer, Ari

    2011-11-01

    The unsteady interaction between trailing edge aerodynamic flow control and airfoil motion in pitch and plunge is investigated in wind tunnel experiments using a 2-DOF traverse which enables application of time-dependent external torque and forces by servo motors. The global aerodynamic forces and moments are regulated by controlling vorticity generation and accumulation near the surface using hybrid synthetic jet actuators. The dynamic coupling between the actuation and the time-dependent flow field is characterized using simultaneous force and velocity measurements that are taken phase-locked to the commanded actuation waveform. The effect of the unsteady motion on the model-embedded flow control is assessed in unsteady several maneuvers. Circulation time history that is estimated from a PIV wake survey shows that the entire flow over the airfoil readjusts within about 1.5 TCONV, which is about two orders of magnitude shorter than the characteristic time associated with the controlled maneuver of the wind tunnel model. This illustrates that flow-control actuation can be typically effected on time scales that are commensurate with the flow's convective time scale, and that the maneuver response is primarily limited by the inertia of the platform.

  14. Some Advanced Concepts in Discrete Aerodynamic Sensitivity Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Arthur C., III; Green, Lawrence L.; Newman, Perry A.; Putko, Michele M.

    2001-01-01

    An efficient incremental-iterative approach for differentiating advanced flow codes is successfully demonstrated on a 2D inviscid model problem. The method employs the reverse-mode capability of the automatic- differentiation software tool ADIFOR 3.0, and is proven to yield accurate first-order aerodynamic sensitivity derivatives. A substantial reduction in CPU time and computer memory is demonstrated in comparison with results from a straight-forward, black-box reverse- mode application of ADIFOR 3.0 to the same flow code. An ADIFOR-assisted procedure for accurate second-order aerodynamic sensitivity derivatives is successfully verified on an inviscid transonic lifting airfoil example problem. The method requires that first-order derivatives are calculated first using both the forward (direct) and reverse (adjoint) procedures; then, a very efficient non-iterative calculation of all second-order derivatives can be accomplished. Accurate second derivatives (i.e., the complete Hessian matrices) of lift, wave-drag, and pitching-moment coefficients are calculated with respect to geometric- shape, angle-of-attack, and freestream Mach number

  15. Computing aerodynamic sound using advanced statistical turbulence theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, A. M.; Teske, M. E.; Bilanin, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    It is noted that the calculation of turbulence-generated aerodynamic sound requires knowledge of the spatial and temporal variation of Q sub ij (xi sub k, tau), the two-point, two-time turbulent velocity correlations. A technique is presented to obtain an approximate form of these correlations based on closure of the Reynolds stress equations by modeling of higher order terms. The governing equations for Q sub ij are first developed for a general flow. The case of homogeneous, stationary turbulence in a unidirectional constant shear mean flow is then assumed. The required closure form for Q sub ij is selected which is capable of qualitatively reproducing experimentally observed behavior. This form contains separation time dependent scale factors as parameters and depends explicitly on spatial separation. The approximate forms of Q sub ij are used in the differential equations and integral moments are taken over the spatial domain. The velocity correlations are used in the Lighthill theory of aerodynamic sound by assuming normal joint probability.

  16. Wind turbine trailing-edge aerodynamic brake design

    SciTech Connect

    Quandt, G.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the design of a centrifugally actuated aerodynamic-overspeed device for a horizontal-axis wind turbine. The device will meet the following criteria; (1) It will be effective for airfoil angles of attack 0{degrees} to 45{degrees}. (2) It will be stowed inside the blade profile prior to deployment. (3) It will be capable of offsetting the positive torque produced by the overall blade. (4) Hinge moments will be minimized to lower actuator loads and cost. (5) It will be evaluated as a potential power modulating active rotor-control system. A literature review of aerodynamic braking devices was conducted. Information from the literature review was used to conceptualize the most effective devices for subsequent testing and design. Wind-tunnel test data for several braking devices are presented in this report. Using the data for the most promising configuration, a preliminary design was developed for a MICON 65/13 wind turbine with Phoenix 7.9-m rotor blades.

  17. Radiation reaction of multipole moments

    SciTech Connect

    Kazinski, P. O.

    2007-08-15

    A Poincare-invariant description is proposed for the effective dynamics of a localized system of charged particles in classical electrodynamics in terms of the intrinsic multipole moments of the system. A relativistic-invariant definition for the intrinsic multipole moments of a system of charged particles is given. A new generally covariant action functional for a relativistic perfect fluid is proposed. In the case of relativistic charged dust, it is proven that the description of the problem of radiation reaction of multipole moments by the model of particles is equivalent to the description of this problem by a hydrodynamic model. An effective model is obtained for a pointlike neutral system of charged particles that possesses an intrinsic dipole moment, and the free dynamics of this system is described. The bound momentum of a point dipole is found.

  18. Radiation reaction of multipole moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazinski, P. O.

    2007-08-01

    A Poincaré-invariant description is proposed for the effective dynamics of a localized system of charged particles in classical electrodynamics in terms of the intrinsic multipole moments of the system. A relativistic-invariant definition for the intrinsic multipole moments of a system of charged particles is given. A new generally covariant action functional for a relativistic perfect fluid is proposed. In the case of relativistic charged dust, it is proven that the description of the problem of radiation reaction of multipole moments by the model of particles is equivalent to the description of this problem by a hydrodynamic model. An effective model is obtained for a pointlike neutral system of charged particles that possesses an intrinsic dipole moment, and the free dynamics of this system is described. The bound momentum of a point dipole is found.

  19. Dynamic stall and aerodynamic damping

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, F.; Petersen, J.T.; Madsen, H.A.

    1999-08-01

    A dynamic stall model is used to analyze and reproduce open air blade section measurements as well as wind tunnel measurements. The dynamic stall model takes variations in both angle of attack and flow velocity into account. The paper gives a brief description of the dynamic stall model and presents results from analyses of dynamic stall measurements for a variety of experiments with different airfoils in wind tunnel and on operating rotors. The wind tunnel experiments comprises pitching as well as plunging motion of the airfoils. The dynamic stall model is applied for derivation of aerodynamic damping characteristics for cyclic motion of the airfoils in flapwise and edgewise direction combined with pitching. The investigation reveals that the airfoil dynamic stall characteristics depend on the airfoil shape, and the type of motion (pitch, plunge). The aerodynamic damping characteristics, and thus the sensitivity to stall induced vibrations, depend highly on the relative motion of the airfoil in flapwise and edgewise direction, and on a possibly coupled pitch variation, which is determined by the structural characteristics of the blade.

  20. Orion Crew Module Aerodynamic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Kelly J.; Bibb, Karen L.; Brauckmann, Gregory J.; Rhode, Matthew N.; Owens, Bruce; Chan, David T.; Walker, Eric L.; Bell, James H.; Wilson, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    The Apollo-derived Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), part of NASA s now-cancelled Constellation Program, has become the reference design for the new Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). The MPCV will serve as the exploration vehicle for all near-term human space missions. A strategic wind-tunnel test program has been executed at numerous facilities throughout the country to support several phases of aerodynamic database development for the Orion spacecraft. This paper presents a summary of the experimental static aerodynamic data collected to-date for the Orion Crew Module (CM) capsule. The test program described herein involved personnel and resources from NASA Langley Research Center, NASA Ames Research Center, NASA Johnson Space Flight Center, Arnold Engineering and Development Center, Lockheed Martin Space Sciences, and Orbital Sciences. Data has been compiled from eight different wind tunnel tests in the CEV Aerosciences Program. Comparisons are made as appropriate to highlight effects of angle of attack, Mach number, Reynolds number, and model support system effects.

  1. X-33 Hypersonic Aerodynamic Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Kelly J.; Nowak, Robert J.; Thompson, Richard A.; Hollis, Brian R.; Prabhu, Ramadas K.

    1999-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Skunk Works, under a cooperative agreement with NASA, will design, build, and fly the X-33, a half-scale prototype of a rocket-based, single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO), reusable launch vehicle (RLV). A 0.007-scale model of the X-33 604BOO02G configuration was tested in four hypersonic facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center to examine vehicle stability and control characteristics and to populate the aerodynamic flight database for the hypersonic regime. The vehicle was found to be longitudinally controllable with less than half of the total body flap deflection capability across the angle of attack range at both Mach 6 and Mach 10. Al these Mach numbers, the vehicle also was shown to be longitudinally stable or neutrally stable for typical (greater than 20 degrees) hypersonic flight attitudes. This configuration was directionally unstable and the use of reaction control jets (RCS) will be necessary to control the vehicle at high angles of attack in the hypersonic flight regime. Mach number and real gas effects on longitudinal aerodynamics were shown to be small relative to X-33 control authority.

  2. X-33 Hypersonic Aerodynamic Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Kelly J.; Nowak, Robert J.; Thompson, Richard A.; Hollis, Brian R.; Prabhu, Ramadas K.

    1999-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Skunk Works, under a cooperative agreement with NASA, will build and fly the X-33, a half-scale prototype of a rocket-based, single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO), reusable launch vehicle (RLV). A 0.007-scale model of the X-33 604B0002G configuration was tested in four hypersonic facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center to examine vehicle stability and control characteristics and to populate an aerodynamic flight database in the hypersonic regime, The vehicle was found to be longitudinally controllable with less than half of the total body flap deflection capability across the angle of attack range at both Mach 6 and Mach 10. At these Mach numbers, the vehicle also was shown to be longitudinally stable or neutrally stable for typical (greater than 20 degrees) hypersonic flight attitudes. This configuration was directionally unstable and the use of reaction control jets (RCS) will be necessary to control the vehicle at high angles of attack in the hypersonic flight regime. Mach number and real gas effects on longitudinal aerodynamics were shown to be small relative to X-33 control authority.

  3. X-33 Hypersonic Aerodynamic Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Kelly J.; Nowak, Robert J.; Thompson, Richard A.; Hollis, Brian R.; Prabhu, Ramadas K.

    1999-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Skunk Works, under a cooperative agreement with NASA, will build and fly the X-33, a half-scale prototype of a rocket-based, single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO), reusable launch vehicle (RLV). A 0.007-scale model of the X-33 604B0002G configuration was tested in four hypersonic facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center to examine vehicle stability and control characteristics and to populate an aerodynamic flight database i n the hypersonic regime. The vehicle was found to be longitudinally controllable with less than half of the total body flap deflection capability across the angle of attack range at both Mach 6 and Mach 10. At these Mach numbers, the vehicle also was shown to be longitudinally stable or neutrally stable for typical (greater than 20 degrees) hypersonic flight attitudes. This configuration was directionally unstable and the use of reaction control jets (RCS) will be necessary to control the vehicle at high angles of attack in the hypersonic flight regime. Mach number and real gas effects on longitudinal aerodynamics were shown to be small relative to X-33 control authority.

  4. X-33 Hypersonic Aerodynamic Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Kelly J.; Nowak, Robert J.; Thompson, Richard A.; Hollis, Brian R.; Prabhu, Ramadas K.

    1999-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Skunk Works, under a cooperative agreement with NASA, will build and fly the X-33, a half-scale prototype of a rocket-based, single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO), reusable launch vehicle (RLV). A 0.007-scale model of the X-33 604B0002G configuration was tested in four hypersonic facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center to examine vehicle stability and control characteristics and to populate an aerodynamic flight database in the hypersonic regime. The vehicle was found to be longitudinally controllable with less than half of the total body flap deflection capability across the angle of attack range at both Mach 6 and Mach 10. At these Mach numbers, the vehicle also was shown to be longitudinally stable or neutrally stable for typical (greater than 20 degrees) hypersonic flight attitudes. This configuration was directionally unstable and the use of reaction control jets (RCS) will be necessary to control the vehicle at high angles of attack in the hypersonic flight regime. Mach number and real gas effects on longitudinal aerodynamics were shown to be small relative to X-33 control authority.

  5. Aerodynamics of the hovering hummingbird.

    PubMed

    Warrick, Douglas R; Tobalske, Bret W; Powers, Donald R

    2005-06-23

    Despite profound musculoskeletal differences, hummingbirds (Trochilidae) are widely thought to employ aerodynamic mechanisms similar to those used by insects. The kinematic symmetry of the hummingbird upstroke and downstroke has led to the assumption that these halves of the wingbeat cycle contribute equally to weight support during hovering, as exhibited by insects of similar size. This assumption has been applied, either explicitly or implicitly, in widely used aerodynamic models and in a variety of empirical tests. Here we provide measurements of the wake of hovering rufous hummingbirds (Selasphorus rufus) obtained with digital particle image velocimetry that show force asymmetry: hummingbirds produce 75% of their weight support during the downstroke and only 25% during the upstroke. Some of this asymmetry is probably due to inversion of their cambered wings during upstroke. The wake of hummingbird wings also reveals evidence of leading-edge vortices created during the downstroke, indicating that they may operate at Reynolds numbers sufficiently low to exploit a key mechanism typical of insect hovering. Hummingbird hovering approaches that of insects, yet remains distinct because of effects resulting from an inherently dissimilar-avian-body plan.

  6. Aerodynamic design on high-speed trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, San-San; Li, Qiang; Tian, Ai-Qin; Du, Jian; Liu, Jia-Li

    2016-04-01

    Compared with the traditional train, the operational speed of the high-speed train has largely improved, and the dynamic environment of the train has changed from one of mechanical domination to one of aerodynamic domination. The aerodynamic problem has become the key technological challenge of high-speed trains and significantly affects the economy, environment, safety, and comfort. In this paper, the relationships among the aerodynamic design principle, aerodynamic performance indexes, and design variables are first studied, and the research methods of train aerodynamics are proposed, including numerical simulation, a reduced-scale test, and a full-scale test. Technological schemes of train aerodynamics involve the optimization design of the streamlined head and the smooth design of the body surface. Optimization design of the streamlined head includes conception design, project design, numerical simulation, and a reduced-scale test. Smooth design of the body surface is mainly used for the key parts, such as electric-current collecting system, wheel truck compartment, and windshield. The aerodynamic design method established in this paper has been successfully applied to various high-speed trains (CRH380A, CRH380AM, CRH6, CRH2G, and the Standard electric multiple unit (EMU)) that have met expected design objectives. The research results can provide an effective guideline for the aerodynamic design of high-speed trains.

  7. A new technique for aerodynamic noise calculation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, J. C.; Pope, D. S.

    1992-01-01

    A novel method for the numerical analysis of aerodynamic noise generation is presented. The method involves first solving for the time-dependent incompressible flow for the given geometry. This fully nonlinear method that is tailored to extract the relevant acoustic fluctuations seems to be an efficient approach to the numerical analysis of aerodynamic noise generation.

  8. Aerodynamic seal assemblies for turbo-machinery

    SciTech Connect

    Bidkar, Rahul Anil; Wolfe, Christopher; Fang, Biao

    2015-09-29

    The present application provides an aerodynamic seal assembly for use with a turbo-machine. The aerodynamic seal assembly may include a number of springs, a shoe connected to the springs, and a secondary seal positioned about the springs and the shoe.

  9. Distributed Aerodynamic Sensing and Processing Toolbox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, Martin; Jutte, Christine; Mangalam, Arun

    2011-01-01

    A Distributed Aerodynamic Sensing and Processing (DASP) toolbox was designed and fabricated for flight test applications with an Aerostructures Test Wing (ATW) mounted under the fuselage of an F-15B on the Flight Test Fixture (FTF). DASP monitors and processes the aerodynamics with the structural dynamics using nonintrusive, surface-mounted, hot-film sensing. This aerodynamic measurement tool benefits programs devoted to static/dynamic load alleviation, body freedom flutter suppression, buffet control, improvement of aerodynamic efficiency through cruise control, supersonic wave drag reduction through shock control, etc. This DASP toolbox measures local and global unsteady aerodynamic load distribution with distributed sensing. It determines correlation between aerodynamic observables (aero forces) and structural dynamics, and allows control authority increase through aeroelastic shaping and active flow control. It offers improvements in flutter suppression and, in particular, body freedom flutter suppression, as well as aerodynamic performance of wings for increased range/endurance of manned/ unmanned flight vehicles. Other improvements include inlet performance with closed-loop active flow control, and development and validation of advanced analytical and computational tools for unsteady aerodynamics.

  10. Aerodynamics of Sounding-Rocket Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrowman, J.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical aerodynamics program TAD predicts aerodynamic characteristics of vehicles with sounding-rocket configurations. These slender, Axisymmetric finned vehicles have a wide range of aeronautical applications from rockets to high-speed armament. TAD calculates characteristics of separate portions of vehicle, calculates interference between portions, and combines results to form total vehicle solution.

  11. Future Computer Requirements for Computational Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Recent advances in computational aerodynamics are discussed as well as motivations for and potential benefits of a National Aerodynamic Simulation Facility having the capability to solve fluid dynamic equations at speeds two to three orders of magnitude faster than presently possible with general computers. Two contracted efforts to define processor architectures for such a facility are summarized.

  12. The aerodynamics of small Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F. W.

    1980-01-01

    Aerodynamic characteristics of wing model gliders and bird wings in particular are discussed. Wind tunnel measurements and aerodynamics of small Reynolds numbers are enumerated. Airfoil behavior in the critical transition from laminar to turbulent boundary layer, which is more important to bird wing models than to large airplanes, was observed. Experimental results are provided, and an artificial bird wing is described.

  13. Experimental investigation on the dissipative and elastic characteristics of a yaw colloidal damper destined to carbody suspension of a bullet train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suciu, B.; Tomioka, T.

    2016-09-01

    Yaw damper represents a major source of excitation for flexural vibration of the railway carbody. In order to reduce transmissibility of such undesired excitation, yaw damper should allow for large force transmission at low working frequencies, but should behave as vibration isolator at high working frequencies. Unfortunately, the yaw oil damper (OD), which is nowadays in service, has poor intrinsic elastic capabilities and provides damping forces varying as a power function versus the piston speed. Since colloidal damper (CD) has intrinsic elastic capabilities and larger damping forces at lower excitation frequencies, it occurs as an attractive alternative solution to traditional yaw dampers. In this work, a yaw CD destined to carbody suspension of a bullet train was designed and manufactured; then, its dynamic characteristics, produced by both the frictional and colloidal effects, were evaluated from the experimental results, obtained during horizontal vibration tests, performed on a ball-screw shaker. Compared to the corresponding classical yaw OD, the trial yaw CD allowed for: weight reduction of 31.6%; large damping force, dissipated energy and spring constant at long piston stroke under low excitation frequency; low damping force, dissipated energy and spring constant at short piston stroke under high excitation frequency. Elastic properties were justified by introducing a model for the spring constant that included the effect of pore size distribution.

  14. The generation of rolling moments with the superconducting solenoid model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodyear, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    The superconducting solenoid model is a pilot model core for levitation in a wind tunnel magnetic suspension system. This type of core would replace the ferromagnetic core typically installed in the model fuselage. For suspension purposes, the solenoid is operated upon by a set of electromagnets surrounding the wind tunnel which are to support and restrain the model at required positions and orientations under the influence of powerful aerodynamic disturbances. The subject of providing sources of magnets rolling moment for use when spanwise magnets, which can be used for winged models, are not available is covered. Several methods have emerged for generating a rolling moment based on the use of additional superconducting loops or magnetic poles positioned around or within the solenoid. Predictions of the moment capacities of superconducting loops in models sized for a large wind tunnel are presented. An existing prototype superconducting model proved a suitable vehicle for demonstrating and calibrating, at a smaller scale, some of the other roll elements based on magnetic pole devices. Calibration data are included.

  15. Aerodynamic effects of flexibility in flapping wings.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang; Huang, Qingfeng; Deng, Xinyan; Sane, Sanjay P

    2010-03-01

    Recent work on the aerodynamics of flapping flight reveals fundamental differences in the mechanisms of aerodynamic force generation between fixed and flapping wings. When fixed wings translate at high angles of attack, they periodically generate and shed leading and trailing edge vortices as reflected in their fluctuating aerodynamic force traces and associated flow visualization. In contrast, wings flapping at high angles of attack generate stable leading edge vorticity, which persists throughout the duration of the stroke and enhances mean aerodynamic forces. Here, we show that aerodynamic forces can be controlled by altering the trailing edge flexibility of a flapping wing. We used a dynamically scaled mechanical model of flapping flight (Re approximately 2000) to measure the aerodynamic forces on flapping wings of variable flexural stiffness (EI). For low to medium angles of attack, as flexibility of the wing increases, its ability to generate aerodynamic forces decreases monotonically but its lift-to-drag ratios remain approximately constant. The instantaneous force traces reveal no major differences in the underlying modes of force generation for flexible and rigid wings, but the magnitude of force, the angle of net force vector and centre of pressure all vary systematically with wing flexibility. Even a rudimentary framework of wing veins is sufficient to restore the ability of flexible wings to generate forces at near-rigid values. Thus, the magnitude of force generation can be controlled by modulating the trailing edge flexibility and thereby controlling the magnitude of the leading edge vorticity. To characterize this, we have generated a detailed database of aerodynamic forces as a function of several variables including material properties, kinematics, aerodynamic forces and centre of pressure, which can also be used to help validate computational models of aeroelastic flapping wings. These experiments will also be useful for wing design for small

  16. Aerodynamic effects of flexibility in flapping wings

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liang; Huang, Qingfeng; Deng, Xinyan; Sane, Sanjay P.

    2010-01-01

    Recent work on the aerodynamics of flapping flight reveals fundamental differences in the mechanisms of aerodynamic force generation between fixed and flapping wings. When fixed wings translate at high angles of attack, they periodically generate and shed leading and trailing edge vortices as reflected in their fluctuating aerodynamic force traces and associated flow visualization. In contrast, wings flapping at high angles of attack generate stable leading edge vorticity, which persists throughout the duration of the stroke and enhances mean aerodynamic forces. Here, we show that aerodynamic forces can be controlled by altering the trailing edge flexibility of a flapping wing. We used a dynamically scaled mechanical model of flapping flight (Re ≈ 2000) to measure the aerodynamic forces on flapping wings of variable flexural stiffness (EI). For low to medium angles of attack, as flexibility of the wing increases, its ability to generate aerodynamic forces decreases monotonically but its lift-to-drag ratios remain approximately constant. The instantaneous force traces reveal no major differences in the underlying modes of force generation for flexible and rigid wings, but the magnitude of force, the angle of net force vector and centre of pressure all vary systematically with wing flexibility. Even a rudimentary framework of wing veins is sufficient to restore the ability of flexible wings to generate forces at near-rigid values. Thus, the magnitude of force generation can be controlled by modulating the trailing edge flexibility and thereby controlling the magnitude of the leading edge vorticity. To characterize this, we have generated a detailed database of aerodynamic forces as a function of several variables including material properties, kinematics, aerodynamic forces and centre of pressure, which can also be used to help validate computational models of aeroelastic flapping wings. These experiments will also be useful for wing design for small robotic

  17. Summary of low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of upper-surface-blown jet-flap configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phelps, A. E., III; Johnson, J. L., Jr.; Margason, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    The results of recent wind tunnel investigations to provide fundamental information on the upper surface blown (USB) jet flap concept demonstrated that the USB concept provides good high-lift performance. It is shown that the low speed performance is dependent upon the jet turning angle and turning efficiency and on the use of proper leading and trailing edge treatment to prevent premature flow separation. The best means of achieving good turning performance in any particular USB application must be determined from overall operational considerations in which high speed performance, structures and noise, as well as low speed performance, are evaluated. The large diving moments generated at high lift coefficients can be trimmed satisfactorily with a large, conventional horizontal tail; a high tail position is best from longitudinal stability considerations. Large rolling and yawing moments are introduced with the loss of an engine, but these moments can be trimmed satisfactorily through the use of asymmetrical boundary layer control and through the use of spoiler and rudder deflection as needed.

  18. Subsonic Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Circular Body Earth-to-Orbit Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepsch, Roger A., Jr.; Ware, George M.; MacConochie, Ian O.

    1996-01-01

    A test of a generic reusable earth-to-orbit transport was conducted in the 7- by 10-Foot high-speed tunnel at the Langley Research Center at Mach number 0.3. The model had a body with a circular cross section and a thick clipped delta wing as the major lifting surface. For directional control, three different vertical fin arrangements were investigated: a conventional aft-mounted center vertical fin, wingtip fins, and a nose-mounted vertical fin. The configuration was longitudinally stable about the estimated center-of-gravity position of 0.72 body length and had sufficient pitch-control authority for stable trim over a wide range of angle of attack, regardless of fin arrangement. The maximum trimmed lift/drag ratio for the aft center-fin configuration was less than 5, whereas the other configurations had values of above 6. The aft center-fin configuration was directionally stable for all angles of attack tested. The wingtip and nose fins were not intended to produce directional stability but to be active controllers for artificial stabilization. Small rolling-moment values resulted from yaw control of the nose fin. Large adverse rolling-moment increments resulted from tip-fin controller deflection above 13 deg angle of attack. Flow visualization indicated that the adverse rolling-moment increments were probably caused by the influence of the deflected tip-fin controller on wing flow separation.

  19. Effects of reaction control system jet flow field interactions on the aerodynamic characteristics of a 0.010-scale space shuttle orbiter model in the Langley Research Center 31 inch CFHT (OA85)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daileda, J. J.; Marroquin, J.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to obtain detailed effects on supersonic vehicle hypersonic aerodynamic and stability and control characteristics of reaction control system jet flow field interactions with the local vehicle flow field. A 0.010-scale model was used. Six-component force data and wing, elevon, and body flap surface pressure data were obtained through an angle-of-attack range of -10 to +35 degrees with 0 deg angle of sideslip. The test was conducted with yaw, pitch and roll jet simulation at a free-stream Mach number of 10.3 and reaction control system plume simulation of flight dynamic pressures of 5, 10 and 20 PSF.

  20. Second Moments (planar Moments) and Their Application in Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohn, Robert K.; Montgomery, John A., Jr.; Michels, H. Harvey; Byrd, Jason N.

    2013-06-01

    Second moments, also called planar moments (P_{ii} = Σ m_{i}^{} x_{i}^{2}), are the spectroscopic parameters used to determine substitution structures (r_{s}) ) by Kraitchman''s method from spectra of a molecule and its isotopologs. They are also useful for discussing other molecular structural properties. Just as bond lengths and angles are considered transferable among similar molecules, second moments of many common groups are also transferable. This paper discusses applications of second moments of methylene/methyl groups, singly or multiply, isopropyl/tert-butyl groups, phenyl groups, per{f}{l}uoro methylene/methyl groups, combinations of any of them, and planarity of molecules, the historically most common application of second moments. The inertial defect is Δ = (I_{c} - I_{a} - I_{b}) or -2P_{cc}. Some authors err by assuming each isotopolog provides three independent rotational constants, but in some cases they are not all independent. J. Kraitchman, Am. J. Phys. {21 (17), 1953.}