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Sample records for aerodyne quadrupole aerosol

  1. Development of Soft Ionization for Particulate Organic Detection with the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Trimborn, A; Williams, L R; Jayne, J T; Worsnop, D R

    2008-06-19

    During this DOE SBIR Phase II project, we have successfully developed several soft ionization techniques, i.e., ionization schemes which involve less fragmentation of the ions, for use with the Aerodyne time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (ToF-AMS). Vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization was demonstrated in the laboratory and deployed in field campaigns. Vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization allows better identification of organic species in aerosol particles as shown in laboratory experiments on single component particles, and in field measurements on complex multi-component particles. Dissociative electron attachment with lower energy electrons (less than 30 eV) was demonstrated in the measurement of particulate organics in chamber experiments in Switzerland, and is now a routine approach with AMS systems configured for bipolar, negative ion detection. This technique is particularly powerful for detection of acidic and other highly oxygenated secondary organic aerosol (SOA) chemical functionality. Low energy electron ionization (10 to 12 eV) is also a softer ionization approach routinely available to AMS users. Finally, Lithium ion attachment has been shown to be sensitive to more alkyl-like chemical functionality in SOA. Results from Mexico City are particularly exciting in observing changes in SOA molecular composition under different photochemical/meteorological conditions. More recent results detecting biomass burns at the Montana fire lab have demonstrated quantitative and selective detection of levoglucosan. These soft ionization techniques provide the ToF-AMS with better capability for identifying organic species in ambient atmospheric aerosol particles. This, in turn, will allow more detailed study of the sources, transformations and fate of organic-containing aerosol.

  2. Optical properties of urban aerosols, aircraft emissions, and heavy-duty diesel trucks using aerosol light extinction measurements by an Aerodyne Cavity Attenuated Phase Shift Particle Extinction Monitor (CAPS PMex)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, A.; Massoli, P.; Wood, E. C.; Allan, J. D.; Fortner, E.; Yu, Z.; Herndon, S. C.; Miake-Lye, R. C.; Onasch, T. B.

    2010-12-01

    We present results of optical property characterization of ambient particulate during several field deployments where measurements of aerosol light extinction (σep) are obtained using an Aerodyne Cavity Attenuated Phase Shift Particle Extinction Monitor (CAPS PMex). The CAPS PMex is able to provide extinction measurements with 3-σ detection limit of 3 Mm-1 for 1s integration time. The CAPS PMex (630 nm) is integrated in the Aerodyne Research, Inc. (ARI) mobile laboratory where a co-located Multi Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP) provides particle light absorption coefficient at 632 nm. The combination of the CAPS with the MAAP data allows estimating the single scattering albedo (ω) of the ambient aerosol particles. The ARI mobile laboratory was deployed in winter 2010 at the Chicago O’Hare International Airport to measure gas phase and particulate emissions from different aircraft engines, and during summer 2010 in Oakland, CA, to characterize vehicular gaseous and particulate emissions (mainly exhaust from heavy-duty diesel trucks) from the Caldecott Tunnel. We provide estimates of black carbon emission factors from individual aircraft engines and diesel trucks, in addition to characterizing the optical properties of these ambient samples studying fleet-average emissions for both light-duty passenger vehicles and heavy-duty diesel trucks. Two CAPS PMex instruments (measuring σep at 630 and 532 nm) were also deployed during the CalNex 2010 study (May 14 - June 16) at the CalTech ground site in Pasadena, CA. During the same time, a photo-acoustic spectrometer (PAS, DMT) and an aethalometer instrument (Magee Sci.) measured particle light absorption of submicron aerosol particles from the same sample line as the CAPS PMex monitors. We combine these data to provide multi-wavelength ω trends for the one-month campaign. Our results show the high potential of the CAPS as light weight, compact instrument to perform precise and accurate σep measurements of

  3. AeroDyn Theory Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Moriarty, P. J.; Hansen, A. C.

    2005-01-01

    AeroDyn is a set of routines used in conjunction with an aeroelastic simulation code to predict the aerodynamics of horizontal axis wind turbines. These subroutines provide several different models whose theoretical bases are described in this manual. AeroDyn contains two models for calculating the effect of wind turbine wakes: the blade element momentum theory and the generalized dynamic-wake theory. Blade element momentum theory is the classical standard used by many wind turbine designers and generalized dynamic wake theory is a more recent model useful for modeling skewed and unsteady wake dynamics. When using the blade element momentum theory, various corrections are available for the user, such as incorporating the aerodynamic effects of tip losses, hub losses, and skewed wakes. With the generalized dynamic wake, all of these effects are automatically included. Both of these methods are used to calculate the axial induced velocities from the wake in the rotor plane. The user also has the option of calculating the rotational induced velocity. In addition, AeroDyn contains an important model for dynamic stall based on the semi-empirical Beddoes-Leishman model. This model is particularly important for yawed wind turbines. Another aerodynamic model in AeroDyn is a tower shadow model based on potential flow around a cylinder and an expanding wake. Finally, AeroDyn has the ability to read several different formats of wind input, including single-point hub-height wind files or multiple-point turbulent winds.

  4. Characterization of urban aerosol using aerosol mass spectrometry and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleveland, M. J.; Ziemba, L. D.; Griffin, R. J.; Dibb, J. E.; Anderson, C. H.; Lefer, B.; Rappenglück, B.

    2012-07-01

    Particulate matter was measured during August and September of 2006 in Houston as part of the Texas Air Quality Study II Radical and Aerosol Measurement Project. Aerosol size and composition were determined using an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer. Aerosol was dominated by sulfate (4.1 ± 2.6 μg m-3) and organic material (5.5 ± 4.0 μg m-3), with contributions of organic material from both primary (˜32%) and secondary (˜68%) sources. Secondary organic aerosol appears to be formed locally. In addition, 29 aerosol filter samples were analyzed using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy to determine relative concentrations of organic functional groups. Houston aerosols are less oxidized than those observed elsewhere, with smaller relative contributions of carbon-oxygen double bonds. These particles do not fit 1H NMR source apportionment fingerprints for identification of secondary, marine, and biomass burning organic aerosol, suggesting that a new fingerprint for highly urbanized and industrially influenced locations be established.

  5. Eddy Covariance Flux Measurements of Urban Aerosols During the MILAGRO Mexico City Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grivicke, R.; Pressley, S.; Jimenez, J.; Nemitz, E.; Alexander, L.; Velasco, E.; Allwine, E.; Jobson, T.; Westberg, H.; Ramos, R.; Molina, L.; Lamb, B.

    2007-12-01

    Expansive urban development in the fast growing number of megacities around the world raises concerns regarding the pollution levels in such sites. The Mexico City MILAGRO 2006 (Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations) field campaign was a worldwide initiative aiming to understand sources, chemical nature and evolution of pollution in one of the largest urban developments. As part of the MILAGRO campaign, urban fluxes of aerosols and related trace gases were measured near the centre of Mexico City at 42 m above street level. Aerosol concentrations (1 min. averages) and aerosol fluxes (10 Hz, selected ion monitoring) were measured with an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer operated in an alternating 30 minute mode of ambient concentrations and fluxes. The fluxes were derived using eddy covariance calculations. The aerosol flux data were supported by additional flux measurements of CO2 and a number of gas phase VOC species using a combination of techniques, including Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry using a disjunct eddy covariance technique and GC-FID analysis of samples from a disjunct eddy accumulation sampler. Preliminary results of aerosol concentrations and flux measurements indicate that the urban landscape is a significant source of organic aerosols.

  6. Interactions of Gas-Phase Nitric/Nitrous Acids and Primary Organic Aerosol in the Atmosphere of Houston, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemba, L. D.; Griffin, R. J.; Dibb, J. E.; Anderson, C. H.; Whitlow, S. I.; Lefer, B. L.; Flynn, J.; Rappenglück, B.

    2007-12-01

    Concentrations of aerosol and gas-phase pollutants were measured on the roof of an 18-story building during the Texas Air Quality Study II Radical and Aerosol Measurement Project (TRAMP) from August 15 through September 28, 2006. Aerosol measurements included size-resolved, non-refractory mass concentrations of ammonium, nitrate, sulfate, chloride, and organic aerosol in submicron particles using an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer (Q-AMS). Particulate water-soluble organic carbon (PWSOC) was quantified using a mist chamber/total organic carbon analysis system. Concentration data for gas-phase pollutants included those for nitric acid (HNO3), nitrous acid (HONO), and hydrochloric acid (HCl) collected using a mist chamber/ion chromatographic technique, oxides of nitrogen (NOx) collected using a chemiluminescent method, and carbon monoxide (CO) collected using an infrared gas correlation wheel instrument. Coincident increases in nitrate and organic aerosol mass concentrations were observed on many occasions throughout the measurement campaign, most frequently during the morning rush hour. Based on the lack of organic aerosol processing (defined by the ratio of m/z = 44/57 in the Q-AMS spectra), strong correlation with NOx and CO, and a lack of significant increase in PWSOC concentration, the spikes in organic aerosol were likely associated with primary organic aerosol (POA). During these events, gas-phase HNO3 concentration decreases were observed simultaneously with increases in gas-phase HONO concentrations. These data likely indicate uptake of HNO3 and subsequent heterogeneous conversion to HONO involving POA. Preliminary calculations show that HNO3 partitioning could account for the majority of the observed HONO and aerosol nitrate concentrations during these events. Q-AMS chloride and HCl data also indicate uptake of chloride by particles during these events. This phenomenon was also observed during the night, but these nocturnal events were less

  7. Sources and components of organic aerosols in Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanz, V. A.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Alfarra, M. R.; Hüglin, C.; Mohr, C.; Weimer, S.; Baltensperger, U.

    2009-04-01

    The quadrupole version of the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (q-AMS) was deployed at several places in Switzerland, Austria, and Liechtenstein. The q-AMS provides real-time information on mass concentration and composition of the non-refractory species in particulate matter smaller than 1 µm (NR-PM1) with high time- and size-resolution at unit mass resolution. The combination of factor analysis and ambient AMS data represents a relatively new approach to identify organic aerosol (OA) sources/components (Zhang et al., 2005). In this study, such an approach (PMF - positive matrix factorization; Lanz et al., 2007, 2008) was applied to various OA data sets covering a wide range of pollution levels (mobile measurements on motorways, urban, rural, and even a high-alpine location) as well as all seasons of the year. Dominating aerosol components were representing oxygenated and secondary organic aerosol (OOA-I and OOA-II), primary particles from wood burning (P-BBOA; especially in residential areas in wintertime with abundances of ~50% OA and more) and primary traffic-related aerosols (usually ~10% of OA, but up to 60% on motorways). Close to sources, charbroiling and potentially food cooking aerosols could be distinguished as well. The OOAs' time series were compared to measurements of AMS inorganics (sulphate, nitrate, and ammonium) in order to facilitate their interpretation as secondary OA (SOA). Diurnal cycles of the estimated source strengths, ancillary gas-phase and meteorological data, estimated emission ratios etc. were also used to validate the interpretations of the factor analytical results. Lanz, V. A., Alfarra, M. R., Baltensperger, U., Buchmann, B., Hueglin, C., and Prévôt, A. S. H.: Source apportionment of submicron organic aerosols at an urban site by factor analytical modelling of aerosol mass spectra, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 7, 1503-1522, 2007, http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/7/1503/2007/. Lanz, V. A., Alfarra, M. R., Baltensperger, U., Buchmann, B

  8. Extensive aerosol optical properties and aerosol mass related measurements during TRAMP/TexAQS 2006 - Implications for PM compliance and planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Monica E.; Atkinson, Dean B.; Ziemba, Luke; Griffin, Robert; Hiranuma, Naruki; Brooks, Sarah; Lefer, Barry; Flynn, James; Perna, Ryan; Rappenglück, Bernhard; Luke, Winston; Kelley, Paul

    2010-10-01

    Extensive aerosol optical properties, particle size distributions, and Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer measurements collected during TRAMP/TexAQS 2006 were examined in light of collocated meteorological and chemical measurements. Much of the evident variability in the observed aerosol-related air quality is due to changing synoptic meteorological situations that direct emissions from various sources to the TRAMP site near the center of the Houston-Galveston-Brazoria (HGB) metropolitan area. In this study, five distinct long-term periods have been identified. During each of these periods, observed aerosol properties have implications that are of interest to environmental quality management agencies. During three of the periods, long range transport (LRT), both intra-continental and intercontinental, appears to have played an important role in producing the observed aerosol. During late August 2006, southerly winds brought super-micron Saharan dust and sea salt to the HGB area, adding mass to fine particulate matter (PM 2.5) measurements, but apparently not affecting secondary particle growth or gas-phase air pollution. A second type of LRT was associated with northerly winds in early September 2006 and with increased ozone and sub-micron particulate matter in the HGB area. Later in the study, LRT of emissions from wildfires appeared to increase the abundance of absorbing aerosols (and carbon monoxide and other chemical tracers) in the HGB area. However, the greatest impacts on Houston PM 2.5 air quality are caused by periods with low-wind-speed sea breeze circulation or winds that directly transport pollutants from major industrial areas, i.e., the Houston Ship Channel, into the city center.

  9. ACTRIS ACSM intercomparison - Part 1: Reproducibility of concentration and fragment results from 13 individual Quadrupole Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitors (Q-ACSM) and consistency with co-located instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crenn, V.; Sciare, J.; Croteau, P. L.; Verlhac, S.; Fröhlich, R.; Belis, C. A.; Aas, W.; Äijälä, M.; Alastuey, A.; Artiñano, B.; Baisnée, D.; Bonnaire, N.; Bressi, M.; Canagaratna, M.; Canonaco, F.; Carbone, C.; Cavalli, F.; Coz, E.; Cubison, M. J.; Esser-Gietl, J. K.; Green, D. C.; Gros, V.; Heikkinen, L.; Herrmann, H.; Lunder, C.; Minguillón, M. C.; Močnik, G.; O'Dowd, C. D.; Ovadnevaite, J.; Petit, J.-E.; Petralia, E.; Poulain, L.; Priestman, M.; Riffault, V.; Ripoll, A.; Sarda-Estève, R.; Slowik, J. G.; Setyan, A.; Wiedensohler, A.; Baltensperger, U.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Jayne, J. T.; Favez, O.

    2015-12-01

    As part of the European ACTRIS project, the first large Quadrupole Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (Q-ACSM) intercomparison study was conducted in the region of Paris for 3 weeks during the late-fall - early-winter period (November-December 2013). The first week was dedicated to the tuning and calibration of each instrument, whereas the second and third were dedicated to side-by-side comparison in ambient conditions with co-located instruments providing independent information on submicron aerosol optical, physical, and chemical properties. Near real-time measurements of the major chemical species (organic matter, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and chloride) in the non-refractory submicron aerosols (NR-PM1) were obtained here from 13 Q-ACSM. The results show that these instruments can produce highly comparable and robust measurements of the NR-PM1 total mass and its major components. Taking the median of the 13 Q-ACSM as a reference for this study, strong correlations (r2 > 0.9) were observed systematically for each individual Q-ACSM across all chemical families except for chloride for which three Q-ACSMs showing weak correlations partly due to the very low concentrations during the study. Reproducibility expanded uncertainties of Q-ACSM concentration measurements were determined using appropriate methodologies defined by the International Standard Organization (ISO 17025, 1999) and were found to be 9, 15, 19, 28, and 36 % for NR-PM1, nitrate, organic matter, sulfate, and ammonium, respectively. However, discrepancies were observed in the relative concentrations of the constituent mass fragments for each chemical component. In particular, significant differences were observed for the organic fragment at mass-to-charge ratio 44, which is a key parameter describing the oxidation state of organic aerosol. Following this first major intercomparison exercise of a large number of Q-ACSMs, detailed intercomparison results are presented, along with a discussion of some

  10. Source apportionment of ambient aerosol applying PMF on AMS mobile and stationary data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, C.; Weimer, S.; Richter, R.; Decarlo, P. F.; Chirico, R.; Heringa, M. F.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.

    2009-04-01

    Ambient aerosols are divided into the categories "primary" and "secondary", referring to particles directly emitted into the air, or formed out of precursor species such as volatile organic compounds, respectively. Main sources for primary urban aerosol and precursor species are traffic emissions, but also wood burning for domestic heating purposes especially in winter time (Alfarra et al., 2007). The quantification of various types of aerosol components is important for source identification which in turn is the basis of all mitigation activities. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) is a statistical based source apportionment tool that uses constrained, weighted least squares estimation to determine source profiles and strengths. PMF has been applied recently for the first time on highly time resolved organic mass spectra (Lanz et al., 2007) measured by an Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) (Canagaratna et al., 2007). For the data presented here, two AMS were deployed together with additional instrumentation in the metropolitan area of Zurich in winter 2007/2008. The high-resolution time-of-flight AMS was stationed at an urban background site in the center, 30 meters from and shielded against direct traffic emissions. The quadrupole-based AMS was deployed in a mobile van allowing for on-road submicron aerosol composition measurements, and investigations into the spatial variability of aerosol concentration and composition. Results indicate that traffic emissions are the main contributor to submicron aerosol concentrations measured on-road. Hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA), a marker for traffic emissions (Lanz et al. 2007), dominates the primary aerosol mass, together with black carbon (BC). BC was monitored with the MAAP (multi angle absorption photometer). Another significant contributor to primary organic aerosol mass in downtown Zurich is domestic wood burning for heating purposes. Traffic and wood burning emissions make up roughly 50% of the total

  11. Characterizing the aging of biomass burning organic aerosol by use of mixing ratios: a meta-analysis of four regions.

    PubMed

    Jolleys, Matthew D; Coe, Hugh; McFiggans, Gordon; Capes, Gerard; Allan, James D; Crosier, Jonathan; Williams, Paul I; Allen, Grant; Bower, Keith N; Jimenez, Jose L; Russell, Lynn M; Grutter, Michel; Baumgardner, Darrel

    2012-12-18

    Characteristic organic aerosol (OA) emission ratios (ERs) and normalized excess mixing ratios (NEMRs) for biomass burning (BB) events have been calculated from ambient measurements recorded during four field campaigns. Normalized OA mass concentrations measured using Aerodyne Research Inc. quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometers (Q-AMS) reveal a systematic variation in average values between different geographical regions. For each region, a consistent, characteristic ratio is seemingly established when measurements are collated from plumes of all ages and origins. However, there is evidence of strong regional and local-scale variability between separate measurement periods throughout the tropical, subtropical, and boreal environments studied. ERs close to source typically exceed NEMRs in the far-field, despite apparent compositional change and increasing oxidation with age. The absence of any significant downwind mass enhancement suggests no regional net source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from atmospheric aging of BB sources, in contrast with the substantial levels of net SOA formation associated with urban sources. A consistent trend of moderately reduced ΔOA/ΔCO ratios with aging indicates a small net loss of OA, likely as a result of the evaporation of organic material from initial fire emissions. Variability in ERs close to source is shown to substantially exceed the magnitude of any changes between fresh and aged OA, emphasizing the importance of fuel and combustion conditions in determining OA loadings from biomass burning. PMID:23163290

  12. Comparison of measured and calculated scattering from surface aerosols with an average, a size-dependent, and a time-dependent refractive index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yong; Montague, Derek C.; Deshler, Terry

    2011-01-01

    Midcontinental surface aerosols have been measured at a small, minimally polluted city in summer and winter and on a nearby remote mountain in summer. Aerosol scattering, absorption, size distribution, and composition were measured using a three-wavelength nephelometer, an aethalometer, a passive cavity aerosol spectrometer, a scanning mobility particle sizer, an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer, and conventional filter systems. Size-dependent, time-dependent, and averaged refractive indices are estimated from the aerosol composition measurements and then used to calculate time-dependent aerosol scattering. The calculated scattering values show differences that are generally less than 5% on average for all three refractive indices, suggesting that the average refractive index is adequate for scattering estimations from time- or size-dependent aerosol measurements. The calculated scattering (backscattering) at 550 nm ranges from 2% less to 23% greater (11-22% smaller) than that measured. These differences decrease at 450 nm and increase at 700 nm and significantly exceed these values if optical size distribution measurements are not corrected for an appropriate index of refraction. Optimal agreement between calculated and measured scattering is achieved on 4 of the 6 days investigated in detail, if the real refractive index of the aerosol organic species ranges from 1.45 ± 0.02 at 450 nm to 1.62 ± 0.05 at 700 nm. Single-scatter albedos are also calculated and found to be in good agreement with those derived from the experimental observations, ranging from 0.79 to 0.87 in the city and constant, near 0.95, on the mountain top.

  13. Cookstove Emissions Quantified with the Aerodyne Mobile Laboratory During the Short Lived Climate Forcing (SLCF) 2013 Campaign in Pátzcuaro Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez Abraham, R.; Zavala, M.; Molina, L. T.; Fortner, E.; Wormhoudt, J.; Knighton, B.; Herndon, S.; Roscioli, J. R.; Onasch, T. B.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Kolb, C. E.; Masera, O.; Berrueta, V.

    2013-12-01

    Black carbon emissions are a major contributor to climate change, with cookstoves being one of the top sources. The SLCF cookstove study was conducted in March 2013 at the Interdisciplinary Group for Appropriate Rural Technology (GIRA) in Pátzcuaro, Mexico. Seven different types of wood-burning cookstoves were measured giving insight to the effects of different designs and operating conditions on particle and gas phase emissions. High-time resolution measurements of emissions were made. For most of the cookstoves, measurements were made throughout a standard water boiling test. The Aerodyne Mobile Laboratory conducted these emission measurements utilizing extractive sampling from the stove exhaust. Sample flow to the gas phase instruments was extracted directly from the stovepipe and then quickly diluted with nitrogen. Sample flows for the particulate instruments were taken at points under a meter from the exit of the stovepipe, after dilution with ambient air. The key particulate instrument was the Aerodyne soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS), which provided measurements of black carbon, divided into several sub-components, along with other classes of particulate matter classified by chemical composition. Gas phase measurements conducted included CO, CO2, NO, NOx, SO2, CH4, C2H2, C2H6, and a variety of VOCs (including benzene, methanol, acetaldehyde, toluene, acetone, acetonitrile, and terpene) measured with a PTR-MS instrument. All of these measurements will be examined to construct emission ratios evaluating how these vary with different cookstove types and different stove operating conditions. Comparisons will be made to previous measurements of cookstove emissions in the literature, with a focus on the variety of particulate measurements reported.

  14. Characterisation of regional ambient biomass burning organic aerosol mixing ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolleys, M.; Coe, H.; McFiggans, G.; Capes, G.; Allan, J. D.; Crosier, J.; Williams, P.; Allen, G.; Bower, K.; Jimenez, J. L.; Russell, L. M.; Grutter, M.; Baumgardner, D.

    2012-12-01

    No evidence for a regional additional source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) has been identified in measurements of biomass burning-influenced ambient air masses. Measurements included in this study were obtained from the deployment of an Aerodyne Quadrupole Aerosol Mass Spectrometer during four field campaigns, involving both research aircraft flights and ground-based measurements. OA concentrations normalised to excess CO (OA/dCO) show strong regional and local scale variability, with a difference of almost a factor of five across fresh OA emissions between campaigns. Average OA/dCO is typically higher in the near-field than at a greater distance from source, indicating an absence of significant SOA formation, despite evidence to suggest OA becomes increasingly oxidized with age. This trend is in contrast with observations of anthropogenic OA in urban environments, where OA/dCO is consistently shown to increase with distance from source. There is no such agreement in the case of biomass burning OA (BBOA) amongst the literature base, with conflicting examples relating to the influence of SOA on aerosol loadings. A wide range of average initial emission ratios (ERs) close to source are observed both within the datasets analysed here and within the literature, together with considerable variability in individual OA/dCO values throughout fresh biomass burning plumes. The extent of this variability far outweighs any increase in OA/dCO in the few instances it is observed here, suggesting that source conditions are of greater importance for the propagation of BBOA loadings within the ambient atmosphere. However, the implications of ageing on OA/dCO variability appear to be highly uncertain, with little consistency between observed trends for different locations. Furthermore, the exact effects of the fire conditions influencing emissions from biomass burning events remain poorly constrained. These uncertainties regarding the evolution of biomass burning emissions

  15. Development and Validation of a New Blade Element Momentum Skewed-Wake Model within AeroDyn: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Ning, S. A.; Hayman, G.; Damiani, R.; Jonkman, J.

    2014-12-01

    Blade element momentum methods, though conceptually simple, are highly useful for analyzing wind turbines aerodynamics and are widely used in many design and analysis applications. A new version of AeroDyn is being developed to take advantage of new robust solution methodologies, conform to a new modularization framework for National Renewable Energy Laboratory's FAST, utilize advanced skewed-wake analysis methods, fix limitations with previous implementations, and to enable modeling of highly flexible and nonstraight blades. This paper reviews blade element momentum theory and several of the options available for analyzing skewed inflow. AeroDyn implementation details are described for the benefit of users and developers. These new options are compared to solutions from the previous version of AeroDyn and to experimental data. Finally, recommendations are given on how one might select from the various available solution approaches.

  16. ACTRIS ACSM intercomparison - Part I: Reproducibility of concentration and fragment results from 13 individual Quadrupole Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitors (Q-ACSM) and consistency with Time-of-Flight ACSM (ToF-ACSM), High Resolution ToF Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and other co-located instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crenn, V.; Sciare, J.; Croteau, P. L.; Verlhac, S.; Fröhlich, R.; Belis, C. A.; Aas, W.; Äijälä, M.; Alastuey, A.; Artiñano, B.; Baisnée, D.; Bonnaire, N.; Bressi, M.; Canagaratna, M.; Canonaco, F.; Carbone, C.; Cavalli, F.; Coz, E.; Cubison, M. J.; Esser-Gietl, J. K.; Green, D. C.; Gros, V.; Heikkinen, L.; Herrmann, H.; Lunder, C.; Minguillón, M. C.; Močnik, G.; O'Dowd, C. D.; Ovadnevaite, J.; Petit, J.-E.; Petralia, E.; Poulain, L.; Priestman, M.; Riffault, V.; Ripoll, A.; Sarda-Estève, R.; Slowik, J. G.; Setyan, A.; Wiedensohler, A.; Baltensperger, U.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Jayne, J. T.; Favez, O.

    2015-07-01

    As part of the European ACTRIS project, the first large Quadrupole Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (Q-ACSM) intercomparison study was conducted in the region of Paris for three weeks during the late fall-early winter period (November-December 2013). The first week was dedicated to tuning and calibration of each instrument whereas the second and third were dedicated to side-by-side comparison in ambient conditions with co-located instruments providing independent information on submicron aerosol optical, physical and chemical properties. Near real-time measurements of the major chemical species (organic matter, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and chloride) in the non-refractory submicron aerosols (NR-PM1) were obtained here from 13 Q-ACSM. The results show that these instruments can produce highly comparable and robust measurements of the NR-PM1 total mass and its major components. Taking the median of the 13 Q-ACSM as a reference for this study, strong correlations (r2 > 0.9) were observed systematically for each individual ACSM across all chemical families except for chloride for which three ACSMs showing weak correlations partly due to the very low concentrations during the study. Reproducibility expanded uncertainties of Q-ACSM concentration measurements were determined using appropriate methodologies defined by the International Standard Organization (ISO 17025) and were found to be of 9, 15, 19, 28 and 36 % for NR-PM1, nitrate, organic matter, sulfate and ammonium respectively. However, discrepancies were observed in the relative concentrations of the constituent mass fragments for each chemical component. In particular, significant differences were observed for the organic fragment at mass-to-charge ratio 44, which is a key parameter describing the oxidation state of organic aerosol. Following this first major intercomparison exercise of a large number of ACSMs, detailed intercomparison results are presented as well as a discussion of some recommendations

  17. Submicron particles at Thompson Farm during ICARTT measured using aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottrell, Laura D.; Griffin, Robert J.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Zhang, Qi; Ulbrich, Ingrid; Ziemba, Luke D.; Beckman, Pieter J.; Sive, Barkley C.; Talbot, Robert W.

    2008-04-01

    The composition and size of aerosols were measured using an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer at Thompson Farm in Durham, NH, during the International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation campaign during summer 2004. Submicron, non-refractory aerosol was dominated by organic matter and sulfate (averages of 5.7 μg m-3 and 3.6 μg m-3, respectively), with smaller contributions from nitrate and ammonium (averages of 0.3 μg m-3 and 1.02 μg m-3, respectively). Organic aerosol (OA) mass correlates well with anthropogenic tracers such as carbon monoxide (CO, R2 = 0.58) and black carbon (R2 = 0.59), but multiple analyses indicate possible contributions from primary, secondary, anthropogenic, and biogenic OA. Multivariate statistical analysis of the OA mass spectra indicates the presence of two types of oxygenated OA (OOA) and a hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) component that also contains contributions from biomass burning OA (BBOA). On average, the HOA/BBOA component accounts for 21% of the total OA mass while the two OOA components account for 24% and 55%, respectively, of the OA burden. Observed nitrate correlates well with OA (R2 = 0.67), suggesting interference, the presence of organic nitrates, processing/uptake of nitric acid by OA, or other temporally coincident processes because of the ammonia-poor environment with respect to sulfate. The relative increase of OA with respect to background compared to that of CO (average of 72.7 μg m-3 ppmv-1) indicates values that are higher than those based on previous measurements in New England.

  18. Wind tunnel validation of AeroDyn within LIFES50+ project: imposed Surge and Pitch tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayati, I.; Belloli, M.; Bernini, L.; Zasso, A.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the first set of results of the steady and unsteady wind tunnel tests, performed at Politecnico di Milano wind tunnel, on a 1/75 rigid scale model of the DTU 10 MW wind turbine, within the LIFES50+ project. The aim of these tests is the validation of the open source code AeroDyn developed at NREL. Numerical and experimental steady results are compared in terms of thrust and torque coefficients, showing good agreement, as well as for unsteady measurements gathered with a 2 degree-of-freedom test rig, capable of imposing the displacements at the base of the model, and providing the surge and pitch motion of the floating offshore wind turbine (FOWT) scale model. The measurements of the unsteady test configuration are compared with AeroDyn/Dynin module results, implementing the generalized dynamic wake (GDW) model. Numerical and experimental comparison showed similar behaviours in terms of non linear hysteresis, however some discrepancies are herein reported and need further data analysis and interpretations about the aerodynamic integral quantities, with a special attention to the physics of the unsteady phenomenon.

  19. Using aerosol light absorption measurements for the quantitative determination of wood burning and traffic emission contributions to particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Sandradewi, Jisca; Prévôt, Andre S H; Szidat, Sönke; Perron, Nolwenn; Alfarra, M Rami; Lanz, Valentin A; Weingartner, Ernest; Baltensperger, Urs

    2008-05-01

    A source apportionment study was performed for particulate matter in the small village of Roveredo, Switzerland, where more than 70% of the households use wood burning for heating purposes. A two-lane trans-Alpine highway passes through the village and contributes to the total aerosol burden in the area. The village is located in a steep Alpine valley characterized by strong and persistent temperature inversions during winter, especially from December to February. During two winter and one early spring campaigns, a seven-wavelength aethalometer, high volume (HIVOL) samplers, an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), an optical particle counter (OPC), and a Sunset Laboratory OCEC analyzer were deployed to study the contribution of wood burning and traffic aerosols to particulate matter. A linear regression model of the carbonaceous particulate mass in the submicrometer size range CM(PM1) as a function of aerosol light absorption properties measured by the aethalometer is introduced to estimate the particulate mass from wood burning and traffic (PM(wb), PM(traffic)). This model was calibrated with analyses from the 14C method using HIVOL filter measurements. These results indicate that light absorption exponents of 1.1 for traffic and 1.8-1.9 for wood burning calculated from the light absorption at 470 and 950 nanometers should be used to obtain agreement of the two methods regarding the relative wood burning and traffic emission contributions to CM(PM1) and also to black carbon. The resulting PM(wb) and PM(traffic) values explain 86% of the variance of the CM(PM1) and contribute, on average, 88 and 12% to CM(PM1), respectively. The black carbon is estimated to be 51% due to wood burning and 49% due to traffic emissions. The average organic carbon/total carbon (OC/TC) values were estimated to be 0.52 for traffic and 0.88 for wood burning particulate emissions.

  20. Effect of Vaporizer Temperature on Ambient Non-Refractory Submicron Aerosol Composition and Mass Spectra Measured by the Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (AMS) are routinely operated with a constant vaporizer temperature (Tvap) of 600oC in order to facilitate quantitative detection of non-refractory submicron (NR-PM1) species. By analogy with other thermal desorption instrument...

  1. Impacts of Anthropogenic Emissions in the Southeastern U.S. on Heterogeneous Chemistry of Isoprene-Derived Epoxides Leading to Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surratt, J. D.; Pye, H.; Lin, Y.; Budisulistiorini, S.; Zhang, H.; Marth, W.; Cui, T.; Arashiro, M.; Chu, K.; Zhang, Z.; Sexton, K.; Piletic, I.; Xie, Y.; Capps, S. L.; Luecken, D.; Hutzell, W. T.; Jaoui, M.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Croteau, D.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Offenberg, J.; Kleindienst, T. E.; Lewandowski, M.; Edney, E.; Pinder, R. W.; Bartolotti, L.; Gold, A.

    2013-12-01

    Isoprene is a major source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA); however, the exact manner in which it forms SOA remains unclear. Improving our fundamental understanding of isoprene-derived SOA is key to improving existing air quality models, especially in the southeastern U.S. where models currently underestimate observations. By combining organic synthesis, computational calculations, mass spectrometry, smog chamber studies, and field measurements, we show that reactive epoxides, which include methacrylic acid epoxide (MAE) and isomeric isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX), produced from the photochemical oxidation of isoprene are key to SOA formation. Furthermore, anthropogenic pollutants (NOx and SO2) enhance isoprene-derived epoxides as an SOA source. In the laboratory, we find that the reactive uptake of synthetic IEPOX and MAE standards onto acidified sulfate aerosol yields known isoprene-derived SOA tracers (2-methlytetrols, 2-methylglyceric acid, C5-alkene triols, 3-methyltetrahydrofuran-3,4-diols, dimers and organosulfates) that we measure in fine aerosol collected from multiple sites across the southeastern U.S. using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and liquid chromatography coupled to diode array detection and electrospray ionization high-resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/DAD-ESI-QTOFMS). Notably, IEPOX- and MAE-derived SOA tracers account for ~19% of the organic aerosol mass in Yorkville, GA. Moreover, real-time continuous chemical measurements of fine aerosol made using an Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) during summer 2011 and summer 2013 in Atlanta, GA, and Look Rock, TN, respectively, resolved an IEPOX-oxygenated organic aerosol (IEPOX-OOA) factor when applying positive matrix factorization (PMF) to the organic mass spectral time series. In Atlanta, this factor is found to account for ~33% of the fine OA mass and is correlated with IEPOX-derived SOA tracers (r2 = 0.6), sulfate (r2 = 0.5), and to some

  2. Superconducting magnetic quadrupole

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.W.; Shepard, K.W.; Nolen, J.A.

    1995-08-01

    A design was developed for a 350 T/m, 2.6-cm clear aperture superconducting quadrupole focussing element for use in a very low q/m superconducting linac as discussed below. The quadrupole incorporates holmium pole tips, and a rectangular-section winding using standard commercially-available Nb-Ti wire. The magnet was modeled numerically using both 2D and 3D codes, as a basis for numerical ray tracing using the quadrupole as a linac element. Components for a prototype singlet are being procured during FY 1995.

  3. Brick Kiln Emissions Quantified with the Aerodyne Mobile Laboratory During the Short Lived Climate Forcing (SLCF) 2013 Campaign in Guanajuato Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortner, E.; Knighton, W. B.; Herndon, S.; Roscioli, J. R.; Zavala, M.; Onasch, T. B.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Kolb, C. E.; Molina, L. T.

    2013-12-01

    Brick kiln emissions are suspected to be a major source of atmospheric black carbon (BC) in developing countries; and black carbon's role as a short lived climate forcing (SLCF) pollutant is widely recognized. The SLCF-Mexico brick kiln study was conducted from 12-17 March 2013 in Mexico's Guanajuato state. Three different types of brick kilns were investigated (MK2, traditional, and traditional three tier) providing data on the effects of different kiln designs on particle and gas phase emissions. The BC and gaseous combustion emissions from these kilns were measured during both the fire stage and the subsequent smoldering stage with real-time instruments deployed on the Aerodyne Mobile Laboratory, and quantified utilizing flux tracer gases released adjacent to the brick kiln. This method allows examination of the brick kiln plume's evolution as it transits downwind from the source. Particulate measurements conducted by the mobile laboratory included the multi angle absorption photometer (MAAP) to measure black carbon mass, cavity attenuated phase shift (CAPSext) monitor to measure extinction and soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) measurements of black carbon. The SP-AMS instrument combines the ability to measure black carbon with the ability to determine the chemical composition of the other particulate matter (PM) components associated with black carbon particles. The variance of PM chemical composition will be examined as a function of burning stage and kiln type and compared to other black carbon PM sources. Gas phase exhaust species measured included CO, CO2, NOx, SO2, CH4, C2H6, as well as a variety of VOCs (acetonitrile, benzene etc.) measured with a PTR-MS instrument. All of these measurements will be examined to construct emission ratios evaluating how these vary with different kiln types and different firing conditions. The evolution of particulate matter and gas phase species as they transit away from the source will also be examined.

  4. Correcting Quadrupole Roll in Magnetic Lenses with Skew Quadrupoles

    SciTech Connect

    Walstrom, Peter Lowell

    2014-11-10

    Quadrupole rolls (i.e. rotation around the magnet axis) are known to be a significant source of image blurring in magnetic quadrupole lenses. These rolls may be caused by errors in mechanical mounting of quadrupoles, by uneven radiation-induced demagnetization of permanent-magnet quadrupoles, etc. Here a four-quadrupole ×10 lens with so-called ”Russian” or A -B B-A symmetry is used as a model problem. Existing SLAC 1/2 in. bore high-gradient quadrupoles are used in the design. The dominant quadrupole roll effect is changes in the first-order part of the transfer map (the R matrix) from the object to the image plane (Note effects on the R matrix can be of first order in rotation angle for some R-matrix elements and second order in rotation angle for other elements, as shown below). It is possible to correct roll-induced image blur by mechanically adjusting the roll angle of one or more of the quadrupoles. Usually, rotation of one quadrupole is sufficient to correct most of the combined effect of rolls in all four quadrupoles. There are drawbacks to this approach, however, since mechanical roll correction requires multiple entries into experimental area to make the adjustments, which are made according to their effect on images. An alternative is to use a single electromagnetic skew quadrupole corrector placed either between two of the quadrupoles or after the fourth quadrupole (so-called “non-local” correction). The basic feasibility of skew quadrupole correction of quadrupole roll effects is demonstrated here. Rolls of the third lens quadrupole of up to about 1 milliradian can be corrected with a 15 cm long skew quadrupole with a gradient of up to 1 T/m. Since the effect of rolls of the remaining three lens quadrupoles are lower, a weaker skew quadrupole can be used to correct them. Non-local correction of quadrupole roll effects by skew quadrupoles is shown to be about one-half as effective as local correction (i.e. rotating individual quadrupoles to zero

  5. The Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matheson, E.; Harris, T. J.

    1969-01-01

    Describes the construction and operation of a quadrupole mass spectrometer for experiments in an advanced-teaching laboratory. Discusses the theory of operation of the spectrometer and the factors affecting the resolution. Some examples of mass spectra obtained with this instrument are presented and discussed. (LC)

  6. Variable Permanent Magnet Quadrupole

    SciTech Connect

    Mihara, T.; Iwashita, Y.; Kumada, M.; Spencer, C.M.; /SLAC

    2007-05-23

    A permanent magnet quadrupole (PMQ) is one of the candidates for the final focus lens in a linear collider. An over 120 T/m strong variable permanent magnet quadrupole is achieved by the introduction of saturated iron and a 'double ring structure'. A fabricated PMQ achieved 24 T integrated gradient with 20 mm bore diameter, 100 mm magnet diameter and 20 cm pole length. The strength of the PMQ is adjustable in 1.4 T steps, due to its 'double ring structure': the PMQ is split into two nested rings; the outer ring is sliced along the beam line into four parts and is rotated to change the strength. This paper describes the variable PMQ from fabrication to recent adjustments.

  7. Linac quadrupole connections

    SciTech Connect

    Stiening, R.

    1984-07-12

    Linac type QC and QCH quadrupoles are mounted on the accelerator with their power connection side facing the injector. The connections are on the top of the magnet. The correct polarity for magnets is shown. The magnetic centers of all magnets are measured. If the magnetic center is above the geometric center, the distance delta y is positive. If the magnetic center is to the right of the geometric center, the distance delta x is positive.

  8. Chemical properties and morphology of Marine Aerosol in the Mediterranean atmosphere: a mesocosm study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Anna, Barbara; Sellegri, Karine; Charrière, Bruno; Sempéré, Richard; Mas, Sébastien; Marchand, Nicolas; George, Christian; Même, Aurèlie; R'mili, Badr; Delmont, Anne; Schwier, Allison; Rose, Clémence; Colomb, Aurèlie; Pey, Jorge; Langley Dewitt, Helen

    2014-05-01

    -line chemical analysis of the sub-micrometer fraction was performed by a TOF-AMS (Aerodyne). Off-line analysis included TEM-EDX for morphology and size distribution studies and a hybrid quadrupole-orbitrap mass spectrometer (Thermo Fischer) for molecular identification of the organic fraction.

  9. Sugars in Antarctic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbaro, Elena; Kirchgeorg, Torben; Zangrando, Roberta; Vecchiato, Marco; Piazza, Rossano; Barbante, Carlo; Gambaro, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    The processes and transformations occurring in the Antarctic aerosol during atmospheric transport were described using selected sugars as source tracers. Monosaccharides (arabinose, fructose, galactose, glucose, mannose, ribose, xylose), disaccharides (sucrose, lactose, maltose, lactulose), alcohol-sugars (erythritol, mannitol, ribitol, sorbitol, xylitol, maltitol, galactitol) and anhydrosugars (levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan) were measured in the Antarctic aerosol collected during four different sampling campaigns. For quantification, a sensitive high-pressure anion exchange chromatography was coupled with a single quadrupole mass spectrometer. The method was validated, showing good accuracy and low method quantification limits. This study describes the first determination of sugars in the Antarctic aerosol. The total mean concentration of sugars in the aerosol collected at the "Mario Zucchelli" coastal station was 140 pg m-3; as for the aerosol collected over the Antarctic plateau during two consecutive sampling campaigns, the concentration amounted to 440 and 438 pg m-3. The study of particle-size distribution allowed us to identify the natural emission from spores or from sea-spray as the main sources of sugars in the coastal area. The enrichment of sugars in the fine fraction of the aerosol collected on the Antarctic plateau is due to the degradation of particles during long-range atmospheric transport. The composition of sugars in the coarse fraction was also investigated in the aerosol collected during the oceanographic cruise.

  10. Examining the effects of anthropogenic emissions on isoprene-derived secondary organic aerosol formation during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) at the Look Rock, Tennessee ground site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budisulistiorini, S. H.; Li, X.; Bairai, S. T.; Renfro, J.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Y. J.; McKinney, K. A.; Martin, S. T.; McNeill, V. F.; Pye, H. O. T.; Nenes, A.; Neff, M. E.; Stone, E. A.; Mueller, S.; Knote, C.; Shaw, S. L.; Zhang, Z.; Gold, A.; Surratt, J. D.

    2015-08-01

    A suite of offline and real-time gas- and particle-phase measurements was deployed at Look Rock, Tennessee (TN), during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) to examine the effects of anthropogenic emissions on isoprene-derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. High- and low-time-resolution PM2.5 samples were collected for analysis of known tracer compounds in isoprene-derived SOA by gas chromatography/electron ionization-mass spectrometry (GC/EI-MS) and ultra performance liquid chromatography/diode array detection-electrospray ionization-high-resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/DAD-ESI-HR-QTOFMS). Source apportionment of the organic aerosol (OA) was determined by positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis of mass spectrometric data acquired on an Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM). Campaign average mass concentrations of the sum of quantified isoprene-derived SOA tracers contributed to ~ 9 % (up to 28 %) of the total OA mass, with isoprene-epoxydiol (IEPOX) chemistry accounting for ~ 97 % of the quantified tracers. PMF analysis resolved a factor with a profile similar to the IEPOX-OA factor resolved in an Atlanta study and was therefore designated IEPOX-OA. This factor was strongly correlated (r2 > 0.7) with 2-methyltetrols, C5-alkene triols, IEPOX-derived organosulfates, and dimers of organosulfates, confirming the role of IEPOX chemistry as the source. On average, IEPOX-derived SOA tracer mass was ~ 26 % (up to 49 %) of the IEPOX-OA factor mass, which accounted for 32 % of the total OA. A low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA) and an oxidized factor with a profile similar to 91Fac observed in areas where emissions are biogenic-dominated were also resolved by PMF analysis, whereas no primary organic aerosol (POA) sources could be resolved. These findings were consistent with low levels of primary pollutants, such as nitric oxide (NO ~ 0.03 ppb), carbon monoxide (CO ~ 116 ppb), and black

  11. Examining the effects of anthropogenic emissions on isoprene-derived secondary organic aerosol formation during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) at the Look Rock, Tennessee, ground site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budisulistiorini, S. H.; Li, X.; Bairai, S. T.; Renfro, J.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Y. J.; McKinney, K. A.; Martin, S. T.; McNeill, V. F.; Pye, H. O. T.; Nenes, A.; Neff, M. E.; Stone, E. A.; Mueller, S.; Knote, C.; Shaw, S. L.; Zhang, Z.; Gold, A.; Surratt, J. D.

    2015-03-01

    A suite of offline and real-time gas- and particle-phase measurements was deployed at Look Rock, Tennessee (TN), during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) to examine the effects of anthropogenic emissions on isoprene-derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. High- and low-time resolution PM2.5 samples were collected for analysis of known tracer compounds in isoprene-derived SOA by gas chromatography/electron ionization-mass spectrometry (GC/EI-MS) and ultra performance liquid chromatography/diode array detection-electrospray ionization-high-resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/DAD-ESI-HR-QTOFMS). Source apportionment of the organic aerosol (OA) was determined by positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis of mass spectrometric data acquired on an Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM). Campaign average mass concentrations of the sum of quantified isoprene-derived SOA tracers contributed to ~9% (up to 26%) of the total OA mass, with isoprene-epoxydiol (IEPOX) chemistry accounting for ~97% of the quantified tracers. PMF analysis resolved a factor with a profile similar to the IEPOX-OA factor resolved in an Atlanta study and was therefore designated IEPOX-OA. This factor was strongly correlated (r2>0.7) with 2-methyltetrols, C5-alkene triols, IEPOX-derived organosulfates, and dimers of organosulfates, confirming the role of IEPOX chemistry as the source. On average, IEPOX-derived SOA tracer mass was ~25% (up to 47%) of the IEPOX-OA factor mass, which accounted for 32% of the total OA. A low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA) and an oxidized factor with a profile similar to 91Fac observed in areas where emissions are biogenic-dominated were also resolved by PMF analysis, whereas no primary organic aerosol (POA) sources could be resolved. These findings were consistent with low levels of primary pollutants, such as nitric oxide (NO~0.03ppb), carbon monoxide (CO~116 ppb), and black carbon (BC~0

  12. Aerosol activation properties and CCN closure during TCAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, F.; Tomlinson, J. M.; Shilling, J. E.; Wilson, J. M.; Zelenyuk, A.; Chand, D.; Comstock, J. M.; Hubbe, J.; Berg, L. K.; Schmid, B.

    2013-12-01

    The indirect effects of atmospheric aerosols currently remain the most uncertain components in forcing of climate change over the industrial period (IPCC, 2007). This large uncertainty is partially due to our incomplete understanding of the ability of particles to form cloud droplets under atmospherically relevant supersaturation. In addition, there is a large uncertainty in the aerosol optical depth (AOD) simulated by climate models near the North American coast and a wide variety in the types of clouds are observed over this region. The goal of the US Department of Energy Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) is to understand the processes responsible for producing and maintaining aerosol distributions and associated radiative and cloud forcing off the coast of North America. During the TCAP study, aerosol total number concentration, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra and aerosol chemical composition were in-situ measured from the DOE Gulfstream 1 (G-1) research aircraft during two Intensive Operations Periods (IOPs), one conducted in July 2012 and the other in February 2013. An overall aerosol size distribution was achieved by merging the observations from several instruments, including Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer - Airborne (UHSAS-A, DMT), Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (PCASP-200, DMT), and Cloud Aerosol Spectrometer (CAS, DMT). Aerosol chemical composition was characterized using a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS, Aerodyne Inc.) and single particle mass spectrometer, mini-SPLAT. Based on the aerosol size distribution, CCN number concentration (characterized by a DMT dual column CCN counter with a range from 0.1% to 0.4%), and chemical composition, a CCN closure was obtained. The sensitivity of CCN closure to organic hygroscopicity was investigated. The differences in aerosol/CCN properties between two columns, and between two phases, will be discussed.

  13. Quadrupole Induced Resonant Particle Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilson, Erik; Fajans, Joel

    1998-11-01

    We have performed experiments that explore the effects of a magnetic quadrupole field on a pure electron plasma confined in a Penning-Malmberg trap. A model that we have developed describes the shape of the plasma and shows that a certain class of resonant particles follows trajectories that take them out of the plasma. Even though the quadrupole field destroys the cylindrical symmetry of the system, our theory predicts that if the electrons are off resonance, then the lifetime of the plasma will not be greatly affected by the quadrupole field. Our preliminary experimental results show that the shape of the plasma and the plasma lifetime agree with our model. We are investigating the scaling of this behavior with various experimental parameters such as the plasma length, density, and strength of the quadrupole field. In addition to being an example of resonant particle transport, this effect may find practical applications in experiments that plan to use magnetic quadrupole neutral atom traps to confine anti-hydrogen created in double-well positron/anti-proton Penning-Malmberg traps. (ATHENA Collaboration.)

  14. Quadrupole Induced Resonant Particle Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilson, Erik; Fajans, Joel

    1999-11-01

    We have performed experiments that explore the effects of a magnetic quadrupole field on a pure electron plasma confined in a Malmberg-Penning trap. A model that we have developed describes the shape of the plasma and shows that a certain class of resonant particles follows trajectories that take them out of the plasma. Even though the quadrupole field destroys the cylindrical symmetry of the system, our theory predicts that if the electrons are off resonance, then the lifetime of the plasma will not be greatly affected by the quadrupole field. Our preliminary experimental results show that the shape of the plasma and the plasma lifetime agree with our model. We are investigating the scaling of this behavior with various experimental parameters such as the plasma length, density, and strength of the quadrupole field. In addition to being an example of resonant particle transport, this effect may find practical applications in experiments that plan to use magnetic quadrupole neutral atom traps to confine anti-hydrogen created in double-well positron/anti-proton Malmberg-Penning traps. (ATHENA Collaboration.)

  15. Development of a new corona discharge based ion source for high resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer to measure gaseous H2SO4 and aerosol sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Yang, Dongsen; Ma, Yan; Chen, Mindong; Cheng, Jin; Li, Shizheng; Wang, Ming

    2015-10-01

    A new corona discharge (CD) based ion source was developed for a commercial high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HRToF-CIMS) (Aerodyne Research Inc.) to measure both gaseous sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and aerosol sulfate after thermal desorption. Nitrate core ions (NO3-) were used as reagent ions and were generated by a negative discharge in zero air followed by addition of excess nitrogen dioxide (NO2) to convert primary ions and hydroxyl radicals (OH) into NO3- ions and nitric acid (HNO3). The CD-HRToF-CIMS showed no detectable interference from hundreds parts per billion by volume (ppbv) of sulfur dioxide (SO2). Unlike the atmospheric pressure ionization (API) ToF-CIMS, the CD ion source was integrated onto the ion-molecule reaction (IMR) chamber and which made it possible to measure aerosol sulfate by coupling to a filter inlet for gases and aerosols (FIGAERO). Moreover, compared with a quadrupole-based mass spectrometer, the desired HSO4- signal was detected by its exact mass of m/z 96.960, which was well resolved from the potential interferences of HCO3-ṡ(H2O)2 (m/z 97.014) and O-ṡH2OṡHNO3 (m/z 97.002). In this work, using laboratory-generated standards the CD-HRToF-CIMS was demonstrated to be able to detect as low as 3.1 × 105 molecules cm-3 gaseous H2SO4 and 0.5 μg m-3 ammonium sulfate based on 10-s integration time and two times of the baseline noise. The CD ion source had the advantages of low cost and a simple but robust structure. Since the system was non-radioactive and did not require corrosive HNO3 gas, it can be readily field deployed. The CD-HRToF-CIMS can be a powerful tool for both field and laboratory studies of aerosol formation mechanism and the chemical processes that were critical to understand the evolution of aerosols in the atmosphere.

  16. Evolution of the Physicochemical and Activation Properties of Aerosols within Smoke Plumes during the Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomlinson, J. M.; Mei, F.; Wang, J.; Comstock, J. M.; Hubbe, J. M.; Pekour, M. S.; Shilling, J. E.; Fortner, E.; Chand, D.; Sedlacek, A. J., III; Kleinman, L. I.; Senum, G.; Schmid, B.

    2014-12-01

    Biomass burning from wildfires and controlled agricultural burns are known to be a major source of fine particles and organic aerosols at northern temperate latitudes during the summer months. However, the evolution of the physicochemical properties of the aerosol during transport and the potential impact of this evolution on cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity has rarely been studied for these events. During the DOE-sponsored Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) conducted in the summer and fall of 2013, over 30 research flights sampled biomass burning plumes from wildfires in the Northwestern United States and agricultural burns in the Mid-South region of the United States. A large suite of instruments aboard the DOE G-1 (Gulfstream-1) measured the chemical, physical, and optical properties of biomass burning aerosol with an emphasis on black carbon. A Fast Integrated Mobility Spectrometer (FIMS), Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer - Airborne (UHSAS-A), and Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer (PCASP) were used to measure the aerosol size distribution from 15 - 3,000 nm at 1-Hz. A dual column CCN counter measured the CCN number concentration at supersaturations of 0.25% and 0.50% at a time resolution of 1-Hz and the aerosol chemical composition was measured using a soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS, Aerodyne, Inc). The SP-AMS was operated in two modes: (i) as a traditional high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS, Aerodyne Inc.), which measured chemical composition of non-refractory aerosols and (ii) as the SP-AMS which measured chemical composition of the refractory black carbon-containing (rBC) particle coating and rBC aerosol mass. Utilizing the aforementioned measurements, a CCN closure study is used to investigate the emitted aerosol hygroscopicity, the evolution of the physicochemical properties of the aerosol, and the potential impacts on cloud microphysics from the different fuel sources.

  17. Biogenic Contributions to Summertime Arctic Aerosol: Observations of Aerosol Composition from the Netcare 2014 Aircraft Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, M. D.; Burkart, J.; Koellner, F.; Schneider, J.; Bozem, H.; Hoor, P. M.; Brauner, R.; Herber, A. B.; Leaitch, W. R.; Abbatt, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Arctic is a complex and poorly studied aerosol environment, impacted by strong anthropogenic contributions during winter months and by regional sources in cleaner summer months. In order to gain a predictive understanding of the changing climate in this region, it is necessary to understand the balance between these two aerosol sources to clarify how aerosol might be altered by or contribute to climate change. We present results of vertically resolved, submicron aerosol composition from an Aerodyne high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) during the NETCARE 2014 Polar6 aircraft campaign. The campaign was based in the high Arctic, at Resolute, NU (74°N), allowing measurements from 60 to 2900 meters over ice, open water and near the ice-edge. Concurrent measurements aboard the Polar6 included ultrafine and accumulation mode particle number and size, cloud condensation nuclei concentrations, trace gas concentrations and single particle composition. Aerosol vertical profiles measured by the AMS can be broadly characterized into two regimes corresponding to different meteorological conditions: the first with very low aerosol loading (<0.1 μg/m3) at low altitudes compared to that aloft and high numbers of nucleation mode particles, and the second with higher concentrations at lower levels. This second regime was associated with low concentrations of nucleation mode particles, and higher observable levels of methane sulphonic acid (MSA) from AMS measurements at low altitudes. MSA, produced during the oxidation of dimethyl sulphide, is a marker for the contribution of ocean-derived biogenic sulphur to particulate sulphur and could be identified and quantified using the high-resolution AMS. MSA to sulphate ratios were observed to increase towards lower altitudes, suggesting a contribution to aerosol loading from the ocean. In addition, we present measurements of aerosol neutralization and the characteristics of organic aerosol that relate to the growth of

  18. Nuclear Quadrupole Moments and Nuclear Shell Structure

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Townes, C. H.; Foley, H. M.; Low, W.

    1950-06-23

    Describes a simple model, based on nuclear shell considerations, which leads to the proper behavior of known nuclear quadrupole moments, although predictions of the magnitudes of some quadrupole moments are seriously in error.

  19. LCLS Undulator Quadrupole Fiducialization Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zachary; Levashov, Michael; Lundahl, Eric; Reese, Ed; LeCocq, Catherine; Ruland, Robert; /SLAC

    2010-11-24

    This note presents the fiducialization plan for the LCLS undulator quadrupoles. The note begins by summarizing the requirements for the fiducialization. A discussion of the measurement equipment is presented, followed by the methods used to perform the fiducialization and check the results. This is followed by the detailed fiducialization plan in which each step is enumerated. Finally, the measurement results and data storage formats are presented. The LCLS is made up of 33 assemblies consisting of an undulator, quadrupole, beam finder wire, and other components mounted on a girder. The components must be mounted in such a way that the beam passes down the axis of each component. In this note, we describe how the ideal beam axis is related to tooling balls on the quadrupole. This step, called fiducialization, is necessary because the ideal beam axis is determined magnetically, whereas tangible objects must be used to locate the quadrupole. The note begins with the list of fiducialization requirements. The laboratory in which the work will be performed and the relevant equipment is then briefly described. This is followed by a discussion of the methods used to perform the fiducialization and the methods used to check the results. A detailed fiducialization plan is presented in which all the steps of fiducialization are enumerated. A discussion of the resulting data files and directory structure concludes the note.

  20. Aerosol Chemical and Physical Characterization in Central Amazonia during the 2013 Dry Season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artaxo, P.; Stern, R.; Brito, J.; Carbone, S.

    2015-12-01

    During the dry season, the central Amazon forest is highly influenced by forest fires transported through large distances, changing drastically the atmospheric composition even in remote places. This work focuses on a physical-chemical characterization of the aerosol population over a pristine site in Central Amazonia during the dry season. The submicrometer organic aerosols were measured with the Aerodyne ACSM (Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor, Aerodyne Inc). Optical properties, size distribution and other micro-physical characteristics were also analyzed. Other instruments were simultaneously used. The measurements were taken during the dry season of 2013 in the Cuieiras ecological reserve (ZF2), northwest of Manaus. The statistical analysis of the data was done with the PMF (Positive Matrix Factorization) technique, in which the organic aerosol was separated into different factors, and then its sources and forming processes were attributed. Results show that the mean aerosol loading was 5,91 μg m-3, from which 78% are of organic composition, 8.5% are sulfate, 6.5% are equivalent black carbon, 4% are ammonium and 3% are nitrate. The mass spectra variability can be explained by 3 factors only, determined with the PMF technique. They were identified as BBOA (Biomass Burning Organic Aerosol), representing 12% of the total organic mass, OOA (Oxygenated Organic Aerosol), representing 66% of the total organic mass and IEPOX-SOA (Isoprene derived Epoxydiol-Secondary Organic Aerosol), representing 21% of the total organic mass. Even in remote and pristine regions, Central Amazonia is highly impacted by biomass burning. Biogenic secondary organic aerosols are also present during the dry season, and the suppression of its wet deposition processes increases their concentration. The oxidation level and other physical-chemical characteristics indicate that the long range transport is responsible for the regional range of this impact.

  1. Analytic formula for quadrupole-quadrupole matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosensteel, G.

    1990-12-01

    An analytic formula is reported for general matrix elements of the microscopic quadrupole-quadrupole operator in the U(3)-boson approximation. The complete infinite-dimensional basis of A-fermion wave functions is compatible with the harmonic-oscillator shell model and consists of np-nh configurations, with spurious center-of-mass excitations removed, which are symmetry adapted to the Elliott U(3) and symplectic Sp(3,R) models. The formula expresses the general Q2.Q2 matrix element with respect to this complete orthonormal basis as a Racah SU(3) U coefficient times a closed-shell matrix element. An oscillator closed-shell matrix element of Q2.Q2 is a square root of a rational function of the integer quantum numbers of the U(3) basis.

  2. Elemental Composition of Primary Aerosols Emitted from Burning of 21 Biomass Fuels Measured by Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desyaterik, Y.; Mack, L.; Lee, T.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Collett, J. L.; Jimenez, J. L.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2010-12-01

    Biomass burning emissions are an important contributor to regional aerosol loading and have a large impact of on air quality, visibility, and radiative forcing. However, the detailed chemical composition of the aerosols emitted during biomass burning is largely unknown. In order to gain a better understanding of the chemical and physical properties of these emissions, 92 burns were undertaken in the combustion chamber of the USDA/FS Fire Sciences Laboratory in Missoula, Montana, in well-defined laboratory conditions. A set of 21 different fuels was tested that represents biomass burned annually in the western and southeastern U.S. The chemical composition of the resulting biomass smoke aerosols was analyzed with a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (Aerodyne HR-ToF-AMS). Simultaneous measurements of CO2 and CO concentrations allowed flaming and smoldering fire regimes to be distinguished. The elemental composition of the organic portion of the aerosols was extracted from the AMS measurements. Here we present the variation of O/C, H/C and organic mass to organic carbon ratios (OM/OC) versus fire regime and fuel type. We also discuss the influence on the organic aerosol chemical composition of various factors such as fuel moisture content and total aerosol loading, as well as the approach used to account for water vapor ions derived from water originally present in sampled particles versus water vapor ions produced by electron impact fragmentation of organic molecules.

  3. Investigating Types and Sources of Organic Aerosol in Rocky Mountain National Park Using Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schurman, M. I.; Lee, T.; Sun, Y.; Schichtel, B. A.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Collett, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    The Rocky Mountain Atmospheric Nitrogen and Sulfur Study (RoMANS) focuses on identifying pathways and sources of nitrogen deposition in Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP). Past work has combined measurements from a range of instrumentation such as annular denuders, PILS-IC, Hi-Vol samplers, and trace gas analyzers. Limited information from early RoMANS campaigns is available regarding organic aerosol. While prior measurements have produced a measure of total organic carbon mass, high time resolution measures of organic aerosol concentration and speciation are lacking. One area of particular interest is characterizing the types, sources, and amounts of organic nitrogen aerosol. Organic nitrogen measurements in RMNP wet deposition reveal a substantial contribution to the total reactive nitrogen deposition budget. In this study an Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was deployed in summer 2010 at RMNP to investigate organic aerosol composition and its temporal variability. The species timeline and diurnal species variations are combined with meteorological data to investigate local transport events and chemistry; transport from the Colorado Front Range urban corridor appears to be more significant for inorganic species than for the overall organic aerosol mass. Considerable variation in organic aerosol concentration is observed (0.5 to 20 μg/m3), with high concentration episodes lasting between hours and two days. High resolution AMS data are analyzed for organic aerosol, including organic nitrogen species that might be expected from local biogenic emissions, agricultural activities, and secondary reaction products of combustion emissions. Positive matrix factorization reveals that semi-volatile oxidized OA, low-volatility oxidized OA, and biomass burning OA comprise most organic mass; the diurnal profile of biomass burning OA peaks at four and nine pm and may arise from local camp fires, while constant concentrations of

  4. Aerosol composition and sources during the Chinese Spring Festival: fireworks, secondary aerosol, and holiday effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Q.; Sun, Y. L.; Wang, Z.; Yin, Y.

    2015-06-01

    Aerosol particles were characterized by an Aerodyne aerosol chemical speciation monitor along with various collocated instruments in Beijing, China, to investigate the role of fireworks (FW) and secondary aerosol in particulate pollution during the Chinese Spring Festival of 2013. Three FW events, exerting significant and short-term impacts on fine particles (PM2.5), were observed on the days of Lunar New Year, Lunar Fifth Day, and Lantern Festival. The FW were shown to have a large impact on non-refractory potassium, chloride, sulfate, and organics in submicron aerosol (PM1), of which FW organics appeared to be emitted mainly in secondary, with its mass spectrum resembling that of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Pollution events (PEs) and clean periods (CPs) alternated routinely throughout the study. Secondary particulate matter (SPM = SOA + sulfate + nitrate + ammonium) dominated the total PM1 mass on average, accounting for 63-82% during nine PEs in this study. The elevated contributions of secondary species during PEs resulted in a higher mass extinction efficiency of PM1 (6.4 m2 g-1) than during CPs (4.4 m2 g-1). The Chinese Spring Festival also provides a unique opportunity to study the impact of reduced anthropogenic emissions on aerosol chemistry in the city. Primary species showed ubiquitous reductions during the holiday period with the largest reduction being in cooking organic aerosol (OA; 69%), in nitrogen monoxide (54%), and in coal combustion OA (28%). Secondary sulfate, however, remained only slightly changed, and the SOA and the total PM2.5 even slightly increased. Our results have significant implications for controlling local primary source emissions during PEs, e.g., cooking and traffic activities. Controlling these factors might have a limited effect on improving air quality in the megacity of Beijing, due to the dominance of SPM from regional transport in aerosol particle composition.

  5. Comparison of Aerosol Mass Spectrometer and Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor Measurements of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation in Smog Chamber Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croteau, P. L.; Hunter, J. F.; Daumit, K. E.; Carrasquillo, A. J.; Cross, E. S.; Canagaratna, M.; Jayne, J.; Worsnop, D. R.; Kroll, J. H.

    2012-12-01

    Thermal vaporization-electron impact ionization (TV-EI) mass spectrometry is a powerful tool for understanding the chemistry of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation and atmospheric aging. The Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and recently developed Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) are two instruments that utilize the same TV-EI technique. The ACSM trades the particle sizing capability, sensitivity, speed, and resolution of the AMS for simplicity, affordability, and ease of operation - enabling stand-alone continuous sampling for extended periods of time. Here we present results of an intercomparison between a high-resolution AMS and an ACSM. Three well-studied SOA formation chamber experiments were conducted: isoprene photooxidation under high NOx conditions, m-xylene photooxidation under high NOx conditions, and α-pinene ozonolysis under low NOx conditions. Comparisons between time-series and mass spectra from these experiments, along with positive matrix factorization analysis results demonstrate that the ACSM, while it does not provide the same level of detail as an AMS, is a suitable tool for exploring the chemistry of SOA formation in chamber studies.

  6. Aerosol Size Distribution, Composition, and Hygroscopicity Measurements During CSTRIPE Using an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer and a Dual Differential Mobility Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahreini, R.; Varutbangkul, V.; Conant, W. C.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Buzorius, G.; Jonsson, H. H.

    2003-12-01

    During July 2003, the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft was deployed in the CSTRIPE (Coastal STRatocumulus Imposed Perturbation Experiment) field experiment in order to quantify the effects of aerosols on the microphysics and dynamics of marine stratocumulus clouds. In order to characterize the effects of different aerosol types on stratocumulus clouds, various air masses were sampled, including local fire plumes, pollution over the San Joaquin valley, unperturbed marine stratocumulus clouds, and stratocumulus clouds perturbed by seeding flares. Some research flights were also dedicated to characterize the seeding flares in the clear sky. Measurements of aerosol mass distribution and composition, using an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS), and size distribution and hygroscopic behavior, using a Dual Differential Mobility Analyzer (Dual DMA) with one column at dry conditions and another at a relative humidity of approximately 70 percent, will be presented here. During a number of in-cloud sampling periods, the Counter-flow Virtual Impactor (CVI) was used to select and dry cloud droplets, which were then analyzed by the AMS and the Dual DMA. The AMS composition measurements showed that sulfate and organics comprised most of the mass of the non-refractory components of the aerosol. The DMA showed a mixture of unimodal and bimodal size distributions in most types of air masses. The air mass over the San Joaquin valley, however, showed strong evidence of freshly nucleated particles, with aerosol number concentrations often above 80,000 cm-3.

  7. Long term aerosol and trace gas measurements in Central Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artaxo, Paulo; Barbosa, Henrique M. J.; Ferreira de Brito, Joel; Carbone, Samara; Rizzo, Luciana V.; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Martin, Scot T.

    2016-04-01

    The central region of the Amazonian forest is a pristine region in terms of aerosol and trace gases concentrations. In the wet season, Amazonia is actually one of the cleanest continental region we can observe on Earth. A long term observational program started 20 years ago, and show important features of this pristine region. Several sites were used, between then ATTO (Amazon Tall Tower Observatory) and ZF2 ecological research site, both 70-150 Km North of Manaus, receiving air masses that traveled over 1500 km of pristine tropical forests. The sites are GAW regional monitoring stations. Aerosol chemical composition (OC/EC and trace elements) is being analysed using filters for fine (PM2.5) and coarse mode aerosol as well as Aerodyne ACSM (Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitors). VOCs are measured using PTR-MS, while CO, O3 and CO2 are routinely measured. Aerosol absorption is being studied with AE33 aethalometers and MAAP (Multi Angle Absorption Photometers). Aerosol light scattering are being measured at several wavelengths using TSI and Ecotech nephelometers. Aerosol size distribution is determined using scanning mobility particle sizer at each site. Lidars measure the aerosol column up to 12 Km providing the vertical profile of aerosol extinction. The aerosol column is measures using AERONET sun photometers. In the wet season, organic aerosol comprises 75-85% of fine aerosol, and sulfate and nitrate concentrations are very low (1-3 percent). Aerosols are dominated by biogenic primary particles as well as SOA from biogenic precursors. Black carbon in the wet season accounts for 5-9% of fine mode aerosol. Ozone in the wet season peaks at 10-12 ppb at the middle of the day, while carbon monoxide averages at 50-80 ppb. Aerosol optical thickness (AOT) is a low 0.05 to 0.1 at 550 nm in the wet season. Sahara dust transport events sporadically enhance the concentration of soil dust aerosols and black carbon. In the dry season (August-December), long range transported

  8. A Vibrating Wire System For Quadrupole Fiducialization

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zachary

    2010-12-13

    A vibrating wire system is being developed to fiducialize the quadrupoles between undulator segments in the LCLS. This note provides a detailed analysis of the system. The LCLS will have quadrupoles between the undulator segments to keep the electron beam focused. If the quadrupoles are not centered on the beam axis, the beam will receive transverse kicks, causing it to deviate from the undulator axis. Beam based alignment will be used to move the quadrupoles onto a straight line, but an initial, conventional alignment must place the quadrupole centers on a straight line to 100 {micro}m. In the fiducialization step of the initial alignment, the position of the center of the quadrupole is measured relative to tooling balls on the outside of the quadrupole. The alignment crews then use the tooling balls to place the magnet in the tunnel. The required error on the location of the quadrupole center relative to the tooling balls must be less than 25 {micro}m. In this note, we analyze a system under construction for the quadrupole fiducialization. The system uses the vibrating wire technique to position a wire onto the quadrupole magnetic axis. The wire position is then related to tooling balls using wire position detectors. The tooling balls on the wire position detectors are finally related to tooling balls on the quadrupole to perform the fiducialization. The total 25 {micro}m fiducialization error must be divided between these three steps. The wire must be positioned onto the quadrupole magnetic axis to within 10 {micro}m, the wire position must be measured relative to tooling balls on the wire position detectors to within 15 {micro}m, and tooling balls on the wire position detectors must be related to tooling balls on the quadrupole to within 10 {micro}m. The techniques used in these three steps will be discussed. The note begins by discussing various quadrupole fiducialization techniques used in the past and discusses why the vibrating wire technique is our method

  9. Electrostatic quadrupoles for heavy-ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, P.; Faltens, A.

    1993-05-01

    Voltage-holding data for three quadrupole electrode sizes and inter-electrode spacings are reported. The dependence of the breakdown voltage on system size and its influence on the optimum quadrupole size for beam transport in a multiple beam array are discussed.

  10. Aerosol composition and sources during the Chinese Spring Festival: fireworks, secondary aerosol, and holiday effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Q.; Sun, Y. L.; Wang, Z.; Yin, Y.

    2014-08-01

    Aerosol particles were characterized by an Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) along with various collocated instruments in Beijing, China to investigate the aerosol composition and sources during the Chinese Spring Festival, 2013. Three fireworks (FW) events exerting significant and short-term impacts on fine particles (PM2.5) were observed on the days of Lunar New Year, Lunar Fifth Day, and Lantern Festival. The FW showed major impacts on non-refractory potassium, chloride, sulfate, and organics in PM1, of which the FW organics appeared to be mainly secondary with its mass spectrum resembling to that of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Pollution events (PEs) and clean periods (CPs) alternated routinely throughout the study. Secondary particulate matter (SPM = SOA + sulfate + nitrate + ammonium) dominated PM1 accounting for 63-82% during the nine PEs observed. The elevated contributions of secondary species during PEs resulted in a higher mass extinction efficiency of PM1 (6.4 m2 g-1) than that during CPs (4.4 m2 g-1). The Chinese Spring Festival also provides a unique opportunity to study the impacts of reduced anthropogenic emissions on aerosol chemistry in the city. The primary species showed ubiquitous reductions during the holiday period with the largest reduction for cooking OA (69%), nitrogen monoxide (54%), and coal combustion OA (28%). The secondary sulfate, however, remained minor change, and the SOA and the total PM2.5 even slightly increased. These results have significant implications that controlling local primary source emissions, e.g., cooking and traffic activities, might have limited effects on improving air quality during PEs when SPM that is formed over regional scales dominates aerosol particle composition.

  11. Studies of Ambient and Chamber Aerosol Composition using the Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craven, Jill Suzanne

    This thesis presents composition measurements for atmospherically relevant inorganic and organic aerosol from laboratory and ambient measurements using the Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer. Studies include the oxidation of dodecane in the Caltech environmental chambers, and several aircraft- and ground-based field studies, which include the quantification of wildfire emissions off the coast of California, and Los Angeles urban emissions. The oxidation of dodecane by OH under low NO conditions and the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was explored using a gas-phase chemical model, gas-phase CIMS measurements, and high molecular weight ion traces from particlephase HR-TOF-AMS mass spectra. The combination of these measurements support the hypothesis that particle-phase chemistry leading to peroxyhemiacetal formation is important. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) was applied to the AMS mass spectra which revealed three factors representing a combination of gas-particle partitioning, chemical conversion in the aerosol, and wall deposition. Airborne measurements of biomass burning emissions from a chaparral fire on the central Californian coast were carried out in November 2009. Physical and chemical changes were reported for smoke ages 0--4 h old. CO 2 normalized ammonium, nitrate, and sulfate increased, whereas the normalized OA decreased sharply in the first 1.5--2 h, and then slowly increased for the remaining 2 h (net decrease in normalized OA). Comparison to wildfire samples from the Yucatan revealed that factors such as relative humidity, incident UV radiation, age of smoke, and concentration of emissions are important for wildfire evolution. Ground-based aerosol composition is reported for Pasadena, CA during the sumix mer of 2009. The OA component, which dominated the submicron aerosol mass, was deconvolved into hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA), semi-volatile oxidized organic aerosol (SVOOA), and low-volatility oxidized organic aerosol

  12. Organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Organic aerosols scatter solar radiation. They may also either enhance or decrease concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei. This paper summarizes observed concentrations of aerosols in remote continental and marine locations and provides estimates for the sources of organic aerosol matter. The anthropogenic sources of organic aerosols may be as large as the anthropogenic sources of sulfate aerosols, implying a similar magnitude of direct forcing of climate. The source estimates are highly uncertain and subject to revision in the future. A slow secondary source of organic aerosols of unknown origin may contribute to the observed oceanic concentrations. The role of organic aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is described and it is concluded that they may either enhance or decrease the ability of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols to act as CCN.

  13. Development and Characterization of a Thermodenuder for Aerosol Volatility Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Timothy Onasch

    2009-09-09

    This SBIR Phase I project addressed the critical need for improved characterization of carbonaceous aerosol species in the atmosphere. The proposed work focused on the development of a thermodenuder (TD) system capable of systematically measuring volatility profiles of primary and secondary organic aerosol species and providing insight into the effects of absorbing and nonabsorbing organic coatings on particle absorption properties. This work provided the fundamental framework for the generation of essential information needed for improved predictions of ambient aerosol loadings and radiative properties by atmospheric chemistry models. As part of this work, Aerodyne Research, Inc. (ARI) continued to develop and test, with the final objective of commercialization, an improved thermodenuder system that can be used in series with any aerosol instrument or suite of instruments (e.g., aerosol mass spectrometers-AMS, scanning mobility particle sizers-SMPS, photoacoustic absorption spectrometers-PAS, etc.) to obtain aerosol chemical, physical, and optical properties as a function of particle volatility. In particular, we provided the proof of concept for the direct coupling of our improved TD design with a full microphysical model to obtain volatility profiles for different organic aerosol components and to allow for meaningful comparisons between different TD-derived aerosol measurements. In a TD, particles are passed through a heated zone and a denuding (activated charcoal) zone to remove semi-volatile material. Changes in particle size, number concentration, optical absorption, and chemical composition are subsequently detected with aerosol instrumentation. The aerosol volatility profiles provided by the TD will strengthen organic aerosol emission inventories, provide further insight into secondary aerosol formation mechanisms, and provide an important measure of particle absorption (including brown carbon contributions and identification, and absorption enhancements

  14. Characterizing the Hygroscopicity of Nascent Sea Spray Aerosol from Synthetic Blooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forestieri, S.; Cappa, C. D.; Sultana, C. M.; Lee, C.; Wang, X.; Helgestad, T.; Moore, K.; Prather, K. A.; Cornwell, G.; Novak, G.; Bertram, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    Marine sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles make up a significant portion of natural aerosols and are therefore important in establishing the baseline for anthropogenic aerosol climate impacts. Scattering of solar radiation by aerosols affects Earth's radiative budget and the degree of scattering is size-dependent. Thus, aerosols scatter more light at elevated relative humidities when they grow larger via water uptake. This growth depends critically on chemical composition. SSA can become enriched in organics during phytoplankton blooms, becoming less salty and therefore less hygroscopic. Subsaturated hygroscopic growth factors at 85% relative humidity (GF(85%)) of SSA particles were quantified during two mesocosm experiments in enclosed marine aerosol reference tanks (MARTs). The two experiments were conducted with filtered seawater collected at separate times from the Scripps Institute of Oceanography Pier in La Jolla, CA. Phytoplankton blooms in each tank were induced via the addition of nutrients and photosynthetically active radiation. The "indoor" MART was illuminated with fluorescent light and the other "outdoor" MART was illuminated with sunlight. The peak chlorophyll-a concentrations were 59 micrograms/L and 341 micrograms /L for the indoor and outdoor MARTs, respectively. GF(85%) values for SSA particles were quantified using a humidified cavity ringdown spectrometer and particle size distributions. Particle composition was monitored with a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) and an Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). Relationships between the observed particle GFs and the particle composition markers will be discussed.

  15. QUADRUPOLE BEAM-BASED ALIGNMENT AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    NIEDZIELA, J.; MONTAG, C.; SATOGATA, T.

    2005-05-16

    Successful implementation of a beam-based alignment algorithm, tailored to different types of quadrupoles at RHIC, provides significant benefits to machine operations for heavy ions and polarized protons. This algorithm was used to calibrate beam position monitor centers relative to interaction region quadrupoles to maximize aperture. This approach was also used to determine the optimal orbit through transition jump quadrupoles to minimize orbit changes during the transition jump for heavy ion acceleration. This paper provides background discussion and results from first measurements during the RHIC 2005 run.

  16. Characterization and source apportionment of organic aerosol using offline aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daellenbach, K. R.; Bozzetti, C.; Křepelová, A.; Canonaco, F.; Wolf, R.; Zotter, P.; Fermo, P.; Crippa, M.; Slowik, J. G.; Sosedova, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Huang, R.-J.; Poulain, L.; Szidat, S.; Baltensperger, U.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; El Haddad, I.

    2015-08-01

    Field deployments of the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) have significantly advanced real-time measurements and source apportionment of non-refractory particulate matter. However, the cost and complex maintenance requirements of the AMS make impractical its deployment at sufficient sites to determine regional characteristics. Furthermore, the negligible transmission efficiency of the AMS inlet for supermicron particles significantly limits the characterization of their chemical nature and contributing sources. In this study, we utilize the AMS to characterize the water-soluble organic fingerprint of ambient particles collected onto conventional quartz filters, which are routinely sampled at many air quality sites. The method was applied to 256 particulate matter (PM) filter samples (PM1, PM2.5, PM10) collected at 16 urban and rural sites during summer and winter. We show that the results obtained by the present technique compare well with those from co-located online measurements, e.g. AMS or Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM). The bulk recoveries of organic aerosol (60-91 %) achieved using this technique, together with low detection limits (0.8 μg of organic aerosol on the analyzed filter fraction) allow its application to environmental samples. We will discuss the recovery variability of individual hydrocarbon, oxygen containing and other ions. The performance of such data in source apportionment is assessed in comparison to ACSM data. Recoveries of organic components related to different sources as traffic, wood burning and secondary organic aerosol are presented. This technique, while subjected to the limitations inherent to filter-based measurements (e.g. filter artifacts and limited time resolution) may be used to enhance the AMS capabilities in measuring size-fractionated, spatially-resolved long-term datasets.

  17. Characterization and source apportionment of organic aerosol using offline aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daellenbach, K. R.; Bozzetti, C.; Křepelová, A.; Canonaco, F.; Wolf, R.; Zotter, P.; Fermo, P.; Crippa, M.; Slowik, J. G.; Sosedova, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Huang, R.-J.; Poulain, L.; Szidat, S.; Baltensperger, U.; El Haddad, I.; Prévôt, A. S. H.

    2016-01-01

    Field deployments of the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) have significantly advanced real-time measurements and source apportionment of non-refractory particulate matter. However, the cost and complex maintenance requirements of the AMS make its deployment at sufficient sites to determine regional characteristics impractical. Furthermore, the negligible transmission efficiency of the AMS inlet for supermicron particles significantly limits the characterization of their chemical nature and contributing sources. In this study, we utilize the AMS to characterize the water-soluble organic fingerprint of ambient particles collected onto conventional quartz filters, which are routinely sampled at many air quality sites. The method was applied to 256 particulate matter (PM) filter samples (PM1, PM2.5, and PM10, i.e., PM with aerodynamic diameters smaller than 1, 2.5, and 10 µm, respectively), collected at 16 urban and rural sites during summer and winter. We show that the results obtained by the present technique compare well with those from co-located online measurements, e.g., AMS or Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM). The bulk recoveries of organic aerosol (60-91 %) achieved using this technique, together with low detection limits (0.8 µg of organic aerosol on the analyzed filter fraction) allow its application to environmental samples. We will discuss the recovery variability of individual hydrocarbon ions, ions containing oxygen, and other ions. The performance of such data in source apportionment is assessed in comparison to ACSM data. Recoveries of organic components related to different sources as traffic, wood burning, and secondary organic aerosol are presented. This technique, while subjected to the limitations inherent to filter-based measurements (e.g., filter artifacts and limited time resolution) may be used to enhance the AMS capabilities in measuring size-fractionated, spatially resolved long-term data sets.

  18. Clusterization and quadrupole deformation in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Cseh, J.; Algora, A.; Antonenko, N. V.; Jolos, R. V.; Scheid, W.; Darai, J.; Hess, P. O.

    2006-04-26

    We study the interrelation of the clusterization and quadrupole deformation of atomic nuclei, by applying cluster models. Both the energetic stability and the exclusion principle is investigated. Special attention is paid to the relative orientations of deformed clusters.

  19. Nonuniform radiation damage in permanent magnet quadrupoles

    SciTech Connect

    Danly, C. R.; Merrill, F. E.; Barlow, D.; Mariam, F. G.

    2014-08-15

    We present data that indicate nonuniform magnetization loss due to radiation damage in neodymium-iron-boron Halbach-style permanent magnet quadrupoles. The proton radiography (pRad) facility at Los Alamos uses permanent-magnet quadrupoles for magnifying lenses, and a system recently commissioned at GSI-Darmsdadt uses permanent magnets for its primary lenses. Large fluences of spallation neutrons can be produced in close proximity to these magnets when the proton beam is, intentionally or unintentionally, directed into the tungsten beam collimators; imaging experiments at LANL’s pRad have shown image degradation with these magnetic lenses at proton beam doses lower than those expected to cause damage through radiation-induced reduction of the quadrupole strength alone. We have observed preferential degradation in portions of the permanent magnet quadrupole where the field intensity is highest, resulting in increased high-order multipole components.

  20. Permanent magnet edge-field quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Tatchyn, R.O.

    1997-01-21

    Planar permanent magnet edge-field quadrupoles for use in particle accelerating machines and in insertion devices designed to generate spontaneous or coherent radiation from moving charged particles are disclosed. The invention comprises four magnetized rectangular pieces of permanent magnet material with substantially similar dimensions arranged into two planar arrays situated to generate a field with a substantially dominant quadrupole component in regions close to the device axis. 10 figs.

  1. Permanent magnet edge-field quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Tatchyn, Roman O.

    1997-01-01

    Planar permanent magnet edge-field quadrupoles for use in particle accelerating machines and in insertion devices designed to generate spontaneous or coherent radiation from moving charged particles are disclosed. The invention comprises four magnetized rectangular pieces of permanent magnet material with substantially similar dimensions arranged into two planar arrays situated to generate a field with a substantially dominant quadrupole component in regions close to the device axis.

  2. Miniature quadrupole mass spectrometer array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Hecht, Michael H. (Inventor); Orient, Otto J. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a minature quadrupole mass spectrometer array for the separation of ions, comprising a first pair of parallel, planar, nonmagnetic conducting rods each having an axis of symmetry, a second pair of planar, nonmagnetic conducting rods each having an axis of symmetry parallel to said first pair of rods and disposed such that a line perpendicular to each of said first axes of symmetry and a line perpendicular to each of said second axes of symmetry bisect each other and form a generally 90 degree angle. A nonconductive top positioning plate is positioned generally perpendicular to the first and second pairs of rods and has an aperture for ion entrance along an axis equidistant from each axis of symmetry of each of the parallel rods, a nonconductive bottom positioning plate is generally parallel to the top positioning plate and has an aperture for ion exit centered on an axis equidistant from each axis of symmetry of each of the parallel rods, means for maintaining a direct current voltage between the first and second pairs of rods, and means for applying a radio frequency voltage to the first and second pairs of rods.

  3. Miniature quadrupole mass spectrometer array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Hecht, Michael H. (Inventor); Orient, Otto J. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a minature quadrupole mass spectrometer array for the separation of ions, comprising a first pair of parallel, planar, nonmagnetic conducting rods each having an axis of symmetry, a second pair of planar, nonmagnetic conducting rods each having an axis of symmetry parallel to said first pair of rods and disposed such that a line perpendicular to each of said first axes of symmetry and a line perpendicular to each of said second axes of symmetry bisect each other and form a generally 90 degree angle. A nonconductive top positioning plate is positioned generally perpendicular to the first and second pairs of rods and has an aperture for ion entrance along an axis equidistant from each axis of symmetry of each of the parallel rods, a nonconductive bottom positioning plate is generally parallel to the top positioning plate and has an aperture for ion exit centered on an axis equidistant from each axis of symmetry of each of the parallel rods, means for maintaining a direct current voltage between the first and second pairs of rods, and means for applying a radio frequency voltage to the first and second pairs of rods.

  4. Integrally formed radio frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Abbott, Steven R.

    1989-01-01

    An improved radio frequency quadrupole (10) is provided having an elongate housing (11) with an elongate central axis (12) and top, bottom and two side walls (13a-d) symmetrically disposed about the axis, and vanes (14a-d) formed integrally with the walls (13a-d), the vanes (14a-d) each having a cross-section at right angles to the central axis (12) which tapers inwardly toward the axis to form electrode tips (15a-d) spaced from each other by predetermined distances. Each of the four walls (13a-d), and the vanes (14a-d) integral therewith, is a separate structural element having a central lengthwise plane (16) passing through the tip of the vane, the walls (13a-d) having flat mounting surfaces (17, 18) at right angles to and parallel to the control plane (16), respectively, which are butted together to position the walls and vane tips relative to each other.

  5. The Composition of Droplet-Forming Aerosol as a Function of Supersaturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, B.; Browne, E. C.; Ardon-Dryer, K.; Carrasquillo, A. J.; Daumit, K. E.; Boulanger, K.; Kroll, J. H.; Thornton, J. A.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    Ambient aerosol measurements were conducted during February 2013 as part of the Department of Energy's Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). Located in North Truro, MA, the site provided access to a variety of air mass sources, including marine, continental, and aged urban outflow. A CCN closure study was conducted with measurements from a commercial Cloud Condensation Nuclei Counter (CCNC, Droplet Measurement Technologies) at a range of supersaturation conditions, as well as an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS, Aerodyne). Further measurements were conducted utilizing a Pumped Counterflow Virtual Impactor (PCVI) in order to separate the activated droplets, as a function of supersaturation, from un-activated aerosol at the output of the CCNC. Subsequent composition measurements of the droplet residuals were conducted with the AMS. High-resolution residual aerosol composition will be presented as a function of instrument supersaturation and air mass, and will be compared to the total ambient aerosol composition. Results indicate an enhancement of nitrate as well as compositional differences between the organic content of the un-activated aerosol and the droplet residuals. The advantages and disadvantages of the CCNC/PCVI/AMS instrumental setup will be discussed with a focus on how this new technique allows for an improvement in our understanding of warm cloud formation.

  6. Limits on the diurnal variation of H2 quadrupole features in Neptune

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, W. H.; Schempp, W. V.; Baines, K. H.

    1989-08-01

    Spectral profiles of the H2 S4(0) and S4(1) lines are presented for Neptune on three consecutive nights; no variation is detected in the equivalent widths of the H2 4-0 features to within an observational uncertainty of about 20 percent. Comparisons with previous H2 quadrupole observations indicate that no secular trends have been detected over about 15 yr. The equivalent-width error limits are interpreted in terms of the maximum variability of Neptunian tropospheric aerosols. Specifically, the error bars for the globally averaged equivalent widths of the two H2 quadrupole absorption features constrain the bottom of the visible atmosphere, as defined by a bright optically infinite isotropically scattering cloud, to be 2.9 + or - 0.6 bars, while the methane haze opacity is constrained to be 0.30 + or - 0.25.

  7. Evolution of Asian aerosols during transpacific transport in INTEX-B

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlea, E. J.; DeCarlo, Peter; Aiken, Allison; Kimmel, Joel; Peltier, R. E.; Weber, R. J.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Collins, Donald R.; Shinozuka, Yohei; McNaughton, C. S.; Howell, S. G.; Clarke, A. D.; Emmons, L.; Apel, Eric; Pfister, G. G.; van Donkelaar, A.; Martin, R. V.; Millet, D. B.; Heald, C. L.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2009-10-01

    Measurements of aerosol composition were made with an Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) on board the NSF/NCAR C-130 aircraft as part of the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment Phase B 5 (INTEX-B) field campaign over the Eastern Pacific Ocean. The HR-ToF-AMS measurements of non-refractory submicron aerosol mass are shown to compare well with other aerosol instrumentation in the INTEX-B field study. Two case studies are described for pollution layers transported across the Pacific from the Asian continent, intercepted 3–4 days and 7–10 days downwind of Asia, respectively. Aerosol chemistry is shown to 10 be a robust tracer for air masses originating in Asia, specifically the presence of sulfate dominated aerosol is a distinguishing feature of Asian pollution layers that have been transported to the Eastern Pacific. We examine the time scales of processing for sulfate and organic aerosol in the atmosphere and show that our observations confirm a conceptual model for transpacific transport from Asia proposed by Brock et al. (2004). 15 Our observations of both sulfate and organic aerosol in aged Asian pollution layers are consistent with fast formation near the Asian continent, followed by washout during lofting and subsequent transformation during transport across the Pacific. Our observations are the first atmospheric measurements to indicate that although secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from pollution happens on the timescale of one day, 20 the oxidation of organic aerosol continues at longer timescales in the atmosphere. Comparisons with chemical transport models of data from the entire campaign reveal an under-prediction of SOA mass in the MOZART model, but much smaller discrepancies with the GEOS-Chem model than found in previous studies over the Western Pacific. No evidence is found to support a previous hypothesis for significant secondary 25 organic aerosol formation in the free troposphere.

  8. The impact of relative humidity on aerosol composition and evolution processes during wintertime in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yele; Wang, Zifa; Fu, Pingqing; Jiang, Qi; Yang, Ting; Li, Jie; Ge, Xinlei

    2013-10-01

    Non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1) species measured by an Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) along with collocated gaseous species are used to investigate the impacts of relative humidity (RH) on aerosol composition and evolution processes during wintertime in Beijing, China. Aerosol species exhibit strong, yet different RH dependence between low and high RH levels. At low RH levels (<50%), all aerosol species increase linearly as a function of RH, among which organics present the largest mass increase rate at 11.4 μg m-3/10% RH. Because the particle liquid water predicted by E-AIM model is very low and the temperature is relatively constant, the enhancement of aerosol species is primarily due to the decrease of wind speed. While the rates of increase for most aerosol species are reduced at high RH levels (>50%), sulfate presents an even faster increasing rate, indicating the significant impact of liquid water on sulfate production. The RH dependence of organic aerosol (OA) components is also quite different. Among OA components, coal combustion OA (CCOA) presents the largest enhancement in both mass concentration and contribution as a function of RH. Our results elucidate the important roles of liquid water in aerosol processing at elevated RH levels, in particular affecting sulfate and CCOA via aqueous-phase reaction and gas-particle partitioning associated with water uptake, respectively. It is estimated that aqueous-phase processing can contribute more than 50% of secondary inorganic species production along with an increase of aerosol particle acidity during the fog periods. However, it appears not to significantly enhance secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation and the oxidation degree of OA.

  9. Measurements of aerosol chemical composition in boreal forest summer conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ńijälä, M.; Junninen, H.; Ehn, M.; Petäjä, T.; Vogel, A.; Hoffmann, T.; Corrigan, A.; Russell, L.; Makkonen, U.; Virkkula, A.; Mäntykenttä, J.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D.

    2012-04-01

    Boreal forests are an important biome, covering vast areas of the northern hemisphere and affecting the global climate change via various feedbacks [1]. Despite having relatively few anthropogenic primary aerosol sources, they always contain a non-negligible aerosol population [2]. This study describes aerosol chemical composition measurements using Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (C-ToF AMS, [3]), carried out at a boreal forest area in Hyytiälä, Southern Finland. The site, Helsinki University SMEAR II measurement station [4], is situated at a homogeneous Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) forest stand. In addition to the station's permanent aerosol, gas phase and meteorological instruments, during the HUMPPA (Hyytiälä United Measurements of Photochemistry and Particles in Air) campaign in July 2010, a very comprehensive set of atmospheric chemistry measurement instrumentation was provided by the Max Planck Institute for chemistry, Johannes Gutenberg-University, University of California and the Finnish Meteorological institute. In this study aerosol chemical composition measurements from the campaign are presented. The dominant aerosol chemical species during the campaign were the organics, although periods with elevated amounts of particulate sulfates were also seen. The overall AMS measured particle mass concentrations varied from near zero to 27 μg/m observed during a forest fire smoke episode. The AMS measured aerosol mass loadings were found to agree well with DMPS derived mass concentrations (r2=0.998). The AMS data was also compared with three other aerosol instruments. The Marga instrument [5] was used to provide a quantitative semi-online measurement of inorganic chemical compounds in particle phase. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis was performed on daily filter samples, enabling the identification and quantification of organic aerosol subspecies. Finally an Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer (APCI

  10. Chemical characterization of secondary organic aerosol constituents from isoprene ozonolysis in the presence of acidic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riva, Matthieu; Budisulistiorini, Sri Hapsari; Zhang, Zhenfa; Gold, Avram; Surratt, Jason D.

    2016-04-01

    Isoprene is the most abundant non-methane hydrocarbon emitted into Earth's atmosphere and is predominantly derived from terrestrial vegetation. Prior studies have focused largely on the hydroxyl (OH) radical-initiated oxidation of isoprene and have demonstrated that highly oxidized compounds, such as isoprene-derived epoxides, enhance the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) through heterogeneous (multiphase) reactions on acidified sulfate aerosol. However, studies on the impact of acidified sulfate aerosol on SOA formation from isoprene ozonolysis are lacking and the current work systematically examines this reaction. SOA was generated in an indoor smog chamber from isoprene ozonolysis under dark conditions in the presence of non-acidified or acidified sulfate seed aerosol. The effect of OH radicals on SOA chemical composition was investigated using diethyl ether as an OH radical scavenger. Aerosols were collected and chemically characterized by ultra performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization high-resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/ESI-HR-QTOFMS) and gas chromatography/electron impact ionization-mass spectrometry (GC/EI-MS). Analysis revealed the formation of highly oxidized compounds, including organosulfates (OSs) and 2-methylterols, which were significantly enhanced in the presence of acidified sulfate seed aerosol. OSs identified in the chamber experiments were also observed and quantified in summertime fine aerosol collected from two rural locations in the southeastern United States during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS).

  11. SUPERCONDUCTING QUADRUPOLE ARRAYS FOR MULTIPLE BEAM TRANSPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Rainer Meinke Carl Goodzeit Penny Ball Roger Bangerter

    2003-10-01

    The goal of this research was to develop concepts for affordable, fully functional arrays of superconducting quadrupoles for multi-beam transport and focusing in heavy ion fusion (HIF)accelerators. Previous studies by the Virtual National Laboratory (VNL) collaboration have shown that the multi-beam transport system (consisting of alternating gradient quadrupole magnets, a beam vacuum system, and the beam monitor and control system) will likely be one of the most expensive and critical parts of such an accelerator. This statement is true for near-term fusion research accelerators as well as accelerators for the ultimate goal of power production via inertial fusion. For this reason, research on superconducting quadrupole arrays is both timely and important for the inertial fusion energy (IFE) research program. This research will also benefit near-term heavy ion fusion facilities such as the Integrated Research Experiment (IRE)and/or the Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX). We considered a 2-prong approach that addresses the needs of both the nearer and longer term requirements of the inertial fusion program. First, we studied the flat coil quadrupole design that was developed by LLNL; this magnet is 150 mm long with a 50 mm aperture and thus is suitable for near term experiments that require magnets of a small length to aperture ratio. Secondly, we studied the novel double-helix quadrupole (DHQ) design in a small (3 x 3) array configuration; this design can provide an important step to the longer term solution of low-cost, easy to manufacture array constructions. Our Phase I studies were performed using the AMPERES magnetostatic analysis software. Consideration of these results led to plans for future magnet R&D construction projects. The first objective of Phase I was to develop the concept of a superconducting focusing array that meets the specific requirements of a heavy ion fusion accelerator. Detailed parameter studies for such quadrupole arrays were performed

  12. Induced CMB quadrupole from pointing offsets

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, Adam; Scott, Douglas; Sigurdson, Kris E-mail: dscott@phas.ubc.ca

    2011-01-01

    Recent claims in the literature have suggested that the WMAP quadrupole is not primordial in origin, and arises from an aliasing of the much larger dipole field because of incorrect satellite pointing. We attempt to reproduce this result and delineate the key physics leading to the effect. We find that, even if real, the induced quadrupole would be smaller than the WMAP value. We discuss reasons why the WMAP data are unlikely to suffer from this particular systematic effect, including the implications for observations of point sources. Given this evidence against the reality of the effect, the similarity between the pointing-offset-induced signal and the actual quadrupole then appears to be quite puzzling. However, we find that the effect arises from a convolution between the gradient of the dipole field and anisotropic coverage of the scan direction at each pixel. There is something of a directional conspiracy here — the dipole signal lies close to the Ecliptic Plane, and its direction, together with the WMAP scan strategy, results in a strong coupling to the Y{sub 2,−1} component in Ecliptic co-ordinates. The dominant strength of this component in the measured quadrupole suggests that one should exercise increased caution in interpreting its estimated amplitude. The Planck satellite has a different scan strategy which does not so directly couple the dipole and quadrupole in this way and will soon provide an independent measurement.

  13. Magnetic Measurement Results of the LCLS Undulator Quadrupoles

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Scott; Caban, Keith; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Reese, Ed; Wolf, Zachary; /SLAC

    2011-08-18

    This note details the magnetic measurements and the magnetic center fiducializations that were performed on all of the thirty-six LCLS undulator quadrupoles. Temperature rise, standardization reproducibility, vacuum chamber effects and magnetic center reproducibility measurements are also presented. The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) undulator beam line has 33 girders, each with a LCLS undulator quadrupole which focuses and steers the beam through the beam line. Each quadrupole has main quadrupole coils, as well as separate horizontal and vertical trim coils. Thirty-six quadrupoles, thirty-three installed and three spares were, manufactured for the LCLS undulator system and all were measured to confirm that they met requirement specifications for integrated gradient, harmonics and for magnetic center shifts after current changes. The horizontal and vertical dipole trims of each quadrupole were similarly characterized. Each quadrupole was also fiducialized to its magnetic center. All characterizing measurements on the undulator quads were performed with their mirror plates on and after a standardization of three cycles from -6 to +6 to -6 amps. Since the undulator quadrupoles could be used as a focusing or defocusing magnet depending on their location, all quadrupoles were characterized as focusing and as defocusing quadrupoles. A subset of the undulator quadrupoles were used to verify that the undulator quadrupole design met specifications for temperature rise, standardization reproducibility and magnetic center reproducibility after splitting. The effects of the mirror plates on the undulator quadrupoles were also measured.

  14. Aged organic aerosol in the Eastern Mediterranean: the Finokalia aerosol measurement experiment-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrandt, L.; Engelhart, G. J.; Mohr, C.; Kostenidou, E.; Lanz, V. A.; Bougiatioti, A.; Decarlo, P. F.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Donahue, N. M.; Pandis, S. N.

    2010-01-01

    Aged organic aerosol (OA) was measured at a remote coastal site on the island of Crete, Greece during the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment-2008 (FAME-2008), which was part of the EUCAARI intensive campaign of May 2008. The site at Finokalia is influenced by air masses from different source regions, including long-range transport of pollution from continental Europe. A quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer (Q-AMS) was employed to measure the size-resolved chemical composition of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1), and to estimate the extent of oxidation of the organic aerosol. Factor analysis was used to gain insights into the processes and sources affecting the OA composition. The particles were internally mixed and liquid. The largest fraction of the dry NR-PM1 sampled was ammonium sulfate and ammonium bisulfate, followed by organics and a small amount of nitrate. The variability in OA composition could be explained with two factors of oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) with differing extents of oxidation but similar volatility. Hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) was not detected. There was no statistically significant diurnal variation in the bulk composition of NR-PM1 such as total sulfate or total organic aerosol concentrations. However, the OA composition exhibited statistically significant diurnal variation with more oxidized OA in the afternoon. The organic aerosol was highly oxidized, regardless of the source region. Total OA concentrations also varied little with time of day, suggesting that local sources had only a small effect on OA concentrations measured at Finokalia. The aerosol was transported for about one day before arriving at the site, corresponding to an OH exposure of approximately 4×1011 molecules cm-3 s. The constant extent of oxidation suggests that atmospheric aging results in a highly oxidized OA at these OH exposures, regardless of the aerosol source.

  15. Aged organic aerosol in the Eastern Mediterranean: the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment - 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrandt, L.; Engelhart, G. J.; Mohr, C.; Kostenidou, E.; Lanz, V. A.; Bougiatioti, A.; Decarlo, P. F.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Donahue, N. M.; Pandis, S. N.

    2010-05-01

    Aged organic aerosol (OA) was measured at a remote coastal site on the island of Crete, Greece during the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment-2008 (FAME-2008), which was part of the EUCAARI intensive campaign of May 2008. The site at Finokalia is influenced by air masses from different source regions, including long-range transport of pollution from continental Europe. A quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer (Q-AMS) was employed to measure the size-resolved chemical composition of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1), and to estimate the extent of oxidation of the organic aerosol. Factor analysis was used to gain insights into the processes and sources affecting the OA composition. The particles were internally mixed and liquid. The largest fraction of the dry NR-PM1 sampled was ammonium sulfate and ammonium bisulfate, followed by organics and a small amount of nitrate. The variability in OA composition could be explained with two factors of oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) with differing extents of oxidation but similar volatility. Hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) was not detected. There was no statistically significant diurnal variation in the bulk composition of NR-PM1 such as total sulfate or total organic aerosol concentrations. However, the OA composition exhibited statistically significant diurnal variation with more oxidized OA in the afternoon. The organic aerosol was highly oxidized, regardless of the source region. Total OA concentrations also varied little with source region, suggesting that local sources had only a small effect on OA concentrations measured at Finokalia. The aerosol was transported for about one day before arriving at the site, corresponding to an OH exposure of approximately 4×1011 molecules cm-3 s. The constant extent of oxidation suggests that atmospheric aging results in a highly oxidized OA at these OH exposures, regardless of the aerosol source.

  16. Measurements of Carbonaceous Aerosols using Semi-Continuous Thermal-Optical Method

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xiao-Ying

    2011-08-01

    Carbonaceous aerosols are major components in air pollution as a result of energy consumption, thus measurement of them is important to waste management. Increasing interest has been drawn to the identification, measurement, analysis, and modeling of carbon aerosols in the past decade. This book chapter will provide a review of current state-of-art techniques to determine carbonaceous aerosols in relation to air pollution and waste management. The chapter will be composed of four parts. The introduction will discuss why carbon aerosols including elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), and total carbon (TC=EC+OC) are important to energy consumption, air pollution, waste management, and global climate change. Key definitions will be introduced. Relevant terminologies will be provided. The second part will be a review of the current state-of the art measurement techniques that are used to determine carbon aerosols. Both on-line and off-line methods will be described. Comparisons of different techniques that provide the same physical quantity will be provided based on recent literature findings. Differences among the physical parameters determined by various techniques will be discussed. The third part will focus on data analysis and products obtained from carbon aerosol measurements. In addition to EC, OC, and TC, primary organic carbon (POC) and secondary organic carbon (SOC) are of interest to researchers to understand the source and sink of carbonaceous aerosols. Techniques used to determine POC and SOC, such as the EC tracer method and positive matrix factorization, will be described and their differences discussed. Examples will be provided showing field data comparison between the Sunset organic carbon and elemental carbon field analyzer and the Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer, both of which are widely used for on-line aerosol measurements. The last part will report new trends and summarize future research needs in carbon aerosol measurement. Emerging

  17. The nuclear electric quadrupole moment of copper.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Régis Tadeu; Teodoro, Tiago Quevedo; Haiduke, Roberto Luiz Andrade

    2014-06-21

    The nuclear electric quadrupole moment (NQM) of the (63)Cu nucleus was determined from an indirect approach by combining accurate experimental nuclear quadrupole coupling constants (NQCCs) with relativistic Dirac-Coulomb coupled cluster calculations of the electric field gradient (EFG). The data obtained at the highest level of calculation, DC-CCSD-T, from 14 linear molecules containing the copper atom give rise to an indicated NQM of -198(10) mbarn. Such result slightly deviates from the previously accepted standard value given by the muonic method, -220(15) mbarn, although the error bars are superimposed.

  18. SKEW QUADRUPOLE FOCUSING LATTICES AND APPLICATIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    PARKER,B.

    2001-06-18

    In this paper we revisit using skew quadrupole fields in place of traditional normal upright quadrupole fields to make beam focusing structures. We illustrate by example skew lattice decoupling, dispersion suppression and chromatic correction using the neutrino factory Study-II muon storage ring design. Ongoing BNL investigation of flat coil magnet structures that allow building a very compact muon storage ring arc and other flat coil configurations that might bring significant magnet cost reduction to a VLHC motivate our study of skew focusing.

  19. Electric quadrupole transition probabilities for atomic lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Çelik, Gültekin; Gökçe, Yasin; Yıldız, Murat

    2014-05-15

    Electric quadrupole transition probabilities for atomic lithium have been calculated using the weakest bound electron potential model theory (WBEPMT). We have employed numerical non-relativistic Hartree–Fock wavefunctions for expectation values of radii and the necessary energy values have been taken from the compilation at NIST. The results obtained with the present method agree very well with the Coulomb approximation results given by Caves (1975). Moreover, electric quadrupole transition probability values not existing in the literature for some highly excited levels have been obtained using the WBEPMT.

  20. Intercomparison of an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) with ambient fine aerosol measurements in downtown Atlanta, Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budisulistiorini, S. H.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Croteau, P. L.; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, E. S.; Kollman, M. S.; Ng, N. L.; Verma, V.; Shaw, S. L.; Knipping, E. M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Jayne, J. T.; Weber, R. J.; Surratt, J. D.

    2014-07-01

    Currently, there are a limited number of field studies that evaluate the long-term performance of the Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) against established monitoring networks. In this study, we present seasonal intercomparisons of the ACSM with collocated fine aerosol (PM2.5) measurements at the Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization (SEARCH) Jefferson Street (JST) site near downtown Atlanta, GA, during 2011-2012. Intercomparison of two collocated ACSMs resulted in strong correlations (r2 > 0.8) for all chemical species, except chloride (r2 = 0.21) indicating that ACSM instruments are capable of stable and reproducible operation. In general, speciated ACSM mass concentrations correlate well (r2 > 0.7) with the filter-adjusted continuous measurements from JST, although the correlation for nitrate is weaker (r2 = 0.55) in summer. Correlations of the ACSM NR-PM1 (non-refractory particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to 1 μm) plus elemental carbon (EC) with tapered element oscillating microbalance (TEOM) PM2.5 and Federal Reference Method (FRM) PM1 mass are strong with r2 > 0.7 and r2 > 0.8, respectively. Discrepancies might be attributed to evaporative losses of semi-volatile species from the filter measurements used to adjust the collocated continuous measurements. This suggests that adjusting the ambient aerosol continuous measurements with results from filter analysis introduced additional bias to the measurements. We also recommend to calibrate the ambient aerosol monitoring instruments using aerosol standards rather than gas-phase standards. The fitting approach for ACSM relative ionization for sulfate was shown to improve the comparisons between ACSM and collocated measurements in the absence of calibrated values, suggesting the importance of adding sulfate calibration into the ACSM calibration routine.

  1. Nuclear quadrupole resonance studies in semi-metallic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murty, A. N.

    1974-01-01

    Both experimental and theoretical studies are presented on spectrum analysis of nuclear quadrupole resonance of antimony and arsenic tellurides. Numerical solutions for secular equations of the quadrupole interaction energy are also discussed.

  2. Characterization of aerosol composition, concentrations, and sources at Baengnyeong Island, Korea using an aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taehyoung; Choi, Jinsoo; Lee, Gangwoong; Ahn, Junyoung; Park, Jin Soo; Atwood, Samuel A.; Schurman, Misha; Choi, Yongjoo; Chung, Yoomi; Collett, Jeffrey L.

    2015-11-01

    To improve understanding of the sources and chemical properties of particulate pollutants on the western side of the Korean Peninsula, an Aerodyne High Resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) measured non-refractory fine (PM1) particles from May to November, 2011 at Baengnyeong Island, South Korea. Organic matter and sulfate were generally the most abundant species and exhibited maximum concentrations of 36 μg/m3 and 39 μg/m3, respectively. Nitrate concentrations peaked at 32 μg/m3 but were typically much lower than sulfate and organic matter concentrations. May, September, October, and November featured the highest monthly average concentrations, with lower concentrations typically observed from June through August. Potential source contribution function (PSCF) analysis and individual case studies revealed that transport from eastern China, an area with high SO2 emissions, was associated with high particulate sulfate concentrations at the measurement site. Observed sulfate aerosol sometimes was fully neutralized by ammonium but often was acidic; the average ammonium to sulfate molar ratio was 1.49. Measured species size distributions revealed a range of sulfate particle size distributions with modes between 100 and 600 nm. Organic aerosol source regions were widespread, including contributions from eastern China and South Korea. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis indicated three "factors," or types of organic aerosol, comprising one primary, hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) and two oxidized organic aerosol (OOA) components, including a more oxidized (MO-OOA) and a less oxidized (LO-OOA) oxidized organic aerosol. On average, HOA and OOA contributed 21% and 79% of the organic mass (OM), respectively, with the MO-OOA fraction nearly three times as abundant as the LO-OOA fraction. Biomass burning contributions to observed OM were low during the late spring/early summer agricultural burning season in eastern China, since

  3. Characterization of aerosol particles from grass mowing by joint deployment of ToF-AMS and ATOFMS instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewnick, Frank; Dall'Osto, Manuel; Harrison, Roy

    During a measurement campaign at a semi-urban/industrial site a grass-cutting event was observed, when the lawn in the immediate surrounding of the measurement site was mowed. Using a wide variety of state-of-the-art aerosol measurement technology allowed a broad characterization of the aerosol generated by the lawn mowing. The instrumentation included two on-line aerosol mass spectrometers: an Aerodyne Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (ToF-AMS) and a TSI Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS); in addition, a selection of on-line aerosol concentration and size distribution instruments (OPC, APS, SMPS, CPC, FDMS-TEOM, MAAP) was deployed. From comparison of background aerosol measurements during most of the day with the aerosol measured during the lawn mowing, the grass cutting was found to generate mainly two different types of aerosol particles: an intense ultrafine particle mode (1 h average: 4 μg m -3) of almost pure hydrocarbon-like organics and a distinct particle mode in the upper sub-micrometer size range containing particles with potassium and nitrogen-organic compounds. The ultrafine particles are probably lubricating oil particles from the lawn mower exhaust; the larger particles are swirled-up plant debris particles from the mowing process. While these particle types were identified in the data from the two mass spectrometers, the on-line aerosol concentration and size distribution data support these findings. The results presented here show that the combination of quantitative aerosol particle ensemble mass spectrometry (ToF-AMS) and single particle mass spectrometry (ATOFMS) provides much deeper insights into the nature of the aerosol properties than each of the instruments could do alone. Therefore a combined deployment of both types of instruments is strongly recommended.

  4. Aerosolized Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Restrepo, Marcos I; Keyt, Holly; Reyes, Luis F

    2015-06-01

    Administration of medications via aerosolization is potentially an ideal strategy to treat airway diseases. This delivery method ensures high concentrations of the medication in the targeted tissues, the airways, with generally lower systemic absorption and systemic adverse effects. Aerosolized antibiotics have been tested as treatment for bacterial infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), non-CF bronchiectasis (NCFB), and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). The most successful application of this to date is treatment of infections in patients with CF. It has been hypothesized that similar success would be seen in NCFB and in difficult-to-treat hospital-acquired infections such as VAP. This review summarizes the available evidence supporting the use of aerosolized antibiotics and addresses the specific considerations that clinicians should recognize when prescribing an aerosolized antibiotic for patients with CF, NCFB, and VAP.

  5. Global Aerosols

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... sizes and from multiple sources, including biomass burning, mineral dust, sea salt and regional industrial pollution. A color scale is ... desert source region. Deserts are the main sources of mineral dust, and MISR obtains aerosol optical depth at visible wavelengths ...

  6. Closed orbit response to quadrupole strength variation

    SciTech Connect

    Wolski, Andrzej; Zimmermann, Frank

    2004-01-20

    We derive two formulae relating the variation in closed orbit in a storage ring to variations in quadrupole strength, neglecting nonlinear and dispersive effects. These formulae correct results previously reported [1,2,3]. We compare the results of the formulae applied to the ATF with simulations using MAD, and consider their application to beam-based alignment.

  7. Tevatron low-beta quadrupole triplet interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Oleck, A.R.; Carson, J.A.; Koepke, K.; Sorenson, D.

    1992-04-01

    Installation of cold iron quadrupole magnets in the Low Beta (Superconducting High-Luminosity) upgrade at Fermilab required a newly designed magnet interconnect. The interconnect design and construction experience is presented. Considered are the connections carrying cryogenic fluids, beam vacuum, insulating vacuum, superconducting bus leads, their insulation and mechanical support. Details of the assembly and assembly experience are presented. 2 refs.

  8. Chemical Composition of Atmospheric Aerosols Above a Pristine South East Asian Rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, N. H.; Allan, J. D.; Williams, P. I.; Coe, H.; Hamilton, J.; Chen, Q.; Martin, S.; Trembath, J.

    2009-04-01

    The tropics emit a huge amount of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the Earth's atmosphere. The processes by which these gases are oxidised to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) are currently not well understood or quantified. Intensive field measurements were carried out as part of the Oxidant and Particle Photochemical Processes (OP3) and the Aerosol Coupling in the Earth System (ACES) projects around pristine rainforest in Malaysian Borneo. This is the first campaign of its type in a South East Asian rainforest. We present detailed organic aerosol composition measurements made using an Aerodyne High Resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) at Bukit Atur, a Global Atmosphere Watch site located in the Danum Valley Conservation Area. This is a state-of-the-art field deployable instrument that can provide real time composition, mass loading and aerodynamic particle sizing information. In addition, the mass spectral resolution is sufficient to perform an analysis of the elemental composition of the organic species present. Other tools such as positive matrix factorisation (PMF) have been used to help assess the relative source contributions to the organic aerosol. A suite of supporting aerosol and gas phase measurements were made, including size resolved number concentration measurements with Differential Mobility Particle Sizer (DMPS), as well as absorption measurements made with a Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP). The ground site data are compared with Aerodyne Compact Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (C-ToF-AMS) measurements made on the UK Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM) BAe-146 research aircraft. Airborne measurements were made above pristine rainforest surrounding the Danum Valley site, as well as nearby oil palm agricultural sites and palm oil rendering plants. Airborne hygroscopicity was measured using a Droplet Measurement Technology Cloud Condensation Nuclei counter (DMT CCN counter) in

  9. Incremental Reactivity Effects of Anthropogenic and Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds on Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacarab, M.; Li, L.; Carter, W. P. L.; Cocker, D. R., III

    2015-12-01

    Two surrogate reactive organic gas (ROG) mixtures were developed to create a controlled reactivity environment simulating different urban atmospheres with varying levels of anthropogenic (e.g. Los Angeles reactivity) and biogenic (e.g. Atlanta reactivity) influences. Traditional chamber experiments focus on the oxidation of one or two volatile organic compound (VOC) precursors, allowing the reactivity of the system to be dictated by those compounds. Surrogate ROG mixtures control the overall reactivity of the system, allowing for the incremental aerosol formation from an added VOC to be observed. The surrogate ROG mixtures were developed based on that used to determine maximum incremental reactivity (MIR) scales for O3 formation from VOC precursors in a Los Angeles smog environment. Environmental chamber experiments were designed to highlight the incremental aerosol formation in the simulated environment due to the addition of an added anthropogenic (aromatic) or biogenic (terpene) VOC. All experiments were conducted in the UC Riverside/CE-CERT dual 90m3 environmental chambers. It was found that the aerosol precursors behaved differently under the two altered reactivity conditions, with more incremental aerosol being formed in the anthropogenic ROG system than in the biogenic ROG system. Further, the biogenic reactivity condition inhibited the oxidation of added anthropogenic aerosol precursors, such as m-xylene. Data will be presented on aerosol properties (density, volatility, hygroscopicity) and bulk chemical composition in the gas and particle phases (from a SYFT Technologies selected ion flow tube mass spectrometer, SIFT-MS, and Aerodyne high resolution time of flight aerosol mass spectrometer, HR-ToF-AMS, respectively) comparing the two controlled reactivity systems and single precursor VOC/NOx studies. Incremental aerosol yield data at different controlled reactivities provide a novel and valuable insight in the attempt to extrapolate environmental chamber

  10. Tropospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buseck, P. R.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2003-12-01

    It is widely believed that "On a clear day you can see forever," as proclaimed in the 1965 Broadway musical of the same name. While an admittedly beautiful thought, we all know that this concept is only figurative. Aside from Earth's curvature and Rayleigh scattering by air molecules, aerosols - colloidal suspensions of solid or liquid particles in a gas - limit our vision. Even on the clearest day, there are billions of aerosol particles per cubic meter of air.Atmospheric aerosols are commonly referred to as smoke, dust, haze, and smog, terms that are loosely reflective of their origin and composition. Aerosol particles have arisen naturally for eons from sea spray, volcanic emissions, wind entrainment of mineral dust, wildfires, and gas-to-particle conversion of hydrocarbons from plants and dimethylsulfide from the oceans. However, over the industrial period, the natural background aerosol has been greatly augmented by anthropogenic contributions, i.e., those produced by human activities. One manifestation of this impact is reduced visibility (Figure 1). Thus, perhaps more than in other realms of geochemistry, when considering the composition of the troposphere one must consider the effects of these activities. The atmosphere has become a reservoir for vast quantities of anthropogenic emissions that exert important perturbations on it and on the planetary ecosystem in general. Consequently, much recent research focuses on the effects of human activities on the atmosphere and, through them, on the environment and Earth's climate. For these reasons consideration of the geochemistry of the atmosphere, and of atmospheric aerosols in particular, must include the effects of human activities. (201K)Figure 1. Impairment of visibility by aerosols. Photographs at Yosemite National Park, California, USA. (a) Low aerosol concentration (particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm, PM2.5=0.3 μg m-3; particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 10

  11. Oxidation enhancement of submicron organic aerosols by fog processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Ge, X.; Collier, S.; Setyan, A.; Xu, J.; Sun, Y.

    2011-12-01

    During 2010 wintertime, a measurement study was carried out at Fresno, California, using an Aerodyne High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) combined with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). Four fog events occurred during the first week of the campaign. While ambient aerosol was sampled into the HR-ToF-AMS, fog water samples were collected, and were later aerosolized and analyzed via HR-TOF-AMS in the laboratory. We performed Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) on the AMS ambient organic mass spectra, and identified four OA factors: hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) likely from vehicle emissions, cooking influenced OA (COA), biomass burning OA (BBOA) representing residential wood combustion, and an oxygenated OA (OOA) that has an average O/C ratio of 0.42. The time series of the OOA factor correlates best with that of sulfate (R2 =0.54 ) during fog events, suggesting that aqueous phase processing may have strongly affected OOA production during wintertime in Fresno. We further investigate the OOA compositions and elemental ratios before, during, and after the fog events, as well as those of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in fog waters to study the influence of aqueous phase processing on OA compositions. Results of fog sample analysis shows an enhancement of oxidation of DOM in 11 separate fog samples. Further factor analysis of the fog DOM data will elucidate the possible mechanisms by which fog processing enhances oxidation of aerosol. In addition, in order to investigate the influence of aqueous processing on OA, we used the Extended Aerosol Inorganic Model (E-AIM) (http://www.aim.env.uea.ac.uk/aim/aim.php) to estimate aerosol phase water contents based on the AMS measured aerosol composition. The predicted water content has a good correlation with sulfate and OOA . We will further explore the correlations between particle phase water with organic aerosol characteristics to discuss the influence of aqueous phase processing on

  12. Field and Laboratory Studies of Atmospheric Organic Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coggon, Matthew Mitchell

    This thesis is the culmination of field and laboratory studies aimed at assessing processes that affect the composition and distribution of atmospheric organic aerosol. An emphasis is placed on measurements conducted using compact and high-resolution Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (AMS). The first three chapters summarize results from aircraft campaigns designed to evaluate anthropogenic and biogenic impacts on marine aerosol and clouds off the coast of California. Subsequent chapters describe laboratory studies intended to evaluate gas and particle-phase mechanisms of organic aerosol oxidation. The 2013 Nucleation in California Experiment (NiCE) was a campaign designed to study environments impacted by nucleated and/or freshly formed aerosol particles. Terrestrial biogenic aerosol with > 85% organic mass was observed to reside in the free troposphere above marine stratocumulus. This biogenic organic aerosol (BOA) originated from the Northwestern United States and was transported to the marine atmosphere during periodic cloud-clearing events. Spectra recorded by a cloud condensation nuclei counter demonstrated that BOA is CCN active. BOA enhancements at latitudes north of San Francisco, CA coincided with enhanced cloud water concentrations of organic species such as acetate and formate. Airborne measurements conducted during the 2011 Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment (E-PEACE) were aimed at evaluating the contribution of ship emissions to the properties of marine aerosol and clouds off the coast of central California. In one study, analysis of organic aerosol mass spectra during periods of enhanced shipping activity yielded unique tracers indicative of cloud-processed ship emissions (m/z 42 and 99). The variation of their organic fraction (f42 and f 99) was found to coincide with periods of heavy (f 42 > 0.15; f99 > 0.04), moderate (0.05 < f42 < 0.15; 0.01 < f99 < 0.04), and negligible (f42 < 0.05; f99 < 0.01) ship influence. Application of

  13. Bifacial Metasurface with Quadrupole Optical Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, Andriy; Kivijärvi, Ville; Grahn, Patrick; Kaivola, Matti; Lindfors, Klas

    2015-08-01

    We design, fabricate, and characterize a metasurface, whose multipole optical response depends significantly on the illumination direction. The metasurface is composed of gold-nanodisc dimers embedded in glass. In spite of their nanoscale size, the dimers exhibit a dominating electric-current-quadrupole response in a wide range of wavelengths around 700 nm when illuminated from one side, and a primarily electric-dipole response when illuminated from the opposite side. This leads to two consequences. First, the reflection coefficient of the metasurface considerably differs for the two sides of illumination. Second, quadrupole excitation results in a significant local enhancement of both electric and magnetic fields around the dimers. Our experimental spectroscopic data are in good agreement with simulations obtained using a multipole expansion model.

  14. LARP Long Nb3Sn Quadrupole Design

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Anerella, M.; Barzi, E.; Bossert, R.; Caspi, S.; Chlachidize, G.; Dietderich, D.; Feher, S.; Ferracin, P.; Ghosh, A.; Hafalia, R.; Hannaford, R.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Kerby, J.; Lamm, M.; Lietzke, A.; McInturff, A.; Muratore, J.; Nobrega, F.; Novitsky, I.; Sabbi, G.L.; Schmalzle, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Turrioni, D.; Wanderer, P.; Whitson, G.; Zlobin, A.V.

    2008-06-01

    A major milestone for the LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) is the test, by the end of 2009, of two 4m-long quadrupole magnets (LQ) wound with Nb{sub 3}Sn conductor. The goal of these magnets is to be a proof of principle that Nb{sub 3}Sn is a viable technology for a possible LHC luminosity upgrade. The design of the LQ is based on the design of the LARP Technological Quadrupoles, presently under development at FNAL and LBNL, with 90-mm aperture and gradient higher than 200 T/m. The design of the first LQ model will be completed by the end of 2007 with the selection of a mechanical design. In this paper we present the coil design addressing some fabrication technology issues, the quench protection study, and three designs of the support structure.

  15. LARP Long Nb3Sn Quadrupole Design

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Anerella, M.; Barzi, E.; Bossert, R.; Caspi, S.; Chlachidze, G.; Dietderich, D.; Feher, S.; Felice, H.; Ferracin, P.; /Fermilab /Brookhaven /LBL, Berkeley /Texas A-M

    2007-08-01

    A major milestone for the LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) is the test, by the end of 2009, of two 4m-long quadrupole magnets (LQ) wound with Nb3Sn conductor. The goal of these magnets is to be a proof of principle that Nb3Sn is a viable technology for a possible LHC luminosity upgrade. The design of the LQ is based on the design of the LARP Technological Quadrupoles, presently under development at FNAL and LBNL, with 90-mm aperture and gradient higher than 200 T/m. The design of the first LQ model will be completed by the end of 2007 with the selection of a mechanical design. In this paper we present the coil design addressing some fabrication technology issues, the quench protection study, and three designs of the support structure.

  16. Photochemical organonitrate formation in wet aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Yong Bin; Kim, Hwajin; Kim, Jin Young; Turpin, Barbara J.

    2016-10-01

    Water is the most abundant component of atmospheric fine aerosol. However, despite rapid progress, multiphase chemistry involving wet aerosols is still poorly understood. In this work, we report results from smog chamber photooxidation of glyoxal- and OH-containing ammonium sulfate or sulfuric acid particles in the presence of NOx and O3 at high and low relative humidity. Particles were analyzed using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS). During the 3 h irradiation, OH oxidation products of glyoxal that are also produced in dilute aqueous solutions (e.g., oxalic acids and tartaric acids) were formed in both ammonium sulfate (AS) aerosols and sulfuric acid (SA) aerosols. However, the major products were organonitrogens (CHNO), organosulfates (CHOS), and organonitrogen sulfates (CHNOS). These were also the dominant products formed in the dark chamber, indicating non-radical formation. In the humid chamber (> 70 % relative humidity, RH), two main products for both AS and SA aerosols were organonitrates, which appeared at m / z- 147 and 226. They were formed in the aqueous phase via non-radical reactions of glyoxal and nitric acid, and their formation was enhanced by photochemistry because of the photochemical formation of nitric acid via reactions of peroxy radicals, NOx and OH during the irradiation.

  17. Radio frequency quadrupole resonator for linear accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Moretti, Alfred

    1985-01-01

    An RFQ resonator for a linear accelerator having a reduced level of interfering modes and producing a quadrupole mode for focusing, bunching and accelerating beams of heavy charged particles, with the construction being characterized by four elongated resonating rods within a cylinder with the rods being alternately shorted and open electrically to the shell at common ends of the rods to provide an LC parallel resonant circuit when activated by a magnetic field transverse to the longitudinal axis.

  18. Muon cooling in a quadrupole magnet channel

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, David; Poklonskiy, A.; /Michigan State U.

    2007-10-01

    As discussed before,[1] a cooling channel using quadrupole magnets in a FODO transport channel can be used for initial cooling of muons. In the present note we discuss this possibility of a FODO focusing channel for cooling, and we present ICOOL simulations of muon cooling within a FODO channel. We explore a 1.5m cell-length cooling channel that could be used for the initial transverse cooling stage of a muon collider or neutrino factory.

  19. 15 T And Beyond - Dipoles and Quadrupoles

    SciTech Connect

    Sabbi, GianLuca

    2008-05-19

    Starting with the invention of the cyclotron by Lawrence, accelerator-based experiments have been the primary source of new discoveries in particle physics. In order to progress toward higher energy and luminosity, higher field magnets are required. R&D programs are underway to take advantage of new developments in superconducting materials, achieve better efficiency and simplify magnet fabrication while preserving accelerator-class field quality. A review of recent progress on high field dipole and quadrupole magnets is presented.

  20. Electrostatic quadrupole DC accelerators for BNCT applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, J.W.; Anderson, O.A.; Reginato, L.L.; Vella, M.C.; Yu, S.S.

    1994-04-01

    A dc electrostatic quadrupole (ESQ) accelerator is capable of producing a 2.5 MeV, 100 mA proton beam for the purpose of generating neutrons for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. The ESQ accelerator is better than the conventional aperture column in high beam current application due to the presence of stronger transverse field for beam focusing and for suppressing secondary electrons. The major challenge in this type of accelerator is in developing the proper power supply system.

  1. LHC INTERACTION REGION QUADRUPOLE ERROR IMPACT STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.; PTITSIN,V.; WEI,J.

    1999-09-07

    The performance of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at collision energy is limited by the field quality of the interaction region (IR) quadrupoles and dipoles. In this paper the authors study the impact of the expected field errors of these magnets on the dynamic aperture. The authors investigate different magnet arrangements and error strength. Based on the results they propose and evaluate a corrector layout to meet the required dynamic aperture performance in a companion paper.

  2. Table of nuclear electric quadrupole moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, N. J.

    2016-09-01

    This Table is a compilation of experimental measurements of static electric quadrupole moments of ground states and excited states of atomic nuclei throughout the periodic table. To aid identification of the states, their excitation energy, half-life, spin and parity are given, along with a brief indication of the method and any reference standard used in the particular measurement. Experimental data from all quadrupole moment measurements actually provide a value of the product of the moment and the electric field gradient [EFG] acting at the nucleus. Knowledge of the EFG is thus necessary to extract the quadrupole moment. A single recommended moment value is given for each state, based, for each element, wherever possible, upon a standard reference moment for a nuclear state of that element studied in a situation in which the electric field gradient has been well calculated. For several elements one or more subsidiary EFG/moment reference is required and their use is specified. The literature search covers the period to mid-2015.

  3. Gas- and aerosol-phase chemistry of nitrogen oxides (NOy) in a pine forest (BEACHON-RoMBAS 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, J.; Draper, D.; Zarzana, K. J.; Brown, S. S.; Dube, B.; Wagner, N.; Cohen, R. C.; Palm, B. B.; Ortega, A. M.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Day, D. A.; Jimenez, J. L.; Brune, W. H.; Karl, T.; Kaser, L.; Jud, W.; Hansel, A.

    2011-12-01

    Ambient measurements of NOy (NO2, peroxy- and alkyl-nitrates, and the gas/aerosol partitioning of the latter) and Potential Aerosol Mass measurements of NO3-initiated secondary organic aerosol formation in a 16 L flow-through reactor were made during the BEACHON-RoMBAS field campaign in U.S. Forest Service Manitou Forest Observatory, Colorado (July/August 2011). A cavity ringdown spectrometer (CRDS) is used to monitor NO3 and N2O5 , Thermal Desorption - Laser Induced Fluorescence (TD-LIF) is used to detect the NOy species as NO2; an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) monitors chemical composition of aerosol; Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-TOF-MS) monitors the gas-phase organic compounds; and a thermal converter/chemiluminescent NO/NOx/NH3 analyzer monitors gas-phase inorganic nitrogen compounds. In the PAM measurements, a calibrated flow of NO3 is supplied to the reactor from a temperature-controlled N2O5 trap. With this suite of measurements we seek to elucidate the role of nitrate in biogenic SOA formation, as well as the fate of pollution emissions in a forest environment. We observe significant concentrations of ambient alkyl- and peroxynitrates, despite the remote forest location, and find evidence in PAM measurements that formation of these compounds is linked to organic aerosol production.

  4. Characterization of Organic Nitrogen in the Atmosphere Using High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, X.; Sun, Y.; Chen, M.; Zhang, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Despite extensive efforts on characterizing organic nitrogen (ON) compounds in atmospheric aerosols and aqueous droplets, knowledge of ON chemistry is still limited, mainly due to its chemical complexity and lack of highly time-resolved measurements. This work is aimed at optimizing the method of using Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS) to characterize ON compounds in atmospheric aerosols. Seventy-five pure nitrogen-containing organic compounds covering a variety of functional groups were analyzed with the HR-AMS. Our results show that ON compounds commonly produce NHx+, NOx+, which are usually attributed to inorganic N species such as ammonium and nitrate, and CH2N+ at m/z = 28, which is rarely quantified in ambient aerosol due to large interference from N2+ in the air signal. As a result, using the nitrogen-to-carbon (N/C) calibration factor proposed by Aiken et al. (2008) on average leads to ~ 20% underestimation of N/C in ambient organic aerosol. A new calibration factor of 0.79 is proposed for determining the average N/C in organics. The relative ionization efficiencies (RIEs) of different ON species, on average, are found to be consistent with the default RIE value (1.4) for the total organics. The AMS mass spectral features of various types of ON species (amines, amides, amino acids, etc.) are examined and used for characterizing ON composition in ambient aerosols. Our results indicate that submicron organic aerosol measured during wintertime in Fresno, CA contains significant amounts of amino-compounds whereas more diversified ON species, including N-containing aromatic heterocycle (e.g., imidazoles), are observed in fog waters collected simultaneously. Our findings have important implications for understanding atmospheric ON behaviors via the widespread HR-AMS measurements of ambient aerosols and droplets.

  5. [Aerosol therapy].

    PubMed

    Wildhaber, J H

    1998-08-15

    Aerosol therapy plays a major role in the diagnosis and treatment of various lung diseases. The aim of inhalation therapy is to deposit a reproducible and adequate dose of a specific drug to the airways, in order to achieve a high, local, clinical effect while avoiding serious systemic side effects. To achieve this goal, it is therefore important to have an efficient inhalation device to deliver different medications. However, the currently available therapeutic inhalation devices (nebuliser, pressurised metered-dose inhaler and dry powder inhaler) are not very efficient in aerosol delivery and have several disadvantages. Inhalation devices can be assessed by in vitro studies, filter studies and radiolabelled deposition studies. Several radiolabelled deposition studies have shown that nebulisers and pressurised metered-dose inhalers are not very efficient in aerosol delivery. In children, before 1997, only 0.5% to 15% of the total nebulised or actuated dose from a nebuliser or pressurised metered-dose inhaler actually reached the lungs. These numbers were somewhat improved in adults, 30% of the total nebulised or actuated dose reaching the airways. Aerosol therapy with dry powder inhalers was the most efficient before 1997, 30% of the total dose being deposited in the lungs of adults and children. In 1997, new developments in pressurised metered-dose inhalers much improved their efficiency in aerosol delivery. Lung deposition can be increased by up to 60% with use of a non-electrostatic holding chamber and/or a pressurised metered-dose inhaler with a hydrofluoroalkane propellant possessing superior aerosol characteristics. Several studies comparing the clinical efficiency of different inhalation devices have shown that the choice of an optimal inhalation device is crucial. In addition to the aerosol characteristics, ventilation parameters and airway morphology have an important bearing on deposition patterns. These parameters may be greatly influenced by the

  6. Photoassociation of a cold-atom-molecule pair: Long-range quadrupole-quadrupole interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lepers, M.; Dulieu, O.; Kokoouline, V.

    2010-10-15

    The general formalism of the multipolar expansion of electrostatic interactions is applied to the calculation of the potential energy between an excited atom (without fine structure) and a ground-state diatomic molecule at large mutual separations. Both partners exhibit a permanent quadrupole moment so that their mutual long-range interaction is dominated by a quadrupole-quadrupole term, which is attractive enough to bind trimers. Numerical results are given for an excited Cs(6{sup 2}P) atom and a ground-state Cs{sub 2} molecule. The prospects for achieving photoassociation of a cold-atom-dimer pair are thus discussed and found promising. The formalism can be generalized to the long-range interaction between molecules to investigate the formation of cold tetramers.

  7. Evolution of aerosol downwind of a major highway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liggio, J.; Staebler, R. M.; Brook, J.; Li, S.; Vlasenko, A. L.; Sjostedt, S. J.; Gordon, M.; Makar, P.; Mihele, C.; Evans, G. J.; Jeong, C.; Wentzell, J. J.; Lu, G.; Lee, P.

    2010-12-01

    Primary aerosol from traffic emissions can have a considerable impact local and regional scale air quality. In order to assess the effect of these emissions and of future emissions scenarios, air quality models are required which utilize emissions representative of real world conditions. Often, the emissions processing systems which provide emissions input for the air quality models rely on laboratory testing of individual vehicles under non-ambient conditions. However, on the sub-grid scale particle evolution may lead to changes in the primary emitted size distribution and gas-particle partitioning that are not properly considered when the emissions are ‘instantly mixed’ within the grid volume. The affect of this modeling convention on model results is not well understood. In particular, changes in organic gas/particle partitioning may result in particle evaporation or condensation onto pre-existing aerosol. The result is a change in the particle distribution and/or an increase in the organic mass available for subsequent gas-phase oxidation. These effects may be missing from air-quality models, and a careful analysis of field data is necessary to quantify their impact. A study of the sub-grid evolution of aerosols (FEVER; Fast Evolution of Vehicle Emissions from Roadways) was conducted in the Toronto area in the summer of 2010. The study included mobile measurements of particle size distributions with a Fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS), aerosol composition with an Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), black carbon (SP2, PA, LII), VOCs (PTR-MS) and other trace gases. The mobile laboratory was used to measure the concentration gradient of the emissions at perpendicular distances from the highway as well as the physical and chemical evolution of the aerosol. Stationary sites at perpendicular distances and upwind from the highway also monitored the particle size distribution. In addition, sonic anemometers mounted on the mobile lab provided measurements of

  8. Uptake of Ambient Organic Gases to Acidic Sulfate Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liggio, J.; Li, S.

    2009-05-01

    The formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the atmosphere has been an area of significant interest due to its climatic relevance, its effects on air quality and human health. Due largely to the underestimation of SOA by regional and global models, there has been an increasing number of studies focusing on alternate pathways leading to SOA. In this regard, recent work has shown that heterogeneous and liquid phase reactions, often leading to oligomeric material, may be a route to SOA via products of biogenic and anthropogenic origin. Although oligomer formation in chamber studies has been frequently observed, the applicability of these experiments to ambient conditions, and thus the overall importance of oligomerization reactions remain unclear. In the present study, ambient air is drawn into a Teflon smog chamber and exposed to acidic sulfate aerosols which have been formed in situ via the reaction of SO3 with water vapor. The aerosol composition is measured with a High Resolution Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS), and particle size distributions are monitored with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). The use of ambient air and relatively low inorganic particle loading potentially provides clearer insight into the importance of heterogeneous reactions. Results of experiments, with a range of sulfate loadings show that there are several competing processes occurring on different timescales. A significant uptake of ambient organic gases to the particles is observed immediately followed by a slow shift towards higher m/z over a period of several hours indicating that higher molecular weight products (possibly oligomers) are being formed through a reactive process. The results suggest that heterogeneous reactions can occur with ambient organic gases, even in the presence of ammonia, which may have significant implications to the ambient atmosphere where particles may be neutralized after their formation.

  9. Observed secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and organic nitrate yields from NO3 oxidation of isoprene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollins, A. W.; Fry, J. L.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Wooldridge, P. J.; Brown, S. S.; Fuchs, H.; Dube, W.; Mensah, A.; Tillmann, R.; Dorn, H.; Brauers, T.; Cohen, R. C.

    2008-12-01

    Formation of organic nitrates and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from the NO3 oxidation of isoprene has been studied at atmospheric concentrations of VOC (10 ppb) and oxidant (<100 ppt NO3) in the presence of ammonium sulfate seed aerosol in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR at Forschungszentrum Jülich. Cavity Ringdown (CaRDS) and thermal dissociation - CaRDS measurements of NO3 and N2O5 as well as Thermal Dissociation - Laser Induced Fluorescence (TD-LIF) detection of alkyl nitrates (RONO2) and Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) measurements of aerosol composition were all used in comparison to a Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM) based chemical kinetics box model to quantify the product yields from two stages in isoprene oxidation. We find significant yields of organic nitrate formation from both the initial isoprene + NO3 reaction (71%) as well as from the reaction of NO3 with the initial oxidation products (30% - 60%). Under these low concentration conditions (~1 μg / m3), measured SOA production was greater than instrument noise only for the second oxidation step. Based on the modeled chemistry, we estimate an SOA mass yield of 10% (relative to isoprene mass reacted) for the reaction of the initial oxidation products with NO3. This yield is found to be consistent with the estimated saturation concentration (C*) of the presumed gas products of the doubly oxidized isoprene, where both oxidations lead to the addition of nitrate, carbonyl, and hydroxyl groups.

  10. Daily variation of organic aerosol concentration and composition in Seoul, Korea during KORUS pre-campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, H. J.; Lee, J.; Choi, A. Y.; Park, S. M.; Park, J. S.; Song, I. H.; Hong, Y. D.

    2015-12-01

    Daily variation of Organic Aerosol (OA) as well as organic tracer compounds have been observed in aerosol samples collected during KORUS-AQ (Korea-US Air Quality Study) pre-campaign (From May 18 to June 12) in Seoul, Korea. NR-PM1 bounded OA was measured by HR-TOF-AMS (Aerodyne) and the temporal variation, composition of OA by family group characterization, and oxidation state of OA was studied. And to distinguish the source characteristics (such as HOA, COA, NOA, SV-OOA, LV-OOA, etc…) of the organic, AMS-PMF model will be used.For the observation of organic tracer compounds, solvent extractable fractions were analyzed by GC-MS. More than 80 organic compounds were detected in the aerosol samples and grouped by source characterized classes, including vehicular emission tracers, biomass burning tracers, coal emission tracers, secondary organic aerosol (SOA) tracers. The main objective of this study is evaluation of the validity of OA fractionation based on the AMS measurement. So, we will compare daily variation of OA composition measured by AMS with daily variation of organic tracer compounds. Further, we will specify source characteristics estimated using AMS-PMF model by comparing the results of source apportionment of OA using PMF of organic tracer compounds.

  11. Noise reduction in negative-ion quadrupole mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Chastagner, P.

    1993-04-20

    A quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) system is described having an ion source, quadrupole mass filter, and ion collector/recorder system. A weak, transverse magnetic field and an electron collector are disposed between the quadrupole and ion collector. When operated in negative ion mode, the ion source produces a beam of primarily negatively-charged particles from a sample, including electrons as well as ions. The beam passes through the quadrupole and enters the magnetic field, where the electrons are deflected away from the beam path to the electron collector. The negative ions pass undeflected to the ion collector where they are detected and recorded as a mass spectrum.

  12. Noise reduction in negative-ion quadrupole mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Chastagner, Philippe

    1993-01-01

    A quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) system having an ion source, quadrupole mass filter, and ion collector/recorder system. A weak, transverse magnetic field and an electron collector are disposed between the quadrupole and ion collector. When operated in negative ion mode, the ion source produces a beam of primarily negatively-charged particles from a sample, including electrons as well as ions. The beam passes through the quadrupole and enters the magnetic field, where the electrons are deflected away from the beam path to the electron collector. The negative ions pass undeflected to the ion collector where they are detected and recorded as a mass spectrum.

  13. Magnetic mirror structure for testing shell-type quadrupole coils

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Bossert, R.; Chlachidze, G.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Lamm, M.J.; Nobrega, F.; Novitski, I.; Tartaglia, N.; Turrioni, D.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents magnetic and mechanical designs and analyses of the quadrupole mirror structure to test single shell-type quadrupole coils. Several quadrupole coils made of different Nb{sub 3}Sn strands, cable insulation and pole materials were tested using this structure at 4.5 and 1.9 K. The coils were instrumented with voltage taps, spot heaters, temperature sensors and strain gauges to study their mechanical and thermal properties and quench performance. The results of the quadrupole mirror model assembly and test are reported and discussed.

  14. ANALYTICAL SOLUTIONS OF SINGULAR ISOTHERMAL QUADRUPOLE LENS

    SciTech Connect

    Chu Zhe; Lin, W. P.; Yang Xiaofeng E-mail: linwp@shao.ac.cn

    2013-06-20

    Using an analytical method, we study the singular isothermal quadrupole (SIQ) lens system, which is the simplest lens model that can produce four images. In this case, the radial mass distribution is in accord with the profile of the singular isothermal sphere lens, and the tangential distribution is given by adding a quadrupole on the monopole component. The basic properties of the SIQ lens have been studied in this Letter, including the deflection potential, deflection angle, magnification, critical curve, caustic, pseudo-caustic, and transition locus. Analytical solutions of the image positions and magnifications for the source on axes are derived. We find that naked cusps will appear when the relative intensity k of quadrupole to monopole is larger than 0.6. According to the magnification invariant theory of the SIQ lens, the sum of the signed magnifications of the four images should be equal to unity, as found by Dalal. However, if a source lies in the naked cusp, the summed magnification of the left three images is smaller than the invariant 1. With this simple lens system, we study the situations where a point source infinitely approaches a cusp or a fold. The sum of the magnifications of the cusp image triplet is usually not equal to 0, and it is usually positive for major cusps while negative for minor cusps. Similarly, the sum of magnifications of the fold image pair is usually not equal to 0 either. Nevertheless, the cusp and fold relations are still equal to 0 in that the sum values are divided by infinite absolute magnifications by definition.

  15. Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Studies in MICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, S.; Rhadakrishna, S.; Marino, R. A.

    1986-02-01

    Aluminum-27 NQR transitions were detected in Muscovite Mica at room temperature using double resonance by level crossing (DRLC) techniques. Three lines were observed with frequencies of 572.5, 1052.0, and 1624.5 kHz. These lines are assigned to the octahedrally coordinated site, AlO4(OH)2. The corresponding quadrupole coupling constant, e2q Q/h, and asymmetry parameter, η, are 3554.8 kHz and 0.265, respectively. The remaining tetrahedrally coordinated sites, AlO4, gave no discernible signal, perhaps due to the greater 27Al- 1H distance.

  16. Multi-Pass Quadrupole Mass Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of the composition of planetary atmospheres is one of the most important and fundamental measurements in planetary robotic exploration. Quadrupole mass analyzers (QMAs) are the primary tool used to execute these investigations, but reductions in size of these instruments has sacrificed mass resolving power so that the best present-day QMA devices are still large, expensive, and do not deliver performance of laboratory instruments. An ultra-high-resolution QMA was developed to resolve N2 +/CO+ by trapping ions in a linear trap quadrupole filter. Because N2 and CO are resolved, gas chromatography columns used to separate species before analysis are eliminated, greatly simplifying gas analysis instrumentation. For highest performance, the ion trap mode is used. High-resolution (or narrow-band) mass selection is carried out in the central region, but near the DC electrodes at each end, RF/DC field settings are adjusted to allow broadband ion passage. This is to prevent ion loss during ion reflection at each end. Ions are created inside the trap so that low-energy particles are selected by low-voltage settings on the end electrodes. This is beneficial to good mass resolution since low-energy particles traverse many cycles of the RF filtering fields. Through Monte Carlo simulations, it is shown that ions are reflected at each end many tens of times, each time being sent back through the central section of the quadrupole where ultrahigh mass filtering is carried out. An analyzer was produced with electrical length orders of magnitude longer than its physical length. Since the selector fields are sized as in conventional devices, the loss of sensitivity inherent in miniaturizing quadrupole instruments is avoided. The no-loss, multi-pass QMA architecture will improve mass resolution of planetary QMA instruments while reducing demands on the RF electronics for high-voltage/high-frequency production since ion transit time is no longer limited to a single pass. The

  17. Primary and secondary aerosols in Beijing in winter: sources, variations and processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yele; Du, Wei; Fu, Pingqing; Wang, Qingqing; Li, Jie; Ge, Xinlei; Zhang, Qi; Zhu, Chunmao; Ren, Lujie; Xu, Weiqi; Zhao, Jian; Han, Tingting; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Wang, Zifa

    2016-07-01

    Winter has the worst air pollution of the year in the megacity of Beijing. Despite extensive winter studies in recent years, our knowledge of the sources, formation mechanisms and evolution of aerosol particles is not complete. Here we have a comprehensive characterization of the sources, variations and processes of submicron aerosols that were measured by an Aerodyne high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer from 17 December 2013 to 17 January 2014 along with offline filter analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Our results suggest that submicron aerosols composition was generally similar across the winter of different years and was mainly composed of organics (60 %), sulfate (15 %) and nitrate (11 %). Positive matrix factorization of high- and unit-mass resolution spectra identified four primary organic aerosol (POA) factors from traffic, cooking, biomass burning (BBOA) and coal combustion (CCOA) emissions as well as two secondary OA (SOA) factors. POA dominated OA, on average accounting for 56 %, with CCOA being the largest contributor (20 %). Both CCOA and BBOA showed distinct polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) spectral signatures, indicating that PAHs in winter were mainly from coal combustion (66 %) and biomass burning emissions (18 %). BBOA was highly correlated with levoglucosan, a tracer compound for biomass burning (r2 = 0.93), and made a considerable contribution to OA in winter (9 %). An aqueous-phase-processed SOA (aq-OOA) that was strongly correlated with particle liquid water content, sulfate and S-containing ions (e.g. CH2SO2+) was identified. On average aq-OOA contributed 12 % to the total OA and played a dominant role in increasing oxidation degrees of OA at high RH levels (> 50 %). Our results illustrate that aqueous-phase processing can enhance SOA production and oxidation states of OA as well in winter. Further episode analyses highlighted the significant impacts of meteorological parameters on aerosol composition, size

  18. Insights into Submicron Aerosol Composition and Sources from the WINTER Aircraft Campaign Over the Eastern US.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroder, J. C.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Day, D. A.; Fibiger, D. L.; McDuffie, E. E.; Blake, N. J.; Hills, A. J.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Apel, E. C.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Campos, T. L.; Brown, S. S.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    The WINTER aircraft campaign was a recent field experiment to probe the sources and evolution of gas pollutants and aerosols in Northeast US urban and industrial plumes during the winter. A highly customized Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) was flown on the NCAR C-130 to characterize submicron aerosol composition and evolution. Thirteen research flights were conducted covering a wide range of conditions, including rural, urban, and marine environments during day and night. Organic aerosol (OA) was a large component of the submicron aerosol in the boundary layer. The fraction of OA (fOA) was smaller (35-40%) than in recent US summer campaigns (~60-70%). Biomass burning was observed to be an important source of OA in the boundary layer, which is consistent with recent wintertime studies that show a substantial contribution of residential wood burning to the OA loadings. OA oxygenation (O/C ratio) shows a broad distribution with a substantial fraction of smaller O/C ratios when compared to previous summertime campaigns. Since measurements were rarely made very close to primary sources (i.e. directly above urban areas), this is consistent with oxidative chemistry being slower during winter. SOA formation and aging in the NYC plume was observed during several flights and compared with summertime results from LA (CalNex) and Mexico City (MILAGRO). Additionally, an oxidation flow reactor (OFR) capable of oxidizing ambient air up to several equivalent days of oxidation was deployed for the first time in an aircraft platform. The aerosol outflow of the OFR was sampled with the AMS to provide real-time snapshots of the potential for aerosol formation and aging. For example, a case study of a flight through the Ohio River valley showed evidence of oxidation of SO2 to sulfate. The measured sulfate enhancements were in good agreement with our OFR chemical model. OFR results for SOA will be discussed.

  19. Identification of characteristic mass spectrometric markers for primary biological aerosol particles and comparison with field data from submicron pristine aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freutel, F.; Schneider, J.; Zorn, S. R.; Drewnick, F.; Borrmann, S.; Hoffmann, T.; Martin, S. T.

    2009-04-01

    The contribution of primary biological aerosol (PBA) to the total aerosol particle concentration is estimated to range between 25 and 80%, depending on location and season. Especially in the tropical rain forest it is expected that PBA is a major source of particles in the supermicron range, and is also an important fraction of the submicron aerosol. PBA particles like plant fragments, pollen, spores, fungi, viruses etc. contain chemical compounds as proteins, sugars, amino acids, chlorophyll, and cellular material as cellulose. For this reason we have performed mass spectrometric laboratory measurements (Aerodyne C-ToF and W-ToF AMS, single particle laser ablation instrument SPLAT) on pure submicron aerosol particles containing typical PBA compounds in order to identify typical mass spectral patterns of these compounds and to explain the observed fragmentation patterns on the basis of molecular structures. These laboratory data were compared to submicron particle mass spectra obtained during AMAZE-08 (Amazonian Aerosol CharacteriZation Experiment, Brazil, February/March 2008). The results indicate that characteristic m/z ratios for carbohydrates (e.g., glucose, saccharose, levoglucosan, mannitol) can be identified, for example m/z = 60(C2H4O2+) or m/z = 61(C2H5O2+). Certain characteristic peaks for amino acids were also identified in the laboratory experiments. In the field data from AMAZE-08, these characteristic peaks for carbohydrates and amino acids were found, and their contribution to the total organic mass was estimated to about 5%. Fragment ions from peptides and small proteins were also identified in laboratory experiments. Larger proteins, however, seem to become oxidized to CO2+ to a large extend in the vaporizing process of the AMS. Thus, detection of proteins in atmospheric aerosol particles with the AMS appears to be difficult.

  20. Explosives detection with quadrupole resonance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayner, Timothy J.; Thorson, Benjamin D.; Beevor, Simon; West, Rebecca; Krauss, Ronald A.

    1997-02-01

    The increase in international terrorist activity over the past decade has necessitated the exploration of new technologies for the detection of plastic explosives. Quadrupole resonance analysis (QRA) has proven effective as a technique for detecting the presence of plastic, sheet, and military explosive compounds in small quantities, and can also be used to identify narcotics such as heroin and cocaine base. QRA is similar to the widely used magnetic resonance (MR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, but has the considerable advantage that the item being inspected does not need to be immersed in a steady, homogeneous magnetic field. The target compounds are conclusively identified by their unique quadrupole resonance frequencies. Quantum magnetics has develop and introduced a product line of explosives and narcotics detection devices based upon QRA technology. The work presented here concerns a multi-compound QRA detection system designed to screen checked baggage, cargo, and sacks of mail at airports and other high-security facilities. The design philosophy and performance are discussed and supported by test results from field trials conducted in the United States and the United Kingdom. This detection system represents the current state of QRA technology for field use in both commercial and government sectors.

  1. SSC Quadrupole Magnet Performance at LBL

    SciTech Connect

    Lietzke, A.F.; Barale, P.; Benjegerdes, r.; Caspi, S.; Cortella, J.; Dell'Orco, D.; Gilbert, W.; Green, M.I.; Mirk, K.; Peters, C.; Scalan, R.; Taylor, C.E.; Wandesforde, A.

    1992-10-01

    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) contracted to design, construct, and test four short (1m) models and six full-size (5m) models of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) main-ring 5 meter focusing quadrupole magnet (211 Tesla/meter). The training performance of these magnets is summarized. Magnets were tested in a horizontal boiling helium (1 Atm) cryostat. The magnetic, strain-gage and training responses to two thermal cycles were measured. The quadrupole gradient, and relative multipole purity were determined from Fourier analysis of the rotating coil signals. Magnetic and strain-gage measurements were taken on-the-fly. The voltage-tap data was analyzed to determine quench-origin and propagation characteristics. Quench-training proceeded at 4.3K until a plateau was achieved or sub-cooling (2.5K) was used to accelerate the training process. The early short (1m) magnets were also trained at 1.8K (10kA) to help identify potential weak areas. The MIITs were calculated to compare various magnet protection methods. Except for modest training above the anticipated SSC operating point, the magnets performed very well and proved to be self-protecting. Some design flaws were identified and corrected. The last two 1 m models and all the 5m models have been reinstalled in cryostats at the SSC Laboratory, retested and used to achieve various milestones in their program.

  2. Quadrupole Polarizabilities in A ~150 Superdeformed Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satula, Wojciech; Nazarewicz, Witold; Dobaczewski, Jacek; Dudek, Jerzy

    1996-10-01

    In this study, the quadrupole and hexadecapole moments of superdeformed (SD) bands in the A ~150 mass region have been analyzed in the cranking Skyrme-Hartree-Fock model. The analysis shows that the relative quadrupole moments, δ Q_20(X_A)≡ Q_20(X_A)-Q_20(^152Dy;yrast), follow experimental trends rather well and that they can be written as a sum of independent contributions from the single-particle/hole states around the doubly-magic SD core of ^152Dy with a surpisingly high accuracy. For more than 90% of the SD bands considered, the deviation |δ Q_20 ( X_A) - sum_Nn_zΛδ q^[Nn_zΛ]| is less than 0.04 b. It suggests that the SD high-spin bands around ^152Dy are excellent examples of an almost undisturbed single-particle motion, i.e., can be described by the extreme shell model.

  3. Quadrupole Collectivity in Neutron Deficient Sn Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gade, Alexandra

    2014-03-01

    One of the overarching goals of nuclear physics is the development of a comprehensive model of the atomic nucleus with predictive power across the nuclear chart. Of particular importance for the development of nuclear models is experimental data that consistently track the effect of isospin and changed binding, for example. The chain of Sn isotopes has been a formidable testing ground for nuclear models as some spectroscopic data is available from N = Z = 50 100Sn in the proximity of the proton dripline to 134Sn, beyond the very neutron-rich doubly magic nucleus 132Sn. In even-even nuclei, the electromagnetic quadrupole excitation strength is a measure of quadrupole collectivity, sensitive to the presence of shell gaps, nuclear deformation, and nucleon-nucleon correlations, for example. In the Sn isotopes, this transition strength has been reported from 104Sn to 130Sn, spanning a chain of 14 even-even Sn isotopes. The trend is asymmetric with respect to midshell and not even the largest-scale shell-model calculations have been able to describe the evolution of transition strength across the isotopic chain without varying effective charges. Implications will be discussed. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-1102511.

  4. Sources and transformations of atmospheric aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Eben Spencer

    Aerosol particles are an important component of the Earth-Atmosphere system because of their influence on the radiation budget both directly (through absorption and scattering) and indirectly (through cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity). The magnitude of the raditaive forcing attributed to the direct and indirect aerosol effects is highly uncertain, leading to large uncertainties in projections of global climate change. Real-time measurements of aerosol properties are a critical step toward constraining the uncertainties in current global climate modeling and understanding the influence that anthropogenic activities have on the climate. The objective of the work presented in this thesis is to gain a more complete understanding of the atmospheric transformations of aerosol particles and how such transformations influence the direct and indirect radiative effects of the particles. The work focuses on real-time measurements of aerosol particles made with the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) developed in collaboration with the Boston College research group. A key feature of the work described is the development of a light scattering module for the AMS. Here we present the first results obtained with the integrated light scattering - AMS system. The unique and powerful capabilities of this new instrument combination are demonstrated through laboratory experiments and field deployments. Results from two field studies are presented: (1) The Northeast Air Quality Study (NEAQS), in the summer of 2004, conducted at Chebogue Point, Nova Scotia and (2) The Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) field campaign conducted in and around Mexico City, Mexico in March of 2006. Both field studies were designed to study the transformations that occur within pollution plumes as they are transported throughout the atmosphere. During the NEAQS campaign, the pollution plume from the Northeastern United States was intercepted as it was

  5. Encapsulation effects on carbonaceous aerosol light absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, A.J.; Onasch, T.; Davidovits, P.; Cross, E.; Mazzoleni, C.

    2010-03-15

    The contribution of aerosol absorption on direct radiative forcing is still an active area of research, in part, because aerosol extinction is dominated by light scattering and, in part, because the primary absorbing aerosol of interest, soot, exhibits complex aging behavior that alters its optical properties. The consequences of this can be evidenced by the work of Ramanathan and Carmichael (2008) who suggest that incorporating the atmospheric heating due to brown clouds (plumes containing soot byproducts from automobiles, biomass burning, wood-burning kitchen stoves, and coal-fired power plants) will increase black carbon (BC) radiative forcing from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change best estimate of 0.34 Wm-2 (±0.25 Wm-2) (IPCC 2007) to 0.9 Wm-2. This noteworthy degree of uncertainty is due largely to the interdependence of BC optical properties on particle mixing state and aggregate morphology, each of which changes as the particle ages in the atmosphere and becomes encapsulated within a coating of inorganic and/or organic substances. In July 2008, a laboratory-based measurement campaign, led by Boston College and Aerodyne, was initiated to begin addressing this interdependence. To achieve insights into the interdependence of BC optical properties on particle mixing state and aggregate morphology, measurements of both the optical and physical properties of flame-generated soot under nascent, coated, and denuded conditions were conducted. This poster presents data on black carbon (BC) light absorption measured by Photothermal Interferometry (Sedlacek and Lee 2007). In addition to examining nascent BC—to provide a baseline measurement—encapsulation with varying thicknesses of either dioctyl sebacate (DOS) or sulfuric acid was conducted to glean insights into the interplay between particle mixing state and optical properties. Additionally, some experiments were carried out where BC was coated and then denuded. In the case of DOS-coated soot, a

  6. Apportionment of urban aerosol sources in Cork (Ireland) by synergistic measurement techniques.

    PubMed

    Dall'Osto, Manuel; Hellebust, Stig; Healy, Robert M; O'Connor, Ian P; Kourtchev, Ivan; Sodeau, John R; Ovadnevaite, Jurgita; Ceburnis, Darius; O'Dowd, Colin D; Wenger, John C

    2014-09-15

    The sources of ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) during wintertime at a background urban location in Cork city (Ireland) have been determined. Aerosol chemical analyses were performed by multiple techniques including on-line high resolution aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (Aerodyne HR-ToF-AMS), on-line single particle aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TSI ATOFMS), on-line elemental carbon-organic carbon analysis (Sunset_EC-OC), and off-line gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and ion chromatography analysis of filter samples collected at 6-h resolution. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) has been carried out to better elucidate aerosol sources not clearly identified when analyzing results from individual aerosol techniques on their own. Two datasets have been considered: on-line measurements averaged over 2-h periods, and both on-line and off-line measurements averaged over 6-h periods. Five aerosol sources were identified by PMF in both datasets, with excellent agreement between the two solutions: (1) regional domestic solid fuel burning--"DSF_Regional," 24-27%; (2) local urban domestic solid fuel burning--"DSF_Urban," 22-23%; (3) road vehicle emissions--"Traffic," 15-20%; (4) secondary aerosols from regional anthropogenic sources--"SA_Regional" 9-13%; and (5) secondary aged/processed aerosols related to urban anthropogenic sources--"SA_Urban," 21-26%. The results indicate that, despite regulations for restricting the use of smoky fuels, solid fuel burning is the major source (46-50%) of PM2.5 in wintertime in Cork, and also likely other areas of Ireland. Whilst wood combustion is strongly associated with OC and EC, it was found that peat and coal combustion is linked mainly with OC and the aerosol from these latter sources appears to be more volatile than that produced by wood combustion. Ship emissions from the nearby port were found to be mixed with the SA_Regional factor. The PMF analysis allowed us to link the AMS cooking organic

  7. Aerosol Physical and Chemical Properties Before and After the Manaus Plume in the GoAmazon2014 Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artaxo, P.; Barbosa, H. M.; Ferreira De Brito, J.; Wurm, F.; Holanda, B. A.; Carbone, S.; Arana, A.; Cirino, G. G.; Souza, R. A. F. D.; Rizzo, L. V.; Martin, S. T.; Andreae, M. O.; Holben, B. N.; Schafer, J.

    2014-12-01

    As part of the GoAmazon2014 experiment, several aerosol and trace gas monitoring stations are being operated for at least one year before and after the Manaus plume. Three sites are being operated in pristine conditions, with atmospheric properties under natural biogenic conditions. These three sites called T0 are: ATTO (Amazon Tall Tower Observatory), ZF2 ecological research site and a third site called EMBRAPA. After the air masses are exposed to the Manaus plume, one site (called T2) is being operated right on the opposite side of the Negro River under the direct influence of the Manaus plume at 5 Km downwind of Manaus. Finally, at about 150 Km downwind of Manaus is the T3 Manacapuru site. Aerosol chemical composition is being analyzed using filters for fine (PM2.5) and coarse mode aerosol as well as three Aerodyne ACSM (Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitors) instruments. Aerosol absorption is being studied with several aethalometers and MAAP (Multi Angle Absorption Photometers). Aerosol light scattering are being measured at several wavelengths using nephelometers. Aerosol size distribution is determined using scanning mobility particle sizers. The aerosol column is measures using AERONET sunphotometers before and after the Manaus plume, as well as several Lidar systems. The three sites before the Manaus plume show remarkable similar variability in aerosol concentrations and optical properties. This pattern is very different at the T2 site, with large aerosol concentrations enhancing aerosol absorption and scattering significantly. The aerosol is very oxidized before being exposed to the Manaus plume, and this pattern changes significantly for T2 and T3 sites, with a much higher presence of less oxidized aerosol. Typical ozone concentrations at mid-day before Manaus plume is a low 10-12 ppb, value that changes to 50-70 ppb for air masses suffering the influence of Manaus plume. A detailed comparison of aerosol characteristics and composition for the several

  8. Differentially pumped dual linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Benjamin C.; Kenttamaa, Hilkka I.

    2015-10-20

    The present disclosure provides a new tandem mass spectrometer and methods of using the same for analyzing charged particles. The differentially pumped dual linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer of the present disclose includes a combination of two linear quadrupole (LQIT) mass spectrometers with differentially pumped vacuum chambers.

  9. Electrostatic quadrupole focused particle accelerating assembly with laminar flow beam

    DOEpatents

    Maschke, Alfred W.

    1985-01-01

    A charged particle accelerating assembly provided with a predetermined ratio of parametric structural characteristics and with related operating voltages applied to each of its linearly spaced focusing and accelerating quadrupoles, thereby to maintain a particle beam traversing the electrostatic fields of the quadrupoles in the assembly in an essentially laminar flow throughout the assembly.

  10. Electrostatic quadrupole focused particle accelerating assembly with laminar flow beam

    DOEpatents

    Maschke, A.W.

    1984-04-16

    A charged particle accelerating assembly provided with a predetermined ratio of parametric structural characteristics and with related operating voltages applied to each of its linearly spaced focusing and accelerating quadrupoles, thereby to maintain a particle beam traversing the electrostatic fields of the quadrupoles in the assembly in an essentially laminar flow through the assembly.

  11. Feedback damper system for quadrupole oscillations after transition at RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    Abreu,N.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Schultheiss, C.

    2008-06-23

    The heavy ion beam at RHIC undergoes strong quadrupole oscillations just after it crosses transition, which leads to an increase in bunch length making rebucketing less effective. A feedback system was built to damp these quadrupole oscillations and in this paper the characteristics of the system and the results obtained are presented and discussed.

  12. Commissioning a Vibrating Wire System for Quadrupole Fiducialization

    SciTech Connect

    Levashov, Michael Y

    2010-12-03

    Quadrupoles will be placed between the undulator segments in LCLS to keep the electron beam focused as it passes through. The quadrupoles will be assembled with their respective undulator segments prior to being placed into the tunnel. Beam alignment will be used to center the quadrupoles, along with the corresponding undulators, on the beam. If there is any displacement between the undulator and the quadrupole axes in the assemblies, the beam will deviate from the undulator axis. If it deviates by more than 80{micro}m in vertical or 140{micro}m in horizontal directions, the undulator will not perform as required by LCLS. This error is divided between three sources: undulator axis fiducialization, quadrupole magnetic axis fiducialization, and assembly of the two parts. In particular, it was calculated that the quadrupole needs to be fiducialized to within 25{micro}m in both vertical and horizontal directions. A previous study suggested using a vibrating wire system for finding the magnetic axis of the quadrupoles. The study showed that the method has high sensitivity (up to 1{micro}m) and laid out guidelines for constructing such a system. There are 3 steps in fiducializing the quadrupole with the vibrating wire system. They are positioning the wire at the magnet center (step 1), finding the wire with position detectors (step 2), and finding the quadrupole tooling ball positions relative to the position detector tooling balls (step 3). A previous study investigated the error associated with each step by using a permanent quadrupole magnet on an optical mover system. The study reported an error of 11{micro}m for step 1 and a repeatability of 4{micro}m for step 2. However, the set up used a FARO arm to measure tooling balls and didn't allow to accurately check step 2 for errors; an uncertainty of 100{micro}m was reported. Therefore, even though the repeatability was good, there was no way to check that the error in step 2 was small. Following the recommendations of

  13. Double-photoionization of helium including quadrupole radiation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Colgan, James; Ludlow, J A; Lee, Teck - Ghee; Pindzola, M S; Robicheaux, F

    2009-01-01

    Non-perturbative time-dependent close-coupling calculations are carried out for the double photoionization of helium including both dipole and quadrupole radiation effects. At a photon energy of 800 eV, accessible at CUlTent synchrotron light sources, the quadrupole interaction contributes around 6% to the total integral double photoionization cross section. The pure quadrupole single energy differential cross section shows a local maxima at equal energy sharing, as opposed to the minimum found in the pure dipole single energy differential cross section. The sum of the pure dipole and pure quadrupole single energy differentials is insensitive to non-dipole effects at 800 eV. However, the triple differential cross section at equal energy sharing of the two ejected electrons shows strong non-dipole effects due to the quadrupole interaction that may be experimentally observable.

  14. Quadrupole photoionization of hydrogen atoms in Debye plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, C. Y.; Ho, Y. K.

    2010-09-15

    Although a great deal of effort has been devoted to investigating dipole photoionization of plasma-embedded atoms, far less is known about the corresponding quadrupole transitions. In the present work, quadrupole photoionization processes for the ground and excited states of hydrogen atoms in Debye plasma are explored using the method of complex coordinate rotation. The plasma shielding effects on the quadrupole photoionization cross sections are reported for a variety of Debye screening lengths and compared to the dipole results accordingly. Under the perturbation of plasma screening, shape resonances and Cooper-type minima occurring in both dipole and quadrupole photoionization cross sections are presented and discussed. Comparisons are made to other theoretical calculations for the dipole photoionization with good agreement. The present quadrupole results are the first predictions for hydrogen photoionization in Debye plasmas.

  15. Overview of the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study.

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, L. K.; Berkowitz, C. M.; Ogren, J. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Ferrare, R. A.; Dubey, M.; Andrews, E.; Coulter, R. L.; Hair, J. W.; Hubbe, J. M.Lee, Y. N.; Mazzoleni, C; Olfert, J; Springston, SR; Environmental Science Division; PNNL; NOAA Earth System Research Lab.; NASA Langley Research Center; LANL; BNL; Univ.of Alberta; Univ. of Colorado

    2009-11-01

    convergence pattern caused by the city. Recently, the New England Air Quality Study (NEAQS), and the 2004 International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation, which were conducted during the summer of 2004, examined the transport of pollutants and aerosols eastward from New England over the Atlantic Ocean. The Texas Air Quality Study/Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (TexAQS/GoMACCS) also looked at relationships between clouds and aerosols in polluted conditions around Houston, Texas. In contrast to these recent studies near large or very dirty cities, CHAPS was conducted near a moderately sized city that is representative of a large number of cities around the United States. CHAPS was also one of the first times that a Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer was used in conjunction with a counterflow virtual impactor (CVI) inlet on an aircraft. The AMS provides information on the nonrefractory (i.e., materials that are chemically and physically unstable at high temperatures) composition of aerosols, while the CVI uses a counterflow relative to the main incoming airstream to exclude small droplets and nonactivated particles from the inlet, allowing only larger cloud droplets to enter the inlet. The combination of the CVI and AMS allow the examination of the chemical composition of the dried aerosol kernel from the cloud droplets. A key objective of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE)'s Atmospheric Sciences Program (ASP) is to improve the understanding of aerosol radiative effects on climate. This objective encompasses not only clear sky observations but also studies relating the effects of both aerosols on clouds and clouds on aerosols - in particular, how clouds affect the chemical and optical properties of aerosols. The latter was the science driver in the design of CHAPS. The measurement strategy for CHAPS was intended to provide measurements relevant to four questions associated with the aerosol radiative forcing issues of

  16. Supersonic Quadrupole Noise Theory for High-Speed Helicopter Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Brentner, Kenneth S.

    1997-01-01

    High-speed helicopter rotor impulsive noise prediction is an important problem of aeroacoustics. The deterministic quadrupoles have been shown to contribute significantly to high-speed impulsive (HSI) noise of rotors, particularly when the phenomenon of delocalization occurs. At high rotor-tip speeds, some of the quadrupole sources lie outside the sonic circle and move at supersonic speed. Brentner has given a formulation suitable for efficient prediction of quadrupole noise inside the sonic circle. In this paper, we give a simple formulation based on the acoustic analogy that is valid for both subsonic and supersonic quadrupole noise prediction. Like the formulation of Brentner, the model is exact for an observer in the far field and in the rotor plane and is approximate elsewhere. We give the full analytic derivation of this formulation in the paper. We present the method of implementation on a computer for supersonic quadrupoles using marching cubes for constructing the influence surface (Sigma surface) of an observer space- time variable (x; t). We then present several examples of noise prediction for both subsonic and supersonic quadrupoles. It is shown that in the case of transonic flow over rotor blades, the inclusion of the supersonic quadrupoles improves the prediction of the acoustic pressure signature. We show the equivalence of the new formulation to that of Brentner for subsonic quadrupoles. It is shown that the regions of high quadrupole source strength are primarily produced by the shock surface and the flow over the leading edge of the rotor. The primary role of the supersonic quadrupoles is to increase the width of a strong acoustic signal.

  17. Black carbon aerosol optical properties are influenced by initial mixing state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, M. D.; Healy, R. M.; Riemer, N.; West, M.; Wang, J. M.; Jeong, C. H.; Wenger, J.; Abbatt, J.; Lee, A.

    2015-12-01

    Incomplete combustion emits teragram quantities of black carbon (BC) aerosol to the troposphere each year, resulting in a significant warming effect on climate that may be second only to carbon dioxide. The magnitude of BC impacts on a global scale remains poorly constrained and is intimately related to its particle-scale physical and chemical properties. Using particle-resolved modeling informed by novel quantitative measurements from an Aerodyne soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS), we show that initial mixing state (or the distribution of co-emitted components amongst fresh BC-containing particles) significantly affects BC-aerosol optical properties even after a day of atmospheric processing. Both single particle and ensemble observations indicate that BC near emission co-exists with hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) in two distinct particle types: HOA-rich and BC-rich particles. The average mass fraction of black carbon (mfBC) in HOA- and BC-rich particle types was 0.02-0.08 and 0.72-0.93, respectively. Notably, positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis of ensemble SP-AMS measurements indicates that BC-rich particles contribute the majority of BC mass (> 90%) in freshly emitted particles. This new measurement capability provides quantitative insight into the physical and chemical nature of BC-containing particles and is used to drive a particle-resolved aerosol box model. Significant differences in calculated single scattering albedo (an increase of 0.1) arise from accurate treatment of initial particle mixing state as compared to the assumption of uniform aerosol composition at the point of BC injection to the atmosphere.

  18. Explosives detection by nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garroway, Allen N.; Buess, Michael L.; Yesinowski, James P.; Miller, Joel B.; Krauss, Ronald A.

    1994-10-01

    Pure nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) of 14N nuclei is quite promising as a method for detecting explosives such as RDX and contraband narcotics such as cocaine and heroin in quantities of interest. Pure NQR is conducted without an external applied magnetic field, so potential concerns about damage to magnetically encoded data or exposure of personnel to large magnetic fields are not relevant. Because NQR frequencies of different compounds are quite distinct, we do not encounter false alarms from the NQR signals of other benign materials. We have constructed a laboratory prototype NQR explosives detector which interrogates a volume of 300 liters (10 ft3). This paper presents abbreviated results from a demonstration of the laboratory prototype NQR explosives detector conducted at the Federal Aviation Administration Technical Center in May 1994 on RDX-based explosives.

  19. Quadrupole resonance scanner for narcotics detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Julian D.; Moeller, C. R.; Magnuson, Erik E.; Sheldon, Alan G.

    1994-10-01

    Interest in non-invasive, non-hazardous, bulk detection technologies for narcotics interdiction has risen over the last few years. As part of our continuing research and development programs in detection of narcotics and explosives using sensitive magnetic measuring devices, we present the first commercially available prototype Quadrupole Resonance (QR) scanner for narcotics detection. The portable narcotics detection system was designed in modular form such that a single QR base system could be easily used with a variety of custom detection heads. The QR system presented in this paper is suitable for scanning items up to 61 X 35 X 13 cm in size, and was designed to scan mail packages and briefcase-sized items for the presence of narcotics. System tests have shown that detection sensitivity is comparable that obtained in laboratory systems.

  20. Development of a quadrupole resonance confirmation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrall, Geoffrey A.; Derby, Kevin A.; Drew, Adam J.; Ermolaev, Konstantine V.; Huo, Shouqin; Lathrop, Daniel K.; Petrov, Todor R.; Steiger, Matthew J.; Stewart, Stanley H.; Turner, Peter J.

    2004-09-01

    Quantum Magnetics has developed a Quadrupole Resonance (QR) system for the detection of anti-tank and anti-vehicle landmines. The QR confirmation sensor (QRCS) is a part of the Army GSTAMIDS Block 1 program and is designed to confirm the presence of landmines initially flagged by a primary sensor system. The ultimate goal is to significantly reduce the number of sites that require neutralization or other time consuming investigation into the presence of a landmine. Government tests in 2002 and 2003 demonstrated the performance of the system in a wide variety of conditions including high radio frequency interference (RFI) and piezo electric ringing (PER) environments. Field test results are presented along with an overall description of the system design and methods used to solve prior issues with RFI and PER.

  1. Atomic Quadrupole Moment Measurement Using Dynamic Decoupling.

    PubMed

    Shaniv, R; Akerman, N; Ozeri, R

    2016-04-01

    We present a method that uses dynamic decoupling of a multilevel quantum probe to distinguish small frequency shifts that depend on m_{j}^{2}, where m_{j}^{2} is the angular momentum of level |j⟩ along the quantization axis, from large noisy shifts that are linear in m_{j}, such as those due to magnetic field noise. Using this method we measured the electric-quadrupole moment of the 4D_{5/2} level in ^{88}Sr^{+} to be 2.973_{-0.033}^{+0.026}ea_{0}^{2}. Our measurement improves the uncertainty of this value by an order of magnitude and thus helps mitigate an important systematic uncertainty in ^{88}Sr^{+} based optical atomic clocks and verifies complicated many-body quantum calculations.

  2. Improving IRMPD in a quadrupole ion trap.

    PubMed

    Newsome, G Asher; Glish, Gary L

    2009-06-01

    A focused laser is used to make infrared multiphoton photodissociation (IRMPD) more efficient in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. Efficient (up to 100%) dissociation at the standard operating pressure of 1 x 10(-3) Torr can be achieved without any supplemental ion activation and with shorter irradiation times. The axial amplitudes of trapped ion clouds are measured using laser tomography. Laser flux on the ion cloud is increased six times by focusing the laser so that the beam waist approximates the ion cloud size. Unmodified peptide ions from 200 Da to 3 kDa are completely dissociated in 2.5-10 ms at a bath gas pressure of 3.3 x 10(-4) Torr and in 3-25 ms at 1.0 x 10(-3) Torr. Sequential dissociation of product ions is increased by focusing the laser and by operating at an increased bath gas pressure to minimize the size of the ion cloud.

  3. Atomic Quadrupole Moment Measurement Using Dynamic Decoupling.

    PubMed

    Shaniv, R; Akerman, N; Ozeri, R

    2016-04-01

    We present a method that uses dynamic decoupling of a multilevel quantum probe to distinguish small frequency shifts that depend on m_{j}^{2}, where m_{j}^{2} is the angular momentum of level |j⟩ along the quantization axis, from large noisy shifts that are linear in m_{j}, such as those due to magnetic field noise. Using this method we measured the electric-quadrupole moment of the 4D_{5/2} level in ^{88}Sr^{+} to be 2.973_{-0.033}^{+0.026}ea_{0}^{2}. Our measurement improves the uncertainty of this value by an order of magnitude and thus helps mitigate an important systematic uncertainty in ^{88}Sr^{+} based optical atomic clocks and verifies complicated many-body quantum calculations. PMID:27104691

  4. An improved integrally formed radio frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Abbott, S.R.

    1987-10-05

    An improved radio frequency quadrupole is provided having an elongate housing with an elongate central axis and top, bottom and two side walls symmetrically disposed about the axis, and vanes formed integrally with the walls, the vanes each having a cross-section at right angles to the central axis which tapers inwardly toward the axis to form electrode tips spaced from each other by predetermined distances. Each of the four walls, and the vanes integral therewith, is a separate structural element having a central lengthwise plane passing through the tip of the vane, the walls having flat mounting surfaces at right angles to and parallel to the control plane, respectively, which are butted together to position the walls and vane tips relative to each other. 4 figs.

  5. RADIATION RESISTANT HTS QUADRUPOLES FOR RIA.

    SciTech Connect

    GUPTA,R.; ANERELLA,M.; HARRISON,M.; ET AL.

    2004-10-03

    Extremely high radiation, levels with accumulated doses comparable to those in nuclear reactors than in accelerators, and very high heat loads ({approx}15 kw) make the quadrupole magnets in the fragment separator one of the most challenging elements of the proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA). Removing large heat loads, protecting the superconducting coils against quenching, the long term survivability of magnet components, and in particular, insulation that can retain its functionality in such a harsh environment, are the major challenges associated with such magnets. A magnet design based on commercially available high temperature superconductor (HTS) and stainless steel tape insulation has been developed. HTS will efficiently remove these large heat loads and stainless steel can tolerate these large radiation doses. Construction of a model magnet has been started with several coils already built and tested. This paper presents the basic magnet design, results of the coil tests, the status and the future plans. In addition, preliminary results of radiation calculations are also presented.

  6. Cryostat design for SSC quadrupole magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmann, G.A.; Grut, K.E.; Hiller, M.W.; Huang, X.; Stutzki, D.T.; Waynert, J.A.

    1994-12-31

    The baseline design of the SSC Collider Quadrupole Magnet (CQM) cryostat is complete. The cryostat is designed to minimize cost and maximize system reliability. Many components have already been procured. Material characterization and component tests for many of the parts have been completed or are ongoing. The first CQM cryostat will be assembled in September of 1993. This paper describes the cryostat design for the CQM developed at Babcock & Wilcox (B&W). The CQM cryostat operates at cryogenic temperatures with a very stringent heat load budget. The cryostat supports the cold mass within the cryostat and insulates the cold mass against heating by conduction, thermal radiation and residual gas conduction. A description of the major components highlighting the key design features is given. The tradeoff studies performed for each component are summarized. The results of a static thermal analysis of the cryostat are presented.

  7. Radio-frequency quadrupole linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.; Stokes, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    The radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) is a new linear accelerator concept in which rf electric fields are used to focus, bunch, and accelerate the beam. Because the RFQ can provide strong focusing at low velocities, it can capture a high-current dc ion beam from a low-voltage source and accelerate it to an energy of 1 MeV/nucleon within a distance of a few meters. A recent experimental test at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) has confirmed the expected performance of this structure and has stimulated interest in a wide variety of applications. The general properties of the RFQ are reviewed and examples of applications of this new accelerator are presented.

  8. Quadrupole magnet for a rapid cycling synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Witte, H.; Berg, J. S.

    2015-05-03

    Rapid Cycling Synchrotrons (RCS) feature interleaved warm and cold dipole magnets; the field of the warm magnets is used to modulate the average bending field depending on the particle energy. It has been shown that RCS can be an attractive option for fast acceleration of particles, for example, muons, which decay quickly. In previous studies it was demonstrated that in principle warm dipole magnets can be designed which can provide the required ramp rates, which are equivalent to frequencies of about 1 kHz. To reduce the losses it is beneficial to employ two separate materials for the yoke; it was also shown that by employing an optimized excitation coil geometry the eddy current losses are acceptable. In this paper we show that the same principles can be applied to quadrupole magnets targeting 30 T/m with a repetition rate of 1kHz and good field quality.

  9. Chamber Study Exploring Aerosol Formation from NO3 Oxidation of α-pinene and Δ-carene under Varying HO2/RO2/NO3 Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, H.; Ayres, B. R.; Fry, J.; Brown, S. S.; Day, D. A.; Thompson, S.; Hu, W.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Stark, H.; Jimenez, J. L.; Ranney, A.; Ziemann, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Although monoterpenes are pervasive in wooded environments, their reactions with nitrate radicals (NO3, a potent nighttime oxidant downwind of combustion sources) and the resulting secondary aerosol formation are not well characterized. To better understand these reactions, environmental chamber experiments have often been conducted at elevated terpene concentrations and HO2/RO2/NO3 ratios that are not representative of the real atmosphere, resulting in a range of yields. To elucidate the reasons for these varying yields, a new series of experiments were conducted with varying concentration ratios of α-pinene or Δ-carene with N2O5 (source of NO3 radical) and with/without formaldehyde in a 8000 L Teflon chamber. Formaldehyde served as a precursor for HO2 to bias the system towards HO2-RO2 reactions, elevated N2O5 caused NO3-RO2 reactions to dominate, and elevated monoterpene concentrations (but not amount reacted) favored RO2-RO2 reactions. The chamber products in the gaseous and aerosol phase were characterized using an NO3/N2O5 Cavity Ringdown Spectrometer (CRDS), an Aerodyne High-Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS), a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS), an Ultrafine Condensation Particle Counter (UCPC), an Aerodyne High-Resolution Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer using Iodide ion chemistry (I- CIMS), and a chemiluminescence NOx detector. The mechanistic reasons for the starkly different SOA yield from the NO3 + α-pinene vs. NO3 + Δ-carene systems were explored in addition to differences in gas and aerosol-phase composition and yields under the varying conditions of the primary terpene RO2 radical fate.

  10. Global Atmospheric Aerosol Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Johannes; Aquila, Valentina; Righi, Mattia

    2012-01-01

    Global aerosol models are used to study the distribution and properties of atmospheric aerosol particles as well as their effects on clouds, atmospheric chemistry, radiation, and climate. The present article provides an overview of the basic concepts of global atmospheric aerosol modeling and shows some examples from a global aerosol simulation. Particular emphasis is placed on the simulation of aerosol particles and their effects within global climate models.

  11. Transboundary secondary organic aerosol in western Japan: An observed limitation of the f44 oxidation indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irei, Satoshi; Takami, Akinori; Sadanaga, Yasuhiro; Miyoshi, Takao; Arakaki, Takemitsu; Sato, Kei; Kaneyasu, Naoki; Bandow, Hiroshi; Hatakeyama, Shiro

    2015-11-01

    To obtain evidence for secondary organic aerosol formation during the long-range transport of air masses over the East China Sea, we conducted field measurements in March 2012 at the Fukue atmospheric monitoring station, Nagasaki, in western Japan. The relative abundance of m/z 44 in fine organic aerosol (f44) was measured by an Aerodyne aerosol chemical speciation monitor. The stable carbon isotope ratio (δ13C) of low-volatile water-soluble organic carbon (LV-WSOC) in the daily filter samples of total suspended particulate matter was also analyzed using an elemental-analyzer coupled with an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. Additionally, in situ measurements of NOx and NOy were performed using NOx and NOy analyzers. The measurements showed that, unlike the systematic trends observed in a previous field study, a scatter plot for δ13C of LV-WSOC versus f44 indicated a random variation. Comparison of f44 with the estimated photochemical age by the NOx/NOy ratio revealed that the random distribution of f44 values near 0.2 is likely an indication of saturation already. Such f44 values were significantly lower than the observed f44 (∼0.3) at Hedo in the previous study. These findings imply that the saturation point of f44, and the use of f44 as an oxidation indicator, is case dependent.

  12. Aerosol gels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, Christopher M. (Inventor); Chakrabarti, Amitabha (Inventor); Dhaubhadel, Rajan (Inventor); Gerving, Corey (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An improved process for the production of ultralow density, high specific surface area gel products is provided which comprises providing, in an enclosed chamber, a mixture made up of small particles of material suspended in gas; the particles are then caused to aggregate in the chamber to form ramified fractal aggregate gels. The particles should have a radius (a) of up to about 50 nm and the aerosol should have a volume fraction (f.sub.v) of at least 10.sup.-4. In preferred practice, the mixture is created by a spark-induced explosion of a precursor material (e.g., a hydrocarbon) and oxygen within the chamber. New compositions of matter are disclosed having densities below 3.0 mg/cc.

  13. Diurnal Cycles of Aerosol Optical Properties at Pico Tres Padres, Mexico City: Evidences for Changes in Particle Morphology and Secondary Aerosol Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzoleni, C.; Dubey, M.; Chakrabarty, R.; Moosmuller, H.; Onasch, T.; Zavala, M.; Herndon, S.; Kolb, C.

    2007-12-01

    Aerosol optical properties affect planetary radiative balance and depend on chemical composition, size distribution, and morphology. During the MILAGRO field campaign, we measured aerosol absorption and scattering in Mexico City using the Los Alamos aerosol photoacoustic (LAPA) instrument operating at 781 nm. The LAPA was mounted on-board the Aerodyne Research Inc. mobile laboratory, which hosted a variety of gaseous and aerosol instruments. During the campaign, the laboratory was moved to different sites, capturing spatial and temporal variability. Additionally, we collected ambient aerosols on Nuclepore filters for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. SEM images of selected filters were taken to study particle morphology. Between March 7th and 19th air was sampled at the top of Pico Tres Padres, a mountain on the north side of Mexico City. Aerosol absorption and scattering followed diurnal patterns related to boundary layer height and solar insulation. We report an analysis of aerosol absorption, scattering, and morphology for three days (9th, 11th and 12th of March 2006). The single scattering albedo (SSA, ratio of scattering to total extinction) showed a drop in the tens-of-minutes-to-hour time frame after the boundary layer grew above the sampling site. Later in the day the SSA rose steadily reaching a maximum in the afternoon. The SEM images showed a variety of aerosol shapes including fractal-like aggregates, spherical particles, and other shapes. The absorption correlated with the CO2 signal and qualitatively with the fraction of fractal-like particles to the total particle count. In the afternoon the SSA qualitatively correlated with a relative increase in spherical particles and total particle count. These observed changes in optical properties and morphology can be explained by the dominant contribution of freshly emitted particles in the morning and by secondary particle formation in the afternoon. SSA hourly averaged values ranged from ~0.63 in

  14. Automated beam based alignment of the ALS quadrupoles

    SciTech Connect

    Portmann, G.; Robin, D.; Schachinger, L.

    1995-04-01

    Knowing the electrical offset of the storage ring beam position monitors (BPM) to an adjacent quadrupole magnetic center is important in order to correct the orbit in the ring. The authors describe a simple, fast and reliable technique to measure the BPM electrical centers relative to the quadrupole magnetic centers. By varying individual quadrupole magnets and observing the effects on the orbit they were able to measure the BPM offsets in half the horizontal and vertical BPMs (48) in the ALS. These offsets were measured to an accuracy of better than 50{mu}m. The technique is completely automated and takes less than 3 hours for the whole ring.

  15. Development of Superconducting Focusing Quadrupoles for Heavy Ion Drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Martovetsky, N; Manahan, R; Lietzke, A F

    2001-09-10

    Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) is exploring a promising path to a practical inertial-confinement fusion reactor. The associated heavy ion driver will require a large number of focusing quadrupole magnets. A concept for a superconducting quadrupole array, using many simple racetrack coils, was developed at LLNL. Two, single-bore quadrupole prototypes of the same design, with distinctly different conductor, were designed, built, and tested. Both prototypes reached their short sample currents with little or no training. Magnet design, and test results, are presented and discussed.

  16. Intercomparison of an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) with ambient fine aerosol measurements in Downtown Atlanta, Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budisulistiorini, S. H.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Croteau, P. L.; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, E. S.; Kollman, M. S.; Ng, N. L.; Verma, V.; Shaw, S. L.; Knipping, E. M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Jayne, J. T.; Weber, R. J.; Surratt, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    The Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) was recently developed to provide long-term real-time continuous measurements of ambient non-refractory (i.e., organic, sulfate, ammonium, nitrate, and chloride) submicron particulate matter (NR-PM1). Currently, there are a limited number of field studies that evaluate the long-term performance of the ACSM against established monitoring networks. In this study, we present seasonal intercomparisons of the ACSM with collocated fine aerosol (PM2.5) measurements at the Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization (SEARCH) Jefferson Street (JST) site near downtown Atlanta, GA, during 2011-2012. The collocated measurements included a second ACSM, continuous and integrated sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium measurements, as well as a semi-continuous Sunset organic carbon/elemental carbon (OC/EC) analyzer, continuous tapered element oscillating microbalance (TEOM), 24 h integrated Federal Reference Method (FRM) filters, and continuous scanning electrical mobility system-mixing condensation particle counter (SEMS-MCPC). Intercomparison of the two collocated ACSMs resulted in strong correlations (r2 > 0.8) for all chemical species, except chloride (r2 = 0.21); mass concentration for all chemical species agreed within ±27%, indicating that ACSM instruments are capable of stable and reproducible operation. Chemical constituents measured by the ACSM are also compared with those obtained from the continuous measurements from JST. Since the continuous measurement concentrations are adjusted to match the integrated filter measurements, these comparisons reflect the combined uncertainties of the ACSM, continuous, and filter measurements. In general, speciated ACSM mass concentrations correlate well (r2 > 0.7) with the continuous measurements from JST, although the correlation for nitrate is weaker (r2 = 0.55) in summer. Differences between ACSM mass concentrations and the filter-adjusted JST continuous data are 5-27%, 4

  17. Measurements of the aerosol chemical composition and mixing state in the Po Valley using multiple spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decesari, S.; Allan, J.; Plass-Duelmer, C.; Williams, B. J.; Paglione, M.; Facchini, M. C.; O'Dowd, C.; Harrison, R. M.; Gietl, J. K.; Coe, H.; Giulianelli, L.; Gobbi, G. P.; Lanconelli, C.; Carbone, C.; Worsnop, D.; Lambe, A. T.; Ahern, A. T.; Moretti, F.; Tagliavini, E.; Elste, T.; Gilde, S.; Zhang, Y.; Dall'Osto, M.

    2014-04-01

    The use of co-located multiple spectroscopic techniques can provide detailed information on the atmospheric processes regulating aerosol chemical composition and mixing state. So far, field campaigns heavily equipped with aerosol mass spectrometers have been carried out mainly in large conurbations and in areas directly affected by their outflow, whereas lesser efforts have been dedicated to continental areas characterized by a less dense urbanization. We present here the results obtained in San Pietro Capofiume, which is located in a sparsely inhabited sector of the Po Valley, Italy. The experiment was carried out in summer 2009 in the framework of the EUCAARI project ("European Integrated Project on Aerosol, Cloud Climate Aerosol Interaction"). For the first time in Europe, six state-of-the-art techniques were used in parallel: (1) on-line TSI aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS), (2) on-line Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-TOF-AMS), (3) soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS), (4) on-line high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer-thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatograph (HR-ToFMS-TAG), (5) off-line twelve-hour resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance (H-NMR) spectroscopy, and (6) chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) for the analysis of gas-phase precursors of secondary aerosol. Data from each aerosol spectroscopic method were analysed individually following ad-hoc tools (i.e. PMF for AMS, Art-2a for ATOFMS). The results obtained from each techniques are herein presented and compared. This allows us to clearly link the modifications in aerosol chemical composition to transitions in air mass origin and meteorological regimes. Under stagnant conditions, atmospheric stratification at night and early morning hours led to the accumulation of aerosols produced by anthropogenic sources distributed over the Po Valley plain. Such aerosols include primary components such as black carbon (BC

  18. Aerosol typing - key information from aerosol studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mona, Lucia; Kahn, Ralph; Papagiannopoulos, Nikolaos; Holzer-Popp, Thomas; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol typing is a key source of aerosol information from ground-based and satellite-borne instruments. Depending on the specific measurement technique, aerosol typing can be used as input for retrievals or represents an output for other applications. Typically aerosol retrievals require some a priori or external aerosol type information. The accuracy of the derived aerosol products strongly depends on the reliability of these assumptions. Different sensors can make use of different aerosol type inputs. A critical review and harmonization of these procedures could significantly reduce related uncertainties. On the other hand, satellite measurements in recent years are providing valuable information about the global distribution of aerosol types, showing for example the main source regions and typical transport paths. Climatological studies of aerosol load at global and regional scales often rely on inferred aerosol type. There is still a high degree of inhomogeneity among satellite aerosol typing schemes, which makes the use different sensor datasets in a consistent way difficult. Knowledge of the 4d aerosol type distribution at these scales is essential for understanding the impact of different aerosol sources on climate, precipitation and air quality. All this information is needed for planning upcoming aerosol emissions policies. The exchange of expertise and the communication among satellite and ground-based measurement communities is fundamental for improving long-term dataset consistency, and for reducing aerosol type distribution uncertainties. Aerosol typing has been recognized as one of its high-priority activities of the AEROSAT (International Satellite Aerosol Science Network, http://aero-sat.org/) initiative. In the AEROSAT framework, a first critical review of aerosol typing procedures has been carried out. The review underlines the high heterogeneity in many aspects: approach, nomenclature, assumed number of components and parameters used for the

  19. Influence of aqueous chemistry on the chemical composition of fog water and interstitial aerosol in Fresno

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hwajin; Ge, Xinlei; Collier, Sonya; Xu, Jianzhong; Sun, Yele; Wang, Youliang; Herckes, Pierre; Zhang, Qi

    2015-04-01

    A measurement study was conducted in the Central Valley (Fresno) of California in January 2010, during which radiation fog events were frequently observed. Fog plays important roles in atmospheric chemistry by scavenging aerosol particles and trace gases and serving as a medium for various aqueous-phase reactions. Understanding the effects of fog on the microphysical and chemical processing of aerosol particles requires detailed information on their chemical composition. In this study, we characterized the chemical composition of fog water and interstitial aerosol particles to study the effects of fog processing on aerosol properties. Fog water samples were collected during the 2010 Fresno campaigns with a Caltech Active Strand Cloud water Collector (CASCC) while interstitial submicron aerosols were characterized in real time with an Aerodyne High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and a scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). The fog water samples were later analyzed using the HR-ToF-AMS, ion chromatography, and a total carbon analyzer. The chemical composition and characteristics of interstitial particles during the fog events were compared to those of dissolved inorganic and organic matter in fog waters. Compared to interstitial aerosols, fog water is composed of a higher fraction of ammonium nitrate and oxygenated organics, due to aqueous formation of secondary aerosol species as well as enhanced gas-to-particle partitioning of water soluble species under water rich conditions. Sulfate is formed most efficiently in fog water although its contribution to total dissolved mass is relatively low. The HR-ToF-AMS mass spectra of organic matter in fog water (FOM) are very similar to that of oxygenated organic aerosols (OOA) derived from positive matrix factorization (PMF) of the HR-ToF-AMS spectra of ambient aerosol (r2 = 0.96), but FOM appears to contain a large fraction of acidic functional groups than OOA. FOM is also enriched of

  20. Modeling Gas-phase Glyoxal and Associated Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation in a Megacity using WRF/Chem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Hodzic, A.; Barth, M. C.; Jimenez, J. L.; Volkamer, R.; Ervens, B.; Zhang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Organic aerosol (OA) as one of a major fine particulate matter in the atmosphere plays an important role in air pollution, human health, and climate forcing. OA is composed of directly emitted primary organic aerosol and chemically produced secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Despite much recent progress in understanding SOA formation, current air quality models cannot explain the magnitude and growth of atmospheric SOA, due to high uncertainties in sources, properties, and chemical reactions of precursors and formation pathways of SOA. Recent laboratory and modeling studies showed that glyoxal may serve as an important SOA precursor in the condensed solution of inorganic or organic aerosol particles (e.g., ammonium sulfate, fulvic acid, and amino acids). In this study, the Weather Research and Forecasting model with chemistry (WRF/Chem) is modified to account for the latest observed gas-phase yields of glyoxal from various volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and the associated SOA formation in the aqueous aerosol phase. The SOA formation in the aqueous aerosol phase is implemented using two approaches. In the first approach, two simplified parameterizations are used to represent the lumped particle-phase chemical processes under dark conditions and photochemical surface uptake. In the second approach, more detailed kinetic glyoxal reactions such as reversible glyoxal uptake, dimer formation of glyoxal, and oligomerization are treated and resolved explicitly. The updated WRF/Chem is assessed over the Mexico City and the surrounding region during March 2006 using the MILAGRO campaign data. Various observations such as organic matter from Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer and VOCs from Proton-transfer Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry were compared. The preliminary results showed that the addition of the SOA formation from glyoxal in aqueous particles brings SOA predictions into a better agreement with field observations, in particular in presence of high relative humidity

  1. PRINCIPLE OF SKEW QUADRUPOLE MODULATION TO MEASURE BETATRON COUPLING.

    SciTech Connect

    LUO.Y.PILAT,F.ROSER,T.ET AL.

    2004-07-05

    The measurement of the residual betatron coupling via skew quadrupole modulation is a new diagnostics technique that has been developed and tested at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) as a very promising method for the linear decoupling on the ramp. By modulating the strengths of different skew quadrupole families the two eigentunes are precisely measured with the phase lock loop system. The projections of the residual coupling coefficient onto the skew quadrupole coupling modulation directions are determined. The residual linear coupling could be corrected according to the measurement. An analytical solution for skew quadrupole modulation based on Hamiltonian perturbation approximation is given, and simulation code using smooth accelerator model is also developed. Some issues concerning the practical applications of this technique are discussed.

  2. Chemical characterization of springtime submicrometer aerosol in Po Valley, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saarikoski, S.; Carbone, S.; Decesari, S.; Giulianelli, L.; Angelini, F.; Canagaratna, M.; Ng, N. L.; Trimborn, A.; Facchini, M. C.; Fuzzi, S.; Hillamo, R.; Worsnop, D.

    2012-09-01

    The chemistry of submicron particles was investigated at San Pietro Capofiume (SPC) measurement station in the Po Valley, Italy, in spring 2008. The measurements were performed by using both off-line and on-line instruments. Organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon, organic acids and biomass burning tracers were measured off-line by using a 24-h PM1 filter sampling. More detailed particle chemistry was achieved by using a Aerodyne high resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and analyzing the data by positive matrix factorization (PMF). Oxalic acid had the highest concentrations of organic acids (campaign-average 97.4 ng m-3) followed by methane sulfonic, formic, malonic, and malic acids. Samples were also analyzed for glyoxylic, succinic, azelaic and maleic acids. In total, the nine acids composed 1.9 and 3.8% of OC and water-soluble OC, respectively (average), in terms of carbon atoms. Levoglucosan concentration varied from 17.7 to 495 ng m-3 with the concentration decreasing in the course of the campaign most likely due to the reduced use of domestic heating with wood. Six factors were found for organic aerosol (OA) at SPC by PMF: hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA), biomass burning OA (BBOA), nitrogen-containing OA (N-OA) and three different oxygenated OAs (OOA-a, OOA-b and OOA-c). Most of the OA mass was composed of OOA-a, HOA and OOA-c (26, 24 and 22%, respectively) followed by OOA-b (13%), BBOA (8%) and N-OA (7%). As expected, OOAs were the most oxygenated factors with organic matter:organic carbon (OM : OC) ratios ranging from 1.9 to 2.2. The diurnal variability of the aerosol chemical composition was greatly affected by the boundary layer meteorology. Specifically, the effect of the nocturnal layer break-up in morning hours was most evident for nitrate and N-OA indicating that these compounds originated mainly from the local sources in the Po Valley. For sulfate and OOA-a the concentration did not change during the break-up suggesting their

  3. Chemical characterization of springtime submicrometer aerosol in Po Valley, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saarikoski, S.; Carbone, S.; Decesari, S.; Giulianelli, L.; Angelini, F.; Teinilä, K.; Canagaratna, M.; Ng, N. L.; Trimborn, A.; Facchini, M. C.; Fuzzi, S.; Hillamo, R.; Worsnop, D.

    2012-03-01

    The chemistry of submicron particles was investigated at San Pietro Capofiume (SPC) measurement station in the Po Valley, Italy, in spring 2008. The measurements were performed by using both off-line and on-line instruments. Organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon, organic acids and biomass burning tracers were measured off-line by using a 24-h PM1 filter sampling. More detailed particle chemistry was achieved by using an Aerodyne high resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and analyzing the data by positive matrix factorization (PMF). Oxalic acid had the highest concentrations of organic acids (campaign-average 97.4 ng m-3) followed by methane sulfonic, formic, malonic, and malic acids. Samples were also analyzed for glyoxylic, succinic, azelaic and maleic acids. In total, the nine acids composed 1.9 and 3.8% of OC and water-soluble OC, respectively (average), in terms of carbon atoms. Levoglucosan concentration varied from 17.7 to 495 ng m-3 with the concentration decreasing in the course of the campaign most likely due to the reduced use of domestic heating with wood. Six factors were found for organic aerosol (OA) at SPC by PMF: hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA), biomass burning OA (BBOA), nitrogen-containing OA (N-OA) and three different oxygenated OAs (OOA-a, OOA-b and OOA-c). Most of the OA mass was composed of OOA-a, HOA and OOA-c (26, 24 and 22%, respectively) followed by OOA-b (13%), BBOA (8%) and N-OA (7%). As expected, OOAs were the most oxygenated factors with organic matter:organic carbon (OM:OC) ratios ranging from 1.9 to 2.2. The diurnal variability of the aerosol chemical composition was greatly affected by the boundary layer meteorology. Specifically, the effect of the nocturnal layer break-up in morning hours was most evident for nitrate and N-OA indicating that these compounds originated mainly from the local sources in the Po Valley. For sulfate and OOA-a the concentration did not change during the break-up suggesting their

  4. Thermal Analysis of the ILC Superconductin Quadrupole

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Ian; /Rose-Hulman Inst., Terre Haute /SLAC

    2006-09-13

    Critical to a particle accelerator's functioning, superconducting magnets serve to focus and aim the particle beam. The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) has received a prototype superconducting quadrupole designed and built by the Centro de Investigaciones Energ{acute e}ticas, Medioambientales y Tecnol{acute o}gicas (CIEMAT) to be evaluated for the International Linear Collider (ILC) project. To ensure proper functioning of the magnet, the device must be maintained at cryogenic temperatures by use of a cooling system containing liquid nitrogen and liquid helium. The cool down period of a low temperature cryostat is critical to the success of an experiment, especially a prototype setup such as this one. The magnet and the dewar each contain unique heat leaks and material properties. These differences can lead to tremendous thermal stresses. The system was analyzed mathematically, leading to ideal liquid helium and liquid nitrogen flow rates during the magnet's cool-down to 4.2 K, along with a reasonable estimate of how long this cool-down will take. With a flow rate of ten gaseous liters of liquid nitrogen per minute, the nitrogen shield will take approximately five hours to cool down to 77 K. With a gaseous helium flow rate of sixty liters per minute, the magnet will take at least nineteen hours to cool down to a temperature of 4.2 K.

  5. Quadrupole resonance spectroscopic study of narcotic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayner, Timothy J.; West, Rebecca; Garroway, Allen N.; Lyndquist, R.; Yesinowski, James P.

    1997-02-01

    Bulk narcotic detection systems based upon Quadrupole Resonance Analysis (QRA) technology have a major advantage over imaging technologies, in that QRA is chemical-specific and consequently has a lower rate of false alarms. QRA is a magnetic resonance technology which occurs as a result of the inherent molecular properties of the atomic nuclei in crystalline and amorphous solids. The QRA response is characterized by 1) the precessional frequency of the nucleus, and 2) the nature of the electric field gradient experienced by the nucleus,due to its molecular environment. Another important detection parameter is linewidth, resonant quality. All of these parameters depend on sample purity and manufacturing process. Quantum Magnetics recently carried out a study on the QRA signatures of various narcotic materials with the support of the US Army, US Customs, and the Office of National Drug Control Policy. The aim of the study was to fully characterize the variation in QRA spectroscopic parameters of different samples of cocaine base and cocaine hydrochloride. The results from this study ar discussed here.

  6. Adjustable rare earth quadrupole drift tube magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Feinberg, B.; Tanabe, J.; Halbach, K.; Koehler, G.; Green, M.I.

    1987-03-01

    A prototype permanent-magnet drift tube quadrupole with adjustable field strength has been constructed and tested. The magnet uses iron pole pieces to provide the required field shape along with rare earth permanent-magnet material (samarium cobalt) to energize the magnet. A unique feature of the configuration is the adjustability of the field, accomplished by rotating the outer rings consisting of permanent magnets and iron. In contrast with a previous prototype magnet, this new design uses ball bearings in place of slide bearings to eliminate potential failures. The rotation is now achieved with a bevel gear mechanism. The prototype design also incorporates a new drift tube shell vacuum seal to allow easy disassembly. Tests were made of the magnetic properties and the mechanical performance of this magnet. Field errors are extremely small, and the magnet passed an accelerated ten year lifetime test. It is planned to use this type of magnet to replace 24 of the SuperHILAC prestripper drift tubes.

  7. Autonomously Calibrating a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seungwon; Bornstein, Benjamin J.

    2009-01-01

    A computer program autonomously manages the calibration of a quadrupole ion mass spectrometer intended for use in monitoring concentrations and changes in concentrations of organic chemicals in the cabin air of the International Space Station. The instrument parameters calibrated include the voltage on a channel electron multiplier, a discriminator threshold, and an ionizer current. Calibration is achieved by analyzing the mass spectrum obtained while sweeping the parameter ranges in a heuristic procedure, developed by mass spectrometer experts, that involves detection of changes in signal trends that humans can easily recognize but cannot necessarily be straightforwardly codified in an algorithm. The procedure includes calculation of signal-to-noise ratios, signal-increase rates, and background-noise-increase rates; finding signal peaks; and identifying peak patterns. The software provides for several recovery-from-error scenarios and error-handling schemes. The software detects trace amounts of contaminant gases in the mass spectrometer and notifies associated command- and-data-handling software to schedule a cleaning. Furthermore, the software autonomously analyzes the mass spectrum to determine whether the parameters of a radio-frequency ramp waveform are set properly so that the peaks of the mass spectrum are at expected locations.

  8. Dynamics of a charged drop in a quadrupole electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sudip; Mayya, Y. S.; Thaokar, Rochish

    2015-07-01

    Quadrupole electric fields are commonly employed for confining charged conducting drops in Paul traps for studying Rayleigh instability characteristics. We investigate the effect of these fields on the deformation and stability characteristics of a charged liquid drop, using the axisymmetric boundary integral method (BIM). Different combinations of the amount of charge and strength of the electric field give rise to different equilibrium shapes. Interestingly, unlike in the case of uniform fields, stable oblate equilibrium drop shapes are sustained in quadrupole fields. In a positive endcap configuration of the quadrupole setup a drop carrying a small negative charge displays a transition from oblate to prolate as the field strength increases. On the other hand, for the case of a highly charged drop, a shift in the Rayleigh critical charge is observed in the presence of a weak quadrupole field. The Rayleigh instability displays imperfect transcritical bifurcation characteristics with respect to imposed prolate and oblate perturbations. Results are of significance in i) interpreting deformation and the Rayleigh stability effects using Paul traps with quadrupole fields, ii) designing more efficient quadrupole-field-based technologies for emulsification of water in oil.

  9. Characterization of near-highway submicron aerosols in New York City with a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y. L.; Zhang, Q.; Schwab, J. J.; Chen, W.-N.; Bae, M.-S.; Hung, H.-M.; Lin, Y.-C.; Ng, N. L.; Jayne, J.; Massoli, P.; Williams, L. R.; Demerjian, K. L.

    2012-02-01

    Knowledge of the variations of mass concentration, chemical composition and size distributions of submicron aerosols near roadways is of importance for reducing exposure assessment uncertainties in health effects studies. The goal of this study is to deploy and evaluate an Atmospheric Sciences Research Center-Mobile Laboratory (ASRC-ML), equipped with a suite of rapid response instruments for characterization of traffic plumes, adjacent to the Long Island Expressway (LIE) - a high-traffic highway in the New York City Metropolitan Area. In total, four measurement periods, two in the morning and two in the evening were conducted at a location approximately 30 m south of the LIE. The mass concentrations and size distributions of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1) species were measured in situ at a time resolution of 1 min by an Aerodyne High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer, along with rapid measurements (down to 1 Hz) of gaseous pollutants (e.g. HCHO, NO2, NO, O3, and CO2, etc.), black carbon (BC), and particle number concentrations and size distributions. Particulate organics varied dramatically during periods with high traffic influences from the nearby roadway. The variations were mainly observed in the hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA), a surrogate for primary OA from vehicle emissions. The inorganic species (sulfate, ammonium, and nitrate) and oxygenated OA (OOA) showed much smoother variations indicating minor impacts from traffic emissions. The concentration and chemical composition of NR-PM1 also varied differently on different days depending on meteorology, traffic intensity and vehicle types. Overall, organics dominated the traffic-related NR-PM1 composition (>60%) with HOA accounting for a major fraction of OA. The traffic-influenced organics showed two distinct modes in mass-weighted size distributions, peaking at ∼120 nm and 500 nm (vacuum aerodynamic diameter, Dva), respectively. OOA and inorganic species appear to be

  10. Aerosol mobility size spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jian; Kulkarni, Pramod

    2007-11-20

    A device for measuring aerosol size distribution within a sample containing aerosol particles. The device generally includes a spectrometer housing defining an interior chamber and a camera for recording aerosol size streams exiting the chamber. The housing includes an inlet for introducing a flow medium into the chamber in a flow direction, an aerosol injection port adjacent the inlet for introducing a charged aerosol sample into the chamber, a separation section for applying an electric field to the aerosol sample across the flow direction and an outlet opposite the inlet. In the separation section, the aerosol sample becomes entrained in the flow medium and the aerosol particles within the aerosol sample are separated by size into a plurality of aerosol flow streams under the influence of the electric field. The camera is disposed adjacent the housing outlet for optically detecting a relative position of at least one aerosol flow stream exiting the outlet and for optically detecting the number of aerosol particles within the at least one aerosol flow stream.

  11. AEROSOL AND GAS MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements provide fundamental information for evaluating and managing the impact of aerosols on air quality. Specific measurements of aerosol concentration and their physical and chemical properties are required by different users to meet different user-community needs. Befo...

  12. Aerosols and environmental pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colbeck, Ian; Lazaridis, Mihalis

    2010-02-01

    The number of publications on atmospheric aerosols has dramatically increased in recent years. This review, predominantly from a European perspective, summarizes the current state of knowledge of the role played by aerosols in environmental pollution and, in addition, highlights gaps in our current knowledge. Aerosol particles are ubiquitous in the Earth’s atmosphere and are central to many environmental issues; ranging from the Earth’s radiative budget to human health. Aerosol size distribution and chemical composition are crucial parameters that determine their dynamics in the atmosphere. Sources of aerosols are both anthropogenic and natural ranging from vehicular emissions to dust resuspension. Ambient concentrations of aerosols are elevated in urban areas with lower values at rural sites. A comprehensive understanding of aerosol ambient characteristics requires a combination of measurements and modeling tools. Legislation for ambient aerosols has been introduced at national and international levels aiming to protect human health and the environment.

  13. Aerosols and environmental pollution.

    PubMed

    Colbeck, Ian; Lazaridis, Mihalis

    2010-02-01

    The number of publications on atmospheric aerosols has dramatically increased in recent years. This review, predominantly from a European perspective, summarizes the current state of knowledge of the role played by aerosols in environmental pollution and, in addition, highlights gaps in our current knowledge. Aerosol particles are ubiquitous in the Earth's atmosphere and are central to many environmental issues; ranging from the Earth's radiative budget to human health. Aerosol size distribution and chemical composition are crucial parameters that determine their dynamics in the atmosphere. Sources of aerosols are both anthropogenic and natural ranging from vehicular emissions to dust resuspension. Ambient concentrations of aerosols are elevated in urban areas with lower values at rural sites. A comprehensive understanding of aerosol ambient characteristics requires a combination of measurements and modeling tools. Legislation for ambient aerosols has been introduced at national and international levels aiming to protect human health and the environment.

  14. Aerosol mass spectrometry: particle-vaporizer interactions and their consequences for the measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewnick, F.; Diesch, J.-M.; Faber, P.; Borrmann, S.

    2015-09-01

    The Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) is a frequently used instrument for on-line measurement of the ambient sub-micron aerosol composition. With the help of calibrations and a number of assumptions on the flash vaporization and electron impact ionization processes, this instrument provides robust quantitative information on various non-refractory ambient aerosol components. However, when measuring close to certain anthropogenic or marine sources of semi-refractory aerosols, several of these assumptions may not be met and measurement results might easily be incorrectly interpreted if not carefully analyzed for unique ions, isotope patterns, and potential slow vaporization associated with semi-refractory species. Here we discuss various aspects of the interaction of aerosol particles with the AMS tungsten vaporizer and the consequences for the measurement results: semi-refractory components - i.e., components that vaporize but do not flash-vaporize at the vaporizer and ionizer temperatures, like metal halides (e.g., chlorides, bromides or iodides of Al, Ba, Cd, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, Na, Pb, Sr, Zn) - can be measured semi-quantitatively despite their relatively slow vaporization from the vaporizer. Even though non-refractory components (e.g., NH4NO3 or (NH4)2SO4) vaporize quickly, under certain conditions their differences in vaporization kinetics can result in undesired biases in ion collection efficiency in thresholded measurements. Chemical reactions with oxygen from the aerosol flow can have an influence on the mass spectra for certain components (e.g., organic species). Finally, chemical reactions of the aerosol with the vaporizer surface can result in additional signals in the mass spectra (e.g., WO2Cl2-related signals from particulate Cl) and in conditioning or contamination of the vaporizer, with potential memory effects influencing the mass spectra of subsequent measurements. Laboratory experiments that investigate these particle-vaporizer interactions are

  15. Commissioning of helium injector for coupled radio frequency quadrupole and separated function radio frequency quadrupole accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Shixiang Chen, Jia; Ren, Haitao; Zhao, Jie; Xu, Yuan; Zhang, Tao; Xia, Wenlong; Gao, Shuli; Wang, Zhi; Luo, Yuting; Guo, Zhiyu; Zhang, Ailing; Chen, Jia'er

    2014-02-15

    A project to study a new type of acceleration structure has been launched at Peking University, in which a traditional radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and a separated function radio frequency quadrupole are coupled in one cavity to accelerate the He+ beam. A helium injector for this project is developed. The injector consists of a 2.45 GHz permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance ion source and a 1.16 m long low energy beam transport (LEBT). The commissioning of this injector was carried out and an onsite test was held in June 2013. A 14 mA He+ beam with the energy of 30 keV has been delivered to the end of the LEBT, where a diaphragm with the diameter of 7 mm is located. The position of the diaphragm corresponds to the entrance of the RFQ electrodes. The beam emittance and fraction were measured after the 7 mm diaphragm. Its rms emittance is about 0.14 π mm mrad and the fraction of He+ is about 99%.

  16. Commissioning of helium injector for coupled radio frequency quadrupole and separated function radio frequency quadrupole accelerator.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shixiang; Chen, Jia; Ren, Haitao; Zhao, Jie; Xu, Yuan; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Ailing; Xia, Wenlong; Gao, Shuli; Wang, Zhi; Luo, Yuting; Guo, Zhiyu; Chen, Jia'er

    2014-02-01

    A project to study a new type of acceleration structure has been launched at Peking University, in which a traditional radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and a separated function radio frequency quadrupole are coupled in one cavity to accelerate the He+ beam. A helium injector for this project is developed. The injector consists of a 2.45 GHz permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance ion source and a 1.16 m long low energy beam transport (LEBT). The commissioning of this injector was carried out and an onsite test was held in June 2013. A 14 mA He+ beam with the energy of 30 keV has been delivered to the end of the LEBT, where a diaphragm with the diameter of 7 mm is located. The position of the diaphragm corresponds to the entrance of the RFQ electrodes. The beam emittance and fraction were measured after the 7 mm diaphragm. Its rms emittance is about 0.14 π mm mrad and the fraction of He+ is about 99%.

  17. Aerosol distribution apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, W.D.

    An apparatus for uniformly distributing an aerosol to a plurality of filters mounted in a plenum, wherein the aerosol and air are forced through a manifold system by means of a jet pump and released into the plenum through orifices in the manifold. The apparatus allows for the simultaneous aerosol-testing of all the filters in the plenum.

  18. Improved solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

    1988-07-19

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

  19. Solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, Donald S.; Schober, Robert K.; Beller, John

    1992-01-01

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates.

  20. Solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

    1992-03-17

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration is disclosed. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

  1. Photochemistry of Glyoxal in Wet Aerosols: Smog Chamber Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Y. B.; Kim, H.; Turpin, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Aqueous chemistry is an important pathway for the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Reaction vessel studies provide evidence that in the aqueous phase photooxidation of water soluble organic compounds (e.g., glyoxal, methylglyoxal) form multifunctional organic products and oligomers. In this work, we extend this bulk-phase chemistry to the condensed-phase chemistry that occurs in/on aerosols by conducting smog chamber experiments — photooxidation of ammonium sulfate and sulfuric acid aerosols containing glyoxal and hydrogen peroxide in the presence of NOx under dry/humid conditions. Particles were analyzed using ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS). In the irradiated chamber, photooxidation products of glyoxal as seen in reaction vessel experiments (e.g., oxalic acids and tartaric acids) were also formed in both ammonium sulfate aerosols and sulfuric acid aerosols at humid and even dry conditions. However, the major products were organosulfurs (CHOS), organonitrogens (CHON), and nitrooxy-organosulfates (CHONS), which were also dominantly formed in the dark chamber. These products were formed via non-radical reactions, which depend on acidity and humidity. However, the real-time profiles in the dark chamber and the irradiated chamber were very different, suggesting photochemistry substantially affects non-radical formation in the condensed phase.

  2. Carbonaceous aerosols in the Western Mediterranean during summertime and their contribution to the aerosol optical properties at ground level: First results of the ChArMEx-ADRIMED 2013 intensive campaign in Corsica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciare, Jean; Dulac, Francois; Feron, Anais; Crenn, Vincent; Sarda Esteve, Roland; Baisnee, Dominique; Bonnaire, Nicolas; Hamonou, Eric; Mallet, Marc; Lambert, Dominique; Nicolas, Jose B.; Bourrianne, Thierry; Petit, Jean-Eudes; Favez, Olivier; Canonaco, Francesco; Prevot, Andre; Mocnik, Grisa; Drinovec, Luka; Marpillat, Alexandre; Serrie, Wilfrid

    2014-05-01

    As part of the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx, http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr/), the CORSiCA (http://www.obs-mip.fr/corsica) and the ANR-ADRIMED programs, a large set of real-time measurements of carbonaceous aerosols was deployed in June 2013 at the Cape Corsica atmospheric supersite (http://gaw.empa.ch/gawsis/reports.asp?StationID=2076203042). Submicron organic aerosols (OA) were monitored every 30 min using an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM; Aerodyne Res. Inc. MA, USA); Fine (PM2.5) Organic Carbon (OC) and Elemental Carbon (EC) were measured every 2h using an OCEC Sunset Field Instrument (Sunset Lab, OR, USA) and every 12h using a low-vol (Leckel) filter sampler running at 2.3m3/h. Equivalent Black Carbon (BC) was monitored using two Aethalometers (models AE31 and AE33, Magee Scientific, US & Aerosol d.o.o., Slovenia) and a MAAP instrument (Thermo). Quality control of this large dataset was performed through chemical mass closure studies (using co-located SMPS and TEOM-FDMS) and direct comparisons with other real-time instruments running in parallel (Particle-Into-Liquid-Sampler-Ion-Chromatograph for ions, filter sampling, ...). Source apportionment of OA was then performed using the SourceFinder software (SoFi v4.5, http://www.psi.ch/acsm-stations/me-2) allowing the distinction between hydrogen- and oxygen-like organic aerosols (HOA and OOA, respectively) and highlighting the major contribution of secondary OA in the Western Mediterranean during summer. Using this time-resolved chemical information, reconstruction of the optical aerosol properties were performed and compared with integrating nephelometer (Model 3563, TSI, US) and photoacoustic extinctiometer (PAX, DMT, US) measurements performed in parallel. Results of these different closure studies (chemical/physical/optical) are presented and discussed here in details. They highlight the central role of carbonaceous aerosols on the optical properties of aerosols at ground level

  3. Influences of upwind emission sources and atmospheric processing on aerosol chemistry and properties at a rural location in the Northeastern U.S.

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, Shan; Collier, Sonya; Xu, Jianzhong; Mei, Fan; Wang, Jian; Lee, Yin -Nan; Sedlacek, III, Arthur J.; Springston, Stephen R.; Sun, Yele; Zhang, Qi

    2016-05-19

    Continuous real-time measurements of atmospheric aerosol with an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer coupled with a fast temperature-stepping thermodenuder were carried out in summer 2011 at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL, 40.871°N, 72.89°W) during the Department of Energy Aerosol Life Cycle Intensive Operational Period campaign. BNL was frequently downwind of emissions from the New York metropolitan area and was exposed to various combinations of anthropogenic, biogenic, and marine emissions based on air mass history. The average concentration of submicrometer aerosol (PM1) during this study was 12.6 µg m–3 with 64% of the mass being organic. Organic aerosol (OA) at BNLmore » was found to be overwhelmingly secondary, consisting of (1) a fresher, semivolatile oxygenated organic aerosol (SV-OOA; oxygen-to-carbon ratio (O/C) = 0.54; 63% of OA mass) that was strongly influenced by transported urban plumes; (2) a regional, more aged, low-volatility OOA (LV-OOA; O/C = 0.97; 29% of OA mass) influenced by aqueous-phase processing; and (3) a nitrogen-enriched OA (NOA; nitrogen-to-carbon ratio (N/C) = 0.185; 8% of OA mass) likely composed of amine salts formed from acid-base reactions in industrial emissions. Urban emissions from the New York metropolitan areas to the W and SW in particular led to elevated PM1 mass concentration and altered aerosol composition at BNL. Transported urban plumes and local biogenic emissions likely interacted to enhance secondary organic aerosol production, primarily represented by SV-OOA. Lastly, these results suggest an important role that urban anthropogenic emissions play in affecting ambient PM concentration, composition, and physical-chemical properties at rural areas in the Northeast U.S.« less

  4. Chemical characterization of submicron aerosol and particle growth events at a national background site (3295 m a.s.l.) on the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, W.; Sun, Y. L.; Xu, Y. S.; Jiang, Q.; Wang, Q. Q.; Yang, W.; Wang, F.; Bai, Z. P.; Zhao, X. D.; Yang, Y. C.

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric aerosols exert highly uncertain impacts on radiative forcing and also have detrimental effects on human health. While aerosol particles are widely characterized in megacities in China, aerosol composition, sources and particle growth in rural areas in the Tibetan Plateau remain less understood. Here we present the results from an autumn study that was conducted from 5 September to 15 October 2013 at a national background monitoring station (3295 m a.s.l.) in the Tibetan Plateau. The submicron aerosol composition and particle number size distributions were measured in situ with an Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) and a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). The average mass concentration of submicron aerosol (PM1) is 11.4 μg m-3 (range: 1.0-78.4 μg m-3) for the entire study, which is much lower than observed at urban and rural sites in eastern China. Organics dominated PM1, accounting for 43 % on average, followed by sulfate (28 %) and ammonium (11 %). Positive Matrix Factorization analysis of ACSM organic aerosol (OA) mass spectra identified an oxygenated OA (OOA) and a biomass burning OA (BBOA). The OOA dominated OA composition, accounting for 85 % on average, 17 % of which was inferred from aged BBOA. The BBOA contributed a considerable fraction of OA (15 %) due to the burning of cow dung and straw in September. New particle formation and growth events were frequently observed (80 % of time) throughout the study. The average particle growth rate is 2.0 nm h-1 (range: 0.8-3.2 nm h-1). By linking the evolution of particle number size distribution to aerosol composition, we found an elevated contribution of organics during particle growth periods and also a positive relationship between the growth rate and the fraction of OOA in OA, which potentially indicates an important role of organics in particle growth in the Tibetan Plateau.

  5. Chemical composition, sources and evolution processes of aerosol at an urban site in Yangtze River Delta, China during wintertime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunjiang; Tang, Lili; Yu, Hongxia; Wang, Zhuang; Sun, Yele; Qin, Wei; Chen, Wentai; Chen, Changhong; Ding, Aijun; Wu, Jing; Ge, Shun; Chen, Cheng; Zhou, Hong-cang

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the composition, sources and evolution processes of submicron aerosol during wintertime, a field experiment was conducted during December 1-31, 2013 in urban Nanjing, a megacity in Yangtze River Delta of China. Non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1) species were measured with an Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor. NR-PM1 is dominated by secondary inorganic aerosol (55%) and organic aerosol (OA, 42%) during haze periods. Six OA components were identified by positive matrix factorization of the OA mass spectra. The hydrocarbon-like OA and cooking-related OA represent the local traffic and cooking sources, respectively. A highly oxidized factor related to biomass burning OA accounted for 15% of the total OA mass during haze periods. Three types of oxygenated OA (OOA), i.e., a less-oxidized OOA (LO-OOA), a more-oxidized OOA (MO-OOA), and a low-volatility OOA (LV-OOA), were identified. LO-OOA is likely associated with fresh urban secondary OA. MO-OOA likely represents photochemical products showing a similar diurnal cycle to nitrate with a pronounced noon peak. LV-OOA appears to be a more oxidized factor with a pronounced noon peak. The OA composition is dominated by secondary species, especially during haze events. LO-OOA, MO-OOA and LV-OOA on average account for 11%, (18%), 24% (21%) and 23% (18%) of the total OA mass for the haze (clean) periods respectively. Analysis of meteorological influence suggested that regional transport from the northern and southeastern areas of the city is responsible for large secondary and low-volatility aerosol formation.

  6. The Influence of Urban Emissions on Background Aerosols and Trace Gases in Amazonia as Seen in the GoAmazon2014/2015 Experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artaxo, P.; Martin, S. T.; Barbosa, H. M.; Brito, J.; Carbone, S.; Rizzo, L. V.; Andreae, M. O.; Pöhlker, C.; Souza, R. A. F. D.

    2015-12-01

    As part of the GoAmazon2014/2015 experiment, several aerosol and trace gas monitoring stations are being operated for two years before and after the Manaus urban plume in Central Amazonia. Three sites are being operated in pristine conditions, with atmospheric properties under natural biogenic conditions. These three sites named T0 are ATTO (Amazon Tall Tower Observatory), ZF2 and EMBRAPA. After the air masses are exposed to the Manaus plume, one site (called T2) is being operated under the direct influence of the Manaus plume at 5 Km downwind. Finally, at about 150 Km downwind of Manaus is the T3 Manacapuru site. Aerosol chemical composition is being analysed using filters for fine (PM2.5) and coarse mode aerosol as well as three Aerodyne ACSM (Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitors) instruments. Optical properties were measured with several AE33 aethalometers and MAAP, and multi wavelengths nephelometers. Aerosol size distribution is determined using scanning mobility particle sizers. The aerosol column is measures using AERONET sunphotometers before and after the Manaus plume, as well as several Lidar systems. The three sites before the Manaus plume show remarkable similar variability in aerosol concentrations and optical properties. This pattern is very different at the T2 site, with large aerosol concentrations enhancing aerosol absorption and scattering significantly as a result of the Manaus pollution plume. The aerosol is very oxidized before being exposed to the Manaus plume, and this pattern changes significantly for T2 and T3 sites, with a much higher presence of less oxidized aerosol. Typical ozone concentrations at mid-day before Manaus plume is a low 10-12 ppb, value that changes to 50-70 ppb for air masses suffering the influence of Manaus plume. Aerosol size distribution also change significantly, with stronger presence of nucleation mode particles. A detailed comparison of aerosol characteristics and composition for the several sites will be

  7. Aerosol interactions between the surface and the atmosphere: Urban fluxes, forest canopy vertical exchange, and wintertime urban patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grivicke, Rasa

    Atmospheric aerosols play a major role in regional atmospheric chemistry and air quality, while on a global scale, aerosol processes continue to represent the largest source of uncertainty related to climate change. An important aspect of understanding the role of aerosols in these areas is to document the vertical exchange of aerosols with the surface in both urban and rural landscapes since the vertical exchange represents important sources and sinks of aerosols on regional and global scales. In this dissertation, investigation of aerosol dynamics is described for three separate field studies. First, urban eddy covariance flux measurements were made from a building rooftop in Mexico City using a quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer (Q-AMS) to determine the fluxes of aerosol species to/from the urban landscape. Second, conditional sampling of fine particles in updrafts and downdrafts was performed above a pine forest in Colorado using a thermal desorption chemical ionization mass spectrometer (TD-CIMS) to investigate the relative strengths of sources and sinks for speciated aerosol in a forest environment. Third, the aerosol and gas phase pollutant patterns, measured in Boise, ID during wintertime inversion conditions, were analyzed with respect to the daily evolution of the planetary boundary layer depth and surface meteorological conditions. This dissertation describes the methods used for each of the three studies and summarizes the analysis of the results.

  8. Diurnal Evolution of Aerosol Optical Properties and Morphology at Pico Tres Padres: A Phenomenological Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzoleni, C.; Chakrabarty, R.; Dubey, M. K.; Moosmuller, H.; Chylek, P.; Onasch, T. B.; Herndon, S.; Zavala, M.; Kolb, C.

    2007-05-01

    Aerosol optical properties affect planetary radiative balance and therefore climate. The optical properties are related to chemical composition, size distribution, and morphology, which also have implications for human health and environmental degradation. During the MILAGRO field campaign, we measured ensemble aerosol absorption and angle-integrated scattering in Mexico City. These measurements were performed using the Los Alamos aerosol photoacoustic instrument with an integrated nephelometer (LAPA) operating at 781 nm. The LAPA was mounted on-board the Aerodyne Inc. mobile laboratory, which hosted a wide variety of gaseous and aerosol instruments. During the campaign, the Aerodyne mobile laboratory was moved to different sites, capturing the influence of spatial and temporal parameters including location, aging, elevation, and sources on ambient air pollution. The LAPA operated almost continuously between the 3rd and the 28th of March 2006. During the same period we collected ambient aerosols on more than 100 Nuclepore filters for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. Filter samples were collected during specific pollution events and different times of the day. Subsequently, SEM images of selected filters were taken to study particle morphology. The elemental composition of a few individual particles was also qualitatively assessed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Between March 7th and 19th the laboratory was sampling air close to the top of the Pico Tres Padres, a ~3000 m high mountain on the north side of the Mexico City. Daily changes of aerosol loading and pollutant concentrations followed the expected diurnal variations of the boundary layer height. Here we report a preliminary analysis of aerosol absorption, scattering, and morphology at Pico Tres Padres for three specific days (9th, 11th and 12th of March 2006). The single scattering albedo (ratio of scattering to total extinction) during these three days showed a characteristic drop in the

  9. Higher order parametric excitation modes for spaceborne quadrupole mass spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Gershman, D. J.; Block, B. P.; Rubin, M.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Benna, M.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2011-12-15

    This paper describes a technique to significantly improve upon the mass peak shape and mass resolution of spaceborne quadrupole mass spectrometers (QMSs) through higher order auxiliary excitation of the quadrupole field. Using a novel multiresonant tank circuit, additional frequency components can be used to drive modulating voltages on the quadrupole rods in a practical manner, suitable for both improved commercial applications and spaceflight instruments. Auxiliary excitation at frequencies near twice that of the fundamental quadrupole RF frequency provides the advantages of previously studied parametric excitation techniques, but with the added benefit of increased sensed excitation amplitude dynamic range and the ability to operate voltage scan lines through the center of upper stability islands. Using a field programmable gate array, the amplitudes and frequencies of all QMS signals are digitally generated and managed, providing a robust and stable voltage control system. These techniques are experimentally verified through an interface with a commercial Pfeiffer QMG422 quadrupole rod system. When operating through the center of a stability island formed from higher order auxiliary excitation, approximately 50% and 400% improvements in 1% mass resolution and peak stability were measured, respectively, when compared with traditional QMS operation. Although tested with a circular rod system, the presented techniques have the potential to improve the performance of both circular and hyperbolic rod geometry QMS sensors.

  10. Theoretical investigation of flute modes in a magnetic quadrupole

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, H.S.

    1988-01-01

    This research developed theories and conducted numerical investigations of electrostatic flute modes in a plasma confined in a magnetic quadrupole. Chapter I presents the discussion of relevant background. Chapter II contains a brief discussion of the basic flute-mode operator L{sub 0} for intermediate- and low-frequency regimes. Chapter III develops a simple theory for a flute mode with frequency between the electron and ion bounce frequencies in the uniform density and temperature regions of a magnetic quadrupole. The frequency is predicted to be inversely proportional to the wave number. Chapter IV describes the kinetic approach. Chapter V contains the derivation of an eigenvalue equation for electrostatic waves with frequencies below the ion frequency in the private flux region of a magnetic quadrupole. Chapter VI develops a theory for electrostatic waves with frequency below the ion bounce frequency in the shared flux region of a magnetic quadrupole. Chapter VII contains the derivation of a dispersion equation for flute modes with frequencies between the electron and ion bounce frequencies in a plasma confined to a magnetic quadrupole. Chapter VIII presents a summary of the research described.

  11. Theoretical investigation of flute modes in a magnetic quadrupole

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, H.S.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop theories and conduct numerical investigations of electrostatic flute modes in a plasma confined in magnetic quadrupole. Chapter I presents the discussion of relevant background. Chapter II contains a brief discussion of the basic flute-mode operator L{sub 0} for intermediate- and low frequency regimes. Chapter III develops a simple theory for a flute mode with frequency between the electron and ion bounce frequencies in the uniform density and temperature regions of a magnetic quadrupole. Chapter IV describes the kinetic approach. Chapter V contains the derivation of an eigenvalue equation for electrostatic waves with frequencies below the ion frequency in the private flux region of a magnetic quadrupole. Chapter VI develops a theory for electrostatic waves with frequency below the ion bounce frequency in the shared flux region of a magnetic quadrupole. Chapter VII contains the derivation of a dispersion equation for flute modes with frequencies between the electron and ion ounce frequencies in a plasma confined to a magnetic quadrupole. Two intermediate-frequency modes are predicted.

  12. Aerodyne Research mobile infrared methane monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmanus, J. B.; Kebabian, P. L.; Kolb, C. E.

    1991-01-01

    An improved real-time methane monitor based on infrared absorption of the 3.39 micron line of a HeNe laser is described. Real time in situ measurement of methane has important applications in stratospheric and tropospheric chemistry, especially when high accuracy measurements can be made rapidly, providing fine spatial-scale information. The methane instrument provides 5 ppb resolution in a 1 sec averaging time. A key feature in this instrument is the use of magnetic (Zeeman) broadening to achieve continuous tunability with constant output power over a range of 0.017/cm. The instruments optical absorption path length is 47 m through sampled air held at 50 torr in a multipass cell of the Herriott (off-axis resonator) type. A microprocessor controls laser frequency and amplitude and collects data with minimal operator attention. The instrument recently has been used to measure methane emissions from a variety of natural and artificial terrestrial sources.

  13. Aerosol composition, chemistry, and source characterization during the 2008 VOCALS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.; Springston, S.; Jayne, J.; Wang, J.; Senum, G.; Hubbe, J.; Alexander, L.; Brioude, J.; Spak, S.; Mena-Carrasco, M.; Kleinman, L.; Daum, P.

    2010-03-15

    Chemical composition of fine aerosol particles over the northern Chilean coastal waters was determined onboard the U.S. DOE G-1 aircraft during the VOCALS (VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study) field campaign between October 16 and November 15, 2008. SO42-, NO3-, NH4+, and total organics (Org) were determined using an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer, and SO42-, NO3-, NH4+, Na+, Cl-, CH3SO3-, Mg2+, Ca2+, and K+ were determined using a particle-into-liquid sampler-ion chromatography technique. The results show the marine boundary layer (MBL) aerosol mass was dominated by non- sea-salt SO42- followed by Na+, Cl-, Org, NO3-, and NH4+, in decreasing importance; CH3SO3-, Ca2+, and K+ rarely exceeded their respective limits of detection. The SO42- aerosols were strongly acidic as the equivalent NH4+ to SO42- ratio was only {approx}0.25 on average. NaCl particles, presumably of sea-salt origin, showed chloride deficits but retained Cl- typically more than half the equivalency of Na+, and are externally mixed with the acidic sulfate aerosols. Nitrate was observed only on sea-salt particles, consistent with adsorption of HNO3 on sea-salt aerosols, responsible for the Cl- deficit. Dust particles appeared to play a minor role, judging from the small volume differences between that derived from the observed mass concentrations and that calculated based on particle size distributions. Because SO42- concentrations were substantial ({approx}0.5 - {approx}3 {micro}g/m3) with a strong gradient (highest near the shore), and the ocean-emitted dimethylsulfide and its unique oxidation product, CH3SO3-, were very low (i.e., {le} 40 parts per trillion and <0.05 {micro}g/m3, respectively), the observed SO42- aerosols are believed to be primarily of terrestrial origin. Back trajectory calculations indicate sulfur emissions from smelters and power plants along coastal regions of Peru and Chile are the main sources of these SO4- aerosols. However, compared to observations, model

  14. Ambient Observations of Organic Nitrogen Compounds in Submicrometer Aerosols in New York Using High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, S.; Ge, X.; Xu, J.; Sun, Y.; Zhang, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Organic nitrogen (ON) compounds, which include amines, nitriles, organic nitrates, amides, and N-containing aromatic heterocycles, are an important class of compounds ubiquitously detected in atmospheric particles and fog and cloud droplets. Previous studies indicate that these compounds can make up a significant fraction (20-80%) of the total nitrogen (N) content in atmospheric condensed phases and play important roles in new particle formation and growth and affecting the optical and hygroscopicity of aerosols. In this study, we report the observation of ON compounds in submicrometer particles (PM1) at two locations in New York based on measurements using Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). One study was conducted as part of the US Department of Energy funded Aerosol Lifecyle - Intensive Operation Period (ALC-IOP) campaign at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL, 40.871˚N, 72.89˚W) in summer, 2011 and the other was conducted at the Queen's College (QC) in New York City (NYC) in summer, 2009. We observed a notable amount of N-containing organic fragment ions, CxHyNp+ and CxHyOzNp+, in the AMS spectra of organic aerosols at both locations and found that they were mainly associated with amino functional groups. Compared with results from lab experiments, the C3H8N+ at m/z = 58 was primarily attributed to trimethylamine. In addition, a significant amount of organonitrates was observed at BNL. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis of the high resolution mass spectra (HRMS) of organic aerosols identified a unique nitrogen-enriched OA (NOA) factor with elevated nitrogen-to-carbon (N/C) at both BNL and QC. Analysis of the size distributions, volatility profiles, and correlations with external tracer indicates that acid-base reactions of amino compounds with sulfate and acidic gas were mainly responsible for the formation of amine salts. Photochemical production was also observed to play a role in the formation of NOA. Bivariate polar

  15. Chemical composition, sources, and processes of urban aerosols during summertime in Northwest China: insights from High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Zhang, Q.; Chen, M.; Ge, X.; Ren, J.; Qin, D.

    2014-06-01

    An aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was deployed along with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) and a Multi Angle Absorption Photometers (MAAP) to measure the temporal variations of the mass loading, chemical composition, and size distribution of sub-micrometer particulate matter (PM1) in Lanzhou, northwest China, during 12 July-7 August 2012. The average PM1 mass concentration including non-refractory PM1 (NR-PM1) measured by HR-ToF-AMS and black carbon (BC) measured by MAAP during this study was 24.5 μg m-3 (ranging from 0.86 to 105μg m-3), with a mean composition consisting of 47% organics, 16% sulfate, 12% BC, 11% ammonium, 10% nitrate, and 4% chloride. The organics was consisted of 70% carbon, 21% oxygen, 8% hydrogen, and 1% nitrogen, with the average oxygen-to-carbon ratio (O / C) of 0.33 and organic mass-to-carbon ratio (OM / OC) of 1.58. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) of the high-resolution mass spectra of organic aerosols (OA) identified four distinct factors which represent, respectively, two primary OA (POA) emission sources (traffic and food cooking) and two secondary OA (SOA) types - a fresher, semi-volatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA) and a more aged, low-volatility oxygenated OA (LV-OOA). Traffic-related hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and BC displayed distinct diurnal patterns both with peak at ~07:00-11:00 (BJT: UTC +8) corresponding to the morning rush hours, while cooking OA (COA) peaked during three meal periods. The diurnal profiles of sulfate and LV-OOA displayed a broad peak between ∼07:00-15:00, while those of nitrate, ammonium, and SV-OOA showed a narrower peak at ~08:00-13:00. The later morning and early afternoon peak in the diurnal profiles of secondary aerosol species was likely caused by mixing down of pollutants aloft, which were likely produced in the residual layer decoupled from the boundary layer during night time. The mass spectrum of SV-OOA also showed similarity with that of

  16. On the Interpretation of Oxygenated Organic Aerosols (and their Subtypes) Arising from Factor Analysis of Aerosol Mass Spectrometer Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, J. L.; Zhang, Q.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Ulbrich, I. M.; Ng, N. L.; Aiken, A. C.; Decarlo, P. F.; Kroll, J.; Mohr, C.; Allan, J. D.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2008-12-01

    Zhang et al. (ES&T 2005; ACP 2005) first performed factor analysis (FA) of Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) complete organic aerosol (OA) mass spectra. This study showed that an oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) factor accounted for 2/3 of the OA mass at an urban site in Pittsburgh and strongly linked OOA to secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Many subsequent studies and the application of more powerful solution algorithms such as Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) to the same FA problem have demonstrated the importance of OOA at most locations (e.g. Volkamer et al., GRL, 2006; Zhang et al., GRL, 2007; Lanz et al., ACP, 2007 and ES&T, 2008; Ulbrich et al., ACPD, 2008). Multiple studies have also identified several subtypes of OOA (e.g. OOA-1 and OOA-2). This type of analysis offers new insights because it provides some chemical resolution on the total OA mass with high time and size resolution, and bypasses the limitations of techniques that only analyze tracers and which may favor more reduced species. However the chemical resolution is limited and careful interpretation of the FA output is required, including the use of database spectra, time series of external tracers, tracer ratios, back-trajectory analyses, size- distribution analyses, etc. This presentation will address the interpretation of total OOA and its subfactors across a large range of locations in urban, suburban, rural, remote, and forested areas, and will compare with the results of other source apportionment techniques. Based on data from multiple datasets we conclude that (1) anthropogenic SOA in and downwind of urban areas is an important source of OOA; (2) motor vehicles, meat cooking, and trash burning are unlikely to be sources of primary OOA; (3) SOA from biogenic and biomass burning precursors are also clear sources of OOA; (4) primary biomass burning OA (P-BBOA) typically shows significant differences with ambient OOA factors; (5) heterogeneous oxidation of urban POA may give rise to

  17. Demonstration of a VUV lamp photoionization source for improvedorganic speciation in an aerosol mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Northway, M.J.; Jayne, J.T.; Toohey, D.W.; Canagaratna, M.R.; Trimborn, A.; Akiyama, K-I.; Shimono, A.; Jimenez, J.L.; DeCarlo, P.F.; Wilson, K.R.; Worsnop, D.R.

    2007-10-03

    In recent years, the Aerodyne AerosolMass Spectrometer(AMS) has become a widely used tool for determining aerosol sizedistributions and chemical composition for non-refractory inorganic andorganic aerosol. The current version of the AMS uses a combination offlash thermal vaporization and 70 eV electron impact (EI) ionization.However, EI causes extensive fragmentation and mass spectra of organicaerosols are difficult to deconvolute because they are composites of theoverlapping fragmentation patterns of all species present. Previous AMSstudies have been limited to classifying organics in broad categoriessuch as oxidized and hydrocarbon-like." In this manuscript we present newefforts to gain more information about organic aerosol composition byemploying the softer technique of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) ionization ina Time-of-Flight AMS (ToF-AMS). In our novel design a VUV lamp is placedin direct proximity of the ionization region of the AMS, with only awindow separating the lamp and the ionizer. This design allows foralternation of photoionization and electron impact ionization within thesame instrument on the timescale of minutes. Thus, the EI-basedquantification capability of the AMS is retained while improved spectralinterpretation is made possible by combined analysis of the complementaryVUV and EI ionization spectra. Photoionization and electron impactionization spectra are compared for a number of compounds including oleicacid, long chain hydrocarbons, and cigarette smoke. In general, the VUVspectra contain much less fragmentation than the EI spectra and for manycompounds the parent ion is the dominant ion in the VUV spectrum. As anexample of the usefulness of the integration of PI within the fullcapability of the ToF-AMS, size distributions and size-segregated massspectra are examined for the cigarette smoke analysis. As a finalevaluation of the new VUV module, spectra for oleic acid are compared tosimilar experiments conducted using the tunable VUV radiation

  18. Mass spectra deconvolution of low, medium, and high volatility biogenic secondary organic aerosol.

    PubMed

    Kostenidou, Evangelia; Lee, Byong-Hyoek; Engelhart, Gabriella J; Pierce, Jeffrey R; Pandis, Spyros N

    2009-07-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) consists of compounds with a wide range of volatilities and its ambient concentration is sensitive to this volatility distribution. Recent field studies have shown that the typical mass spectrum of ambient oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) as measured by the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) is quite different from the SOA mass spectra reported in smog chamber experiments. Part of this discrepancy is due to the dependence of SOA composition on the organic aerosol concentration. High precursor concentrations lead to higher concentrations of the more volatile species in the produced SOA while at lower concentrations the less volatile compounds dominate the SOA composition. alpha-Pinene, beta-pinene, d-limonene, and beta-caryophyllene ozonolysis experiments were performed at moderate concentration levels. Using a thermodenuder the more volatile SOA species were removed achieving even lower SOA concentration. The less volatile fraction was then chemically characterized by an AMS. The signal fraction of m/z44, and thus the concentration of C02+, is significantly higher for the less volatile SOA. High NO(x) conditions result in less oxidized SOA than low NO(x) conditions, while increasing relative humidity levels results in more oxidized products for limonene but has little effect on alpha-and beta-pinene SOA. Combining a smog chamber with a thermodenuder model employing the volatility basis-set framework, the AMS SOA mass spectrum for each experiment and for each precursor is deconvoluted into low, medium, and high volatility component mass spectra. The spectrum of the surrogate component with the lower volatility is quite similar to that of ambient OOA.

  19. Quantitative LC–MS for water-soluble heterocyclic amines in fine aerosols (PM2.5) at Duke Forest, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, a quantitative liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) technique capable of measuring the concentrations of heterocyclic nitrogen compounds in ambient fine aerosols (PM2.5) has been developed. Quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-TOF) MS technology is used to provi...

  20. OPERATIONAL MEASUREMENT OF COUPLING BY SKEW QUADRUPOLE MODULATION.

    SciTech Connect

    LUO.Y.CAMERON,P.LEE,R.ET AL.

    2004-07-05

    The measurement and correction of the residual betatron coupling via skew quadrupole modulation is a new diagnostics technique that has been developed and tested at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) as a very promising method for the linear decoupling on the ramp. By modulating the strengths of the skew quadrupole families the two eigentune modulations are precisely measured with a high resolution phase lock loop system. The projections of the residual coupling coefficient onto the skew quadrupole coupling modulation direction are determined. The residual linear coupling could be corrected according the measurement. We report the results from the dedicated beam studies carried on at RHIC injection, store and on the ramp. A capability of measuring coupling on the ramp opens possibility of continuous coupling corrections during acceleration.

  1. Space charge induced nonlinear effects in quadrupole ion traps.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dan; Wang, Yuzhuo; Xiong, Xingchuang; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Xiaohua; Yuan, Tao; Fang, Xiang; Xu, Wei

    2014-03-01

    A theoretical method was proposed in this work to study space charge effects in quadrupole ion traps, including ion trapping, ion motion frequency shift, and nonlinear effects on ion trajectories. The spatial distributions of ion clouds within quadrupole ion traps were first modeled for both 3D and linear ion traps. It is found that the electric field generated by space charge can be expressed as a summation of even-order fields, such as quadrupole field, octopole field, etc. Ion trajectories were then solved using the harmonic balance method. Similar to high-order field effects, space charge will result in an "ocean wave" shape nonlinear resonance curve for an ion under a dipolar excitation. However, the nonlinear resonance curve will be totally shifted to lower frequencies and bend towards ion secular frequency as ion motion amplitude increases, which is just the opposite effect of any even-order field. Based on theoretical derivations, methods to reduce space charge effects were proposed.

  2. Study of a micro chamber quadrupole mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jinchan; Zhang Xiaobing; Mao Fuming; Xiao Mei; Cui Yunkang; Engelsen, Daniel den; Lei Wei

    2008-03-15

    The design of a micro chamber quadrupole mass spectrometer (MCQMS) having a small total volume of only 20 cm{sup 3}, including Faraday cup ion detector and ion source, is described. This MCQMS can resist a vacuum baking temperature of 400-500 deg. C. The quadrupole elements with a hyperbolic surface are made of a ceramic material and coated with a thin metal layer. The quadrupole mass filter has a field radius of 3 mm and a length of 100 mm. Prototypes of this new MCQMS can detect a minimum partial pressure of 10{sup -8} Pa, have a peak width of {delta}M=1 at 10% peak height from mass number 1 to 60, and show an excellent long-term stability. The new MCQMS is intended to be used in residual gas analyses of electron devices during a mutual pumping and baking process.

  3. Mechanical design of a large bore quadrupole triplet magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, S.; Caylor, R.; Fong, E.; Tanabe, J.

    1987-03-01

    The mechanical design and construction of a 1 meter bore, low gradient quadrupole triplet is described. The magnet will be used for focussing a proton beam in accelerator studies of neutral particle at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. A significant feature of this magnet design is the precision location of the coil conductors within the steel yoke tube. Each of the quadrupole coils have been fabricated from water cooled aluminum conductor, wound in a cosine 2-theta geometry. The conductor bundles have been wound to a positional accuracy within +-0.050 cm which was required to reduce the harmonic content to less than 0.04% of the quadrupole field. Important aspects of the design, construction and assembly are described.

  4. Variable-field permanent magnet quadrupole for the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Barlow, D.B.; Kraus, R.H. Jr.; Martinez, R.P.; Meyer, R.E.

    1993-10-01

    A set of compact variable-field permanent-magnet quadrupoles have been designed, fabricated, and tested for use In the SSC linac matching section. The quadrupoles have 24 mm-diameter apertures and 40 mm-long poles. The hybrid (permanent-magnet and iron) design, uses a fixed core of magnet material (NdFeB) and iron (C-1006) surrounded by a rotating ring of the same magnet material and iron. The quadrupole gradient-length product can be smoothly varied from a minimum of 0.7 T up to a maximum, of 4.3 T by a 90{degrees} rotation of the outer ring of iron and magnet material.

  5. Cryogen free superconducting splittable quadrupole magnet for linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, V.S.; Andreev, N.; Kerby, J.; Orlov, Y.; Solyak, N.; Tartaglia, M.; Velev, G.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    A new superconducting quadrupole magnet for linear accelerators was fabricated at Fermilab. The magnet is designed to work inside a cryomodule in the space between SCRF cavities. SCRF cavities must be installed inside a very clean room adding issues to the magnet design, and fabrication. The designed magnet has a splittable along the vertical plane configuration and could be installed outside of the clean room around the beam pipe previously connected to neighboring cavities. For more convenient assembly and replacement a 'superferric' magnet configuration with four racetrack type coils was chosen. The magnet does not have a helium vessel and is conductively cooled from the cryomodule LHe supply pipe and a helium gas return pipe. The quadrupole generates 36 T integrated magnetic field gradient, has 600 mm effective length, and the peak gradient is 54 T/m. In this paper the quadrupole magnetic, mechanical, and thermal designs are presented, along with the magnet fabrication overview and first test results.

  6. High and ulta-high gradient quadrupole magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Brunk, W.O.; Walz, D.R.

    1985-05-01

    Small bore conventional dc quadrupoles with apertures from 1 to 2.578cm were designed and prototypes built and measured. New fabrication techniques including the use of wire electric discharge milling (EDM) to economically generate the pole tip contours and aperture tolerances are described. Magnetic measurement data from a prototype of a 1cm aperture quadrupole with possible use in future e/sup +//e/sup -/ super colliders are presented. At a current of 400A, the lens achieved a gradient of 2.475 T/cm, and had an efficiency of 76.6%.

  7. Conceptual design of a quadrupole magnet for eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Witte, H.; Berg, J. S.

    2015-05-03

    eRHIC is a proposed upgrade to the existing Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) hadron facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory, which would allow collisions of up to 21 GeV polarized electrons with a variety of species from the existing RHIC accelerator. eRHIC employs an Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) and an FFAG lattice for the arcs. The arcs require open-midplane quadrupole magnets of up to 30 T/m gradient of good field quality. In this paper we explore initial quadrupole magnet design concepts based on permanent magnetic material which allow to modify the gradient during operation.

  8. Quadrupole Collective Inertia in Nuclear Fission: Cranking Approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Baran, A.; Sheikh, J. A.; Dobaczewski, J.; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2011-01-01

    Collective mass tensor derived from the cranking approximation to the adiabatic time-dependent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (ATDHFB) approach is compared with that obtained in the Gaussian Overlap Approximation (GOA) to the generator coordinate method. Illustrative calculations are carried out for one-dimensional quadrupole fission pathways in ^{256}Fm. It is shown that the collective mass exhibits strong variations with the quadrupole collective coordinate. These variations are related to the changes in the intrinsic shell structure. The differences between collective inertia obtained in cranking and perturbative cranking approximations to ATDHFB, and within GOA, are discussed.

  9. Carbonaceous aerosols contributed by traffic and solid fuel burning at a polluted rural site in Northwestern England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Allan, J.; Corris, B.; Flynn, M.; Andrews, E.; Ogren, J.; Beswick, K.; Bower, K.; Burgess, R.; Choularton, T.; Dorsey, J.; Morgan, W.; Williams, P.; Coe, H.

    2010-10-01

    The experiment presented in this paper was conducted at the Holme Moss site, which is located in the southern Pennines region in Northwestern England during November-December 2006. The strong southwesterly wind during the experimental period, which enhanced the transport of urban pollutants from the conurbations of Greater Manchester and Liverpool, in addition to the seasonally increased nearby residential heating activities, made this site a receptor for pollutants from a range of sources. A factor analysis is applied to the mass spectra of organic matter (OM) measured by the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) to attribute the pollutant sources. Besides the oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA), this site was found to contain a considerable fraction of primary organic aerosols (POA, mass fraction 50-70% within total mass of OM), which are source attributed as traffic emission and solid fuel burning, and are identified as hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) and solid fuel organic aerosol (SFOA) respectively. There were strongly combined emissions of black carbon (BC) particles from both sources, as the refractory BC component (rBC) was characterized by the single particle soot photometer. This site began to be influenced during the late morning by fresh traffic emissions, whereas solid fuel burning became dominant from late afternoon until night. A covariance analysis of rBC and POA was used to derive source specific emission factors of 1.61 μgHOA/μgrBC and 1.96 μgSFOA/μgrBC. The absorbing properties of aerosols were characterized at multiple wavelengths (λ), and a stronger spectral dependence of absorption was observed when this site was significantly influenced by solid fuel burning. The rBC was estimated to contribute 3-16% of submicron aerosol mass. The single scattering albedo at λ=550 nm (SSA550 nm) was significantly anti-correlated with the rBC mass fraction, but also associated with the BC mixing state. The BC incorporation/removal process

  10. Carbonaceous aerosols contributed by traffic and solid fuel burning at a polluted rural site in Northwestern England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Allan, J.; Corris, B.; Flynn, M.; Andrews, E.; Ogren, J.; Beswick, K.; Bower, K.; Burgess, R.; Choularton, T.; Dorsey, J.; Morgan, W.; Williams, P. I.; Coe, H.

    2011-02-01

    The experiment presented in this paper was conducted at the Holme Moss site, which is located in the southern Pennines region in Northwestern England during November-December 2006. The strong southwesterly wind during the experimental period, which enhanced the transport of urban pollutants from the conurbations of Greater Manchester and Liverpool, in addition to the seasonally increased nearby residential heating activities, made this site a receptor for pollutants from a range of sources. A factor analysis is applied to the mass spectra of organic matter (OM) measured by the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) to attribute the pollutant sources. Besides the oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA), this site was found to contain a considerable fraction of primary organic aerosols (POA, mass fraction 50-70% within total mass of OM). The POA sources are attributed to be traffic emission and solid fuel burning, which are identified as hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) and solid fuel organic aerosol (SFOA) respectively. There were strongly combined emissions of black carbon (BC) particles from both sources. The refractory BC component (rBC) was characterized by a single particle soot photometer. This site began to be influenced during the late morning by fresh traffic emissions, whereas solid fuel burning became dominant from late afternoon until night. A covariance analysis of rBC and POA was used to derive source specific emission factors of 1.61 μgHOA/μgrBC and 1.96 μgHOA/μgrBC. The absorbing properties of aerosols were characterized at multiple wavelengths (λ), and a stronger spectral dependence of absorption was observed when this site was significantly influenced by solid fuel burning. The rBC was estimated to contribute 3-16% of submicron aerosol mass. The single scattering albedo at λ = 700 nm (SSA700 nm) was significantly anti-correlated with the rBC mass fraction, but also associated with the BC mixing state. The BC incorporation/removal process

  11. Metaproteomic analysis of atmospheric aerosol samples.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fobang; Lai, Senchao; Reinmuth-Selzle, Kathrin; Scheel, Jan Frederik; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine; Després, Viviane R; Hoffmann, Thorsten; Pöschl, Ulrich; Kampf, Christopher J

    2016-09-01

    Metaproteomic analysis of air particulate matter provides information about the abundance and properties of bioaerosols in the atmosphere and their influence on climate and public health. We developed and applied efficient methods for the extraction and analysis of proteins from glass fiber filter samples of total, coarse, and fine particulate matter. Size exclusion chromatography was applied to remove matrix components, and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was applied for protein fractionation according to molecular size, followed by in-gel digestion and LC-MS/MS analysis of peptides using a hybrid Quadrupole-Orbitrap MS. Maxquant software and the Swiss-Prot database were used for protein identification. In samples collected at a suburban location in central Europe, we found proteins that originated mainly from plants, fungi, and bacteria, which constitute a major fraction of primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP) in the atmosphere. Allergenic proteins were found in coarse and fine particle samples, and indications for atmospheric degradation of proteins were observed. Graphical abstract Workflow for the metaproteomic analysis of atmospheric aerosol samples. PMID:27411545

  12. Aerosol MTF revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeika, Norman S.; Zilberman, Arkadi; Yitzhaky, Yitzhak

    2014-05-01

    Different views of the significance of aerosol MTF have been reported. For example, one recent paper [OE, 52(4)/2013, pp. 046201] claims that the aerosol MTF "contrast reduction is approximately independent of spatial frequency, and image blur is practically negligible". On the other hand, another recent paper [JOSA A, 11/2013, pp. 2244-2252] claims that aerosols "can have a non-negligible effect on the atmospheric point spread function". We present clear experimental evidence of common significant aerosol blur and evidence that aerosol contrast reduction can be extremely significant. In the IR, it is more appropriate to refer to such phenomena as aerosol-absorption MTF. The role of imaging system instrumentation on such MTF is addressed too.

  13. Simple loss scaling laws for quadrupoles and higher-order multipoles used in antihydrogen traps

    SciTech Connect

    Fajans, J.; Bertsche, W.; Burke, K.; Deutsch, A.; Chapman, S. F.; Gomberoff, K.; Wurtele, J. S.; Werf, D. P. van der

    2006-10-18

    Simple scaling laws strongly suggest that for antihydrogen relevant parameters, quadrupole magnetic fields will transport particles into, or near to, the trap walls. Consequently quadrupoles are a poor choice for antihydrogen trapping. Higher order multipoles lead to much less transport.

  14. Field and Laboratory Studies of Atmospheric Organic Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coggon, Matthew Mitchell

    This thesis is the culmination of field and laboratory studies aimed at assessing processes that affect the composition and distribution of atmospheric organic aerosol. An emphasis is placed on measurements conducted using compact and high-resolution Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (AMS). The first three chapters summarize results from aircraft campaigns designed to evaluate anthropogenic and biogenic impacts on marine aerosol and clouds off the coast of California. Subsequent chapters describe laboratory studies intended to evaluate gas and particle-phase mechanisms of organic aerosol oxidation. The 2013 Nucleation in California Experiment (NiCE) was a campaign designed to study environments impacted by nucleated and/or freshly formed aerosol particles. Terrestrial biogenic aerosol with > 85% organic mass was observed to reside in the free troposphere above marine stratocumulus. This biogenic organic aerosol (BOA) originated from the Northwestern United States and was transported to the marine atmosphere during periodic cloud-clearing events. Spectra recorded by a cloud condensation nuclei counter demonstrated that BOA is CCN active. BOA enhancements at latitudes north of San Francisco, CA coincided with enhanced cloud water concentrations of organic species such as acetate and formate. Airborne measurements conducted during the 2011 Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment (E-PEACE) were aimed at evaluating the contribution of ship emissions to the properties of marine aerosol and clouds off the coast of central California. In one study, analysis of organic aerosol mass spectra during periods of enhanced shipping activity yielded unique tracers indicative of cloud-processed ship emissions (m/z 42 and 99). The variation of their organic fraction (f42 and f 99) was found to coincide with periods of heavy (f 42 > 0.15; f99 > 0.04), moderate (0.05 < f42 < 0.15; 0.01 < f99 < 0.04), and negligible (f42 < 0.05; f99 < 0.01) ship influence. Application of

  15. Highly time-resolved urban aerosol characteristics during springtime in Yangtze River Delta, China: insights from soot particle aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junfeng; Ge, Xinlei; Chen, Yanfang; Shen, Yafei; Zhang, Qi; Sun, Yele; Xu, Jianzhong; Ge, Shun; Yu, Huan; Chen, Mindong

    2016-07-01

    In this work, the Aerodyne soot particle - aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) was deployed for the first time during the spring of 2015 in urban Nanjing, a megacity in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) of China, for online characterization of the submicron aerosols (PM1). The SP-AMS enables real-time and fast quantification of refractory black carbon (rBC) simultaneously with other non-refractory species (ammonium, sulfate, nitrate, chloride, and organics). The average PM1 concentration was found to be 28.2 µg m-3, with organics (45 %) as the most abundant component, following by sulfate (19.3 %), nitrate (13.6 %), ammonium (11.1 %), rBC (9.7 %), and chloride (1.3 %). These PM1 species together can reconstruct ˜ 44 % of the light extinction during this campaign based on the IMPROVE method. Chemically resolved mass-based size distributions revealed that small particles especially ultrafine ones (< 100 nm vacuum aerodynamic diameter) were dominated by organics and rBC, while large particles had significant contributions from secondary inorganic species. Source apportionment of organic aerosols (OA) yielded four OA subcomponents, including hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA), cooking-related OA (COA), semi-volatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA), and low-volatility oxygenated OA (LV-OOA). Overall, secondary organic aerosol (SOA, equal to the sum of SV-OOA and LV-OOA) dominated the total OA mass (55.5 %), but primary organic aerosol (POA, equal to the sum of HOA and COA) can outweigh SOA in the early morning and evening due to enhanced human activities. High OA concentrations were often associated with high mass fractions of POA and rBC, indicating the important role of anthropogenic emissions during heavy pollution events. The diurnal cycles of nitrate, chloride, and SV-OOA both showed good anti-correlations with air temperatures, suggesting their variations were likely driven by thermodynamic equilibria and gas-to-particle partitioning. On the other hand, in contrast to other species

  16. Seasonal characterization of submicron aerosol chemical composition and organic aerosol sources in the southeastern United States: Atlanta, Georgia,and Look Rock, Tennessee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hapsari Budisulistiorini, Sri; Baumann, Karsten; Edgerton, Eric S.; Bairai, Solomon T.; Mueller, Stephen; Shaw, Stephanie L.; Knipping, Eladio M.; Gold, Avram; Surratt, Jason D.

    2016-04-01

    A year-long near-real-time characterization of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1) was conducted at an urban (Atlanta, Georgia, in 2012) and rural (Look Rock, Tennessee, in 2013) site in the southeastern US using the Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) collocated with established air-monitoring network measurements. Seasonal variations in organic aerosol (OA) and inorganic aerosol species are attributed to meteorological conditions as well as anthropogenic and biogenic emissions in this region. The highest concentrations of NR-PM1 were observed during winter and fall seasons at the urban site and during spring and summer at the rural site. Across all seasons and at both sites, NR-PM1 was composed largely of OA (up to 76 %) and sulfate (up to 31 %). Six distinct OA sources were resolved by positive matrix factorization applied to the ACSM organic mass spectral data collected from the two sites over the 1 year of near-continuous measurements at each site: hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA), biomass burning OA (BBOA), semi-volatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA), low-volatility oxygenated OA (LV-OOA), isoprene-derived epoxydiols (IEPOX) OA (IEPOX-OA) and 91Fac (a factor dominated by a distinct ion at m/z 91 fragment ion previously observed in biogenic influenced areas). LV-OOA was observed throughout the year at both sites and contributed up to 66 % of total OA mass. HOA was observed during the entire year only at the urban site (on average 21 % of OA mass). BBOA (15-33 % of OA mass) was observed during winter and fall, likely dominated by local residential wood burning emission. Although SV-OOA contributes quite significantly ( ˜ 27 %), it was observed only at the urban site during colder seasons. IEPOX-OA was a major component (27-41 %) of OA at both sites, particularly in spring and summer. An ion fragment at m/z 75 is well correlated with the m/z 82 ion associated with the aerosol mass spectrum of IEPOX-derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The

  17. Radiative Effects of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.

    1997-01-01

    During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) in June 1992, two descents in cloud-free regions allowed comparison of the change in aerosol optical depth as determined by an onboard total-direct-diffuse radiometer (TDDR) to the change calculated from measured size resolved aerosol microphysics and chemistry. Both profiles included pollution haze layer from Europe but the second also included the effect of a Saharan dust layer above the haze. The separate contributions of supermicrometer (coarse) and submicrometer (fine) aerosol were determined and thermal analysis of the pollution haze indicated that the fine aerosol was composed primarily of a sulfate/water mixture with a refractory soot-like core.

  18. Thermoluminescent aerosol analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogowski, R. S.; Long, E. R., Jr. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A method for detecting and measuring trace amounts of aerosols when reacted with ozone in a gaseous environment was examined. A sample aerosol was exposed to a fixed ozone concentration for a fixed period of time, and a fluorescer was added to the exposed sample. The sample was heated in a 30 C/minute linear temperature profile to 200 C. The trace peak was measured and recorded as a function of the test aerosol and the recorded thermoluminescence trace peak of the fluorescer is specific to the aerosol being tested.

  19. Atmospheric aerosol compositions and sources at two national background sites in northern and southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qiao; He, Ling-Yan; Huang, Xiao-Feng; Cao, Li-Ming; Gong, Zhao-Heng; Wang, Chuan; Zhuang, Xin; Hu, Min

    2016-08-01

    Although China's severe air pollution has become a focus in the field of atmospheric chemistry and the mechanisms of urban air pollution there have been researched extensively, few field sampling campaigns have been conducted at remote background sites in China, where air pollution characteristics on a larger scale are highlighted. In this study, an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS), together with an Aethalometer, was deployed at two of China's national background sites in northern (Lake Hongze site; 33.23° N, 118.33° E; altitude 21 m) and southern (Mount Wuzhi site; 18.84° N, 109.49° E; altitude 958 m) China in the spring seasons in 2011 and 2015, respectively, in order to characterize submicron aerosol composition and sources. The campaign-average PM1 concentration was 36.8 ± 19.8 µg m-3 at the northern China background (NCB) site, which was far higher than that at the southern China background (SCB) site (10.9 ± 7.8 µg m-3). Organic aerosol (OA) (27.2 %), nitrate (26.7 %), and sulfate (22.0 %) contributed the most to the PM1 mass at NCB, while OA (43.5 %) and sulfate (30.5 %) were the most abundant components of the PM1 mass at SCB, where nitrate only constituted a small fraction (4.7 %) and might have contained a significant amount of organic nitrates (5-11 %). The aerosol size distributions and organic aerosol elemental compositions all indicated very aged aerosol particles at both sites. The OA at SCB was more oxidized with a higher average oxygen to carbon (O / C) ratio (0.98) than that at NCB (0.67). Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis was used to classify OA into three components, including a hydrocarbon-like component (HOA, attributed to fossil fuel combustion) and two oxygenated components (OOA1 and OOA2, attributed to secondary organic aerosols from different source areas) at NCB. PMF analysis at SCB identified a semi-volatile oxygenated component (SV-OOA) and a low-volatility oxygenated

  20. Aerosol mass spectrometry: particle-vaporizer interactions and their consequences for the measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewnick, F.; Diesch, J.-M.; Faber, P.; Borrmann, S.

    2015-04-01

    The Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) is a frequently used instrument for on-line measurement of the ambient sub-micron aerosol composition. With the help of calibrations and a number of assumptions on the flash vaporization and electron impact ionization processes this instrument provides robust quantitative information on various ambient aerosol components. However, when measuring close to certain anthropogenic sources or in marine environments, several of these assumptions may not be met and measurement results might easily be misinterpreted. Here we discuss various aspects of the interaction of aerosol particles with the AMS tungsten vaporizer and the consequences for the measurement results: semi-refractory components, i.e. components that vaporize but do not flash vaporize at the vaporizer and ionizer temperatures, like metal halides (e.g. chlorides, bromides or iodides of Al, Ba, Cd, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, Na, Pb, Sr, Zn) can be measured semi-quantitatively despite their relatively slow vaporization from the vaporizer. Even though non-refractory components (e.g. NH4NO3 or (NH4)2SO4) vaporize quickly, their differences in vaporization kinetics can result in undesired biases in ion collection efficiency in the measurements. Chemical reactions with water vapor and oxygen from the aerosol flow can have an influence on the mass spectra for certain components (e.g. NH4NO3, (NH4)2SO4, organic species). Finally, chemical reactions of the aerosol with the vaporizer surface can result in additional signals in the mass spectra (e.g. WO2C2-related signals from particulate Cl) and in conditioning or contamination of the vaporizer with potential memory effects influencing the mass spectra of subsequent measurements. Laboratory experiments that investigate these particle-vaporizer interactions are presented and are discussed together with field results showing that measurements of typical continental or urban aerosols are not significantly affected while laboratory

  1. Aerosol-Cloud microphysical closure in warm tropical cumulus during CRYSTAL-FACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conant, W. C.; Lu, M.; Vanreken, T.; Rissman, T.; Varutbangkul, V.; Jonsson, H. H.; Nenes, A.; Jimenez, J. L.; Delia, A. E.; Bahreini, R.; Roberts, G. C.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2002-12-01

    We present a closure study between aerosol and warm-cloud microphysics using field data collected during the NASA CRYSTAL-FACE campaign. CRYSTAL-FACE was conducted in continental and marine environments near southern Florida in July, 2002. Detailed profiles of thirteen cumulus clouds were made by the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft, which was equipped with four aerosol sizing systems, two CCN counters operated at 0.4% and 0.7% supersaturation, an Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer, a MOUDI filter sampler system, two cloud drop sizing probes, and two turbulence probes. A wide range of CCN (300 to >3500 cm-3) and cloud drop concentrations (200 to >1600 cm-3) provides an ideal case study for aerosol-cloud interactions and the first and second indirect effects. Vertical characterization of the young and mature cumulus clouds are obtained from multiple horizontal passes from below cloud base to cloud top. A detailed adiabatic cloud activation model accurately predicts the cloud drop concentration 100 m above cloud base. The model is constrained by observed updraft velocity and below-cloud aerosol properties (i.e. concentration, size distribution, composition, and supersaturation spectrum). Each cloud contains a core often exceeding 500 m in height in which the equivalent potential temperature follows a moist-adiabatic vertical profile. Effective radius most often follows an adiabatic profile, even in regions where liquid water content and/or equivalent potential temperature are sub-adiabatic. Large cloud-to-cloud variations in the vertical profile of effective radius are primarily driven by below-cloud aerosol concentration and to a lesser degree by cloud dynamics (i.e. vertical velocity). Six of the thirteen clouds are simulated using the RAMS large-eddy-simulation model. RAMS is integrated with bulk and bin microphysical models and is coupled to an offline 3-D radiative transfer model to study the aerosol effects on cloud microphysics and radiative properties. More

  2. Understanding the Evolution of Organic Aerosols in the Mexico City Airshed in 2002, 2003 and 2006 using Positive Matrix Factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulbrich, I. M.; Dzepina, K.; Canagaratna, M.; Zhang, Q.; Decarlo, P.; Salcedo, D.; Aiken, A. C.; Onasch, T. B.; Allan, J.; Russell, L. M.; Grivicke, R.; Lamb, B.; Alexander, M. L.; Worsnop, D. R.; Jimenez, J.

    2008-12-01

    Aerosol mass spectrometric measurements yield spectra of ambient aerosols that are a mix of various primary and secondary sources. Organic aerosol (OA) datasets acquired using Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometers (Q-AMS, C-ToF-AMS, and HR-ToF-AMS) deployed in 2002, 2003, and 2006 in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) at multiple ground locations and from aircraft flights are analyzed with Positive Matrix Factorization to deconvolve information about important sources and processes for organic aerosols. Several components are identified in each dataset. Most datasets resolve contributions from: reduced (oxidative state) hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA), which correlates well with primary combustion tracers such as CO, NOx, and BC; biomass burning OA (BBOA), which correlates with regional fire counts, potassium, levoglucosan, acetonitrile, and HCN; highly-oxidized OA (OOA-I) which shows more regional behavior; and less oxidized OA (OOA-II) which correlates with semivolatile inorganic species such as ammonium nitrate and gas-phase secondary species such as Ox (NO2 + O3) and glyoxal. These correlations are consistent across most datasets when run separately in PMF. Factor spectra are also compared to reference spectra, and ratios of factor concentrations to relevant tracers (e.g., HOA/CO, OOA/Ox) are presented. Factor spectra, time series, diurnal cycles, and ratios are compared at sampling locations across the MCMA and in different years in order to understand the evolution of OA across the airshed. The effect of running multiple datasets within a single PMF model (e.g., simultaneous measurements made at two locations in Mexico City), and the stability of PMF solutions will be described.

  3. LARP Long Quadrupole: A "Long" Step Toward an LHC

    ScienceCinema

    Giorgio Ambrosio

    2016-07-12

    The beginning of the development of Nb3Sn magnets for particle accelerators goes back to the 1960’s. But only very recently has this development begun to face the challenges of fabricating Nb3Sn magnets which can meet the requirements of modern particle accelerators. LARP (the LHC Accelerator Research Program) is leading this effort focusing on long models of the Interaction Region quadrupoles for a possible luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider. A major milestone in this development is to test, by the end of 2009, 4m-long quadrupole models, which will be the first Nb3Sn accelerator-type magnets approaching the length of real accelerator magnets. The Long Quadrupoles (LQ) are “Proof-of-Principle” magnets which are to demonstrate that Nb3Sn technology is sufficiently mature for use in high energy particle accelerators. Their design is based on the LARP Technological Quadrupole (TQ) models, under development at FNAL and LBNL, which have design gradients higher than 200 T/m and an aperture of 90 mm. Several challenges must be addressed for the successful fabrication of long Nb3Sn coils and magnets. These challenges and the solutions adopted will be presented together with the main features of the LQ magnets. Several R&D lines are participating to this effort and their contributions will be also presented.

  4. Measurement of an atomic quadrupole moment using dynamic decoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akerman, Nitzan; Shaniv, Ravid; Ozeri, Roee

    2016-05-01

    Some of the best clocks today are ion-based optical clocks. These clocks are referenced to a narrow optical transition in a trapped ion. An example for such a narrow transition is the electric quadrupole E 2 transition between states with identical parity. An important systematic shift of such a transition is the quadrupole shift resulting from the electric field gradient inherent to the ion trap. We present a new dynamic decoupling method that rejects magnetic field noise while measuring the small quadrupole shift of the optical clock transition. Using our sequence we measured the quadrupole moment of the 4D5/2 level in a trapped 88 Sr+ ion to be 2 .973-0 . 033 + 0 . 026 ea02 , where e is the electron charge and a0 is the Bohr radius. Our measurement improves the uncertainty of this value by an order of magnitude and thus helps mitigate an important systematic uncertainty in 88 Sr+ based optical atomic clocks and verifies complicated many-body quantum calculations.

  5. The low-energy quadrupole mode of nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frauendorf, S.

    2015-08-01

    The phenomenological classification of collective quadrupole excitations by means of the Bohr-Hamiltonian (BH) is reviewed with focus on signatures for triaxility. The variants of the microscopic BH derived by means of the Adiabatic Time-Dependent Mean Field theory from the Pairing-plus-quadrupole-quadrupole interaction, the Shell Correction Method, the Skyrme Energy Density Functional, the Relativistic Mean Field Theory and the Gogny interaction are discussed and applications to concrete nuclides reviewed. The Generator Coordinate Method for the five-dimensional quadrupole deformation space and first applications to triaxial nuclei are presented. The phenomenological classification in the framework of the Interacting Boson Model is discussed with a critical view on the boson number counting rule. The recent success in calculating the model parameters by mapping the mean field deformation energy surface on the bosonic one is discussed and the applications listed. A critical assessment of the models is given with focus on the limitations due to the adiabatic approximation. The Tidal Wave approach and the Triaxial Projected Shell Model are presented as practical approaches to calculate spectral properties outside the adiabatic region.

  6. Magnetic field data on Fermilab Energy-Saver quadrupoles

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, E.E.; Brown, B.C.; Cooper, W.E.; Fisk, H.E.; Gross, D.A.; Hanft, R.; Ohnuma, S.; Turkot, F.T.

    1983-03-01

    The Fermilab Energy Saver/Doubler (Tevatron) accelerator contains 216 superconducting quadrupole magnets. Before installation in the Tevatron ring, these magnets plus an additional number of spares were extensively tested at the Fermilab Magnet Test Facility (MTF). Details on the results of the tests are presented here.

  7. Large energy-spread beam diagnostics through quadrupole scans

    SciTech Connect

    Frederico, Joel; Adli, Erik; Hogan, Mark; Raubenheimer, Tor

    2012-12-21

    The Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests (FACET) is a new user facility at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, servicing next-generation accelerator experiments. The 1.5% RMS energy spread of the FACET beam causes large chromatic aberrations in optics. These aberrations necessitate updated quadrupole scan fits to remain accurate.

  8. Hybrid quadrupole excitons and polaritons in cuprous oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roslyak, Oleksiy

    In this thesis I consider novel type of materials such as hybrid organic/inorganic heteoro-structures and polystyrene micro-spheres/inorganic composites. The organic/inorganic compound is presented by DCM2:CA:PS/cuprous oxide material. Using "solid state solvent" mechanism I propose to bring the Frenkel exciton (FE) of the DCM2 into resonance with 1S quadrupole Wanier-Mott exciton (WE) in cuprous oxide. This two types of the excitons form new type of quadrupole-dipole hybrid exciton. This hybrid is characterized by long lifetime and big oscillator strength inherited from the organic FE. In the part I of the thesis I investigate the enhancement of the quadrupole properties generic to cuprous oxide exciton by means of such resonant hybridization. I consider enhancement of photo-thermal bi-stability and second harmonic generation. The second part is devoted to the problems of light-matter interaction in cuprous oxide crystals such as weak interaction with LA phonons and whispering gallery modes (WGM) in adjacent layer of polystyrene micro-spheres. While the first effect is likely to impeded BEC of the polaritons, the second mechanism provides necessary temporal coherence. It is possible by trapping the light part of the polariton into resonant WGM through big gradient of the evanescent tail which provides big lifetime of such evanescent polariton. Due to big gradient of the evanescent field it couples "naturally" to the quadrupole WE in cuprous oxide.

  9. Driving a quadrupole mass spectrometer via an isolating stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Aalami, Dean (Inventor); Darrach, Murray (Inventor); Orient, Otto (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Driving a quadrupole mass spectrometer includes obtaining an air core transformer with a primary and a secondary, matching the secondary to the mass spectrometer, and driving the primary based on first and second voltage levels. Driving of the primary is via an isolating stage that minimizes low level drive signal coupling.

  10. Chemical characterization of organosulfates in secondary organic aerosol derived from the photooxidation of alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riva, Matthieu; Da Silva Barbosa, Thais; Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Stone, Elizabeth A.; Gold, Avram; Surratt, Jason D.

    2016-09-01

    We report the formation of aliphatic organosulfates (OSs) in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from the photooxidation of C10-C12 alkanes. The results complement those from our laboratories reporting the formation of OSs and sulfonates from gas-phase oxidation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Both studies strongly support the formation of OSs from the gas-phase oxidation of anthropogenic precursors, as hypothesized on the basis of recent field studies in which aromatic and aliphatic OSs were detected in fine aerosol collected from several major urban locations. In this study, dodecane, cyclodecane and decalin, considered to be important SOA precursors in urban areas, were photochemically oxidized in an outdoor smog chamber in the presence of either non-acidified or acidified ammonium sulfate seed aerosol. Effects of acidity and relative humidity on OS formation were examined. Aerosols collected from all experiments were characterized by ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization high-resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/ESI-HR-QTOFMS). Most of the OSs identified could be explained by formation of gaseous epoxide precursors with subsequent acid-catalyzed reactive uptake onto sulfate aerosol and/or heterogeneous reactions of hydroperoxides. The OSs identified here were also observed and quantified in fine urban aerosol samples collected in Lahore, Pakistan, and Pasadena, CA, USA. Several OSs identified from the photooxidation of decalin and cyclodecane are isobars of known monoterpene organosulfates, and thus care must be taken in the analysis of alkane-derived organosulfates in urban aerosol.

  11. Aircraft observations of aerosol composition and ageing in New England and Mid-Atlantic States during the summer 2002 New England Air Quality Study field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinman, Lawrence I.; Daum, Peter H.; Lee, Yin-Nan; Senum, Gunnar I.; Springston, Stephen R.; Wang, Jian; Berkowitz, Carl; Hubbe, John; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Brechtel, Fred J.; Jayne, John; Onasch, Timothy B.; Worsnop, Douglas

    2007-05-01

    Aerosol chemical composition, size distribution, and optical properties were measured during 17 aircraft flights in New England and Middle Atlantic States as part of the summer 2002 New England Air Quality Study field campaign. An Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) was operated with a measurement cycle of 30 s, about an order of magnitude faster than used for ground-based measurements. Noise levels within a single measurement period were sub μg m-3. Volume data derived from the AMS were compared with volume measurements from a Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer (PCASP) optical particle detector and a Twin Scanning Electrical Mobility Spectrometer (TSEMS); calculated light scattering was compared with measured values from an integrating nephelometer. The median ratio for AMS/TSEMS volume was 1.25 (1.33 with an estimated refractory component); the median ratio for AMS/nephelometer scattering was 1.18. A dependence of the AMS collection efficiency on aerosol acidity was quantified by a comparison between AMS and PCASP volumes in two high sulfate plumes. For the entire field campaign, the average aerosol concentration was 11 μg m-3. Compared with monitoring data from the IMPROVE network, the organic component made up a large fraction of total mass, varying from 70% in clean air to 40% in high concentration sulfate plumes. In combination with other optical and chemical measurements, the AMS gave information on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production and the time evolution of aerosol light absorption. CO is taken as a conservative tracer of urban emissions and the ratios of organic aerosol and aerosol light absorption to CO examined as a function of photochemical age. Comparisons were made to ratios determined from surface measurements under conditions of minimal atmospheric processing. In air masses in which the NOx to NOy ratio has decreased to 10%, the ratio of organic aerosol to CO has quadrupled indicating that 75% of the organic aerosol is secondary

  12. Deconvolution and Quantification of Primary and Oxygenated Organic Aerosols: Technique Development and Applications to the Pittsburgh AMS Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Jimenez, J.; Alfarra, R.; Allan, J.; Coe, H.; Worsnop, D.; Canagaratna, M.

    2004-12-01

    A new technique has been developed to deconvolve and quantify the mass concentrations of primary and oxygenated organic aerosol (POA and OOA) using highly time-resolved organic mass spectral data obtained with an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS). OOA may comprise secondary organic aerosol (SOA) as well as oxidized POA. This technique involves a series of multivariate linear regressions that use mass-to-charge ratios (m/z's) 57 (mostly C4H9+) and 44 (mostly CO2+), the identified AMS mass spectral tracers for POA and OOA, respectively, as the initial principal components followed by an iterative algorithm to evaluate and "purify" POA and OOA mass spectral tracers. We have applied this technique to the AMS organic aerosol data acquired at the EPA Pittsburgh Supersite during September 2002 and have observed excellent agreement between the reconstructed organic concentrations (= POA + OOA) and the measured values (r2 = 0.997, slope = 0.998). The reconstructed organic data matrix (size = 3199 time steps x 300 m/z's) explains 99% of the variance in the measured time series. The extracted mass spectrum of POA shows high similarity to those of diesel exhaust sampled during a chase study, lab-measured lubricating oil, and freshly emitted traffic aerosols measured in urban environments. The spectrum of OOA closely resembles those of aged organic aerosols sampled in remote areas and also shows similarity with the spectrum of fulvic acid-a humic-like substance that is ubiquitous in the environment and has previously been used as an analogue to represent polyacid compounds found in highly processed and oxidized atmospheric organic aerosols. Organic aerosols in Pittsburgh during Sept. 2002 are mainly oxygenated, on average consisting of ~ 70% OOA (likely mainly secondary in nature). Pronounced diurnal variations in the POA/OOA contributions to organic mass have been observed, with the contribution of POA peaking in the morning rush hours while that of OOA is largest in

  13. Portable Aerosol Contaminant Extractor

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, Duane C.; DeGange, John J.; Cable-Dunlap, Paula

    2005-11-15

    A compact, portable, aerosol contaminant extractor having ionization and collection sections through which ambient air may be drawn at a nominal rate so that aerosol particles ionized in the ionization section may be collected on charged plate in the collection section, the charged plate being readily removed for analyses of the particles collected thereon.

  14. Global Aerosol Observations

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... atmosphere, directly influencing global climate and human health. Ground-based networks that accurately measure column aerosol amount and ... being used to improve Air Quality Models and for regional health studies. To assess the human-health impact of chronic aerosol exposure, ...

  15. Direct Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty

    DOE Data Explorer

    Mccomiskey, Allison

    2008-01-15

    Understanding sources of uncertainty in aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF), the difference in a given radiative flux component with and without aerosol, is essential to quantifying changes in Earth's radiation budget. We examine the uncertainty in DRF due to measurement uncertainty in the quantities on which it depends: aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, solar geometry, and surface albedo. Direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface as well as sensitivities, the changes in DRF in response to unit changes in individual aerosol or surface properties, are calculated at three locations representing distinct aerosol types and radiative environments. The uncertainty in DRF associated with a given property is computed as the product of the sensitivity and typical measurement uncertainty in the respective aerosol or surface property. Sensitivity and uncertainty values permit estimation of total uncertainty in calculated DRF and identification of properties that most limit accuracy in estimating forcing. Total uncertainties in modeled local diurnally averaged forcing range from 0.2 to 1.3 W m-2 (42 to 20%) depending on location (from tropical to polar sites), solar zenith angle, surface reflectance, aerosol type, and aerosol optical depth. The largest contributor to total uncertainty in DRF is usually single scattering albedo; however decreasing measurement uncertainties for any property would increase accuracy in DRF. Comparison of two radiative transfer models suggests the contribution of modeling error is small compared to the total uncertainty although comparable to uncertainty arising from some individual properties.

  16. Ganges valley aerosol experiment.

    SciTech Connect

    Kotamarthi, V.R.; Satheesh, S.K.

    2011-08-01

    In June 2011, the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX) began in the Ganges Valley region of India. The objective of this field campaign is to obtain measurements of clouds, precipitation, and complex aerosols to study their impact on cloud formation and monsoon activity in the region.

  17. Analysis of Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prather, Kimberly A.; Hatch, Courtney D.; Grassian, Vicki H.

    2008-07-01

    Aerosols represent an important component of the Earth's atmosphere. Because aerosols are composed of solid and liquid particles of varying chemical complexity, size, and phase, large challenges exist in understanding how they impact climate, health, and the chemistry of the atmosphere. Only through the integration of field, laboratory, and modeling analysis can we begin to unravel the roles atmospheric aerosols play in these global processes. In this article, we provide a brief review of the current state of the science in the analysis of atmospheric aerosols and some important challenges that need to be overcome before they can become fully integrated. It is clear that only when these areas are effectively bridged can we fully understand the impact that atmospheric aerosols have on our environment and the Earth's system at the level of scientific certainty necessary to design and implement sound environmental policies.

  18. Characterization of aerosol particles at the forested site in Lithuania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimselyte, I.; Garbaras, A.; Kvietkus, K.; Remeikis, V.

    2009-04-01

    monitoring station (55˚ 26'26"N; 26˚ 03'60"E) in the eastern part of Lithuania in the Aukštaitija national park during 2-24 July, 2008. The Rugšteliškis station is located in a remote relatively clean forested area. An aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), developed at Aerodyne Research, was used to obtain real-time quantitative information on particle size-resolved mass loadings for volatile and semi-volatile chemical components present in/on ambient aerosol. The AMS inlet system allows 100 % transmission efficiency for particles with size diameter between 60 to 600 nm and partial transmission down to 20 nm and up to 2000 nm. The aerosol sampling was also carried out using a Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI) model 110. The flow rate was 30 l/min, and the 50% aerodynamic cutoff diameters of the 10 stages were 18, 10, 5.6, 3.2, 1.8, 1.0, 0.56, 0.32, 0.18, 0.10 and 0.056 m. Aluminum foil was used as the impaction surface. The aerosol samples were analyzed for total carbon using the elemental analyzer (Flash EA1112). Besides, samples were analyzed for ^13C/12C ratio by the isotopic ratio mass spectrometer (Thermo Finnigan Delta Plus Advantage) (Norman et al., 1999; Garbaras et al., 2008). During campaign the dynamic behavior of aerosols was measured and quantitatively compared with meteorological conditions and air mass transport. The submicron aerosol was predominately sulphate and organic material. The AMS was able to discriminate and quantify mixed organic/inorganic accumulation mode particles (300 - 400 nm), which appeared to be dominated by regional sources and were of the origin similar to those seen in the more remote areas. The particulate organic fraction was also investigated in detail using the mass spectral data. By combining the organic matter size distribution (measured with AMS) with the total carbon (TC) size distribution (measured with MOUDI) we were able to report organic carbon to total carbon (OC/TC) ratio in different size particles

  19. Evolution of biomass burning aerosol over the Amazon: airborne measurements of aerosol chemical composition, microphysical properties, mixing state and optical properties during SAMBBA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, W.; Allan, J. D.; Flynn, M.; Darbyshire, E.; Hodgson, A.; Liu, D.; O'Shea, S.; Bauguitte, S.; Szpek, K.; Johnson, B.; Haywood, J.; Longo, K.; Artaxo, P.; Coe, H.

    2013-12-01

    Biomass burning represents one of the largest sources of particulate matter to the atmosphere, resulting in a significant perturbation to the Earth's radiative balance coupled with serious impacts on public health. On regional scales, the impacts are substantial, particularly in areas such as the Amazon Basin where large, intense and frequent burning occurs on an annual basis for several months. Absorption by atmospheric aerosols is underestimated by models over South America, which points to significant uncertainties relating to Black Carbon (BC) aerosol properties. Initial results from the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA) field experiment, which took place during September and October 2012 over Brazil on-board the UK Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurement (FAAM) BAe-146 research aircraft, are presented here. Aerosol chemical composition was measured by an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and a DMT Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). The physical, chemical and optical properties of the aerosols across the region will be characterized in order to establish the impact of biomass burning on regional air quality, weather and climate. The aircraft sampled a range of conditions including sampling of pristine Rainforest, fresh biomass burning plumes, regional haze and elevated biomass burning layers within the free troposphere. The aircraft sampled biomass burning aerosol across the southern Amazon in the states of Rondonia and Mato Grosso, as well as in a Cerrado (Savannah-like) region in Tocantins state. This presented a range of fire conditions, in terms of their number, intensity, vegetation-type and their combustion efficiencies. Near-source sampling of fires in Rainforest environments suggested that smouldering combustion dominated, while flaming combustion dominated in the Cerrado. This led to significant differences in aerosol chemical composition, particularly in terms of the BC content, with BC being enhanced in the Cerrado

  20. Radiative Effects of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.

    1996-01-01

    During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) in June 1992, two descents in cloud-free regions allowed comparison of the change in aerosol optical depth as determined by an onboard total-direct-diffuse radiometer (TDDR) to the change calculated from measured size-resolved aerosol microphysics and chemistry. Both profiles included a pollution haze from Europe but the second also included the effect of a Saharan dust layer above the haze. The separate contributions of supermicrometer (coarse) and submicrometer (fine) aerosol were determined and thermal analysis of the pollution haze indicated that the fine aerosol was composed primarily of a sulfate/water mixture with a refractory soot-like core. The soot core increased the calculated extinction by about 10% in the most polluted drier layer relative to a pure sulfate aerosol but had significantly less effect at higher humidities. A 3 km descent through a boundary layer air mass dominated by pollutant aerosol with relative humidities (RH) 10-77% yielded a close agreement between the measured and calculated aerosol optical depths (550 nm) of 0.160 (+/- 0.07) and 0. 157 (+/- 0.034) respectively. During descent the aerosol mass scattering coefficient per unit sulfate mass varied from about 5 to 16 m(exp 2)/g and primarily dependent upon ambient RH. However, the total scattering coefficient per total fine mass was far less variable at about 4+/- 0.7 m(exp 2)/g. A subsequent descent through a Saharan dust layer located above the pollution aerosol layer revealed that both layers contributed similarly to aerosol optical depth. The scattering per unit mass of the coarse aged dust was estimated at 1.1 +/- 0.2 m(exp 2)/g. The large difference (50%) in measured and calculated optical depth for the dust layer exceeded measurements.

  1. Aqueous aerosol SOA formation: impact on aerosol physical properties.

    PubMed

    Woo, Joseph L; Kim, Derek D; Schwier, Allison N; Li, Ruizhi; McNeill, V Faye

    2013-01-01

    Organic chemistry in aerosol water has recently been recognized as a potentially important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) material. This SOA material may be surface-active, therefore potentially affecting aerosol heterogeneous activity, ice nucleation, and CCN activity. Aqueous aerosol chemistry has also been shown to be a potential source of light-absorbing products ("brown carbon"). We present results on the formation of secondary organic aerosol material in aerosol water and the associated changes in aerosol physical properties from GAMMA (Gas-Aerosol Model for Mechanism Analysis), a photochemical box model with coupled gas and detailed aqueous aerosol chemistry. The detailed aerosol composition output from GAMMA was coupled with two recently developed modules for predicting a) aerosol surface tension and b) the UV-Vis absorption spectrum of the aerosol, based on our previous laboratory observations. The simulation results suggest that the formation of oligomers and organic acids in bulk aerosol water is unlikely to perturb aerosol surface tension significantly. Isoprene-derived organosulfates are formed in high concentrations in acidic aerosols under low-NO(x) conditions, but more experimental data are needed before the potential impact of these species on aerosol surface tension may be evaluated. Adsorption of surfactants from the gas phase may further suppress aerosol surface tension. Light absorption by aqueous aerosol SOA material is driven by dark glyoxal chemistry and is highest under high-NO(x) conditions, at high relative humidity, in the early morning hours. The wavelength dependence of the predicted absorption spectra is comparable to field observations and the predicted mass absorption efficiencies suggest that aqueous aerosol chemistry can be a significant source of aerosol brown carbon under urban conditions. PMID:24601011

  2. Measurement reports for the cryogenically-cooled drift tube quadrupoles

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    This compilation contains quadrupole measurement reports for LANL type A and type E drift tube cryoquads. The cryoquad information gives s/n, vendor, field strength, phase, b3/b2, b4/b2, b5/b2, b6/b2, center wire location. The measurements for the harmonic measuring system gives time and date of measurements, magnet p/n, coil p/n, coil radii, coil turns, low and high gain, and temperature. Quadrupole information includes effective B` X L, and magnetic center. Bucked and unbucked calculations give signal in {mu}V{center_dot}sec, field in Tesla{center_dot}meter, B(n)/B(2), absolute and relative phase.

  3. Development and test of LARP technological quadrupole (TQC) magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Feher, S.; Bossert, R.C.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Carcagno, R.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Lamm, M.J.; Nobrega, F.; Novitski, I.; /Fermilab /LBL, Berkeley

    2006-08-01

    In support of the development of a large-aperture Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting quadrupole for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade, two-layer quadrupole models (TQC and TQS) with 90-mm aperture are being constructed at Fermilab and LBNL within the framework of the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP). This paper describes the construction and test of model TQC01. ANSYS calculations of the structure are compared with measurements during construction. Fabrication experience is described and in-process measurements are reported. Test results at 4.5K are presented, including magnet training, current ramp rate studies and magnet quench current . Results of magnetic measurements at helium temperature are also presented.

  4. Development and Test of LARP Technological Quadrupole (TQC) Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Feher, S.; Bossert, R.C.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Carcagno, R.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Lamm, M.J.; Nobrega, F.; Novitski, I.; Pischalnikov, Yu.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.; Turrioni, D.; Whitson, G.; Yamada, R.; Zlobin, A.V.; Caspi, S.; Dietderich, D.; Ferracin, P.; Hannaford, R.; Hafalia, A.R.; Sabbi, G.

    2007-06-01

    In support of the development of a large-aperture Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting quadrupole for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade, two-layer quadrupole models (TQC and TQS) with 90 mm aperture are being constructed at Fermilab and LBNL within the framework of the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP). This paper describes the construction and test of model TQC01. ANSYS calculations of the structure are compared with measurements during construction. Fabrication experience is described and in-process measurements are reported. Test results at 4.5 K are presented, including magnet training, current ramp rate studies and magnet quench current. Results of magnetic measurements at helium temperature are also presented.

  5. Performance of An Adjustable Strength Permanent Magnet Quadrupole

    SciTech Connect

    Gottschalk, S.C.; DeHart, T.E.; Kangas, K.W.; Spencer, C.M.; Volk, J.T.; /Fermilab

    2006-03-01

    An adjustable strength permanent magnet quadrupole suitable for use in Next Linear Collider has been built and tested. The pole length is 42cm, aperture diameter 13mm, peak pole tip strength 1.03Tesla and peak integrated gradient * length (GL) is 68.7 Tesla. This paper describes measurements of strength, magnetic CL and field quality made using an air bearing rotating coil system. The magnetic CL stability during -20% strength adjustment proposed for beam based alignment was < 0.2 microns. Strength hysteresis was negligible. Thermal expansion of quadrupole and measurement parts caused a repeatable and easily compensated change in the vertical magnetic CL. Calibration procedures as well as CL measurements made over a wider tuning range of 100% to 20% in strength useful for a wide range of applications will be described. The impact of eddy currents in the steel poles on the magnetic field during strength adjustments will be reported.

  6. Nuclear quadrupole moment of the {sup 99}Tc ground state

    SciTech Connect

    Errico, Leonardo; Darriba, German; Renteria, Mario; Tang Zhengning; Emmerich, Heike; Cottenier, Stefaan

    2008-05-15

    By combining first-principles calculations and existing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments, we determine the quadrupole moment of the 9/2{sup +} ground state of {sup 99}Tc to be (-)0.14(3)b. This confirms the value of -0.129(20)b, which is currently believed to be the most reliable experimental determination, and disagrees with two earlier experimental values. We supply ab initio calculated electric-field gradients for Tc in YTc{sub 2} and ZrTc{sub 2}. If this calculated information would be combined with yet to be performed Tc-NMR experiments in these compounds, the error bar on the {sup 99}Tc ground state quadrupole moment could be further reduced.

  7. Superferric quadrupoles for FAIR Super FRS energy buncher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, G.; Bhunia, U.; Akhter, J.; Nandi, C.; Datta, A.; Sarma, P. R.; Roy, S.; Bajirao, S.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Bhattacharyya, T. K.; Dey, M. K.; Mallik, C.; Bhandari, R. K.

    2012-12-01

    The quadrupole magnets for FAIR Super FRS energy buncher have large usable aperture, high magnetic pole-tip field and high gradient field quality. The iron-dominated magnets with superconducting coils have to be used in this application. The NbTi coil, laminated iron, and support structure of about 22 tons is immersed in liquid helium. The 4.5 K helium chamber is completely covered with a thermal shield cooled by helium at 50-80 K on its outer and inner surface. The helium chamber and thermal shield is enclosed in a vacuum shell. The paper presents design details of the long quadrupole. Coupled thermal, magnetic and structural analysis was carried out to design the magnet iron, magnet coil, helium vessel and support links and ensure the required gradient field quality is achieved. The paper also presents the design of support links and outer vacuum chamber.

  8. ELECTRON TRAPPING IN WIGGLER AND QUADRUPOLE MAGNETS OF CESRTA

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lanfa; Huang, Xiaobiao; Pivi, Mauro; /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) has been reconfigured as an ultra low emittance damping ring for use as a test accelerator (CesrTA) for International Linear Collider (ILC) damping ring R&D [1]. One of the primary goals of the CesrTA program is to investigate the interaction of the electron cloud with low emittance positron beam to explore methods to suppress the electron cloud, develop suitable advanced instrumentation required for these experimental studies and benchmark predictions by simulation codes. This paper reports the simulation of the electron-cloud formation in the wiggler and quadrupole magnets using the 3D code CLOUDLAND. We found that electrons can be trapped with long lifetime in a quadrupole magnet due to the mirror field trapping mechanism and photoelectrons produced in the wiggler zero field zone have long lifetime due to their complicated trajectory.

  9. Detection of the quadrupole hyperfine structure in HCNH(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziurys, L. M.; Apponi, A. J.; Yoder, J. T.

    1992-01-01

    We report the first measurement of the electric quadrupole hyperfine structure of HCNH(+). The J = 1-0 transition of this interstellar molecular ion was observed toward the cold, dark cloud TMC-1, using the NRAO 12 m telescope at 74 GHz. The three hyperfine components of this transition were clearly detected and resolved, enabling the first experimental determination of the quadrupole coupling constant eqQ of HCNH(+). The value of this constant is calculated to be eqQ = -0.49 +/- 0.07 MHz. The column density of HCNH(+) toward TMC-1 was found to be N(tot) about 2.8 x 10 exp 13/sq cm, corresponding to a fractional abundance relative to H2 of f about 3 x 10 exp -9. This abundance is at least one order of magnitude higher than the predictions of ion-molecule chemistry. Detection of the hyperfine structure clearly establishes the presence of HCNH(+) in interstellar space.

  10. Specification of multipole tolerances for the APS quadrupole magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S.L.

    1988-08-01

    This note will address a proposed method for specifying the multipole tolerance for the design and production of APS quadrupole magnets. The tolerances for the multipole components for the quadrupole magnets will be set to that level which reduces the dynamic aperture by about 10--15% from the ideal machine dynamic aperture (as specified in CDR-87). This level may appear rather stringent, especially compared to the 50--60% reduction resulting from quad placement errors. However, when all tolerances are taken together, the residual dynamic aperture would be prohibitively small and commissioning would be difficult if these tolerances were at twice this level. The dynamic aperture was determined using the numerical tracking program RACETRACK.

  11. SKEW QUADRUPOLES IN RHIC DIPOLE MAGNETS AT HIGH FIELDS.

    SciTech Connect

    JAIN, A.; GUPTA, P.; THOMPSON, P.; WANDERER, P.

    1995-06-11

    In the RHIC arc dipoles, the center of the cold mass lies above the center of the cryostat. At the maximum design field, the magnetic flux lines leak through the yoke to the asymmetrically located cryostat, which provides an additional return path. This introduces a systematic top-bottom asymmetry leading to a skew quadrupole term at high fields. A similar asymmetry is also created by any difference in weights of the upper and the lower yoke halves. Data from measurements of several RHIC dipoles are presented to study this effect. In the current production series of the RDIC dipoles, an attempt is made to compensate the effect of the cryostat by an asymmetry in the iron yoke. Seven dipoles with this type of yoke have been cold tested, and show a reduced saturation in the skew quadrupole term, as expected.

  12. Quadrupole moments of wobbling excitations in 163Lu

    SciTech Connect

    Gorgen, A.; Clark, R.M.; Cromaz, M.; Fallon, P.; Hagemann, G.B.; Hubel, H.; Lee, I.Y.; Macchiavelli, A.O.; Sletten, G.; Ward, D.; Bengtsson, R.

    2004-01-01

    Lifetimes of states in the triaxial strongly deformed bands of {sup 163}Lu have been measured in a Gammasphere experiment using the Doppler-shift attenuation method. The bands are interpreted as wobbling-phonon excitations from the characteristic electromagnetic properties of the transitions connecting the bands. Quadrupole moments were extracted for the 0-phonon yrast band and, for the first time, for the 1-phonon wobbling band. The very similar results found for both bands suggest a similar intrinsic structure confirming the wobbling interpretation. While the in-band quadrupole moments for the bands show a decreasing trend towards higher spin, the strength of the inter-band transitions remains constant. Both features can be understood by a small increase in triaxiality towards higher spin. Such a change in triaxiality is also found in cranking calculations, to which the experimental results are compared.

  13. Improved performance of a quadrupole based glow discharge mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Valiga, R.E.; Duckworth, D.C.; Smith, D.H.

    1995-12-31

    Glow discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS) has experienced most of its commercial success in trace multi-element analysis using sector-based mass spectrometry. In most cases, the mass resolution available with these instruments allows elements of interest to be analyzed, even in the presence of polyatomic interferences (e.g., ArC+, ArN+, ArO+). Because quadrupole mass filters have little more than unit resolution, background equivalent concentrations (BEC`s) for many elements can be quite high (1-100 ppm). Because of this, many have discounted quadrupole GDMS as a useful trace analysis technique. In this work, the authors have explored methods of reducing the polyatomic interferences.

  14. 120-mm supercondcting quadrupole for interaction regions of hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Zlobin, A.V.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Mokhov, N.V.; Novitski, I.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    Magnetic and mechanical designs of a Nb{sub 3}Sn quadrupole magnet with 120-mm aperture suitable for interaction regions of hadron colliders are presented. The magnet is based on a two-layer shell-type coil and a cold iron yoke. Special spacers made of a low-Z material are implemented in the coil mid-planes to reduce the level of radiation heat deposition and radiation dose in the coil. The quadrupole mechanical structure is based on aluminum collars supported by an iron yoke and a stainless steel skin. Magnet parameters including maximum field gradient and field harmonics, Nb3Sn coil pre-stress and protection at the operating temperatures of 4.5 and 1.9 K are reported. The level and distribution of radiation heat deposition in the coil and other magnet components are discussed.

  15. Quadrupole association and dissociation of hydrogen in the early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrey, Robert C.

    2016-10-01

    Radiative association and photodissociation rates are calculated for quadrupole transitions of H2. A complete set of bound and unbound states are included in a self-consistent master equation to obtain steady-state concentrations for a dilute system of hydrogen atoms and molecules. Phenomenological rate constants computed from the steady-state concentrations satisfy detailed balance for any combination of matter and radiation temperature. Simple formulas are derived for expressing the steady-state distributions in terms of equilibrium distributions. The rate constant for radiative association is found to be generally small for all temperature combinations. The photodissociation rate constant for quadrupole transitions is found to dominate the rate constants for other H2 photodestruction mechanisms for {T}{{R}} ≤slant 3000 K. Implications for the formation and destruction of H2 in the early Universe are discussed.

  16. Electrostatic quadrupole array for focusing parallel beams of charged particles

    DOEpatents

    Brodowski, John

    1982-11-23

    An array of electrostatic quadrupoles, capable of providing strong electrostatic focusing simultaneously on multiple beams, is easily fabricated from a single array element comprising a support rod and multiple electrodes spaced at intervals along the rod. The rods are secured to four terminals which are isolated by only four insulators. This structure requires bias voltage to be supplied to only two terminals and eliminates the need for individual electrode bias and insulators, as well as increases life by eliminating beam plating of insulators.

  17. Radio-frequency quadrupole resonator for linear accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Moretti, A.

    1982-10-19

    An RFQ resonator for a linear accelerator having a reduced level of interfering modes and producing a quadrupole mode for focusing, bunching and accelerating beams of heavy charged particles, with the construction being characterized by four elongated resonating rods within a cylinder with the rods being alternately shorted and open electrically to the shell at common ends of the rods to provide an LC parallel resonant circuit when activated by a magnetic field transverse to the longitudinal axis.

  18. Gravitational radiation quadrupole formula is valid for gravitationally interacting systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, M.; Will, C. M.

    1980-01-01

    An argument is presented for the validity of the quadrupole formula for gravitational radiation energy loss in the far field of nearly Newtonian (e.g., binary stellar) systems. This argument differs from earlier ones in that it determines beforehand the formal accuracy of approximation required to describe gravitationally self-interacting systems, uses the corresponding approximate equation of motion explicitly, and evaluates the appropriate asymptotic quantities by matching along the correct space-time light cones.

  19. Microfabricated quadrupole ion trap for mass spectrometer applications.

    PubMed

    Pau, S; Pai, C S; Low, Y L; Moxom, J; Reilly, P T A; Whitten, W B; Ramsey, J M

    2006-03-31

    An array of miniaturized cylindrical quadrupole ion traps, with a radius of 20 microm, is fabricated using silicon micromachining using phosphorus doped polysilicon and silicon dioxide for the purpose of creating a mass spectrometer on a chip. We have operated the array for mass-selective ion ejection and mass analysis using Xe ions at a pressure of 10(-4). The scaling rules for the ion trap in relation to operating pressure, voltage, and frequency are examined. PMID:16605890

  20. Magnetic performance of new Fermilab high gradient quadrupoles

    SciTech Connect

    Hanft, R.; Brown, B.C.; Carson, J.A.; Gourlay, S.A.; Lamm, M.J.; McInturff, A.D.; Mokhtarani, A.; Riddiford, A.

    1991-05-01

    For the Fermilab Tevatron low beta insertions installed in 1990--1991 as part of a luminosity upgrade there were built approximately 35 superconducting cold iron quadrupoles utilizing a two layer cos 2{theta} coil geometry with 76 mm diameter aperature. The field harmonics and strengths of these magnets obtained by measurement at cryogenic conditions are presented. Evidence for a longitudinal periodic structure in the remnant field is shown. 6 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Analysis on linac quadrupole misalignment in FACET commissioning 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yipeng; /SLAC

    2012-07-05

    In this note, the analysis on linac quadrupole misalignment is presented for the FACET linac section LI05-09 plus LI11-19. The effectiveness of the beam-based alignment technique is preliminarily confirmed by the measurement. Beam-based alignment technique was adopted at SLAC linac since SLC time. Here the beam-based alignment algorithms are further developed and applied in the FACET commissioning during 2012 run.

  2. MEASURING LOCAL GRADIENT AND SKEW QUADRUPOLE ERRORS IN RHIC IRS.

    SciTech Connect

    CARDONA,J.; PEGGS,S.; PILAT,R.; PTITSYN,V.

    2004-07-05

    The measurement of local linear errors at RHIC interaction regions using an ''action and phase'' analysis of difference orbits has already been presented. This paper evaluates the accuracy of this technique using difference orbits that were taken when known gradient errors and skew quadrupole errors were intentionally introduced. It also presents action and phase analysis of simulated orbits when controlled errors are intentionally placed in a RHIC simulation model.

  3. Design and Measurement of the NSLS II Quadrupole Prototypes

    SciTech Connect

    Rehak,M.; Jain, A. K.; Skaritka, J.; Spataro, C.

    2009-05-04

    The design and measurement of the NSLS-II ring quadrupoles prototypes are presented. These magnets are part of a larger prototype program described in [1]. Advances in software, hardware, and manufacturing have led to some new level of insight in the quest for the perfect magnet design. Three geometric features are used to minimize the first three allowed harmonics by way of optimization. Validations through measurement and confidence levels in calculations are established.

  4. Comparison of cloud residual and background aerosol particle composition during the hill cap cloud experiment HCCT 2010 in Central Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, A.; Mertes, S.; van Pinxteren, D.; Klimach, T.; Herrmann, H.; Schneider, J.; Borrmann, S.

    2013-12-01

    Physical and chemical characterization of cloud residual and background aerosol particles as well as aerosol-cloud interactions were investigated during the Hill Cap Cloud Thuringia (HCCT) experiment in September and October 2010 on the mountain site Schmücke (938m a.s.l.) in Germany. Background aerosol particles were sampled by an interstitial inlet whereas cloud droplets from orographic clouds were collected by a counter flow virtual impactor (CVI). Chemical composition analysis and sizing of the particles was done by single particle mass spectrometry using the bipolar Aircraft-based Laser Ablation Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (ALABAMA, particle diameter range 150 nm - 900 nm; Brands et al., 2011) and by two Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (C-ToF, HR-ToF). Supplementary, the particle size distribution was measured with an optical particle counter (OPC, size range 0.25 μm - 32 μm). During the field campaign about 21000 positive and negative single particle mass spectra could be obtained from cloud residual particles and about 239000 from background aerosol particles. The data were clustered by means of the fuzzy c-means algorithm. The resulting clusters consisting of mass spectra with similar fragmentation patterns were, dependent on presence and combination of peaks, assigned to certain particle types. For both sampled particle types a large portion is internally mixed with nitrate and/or sulfate. This might be an explanation, why a comparison of the composition shows a higher fraction of soot particles and amine-containing particles among cloud residuals. Furthermore cloud residuals show a decreased fraction of particles being internally mixed only with nitrate (10%) compared to background aerosol particles (19%) of the same air masses, whereas the fraction of particles containing both nitrate and sulfate increases from 39% to 63% indicating cloud processing by uptake and oxidation of SO2 (Harris et al, 2013). Brands, M., Kamphus, M., Böttger, T., Schneider

  5. Quadrupole Magnetic Sorting of Porcine Islets of Langerhans

    PubMed Central

    Shenkman, Rustin M.; Chalmers, Jeffrey J.; Hering, Bernhard J.; Kirchhof, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Islet transplantation is emerging as a treatment option for selected patients with type 1 diabetes. Inconsistent isolation, purification, and recovery of large numbers of high-quality islets remain substantial impediments to progress in the field. Removing islets as soon as they are liberated from the pancreas during digestion and circumventing the need for density gradient purification is likely to result in substantially increased viable islet yields by minimizing exposure to proteolytic enzymes, reactive oxygen intermediates, and mechanical stress associated with centrifugation. This study capitalized on the hypervascularity of islets compared with acinar tissue to explore their preferential enrichment with magnetic beads to enable immediate separation in a magnetic field utilizing a quadrupole magnetic sorting. The results demonstrate that (1) preferential enrichment of porcine islets is achievable, but homogeneous bead distribution within the pancreas is difficult to achieve with current protocols; (2) greater than 70% of islets in the dissociated pancreatic tissue were recovered by quadrupole magnetic sorting, but their purity was low; and (3) infused islets purified by density gradients and subsequently passed through quadrupole magnetic sorting had similar potency as uninfused islets. These results demonstrate proof of concept and define the steps for implementation of this technology in pig and human islet isolation. PMID:19505179

  6. Transverse beam emittance measurement using quadrupole variation at KIRAMS-430

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Dong Hyun; Hahn, Garam; Park, Chawon

    2015-02-01

    In order to produce a 430 MeV/u carbon ion (12 C 6+) beam for medical therapy, the Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences (KIRAMS) has carried out the development of a superconducting isochronous cyclotron, the KIRAMS-430. At the extraction of the cyclotron, an Energy Selection System (ESS) is located to modulate the fixed beam energy and to drive the ion beam through High Energy Beam Transport (HEBT) into the treatment room. The beam emittance at the ion beamline is to be measured to provide information on designing a beam with high quality. The well-known quadrupole variation method was used to determine the feasibility of measuring the transverse beam emittance. The beam size measured at the beam profile monitor (BPM) is to be utilized and the transformation of beam by transfer matrix is to be applied being taken under various transport condition of varying quadrupole magnetic strength. Two different methods where beam optics are based on the linear matrix formalism and particle tracking with a 3-D magnetic field distribution obtained by using OPERA3D TOSCA, are applied to transport the beam. The fittings for the transformation parameters are used to estimate the transverse emittance and the twiss parameters at the entrance of the quadrupole in the ESS. Including several systematic studies, we conclude that within the uncertainty the estimated emittances are consistent with the ones calculated by using Monte Carlo simulations.

  7. CMB quadrupole suppression. II. The early fast roll stage

    SciTech Connect

    Boyanovsky, D.; Vega, H. J. de; Sanchez, N. G.

    2006-12-15

    Within the effective field theory of inflation, an initialization of the classical dynamics of the inflaton with approximate equipartition between the kinetic and potential energy of the inflaton leads to a brief fast roll stage that precedes the slow roll regime. The fast roll stage leads to an attractive potential in the wave equations for the mode functions of curvature and tensor perturbations. The evolution of the inflationary perturbations is equivalent to the scattering by this potential and a useful dictionary between the scattering data and observables is established. Implementing methods from scattering theory we prove that this attractive potential leads to a suppression of the quadrupole moment for CMB and B-mode angular power spectra. The scale of the potential is determined by the Hubble parameter during slow roll. Within the effective field theory of inflation at the grand unification (GUT) energy scale we find that if inflation lasts a total number of e-folds N{sub tot}{approx}59, there is a 10%-20% suppression of the CMB quadrupole and about 2%-4% suppression of the tensor quadrupole. The suppression of higher multipoles is smaller, falling off as 1/l{sup 2}. The suppression is much smaller for N{sub tot}>59, therefore if the observable suppression originates in the fast roll stage, there is the upper bound N{sub tot}{approx}59.

  8. Perfect 2-d quadrupole fields from permanent magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.P.; Vella, M.

    1996-04-01

    Consider the 13-beam channel array shown in Figure 1. It is asserted that, under mathematically ideal assumptions, a pure quadrupole field is centered in each of the 13 beam channel boxes. An identical quadrupole field (for {bar H}, not {bar B}) is also centered in each of the 4 boxes containing 4 magnetic wedges located near the center of the system. An iron yoke ({mu} = {infinity}) with the displayed zig-zag shape provides a boundary condition (H{sub {parallel}} = 0) that makes the 13 channels equivalent to a portion of an infinite array. A similar array can be readily drawn for any number of beams. The quadrupole gradient in the beam channels is B{prime} = M{sub o}/2b, where M{sub o} is the remnant field of the magnetic wedges, and the channel diameter (wedge-to-wedge) is 2b. Note that a unit cell of the array, containing one beam, has diameter 2{radical}2 b (viewed from 45{degree} tilt) so its area is 8 b{sup 2}. A significant advantage of this design over those using dipolar blocks is the large fraction of cross section devoted to beam channels (50% vs 25%). Application to a heavy ion fusion driver is discussed.

  9. Simulating the formation of carbonaceous aerosol in a European Megacity (Paris) during the MEGAPOLI summer and winter campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fountoukis, C.; Megaritis, A. G.; Skyllakou, K.; Charalampidis, P. E.; Denier van der Gon, H. A. C.; Crippa, M.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Freutel, F.; Wiedensohler, A.; Pilinis, C.; Pandis, S. N.

    2015-09-01

    We use a three dimensional regional chemical transport model (PMCAMx) with high grid resolution and high resolution emissions (4 km × 4 km) over the Paris greater area to simulate the formation of carbonaceous aerosol during a summer (July 2009) and a winter (January/February 2010) period as part of the MEGAPOLI (Megacities: Emissions, urban, regional, and Global Atmospheric POLlution and climate effects, and Integrated tools for assessment and mitigation) campaigns. Model predictions of carbonaceous aerosol are compared against Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer and black carbon (BC) high time resolution measurements from three ground sites. PMCAMx predicts BC concentrations reasonably well reproducing the majority (70 %) of the hourly data within a factor of two during both periods. The agreement for the summertime secondary organic aerosol (OA) concentrations is also encouraging (mean bias = 0.1 μg m-3) during a photochemically intense period. The model tends to underpredict the summertime primary OA concentrations in the Paris greater area (by approximately 0.8 μg m-3) mainly due to missing primary OA emissions from cooking activities. The total cooking emissions are estimated to be approximately 80 mg d-1 per capita and have a distinct diurnal profile in which 50 % of the daily cooking OA is emitted during lunch time (12:00-14:00 LT) and 20 % during dinner time (20:00-22:00 LT). Results also show a large underestimation of secondary OA in the Paris greater area during wintertime (mean bias = -2.3 μg m-3) pointing towards a secondary OA formation process during low photochemical activity periods that is not simulated in the model.

  10. Simulating the formation of carbonaceous aerosol in a European Megacity (Paris) during the MEGAPOLI summer and winter campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fountoukis, Christos; Megaritis, Athanasios G.; Skyllakou, Ksakousti; Charalampidis, Panagiotis E.; Denier van der Gon, Hugo A. C.; Crippa, Monica; Prévôt, André S. H.; Fachinger, Friederike; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Pilinis, Christodoulos; Pandis, Spyros N.

    2016-03-01

    We use a three-dimensional regional chemical transport model (PMCAMx) with high grid resolution and high-resolution emissions (4 × 4 km2) over the Paris greater area to simulate the formation of carbonaceous aerosol during a summer (July 2009) and a winter (January/February 2010) period as part of the MEGAPOLI (megacities: emissions, urban, regional, and global atmospheric pollution and climate effects, and Integrated tools for assessment and mitigation) campaigns. Model predictions of carbonaceous aerosol are compared against Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer and black carbon (BC) high time resolution measurements from three ground sites. PMCAMx predicts BC concentrations reasonably well reproducing the majority (70 %) of the hourly data within a factor of two during both periods. The agreement for the summertime secondary organic aerosol (OA) concentrations is also encouraging (mean bias = 0.1 µg m-3) during a photochemically intense period. The model tends to underpredict the summertime primary OA concentrations in the Paris greater area (by approximately 0.8 µg m-3) mainly due to missing primary OA emissions from cooking activities. The total cooking emissions are estimated to be approximately 80 mg d-1 per capita and have a distinct diurnal profile in which 50 % of the daily cooking OA is emitted during lunch time (12:00-14:00 LT) and 20 % during dinner time (20:00-22:00 LT). Results also show a large underestimation of secondary OA in the Paris greater area during wintertime (mean bias = -2.3 µg m-3) pointing towards a secondary OA formation process during low photochemical activity periods that is not simulated in the model.

  11. Fossil and non-fossil source contributions to atmospheric carbonaceous aerosols during extreme spring grassland fires in Eastern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulevicius, Vidmantas; Byčenkienė, Steigvilė; Bozzetti, Carlo; Vlachou, Athanasia; Plauškaitė, Kristina; Mordas, Genrik; Dudoitis, Vadimas; Abbaszade, Gülcin; Remeikis, Vidmantas; Garbaras, Andrius; Masalaite, Agne; Blees, Jan; Fröhlich, Roman; Dällenbach, Kaspar R.; Canonaco, Francesco; Slowik, Jay G.; Dommen, Josef; Zimmermann, Ralf; Schnelle-Kreis, Jürgen; Salazar, Gary A.; Agrios, Konstantinos; Szidat, Sönke; El Haddad, Imad; Prévôt, André S. H.

    2016-05-01

    In early spring the Baltic region is frequently affected by high-pollution events due to biomass burning in that area. Here we present a comprehensive study to investigate the impact of biomass/grass burning (BB) on the evolution and composition of aerosol in Preila, Lithuania, during springtime open fires. Non-refractory submicron particulate matter (NR-PM1) was measured by an Aerodyne aerosol chemical speciation monitor (ACSM) and a source apportionment with the multilinear engine (ME-2) running the positive matrix factorization (PMF) model was applied to the organic aerosol fraction to investigate the impact of biomass/grass burning. Satellite observations over regions of biomass burning activity supported the results and identification of air mass transport to the area of investigation. Sharp increases in biomass burning tracers, such as levoglucosan up to 683 ng m-3 and black carbon (BC) up to 17 µg m-3 were observed during this period. A further separation between fossil and non-fossil primary and secondary contributions was obtained by coupling ACSM PMF results and radiocarbon (14C) measurements of the elemental (EC) and organic (OC) carbon fractions. Non-fossil organic carbon (OCnf) was the dominant fraction of PM1, with the primary (POCnf) and secondary (SOCnf) fractions contributing 26-44 % and 13-23 % to the total carbon (TC), respectively. 5-8 % of the TC had a primary fossil origin (POCf), whereas the contribution of fossil secondary organic carbon (SOCf) was 4-13 %. Non-fossil EC (ECnf) and fossil EC (ECf) ranged from 13-24 and 7-13 %, respectively. Isotope ratios of stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes were used to distinguish aerosol particles associated with solid and liquid fossil fuel burning.

  12. Fossil and non-fossil source contributions to atmospheric carbonaceous aerosols during extreme spring grassland fires in Eastern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulevicius, V.; Byčenkienė, S.; Bozzetti, C.; Vlachou, A.; Plauškaitė, K.; Mordas, G.; Dudoitis, V.; Abbaszade, G.; Remeikis, V.; Garbaras, A.; Masalaite, A.; Blees, J.; Fröhlich, R.; Dällenbach, K. R.; Canonaco, F.; Slowik, J. G.; Dommen, J.; Zimmermann, R.; Schnelle-Kreis, J.; Salazar, G. A.; Agrios, K.; Szidat, S.; El Haddad, I.; Prévôt, A. S. H.

    2015-09-01

    In early spring the Baltic region is frequently affected by high pollution events due to biomass burning in that area. Here we present a comprehensive study to investigate the impact of biomass/grass burning (BB) on the evolution and composition of aerosol in Preila, Lithuania, during springtime open fires. Non-refractory submicron particulate matter (NR-PM1) was measured by an Aerodyne aerosol chemical speciation monitor (ACSM) and a source apportionment with the multilinear engine (ME-2) running the positive matrix factorization (PMF) model was applied to the organic aerosol fraction to investigate the impact of biomass/grass burning. Satellite observations over regions of biomass burning activity supported the results and identification of air mass transport to the area of investigation. Sharp increases in biomass burning tracers, such as levoglucosan up to 683 ng m-3 and black carbon (BC) up to 17 μg m-3 were observed during this period. A further separation between fossil and non-fossil primary and secondary contributions was obtained by coupling ACSM PMF results and radiocarbon (14C) measurements of the elemental (EC) and organic (OC) carbon fractions. Non-fossil organic carbon (OCnf) was the dominant fraction of PM1, with the primary (POCnf) and secondary (SOCnf) fractions contributing 26-44 % and 13-23 % to the TC, respectively. 5-8 % of the TC had a primary fossil origin (POCf), whereas the contribution of fossil secondary organic carbon (SOCf) was 4-13 %. Non-fossil EC (ECnf) and fossil EC (ECf) ranged from 13-24 % and 7-12 %, respectively. Isotope ratio of stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes were used to distinguish aerosol particles associated with solid and liquid fossil fuel burning.

  13. Aerosol Size and Chemical Composition in the Canadian High Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, R. Y. W.; Hayes, P. L.; Leaitch, W. R.; Croft, B.; O'Neill, N. T.; Fogal, P.; Drummond, J. R.; Sloan, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic aerosol have a strong annual cycle, with winter months dominated by long range transport from lower latitudes resulting in high mass loadings. Conversely, local emissions are more prominent in the summer months because of the decreased influence of transported aerosol, allowing us to regularly observe both transported and local aerosol. This study will present observations of aerosol chemical composition and particle number size distribution collected at the Polar Environment Artic Research Laboratory and the Alert Global Atmospheric Watch Observatory at Eureka (80N, 86W) and Alert (82N, 62W), Nunavut, respectively. Summer time observations of the number size distribution reveal a persistent mode of particles centered between 30-50 nm, with occasional bursts of smaller particles. The non-refractory aerosol chemical composition, measured by the Canadian Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Change quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer, is primarily organic, with contributions from both aged and fresher organic aerosol. Factor analysis will be conducted to better understand these sources. The site at Eureka is more susceptible to long range transport since it is at the top of a mountain ridge (610 m above sea level) and will be compared to the site at Alert on an elevated plain (200 m above sea level). This will allow us to determine the relative contributions from processes and sources at the sites at different elevations. Comparisons with aerosol optical depth and GEOS-Chem model output will also be presented to put these surface measurements into context with the overlying and regional atmosphere. Results from this study contribute to our knowledge of aerosol in the high Arctic.

  14. Volcanic Aerosol Radiative Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacis, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Large sporadic volcanic eruptions inject large amounts of sulfur bearing gases into the stratosphere which then get photochemically converted to sulfuric acid aerosol droplets that exert a radiative cooling effect on the global climate system lasting for several years.

  15. Palaeoclimate: Aerosols and rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partin, Jud

    2015-03-01

    Instrumental records have hinted that aerosol emissions may be shifting rainfall over Central America southwards. A 450-year-long precipitation reconstruction indicates that this shift began shortly after the Industrial Revolution.

  16. Emergency Protection from Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Cristy, G.A.

    2001-11-13

    Expedient methods were developed that could be used by an average person, using only materials readily available, to protect himself and his family from injury by toxic (e.g., radioactive) aerosols. The most effective means of protection was the use of a household vacuum cleaner to maintain a small positive pressure on a closed house during passage of the aerosol cloud. Protection factors of 800 and above were achieved.

  17. Emergency protection from aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Cristy, G.A.; Chester, C.V.

    1981-07-01

    Expedient methods were developed that could be used by an average person, using only materials readily available, to protect himself and his family from injury by toxic (e.g., radioactive) aerosols. The most effective means of protection was the use of a household vacuum cleaner to maintain a small positive pressure on a closed house during passage of the aerosol cloud. Protection factors of 800 and above were achieved.

  18. Monodisperse aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Ortiz, Lawrence W.; Soderholm, Sidney C.

    1990-01-01

    An aerosol generator is described which is capable of producing a monodisperse aerosol within narrow limits utilizing an aqueous solution capable of providing a high population of seed nuclei and an organic solution having a low vapor pressure. The two solutions are cold nebulized, mixed, vaporized, and cooled. During cooling, particles of the organic vapor condense onto the excess seed nuclei, and grow to a uniform particle size.

  19. MISR Aerosol Typing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph A.

    2014-01-01

    AeroCom is an open international initiative of scientists interested in the advancement of the understanding of global aerosol properties and aerosol impacts on climate. A central goal is to more strongly tie and constrain modeling efforts to observational data. A major element for exchanges between data and modeling groups are annual meetings. The meeting was held September 20 through October 2, 1014 and the organizers would like to post the presentations.

  20. Biomass burning aerosol over the Amazon during SAMBBA: impact of chemical composition on radiative properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, William; Allan, James; Flynn, Michael; Darbyshire, Eoghan; Hodgson, Amy; Liu, Dantong; O'shea, Sebastian; Bauguitte, Stephane; Szpek, Kate; Langridge, Justin; Johnson, Ben; Haywood, Jim; Longo, Karla; Artaxo, Paulo; Coe, Hugh

    2014-05-01

    Biomass burning represents one of the largest sources of particulate matter to the atmosphere, resulting in a significant perturbation to the Earth's radiative balance coupled with serious impacts on public health. Globally, biomass burning aerosols are thought to exert a small warming effect but with the uncertainty being 4 times greater than the central estimate. On regional scales, the impact is substantially greater, particularly in areas such as the Amazon Basin where large, intense and frequent burning occurs on an annual basis for several months. Absorption by atmospheric aerosols is underestimated by models over South America, which points to significant uncertainties relating to Black Carbon (BC) aerosol properties. Initial results from the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA) field experiment, which took place during September and October 2012 over Brazil on-board the UK Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurement (FAAM) BAe-146 research aircraft, are presented here. Aerosol chemical composition was measured by an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and a DMT Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). The physical, chemical and optical properties of the aerosols across the region will be characterized in order to establish the impact of biomass burning on regional air quality, weather and climate. The aircraft sampled a range of conditions including sampling of pristine Rainforest, fresh biomass burning plumes, regional haze and elevated biomass burning layers within the free troposphere. The aircraft sampled biomass burning aerosol across the southern Amazon in the states of Rondonia and Mato Grosso, as well as in a Cerrado (Savannah-like) region in Tocantins state. This presented a range of fire conditions, both in terms of their number, intensity, vegetation-type and their combustion efficiencies. Near-source sampling of fires in Rainforest environments suggested that smouldering combustion dominated, while flaming combustion dominated

  1. Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) flow reactor measurements of SOA formation in a Ponderosa Pine forest in the southern Rocky Mountains during BEACHON-RoMBAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palm, B. B.; Ortega, A. M.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Day, D. A.; Kaser, L.; Karl, T.; Jud, W.; Hansel, A.; Fry, J.; Brown, S. S.; Zarzana, K. J.; Dube, W. P.; Wagner, N.; Draper, D.; Brune, W. H.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2012-12-01

    A Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) photooxidation flow reactor was used in combination with an Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer to characterize biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation in a terpene-dominated forest during the July-August 2011 Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics & Nitrogen - Rocky Mountain Biogenic Aerosol Study (BEACHON-RoMBAS) field campaign at the U.S. Forest Service Manitou Forest Observatory, Colorado, as well as in corresponding laboratory experiments. In the PAM reactor, a chosen oxidant (OH, O3, or NO3) was generated and controlled over a range of values up to 10,000 times ambient levels. High oxidant concentrations accelerated the gas-phase, heterogeneous, and possibly aqueous oxidative aging of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), inorganic gases, and existing aerosol, which led to repartitioning into the aerosol phase. PAM oxidative processing represented from a few hours up to ~20 days of equivalent atmospheric aging during the ~3 minute reactor residence time. During BEACHON-RoMBAS, PAM photooxidation enhanced SOA at intermediate OH exposure (1-10 equivalent days) but resulted in net loss of OA at long OH exposure (10-20 equivalent days), demonstrating the competing effects of functionalization vs. fragmentation (and possibly photolysis) as aging increased. PAM oxidation also resulted in f44 vs. f43 and Van Krevelen diagram (H/C vs. O/C) slopes similar to ambient oxidation, suggesting the PAM reactor employs oxidation pathways similar to ambient air. Single precursor aerosol yields were measured using the PAM reactor in the laboratory as a function of organic aerosol concentration and reacted hydrocarbon amounts. When applying the laboratory PAM yields with complete consumption of the most abundant VOCs measured at the forest site (monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, MBO, and toluene), a simple model underpredicted the amount of SOA formed in the PAM reactor in the

  2. RACORO aerosol data processing

    SciTech Connect

    Elisabeth Andrews

    2011-10-31

    The RACORO aerosol data (cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), condensation nuclei (CN) and aerosol size distributions) need further processing to be useful for model evaluation (e.g., GCM droplet nucleation parameterizations) and other investigations. These tasks include: (1) Identification and flagging of 'splash' contaminated Twin Otter aerosol data. (2) Calculation of actual supersaturation (SS) values in the two CCN columns flown on the Twin Otter. (3) Interpolation of CCN spectra from SGP and Twin Otter to 0.2% SS. (4) Process data for spatial variability studies. (5) Provide calculated light scattering from measured aerosol size distributions. Below we first briefly describe the measurements and then describe the results of several data processing tasks that which have been completed, paving the way for the scientific analyses for which the campaign was designed. The end result of this research will be several aerosol data sets which can be used to achieve some of the goals of the RACORO mission including the enhanced understanding of cloud-aerosol interactions and improved cloud simulations in climate models.

  3. Characteristics of Submicron Aerosols in 2013 summer of Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Song; Hu, Min; Shang, Dongjie; Zheng, Jing; Du, Zhuofei; Wu, Yusheng; Lu, Sihua; Zeng, Limin; Zhang, Renyi

    2016-04-01

    To characterize the air pollution of North China Plain of China, CAREBEIJING-2013 field campaign (Campaigns of Air quality REsearch in BEIJING and surrounding region) was conducted in summer of 2013. Submicron aerosols were measured at an urban site PKU (Peking University, 39° 59'21"N, 116° 18'25"E) from July 28th to September 31st 2013. A suite of integrated instruments was used to measure the size distribution, effective density and hygroscopicity of ambient particles. The chemical composition of submicron particles were measured by using an Aerodyne High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) (Billerica, MA, USA). The average PM2.5 concentration was 73.0±70.7 μg m‑3 during the measurement. The particulate pollution showed distinct 4-7 days cycles controlled by the meteorological conditions. Each cycle started with low PM2.5 mass concentrations (<20 μg m‑3), since the air mass was from relatively clean mountainous area. The particle number concentrations were high, but and the sizes were small (<30 nm) at this stage, which can be explained by the new particle formation. In the succeeding days, both the particle mass and size continuously increased. The PM2.5concentration increased rapidly by >60 μg day‑1, and the particle mean diameter grew to >100 nm. It is interesting to note that the mean diameters showed similar trend to PM2.5 mass concentrations, indicating the particle pollution attributed to the growth of the newly formed small particles. During the measurement, the average particle densities are between 1.3-1.5 g cm‑3, indicating organics and sulfate were dominant in the particles. The densities of smaller particles, i.e. 46 nm, 81nm, showed single peak at 1.3-1.5 g cm‑3, indicating the particles are internal mixed sulfate and organics. While the 150nm and 240 nm particle densities exhibited bimodal distribution with an additional small peak at ˜1.1 g cm‑3, which is considered as external mixed organic

  4. Characteristics of Submicron Aerosols in 2013 summer of Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Song; Hu, Min; Shang, Dongjie; Zheng, Jing; Du, Zhuofei; Wu, Yusheng; Lu, Sihua; Zeng, Limin; Zhang, Renyi

    2016-04-01

    To characterize the air pollution of North China Plain of China, CAREBEIJING-2013 field campaign (Campaigns of Air quality REsearch in BEIJING and surrounding region) was conducted in summer of 2013. Submicron aerosols were measured at an urban site PKU (Peking University, 39° 59'21"N, 116° 18'25"E) from July 28th to September 31st 2013. A suite of integrated instruments was used to measure the size distribution, effective density and hygroscopicity of ambient particles. The chemical composition of submicron particles were measured by using an Aerodyne High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) (Billerica, MA, USA). The average PM2.5 concentration was 73.0±70.7 μg m-3 during the measurement. The particulate pollution showed distinct 4-7 days cycles controlled by the meteorological conditions. Each cycle started with low PM2.5 mass concentrations (<20 μg m-3), since the air mass was from relatively clean mountainous area. The particle number concentrations were high, but and the sizes were small (<30 nm) at this stage, which can be explained by the new particle formation. In the succeeding days, both the particle mass and size continuously increased. The PM2.5concentration increased rapidly by >60 μg day-1, and the particle mean diameter grew to >100 nm. It is interesting to note that the mean diameters showed similar trend to PM2.5 mass concentrations, indicating the particle pollution attributed to the growth of the newly formed small particles. During the measurement, the average particle densities are between 1.3-1.5 g cm-3, indicating organics and sulfate were dominant in the particles. The densities of smaller particles, i.e. 46 nm, 81nm, showed single peak at 1.3-1.5 g cm-3, indicating the particles are internal mixed sulfate and organics. While the 150nm and 240 nm particle densities exhibited bimodal distribution with an additional small peak at ˜1.1 g cm-3, which is considered as external mixed organic particles or aged

  5. Chemical characterization and physico-chemical properties of aerosols at Villum Research Station, Greenland during spring 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasius, M.; Iversen, L. S.; Svendsen, S. B.; Hansen, A. M. K.; Nielsen, I. E.; Nøjgaard, J. K.; Zhang, H.; Goldstein, A. H.; Skov, H.; Massling, A.; Bilde, M.

    2015-12-01

    The effects of aerosols on the radiation balance and climate are of special concern in Arctic areas, which have experienced warming at twice the rate of the global average. As future scenarios include increased emissions of air pollution, including sulfate aerosols, from ship traffic and oil exploration in the Arctic, there is an urgent need to obtain the fundamental scientific knowledge to accurately assess the consequences of pollutants to environment and climate. In this work, we studied the chemistry of aerosols at the new Villum Research Station (81°36' N, 16°40' W) in north-east Greenland during the "inauguration campaign" in spring 2015. The chemical composition of sub-micrometer Arctic aerosols was investigated using a Soot Particle Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-ToF-AMS). Aerosol samples were also collected on filters using both a high-volume sampler and a low-volume sampler equipped with a denuder for organic gases. Chemical analyses of filter samples include determination of inorganic anions and cations using ion-chromatography, and analysis of carboxylic acids and organosulfates of anthropogenic and biogenic origin using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QTOF-MS). Previous studies found that organosulfates constitute a surprisingly high fraction of organic aerosols during the Arctic Haze period in winter and spring. Investigation of organic molecular tracers provides useful information on aerosol sources and atmospheric processes. The physico-chemical properties of Arctic aerosols are also under investigation. These measurements include particle number size distribution, water activity and surface tension of aerosol samples in order to deduct information on their hygroscopicity and cloud-forming potential. The results of this study are relevant to understanding aerosol sources and processes as well as climate effects in the Arctic, especially during the Arctic haze

  6. Testing of Nb3Sn quadrupole coils using magnetic mirror structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zlobin, A.V.; Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Bossert, R.; Chlachidze, G.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Lamm, M.; Novitski, I.; Tartaglia, M.; Tompkins, J.C.; /Fermilab

    2009-07-01

    This paper describes the design and parameters of a quadrupole mirror structure for testing the mechanical, thermal and quench performance of single shell-type superconducting quadrupole coils at field, current and force levels similar to that of real magnet. The concept was experimentally verified by testing two quadrupole coils, previously used in quadrupole models, in the developed mirror structure in the temperature range from 4.5 to 1.9 K. The coils were instrumented with voltage taps, heaters, and strain gauges to monitor their mechanical and thermal properties and quench performance. A new quadrupole coil made of improved Nb{sub 3}Sn RRP-108/127 strand and cable insulation based on E-glass tape was also tested using this structure. The fabrication and test results of the quadrupole mirror models are reported and discussed.

  7. Testing of NB3SN Quadrupole Coils Using Magnetic Mirror Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlobin, A. V.; Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Bossert, R.; Chlachidze, G.; Kashikhin, V. S.; Kashikhin, V. V.; Lamm, M. J.; Novitski, I.; Tartaglia, M.; Tompkins, J. C.; Turrioni, D.; Yamada, R.

    2010-04-01

    This paper describes the design and parameters of a quadrupole mirror structure for testing the mechanical, thermal and quench performance of single shell-type superconducting quadrupole coils at field, current and force levels similar to that of real magnet. The concept was experimentally verified by testing two quadrupole coils, previously used in quadrupole models, in the developed mirror structure in the temperature range from 4.5 to 1.9 K. The coils were instrumented with voltage taps, heaters, and strain gauges to monitor their mechanical and thermal properties and quench performance. A new quadrupole coil made of improved Nb3Sn RRP-108/127 strand and cable insulation based on E-glass tape was also tested using this structure. The fabrication and test results of the quadrupole mirror models are reported and discussed.

  8. Sensitivity of nuclear-quadrupole double-resonance detection of half-integer spin nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seliger, J.; Žagar, V.

    2008-10-01

    The sensitivity of the Slusher and Hahn's nuclear quadrupole double resonance technique is calculated in general for an arbitrary nuclear spin S of the quadrupole nuclei and for an arbitrary asymmetry parameter η of the electric field gradient tensor. The nuclear spin S = 5/2 ( 17O, 25Mg, …) is treated in details. The influence of the cross-relaxation rate between the quadrupole nuclei and the abundant spin system on the sensitivity of double resonance is discussed. The results of the theoretical analysis are applied in the analysis of the 1H- 17O nuclear quadrupole double resonance spectra in p-toluenesulfonamide and 2-nitrobenzoic acid. The 17O nuclear quadrupole resonance frequencies from a sulfonamide group are determined for the first time. The proton-oxygen cross-relaxation rates and the proton local frequency in zero external magnetic field are experimentally determined from the nuclear quadrupole double resonance spectra.

  9. Characterization of aerosol particles at the forested site in Lithuania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimselyte, I.; Garbaras, A.; Kvietkus, K.; Remeikis, V.

    2009-04-01

    monitoring station (55˚ 26'26"N; 26˚ 03'60"E) in the eastern part of Lithuania in the Aukštaitija national park during 2-24 July, 2008. The Rugšteliškis station is located in a remote relatively clean forested area. An aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), developed at Aerodyne Research, was used to obtain real-time quantitative information on particle size-resolved mass loadings for volatile and semi-volatile chemical components present in/on ambient aerosol. The AMS inlet system allows 100 % transmission efficiency for particles with size diameter between 60 to 600 nm and partial transmission down to 20 nm and up to 2000 nm. The aerosol sampling was also carried out using a Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI) model 110. The flow rate was 30 l/min, and the 50% aerodynamic cutoff diameters of the 10 stages were 18, 10, 5.6, 3.2, 1.8, 1.0, 0.56, 0.32, 0.18, 0.10 and 0.056 m. Aluminum foil was used as the impaction surface. The aerosol samples were analyzed for total carbon using the elemental analyzer (Flash EA1112). Besides, samples were analyzed for ^13C/12C ratio by the isotopic ratio mass spectrometer (Thermo Finnigan Delta Plus Advantage) (Norman et al., 1999; Garbaras et al., 2008). During campaign the dynamic behavior of aerosols was measured and quantitatively compared with meteorological conditions and air mass transport. The submicron aerosol was predominately sulphate and organic material. The AMS was able to discriminate and quantify mixed organic/inorganic accumulation mode particles (300 - 400 nm), which appeared to be dominated by regional sources and were of the origin similar to those seen in the more remote areas. The particulate organic fraction was also investigated in detail using the mass spectral data. By combining the organic matter size distribution (measured with AMS) with the total carbon (TC) size distribution (measured with MOUDI) we were able to report organic carbon to total carbon (OC/TC) ratio in different size particles

  10. Kinetic limitations in gas-particle reactions arising from slow diffusion in secondary organic aerosol.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shouming; Shiraiwa, Manabu; McWhinney, Robert D; Pöschl, Ulrich; Abbatt, Jonathan P D

    2013-01-01

    The potential for aerosol physical properties, such as phase, morphology and viscosity/ diffusivity, to affect particle reactivity remains highly uncertain. We report here a study of the effect of bulk diffusivity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) on the kinetics of the heterogeneous reaction of particle-borne benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) with ozone. The experiments were performed by coating BaP-ammonium sulfate particles with multilayers of SOA formed from ozonolysis of alpha-pinene, and by subsequently investigating the kinetics of BaP loss via reaction with excess ozone using an aerosol flow tube coupled to an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS). All reactions exhibit pseudo-first order kinetics and are empirically well described by a Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) mechanism. The results show that under dry conditions (RH < 5%) diffusion through the SOA coating can lead to significant mass transfer constraints on the kinetics, with behavior between that previously observed by our group for solid and liquid organic coats. The reactivity of BaP was enhanced at -50% relative humidity (RH) suggesting that water uptake lowers the viscosity of the SOA, hence lifting the mass transfer constraint to some degree. The kinetics for -70% RH were similar to results obtained without SOA coats, indicating that the SOA had sufficiently low viscosity and was sufficiently liquid-like that reactants could rapidly diffuse through the coat. A kinetic multi-layer model for aerosol surface and bulk chemistry was applied to simulate the kinetics, yielding estimates for the diffusion coefficients (in cm2 s(-1)) for BaP in alpha-pinene SOA of 2 x 10(-14), 8 x 10(-14) and > 1 x 10(-12) for dry (RH < 5%), 50% RH and 70% RH conditions, respectively. These results clearly indicate that slow diffusion of reactants through SOA coats under specific conditions can provide shielding from gas-phase oxidants, enabling the long-range atmospheric transport of

  11. Kinetic limitations in gas-particle reactions arising from slow diffusion in secondary organic aerosol.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shouming; Shiraiwa, Manabu; McWhinney, Robert D; Pöschl, Ulrich; Abbatt, Jonathan P D

    2013-01-01

    The potential for aerosol physical properties, such as phase, morphology and viscosity/ diffusivity, to affect particle reactivity remains highly uncertain. We report here a study of the effect of bulk diffusivity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) on the kinetics of the heterogeneous reaction of particle-borne benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) with ozone. The experiments were performed by coating BaP-ammonium sulfate particles with multilayers of SOA formed from ozonolysis of alpha-pinene, and by subsequently investigating the kinetics of BaP loss via reaction with excess ozone using an aerosol flow tube coupled to an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS). All reactions exhibit pseudo-first order kinetics and are empirically well described by a Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) mechanism. The results show that under dry conditions (RH < 5%) diffusion through the SOA coating can lead to significant mass transfer constraints on the kinetics, with behavior between that previously observed by our group for solid and liquid organic coats. The reactivity of BaP was enhanced at -50% relative humidity (RH) suggesting that water uptake lowers the viscosity of the SOA, hence lifting the mass transfer constraint to some degree. The kinetics for -70% RH were similar to results obtained without SOA coats, indicating that the SOA had sufficiently low viscosity and was sufficiently liquid-like that reactants could rapidly diffuse through the coat. A kinetic multi-layer model for aerosol surface and bulk chemistry was applied to simulate the kinetics, yielding estimates for the diffusion coefficients (in cm2 s(-1)) for BaP in alpha-pinene SOA of 2 x 10(-14), 8 x 10(-14) and > 1 x 10(-12) for dry (RH < 5%), 50% RH and 70% RH conditions, respectively. These results clearly indicate that slow diffusion of reactants through SOA coats under specific conditions can provide shielding from gas-phase oxidants, enabling the long-range atmospheric transport of

  12. Long-term Chemical Characterization of Submicron Aerosol Particles in the Amazon Forest - ATTO Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, S.; Brito, J.; Rizzo, L. V.; Holanda, B. A.; Cirino, G. G.; Saturno, J.; Krüger, M. L.; Pöhlker, C.; Ng, N. L.; Xu, L.; Andreae, M. O.; Artaxo, P.

    2015-12-01

    The study of the chemical composition of aerosol particles in the Amazon forest represents a step forward to understand the strong coupling between the atmosphere and the forest. For this reason submicron aerosol particles were investigated in the Amazon forest, where biogenic and anthropogenic aerosol particles coexist at the different seasons (wet/dry). The measurements were performed at the ATTO station, which is located about 150 km northeast of Manaus. At ATTO station the Aerosol chemical speciation monitor (ACSM, Aerodyne) and the Multiangle absorption photometer (MAAP, Thermo 5012) have been operated continuously from March 2014 to July 2015. In this study, long-term measurements (near-real-time, ~30 minutes) of PM1 chemical composition were investigated for the first time in this environment.The wet season presented lower concentrations than the dry season (~5 times). In terms of chemical composition, both seasons were dominated by organics (75 and 63%) followed by sulfate (11 and 13%). Nitrate presented different ratio values between the mass-to-charges 30 to 46 (main nitrate fragments) suggesting the presence of nitrate as inorganic and organic nitrate during both seasons. The results indicated that about 75% of the nitrate signal was from organic nitrate during the dry season. In addition, several episodes with elevated amount of chloride, likely in the form of sea-salt from the Atlantic Ocean, were observed during the wet season. During those episodes, chloride comprised up to 7% of the PM1. During the dry season, chloride was also observed; however, with different volatility, which suggested that Chloride was present in different form and source. Moreover, the constant presence of sulfate and BC during the wet season might be related to biomass burning emissions from Africa. BC concentration was 2.5 times higher during the dry season. Further characterization of the organic fraction was accomplished with the positive matrix factorization (PMF), which

  13. Design and construction of a radiation resistant quadrupole using metal oxide insulated CICC

    SciTech Connect

    Albert F. Zeller

    2012-12-28

    The construction of a engineering test model of a radiation resistant quadrupole is described. The cold-iron quadrupole uses coils fabricated from metal-oixide (synthetic spinel) insulated Cable-In-Conduit-Conductor (CICC). The superconductor is NbTi in a copper matrix. The quadrupole is designed to produce a pole-tip field of 2 T with an operating current of 7,000 A.

  14. Chemical composition, sources, and processes of urban aerosols during summertime in northwest China: insights from high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Zhang, Q.; Chen, M.; Ge, X.; Ren, J.; Qin, D.

    2014-12-01

    An Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was deployed along with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and a multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP) to measure the temporal variations of the mass loading, chemical composition, and size distribution of submicron particulate matter (PM1) in Lanzhou, northwest China, during 11 July-7 August 2012. The average (PM1 mass concentration including non-refractory (PM1 (NR-(PM1) measured by HR-ToF-AMS and black carbon (BC) measured by MAAP during this study was 24.5 μg m-3 (ranging from 0.86 to 105 μg m-3), with a mean composition consisting of 47% organics, 16% sulfate, 12% BC, 11% ammonium, 10% nitrate, and 4% chloride. Organic aerosol (OA) on average consisted of 70% carbon, 21% oxygen, 8% hydrogen, and 1% nitrogen, with the average oxygen-to-carbon ratio (O / C) of 0.33 and organic mass-to-carbon ratio (OM / OC) of 1.58. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) of the high-resolution organic mass spectra identified four distinct factors which represent, respectively, two primary OA (POA) emission sources (traffic and food cooking) and two secondary OA (SOA) types - a fresher, semi-volatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA) and a more aged, low-volatility oxygenated OA (LV-OOA). Traffic-related hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and BC displayed distinct diurnal patterns, both with peak at ~ 07:00-11:00 (BJT: UTC +8), corresponding to the morning rush hours, while cooking-emission related OA (COA) peaked during three meal periods. The diurnal profiles of sulfate and LV-OOA displayed a broad peak between ~ 07:00 and 15:00, while those of nitrate, ammonium, and SV-OOA showed a narrower peak between ~ 08:00-13:00. The later morning and early afternoon maximum in the diurnal profiles of secondary aerosol species was likely caused by downward mixing of pollutants aloft, which were likely produced in the residual layer decoupled from the boundary layer during nighttime. The mass spectrum of SV-OOA was

  15. Aerosol optical extinction during the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Éxperiment (FRAPPÉ) 2014 summertime field campaign, Colorado, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingle, Justin H.; Vu, Kennedy; Bahreini, Roya; Apel, Eric C.; Campos, Teresa L.; Flocke, Frank; Fried, Alan; Herndon, Scott; Hills, Alan J.; Hornbrook, Rebecca S.; Huey, Greg; Kaser, Lisa; Montzka, Denise D.; Nowak, John B.; Reeves, Mike; Richter, Dirk; Roscioli, Joseph R.; Shertz, Stephen; Stell, Meghan; Tanner, David; Tyndall, Geoff; Walega, James; Weibring, Petter; Weinheimer, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    Summertime aerosol optical extinction (βext) was measured in the Colorado Front Range and Denver metropolitan area as part of the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Éxperiment (FRAPPÉ) campaign during July-August 2014. An Aerodyne cavity attenuated phase shift particle light extinction monitor (CAPS-PMex) was deployed to measure βext (at average relative humidity of 20 ± 7 %) of submicron aerosols at λ = 632 nm at 1 Hz. Data from a suite of gas-phase instrumentation were used to interpret βext behavior in various categories of air masses and sources. Extinction enhancement ratios relative to CO (Δβext / ΔCO) were higher in aged urban air masses compared to fresh air masses by ˜ 50 %. The resulting increase in Δβext / ΔCO for highly aged air masses was accompanied by formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). In addition, the impacts of aerosol composition on βext in air masses under the influence of urban, natural oil and gas operations (O&G), and agriculture and livestock operations were evaluated. Estimated non-refractory mass extinction efficiency (MEE) values for different air mass types ranged from 1.51 to 2.27 m2 g-1, with the minimum and maximum values observed in urban and agriculture-influenced air masses, respectively. The mass distribution for organic, nitrate, and sulfate aerosols presented distinct profiles in different air mass types. During 11-12 August, regional influence of a biomass burning event was observed, increasing the background βext and estimated MEE values in the Front Range.

  16. Progress in the Development of Superconducting Quadrupoles forHeavy-ion Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Faltens, A.; Lietzke, A.; Sabbi, G.; Seidl, P.; Lund, S.; Manahan, R.; Martovetsky, N.; Gung, C.; Minervini, J.; Schultz, J.; Myatt, L.; Meinke, R.

    2002-08-19

    The Heavy Ion Fusion program is developing single aperture superconducting quadrupoles based on NbTi conductor, for use in the High Current Experiment at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Following the fabrication and testing of prototypes using two different approaches, a baseline design has been selected and further optimized. A prototype cryostat for a quadrupole doublet, with features to accommodate induction acceleration modules, is being fabricated. The single aperture magnet was derived from a conceptual design of a quadrupole array magnet for multi-beam transport. Progress on the development of superconducting quadrupole arrays for future experiments is also reported.

  17. Progress in the development of superconducting quadrupoles for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Faltens, A.; Lietzke, A.; Sabbi, G.; Seidl, P.; Lund, S.; Manahan, B.; Martovetsky, N.; Gung, C.; Minervini, J.; Schultz, J.; Myatt, L.; Meinke, R.

    2002-05-24

    The Heavy Ion Fusion program is developing single aperture superconducting quadrupoles based on NbTi conductor, for use in the High Current Experiment at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Following the fabrication and testing of prototypes using two different approaches, a baseline design has been selected and further optimized. A prototype cryostat for a quadrupole doublet, with features to accommodate induction acceleration modules, is being fabricated. The single aperture magnet was derived from a conceptual design of a quadrupole array magnet for multi-beam transport. Progress on the development of superconducting quadrupole arrays for future experiments is also reported.

  18. Comparison of conventional and novel quadrupole drift tube magnets inspired by Klaus Halbach

    SciTech Connect

    Feinberg, B.

    1995-02-01

    Quadrupole drift tube magnets for a heavy-ion linac provide a demanding application of magnet technology. A comparison is made of three different solutions to the problem of providing an adjustable high-field-strength quadrupole magnet in a small volume. A conventional tape-wound electromagnet quadrupole magnet (conventional) is compared with an adjustable permanent-magnet/iron quadrupole magnet (hybrid) and a laced permanent-magnet/iron/electromagnet (laced). Data is presented from magnets constructed for the SuperHILAC heavy-ion linear accelerator, and conclusions are drawn for various applications.

  19. Quadrupole-induced resonant-particle transport in a pure electron plasma.

    PubMed

    Gilson, E P; Fajans, J

    2003-01-10

    Small transverse magnetic quadrupole fields sharply degrade the confinement of non-neutral plasmas held in Malmberg-Penning traps. For example, a quadrupole magnetic field of only 0.02 G/cm doubles the diffusion rate in a trap with a 100 G axial magnetic field. Larger quadrupole fields noticeably change the shape of the plasma. The transport is greatest at an orbital resonance. These results cast doubt on plans to use magnetic quadrupole neutral atom traps to confine antihydrogen atoms created in double-well positron/antiproton Malmberg-Penning traps.

  20. Compositional and Optical Properties of Titan Haze Analogs Using Aerosol Mass Spectrometry, Photoacoustic Spectroscopy and Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugelow, M.; Zarzana, K. J.; Tolbert, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    The organic haze that surrounds Saturn's moon Titan is formed through the photolysis and electron initiated dissociation of methane and nitrogen. The chemical pathways leading to haze formation and the resulting haze optical properties are still highly uncertain. Here we examine the compositional and optical properties of Titan haze aerosol analogs. By studying these properties together, the impact of haze on Titan's radiative balance can be better understood. The aerosol analogs studied are produced from different initial methane concentrations (0.1, 2 and 10% CH4) using spark discharge excitation. To determine the complex refractive index of the aerosol, we combine two spectroscopic techniques, one that measures absorption and one that measures extinction: photoacoustic spectroscopy coupled with cavity ring-down spectroscopy (PASCaRD). This technique provides the benefit of a high precision determination of the imaginary component of the refractive index (k), along with the highly sensitive determination of the real component of the refractive index (n). The refractive indices are retrieved at two wavelengths, 405 and 532 nm, using the PASCaRD system. To yield aerosol composition, quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometry is used. Compositional information is obtained from a technique that uses isotopically labeled and unlabeled methane gas. I will present preliminary data on the complex refractive indices of Titan aerosol analogs at both wavelengths, in conjunction with the aerosol composition as a percent by weight of carbon, nitrogen and hydrogen. The correlation of optical and chemical properties should be useful for remote sensing instruments probing Titan haze.

  1. CMB quadrupole suppression. I. Initial conditions of inflationary perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Boyanovsky, D.; Vega, H. J. de; Sanchez, N. G.

    2006-12-15

    We investigate the issue of initial conditions of curvature and tensor perturbations at the beginning of slow roll inflation and their effect on the power spectra. Renormalizability and small backreaction constrain the high k behavior of the Bogoliubov coefficients that define these initial conditions. We introduce a transfer function D(k) which encodes the effect of generic initial conditions on the power spectra. The constraint from renormalizability and small backreaction entails that D(k)(less-or-similar sign){mu}{sup 2}/k{sup 2} for large k, implying that observable effects from initial conditions are more prominent in the low multipoles. This behavior affects the CMB quadrupole by the observed amount {approx}10%-20% when {mu} is of the order of the energy scale of inflation. The effects on high l-multipoles are suppressed by a factor {approx}1/l{sup 2} due to the falloff of D(k) for large wave vectors k. We show that the determination of generic initial conditions for the fluctuations is equivalent to the scattering problem by a potential V({eta}) localized just prior to the slow roll stage. Such potential leads to a transfer function D(k) which automatically obeys the renormalizability and small backreaction constraints. We find that an attractive potential V({eta}) yields a suppression of the lower CMB multipoles. Both for curvature and tensor modes, the quadrupole suppression depends only on the energy scale of V({eta}), and on the time interval where V({eta}) is nonzero. A suppression of the quadrupole for curvature perturbations consistent with the data is obtained when the scale of the potential is of the order of k{sub Q}{sup 2} where k{sub Q} is the wave vector whose physical wavelength is the Hubble radius today.

  2. Optimized Superconducting Quadrupole Arrays for Multiple Beam Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Meinke, Rainer, B.; Goodzeit, Carl, L.; Ball, Millicent, J.

    2005-09-20

    This research project advanced the development of reliable, cost-effective arrays of superconducting quadrupole magnets for use in multi-beam inertial fusion accelerators. The field in each array cell must be identical and meet stringent requirements for field quality and strength. An optimized compact array design using flat double-layer pancake coils was developed. Analytical studies of edge termination methods showed that it is feasible to meet the requirements for field uniformity in all cells and elimination of stray external field in several ways: active methods that involve placement of field compensating coils on the periphery of the array or a passive method that involves use of iron shielding.

  3. Beam acceleration through proton radio frequency quadrupole accelerator in BARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagwat, P. V.; Krishnagopal, S.; Mathew, J. V.; Singh, S. K.; Jain, P.; Rao, S. V. L. S.; Pande, M.; Kumar, R.; Roychowdhury, P.; Kelwani, H.; Rama Rao, B. V.; Gupta, S. K.; Agarwal, A.; Kukreti, B. M.; Singh, P.

    2016-05-01

    A 3 MeV proton Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator has been designed at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India, for the Low Energy High Intensity Proton Accelerator (LEHIPA) programme. The 352 MHz RFQ is built in 4 segments and in the first phase two segments of the LEHIPA RFQ were commissioned, accelerating a 50 keV, 1 mA pulsed proton beam from the ion source, to an energy of 1.24 MeV. The successful operation of the RFQ gave confidence in the physics understanding and technology development that have been achieved, and indicate that the road forward can now be traversed rather more quickly.

  4. Nuclear quadrupole resonance studies project. [spectrometer design and spectrum analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murty, A. N.

    1978-01-01

    The participation of undergraduates in nuclear quadrupole resonance research at Grambling University was made possible by NASA grants. Expanded laboratory capabilities include (1) facilities for high and low temperature generation and measurement; (2) facilities for radio frequency generation and measurement with the modern spectrum analyzers, precision frequency counters and standard signal generators; (3) vacuum and glass blowing facilities; and (4) miscellaneous electronic and machine shop facilities. Experiments carried out over a five year period are described and their results analyzed. Theoretical studies on solid state crystalline electrostatic fields, field gradients, and antishielding factors are included.

  5. Superconducting focusing quadrupoles for heavy ion fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Sabbi, G.L.; Faltens, A.; Leitner, M.; Lietzke, A.; Seidl, P.; Barnard, J.; Lund, S.; Martovetsky, N.; Gung, C.; Minervini, J.; Radovinsky, A.; Schultz, J.; Meinke, R.

    2003-05-01

    The Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) Program is developing superconducting focusing magnets for both near-term experiments and future driver accelerators. In particular, single bore quadrupoles have been fabricated and tested for use in the High Current Experiment (HCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The next steps involve the development of magnets for the planned Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX) and the fabrication of the first prototype multi-beam focusing arrays for fusion driver accelerators. The status of the magnet R&D program is reported, including experimental requirements, design issues and test results.

  6. Cool Down Analysis of a Cryocooler Based Quadrupole Magnet Cryostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, A.; Kar, S.; Chacko, J.; Kumar, M.; Babu, S.; Sahu, S.; Kumar, R.; Antony, J.; Datta, T. S.

    A superconducting quadrupole doublet magnet with cold superferric iron cover for the Hybrid Recoil Mass Analyzer (HYRA) beam line has been commissioned. The total cold mass of the helium vessel with iron yoke and pole is 2 ton. A set of two Sumitomo cryocoolers take care of various heat loads to the cryostat. The first successful cool down of the cryostat has been completed recently, magnets have been powered and magnetic field profiling has been done inside theroom temperature beam tube. This paper will highlight the cryostat details along with the cool down and operational test results obtained from the first cool down.

  7. Miniature quadrupole mass spectrometer having a cold cathode ionization source

    DOEpatents

    Felter, Thomas E.

    2002-01-01

    An improved quadrupole mass spectrometer is described. The improvement lies in the substitution of the conventional hot filament electron source with a cold cathode field emitter array which in turn allows operating a small QMS at much high internal pressures then are currently achievable. By eliminating of the hot filament such problems as thermally "cracking" delicate analyte molecules, outgassing a "hot" filament, high power requirements, filament contamination by outgas species, and spurious em fields are avoid all together. In addition, the ability of produce FEAs using well-known and well developed photolithographic techniques, permits building a QMS having multiple redundancies of the ionization source at very low additional cost.

  8. Quench margin measurement in Nb3Sn quadrupole magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, V.V.; Bossert, R.; Chlachidze, G.; Lamm, M.; Novitski, I.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

    2008-08-01

    One of the possible practical applications of the Nb{sub 3}Sn accelerator magnets is the LHC luminosity upgrade that involves replacing the present NbTi focusing quadrupoles in two high-luminosity interaction regions (IR). The IR magnets are exposed to strong radiation from the interaction point that requires a detailed investigation of the magnet operating margins under the expected radiation-induced heat depositions. This paper presents the results of simulation and measurement of quench limits and temperature margins for a Nb{sub 3}Sn model magnet using a special midplane strip heater.

  9. Biological aerosol background characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blatny, Janet; Fountain, Augustus W., III

    2011-05-01

    To provide useful information during military operations, or as part of other security situations, a biological aerosol detector has to respond within seconds or minutes to an attack by virulent biological agents, and with low false alarms. Within this time frame, measuring virulence of a known microorganism is extremely difficult, especially if the microorganism is of unknown antigenic or nucleic acid properties. Measuring "live" characteristics of an organism directly is not generally an option, yet only viable organisms are potentially infectious. Fluorescence based instruments have been designed to optically determine if aerosol particles have viability characteristics. Still, such commercially available biological aerosol detection equipment needs to be improved for their use in military and civil applications. Air has an endogenous population of microorganisms that may interfere with alarm software technologies. To design robust algorithms, a comprehensive knowledge of the airborne biological background content is essential. For this reason, there is a need to study ambient live bacterial populations in as many locations as possible. Doing so will permit collection of data to define diverse biological characteristics that in turn can be used to fine tune alarm algorithms. To avoid false alarms, improving software technologies for biological detectors is a crucial feature requiring considerations of various parameters that can be applied to suppress alarm triggers. This NATO Task Group will aim for developing reference methods for monitoring biological aerosol characteristics to improve alarm algorithms for biological detection. Additionally, they will focus on developing reference standard methodology for monitoring biological aerosol characteristics to reduce false alarm rates.

  10. MISR UAE2 Aerosol Versioning

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-03-21

    ... the MISR aerosol microphysical properties are "Beta." Uncertainty envelopes for the aerosol optical depths are given in  Kahn et ... particle microphysical property validation is in progress, uncertainty envelopes on particle size distribution, shape, and ...

  11. Atmospheric Chemistry: Nature's plasticized aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemann, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    The structure of atmospheric aerosol particles affects their reactivity and growth rates. Measurements of aerosol properties over the Amazon rainforest indicate that organic particles above tropical rainforests are simple liquid drops.

  12. Fullerene Soot in Eastern China Air: Results from Soot Particle-Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Ge, X.; Chen, M.; Zhang, Q.; Yu, H.; Sun, Y.; Worsnop, D. R.; Collier, S.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we present for the first time, the observation and quantification of fullerenes in ambient airborne particulate using an Aerodyne Soot Particle - Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS) deployed during 2015 winter in suburban Nanjing, a megacity in eastern China. The laser desorption and electron impact ionization techniques employed by the SP-AMS allow us to differentiate various fullerenes from other aerosol components. Mass spectrum of the identified fullerene soot is consisted by a series of high molecular weight carbon clusters (up to m/z of 2000 in this study), almost identical to the spectral features of commercially available fullerene soot, both with C70 and C60 clusters as the first and second most abundant species. This type of soot was observed throughout the entire study period, with an average mass loading of 0.18 μg/m3, accounting for 6.4% of the black carbon mass, 1.2% of the total organic mass. Temporal variation and diurnal pattern of fullerene soot are overall similar to those of black carbon, but are clearly different in some periods. Combining the positive matrix factorization, back-trajectory and analyses of the meteorological parameters, we identified the petrochemical industrial plants situating upwind from the sampling site, as the major source of fullerene soot. In this regard, our findings imply the ubiquitous presence of fullerene soot in ambient air of industry-influenced area, especially the oil and gas production regions. This study also offers new insights into the characterization of fullerenes from other environmental samples via the advanced SP-AMS technique.

  13. Aerosol characterization with lidar methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Nobuo; Nishizawa, Tomoaki; Shimizu, Atsushi; Matsui, Ichiro

    2014-08-01

    Aerosol component analysis methods for characterizing aerosols were developed for various types of lidars including polarization-sensitive Mie scattering lidars, multi-wavelength Raman scattering lidars, and multi-wavelength highspectral- resolution lidars. From the multi-parameter lidar data, the extinction coefficients for four aerosol components can be derived. The microphysical parameters such as single scattering albedo and effective radius can be also estimated from the derived aerosol component distributions.

  14. Aerosol Quality Monitor (AQUAM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, X.; Ignatov, A.

    2011-12-01

    The Advanced Clear-Sky Processor for Oceans (ACSPO) developed at NESDIS generates three products from AVHRR, operationally: clear sky radiances in all bands, and sea surface temperature (SST) derived from clear-sky brightness temperatures (BT) in Ch3B (centered at 3.7 μm), Ch4 (11 μm) and Ch5 (12 μm), and aerosol optical depths (AOD) derived from clear-sky reflectances in Ch1 (0.63), Ch2 (0.83) and Ch3A (1.61 μm). An integral part of ACSPO is the fast Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM), which calculates first-guess clear-sky BTs using global NCEP forecast atmospheric and Reynolds SST fields. Simulated BTs are employed in ACSPO for improved cloud screening, physical (RTM-based) SST inversions, and to monitor and validate satellite BTs. The model minus observation biases are monitored online in near-real time using the Monitoring IR Clear-sky radiances over Oceans for SST (MICROS; http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/sod/sst/micros/). A persistent positive M-O bias is observed in MICROS, partly attributed to missing aerosol in CRTM input, causing "M" to be warmer than "O". It is thus necessary to include aerosols in CRTM and quantify their effects on AVHRR BTs and SSTs. However, sensitivity of thermal bands to aerosol is only minimal, and use of solar reflectance bands is preferable to evaluate the accuracy of CRTM modeling, with global aerosol fields as input (from e.g. Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport, GOCART, or Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System, NAAPS). Once available, the corresponding M-O biases in solar reflectance bands will be added to MICROS. Also, adding CRTM simulated reflectances in ACSPO would greatly improve cloud detection, help validate CRTM in the solar reflectance bands, and assist aerosol retrievals. Running CRTM with global aerosol as input is very challenging, computationally. While CRTM is being optimized to handle such global scattering computations, a near-real time web-based Aerosol Quality Monitor (AQUAM

  15. Cantera Aerosol Dynamics Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Moffat, Harry

    2004-09-01

    The Cantera Aerosol Dynamics Simulator (CADS) package is a general library for aerosol modeling to address aerosol general dynamics, including formation from gas phase reactions, surface chemistry (growth and oxidation), bulk particle chemistry, transport by Brownian diffusion, thermophoresis, and diffusiophoresis with linkage to DSMC studies, and thermal radiative transport. The library is based upon Cantera, a C++ Cal Tech code that handles gas phase species transport, reaction, and thermodynamics. The method uses a discontinuous galerkin formulation for the condensation and coagulation operator that conserves particles, elements, and enthalpy up to round-off error. Both O-D and 1-D time dependent applications have been developed with the library. Multiple species in the solid phase are handled as well. The O-D application, called Tdcads (Time Dependent CADS) is distributed with the library. Tdcads can address both constant volume and constant pressure adiabatic homogeneous problems. An extensive set of sample problems for Tdcads is also provided.

  16. Indian aerosols: present status.

    PubMed

    Mitra, A P; Sharma, C

    2002-12-01

    This article presents the status of aerosols in India based on the research activities undertaken during last few decades in this region. Programs, like International Geophysical Year (IGY), Monsoon Experiment (MONEX), Indian Middle Atmospheric Program (IMAP) and recently conducted Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX), have thrown new lights on the role of aerosols in global change. INDOEX has proved that the effects of aerosols are no longer confined to the local levels but extend at regional as well as global scales due to occurrence of long range transportation of aerosols from source regions along with wind trajectories. The loading of aerosols in the atmosphere is on rising due to energy intensive activities for developmental processes and other anthropogenic activities. One of the significant observation of INDOEX is the presence of high concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols in the near persistent winter time haze layer over tropical Indian Ocean which have probably been emitted from the burning of fossil-fuels and biofuels in the source region. These have significant bearing on the radiative forcing in the region and, therefore, have potential to alter monsoon and hydrological cycles. In general, the SPM concentrations have been found to be on higher sides in ambient atmosphere in many Indian cities but the NOx concentrations have been found to be on lower side. Even in the haze layer over Indian Ocean and surrounding areas, the NOx concentrations have been reported to be low which is not conducive of O3 formation in the haze/smog layer. The acid rain problem does not seem to exist at the moment in India because of the presence of neutralizing soil dust in the atmosphere. But the high particulate concentrations in most of the cities' atmosphere in India are of concern as it can cause deteriorated health conditions. PMID:12492171

  17. Indian aerosols: present status.

    PubMed

    Mitra, A P; Sharma, C

    2002-12-01

    This article presents the status of aerosols in India based on the research activities undertaken during last few decades in this region. Programs, like International Geophysical Year (IGY), Monsoon Experiment (MONEX), Indian Middle Atmospheric Program (IMAP) and recently conducted Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX), have thrown new lights on the role of aerosols in global change. INDOEX has proved that the effects of aerosols are no longer confined to the local levels but extend at regional as well as global scales due to occurrence of long range transportation of aerosols from source regions along with wind trajectories. The loading of aerosols in the atmosphere is on rising due to energy intensive activities for developmental processes and other anthropogenic activities. One of the significant observation of INDOEX is the presence of high concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols in the near persistent winter time haze layer over tropical Indian Ocean which have probably been emitted from the burning of fossil-fuels and biofuels in the source region. These have significant bearing on the radiative forcing in the region and, therefore, have potential to alter monsoon and hydrological cycles. In general, the SPM concentrations have been found to be on higher sides in ambient atmosphere in many Indian cities but the NOx concentrations have been found to be on lower side. Even in the haze layer over Indian Ocean and surrounding areas, the NOx concentrations have been reported to be low which is not conducive of O3 formation in the haze/smog layer. The acid rain problem does not seem to exist at the moment in India because of the presence of neutralizing soil dust in the atmosphere. But the high particulate concentrations in most of the cities' atmosphere in India are of concern as it can cause deteriorated health conditions.

  18. Easy Volcanic Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toohey, Matthew; Stevens, Bjorn; Schmidt, Hauke; Timmreck, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    Radiative forcing by stratospheric sulfate aerosol of volcanic origin is one of the strongest drivers of natural climate variability. Transient model simulations attempting to match observed climate variability, such as the CMIP historical simulations, rely on volcanic forcing reconstructions based on observations of a small sample of recent eruptions and coarse proxy data for eruptions before the satellite era. Volcanic forcing data sets used in CMIP5 were provided either in terms of optical properties, or in terms of sulfate aerosol mass, leading to significant inter-model spread in the actual volcanic radiative forcing produced by models and in their resulting climate responses. It remains therefore unclear to what degree inter-model spread in response to volcanic forcing represents model differences or variations in the forcing. In order to isolate model differences, Easy Volcanic Aerosol (EVA) provides an analytic representation of volcanic stratospheric aerosol forcing, based on available observations and aerosol model results, prescribing the aerosol's radiative properties and primary modes of spatial and temporal variability. In contrast to regriddings of observational data, EVA allows for the production of physically consistent forcing for historic and hypothetical eruptions of varying magnitude, source latitude, and season. Within CMIP6, EVA will be used to reconstruct volcanic forcing over the past 2000 years for use in the Paleo-Modeling Intercomparison Project (PMIP), and will provide forcing sets for VolMIP experiments aiming to quantify model uncertainty in the response to volcanic forcing. Here, the functional form of EVA will be introduced, along with illustrative examples including the EVA-based reconstruction of volcanic forcing over the historical period, and that of the 1815 Tambora eruption.

  19. simplified aerosol representations in global modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinne, Stefan; Peters, Karsten; Stevens, Bjorn; Rast, Sebastian; Schutgens, Nick; Stier, Philip

    2015-04-01

    The detailed treatment of aerosol in global modeling is complex and time-consuming. Thus simplified approaches are investigated, which prescribe 4D (space and time) distributions of aerosol optical properties and of aerosol microphysical properties. Aerosol optical properties are required to assess aerosol direct radiative effects and aerosol microphysical properties (in terms of their ability as aerosol nuclei to modify cloud droplet concentrations) are needed to address the indirect aerosol impact on cloud properties. Following the simplifying concept of the monthly gridded (1x1 lat/lon) aerosol climatology (MAC), new approaches are presented and evaluated against more detailed methods, including comparisons to detailed simulations with complex aerosol component modules.

  20. Performance of Nb3Sn Quadrupole Under High Stress

    SciTech Connect

    Felice, H.; Bajko, M.; Bingham, B.; Bordini, B.; Bottura, L.; Caspi, S.; Rijk, G. De; Dietderich, D.; Ferracin, P.; Giloux, C.; Godeke, A.; Hafalia, R.; Milanese, A.; Rossi, L.; Sabbi, G. L.

    2010-08-01

    Future upgrades of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will require large aperture and high gradient quadrupoles. Nb{sub 3}Sn is the most viable option for this application but is also known for its strain sensitivity. In high field magnets, with magnetic fields above 12 T, the Lorentz forces will generate mechanical stresses that may exceed 200 MPa in the windings. The existing measurements of critical current versus strain of Nb{sub 3}Sn strands or cables are not easily applicable to magnets. In order to investigate the impact of high mechanical stress on the quench performance, a series of tests was carried out within a LBNL/CERN collaboration using the magnet TQS03 (a LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) 1-meter long, 90-mm aperture Nb{sub 3}Sn quadrupole). The magnet was tested four times at CERN under various pre-stress conditions. The average mechanical compressive azimuthal pre-stress on the coil at 4.2 K ranged from 120 MPa to 200 MPa. This paper reports on the magnet performance during the four tests focusing on the relation between pre-stress conditions and the training plateau.

  1. Heavy ion plasma confinement in an RF quadrupole trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schermann, J.; Major, F. G.

    1971-01-01

    The confinement of an electron free plasma in a pure quadrupole RF electric trap was considered. The ultimate goal was to produce a large density of mercury ions, in order to realize a trapped ion frequency standard using the hyperfine resonance of 199 Hg(+) at 40.7 GHz. An attempt was made to obtain an iodine plasma consisting of equal numbers of positive and negative ions of atomic iodine, the positive iodine ions, being susceptible to charge-exchange with mercury atoms, will produce the desired mercury ions. The experiment showed that the photoproduction of ions pairs in iodine using the necessary UV radiation occurs with a small cross-section, making it difficult to demonstrate the feasibility of space charge neutralization in a quadrupole trap. For this reason it was considered expedient to choose thallium iodide, which has a more favorable absorption spectrum (in the region of 2000 to 2100 A). The results indicate that, although the ionic recombination is a serious limiting factor, a considerable improvement can be obtained in practice for the density of trapped ions, with a considerable advantage in lifetimes for spectroscopic purposes. The ion pair formation by photoionization is briefly reviewed.

  2. VIBRATION MEASUREMENTS IN A RHIC QUADRUPOLE AT CRYOGENIC TEMPERATURES.

    SciTech Connect

    JAIN, A.; AYDIN, S.; HE, P.; ANERELLA, M.; GANETIS, G.; HARRISON, M.; PARKER, B.; PLATE, S.

    2005-10-17

    One of the concerns in using compact superconducting magnets in the final focus region of the ILC is the influence of the cryogen flow on the vibration characteristics. As a first step towards characterizing such motion at nanometer levels, a project was undertaken at BNL to measure the vibrations in a spare RHIC quadrupole under cryogenic conditions. Given the constraints of cryogenic operation, and limited space available, it was decided to use a dual head laser Doppler vibrometer for this work. The performance of the laser vibrometer was tested in a series of room temperature tests and compared with results from Mark L4 geophones. The laser system was then used to measure the vibration of the cold mass of the quadrupole with respect to the outside warm enclosure. These measurements were carried out both with and without the flow of cold helium through the magnet. The results indicate only a minor increase in motion in the horizontal direction (where the cold mass is relatively free to move).

  3. Adjustable permanent quadrupoles for the next linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    James T. Volk et al.

    2001-06-22

    The proposed Next Linear Collider (NLC) will require over 1400 adjustable quadrupoles between the main linacs' accelerator structures. These 12.7 mm bore quadrupoles will have a range of integrated strength from 0.6 to 138 Tesla, with a maximum gradient of 141 Tesla per meter, an adjustment range of +0 to {minus}20% and effective lengths from 324 mm to 972 mm. The magnetic center must remain stable to within 1 micron during the 20% adjustment. In an effort to reduce costs and increase reliability, several designs using hybrid permanent magnets have been developed. Four different prototypes have been built. All magnets have iron poles and use Samarium Cobalt to provide the magnetic fields. Two use rotating permanent magnetic material to vary the gradient, one uses a sliding shunt to vary the gradient and the fourth uses counter rotating magnets. Preliminary data on gradient strength, temperature stability, and magnetic center position stability are presented. These data are compared to an equivalent electromagnetic prototype.

  4. Low-frequency nuclear quadrupole resonance with a dc SQUID

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, J.W.

    1991-07-01

    Conventional pure nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) is a technique well suited for the study of very large quadrupolar interactions. Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques have been developed for the study of smaller quadrupolar interactions. However, there are many nuclei which have quadrupolar interactions of intermediate strength. Quadrupolar interactions in this region have traditionally been difficult or unfeasible to detect. This work describes the development and application of a SQUID NQR technique which is capable of measuring intermediate strength quadrupolar interactions, in the range of a few hundred kilohertz to several megahertz. In this technique, a dc SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) is used to monitor the longitudinal sample magnetization, as opposed to the transverse magnetization, as a rf field is swept in frequency. This allows the detection of low-frequency nuclear quadrupole resonances over a very wide frequency range with high sensitivity. The theory of this NQR technique is discussed and a description of the dc SQUID system is given. In the following chapters, the spectrometer is discussed along with its application to the study of samples containing half-odd-integer spin quadrupolar nuclei, in particular boron-11 and aluminum-27. The feasibility of applying this NQR technique in the study of samples containing integer spin nuclei is discussed in the last chapter. 140 refs., 46 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Precision Magnet Measurements for X-Band Accelerator Quadrupole Triplets

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, R A; Anderson, S G; Armstrong, J P

    2012-05-16

    An X-band test station is being developed at LLNL to investigate accelerator optimization for future upgrades to mono-energetic gamma-ray (MEGa-Ray) technology at LLNL. Beamline magnets will include an emittance compensation solenoid, windowpane steering dipoles, and quadrupole magnets. Demanding tolerances have been placed on the alignment of these magnets, which directly affects the electron bunch beam quality. A magnet mapping system has been established at LLNL in order to ensure the delivered magnets match their field specification, and the mountings are aligned and capable of reaching the specified alignment tolerances. The magnet measurement system will be described which uses a 3-axis Lakeshore gauss probe mounted on a 3-axis translation stage. Alignment accuracy and precision will be discussed, as well as centering measurements and analysis. The dependence on data analysis over direct multi-pole measurement allows a significant improvement in useful alignment information. Detailed analysis of measurements on the beamline quadrupoles will be discussed, including multi-pole content both from alignment of the magnets, and the intrinsic level of multi-pole magnetic field.

  6. Highly stable aerosol generator

    SciTech Connect

    DeFord, Henry S.; Clark, Mark L.

    1981-01-01

    An improved compressed air nebulizer has been developed such that a uniform aerosol particle size and concentration may be produced over long time periods. This result is achieved by applying a vacuum pressure to the makeup assembly and by use of a vent tube between the atmosphere and the makeup solution. By applying appropriate vacuum pressures to the makeup solution container and by proper positioning of the vent tube, a constant level of aspirating solution may be maintained within the aspirating assembly with aspirating solution continuously replaced from the makeup solution supply. This device may also be adapted to have a plurality of aerosol generators and only one central makeup assembly.

  7. Highly stable aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    DeFord, H.S.; Clark, M.L.

    1981-11-03

    An improved compressed air nebulizer has been developed such that a uniform aerosol particle size and concentration may be produced over long time periods. This result is achieved by applying a vacuum pressure to the makeup assembly and by use of a vent tube between the atmosphere and the makeup solution. By applying appropriate vacuum pressures to the makeup solution container and by proper positioning of the vent tube, a constant level of aspirating solution may be maintained within the aspirating assembly with aspirating solution continuously replaced from the makeup solution supply. This device may also be adapted to have a plurality of aerosol generators and only one central makeup assembly. 2 figs.

  8. Stratospheric Aerosol Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, Rudolf, F.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Stratospheric aerosols affect the atmospheric energy balance by scattering and absorbing solar and terrestrial radiation. They also can alter stratospheric chemical cycles by catalyzing heterogeneous reactions which markedly perturb odd nitrogen, chlorine and ozone levels. Aerosol measurements by satellites began in NASA in 1975 with the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) program, to be followed by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) starting in 1979. Both programs employ the solar occultation, or Earth limb extinction, techniques. Major results of these activities include the discovery of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in both hemispheres in winter, illustrations of the impacts of major (El Chichon 1982 and Pinatubo 1991) eruptions, and detection of a negative global trend in lower stratospheric/upper tropospheric aerosol extinction. This latter result can be considered a triumph of successful worldwide sulfur emission controls. The SAGE record will be continued and improved by SAGE III, currently scheduled for multiple launches beginning in 2000 as part of the Earth Observing System (EOS). The satellite program has been supplemented by in situ measurements aboard the ER-2 (20 km ceiling) since 1974, and from the DC-8 (13 km ceiling) aircraft beginning in 1989. Collection by wire impactors and subsequent electron microscopic and X-ray energy-dispersive analyses, and optical particle spectrometry have been the principle techniques. Major findings are: (1) The stratospheric background aerosol consists of dilute sulfuric acid droplets of around 0.1 micrometer modal diameter at concentration of tens to hundreds of monograms per cubic meter; (2) Soot from aircraft amounts to a fraction of one percent of the background total aerosol; (3) Volcanic eruptions perturb the sulfuric acid, but not the soot, aerosol abundance by several orders of magnitude; (4) PSCs contain nitric acid at temperatures below 195K, supporting chemical hypotheses

  9. The aerosol distribution in Uranus' atmosphere - Interpretation of the hydrogen spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trafton, L.

    1976-01-01

    New observations of Uranus' combined H2 spectrum have been obtained. An analysis, emphasizing the leverage provided by the S3(0) quadrupole line, leads to strong constraints on Uranus' bulk aerosol distribution with depth. Using an inhomogeneous model atmosphere program which includes Rayleigh scattering for gases and a 1 plus cos theta phase function for cloud layers, it is shown that Uranus' H2 spectrum implies a cloud layer (or dense aerosol) at a depth from 500 to 700 km-amagat H2. It also implies negligible aerosol scattering in the 280 to 450 km-amagat H2 region and a thin haze at 100 to 200 km-amagat H2 depths. The low albedo in very strong CH4 bands indicates that there is negligible aerosol scattering in Uranus' radiative zone. Hydrogen appears to be more abundant than the sum of all other atmospheric gases. The C/H ratio deep in Uranus' atmosphere is strongly enhanced over the solar value. Accurate limb-darkening measurements in and near strong CH4 bands would be effective in specifying Uranus' aerosol distribution in greater detail.

  10. Characterisation of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formed from the Photooxidation of Isoprene during Cloud Condensation-Evaporation Cycles (CUMULUS Project)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doussin, J. F.; Giorio, C.; Bregonzio-Rozier, L.; Siekmann, F.; Temime-Roussel, B.; Gratien, A.; Ravier, S.; Pangui, E.; Tapparo, A.; Kalberer, M.; Vermeylen, R.; Claeys, M.; Monod, A.

    2014-12-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) undergo many oxidation processes in the atmosphere accompanied by formation of water-soluble compounds. These compounds could partition into atmospheric water droplets, and react within the aqueous phase producing higher molecular weight and less volatile compounds which could form new aerosol (Ervens et al., 2011). This work investigates the formation and composition of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from the photooxidation of isoprene and methacrolein (its main first-generation oxidation product) and the effect of cloud water on SOA formation and composition. The experiments were performed within the CUMULUS project (CloUd MULtiphase chemistry of organic compoUndS in the troposphere) at the 4.2 m3 stainless steel CESAM chamber (Wang et al., 2011). In each experiment, isoprene or methacrolein was injected in the chamber together with HONO under dry conditions before irradiation. The experimental protocol was optimised to generate cloud events in the chamber, lasting for ca. 10 minutes in the presence of light. Gas phase compounds were analyzed on-line by a Proton Transfer Reaction Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS), a Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR), NOx and O3 analyzers. SOA formation and composition were analysed on-line with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) and an Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and off-line through sampling on filters and analysis in GC-MS and LC-MS. We observed that during cloud formation water soluble gas-phase oxidation products readily partitioned into cloud droplets and new SOA was promptly produced. Chemical composition, elemental ratios and density of SOA were compared before, during cloud formation and after cloud evaporation. Ervens, B. et al. (2011) Atmos. Chem. Phys. 11, 11069-11102. Wang, J. et al. (2011) Atmos. Measur. Tech. 4, 2465-2494.

  11. Development of a Metastable Atom Bombardment (MAB) Source for Penning Ionization Time-of-flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, C. B.; Kimmel, J. R.; David, D.; Jayne, J. T.; Trimborn, A.; Worsnop, D. R.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2009-12-01

    The Aerodyne time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (ToF-AMS) utilizes thermal vaporization followed by electron ionization (EI) to convert aerosol components to gas-phase ions. The method enables quantification of chemical classes, but the extensive fragmentation caused by EI limits the specificity of both chemical analysis and source identification by factor analysis. To better identify the molecular components of aerosols, we have constructed a metastable atom bombardment (MAB) ionization source that can be interfaced to standard ToF-AMS hardware. A beam of metastable rare gas atoms is produced by a low-voltage DC discharge and focused toward the vaporization plume, yielding Penning Ionization of the analyte molecules. By changing gases, the excited energies of the metastables can be adjusted between 20.61 eV (He) and 9.92 eV (Kr). Source parameters, including pressures, current, geometry, and materials, were optimized for He, Ar, and Kr. Instrument sensitivity and induced fragmentation was characterized for each using lab-generated oleic acid particles. The demonstrated sensitivities are 0.1% of EI (3% of the SNR of EI in the V-mode, comparable to the Q-AMS SNR), which is sufficient for ambient monitoring. A metastable flux of 2.6e14 sr-1sec-1 has been achieved. The MAB-AMS has been deployed to the FLAME-3 campaign at the USDA Fire Sciences Laboratory in Missoula, MT, and used to sample smoke from open burning of different biomass samples. Preliminary results from FLAME-3 will be presented.

  12. Characterizing particulate matter emissions from vehicles: chassis-dynamometer tests using a High-Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, S.; Zhang, Q.; Forestieri, S.; Kleeman, M.; Cappa, C. D.; Kuwayama, T.

    2012-12-01

    During September of 2011 a suite of real-time instruments was used to sample vehicle emissions at the California Air Resources Board Haagen-Schmidt facility in El Monte, CA. A representative fleet of 8 spark ignition gasoline vehicles, a diesel passenger vehicle, a gasoline direct-injection vehicle and an ultra-low emissions vehicle were tested on a chassis dynamometer. The emissions were sampled into the facility's standard CVS tunnel and diluted to atmospherically relevant levels (5-30 μg/m3) while controlling other factors such as relative humidity or background black carbon particulate loading concentrations. An Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-MS) was among the real-time instruments used and sampled vehicle emissions at 10 second time resolution in order to characterize the non-refractory organic and inorganic particulate matter (PM). PM composition and concentration were tracked throughout the cold start driving cycle which included periods of fast acceleration and high velocity cruise control, meant to recreate typical commuter driving behavior. Variations in inorganic and organic PM composition for a given vehicle throughout the driving cycle as well as for various vehicles with differing emissions loading were characterized. Differences in PM composition for a given vehicle whose emissions are being exposed to differing experimental conditions such as varying relative humidity will also be reported. In conjunction with measurements from a Multi Wavelength Photoacoustic Black Carbon Spectrometer (MWPA-BC) and real-time gas measurements from the CARB facility, we determine the real-time emission ratios of primary organic aerosols (POA) with respect to BC and common combustion gas phase pollutants and compared to different vehicle driving conditions. The results of these tests offer the vehicle emissions community a first time glimpse at the real-time behavior of vehicle PM emissions for a variety of conditions and

  13. Laboratory Investigation of Contact Freezing and the Aerosol to Ice Crystal Transformation Process

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Raymond A.

    2014-10-28

    This project has been focused on the following objectives: 1. Investigations of the physical processes governing immersion versus contact nucleation, specifically surface-induced crystallization; 2. Development of a quadrupole particle trap with full thermodynamic control over the temperature range 0 to –40 °C and precisely controlled water vapor saturation ratios for continuous, single-particle measurement of the aerosol to ice crystal transformation process for realistic ice nuclei; 3. Understanding the role of ice nucleation in determining the microphysical properties of mixed-phase clouds, within a framework that allows bridging between laboratory and field measurements.

  14. Geometrical Optics of Dense Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, Michael J.; Valeo, Ernest J.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2013-04-24

    Assembling a free-standing, sharp-edged slab of homogeneous material that is much denser than gas, but much more rare ed than a solid, is an outstanding technological challenge. The solution may lie in focusing a dense aerosol to assume this geometry. However, whereas the geometrical optics of dilute aerosols is a well-developed fi eld, the dense aerosol limit is mostly unexplored. Yet controlling the geometrical optics of dense aerosols is necessary in preparing such a material slab. Focusing dense aerosols is shown here to be possible, but the nite particle density reduces the eff ective Stokes number of the flow, a critical result for controlled focusing. __________________________________________________

  15. A new method to discriminate secondary organic aerosols from different sources using high-resolution aerosol mass spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heringa, M. F.; Decarlo, P. F.; Chirico, R.; Tritscher, T.; Clairotte, M.; Mohr, C.; Crippa, M.; Slowik, J. G.; Pfaffenberger, L.; Dommen, J.; Weingartner, E.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.

    2011-10-01

    Organic aerosol (OA) represents a significant and often major fraction of the non-refractory PM1 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter da < 1 μm) mass. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is an important contributor to the OA and can be formed from biogenic and anthropogenic precursors. Here we present results from the characterization of SOA produced from the emissions of three different anthropogenic sources. SOA from a log wood burner, a Euro 2 diesel car and a two-stroke Euro 2 scooter were characterized with an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-TOF-AMS) and compared to SOA from α-pinene. The emissions were sampled from the chimney/tailpipe by a heated inlet system and filtered before injection into a smog chamber. The gas phase emissions were irradiated by xenon arc lamps to initiate photo-chemistry which led to nucleation and subsequent particle growth by SOA production. Duplicate experiments were performed for each SOA type, with the averaged organic mass spectra in the m/z range 12-250 showing Pearson's r values >0.94 for the correlations between the different SOA types after 5 h of aging. High-resolution mass spectra (HR-MS) showed that the dominant peaks in the MS, m/z 43 and 44, are dominated by the oxygenated ions C2H3O+ and CO2+, respectively, similarly to the relatively fresh semi-volatile oxidized OA (SV-OOA) observed in the ambient aerosol. The atomic O : C ratios were found to be in the range of 0.25-0.55 with no major increase during the first 5 h of aging. On average, the diesel SOA showed the lowest O : C ratio followed by SOA from wood burning, α-pinene and the scooter emissions. Grouping the fragment ions based on their carbon number revealed that the SOA source with the highest O : C ratio had the largest fraction of small ions. Fragment ions containing up to 3 carbon atoms accounted for 66%, 68%, 72% and 76% of the organic spectrum of the SOA produced by the diesel car, wood burner, α-pinene and

  16. A new method to discriminate secondary organic aerosols from different sources using high-resolution aerosol mass spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heringa, M. F.; Decarlo, P. F.; Chirico, R.; Tritscher, T.; Clairotte, M.; Mohr, C.; Crippa, M.; Slowik, J. G.; Pfaffenberger, L.; Dommen, J.; Weingartner, E.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.

    2012-02-01

    Organic aerosol (OA) represents a significant and often major fraction of the non-refractory PM1 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter da < 1 μm) mass. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is an important contributor to the OA and can be formed from biogenic and anthropogenic precursors. Here we present results from the characterization of SOA produced from the emissions of three different anthropogenic sources. SOA from a log wood burner, a Euro 2 diesel car and a two-stroke Euro 2 scooter were characterized with an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-TOF-AMS) and compared to SOA from α-pinene. The emissions were sampled from the chimney/tailpipe by a heated inlet system and filtered before injection into a smog chamber. The gas phase emissions were irradiated by xenon arc lamps to initiate photo-chemistry which led to nucleation and subsequent particle growth by SOA production. Duplicate experiments were performed for each SOA type, with the averaged organic mass spectra showing Pearson's r values >0.94 for the correlations between the four different SOA types after five hours of aging. High-resolution mass spectra (HR-MS) showed that the dominant peaks in the MS, m/z 43 and 44, are dominated by the oxygenated ions C2H3O+ and CO2+, respectively, similarly to the relatively fresh semi-volatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA) observed in the ambient aerosol. The atomic O:C ratios were found to be in the range of 0.25-0.55 with no major increase during the first five hours of aging. On average, the diesel SOA showed the lowest O:C ratio followed by SOA from wood burning, α-pinene and the scooter emissions. Grouping the fragment ions revealed that the SOA source with the highest O:C ratio had the largest fraction of small ions. The HR data of the four sources could be clustered and separated using principal component analysis (PCA). The model showed a significant separation of the four SOA types and clustering of the duplicate

  17. Effects of extreme magnetic quadrupole fields on penning traps and the consequences for antihydrogen trapping.

    PubMed

    Fajans, J; Bertsche, W; Burke, K; Chapman, S F; van der Werf, D P

    2005-10-01

    Measurements on electrons confined in a Penning trap show that extreme quadrupole fields destroy particle confinement. Much of the particle loss comes from the hitherto unrecognized ballistic transport of particles directly into the wall. The measurements scale to the parameter regime used by ATHENA and ATRAP to create antihydrogen, and suggest that quadrupoles cannot be used to trap antihydrogen.

  18. Effects of Extreme Magnetic Quadrupole Fields on Penning Traps and the Consequences for Antihydrogen Trapping

    SciTech Connect

    Fajans, J.; Bertsche, W.; Burke, K.; Chapman, S.F.; Werf, D.P. van der

    2005-10-07

    Measurements on electrons confined in a Penning trap show that extreme quadrupole fields destroy particle confinement. Much of the particle loss comes from the hitherto unrecognized ballistic transport of particles directly into the wall. The measurements scale to the parameter regime used by ATHENA and ATRAP to create antihydrogen, and suggest that quadrupoles cannot be used to trap antihydrogen.

  19. Measuring the Magnetic Center Behavior of an ILC Superconducting Quadrupole Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Cherrill M.; Adolphsen, Chris; Berndt, Martin; Jensen, David R.; Rogers, Ron; Sheppard, John C.; Lorant, Steve St; Weber, Thomas B.; Weisend, John, II; Brueck, Heinrich; Toral, Fernando; /Madrid, CIEMAT

    2011-02-07

    The main linacs of the proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) consist of superconducting cavities operated at 2K. The accelerating cavities are contained in a contiguous series of cryogenic modules that also house the main linac quadrupoles, thus the quadrupoles also need to be superconducting. In an early ILC design, these magnets are about 0.6 m long, have cos (2{theta}) coils, and operate at constant field gradients up to 60 T/m. In order to preserve the small beam emittances in the ILC linacs, the e+ and e- beams need to traverse the quadrupoles near their magnetic centers. A quadrupole shunting technique is used to measure the quadrupole alignment with the beams; this process requires the magnetic centers move by no more than about 5 micrometers when their strength is changed. To determine if such tight stability is achievable in a superconducting quadrupole, we at SLAC measured the magnetic center motions in a prototype ILC quadrupole built at CIEMAT in Spain. A rotating coil technique was used with a better than 0.1 micrometer precision in the relative field center position, and less than a 2 micrometer systematic error over 30 minutes. This paper describes the warm-bore cryomodule that houses the quadrupole in its Helium vessel, the magnetic center measurement system, the measured center data and strength and harmonics magnetic data.

  20. Receptor modeling of near-roadway aerosol mass spectrometer data in Las Vegas, Nevada, with EPA PMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S. G.; Lee, T.; Norris, G. A.; Roberts, P. T.; Collett, J. L., Jr.; Paatero, P.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2011-08-01

    Ambient non-refractory PM1 aerosol particles were measured with an Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-AMS) at an elementary school 20 m from the US 95 freeway in Las Vegas, Nevada, during January 2008. Additional collocated continuous measurements of black carbon (BC), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and meteorological data were collected. The US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) positive matrix factorization (PMF) data analysis tool was used to apportion organic matter (OM) as measured by HR-AMS, and rotational tools in EPA PMF were used to better characterize the solution space and pull resolved factors toward known source profiles. Three- to six-factor solutions were resolved. The four-factor solution was the most interpretable, with the typical AMS PMF factors of hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA), low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA), biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA), and semi-volatile oxygenated organic aerosol (SV-OOA). When the measurement site was downwind of the freeway, HOA composed about half the OM, with SV-OOA and LV-OOA accounting for the rest. Attempts to pull the PMF factor profiles toward source profiles were successful but did not qualitatively change the results, indicating that these factors are very stable. Oblique edges were present in G-space plots, suggesting that the obtained rotation may not be the most plausible one. Since solutions found by pulling the profiles or using Fpeak retained these oblique edges, there appears to be little rotational freedom in the base solution. On average, HOA made up 26 % of the OM, and it made up nearly half of the OM when the monitoring site was downwind of US 95 during morning rush hour. LV-OOA was highest in the afternoon and accounted for 26 % of the OM. BBOA occurred in the evening hours, was predominantly from the residential area to the north, and on average constituted 12 % of the OM; SV-OOA accounted for the remaining

  1. Receptor modeling of near-roadway aerosol mass spectrometer data in Las Vegas, Nevada, with EPA PMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S. G.; Lee, T.; Norris, G. A.; Roberts, P. T.; Collett, J. L., Jr.; Paatero, P.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2012-01-01

    Ambient non-refractory PM1 aerosol particles were measured with an Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-AMS) at an elementary school 18 m from the US 95 freeway soundwall in Las Vegas, Nevada, during January 2008. Additional collocated continuous measurements of black carbon (BC), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and meteorological data were collected. The US~Environmental Protection Agency's~(EPA) positive matrix factorization (PMF) data analysis tool was used to apportion organic matter (OM) as measured by HR-AMS, and rotational tools in EPA PMF were used to better characterize the solution space and pull resolved factors toward known source profiles. Three- to six-factor solutions were resolved. The four-factor solution was the most interpretable, with the typical AMS PMF factors of hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA), low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA), biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA), and semi-volatile oxygenated organic aerosol (SV-OOA). When the measurement site was downwind of the freeway, HOA composed about half the OM, with SV-OOA and LV-OOA accounting for the rest. Attempts to pull the PMF factor profiles toward source profiles were successful but did not qualitatively change the results, indicating that these factors are very stable. Oblique edges were present in G-space plots, suggesting that the obtained rotation may not be the most plausible one. Since solutions found by pulling the profiles or using Fpeak retained these oblique edges, there appears to be little rotational freedom in the base solution. On average, HOA made up 26% of the OM, while LV-OOA was highest in the afternoon and accounted for 26% of the OM. BBOA occurred in the evening hours, was predominantly from the residential area to the north, and on average constituted 12% of the OM; SV-OOA accounted for the remaining third of the OM. Use of the pulling techniques available in EPA PMF and ME-2 suggested that the four

  2. OH Radical Aging of Model Primary Organic Aerosols In Smog Chamber Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambe, A. T.; Zhang, J.; Sage, A. M.; Donahue, N. M.

    2006-12-01

    initial injection followed by near-continuous injection with a flux to match the TME flow. Condensed-phase chemistry is monitored with an Aerodyne Quadropole Aerosol Mass Spectrometer. Clear oxidation of single-component hexacosane aerosol is observed from the fractional decay of key alkyl fragments, and is used as a reference compound with a calculated uptake coefficient of approximately unity. As case studies, we examine the OH-induced oxidation kinetics of model mixtures designed to serve as surrogates for real primary organic aerosol, such as motor vehicle tailpipe emissions.

  3. Linking variations in sea spray aerosol particle hygroscopicity to composition during two microcosm experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forestieri, Sara D.; Cornwell, Gavin C.; Helgestad, Taylor M.; Moore, Kathryn A.; Lee, Christopher; Novak, Gordon A.; Sultana, Camille M.; Wang, Xiaofei; Bertram, Timothy H.; Prather, Kimberly A.; Cappa, Christopher D.

    2016-07-01

    The extent to which water uptake influences the light scattering ability of marine sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles depends critically on SSA chemical composition. The organic fraction of SSA can increase during phytoplankton blooms, decreasing the salt content and therefore the hygroscopicity of the particles. In this study, subsaturated hygroscopic growth factors at 85 % relative humidity (GF(85 %)) of predominately submicron SSA particles were quantified during two induced phytoplankton blooms in marine aerosol reference tanks (MARTs). One MART was illuminated with fluorescent lights and the other was illuminated with sunlight, referred to as the "indoor" and "outdoor" MARTs, respectively. Optically weighted GF(85 %) values for SSA particles were derived from measurements of light scattering and particle size distributions. The mean optically weighted SSA diameters were 530 and 570 nm for the indoor and outdoor MARTs, respectively. The GF(85 %) measurements were made concurrently with online particle composition measurements, including bulk composition (using an Aerodyne high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer) and single particle (using an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer) measurement, and a variety of water-composition measurements. During both microcosm experiments, the observed optically weighted GF(85 %) values were depressed substantially relative to pure inorganic sea salt by 5 to 15 %. There was also a time lag between GF(85 %) depression and the peak chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentrations by either 1 (indoor MART) or 3-to-6 (outdoor MART) days. The fraction of organic matter in the SSA particles generally increased after the Chl a peaked, also with a time lag, and ranged from about 0.25 to 0.5 by volume. The observed depression in the GF(85 %) values (relative to pure sea salt) is consistent with the large observed volume fractions of non-refractory organic matter (NR-OM) comprising the SSA. The GF(85 %) values exhibited a reasonable negative

  4. Determination of nuclear quadrupole moments – An example of the synergy of ab initio calculations and microwave spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kellö, Vladimir

    2015-01-22

    Highly correlated scalar relativistic calculations of electric field gradients at nuclei in diatomic molecules in combination with accurate nuclear quadrupole coupling constants obtained from microwave spectroscopy are used for determination of nuclear quadrupole moments.

  5. Mesospheric aerosol sampling spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knappmiller, Scott; Robertson, Scott; Sternovsky, Zoltan; Horanyi, Mihaly; Kohnert, Rick

    . The Mesospheric Aerosol Sampling Spectrometer (MASS) instrument has been launched on two sounding rockets in August, 2007 from Andoya, Norway to detect charged sub-visible aerosol particles in the polar mesosphere. The MASS instrument is designed to collect charged aerosols, cluster ions, and electrons on four pairs of graphite electrodes, three of which are biased with increasing voltage. The design of the MASS instrument was complicated by the short mean free path in the mesosphere. The opening to MASS was deliberately built to increase the mean free path and to reduce the shock wave within the instrument. The design procedure began with aerodynamics simulations of the flow through the instrument using Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) in 3-D. The electric fields within the instrument were calculated using a Laplace solver in 3-D. With the aerodynamic and electric field simulations completed, an algorithm was created to find the trajectories of charged aerosols including collisions within MASS. Using this algorithm the collection efficiencies for each electrode was calculated as a function of the charge to mass ratio of the incoming particle. The simulation results have been confirmed experimentally using an Argon RF ion beam. The data from the August launches have been analyzed and the initial results show the MASS instrument operated as expected. Additional studies are underway to determine if there were effects from payload charging or spurious charge generation within the instrument. This project is supported by NASA.

  6. Miniature micromachined quadrupole mass spectrometer array and method of making the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Hecht, Michael (Inventor); Orient, Otto (Inventor); Wiberg, Dean (Inventor); Brennen, Reid A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a quadrupole mass spectrometer and an ion filter for use in the quadrupole mass spectrometer. The ion filter includes a thin patterned layer including a two-dimensional array of poles forming one or more quadrupoles. The patterned layer design permits the use of very short poles and with a very dense spacing of the poles, so that the ion filter may be made very small. Also provided is a method for making the ion filter and the quadrupole mass spectrometer. The method involves forming the patterned layer of the ion filter in such a way that as the poles of the patterned layer are formed, they have the relative positioning and alignment for use in a final quadrupole mass spectrometer device.

  7. Miniature micromachined quadrupole mass spectrometer array and method of making the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Fuerstenau, Stephen D. (Inventor); Orient, Otto J. (Inventor); Yee, Karl Y. (Inventor); Rice, John T. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a quadrupole mass spectrometer and an ion filter, or pole array, for use in the quadrupole mass spectrometer. The ion filter includes a thin patterned layer including a two-dimensional array of poles forming one or more quadrupoles. The patterned layer design permits the use of very short poles and with a very dense spacing of the poles, so that the ion filter may be made very small. Also provided is a method for making the ion filter and the quadrupole mass spectrometer. The method involves forming the patterned layer of the ion filter in such a way that as the poles of the patterned layer are formed, they have the relative positioning and alignment for use in a final quadrupole mass spectrometer device.

  8. Miniature micromachined quadrupole mass spectrometer array and method of making the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Hecht, Michael (Inventor); Orient, Otto (Inventor); Wiberg, Dean (Inventor); Brennen, Reid A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a quadrupole mass spectrometer and an ion filter for use in the quadrupole mass spectrometer. The ion filter includes a thin patterned layer including a two-dimensional array of poles forming one or more quadrupoles. The patterned layer design permits the use of very short poles and with a very dense spacing of the poles, so that the ion filter may be made very small. Also provided is a method for making the ion filter and the quadrupole mass spectrometer. The method involves forming the patterned layer of the ion filter in such a way that as the poles of the patterned layer are formed, they have the relative positioning and aligrnent for use in a final quadrupole mass spectrometer device.

  9. Miniature micromachined quadrupole mass spectrometer array and method of making the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Fuerstenau, Stephen D. (Inventor); Orient, Otto J. (Inventor); Yee, Karl Y. (Inventor); Rice, John T. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a quadrupole mass spectrometer and an ion filter, or pole array, for use in the quadrupole mass spectrometer. The ion filter includes a thin patterned layer including a two-dimensional array of poles forming one or more quadrupoles. The patterned layer design permits the use of very short poles and with a very dense spacing of the poles, so that the ion filter may be made very small. Also provided is a method for making the ion filter and the quadrupole mass spectrometer. The method involves forming the patterned layer of the ion filter in such a way that as the poles of the patterned layer are formed, they have the relative positioning and alignment for use in a final quadrupole mass spectrometer device.

  10. Miniature micromachined quadrupole mass spectrometer array and method of making the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Hecht, Michael (Inventor); Orient, Otto (Inventor); Wiberg, Dean (Inventor); Brennen, Reid A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a quadrupole mass spectrometer and an ion filter for use in the quadrupole mass spectrometer. The ion filter includes a thin patterned layer including a two-dimensional array of poles forming one or more quadrupoles. The patterned layer design permits the use of very short poles and with a very dense spacing of the poles, so that the ion filter may be made very small. Also provided is a method for making the ion filter and the quadrupole mass spectrometer. The method involves forming the patterned layer of the ion filter in such a way that as the poles of the patterned layer are formed, they have the relative positioning and alignment for use in a final quadrupole mass spectrometer device.

  11. Miniature micromachined quadrupole mass spectrometer array and method of making the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Fuerstenau, Stephen D. (Inventor); Orient, Otto J. (Inventor); Yee, Karl Y. (Inventor); Rice, John T. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides a quadrupole mass spectrometer and an ion filter, or pole array, for use in the quadrupole mass spectrometer. The ion filter includes a thin patterned layer including a two-dimensional array of poles forming one or more quadrupoles. The patterned layer design permits the use of very short poles and with a very dense spacing of the poles, so that the ion filter may be made very small. Also provided is a method for making the ion filter and the quadrupole mass spectrometer. The method involves forming the patterned layer of the ion filter in such a way that as the poles of the patterned layer are formed, they have the relative positioning and alignment for use in a final quadrupole mass spectrometer device.

  12. COMPENSATION OF FAST KICKER ROLLS WITH SKEW QUADRUPOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Pinayev, I.

    2011-03-28

    The development of the third generation light sources lead to the implementation of the top-up operation, when injection occurs while users collect data. The beam excursions due to the non-closure of the injection bump can spoil the data and need to be suppressed. In the horizontal plane compensation can be achieved by adjusting timing and kick amplitudes. The rolls of the kicker magnets create non-closure in the vertical plane and usually there is no means for correction. In the paper we describe proposed compensation scheme utilizing two skew quadrupoles placed inside the injection bump. The third generation light sources implement top-up operation firstly introduced at Advanced Photon Source. In this mode the circulating beam current is supported near constant by frequent injection of small charge, while photon beam is delivered for users. The beam perturbations caused by the mismatched injection bump can provide undesired noise in the user data. Usually the injection trigger is distributed to the users end stations so that those affected would be able to blank data acquisition. Nevertheless, as good operational practice such transients should be suppressed as much as possible. In the horizontal plane (which is commonly used for injection) one can adjust individual kicker strength as well as trigger delay while observing motion of the stored beam centroid. In the vertical plane such means are unavailable in the most cases. The possible solutions include dedicated weak vertical kickers and motorized adjustment of the roll angle of the injection kickers. Both abovementioned approaches are expensive and can significantly deteriorate reliability. We suggest two employ two skew quadrupoles (to correct both angle and position) placed inside the injection bump. In this case the beam position itself serves as measure of the kicker strength (assuming that kickers are well matched) and vertical kicks from the skew quadrupoles will be self synchronized with injection bump

  13. Light absorption properties of water soluble organic aerosol from Residential Wood Burning in Fresno, CA: Results from 2013 NASA DISCOVER-AQ Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Zhang, Q.; Young, D. E.; Parworth, C.

    2015-12-01

    Light absorption properties of water soluble organic aerosol were investigated at Fresno, CA from 13 January to 11 February, 2013 as part of the NASA DISCOVER-AQ campaign. The light absorption spectra of water soluble organic aerosol in PM2.5 was measured using a UV/vis diode array detector (DAD) coupled with a particle into liquid sampler (PILS) that sampled downstream of a PM2.5 cyclone (URG). The PILS was also coupled with two ion chromatographs (IC) to measure inorganic and organic ionic species in PM2.5. In addition, an Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was deployed at the same site to measure size-resolved chemical composition of submicrometer aerosol (PM1) in real time during this study. Light absorption at 365 nm (Abs365), which is typically used as a proxy of water-soluble brown carbon (BrC), showed strong enhancement during night time and appeared to correlate well (r = 0.71) with biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA) from residential wood burning for heating in the Fresno area. The tight correlations between Abs365 and biomass burning relevant tracers such as acetonitrile (r = 0.69), AMS-signature ions for phenolic compounds (r = 0.52-0.71), PAH (r = 0.74), and potassium (r = 0.67) further confirm that biomass burning contributed significantly to water soluble brown carbon during this study. The absorption angstrom exponent (Åa) values fitted between 300 and 700 nm wavelength were 3.3 ± 1.1, 2.0 ± 0.9 and 4.0 ± 0.8, respectively, in the morning, afternoon and nighttime, indicating that BrC is prevalent at night in Fresno during wintertime. However, there are also indications that small amount of BrC existed during the daytime as well, likely due to daytime wood burning and other sources such as the formation of light-absorbing secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Finally, light absorption at 300 nm, 330 nm, and 390 nm were found to correlate tightly with BBOA, which indicate that biomass burning also emits

  14. Aircraft Observations of Aerosol Composition and Ageing in New England and Mid-Atlantic States during the Summer 2002 New England Air Quality Study Field Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinman, Lawrence I.; Daum, Peter H.; Lee, Y.- N.; Senum, Gunar; Springston, Stephen R.; Wang, Jian; Berkowitz, Carl M.; Hubbe, John M.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Brechtel, Fred J.; Jayne, J. T.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2007-05-11

    Aerosol chemical composition, size distributions, and optical properties were measured during 17 aircraft flights in New England and Middle Atlantic States as part of the summer 2002 NEAQS field campaign. An Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) was operated with a measurement cycle of 30 s, about an order of magnitude faster than used for ground-based measurements. Noise levels within a single measurement period were sub μg m-3. Volume data derived from the AMS were compared with volume measurements from a PCASP optical particle detector and an Scanning Mobility Particle Spectrometer (SMPS); calculated light scattering was compared with measured values from an integrating nephelometer. The median ratio for AMS/SMPS volume was 1.25; the median ratio for AMS/nephelometer scattering was 1.18. Size spectra were compared for subsets of samples with different effective diameters (Deff). There is good agreement between the AMS, PCASP, and SMPS spectra for larger values of Deff but an unexplained over-prediction in the AMS for small values. A dependence of the AMS collection efficiency on aerosol acidity was quantified by a comparison between AMS and PCASP volumes in 2 high sulfate plumes. Average aerosol concentrations were 11 μg m-3. The organic content was high in comparison to monitoring data from the IMPROVE network, varying from 70% in clean air to 40% in high concentration sulfate plumes. The ratio of organic aerosol to CO and light absorption acting were examined as a function of photochemical age. CO is a conservative tracer for urban emissions and light absorption is a surrogate for black carbon which is also conservative. Comparisons were made to surface ratios measured under conditions where there is little secondary organic aerosol (SOA). An increase in these ratios relative to surface values indicates that 70 - 80% of the organic aerosol in polluted air masses was secondary. Most of this SOA is rapidly formed within a few hours. At longer time scales

  15. Size-resolved aerosol chemistry on Whistler Mountain, Canada with a High-Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer during INTEX-B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y.; Zhang, Q.; MacDonald, A. M.; Hayden, K.; Li, S. M.; Liggio, J.; Liu, P. S. K.; Anlauf, K. G.; Leaitch, W. R.; Cubison, M.; Worsnop, D.; van Donkelaar, A.; Martin, R. V.

    2008-12-01

    An Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was deployed at the peak of Whistler Mountain (elevation 2182 m-MSL), British Columbia, from 19 April to 16 May 2006, as part of the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment Phase B (INTEX-B) campaign. The mass concentrations and size distributions of non-refractory submicron particle (NR-PM1) species (i.e., sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, chloride, and organics) were measured in situ every 5 min. The HR-ToF-AMS results agreed well with collocated measurements. The average concentration of non-refractory submicron particulate matter (NR-PM1; 1.9 μg m-3) is similar to those observed at other remote, high elevation sites in North America. Episodes of enhanced aerosol loadings were observed, due to influences of regional and trans-Pacific transport of air pollution. Organics and sulfate were the dominant species, on average accounting for 55% and 30%, respectively, of the NR-PM1 mass. The average size distributions of sulfate and ammonium both showed a~large accumulation mode peaking around 500-600 nm in Dva while those of organic aerosol (OA) and nitrate peaked at ~300 nm. The size differences suggest that sulfate and OA were mostly present in external mixtures from different source origins. We also quantitatively determined the elemental composition of OA using the high resolution mass spectra. Overall, OA at Whistler Peak was highly oxygenated, with an average organic-mass-to-organic-carbon ratio (OM/OC) of 2.28±0.23 and an atomic ratio of oxygen-to-carbon (O/C) of 0.83±0.17. The nominal formula for OA was C1H1.66N0.03O0.83 for the entire study. Two significant trans-Pacific dust events originated from Asia were observed at Whistler Peak during this study. While both events were characterized with significant enhancements of coarse mode particles and mineral contents, the composition and characteristics of NR-PM1 were significantly different between them. One trans-Pacific event

  16. Phase partitioning and volatility of secondary organic aerosol components formed from α-pinene ozonolysis and OH oxidation: the importance of accretion products and other low volatility compounds

    DOE PAGES

    Lopez-Hilfiker, F. D.; Mohr, C.; Ehn, M.; Rubach, F.; Kleist, E.; Wildt, J.; Mentel, Th. F.; Carrasquillo, A. J.; Daumit, K. E.; Hunter, J. F.; et al

    2015-07-16

    We measured a large suite of gas- and particle-phase multi-functional organic compounds with a Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO) coupled to a high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) developed at the University of Washington. The instrument was deployed on environmental simulation chambers to study monoterpene oxidation as a secondary organic aerosol (SOA) source. We focus here on results from experiments utilizing an ionization method most selective towards acids (acetate negative ion proton transfer), but our conclusions are based on more general physical and chemical properties of the SOA. Hundreds of compounds were observed in both gas andmore » particle phases, the latter being detected by temperature-programmed thermal desorption of collected particles. Particulate organic compounds detected by the FIGAERO–HR-ToF-CIMS are highly correlated with, and explain at least 25–50 % of, the organic aerosol mass measured by an Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). Reproducible multi-modal structures in the thermograms for individual compounds of a given elemental composition reveal a significant SOA mass contribution from high molecular weight organics and/or oligomers (i.e., multi-phase accretion reaction products). Approximately 50 % of the HR-ToF-CIMS particle-phase mass is associated with compounds having effective vapor pressures 4 or more orders of magnitude lower than commonly measured monoterpene oxidation products. The relative importance of these accretion-type and other extremely low volatility products appears to vary with photochemical conditions. We present a desorption-temperature-based framework for apportionment of thermogram signals into volatility bins. The volatility-based apportionment greatly improves agreement between measured and modeled gas-particle partitioning for select major and minor components of the SOA, consistent with thermal decomposition during desorption causing the

  17. Phase partitioning and volatility of secondary organic aerosol components formed from α-pinene ozonolysis and OH oxidation: the importance of accretion products and other low volatility compounds

    DOE PAGES

    Lopez-Hilfiker, F. D.; Mohr, C.; Ehn, M.; Rubach, F.; Kleist, E.; Wildt, J.; Mentel, Th. F.; Carrasquillo, A.; Daumit, K.; Hunter, J.; et al

    2015-02-18

    We measured a large suite of gas and particle phase multi-functional organic compounds with a Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO) coupled to a high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) developed at the University of Washington. The instrument was deployed on environmental simulation chambers to study monoterpene oxidation as a secondary organic aerosol (SOA) source. We focus here on results from experiments utilizing an ionization method most selective towards acids (acetate negative ion proton transfer), but our conclusions are based on more general physical and chemical properties of the SOA. Hundreds of compounds were observed in both gasmore » and particle phases, the latter being detected upon temperature programmed thermal desorption of collected particles. Particulate organic compounds detected by the FIGAERO HR-ToF-CIMS are highly correlated with, and explain at least 25–50% of, the organic aerosol mass measured by an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS). Reproducible multi-modal structures in the thermograms for individual compounds of a given elemental composition reveal a significant SOA mass contribution from large molecular weight organics and/or oligomers (i.e. multi-phase accretion reaction products). Approximately 50% of the HR-ToF-CIMS particle phase mass is associated with compounds having effective vapor pressures 4 or more orders of magnitude lower than commonly measured monoterpene oxidation products. The relative importance of these accretion-type and other extremely low volatility products appears to vary with photochemical conditions. We present a desorption temperature based framework for apportionment of thermogram signals into volatility bins. The volatility-based apportionment greatly improves agreement between measured and modeled gas–particle partitioning for select major and minor components of the SOA, consistent with thermal decomposition during desorption causing the

  18. Covariant spectator theory of np scattering: Deuteron quadrupole moment

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, Franz

    2015-01-26

    The deuteron quadrupole moment is calculated using two CST model wave functions obtained from the 2007 high precision fits to np scattering data. Included in the calculation are a new class of isoscalar np interaction currents automatically generated by the nuclear force model used in these fits. The prediction for model WJC-1, with larger relativistic P-state components, is 2.5% smaller that the experiential result, in common with the inability of models prior to 2014 to predict this important quantity. However, model WJC-2, with very small P-state components, gives agreement to better than 1%, similar to the results obtained recently from XEFT predictions to order N3LO.

  19. Covariant spectator theory of np scattering: Deuteron quadrupole moment

    DOE PAGES

    Gross, Franz

    2015-01-26

    The deuteron quadrupole moment is calculated using two CST model wave functions obtained from the 2007 high precision fits to np scattering data. Included in the calculation are a new class of isoscalar np interaction currents automatically generated by the nuclear force model used in these fits. The prediction for model WJC-1, with larger relativistic P-state components, is 2.5% smaller that the experiential result, in common with the inability of models prior to 2014 to predict this important quantity. However, model WJC-2, with very small P-state components, gives agreement to better than 1%, similar to the results obtained recently frommore » XEFT predictions to order N3LO.« less

  20. Quasiclassical description of bremsstrahlung accompanying {alpha} decay including quadrupole radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jentschura, U. D.; Milstein, A. I.; Terekhov, I. S.; Boie, H.; Scheit, H.; Schwalm, D.

    2008-01-15

    We present a quasiclassical theory of {alpha} decay accompanied by bremsstrahlung with a special emphasis on the case of {sup 210}Po, with the aim of finding a unified description that incorporates both the radiation during the tunneling through the Coulomb wall and the finite energy E{sub {gamma}} of the radiated photon up to E{sub {gamma}}{approx}Q{sub {alpha}}/{radical}({eta}), where Q{sub {alpha}} is the {alpha}-decay Q-value and {eta} is the Sommerfeld parameter. The corrections with respect to previous quasiclassical investigations are found to be substantial, and excellent agreement with a full quantum mechanical treatment is achieved. Furthermore, we find that a dipole-quadrupole interference significantly changes the {alpha}-{gamma} angular correlation. We obtain good agreement between our theoretical predictions and experimental results.

  1. Plasma-beam traps and radiofrequency quadrupole beam coolers

    SciTech Connect

    Maggiore, M. Cavenago, M.; Comunian, M.; Chirulotto, F.; Galatà, A.; De Lazzari, M.; Porcellato, A. M.; Roncolato, C.; Stark, S.; Caruso, A.; Longhitano, A.; Cavaliere, F.; Maero, G.; Paroli, B.; Pozzoli, R.; Romé, M.

    2014-02-15

    Two linear trap devices for particle beam manipulation (including emittance reduction, cooling, control of instabilities, dust dynamics, and non-neutral plasmas) are here presented, namely, a radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) beam cooler and a compact Penning trap with a dust injector. Both beam dynamics studies by means of dedicated codes including the interaction of the ions with a buffer gas (up to 3 Pa pressure), and the electromagnetic design of the RFQ beam cooler are reported. The compact multipurpose Penning trap is aimed to the study of multispecies charged particle samples, primarily electron beams interacting with a background gas and/or a micrometric dust contaminant. Using a 0.9 T solenoid and an electrode stack where both static and RF electric fields can be applied, both beam transport and confinement operations will be available. The design of the apparatus is presented.

  2. Design of general apochromatic drift-quadrupole beam lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindstrøm, C. A.; Adli, E.

    2016-07-01

    Chromatic errors are normally corrected using sextupoles in regions of large dispersion. In low emittance linear accelerators, use of sextupoles can be challenging. Apochromatic focusing is a lesser-known alternative approach, whereby chromatic errors of Twiss parameters are corrected without the use of sextupoles, and has consequently been subject to renewed interest in advanced linear accelerator research. Proof of principle designs were first established by Montague and Ruggiero and developed more recently by Balandin et al. We describe a general method for designing drift-quadrupole beam lines of arbitrary order in apochromatic correction, including analytic expressions for emittance growth and other merit functions. Worked examples are shown for plasma wakefield accelerator staging optics and for a simple final focus system.

  3. Uranus' (3-0) H2 quadrupole line profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trafton, L.

    1987-04-01

    Spectra of Uranus' S3(0) and S3(1) H2 quadrupole lines, obtained during the 1978-1980 apparitions, are analyzed, and are found to require the presence of a deep cloud. Modifications of the Baines and Bergstralh (1986) standard model, including an additional haze layer above the 16-km-am H2 level which contains strongly absorbing particles, are needed to fit the observations. For a Rayleigh phase function, such a haze (uniformly mixed with the gas above this level) would have an absorption optical depth of 0.16 and a single scattering particle albedo of 0.30. This modification would imply a fraction of normal H2 equal to 0.25 + or - 0.10, in agreement with the Baines and Bergstralh standard model.

  4. Super Strong Permanent Magnet Quadrupole for a Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Mihara, Takanori

    2004-02-19

    The field strength generated by permanent magnets has been further extended by the introduction of saturated iron. A permanent magnet quadrupole (PMQ) lens with such saturated iron is one of the candidates for the final focus lens for an e{sup +}e{sup -} Linear Collider accelerator, because of its compactness and low power consumption. The first prototype of the PMQ has been fabricated and demonstrated to have an integrated strength of 28.5T with an overall length of 10 cm and a 7mm bore radius. Two drawbacks should be considered: its negative temperature coefficient of field strength and its fixed strength. A thermal compensation material is being tested to cure the first problem. The other problem may be solved by rotating sectioned magnet bricks, but that may lead to movement of the magnetic center and introduction of multipoles beyond some strict requirements.

  5. Nb3Sn Quadrupole Magnets for the LHC IR

    SciTech Connect

    Sabbi, G.; Caspi, S.; Chiesa, L.; Coccoli, M.; Dietderich, D.r.; Ferracin, P.; Gourlay, S.A.; Hafalia, R.R.; Lietzke, A.F.; McInturff, A.D.; Scanlan, R.M.

    2001-08-01

    The development of insertion quadrupoles with 205 T/m gradient and 90 mm bore represents a promising strategy to achieve the ultimate luminosity goal of 2.5 x 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). At present, Nb{sub 3}Sn is the only practical conductor which can meet these requirements. Since Nb{sub 3}Sn is brittle, and considerably more strain sensitive than NbTi, the design concepts and fabrication techniques developed for NbTi magnets need to be modified appropriately. In addition, IR magnets must provide high field quality and operate reliably under severe radiation loads. The results of conceptual design studies addressing these issues are presented.

  6. Restoring the skew quadrupole moment in the Tevatron dipoles

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, D.J.; Bauer, P.C.; Blowers, J.N.; DiMarco, J.; Glass, H.D.; Hanft, R.W.; Carson, J.A.; Robotham, W.F.; Tartaglia, M.A.; Tompkins, J.C.; Velev, G.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    In early 2003 it was realized that mechanical changes in the Tevatron dipoles had led to a deterioration of the magnetic field quality that was hindering operation of the accelerator. After extensive study, a remediation program was started in late 2003 that will continue through 2005. The mechanical and magnetic effects are discussed. The readjustment process and experience are reported, along with other observations on aging magnets. In January 2003 two lines of inquiry converged, leading to the recognition that the severe betatron coupling that was hindering operation of the Tevatron could be explained by a systematic shift on the skew quadrupole field in the dipole magnets of the same size expected from observed mechanical movement of the coils inside the magnet yokes [1]. This paper reports on subsequent magnet studies that were conducted in parallel with additional beam studies and accelerator modeling [2] exploring the feasibility of the eventual remediation effort [3].

  7. High gradient quadrupoles for low emittance storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bec, G.; Chavanne, J.; Benabderrahmane, C.; Farvacque, L.; Goirand, L.; Liuzzo, S.; Raimondi, P.; Villar, F.

    2016-05-01

    High gradient quadrupoles are key components for the coming generation of storage ring based light sources. The typical specifications of these magnets are: almost 100 T /m gradient, half a meter long, and a vertical aperture for the extraction of the x-ray beam. This paper presents the preparation work done at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, from the design to the manufacture and measurements of a prototype. It demonstrates the feasibility of such magnets. Different aspects of magnet engineering are discussed, including the study of the main scale factors and the preliminary design, the pole shaping, the impact of mechanical errors, and the magnetic measurements of a prototype with a stretched-wire system.

  8. Revision of Spin Echoes in Pure Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meriles, C. A.

    2001-04-01

    Goldman's spin-1/2 formalism has been used for describing the response of an I=3/2 spin system to a two-pulse sequence in a pure nuclear quadrupole resonance experiment. A detailed analysis of the polarization evolution and quadrupolar echo generation is carried out through the use of explicit expressions for secular homo- and heteronuclear dipolar interactions. In striking contrast with previous studies, it is predicted that Van Vleck's second moments governing a classical solid-echo or Hahn sequence differ from those obtained by equivalent means in magnetic resonance. In fact, it is shown that, although measured moments still complement each other, the combined use of standard sequences does not allow the separate determination of homo- and heteronuclear dipolar contributions to the linewidth, not even in an indirect manner. In this context, the importance and potential usefulness of a crossed coil probe are also briefly discussed.

  9. Massive higher spin states in string theory and gravitational quadrupoles

    SciTech Connect

    Giannakis, I. |; Liu, J.T.; Porrati, M. ||

    1999-05-01

    In this paper we study three point functions of the type II superstring involving one graviton and two massive states, focusing in particular on the spin- (7) /(2) fermions at the first mass level. Defining a gravitational quadrupole {open_quotes}{ital h} factor,{close_quotes} we find that the nonminimal interactions of string states in general are parametrized by h{ne}1, in contrast with the preferred field theory value of h=1 (for tree-level unitarity). This difference arises from the fact that consistent gravitational interactions of strings are related to the presence of a complete tower of massive states, not present in the ordinary field theory case. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. Investigation of a quadrupole ultra-high vacuum ion pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, H. J.

    1974-01-01

    The new nonmagnetic ion pump resembles the quadrupole ionization gage. The dimensions are larger, and hyperbolically shaped electrodes replace the four rods. Their surfaces follow y sq. = 36 + x sq. (x, y in centimeters). The electrodes, 55 cm long, are positioned lengthwise in a tube. At one end a cathode emits electrons; at the other end a narrowly wound flat spiral of tungsten clad with titanium on cathode potential can be heated for titanium evaporation. Electrons accelerated by a dc potential of the surface electrodes oscillate between the ends on rotational trajectories, if a high frequency potential superimposed on the dc potential is properly adjusted. Pumping speeds (4-100 liter/sec) for different gases at different peak voltages (1000-3000V) at corresponding frequencies (57-100 MHz), and at different pressures 0.00001 to the minus 9 power Torr were observed. The lowest pressure reached was below 10 to the minus 10 power Torr.

  11. Anthropogenic Aerosols and Tropical Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Kim, D.; Ekman, A. M. L.; Barth, M. C.; Rasch, P. J.

    2009-04-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols can affect the radiative balance of the Earth-atmosphere system and precipitation by acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) or ice nuclei (IN) and thus modifying the optical and microphysical properties as well as lifetimes of clouds. Recent studies have also suggested that the direct radiative effect of anthropogenic aerosols, particularly absorbing aerosols, can perturb the large-scale circulation and cause a significant change in both quantity and distribution of critical tropical precipitation systems ranging from Pacific and Indian to Atlantic Oceans. This effect of aerosols on precipitation often appears in places away from aerosol-concentrated regions and current results suggest that the precipitation changes caused by it could be much more substantial than that by the microphysics-based aerosol effect. To understand the detailed mechanisms and strengths of such a "remote impact" and the climate response/feedback to anthropogenic aerosols in general, an interactive aerosol-climate model has been developed based on the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) of NCAR. Its aerosol module describes size, chemical composition, and mixing states of various sulfate and carbonaceous aerosols. Several model processes are derived based on 3D cloud-resolving model simulations. We have conducted a set of long integrations using the model driven by radiative effects of different combinations of various carbonaceous and sulfate aerosols and their mixtures. The responses of tropical precipitation systems to the forcing of these aerosols are analyzed using both model and observational data. Detailed analyses on the aerosol-precipitation causal relations of two systems: i.e., the Indian summer monsoon and Pacific ITCZ will be specifically presented.

  12. New insights on aerosol sources and properties of Organics in the west Mediterranean basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, José B.; Sciare, Jean; Petit, Jean-Eudes; Bonnaire, Nicolas; Féron, Anais; Dulac, François; Hamonou, Eric; Gros, Valérie; Mallet, Marc; Lambert, Dominique; Sauvage, Stéphane; Léonardis, Thierry; Tison, Emmanuel; Colomb, Aurélie; Fresney, Evelyn; Pichon, Jean-Marc; Bouvier, Laetitia; Bourrianne, Thierry; Roberts, Gregory

    2013-04-01

    The Mediterranean basin exhibits high PM concentrations for a marine area, in particular during the dry season (summer), associated with high photochemistry. The large population of the basin is impacted by both natural and anthropogenic aerosols of various sources from Europe and North Africa. Simulations predict significant climate changes in that area, with less precipitation and hotter temperatures, reinforced by an increasing anthropogenic pressure, which will be linked by higher emissions of pollutants and also by higher impacts on the health. Nevertheless the aerosol models in that area currently suffer from large uncertainties, due to a lack of knowledge in organic aerosol (OA) sources and processes. As part of the French program ChArMEx (The Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment, http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr), a 5-week intensive campaign has been performed in June - July 2012 at the new Cape Corsica station (see Dulac et al. in that session), and aiming at a better characterization of anthropogenic versus biogenic aerosols, long range transport versus local influence, with a focus on fine OA. A complete instrumental strategy was deployed thanks to the contribution of a large French community: PM1 concentration every 6 min with a TEOM-FDMS 1405 (Thermo), major aerosol components in PM1 every 30 min (Organics, SO4, NO3, NH4) by Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (Aerodyne), Equivalent Black Carbon every 5 min with a 7-? aethalometer AE31 (Magee Scientific), on-line major anions and cations (incl. light organics like oxalate & MSA) every 10 min with Particle-Into-Liquid Sampler (PILS, Metrohm) coupled with Ion Chromatographs (Dionex), on-line water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) every 4 min with a PILS (Applikon) coupled with a Total Organic Carbon instrument (Ionics). Filter sampling in PM2.5 and PM10 was also performed every 12h for quality purposes (PM, EC/OC, ions) and for complementary measurements (metals by ICP-MS and organic tracers by LC

  13. Gas phase emissions from cooking processes and their secondary aerosol production potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Felix; Platt, Stephen; Bruns, Emily; Termime-roussel, Brice; Detournay, Anais; Mohr, Claudia; Crippa, Monica; Slowik, Jay; Marchand, Nicolas; Baltensperger, Urs; Prevot, Andre; El Haddad, Imad

    2014-05-01

    Long before the industrial evolution and the era of fossil fuels, high concentrations of aerosol particles were alluded to in heavily populated areas, including ancient Rome and medieval London. Recent radiocarbon measurements (14C) conducted in modern megacities came as a surprise: carbonaceous aerosol (mainly organic aerosol, OA), a predominant fraction of particulate matter (PM), remains overwhelmingly non-fossil despite extensive fossil fuel combustion. Such particles are directly emitted (primary OA, POA) or formed in-situ in the atmosphere (secondary OA, SOA) via photochemical reactions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Urban levels of non-fossil OA greatly exceed the levels measured in pristine environments strongly impacted by biogenic emissions, suggesting a contribution from unidentified anthropogenic non-fossil sources to urban OA. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) techniques applied to ambient aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS, Aerodyne) data identify primary cooking emissions (COA) as one of the main sources of primary non-fossil OA in major cities like London (Allan et al., 2010), New York (Sun et al., 2011) and Beijing (Huang et al., 2010). Cooking processes can also emit VOCs that can act as SOA precursors, potentially explaining in part the high levels of oxygenated OA (OOA) identified by the AMS in urban areas. However, at present, the chemical nature of these VOCs and their secondary aerosol production potential (SAPP) remain virtually unknown. The approach adopted here involves laboratory quantification of PM and VOC emission factors from the main primary COA emitting processes and their SAPP. Primary emissions from deep-fat frying, vegetable boiling, vegetable frying and meat cooking for different oils, meats and vegetables were analysed under controlled conditions after ~100 times dilution. A high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and a high resolution proton transfer time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR

  14. Graphical aerosol classification method using aerosol relative optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qi-Xiang; Yuan, Yuan; Shuai, Yong; Tan, He-Ping

    2016-06-01

    A simple graphical method is presented to classify aerosol types based on a combination of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and aerosol relative optical thickness (AROT). Six aerosol types, including maritime (MA), desert dust (DD), continental (CO), sub-continental (SC), urban industry (UI) and biomass burning (BB), are discriminated in a two dimensional space of AOT440 and AROT1020/440. Numerical calculations are performed using MIE theory based on a multi log-normal particle size distribution, and the AROT ranges for each aerosol type are determined. More than 5 years of daily observations from 8 representative aerosol sites are applied to the method to confirm spatial applicability. Finally, 3 individual cases are analyzed according to their specific aerosol status. The outcomes indicate that the new graphical method coordinates well with regional characteristics and is also able to distinguish aerosol variations in individual situations. This technique demonstrates a novel way to estimate different aerosol types and provide information on radiative forcing calculations and satellite data corrections.

  15. First Observation of a Quadrupole Cooper Minimum in the Photoionization of Xe 5p

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, P. C.; Hemmers, O.; Guillemin, R.; Wolska, A.; Lindle, D. W.; Rolles, D.; Yu, S. W.; Manson, S. T.

    2006-05-01

    The nondipole photoelectron angular distribution parameter ξ (= 3δ+γ) for xenon 5p1/2 and 5p3/2 has been studied experimentally in the 80 - 200 eV range. In addition, calculations have been performed using the relativistic-random-phase approximation (RRPA) methodology with all relativistic single excitation/ionization channels down to 4s coupled in both the dipole and quadrupole manifolds. The results show significant disagreement between theory and experiment above about 130 eV photon energy, in contradistinction to the Xe 5s case where rather good agreement is found. Since it is known that the dipole amplitudes are well-represented by RRPA, the difficulty must be in the quadrupole channels. It was expected that the quadrupole channels should be accurate as well since the f-wave is resonant in Xe and the main quadrupole transitions, the 5p->kf, are included in the calculation. However, we have found that these transitions each have a quadrupole Cooper minimum in the energy region of interest, so that quadrupole satellites, which are not included in the RRPA calculation, become important. This might be the first experimental indication of a quadrupole Cooper minimum.

  16. Aerosol flux measurements above a mixed forest at Borden, Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, M.; Staebler, R. M.; Liggio, J.; Vlasenko, A.; Li, S.-M.; Hayden, K.

    2010-10-01

    Aerosol fluxes were measured above a mixed forest by Eddy Covariance (EC) with a Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS) at the Borden Forest Research Station in Ontario, Canada between 13 July and 12 August 2009. The FMPS, mounted at a height of 33 m (approximately 10 m above the canopy top) and housed in a temperature controlled enclosure, measured size-resolved particle concentrations for 3 to 410 nm at a rate of 1 Hz. For the size range 20Quadrupole Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (Q-AMS) demonstrate a tendency towards downward fluxes, which may be due to an organic particle component which can not be resolved by the flux mode of the Q-AMS.

  17. Aerosol flux measurements above a mixed forest at Borden, Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, M.; Staebler, R. M.; Liggio, J.; Vlasenko, A.; Li, S.-M.; Hayden, K.

    2011-07-01

    Aerosol fluxes were measured above a mixed forest by Eddy Covariance (EC) with a Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS) at the Borden Forest Research Station in Ontario, Canada between 13 July and 12 August 2009. Chemically speciated flux measurements were made at a height of 29 m at the same location between 19 July and 2 August, 2006 using a Quadrupole Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (Q-AMS). The Q-AMS measured an average sulphate deposition velocity of 0.3 mm s-1 and an average nitrate deposition velocity of 4.8 mm s-1. The FMPS, mounted at a height of 33 m (approximately 10 m above the canopy top) and housed in a temperature controlled enclosure, measured size-resolved particle concentrations from 3 to 410 nm diameter at a rate of 1 Hz. For the size range 18 < D < 452 nm, 60 % of fluxes were upward. The exchange velocity was between -0.5 and 2.0 mm s-1, with median values near 0.5 mm s-1 for all sizes between 22 and 310 nm. The size distribution of the apparent production rate of particles at 33 m peaked at a diameter of 75 nm. Results indicate a decoupling of the above and below canopy spaces, whereby particles are stored in the canopy space at night, and are then diluted with cleaner air above during the day.

  18. Exposures to acidic aerosols.

    PubMed

    Spengler, J D; Keeler, G J; Koutrakis, P; Ryan, P B; Raizenne, M; Franklin, C A

    1989-02-01

    Ambient monitoring of acid aerosols in four U.S. cities and in a rural region of southern Ontario clearly show distinct periods of strong acidity. Measurements made in Kingston, TN, and Steubenville, OH, resulted in 24-hr H+ ion concentrations exceeding 100 nmole/m3 more than 10 times during summer months. Periods of elevated acidic aerosols occur less frequently in winter months. The H+ determined during episodic conditions in southern Ontario indicates that respiratory tract deposition can exceed the effects level reported in clinical studies. Observed 12-hr H+ concentrations exceeded 550 nmole/m3 (approximately 27 micrograms/m3 H2SO4). The maximum estimated 1-hr concentration exceeded 1500 nmole/m3 for H+ ions. At these concentrations, an active child might receive more than 2000 nmole of H+ ion in 12 hr and in excess of 900 nmole during the hour when H2SO4 exceeded 50 micrograms/m3.

  19. Aerosol Observing System (AOS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Jefferson, A

    2011-01-17

    The Aerosol Observing System (AOS) is a suite of in situ surface measurements of aerosol optical and cloud-forming properties. The instruments measure aerosol properties that influence the earth’s radiative balance. The primary optical measurements are those of the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients as a function of particle size and radiation wavelength and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements as a function of percent supersaturation. Additional measurements include those of the particle number concentration and scattering hygroscopic growth. Aerosol optical measurements are useful for calculating parameters used in radiative forcing calculations such as the aerosol single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, mass scattering efficiency, and hygroscopic growth. CCN measurements are important in cloud microphysical models to predict droplet formation.

  20. Biological aerosol trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeSha, Michael S.

    1999-01-01

    In recent history, manmade and natural events have shown us the every-present need for systems to monitor the troposphere for contaminates. These contaminants may take either a chemical or biological form, which determines the methods we use to monitor them. Monitoring the troposphere for biological contaminants is of particular interest to my organization. Whether manmade or natural, contaminants of a biological origin share similar constituents; typically the aromatic amino acids tryptophan, phenylalanine, and tyrosine. All of these proteinaceous compounds autofluorescence when exposed to UV radiation and this established the basis of the laser-induced fluorescence technique we use to detect biological contaminants. This technique can be employed in either point or remote detection schemes and is a valuable tool for discriminating proteinaceous form non-proteinaceous aerosols. For this particular presentation I am going to describe a breadboard point sensor we designed and fabricated to detect proteinaceous aerosols. Previous point sensor designs relied on convoluted flow paths to concentrate the aerosols into a solution. Other systems required precise beam alignment to evenly distribute the energy irradiating the detector elements. Our objective was to build a simple system where beam alignment is not critical, and the flow is straight and laminar. The breadboard system was developed over a nine- month period and its performance assessed at a recent test at Dugway Proving Grounds in Utah. In addition, we have performed chamber experiments in an attempt to establish a baseline for the systems. The results of these efforts are presented here.

  1. Cantera Aerosol Dynamics Simulator

    2004-09-01

    The Cantera Aerosol Dynamics Simulator (CADS) package is a general library for aerosol modeling to address aerosol general dynamics, including formation from gas phase reactions, surface chemistry (growth and oxidation), bulk particle chemistry, transport by Brownian diffusion, thermophoresis, and diffusiophoresis with linkage to DSMC studies, and thermal radiative transport. The library is based upon Cantera, a C++ Cal Tech code that handles gas phase species transport, reaction, and thermodynamics. The method uses a discontinuous galerkinmore » formulation for the condensation and coagulation operator that conserves particles, elements, and enthalpy up to round-off error. Both O-D and 1-D time dependent applications have been developed with the library. Multiple species in the solid phase are handled as well. The O-D application, called Tdcads (Time Dependent CADS) is distributed with the library. Tdcads can address both constant volume and constant pressure adiabatic homogeneous problems. An extensive set of sample problems for Tdcads is also provided.« less

  2. Atmospheric aerosols: Their Optical Properties and Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Measured properties of atmospheric aerosol particles are presented. These include aerosol size frequency distribution and complex retractive index. The optical properties of aerosols are computed based on the presuppositions of thermodynamic equilibrium and of Mie-theory.

  3. Wireless power transfer based on magnetic quadrupole coupling in dielectric resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Mingzhao; Iorsh, Ivan; Kapitanova, Polina; Nenasheva, Elizaveta; Belov, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    We numerically investigate a magnetic resonant wireless power transfer system based on high refractive index dielectric resonators. We propose to operate at magnetic quadrupole mode of the resonators to enlarge the efficiency due to minimization of ohmic and radiation losses. Numerical estimation predicts the 80% efficiency of the wireless power transfer (WPT) system operating at quadrupole mode at 300 MHz. Moreover, the system operating at magnetic quadrupole mode is capable of transferring power with 70% efficiency when the receiver rotates 90°. We verify the simulated results by experimental investigation of the WPT system based on microwave ceramic resonators (ɛ = 80 and tanδ = 10-4).

  4. Production techniques for the Superconducting Super Collider Low Energy Booster quadrupole magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, M.E.; Behrsing, G.U.; Fulton, R.L.

    1994-07-01

    The manufacturing techniques used for a prototype quadrupole magnet, developed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Low Energy Booster (LEB), are described. The SSC LEB Ring employs 96 dipoles and 90 quadrupoles connected in series to form the magnetic lattice, requiring the use of a 21.9 mm x 23.0 mm hollow conductor for the quadrupoles. Due to the large conductor size and small bend radii required, development of special fixtures was necessary. A unique coil-forming method with close attention paid to tooling design and special assembly procedures was required to manufacture this prototype to stringent specifications.

  5. Electric quadrupole transition probabilities and line strengths of Ti{sup 11+}

    SciTech Connect

    Gökçe, Yasin; Çelik, Gültekin; Yıldız, Murat

    2014-07-15

    Electric quadrupole transition probabilities and line strengths have been calculated using the weakest bound electron potential model for sodium-like titanium, considering many transition arrays. We employed numerical Coulomb approximation and non-relativistic Hartree–Fock wavefunctions for the expectation values of radii in determination of parameters of the model. The necessary energy values have been taken from experimental data in the literature. The calculated electric quadrupole line strengths have been compared with available data in the literature and good agreement has been obtained. Moreover, some electric quadrupole transition probability and line strength values not existing in the literature for some highly excited levels have been obtained using this method.

  6. Reconstruction of the number and positions of dipoles and quadrupoles using an algebraic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nara, Takaaki

    2008-11-01

    Localization of dipoles and quadrupoles is important in inverse potential analysis, since they can effectively express spatially extended sources with a small number of parmeters. This paper proposes an algebraic method for reconstruction of pole positions as well as the number of dipole-quadrupoles without providing an initial parameter guess or iterative computing forward solutions. It is also shown that a magnetoencephalography inverse problem with a source model of dipole-quadrupoles in 3D space is reduced into the same problem as in 2D space.

  7. On the dipole and quadrupole kinematic anisotropy in the brightness of the cosmic background radiation

    SciTech Connect

    De Bernardis, P.; Epifani, M.; Guarini, G.; Masi, S.; Melchiorri, F. )

    1990-04-01

    This paper studies the dipole and quadrupole anisotropy brightness arising from the motion of the observer in the presence of a pure Planckian spectrum and in the case of a submillimeter excess. It is found that the dipole anisotropy is enhanced in the case of the excess measured by the Japanese-U.S. groups, while it is decreased in the case of the excess found by the Canadian group. The quadrupole term is absent in the radio region, while it acquires detectable values in the IR. Comparisons are made with the observational values, and the possibility of observing the quadrupole pattern in the presence of galactic dust contamination is discussed. 15 refs.

  8. Nb3Sn Quadrupoles in the LHC IR Phase I Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Zlobin,A.; Johnstone, J.; Kashikhin, V.; Mokhov, N.; Rakhno, I.; deMaria, R.; Peggs, S.; Robert-Demolaize, F.; Wanderer, P.

    2008-06-23

    After a number of years of operation at nominal parameters, the LHC will be upgraded for higher luminosity. This paper discusses the possibility of using a limited number of Nb{sub 3}Sn quadrupoles for hybrid optics layouts for the LHC Phase I luminosity upgrades with both NbTi and Nb{sub 3}Sn quadrupoles. Magnet parameters and issues related to using Nb{sub 3}Sn quadrupoles including aperture, gradient, magnetic length, field quality, operation margin, et cetera are discussed.

  9. Nb3Sn quadrupoles in the LHC IR Phase I upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Zlobin, A.V.; Johnstone, J.A.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Mokhov, N.V.; Rakhno, I.L.; de Maria, R.; Peggs, S.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Wanderer, P.; /Brookhaven

    2008-06-01

    After a number of years of operation at nominal parameters, the LHC will be upgraded to a higher luminosity. This paper discusses the possibility of using a limited number of Nb{sub 3}Sn quadrupoles for hybrid optics layouts for the LHC Phase I luminosity upgrades with both NbTi and Nb{sub 3}Sn quadrupoles. Magnet parameters and issues related to using Nb{sub 3}Sn quadrupoles including aperture, gradient, magnetic length, field quality, operation margin, et cetera are discussed.

  10. Volcanic aerosols and lunar eclipses.

    PubMed

    Keen, R A

    1983-12-01

    The moon is visible during total lunar eclipses due to sunlight refracted into the earth's shadow by the atmosphere. Stratospheric aerosols can profoundly affect the brightness of the eclipsed moon. Observed brightnesses of 21 lunar eclipses during 1960-1982 are compared with theoretical calculations based on refraction by an aerosol-free atmosphere to yield globally averaged aerosol optical depths. Results indicate the global aerosol loading from the 1982 eruption of El Chichón is similar in magnitude to that from the 1963 Agung eruption.

  11. Volcanic aerosols and lunar eclipses.

    PubMed

    Keen, R A

    1983-12-01

    The moon is visible during total lunar eclipses due to sunlight refracted into the earth's shadow by the atmosphere. Stratospheric aerosols can profoundly affect the brightness of the eclipsed moon. Observed brightnesses of 21 lunar eclipses during 1960-1982 are compared with theoretical calculations based on refraction by an aerosol-free atmosphere to yield globally averaged aerosol optical depths. Results indicate the global aerosol loading from the 1982 eruption of El Chichón is similar in magnitude to that from the 1963 Agung eruption. PMID:17776243

  12. Stratospheric aerosols and climatic change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, O. B.; Pollack, J. B.

    1978-01-01

    Stratospht1ic sulfuric acid particles scatter and absorb sunlight and they scatter, absorb and emit terrestrial thermal radiation. These interactions play a role in the earth's radiation balance and therefore affect climate. The stratospheric aerosols are perturbed by volcanic injection of SO2 and ash, by aircraft injection of SO2, by rocket exhaust of Al2O3 and by tropospheric mixing of particles and pollutant SO2 and COS. In order to assess the effects of these perturbations on climate, the effects of the aerosols on the radiation balance must be understood and in order to understand the radiation effects the properties of the aerosols must be known. The discussion covers the aerosols' effect on the radiation balance. It is shown that the aerosol size distribution controls whether the aerosols will tend to warm or cool the earth's surface. Calculations of aerosol properties, including size distribution, for various perturbation sources are carried out on the basis of an aerosol model. Calculations are also presented of the climatic impact of perturbed aerosols due to volcanic eruptions and Space Shuttle flights.

  13. Seasonal characterization of submicron aerosol chemical composition and organic aerosol sources in the southeastern United States: Atlanta, Georgia and Look Rock, Tennessee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budisulistiorini, S. H.; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, E. S.; Bairai, S. T.; Mueller, S.; Shaw, S. L.; Knipping, E. M.; Gold, A.; Surratt, J. D.

    2015-08-01

    A yearlong near-real-time characterization of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1) was conducted at an urban (Atlanta, Georgia) and rural (Look Rock, Tennessee) site in the southeastern US using the Aerodyne aerosol chemical speciation monitor (ACSM) collocated with established air-monitoring network measurements. Seasonal variations in organic aerosol (OA) and inorganic aerosol species are attributed to meteorological conditions as well as anthropogenic and biogenic emissions in this region. The highest concentrations of NR-PM1 were observed during winter and fall seasons at the urban site and during spring and summer at the rural site. Across all seasons and at both sites, NR-PM1 was composed largely of OA (50-76 %) and inorganic sulfate (12-31 %). Six distinct OA sources were resolved by positive matrix factorization applied to the ACSM organic mass spectral data collected from the two sites over the one year of near-continuous measurements at each site: hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA), biomass burning OA (BBOA), semi-volatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA), low-volatility oxygenated OA (OOA), isoprene-derived epoxydiol (IEPOX) OA (IEPOX-OA), and 91Fac OA (a factor dominated by a distinct ion at m/z 91 fragment ion previously observed in biogenic influenced areas). LV-OOA was observed throughout the year at both sites and contributed 30-66 % of total OA mass. HOA was also observed during the entire year only at the urban site (15-24 % of OA mass). BBOA (15-33 % of OA mass) was observed during winter and fall, likely dominated by local residential wood burning emission. Although SV-OOA contributes quite significantly (∼ 27 %), it was observed only at the urban site during colder seasons. IEPOX-OA was a major component (27-41 %) of OA at both sites, particularly in spring and summer. An ion fragment at m/z 75 is proposed as an additional marker for IEPOX-OA, as it is shown to correlate well with the m/z 82 ion shown to be associated with the aerosol mass spectrum of

  14. Chemistry and processes of aerosols at Mt. Bachelor, a high elevation site in the Pacific Northwest U.S.: influences from regional transport and wildfire plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, S.; Zhou, S.; Hee, J.; Jaffe, D. A.; Wigder, N. L.; Zhang, Q.

    2013-12-01

    The Mt. Bachelor Observatory (MBO; 43.9794° N, 121.6885° W, altitude 2,763 m asl)) has been used for 10 years to study wildfire impacts on CO, O3, aerosols and other pollutants in the free troposphere. In the summer of 2013, we deployed an Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) at the summit of MBO to obtain high resolution data on the chemical composition of aerosols, with an emphasis on biomass burning aerosols, as part of the DOE sponsored Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP). A main goal of BBOP is to study the downwind time evolution of the microphysical, morphological, chemical, hygroscopic, and optical properties of carbonaceous aerosol generated by biomass burning (BB). MBO is an ideal location for studying remote and high elevation aerosol and the location allows for free tropospheric air masses to be sampled during the night and air coming from the boundary layer during daytime. Our ground-based measurements are also complimentary to simultaneous aircraft BB plume measurements. Our observations indicate a dynamic variation in the chemical composition and physical properties of aerosols with repeatable diurnal patterns. Periods of low particulate matter (PM) loading show distinctly oxidized organic aerosol (OA) with oxygen-to-carbon atomic ratios (O/C) reaching above 1 as well as containing an ammonium sulfate fraction of up to 50% of submicron aerosol (PM1) mass. Methanesulfonic acid (MSA) is also present during low loading periods, which, together with an aerosol size distribution characteristic of a droplet accumulation mode centered at 500-600 nm in vacuum aerodynamic diameter (Dva), suggests that aqueous-phase processing plays an important role in the regional aerosol sampled at this site. During these same measurements, contrasting periods of higher loading and markedly different characteristics have been observed due to effects from injection of wildfire plumes into air masses transported to MBO

  15. Impact of aftertreatment devices on primary emissions and secondary organic aerosol formation potential from in-use diesel vehicles: results from smog chamber experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirico, R.; Decarlo, P. F.; Heringa, M. F.; Tritscher, T.; Richter, R.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Dommen, J.; Weingartner, E.; Wehrle, G.; Gysel, M.; Laborde, M.; Baltensperger, U.

    2010-12-01

    Diesel particulate matter (DPM) is a significant source of aerosol in urban areas and has been linked to adverse health effects. Although newer European directives have introduced increasingly stringent standards for primary PM emissions, gaseous organics emitted from diesel cars can still lead to large amounts of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the atmosphere. Here we present results from smog chamber investigations characterizing the primary organic aerosol (POA) and the corresponding SOA formation at atmospherically relevant concentrations for three in-use diesel vehicles with different exhaust aftertreatment systems. One vehicle lacked exhaust aftertreatment devices, one vehicle was equipped with a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and the third vehicle used both a DOC and diesel particulate filter (DPF). The experiments presented here were obtained from the vehicles at conditions representative of idle mode, and for one car in addition at a speed of 60 km/h. An Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was used to measure the organic aerosol (OA) concentration and to obtain information on the chemical composition. For the conditions explored in this paper, primary aerosols from vehicles without a particulate filter consisted mainly of black carbon (BC) with a low fraction of organic matter (OM, OM/BC < 0.5), while the subsequent aging by photooxidation resulted in a consistent production of SOA only for the vehicles without a DOC and with a deactivated DOC. After 5 h of aging ~80% of the total organic aerosol was on average secondary and the estimated "emission factor" for SOA was 0.23-0.56 g/kg fuel burned. In presence of both a DOC and a DPF, only 0.01 g SOA per kg fuel burned was produced within 5 h after lights on. The mass spectra indicate that POA was mostly a non-oxidized OA with an oxygen to carbon atomic ratio (O/C) ranging from 0.10 to 0.19. Five hours of oxidation led to a more oxidized OA with an O/C range of 0

  16. Impact of aftertreatment devices on primary emissions and secondary organic aerosol formation potential from in-use diesel vehicles: results from smog chamber experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirico, R.; Decarlo, P. F.; Heringa, M. F.; Tritscher, T.; Richter, R.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Dommen, J.; Weingartner, E.; Wehrle, G.; Gysel, M.; Laborde, M.; Baltensperger, U.

    2010-06-01

    Diesel particulate matter (DPM) is a significant source of aerosol in urban areas and has been linked to adverse health effects. Although newer European directives have introduced increasingly stringent standards for primary PM emissions, gaseous organics emitted from diesel cars can still lead to large amounts of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the atmosphere. Here we present results from smog chamber investigations characterizing the primary organic aerosol (POA) and the corresponding SOA formation at atmospherically relevant concentrations for three in-use diesel vehicles with different exhaust aftertreatment systems. One vehicle lacked exhaust aftertreatment devices, one vehicle was equipped with a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and the final vehicle used both a DOC and diesel particulate filter (DPF). The experiments presented here were obtained from the vehicles at conditions representative of idle mode, and for one car in addition at a speed of 60 km/h. An Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was used to measure the organic aerosol (OA) concentration and to obtain information on the chemical composition. For the conditions explored in this paper, primary aerosols from vehicles without a particulate filter consisted mainly of black carbon (BC) with a low fraction of organic matter (OM, OM/BC<0.5), while the subsequent aging by photooxidation resulted in a consistent production of SOA only for the vehicles without a DOC and with a deactivated DOC. After 5 h of aging ~80% of the total organic aerosol was on average secondary and the estimated "emission factor" for SOA was 0.23-0.56 g/kg fuel burned. In presence of both a DOC and a DPF, primary particles with a mobility diameter above 5 nm were 300±19 cm-3, and only 0.01 g SOA per kg fuel burned was produced within 5 h after lights on. The mass spectra indicate that POA was mostly a non-oxidized OA with an oxygen to carbon atomic ratio (O/C) ranging from 0.097 to 0

  17. Real-time measurement of sodium chloride in individual aerosol particles by mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, M. P.; Friedlander, S. K.

    1985-01-01

    The method of particle analysis by mass spectrometry has been applied to the quantitative measurement of sodium chloride in individual particles on a real-time basis. Particles of known masses are individually introduced, in the form of a beam, into a miniature Knudsen cell oven (1600 K). The oven is fabricated from rhenium metal sheet (0.018 mm thick) and is situated in the ion source of a quadrupole mass spectrometer. A particle once inside the oven is trapped and completely volatilized; this overcomes the problem of partial volatilization due to particles bouncing from the filament surface. Individual particles are thermally volatilized and ionized inside the rhenium oven, and produce discrete sodium ion pulses whose intensities are measured with the quadrupole mass spectrometer. An ion pulse width of several milliseconds (4-12 ms) is found for particles in the mass range 1.3 x 10 to the -13th to 5.4 x 10 to the -11th g. The sodium ion intensity is found to be proportional to the particle mass to the 0.86-power. The intensity distribution for monodisperse aerosol particles possesses a geometric standard deviation of 1.09, showing that the method can be used for the determination of the mass distribution function with good resolution in a polydisperse aerosol.

  18. Aerosol hygroscopicity and CCN activation kinetics in a boreal forest environment during the 2007 EUCAARI campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerully, K. M.; Raatikainen, T.; Lance, S.; Tkacik, D.; Tiitta, P.; Petäjä, T.; Ehn, M.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Laaksonen, A.; Smith, J. N.; Nenes, A.

    2011-12-01

    Measurements of size-resolved cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations, subsaturated hygroscopic growth, size distribution, and chemical composition were collected from March through May, 2007, in the remote Boreal forests of Hyytiälä, Finland, as part of the European Integrated project on Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality Interactions (EUCAARI) campaign. Hygroscopicity parameter, κ, distributions were derived independently from Continuous Flow-Streamwise Thermal Gradient CCN Chamber (CFSTGC) and Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA) measurements. CFSTGC-derived κ values for 40, 60, and 80 nm particles range mostly between 0.10 and 0.40 with an average characteristic of highly oxidized organics of 0.20 ± 0.10, indicating that organics play a dominant role for this environment. HTDMA-derived κ were generally 30% lower. Diurnal trends of κ show a minimum at sunrise and a maximum in the late afternoon; this trend covaries with inorganic mass fraction and the m/z 44 organic mass fraction given by a quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer, further illustrating the importance of organics in aerosol hygroscopicity. The chemical dispersion inferred from the observed κ distributions indicates that while 60 and 80 nm dispersion increases around midday, 40 nm dispersion remains constant. Additionally, 80 nm particles show a markedly higher level of chemical dispersion than both 40 and 60 nm particles. An analysis of droplet activation kinetics for the sizes considered indicates that most of the CCN activate as rapidly as (NH4)2SO4 calibration aerosol.

  19. Aerosol hygroscopicity and CCN activation kinetics in a boreal forest environment during the 2007 EUCAARI campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerully, K. M.; Raatikainen, T.; Lance, S.; Tkacik, D.; Tiitta, P.; Petäjä, T.; Ehn, M.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Laaksonen, A.; Smith, J. N.; Nenes, A.

    2011-05-01

    Measurements of size-resolved cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), subsaturated hygroscopic growth, size distribution, and chemical composition were collected from March through May, 2007, in the remote Boreal forests of Hyytiälä, Finland, as part of the European Integrated project on Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality Interactions (EUCAARI) campaign. Hygroscopicity parameter, κ, distributions were derived independently from Continuous Flow-Streamwise Thermal Gradient CCN Chamber (CFSTGC) and Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA) measurements. CFSTGC-derived κ values for 40, 60, and 80 nm particles range mostly between 0.10 and 0.40 with an average of 0.20 ± 0.10; this is characteristic of highly oxidized organics and reflect their dominant influence in this environment. HTDMA-derived κ were generally 30 % lower. Diurnal trends of κ show a minimum at sunrise and a maximum in the late afternoon; this trend covaries with inorganic mass fraction and the m/z 44 organic mass fraction given by a quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer, further illustrating the importance of ageing on aerosol hygroscopicity. The chemical dispersion inferred from the observed κ distributions indicates that while 60 and 80 nm dispersion increases around midday, 40 nm dispersion remains constant. Additionally, 80 nm particles show a markedly higher level of chemical dispersion than both 40 and 60 nm particles. An analysis of droplet activation kinetics for the sizes considered indicates that the CCN activate as rapidly as (NH4)2SO4 calibration aerosol.

  20. Variations in the OM/OC ratio of urban organic aerosol next to a major roadway.

    PubMed

    Brown, Steven G; Lee, Taehyoung; Roberts, Paul T; Collett, Jeffrey L

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the organic matter/organic carbon (OM/OC) ratio in ambient particulate matter (PM) is critical to achieve mass closure in routine PM measurements, to assess the sources of and the degree of chemical processing organic aerosol particles have undergone, and to relate ambient pollutant concentrations to health effects. Of particular interest is how the OM/OC ratio varies in the urban environment, where strong spatial and temporal gradients in source emissions are common. We provide results of near-roadway high-time-resolution PM1 OM concentration and OM/OC ratio observations during January 2008 at Fyfe Elementary School in Las Vegas, NV, 18 m from the U.S. 95 freeway soundwall, measured with an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS). The average OM/OC ratio was 1.54 (+/- 0.20 standard deviation), typical of environments with a low amount of secondary aerosol formation. The 2-min average OM/OC ratios varied between 1.17 and 2.67, and daily average OM/OC ratios varied between 1.44 and 1.73. The ratios were highest during periods of low OM concentrations and generally low during periods of high OM concentrations. OM/OC ratios were low (1.52 +/- 0.14, on average) during the morning rush hour (average OM = 2.4 microg/m3), when vehicular emissions dominate this near-road measurement site. The ratios were slightly lower (1.46 +/- 0.10) in the evening (average OM = 6.3 microg/m3), when a combination of vehicular and fresh residential biomass burning emissions was typically present during times with temperature inversions. The hourly averaged OM/OC ratio peaked at 1.66 at midday. OM concentrations were similar regardless of whether the monitoring site was downwind or upwind of the adjacent freeway throughout the day, though they were higher during stagnant conditions (wind speed < 0.5 m/sec). The OM/OC ratio generally varied more with time of day than with wind direction and speed. PMID:24558705

  1. Properties and evolution of biomass burning organic aerosol from Canadian boreal forest fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolleys, M. D.; Coe, H.; McFiggans, G.; Taylor, J. W.; O'Shea, S. J.; Le Breton, M.; Bauguitte, S. J.-B.; Moller, S.; Di Carlo, P.; Aruffo, E.; Palmer, P. I.; Lee, J. D.

    2014-10-01

    Airborne measurements of biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA) from boreal forest fires reveal highly contrasting properties for plumes of different ages. These measurements, performed using an Aerodyne Research Inc. compact time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (C-ToF-AMS) during the BORTAS (quantifying the impact of BOReal forest fires on Tropospheric oxidants over the Atlantic using Aircraft and Satellites) experiment in the summer of 2011, have been used to derive normalised excess organic aerosol (OA) mass concentrations (ΔOA/ΔCO), with higher average ratios observed closer to source (0.190 ± 0.010) than in the far-field (0.097 ± 0.002). The difference in ΔOA/ΔCO between fresh and aged plumes is influenced by a change in dominant combustion conditions throughout the campaign. Measurements at source sampled largely smouldering fires, while plumes encountered in the far-field originated from fires occurring earlier in the campaign when fire activity had been more intense. Changing combustion conditions also affect the vertical distribution of biomass burning emissions, as aged plumes from more flaming-dominated fires are injected to higher altitudes of up to 6000 m. Proportional contributions of the mass-to-charge ratio (m/z) 60 and 44 peaks in the AMS mass spectra to the total OA mass (denoted f60 and f44) are used as tracers for primary and oxidized BBOA, respectively. Given the shorter aging times associated with near-field plumes, f44 is lower on average than in more aged, transported plumes. However, high levels of ΔO3/ΔCO and -log(NOx/NOy) close to source indicate that emissions can be subject to very rapid oxidation over short timescales. Conversely, the lofting of plumes into the upper troposphere can lead to the retention of source profiles after transportation over extensive temporal and spatial scales, with f60 also higher on average in aged plumes. Evolution of OA composition with aging is comparable to observations of BB tracers in

  2. CCN Activity, Hygroscopicity, and Droplet Activation Kinetics of Secondary Organic Aerosol Resulting from the 2010 Gulf Oil Spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R.; Lathem, T. L.; Cerully, K.; Bahreini, R.; Brock, C. A.; Langridge, J. M.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Nenes, A.; Calnex Science Team

    2010-12-01

    We present an analysis of the hygroscopicity and droplet activation kinetics of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) sampled onboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration WP-3D aircraft downwind of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill site on June 8th and 10th, 2010. This set of measurements provides a unique case study for assessing in-situ the impact of fresh, hydrocarbonlike aerosols, which are expected to be formed via gas-to-particle conversion of the semi-volatile vapors released from oil evaporation. Similar hydrocarbon-rich aerosols constitute an important local emissions source in urban areas, but often coexist as an external/partially-internal mixture with more-oxidized, aged organic and sulfate aerosol. The DWH site provides the means to study the hygroscopic properties of these less-oxidized organic aerosols above a cleaner environmental background typical of marine environments in order to better discern their contribution to CCN activity and droplet growth. Measurements were performed with a Droplet Measurement Technologies Streamwise, Thermal-Gradient CCN counter, operating both as a counter (s=0.3%) and as a spectrometer (s=0.2-0.6%) using the newly-developed Scanning Flow CCN Analysis (SFCA) technique [1]. The instrument measures both the number concentration of particles able to nucleate droplets and also their resulting droplet sizes. The measured size information combined with a comprehensive computational fluid dynamics instrument model enables us to determine the rate of water uptake onto the particles and parameterize it in terms of an effective mass transfer coefficient [2], a key parameter needed to predict the number of activated droplets in ambient clouds. Non-refractory aerosol chemical composition was measured with an Aerodyne compact time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer. It was observed that the aerosols sampled downwind of the site on both days were composed predominantly of organics with a low degree of oxidation and low

  3. Triple Quadrupole Versus High Resolution Quadrupole-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry for Quantitative LC-MS/MS Analysis of 25-Hydroxyvitamin D in Human Serum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geib, Timon; Sleno, Lekha; Hall, Rabea A.; Stokes, Caroline S.; Volmer, Dietrich A.

    2016-08-01

    We describe a systematic comparison of high and low resolution LC-MS/MS assays for quantification of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 in human serum. Identical sample preparation, chromatography separations, electrospray ionization sources, precursor ion selection, and ion activation were used; the two assays differed only in the implemented final mass analyzer stage; viz. high resolution quadrupole-quadrupole-time-of-flight (QqTOF) versus low resolution triple quadrupole instruments. The results were assessed against measured concentration levels from a routine clinical chemiluminescence immunoassay. Isobaric interferences prevented the simple use of TOF-MS spectra for extraction of accurate masses and necessitated the application of collision-induced dissociation on the QqTOF platform. The two mass spectrometry assays provided very similar analytical figures of merit, reflecting the lack of relevant isobaric interferences in the MS/MS domain, and were successfully applied to determine the levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D for patients with chronic liver disease.

  4. Kinetic equilibrium of space charge dominated beams in a misaligned quadrupole focusing channel

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, A.; Sing Babu, P.; Pandit, V. S.

    2013-07-15

    The dynamics of intense beam propagation through the misaligned quadrupole focusing channel has been studied in a self-consistent manner using nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell equations. The equations of motion of the beam centroid have been developed and found to be independent of any specific beam distribution. A Vlasov equilibrium distribution and beam envelope equations have been obtained, which provide us a theoretical tool to investigate the dynamics of intense beam propagating in a misaligned quadrupole focusing channel. It is shown that the displaced quadrupoles only cause the centroid of the beam to wander off axis. The beam envelope around the centroid obeys the familiar Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij envelope equation that is independent of the centroid motion. However, the rotation of the quadrupole about its optical axis affects the beam envelope and causes an increase in the projected emittances in the two transverse planes due to the inter-plane coupling.

  5. A modified quadrupole mass spectrometer with custom RF link rods driver for remote operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tashbar, P. W.; Nisen, D. B.; Moore, W. W., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    A commercial quadrupole residual gas analyzer system has been upgraded for operation at extended cable lengths. Operation inside a vacuum chamber for the standard quadrupole nude head is limited to approximately 2 m from its externally located rf/dc generator because of the detuning of the rf oscillator circuits by the coaxial cable reactance. The advance of long distance remote operation inside a vacuum chamber for distances of 45 and 60 m was made possible without altering the quadrupole's rf/dc generator circuit by employing an rf link to drive the quadrupole rods. Applications of the system have been accomplished for in situ space simulation thermal/vacuum testing of sophisticated payloads.

  6. A compact beam focusing and steering element using quadrupoles with independently excited poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grime, Geoffrey W.

    2013-07-01

    Beam steering elements for accelerator beam transport are conventionally and conveniently incorporated into beamlines by fitting magnetic dipole elements around the vacuum tube of the line. Two steerers in each plane (X and Y) together with a quadrupole doublet constitute a module providing full control of the direction, position and focus of the beam. In some installations however, there may be insufficient space on the beamline to mount separate steerer elements. To provide steering capabilities in such a situation we have used a magnetic quadrupole doublet with the coils of each pole independently excited to synthesise the desired combination of quadrupole, horizontal dipole and vertical dipole fields. This paper describes the quadrupole steerer and its multichannel power supply and presents calculated magnetic field distributions together with raytracing simulation of its performance.

  7. Microscopic derivation of the Bohr-Mottelson collective Hamiltonian and its application to quadrupole shape dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyanagi, Kenichi; Matsuo, Masayuki; Nakatsukasa, Takashi; Yoshida, Kenichi; Hinohara, Nobuo; Sato, Koichi

    2016-06-01

    We discuss the nature of the low-frequency quadrupole vibrations from small-amplitude to large-amplitude regimes. We consider full five-dimensional quadrupole dynamics including three-dimensional rotations restoring the broken symmetries as well as axially symmetric and asymmetric shape fluctuations. Assuming that the time evolution of the self-consistent mean field is determined by five pairs of collective coordinates and collective momenta, we microscopically derive the collective Hamiltonian of Bohr and Mottelson, which describes low-frequency quadrupole dynamics. We show that the five-dimensional collective Schrödinger equation is capable of describing large-amplitude quadrupole shape dynamics seen as shape coexistence/mixing phenomena. We summarize the modern concepts of microscopic theory of large-amplitude collective motion, which is underlying the microscopic derivation of the Bohr-Mottelson collective Hamiltonian.

  8. Design and operation of a laminar-flow electrostatic-quadrupole-focused acceleration column

    SciTech Connect

    Maschke, A.W.

    1983-06-20

    This report deals with the design principles involved in the design of a laminar-flow electrostatic-quadrupole-focused acceleration column. In particular, attention will be paid to making the parameters suitable for incorporation into a DC MEQALAC design.

  9. Fission Quadrupole Mass Parameters in HF+BCS and HFB Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Baran, A.; Sheikh, J. A.; Staszczak, A.; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2009-01-01

    The self-consistent Hartree-Fock+BCS and Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov methods are compared at large nuclear deformations. The calculations are carried out for the fission pathway and quadrupole mass parameter of ^{252}Fm.

  10. Set Up and Test Results for a Vibrating Wire System for Quadrupole Fiducialization

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-11-29

    Quadrupoles will be placed between the undulator segments in LCLS to keep the electron beam focused as it passes through. The quadrupoles will be assembled with their respective undulator segments prior to being placed into the tunnel. Beam alignment will be used to center the quadrupoles, along with the corresponding undulators, on the beam. If there is any displacement between the undulator and the quadrupole axes in the assemblies, the beam will deviate from the undulator axis. If it deviates by more than 80{micro}m in vertical or 140{micro}m in horizontal directions, the undulator will not perform as required by LCLS. This error is divided between three sources: undulator axis fiducialization, quadrupole magnetic axis fiducialization, and assembly of the two parts. In particular, it was calculated that the quadrupole needs to be fiducialized to within 25{micro}m in both vertical and horizontal directions. A previous study suggested using a vibrating wire system for finding the magnetic axis of a quadrupole. The study showed that the method has high sensitivity (up to 1{micro}m) and laid out guidelines for constructing it. There are 3 steps in fiducializing the quadrupole with the vibrating wire system. They are positioning the wire at the magnet center (step 1), finding the wire with position detectors (step 2), and finding the quadrupole tooling ball positions relative to the position detector tooling balls (step 3). The following break up of error was suggested for the fiducialization steps: 10{micro}m for step 1 (finding the center), 20{micro}m for step 2 (finding the wire), and 10{micro}m for step 3 (tooling ball measurements). The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the vibrating wire system meets the requirements for LCLS. In particular, if it can reliably fiducialize a quadrupole magnetic center to within 25{micro}m in both vertical and horizontal directions. The behavior of individual system components is compared to the expected performance

  11. Set Up and Test Results for a Vibrating Wire System for Quadrupole Fiducialization

    SciTech Connect

    Levashov, Michael Y.

    2010-12-01

    Quadrupoles will be placed between the undulator segments in LCLS to keep the electron beam focused as it passes through. The quadrupoles will be assembled with their respective undulator segments prior to being placed into the tunnel. Beam alignment will be used to center the quadrupoles, along with the corresponding undulators, on the beam. If there is any displacement between the undulator and the quadrupole axes in the assemblies, the beam will deviate from the undulator axis. If it deviates by more than 80{micro}m in vertical or 140{micro}m in horizontal directions, the undulator will not perform as required by LCLS. This error is divided between three sources: undulator axis fiducialization, quadrupole magnetic axis fiducialization, and assembly of the two parts. In particular, it was calculated that the quadrupole needs to be fiducialized to within 25{micro}m in both vertical and horizontal directions. A previous study suggested using a vibrating wire system for finding the magnetic axis of a quadrupole. The study showed that the method has high sensitivity (up to 1{micro}m) and laid out guidelines for constructing it. There are 3 steps in fiducializing the quadrupole with the vibrating wire system. They are positioning the wire at the magnet center (step 1), finding the wire with position detectors (step 2), and finding the quadrupole tooling ball positions relative to the position detector tooling balls (step 3). The following break up of error was suggested for the fiducialization steps: 10{micro}m for step 1 (finding the center), 20{micro}m for step 2 (finding the wire), and 10{micro}m for step 3 (tooling ball measurements). The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the vibrating wire system meets the requirements for LCLS. In particular, if it can reliably fiducialize a quadrupole magnetic center to within 25{micro}m in both vertical and horizontal directions. The behavior of individual system components is compared to the expected performance

  12. Permanent Magnet Skew Quadrupoles for the Low Emittance LER Lattice of PEP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, F.-J.; Anderson, S.; Kharakh, D.; Sullivan, M.; /SLAC

    2011-07-05

    The vertical emittance of the low energy ring (LER) in the PEP-II B-Factory was reduced by using skew quadrupoles consisting of permanent magnet material. The advantages over electric quadrupoles or rotating existing normal quadrupoles are discussed. To assure a high field quality, a Biot-Savart calculation was used to cancel the natural 12-pole component by using different size poles over a few layers. A magnetic measurement confirmed the high quality of the magnets. After installation and adjusting the original electric 12 skew and 16 normal quadrupoles the emittance contribution from the region close to the interaction point, which was the biggest part in the original design, was considerably reduced. To strengthen the vertical behavior of the LER beam, a low emittance lattice was developed. It lowered the original vertical design emittance from 0.54 nm-rad to 0.034 nm-rad. In order to achieve this, additional skew quadrupoles were required to bring the coupling correction out of the arcs and closer to the detector solenoid in the straight (Fig. 1). It is important, together with low vertical dispersion, that the low vertical emittance is not coupled into the horizontal, which is what we get if the coupling correction continues into the arcs. Further details of the lattice work is described in another paper; here we concentrate on the development of the permanent skew (PSK) quadrupole solution. Besides the permanent magnets there are two other possibilities, using electric magnets or rotating normal quadrupoles. Electric magnets would have required much more additional equipment like magnets stands, power supply, and new vacuum chamber sections. Rotating existing quadrupoles was also not feasible since they are mostly mounted together with a bending magnet on the same support girder.

  13. Negative coupling and coupling phase dispersion in a silicon quadrupole micro-racetrack resonator.

    PubMed

    Bachman, Daniel; Tsay, Alan; Van, Vien

    2015-07-27

    We report the first experimental study of the effects of coupling phase dispersion on the spectral response of a two-dimensionally coupled quadrupole micro-racetrack resonator. Negative coupling in the system is observed to manifest itself in the sharp stop band transition and deep extinction in the pseudo-elliptic filter response of the quadrupole. The results demonstrate the feasibility of realizing advanced silicon microring devices based on the 2D coupling topology with general complex coupling coefficients.

  14. Frequency selective detection of nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spin echoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somasundaram, Samuel D.; Jakobsson, Andreas; Smith, John A. S.; Althoefer, Kaspar A.

    2006-05-01

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is a radio frequency (RF) technique that can be used to detect the presence of quadrupolar nuclei, such as the 14N nucleus prevalent in many explosives and narcotics. The technique has been hampered by low signal-to-noise ratios and is further aggravated by the presence of RF interference (RFI). To ensure accurate detection, proposed detectors should exploit the rich form of the NQR signal. Furthermore, the detectors should also be robust to any remaining residual interference, left after suitable RFI mitigation has been employed. In this paper, we propose a new NQR data model, particularly for the realistic case where multiple pulse sequences are used to generate trains of spin echoes. Furthermore, we refine two recently proposed approximative maximum likelihood (AML) detectors, enabling the algorithm to optimally exploit the data model of the entire echo train and also incorporate knowledge of the temperature dependent spin-echo decay time. The AML-based detectors ensure accurate detection and robustness against residual RFI, even when the temperature of the sample is not precisely known, by exploiting the dependencies of the NQR resonant lines on temperature. Further robustness against residual interference is gained as the proposed detector is frequency selective; exploiting only those regions of the spectrum where the NQR signal is expected. Extensive numerical evaluations based on both simulated and measured NQR data indicate that the proposed Frequency selective Echo Train AML (FETAML) detector offers a significant improvement as compared to other existing detectors.

  15. Quadrupole collectivity in neutron-rich Cd isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bönig, S.; Kröll, Th; Ilieva, S.; Scheck, M.; Is411; Is477; Is524; Miniball Collaborations

    2015-02-01

    The proximity to the closed shells at Z = 50 and N = 82 makes the neutron-rich Cd isotopes a perfect test case for nuclear theories. The energy of the first excited 2+-state in the even 122-128 shows an irregular behaviour as the Cd isotopes exhibit only a slight increase for 122Cd to 126Cd and even a decrease from 126Cd to 128Cd. This anomaly can so far not be reproduced by shell model calculations. Only beyond mean field calculations with a resultant prolate deformation are capable to describe this anomalous behaviour. In order to gain more information about the neutron-rich Cd isotopes a Coulomb excitation experiment was performed with MINIBALL at REX-ISOLDE, CERN. The extracted transition strengths B (E2,0+gs → 2+1) for 122,124,126,128Cd agree with beyond mean field calculations. The spectroscopic quadrupole moments Qs (2+1) are compared with measurements on odd neutron-rich Cd isotopes.

  16. "Fast excitation" CID in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Murrell, J; Despeyroux, D; Lammert, S A; Stephenson, J L; Goeringer, D E

    2003-07-01

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer is usually performed by applying a small amplitude excitation voltage at the same secular frequency as the ion of interest. Here we disclose studies examining the use of large amplitude voltage excitations (applied for short periods of time) to cause fragmentation of the ions of interest. This process has been examined using leucine enkephalin as the model compound and the motion of the ions within the ion trap simulated using ITSIM. The resulting fragmentation information obtained is identical with that observed by conventional resonance excitation CID. "Fast excitation" CID deposits (as determined by the intensity ratio of the a(4)/b(4) ion of leucine enkephalin) approximately the same amount of internal energy into an ion as conventional resonance excitation CID where the excitation signal is applied for much longer periods of time. The major difference between the two excitation techniques is the higher rate of excitation (gain in kinetic energy) between successive collisions with helium atoms with "fast excitation" CID as opposed to the conventional resonance excitation CID. With conventional resonance excitation CID ions fragment while the excitation voltage is still being applied whereas for "fast excitation" CID a higher proportion of the ions fragment in the ion cooling time following the excitation pulse. The fragmentation of the (M + 17H)(17+) of horse heart myoglobin is also shown to illustrate the application of "fast excitation" CID to proteins.

  17. "Fast Excitation" CID in Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Murrell, J.; Despeyroux, D.; Lammert, Stephen {Steve} A; Stephenson Jr, James {Jim} L; Goeringer, Doug

    2003-01-01

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer is usually performed by applying a small amplitude excitation voltage at the same secular frequency as the ion of interest. Here we disclose studies examining the use of large amplitude voltage excitations (applied for short periods of time) to cause fragmentation of the ions of interest. This process has been examined using leucine enkephalin as the model compound and the motion of the ions within the ion trap simulated using ITSIM. The resulting fragmentation information obtained is identical with that observed by conventional resonance excitation CID. ''Fast excitation'' CID deposits (as determined by the intensity ratio of the a{sub 4}/b{sub 4} ion of leucine enkephalin) approximately the same amount of internal energy into an ion as conventional resonance excitation CID where the excitation signal is applied for much longer periods of time. The major difference between the two excitation techniques is the higher rate of excitation (gain in kinetic energy) between successive collisions with helium atoms with ''fast excitation'' CID as opposed to the conventional resonance excitation CID. With conventional resonance excitation CID ions fragment while the excitation voltage is still being applied whereas for ''fast excitation'' CID a higher proportion of the ions fragment in the ion cooling time following the excitation pulse. The fragmentation of the (M + 17H){sup 17+} of horse heart myoglobin is also shown to illustrate the application of ''fast excitation'' CID to proteins.

  18. On the formation of the South Pacific quadrupole mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jian; Wang, Faming

    2016-08-01

    The formation process of the South Pacific (SP) quadrupole (SPQ) mode was investigated in this study based on observations and reanalysis data. The SPQ is the dominant mode of the sea surface temperature (SST)-surface wind covariability in the SP after removing the ENSO-related signals. The positive phase of the SPQ is characterized by a warm SST anomaly (SSTA) west of the South American coast, a cool SSTA in its southwest, a positive SSTA southeast of New Zealand, and a negative SSTA off the southeast coast of Australia, overlain by cyclonic wind anomalies. The anomalous cyclonic winds weaken the mean southeast trade winds in the southeast SP and the westerlies in the high latitudes of the SP, increasing the SSTAs at the two positive poles through decreased evaporation and latent heat flux (LHF) loss. The southeast wind anomalies advect dry and cold air to the negative pole in the central SP, which reduces the SSTA there by increasing the LHF loss. Off the southeast coast of Australia, the southwest wind anomalies induce equatorward Ekman currents and advect cold water. The resulting oceanic horizontal advection is the main contributor to the negative SSTAs there. In addition to the above processes, cloud cover change can enhance the initial SSTAs in the southeast SP by affecting shortwave radiation. The decay of the SPQ is mainly due to LHF changes.

  19. Hybrid permanent magnet quadrupoles for the Recycler Ring at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.C.; Pruss, S.M.; Foster, G.W.; Glass, H.D.; Harding, D.J.; Jackson, G.R.; May, M.R.; Nicol, T.H.; Ostiguy, J.-F.; Schlabach, R.; Volk, J.T.

    1997-10-01

    Hybrid Permanent Magnet Quadrupoles are used in several applications for the Fermilab Recycler Ring and associated beam transfer lines. Most of these magnets use a 0.6096 m long iron shell and provide integrated gradients up to 1.4 T-m/m with an iron pole tip radius of 41.6 mm. A 58.4 mm pole radius design is also required. Bricks of 25. 4 mm thick strontium ferrite supply the flux to the back of the pole to produce the desired gradients (0.6 to 2.75 T/m). For temperature compensation, Ni-Fe alloy strips are interspersed between ferrite bricks to subtract flux in a temperature dependent fashion. Adjustments of the permeance of each pole using iron between the pole and the flux return shell permits the matching of pole potentials. Magnetic potentials of the poles are adjusted to the desired value to achieve the prescribed strength and field uniformity based on rotating coil harmonic measurements. Procurement, fabrication, pole potential adjustment, and measured fields will be reported.

  20. Effects of Coulomb quadrupole excitation in heavy-ion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Choi, K. S.; Kim, K. S.; Kim, T. H.; So, W. Y.

    2016-09-01

    For 12C + 184W, 18O + 184W, and 20Ne + 208Pb systems, we investigate the suppression of the ratios P E = σ el/ σ RU by using the Coulomb quadrupole excitation (CQE) potentials. In order to explain the effect of the CQE potentials, we first use a well-known Love's CQE potential, and reproduce the experimental P E data well by using this potential. We also introduce a simple CQE potential written as W CQE( r) = - W P / r n , which is much simpler than the conventional Love's potential, to investigate the suppression of the P E ratios. Using this potential, we perform a χ2 analysis to find the adjustable parameter n, then, we find that the best fit parameters n ≈ 5 is close to the lowest order term, 1/ r 5. Consequently, we find that using the simple CQE potential explains the experimental P E data and that the ratio P E depends on the n values sensitively.

  1. Polarization enhanced Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance with an atomic magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, Michael W.; Barrall, Geoffrey A.; Espy, Michelle A.; Monti, Mark C.; Alexson, Dimitri A.; Okamitsu, Jeffrey K.

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) has been demonstrated for the detection of 14-N in explosive compounds. Application of a material specific radio-frequency (RF) pulse excites a response typically detected with a wire- wound antenna. NQR is non-contact and material specific, however fields produced by NQR are typically very weak, making demonstration of practical utility challenging. For certain materials, the NQR signal can be increased by transferring polarization from hydrogen nuclei to nitrogen nuclei using external magnetic fields. This polarization enhancement (PE) can enhance the NQR signal by an order of magnitude or more. Atomic magnetometers (AM) have been shown to improve detection sensitivity beyond a conventional antenna by a similar amount. AM sensors are immune to piezo-electric effects that hamper conventional NQR, and can be combined to form a gradiometer for effective RF noise cancellation. In principle, combining polarization enhancement with atomic magnetometer detection should yield improvement in signal-to-noise ratio that is the product of the two methods, 100-fold or more over conventional NQR. However both methods are even more exotic than traditional NQR, and have never been combined due to challenges in operating a large magnetic field and ultra-sensitive magnetic field sensor in proximity. Here we present NQR with and without PE with an atomic magnetometer, demonstrating signal enhancement greater than 20-fold for ammonium nitrate. We also demonstrate PE for PETN using a traditional coil for detection with an enhancement factor of 10. Experimental methods and future applications are discussed.

  2. Quadrupole beam-based alignment in the RHIC interaction regions

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, J.; Satogata, T.

    2011-03-28

    Continued beam-based alignment (BBA) efforts have provided significant benefit to both heavy ion and polarized proton operations at RHIC. Recent studies demonstrated previously unknown systematic beam position monitor (BPM) offset errors and produced accurate measurements of individual BPM offsets in the experiment interaction regions. Here we describe the algorithm used to collect and analyze data during the 2010 and early 2011 RHIC runs and the results of these measurements. BBA data has been collected over the past two runs for all three of the active experimental IRs at RHIC, updating results from the 2005 run which were taken with incorrectly installed offsets. The technique was successfully applied to expose a systematic misuse of the BPM survey offsets in the control system. This is likely to benefit polarized proton operations as polarization transmission through acceleration ramps depends on RMS orbit control in the arcs, but a quantitative understanding of its impact is still under active investigation. Data taking is ongoing as are refinements to the BBA technique aimed at reducing systematic errors and properly accounting for dispersive effects. Further development may focus on non-triplet BPMs such as those located near snakes, or arc quadrupoles that do not have individually shunted power supplies (a prerequisite for the current method) and as such, will require a modified procedure.

  3. Modal response of 4-rod type radio frequency quadrupole linac.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Avik; Mahapatra, Abhijit; Mondal, Manas; Chakrabarti, Alok

    2009-10-01

    This paper deals with the analysis and experimental study of natural frequencies of vibration of a 4-rod type radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linear accelerator. The eigenvalue analysis of the structure has been done both analytically (multispan beam concept) as well as using blocked Lanczos eigenvalue finite element solver with an ability to extract the rigid body modes. This has been done in the mechanical design phase to find the level of agreement between the output of simplified analytical analysis results and the output of a commercial finite element method (FEM) solver, since a full scale RFQ structure is too complex to handle analytically. Experimental validation of the analysis results has been done on the physical 1.7 m RFQ at the installation site. The experimental data obtained were later analyzed and found to be in close agreement with the predicted frequencies in the lower frequency ranges. It gets more and more deviated in the higher frequency ranges. Also some frequencies were observed during experimentation, which were not found in the finite element analysis results. The source of those frequencies are to be further investigated as it may play a predominant role in the design high quality factor beam line cavities for higher operational efficiency.

  4. Modal response of 4-rod type radio frequency quadrupole linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Avik; Mahapatra, Abhijit; Mondal, Manas; Chakrabarti, Alok

    2009-10-01

    This paper deals with the analysis and experimental study of natural frequencies of vibration of a 4-rod type radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linear accelerator. The eigenvalue analysis of the structure has been done both analytically (multispan beam concept) as well as using blocked Lanczos eigenvalue finite element solver with an ability to extract the rigid body modes. This has been done in the mechanical design phase to find the level of agreement between the output of simplified analytical analysis results and the output of a commercial finite element method (FEM) solver, since a full scale RFQ structure is too complex to handle analytically. Experimental validation of the analysis results has been done on the physical 1.7 m RFQ at the installation site. The experimental data obtained were later analyzed and found to be in close agreement with the predicted frequencies in the lower frequency ranges. It gets more and more deviated in the higher frequency ranges. Also some frequencies were observed during experimentation, which were not found in the finite element analysis results. The source of those frequencies are to be further investigated as it may play a predominant role in the design high quality factor beam line cavities for higher operational efficiency.

  5. Dipole and Quadrupole Plasmon Resonances in Gold Nanoring Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosravi Khorashad, Larousse; Zhang, Hui; Roller, Eva-Maria; Liedl, Tim; Govorov, Alexander O.

    2014-03-01

    The quest for light manipulation in metallic nanostructures has grown greatly over the past decade to create novel optical devices for applications ranging from metamaterials and cloaking to optical sensing and plasmonic waveguides. Nanoring geometries, which are composed of metallic nanospheres, play an important role as the building blocks of plasmonic devices. We have shown that the plasmon resonance modes, which can be observed in absorption and scattering, not only depend on the dielectric function of the material, but also are strongly related to the size and shape of the structures and to the projection of the incident electromagnetic wave. By use of the finite element method, we have simulated ring geometries that are composed of different numbers of gold nanoparticles. The ring structures assembled experimentally have varying radii of nanoparticles and form symmetric and asymmetric geometries. This randomness in sizes and shapes influences the plasmonic spectrum of a ring, which consists of longitudinal and transverse plasmons and electric dipole and quadrupole modes. Moreover, the simulation predicts magnetic dipole radiation resulting from the circulation of current density. This work has been supported under the grant from Volkswagen Foundation

  6. A graphical approach to radio frequency quadrupole design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turemen, G.; Unel, G.; Yasatekin, B.

    2015-07-01

    The design of a radio frequency quadrupole, an important section of all ion accelerators, and the calculation of its beam dynamics properties can be achieved using the existing computational tools. These programs, originally designed in 1980s, show effects of aging in their user interfaces and in their output. The authors believe there is room for improvement in both design techniques using a graphical approach and in the amount of analytical calculations before going into CPU burning finite element analysis techniques. Additionally an emphasis on the graphical method of controlling the evolution of the relevant parameters using the drag-to-change paradigm is bound to be beneficial to the designer. A computer code, named DEMIRCI, has been written in C++ to demonstrate these ideas. This tool has been used in the design of Turkish Atomic Energy Authority (TAEK)'s 1.5 MeV proton beamline at Saraykoy Nuclear Research and Training Center (SANAEM). DEMIRCI starts with a simple analytical model, calculates the RFQ behavior and produces 3D design files that can be fed to a milling machine. The paper discusses the experience gained during design process of SANAEM Project Prometheus (SPP) RFQ and underlines some of DEMIRCI's capabilities.

  7. INDOOR AEROSOLS AND EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter provides an overview of both indoor aerosol concentration measurements, and the considerations for assessment of exposure to aerosols in non-occupational settings. The fixed-location measurements of concentration at an outdoor location, while commuting inside an a...

  8. Aerosol in the Pacific troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Antony D.

    1989-01-01

    The use of near real-time optical techniques is emphasized for the measurement of mid-tropospheric aerosol over the Central Pacific. The primary focus is on measurement of the aerosol size distribution over the range of particle diameters from 0.15 to 5.0 microns that are essential for modeling CO2 backscatter values in support of the laser atmospheric wind sounder (LAWS) program. The measurement system employs a LAS-X (Laser Aerosol Spectrometer-PMS, Boulder, CO) with a custom 256 channel pulse height analyzer and software for detailed measurement and analysis of aerosol size distributions. A thermal preheater system (Thermo Optic Aerosol Descriminator (TOAD) conditions the aerosol in a manner that allows the discrimination of the size distribution of individual aerosol components such as sulfuric acid, sulfates and refractory species. This allows assessment of the relative contribution of each component to the BCO2 signal. This is necessary since the different components have different sources, exhibit independent variability and provide different BCO2 signals for a given mass and particle size. Field activities involve experiments designed to examine both temporal and spatial variability of these aerosol components from ground based and aircraft platforms.

  9. Mount Saint Helens aerosol evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberbeck, V. R.; Farlow, N. H.; Snetsinger, K. G.; Ferry, G. V.; Fong, W.; Hayes, D. M.

    1982-01-01

    Stratospheric aerosol samples were collected using a wire impactor during the year following the eruption of Mt. St. Helens. Analysis of samples shows that aerosol volume increased for 6 months due to gas-to-particle conversion and then decreased to background levels in the following 6 months.

  10. A toroidal trap for cold {}^{87}{Rb} atoms using an rf-dressed quadrupole trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, A.; Mishra, S. R.; Ram, S. P.; Tiwari, S. K.; Rawat, H. S.

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate the trapping of cold {}87{Rb} atoms in a toroidal geometry using a radio frequency (rf) dressed quadrupole magnetic trap formed by superposing a strong rf-field on a quadrupole trap. This rf-dressed quadrupole trap has the minimum potential away from the quadrupole trap centre on a circular path which facilitates trapping in toroidal geometry. In these experiments, the laser cooled atoms were first trapped in a quadrupole trap, then cooled evaporatively using a weak rf-field, and finally trapped in an rf-dressed quadrupole trap. The radius of the toroid could be varied by varying the frequency of the dressing rf-field. It has also been demonstrated that a single rf source and an antenna can be used for the rf-evaporative cooling as well as for the rf-dressing of atoms. The atoms trapped in the toroidal trap may have applications in the realization of an atom gyroscope as well as in studying the quantum gases in low dimensions.

  11. Aerosol Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenoble, Jacqueline (Editor); Remer, Lorraine (Editor); Tanre, Didier (Editor)

    2012-01-01

    This book gives a much needed explanation of the basic physical principles of radia5tive transfer and remote sensing, and presents all the instruments and retrieval algorithms in a homogenous manner. For the first time, an easy path from theory to practical algorithms is available in one easily accessible volume, making the connection between theoretical radiative transfer and individual practical solutions to retrieve aerosol information from remote sensing. In addition, the specifics and intercomparison of all current and historical methods are explained and clarified.

  12. Thermophoretically Dominated Aerosol Coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosner, Daniel E.; Arias-Zugasti, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    A theory of aerosol coagulation due to size-dependent thermophoresis is presented. This previously overlooked effect is important when local temperature gradients are large, the sol population is composed of particles of much greater thermal conductivity than the carrier gas, with mean diameters much greater than the prevailing gas mean free path, and an adequate “spread” in sizes (as in metallurgical mists or fumes). We illustrate this via a population-balance analysis of the evolution of an initially log-normal distribution when this mechanism dominates ordinary Brownian diffusion.

  13. Dependence of aerosol scattering coefficients on relative humidity observed at two coastal sites on the East China Sea: Comparison to remote observations and influence of chemical composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanaya, Y.; Taketani, F.; Irie, H.; Komazaki, Y.; Takashima, H.; Xiaole, P.; Takami, A.; Wang, Z.

    2011-12-01

    We employed an integrating nephelometer equipped with a humidifier (where the relative humidity (RH) was scanned between 40 and 90%) to measure the aerosol scattering coefficients and their dependence on RH at Fukue Island (32.75N, 128.68E), west of Japan, in May 2009 and at Rudong, Jiangsu, China (32.26N, 121.37E) in May/June 2010, aiming at better characterization of optical properties of the regional-scale aerosol pollution over East Asia. The two coastal sites are located east and west of the East China Sea and are separated by about 700 km. The observed scattering coefficients are normalized by the concurrently measured PM2.5 mass concentrations and thereby behaviors of the mass scattering coefficients are discussed. At Fukue, the mass scattering coefficients under the ambient RH conditions were >1.5 times higher than those observed under the dry condition (RH = 40%), suggesting that the RH effect was crucial in determining optical properties under ambient conditions. The coefficients under the ambient RH conditions, rather than the dry values, agreed better with the extinction coefficients determined by MAX-DOAS (Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) technique based on remote measurements of O4 optical depths. The single-scattering albedo (SSA), estimated in combination to the absorption coefficients determined by a MAAP (Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer) instrument, had similar average values (~0.95) at the two sites. The SSA values at the two sites were commonly lowered (to below 0.90) when the air traveled from the North China Plain region. At Fukue, the RH dependence was found to be weakened when the organics/sulfate ratio increased (as observed by an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer), while such influence of chemical composition was less clear at Rudong, possibly masked by large temporal variations in the particle size distributions.

  14. Characterization of near-highway submicron aerosols in New York City with a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y. L.; Zhang, Q.; Schwab, J. J.; Chen, W.-N.; Bae, M.-S.; Hung, H.-M.; Lin, Y.-C.; Ng, N. L.; Jayne, J.; Massoli, P.; Williams, L. R.; Demerjian, K. L.

    2011-11-01

    Knowledge of the variations of mass concentration, chemical composition and size distributions of submicron aerosols near roadways is of importance for reducing exposure assessment uncertainties in health effects studies. The goal of this study is to deploy and evaluate an Atmospheric Sciences Research Center-Mobile Laboratory (ASRC-ML), equipped with a suite of rapid response instruments for characterization of traffic plumes, adjacent to the Long Island Expressway (LIE) - a high-traffic highway in the New York City Metropolitan Area. In total, four measurement periods, two in the morning and two in the evening were conducted at a location approximately 30 m south of the LIE. The mass concentrations and size distributions of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1) species were measured in situ at a time resolution of 1 min by an Aerodyne High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer, along with rapid measurements (down to 1 Hz) of gaseous pollutants (e.g., HCHO, NO2, NO, O3, and CO2, etc.), black carbon (BC), and particle number concentrations and size distributions. The particulate organics varied dramatically during periods with highest traffic influences from the nearby roadway. The variations were mainly observed in the hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA), a surrogate for primary OA from vehicle emissions. The inorganic species (sulfate, ammonium, and nitrate) and oxygenated OA (OOA) showed much smoother variations - with minor impacts from traffic emissions. The concentration and chemical composition of NR-PM1 also varied differently on different days depending on meteorology, traffic intensity and vehicle types. Overall, organics dominated the traffic-related NR-PM1 composition (>60%) with HOA being the major fraction of OA. The traffic-influenced organics showed two distinct modes in mass-weighted size distributions, peaking at ~120 nm and 500 nm (vacuum aerodynamic diameter, Dva), respectively. OOA and inorganic species appear to be

  15. Mexico City aerosol study

    SciTech Connect

    Falcon, Y.I. ); Ramirez, C.R. )

    1988-01-01

    Mexico City is located in a valley at high elevation (2,268 m) and is subject to atmospheric inversion related problems similar to those found in Denver, Colorado. In addition, Mexico City has a tropical climate (latitude 19{degrees} 25 minutes N), and therefore has more sunlight available for production of photochemical smog. There are approximately 9.5 million people spread in a 1,500 km{sup 2} (25 sq. mi) urban area, and more than two million automobiles (D.G.P.T. 1979) which use leaded gasoline. Furthermore, Mexico City is the principal industrial center in the country with more than 131,000 industries. The growth of the city has led to a serious air pollution problem, and there is concern over the possible pollutant effects on human health. The authors discuss work done to characterize the chemical composition of the aerosol. It is shown that many of the organic compounds which have been detected in urban aerosols are carcinogens.

  16. How Important Is Organic Aerosol Hygroscopicity to Aerosol Indirect Forcing?

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaohong; Wang, Jian

    2010-12-07

    Organics are among the most abundant aerosol components in the atmosphere. However, there are still large uncertainties with emissions of primary organic aerosol (POA) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) (precursor gases of secondary organic aerosol, SOA), formation and yield of SOA, and chemical and physical properties (e.g., hygroscopicity) of POA and SOA. All these may have significant impacts on aerosol direct and indirect forcing estimated from global models. In this study a modal aerosol module (MAM) in the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM) is used to examine sensitivities of aerosol indirect forcing to hygroscopicity (“κ” value) of POA and SOA. Our model simulation indicates that in the present-day condition changing “κ” value of POA from 0 to 0.1 increases the number concentration of cloud condensational nuclei (CCN) at supersaturation S=0.1% by 40-60% over the POA source regions, while changing “κ” value of SOA by ±50% (from 0.14 to 0.07 and 0.21) changes the CCN within 30%. Changes in the in-cloud droplet number concentrations (CDNC) are within 20% in most locations on the globe with the above changes in “κ” value of POA and SOA. Global annual mean anthropogenic aerosol indirect forcing (AIF) between present-day (PD) and pre-industrial (PI) conditions change by 0.4 W m-2 with the control run of -1.3 W m-2. AIF reduces with the increase hygroscopicity of organic aerosol, indicating the important role of natural organic aerosol in buffering the relative change of CDNC from PI to PD.

  17. PMSE dependence on aerosol charge number density and aerosol size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, Markus; Lübken, Franz-Josef; Hoffmann, Peter; Latteck, Ralph; Baumgarten, Gerd; Blix, Tom A.

    2003-04-01

    It is commonly accepted that the existence of polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSEs) depends on the presence of charged aerosols since these are comparatively heavy and reduce the diffusion of free electrons due to ambipolar forces. Simple microphysical modeling suggests that this diffusivity reduction is proportional to rA2 (rA = aerosol radius) but only if a significant amount of charges is bound on the aerosols such that NA∣ZA∣/ne > 1.2 (NA = number of aerosols, ZA = aerosol charge, ne = number of free electrons). The fact that the background electron profile frequently shows large depletions ("biteouts") at PMSE altitudes is taken as a support for this idea since within biteouts a major fraction of free electrons is missing, i.e., bound on aerosols. In this paper, we show from in situ measurements of electron densities and from radar and lidar observations that PMSEs can also exist in regions where only a minor fraction of free electrons is bound on aerosols, i.e., with no biteout and with NA∣ZA∣/ne ≪ 1. We show strong experimental evidence that it is instead the product NA∣ZA∣rA2 that is crucial for the existence of PMSEs. For example, small aerosol charge can be compensated by large aerosol radius. We show that this product replicates the main features of PMSEs, in particular the mean altitude distribution and the altitude of PMSEs in the presence of noctilucent clouds (NLCs). We therefore take this product as a "proxy" for PMSE. The agreement between this proxy and the main characteristics of PMSEs implies that simple microphysical models do not satisfactorily describe PMSE physics and need to be improved. The proxy can easily be used in models of the upper atmosphere to better understand seasonal and geographical variations of PMSEs, for example, the long debated difference between Northern and Southern hemisphere PMSEs.

  18. Influences of emission sources and meteorology on aerosol chemistry in a polluted urban environment: results from DISCOVER-AQ California

    DOE PAGES

    Young, Dominique E.; Kim, Hwajin; Parworth, Caroline; Zhou, Shan; Zhang, Xiaolu; Cappa, Christopher D.; Seco, Roger; Kim, Saewung; Zhang, Qi

    2016-05-02

    The San Joaquin Valley (SJV) in California experiences persistent air-quality problems associated with elevated particulate matter (PM) concentrations due to anthropogenic emissions, topography, and meteorological conditions. Thus it is important to unravel the various sources and processes that affect the physicochemical properties of PM in order to better inform pollution abatement strategies and improve parameterizations in air-quality models. During January and February 2013, a ground supersite was installed at the Fresno–Garland California Air Resources Board (CARB) monitoring station, where comprehensive, real-time measurements of PM and trace gases were performed using instruments including an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) andmore » an Ionicon proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) as part of the NASA Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) campaign. The average submicron aerosol (PM1) concentration was 31.0 µg m−3 and the total mass was dominated by organic aerosols (OA, 55 %), followed by ammonium nitrate (35 %). High PM pollution events were commonly associated with elevated OA concentrations, mostly from primary sources. Organic aerosols had average atomic oxygen-to-carbon (O / C), hydrogen-to-carbon (H / C), and nitrogen-to-carbon (N / C) ratios of 0.42, 1.70, and 0.017, respectively. Six distinct sources of organic aerosol were identified from positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis of the AMS data: hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA; 9 % of total OA, O / C  =  0.09) associated with local traffic, cooking OA (COA; 18 % of total OA, O / C  =  0.19) associated with food cooking activities, two biomass burning OA (BBOA1: 13 % of total OA, O / C  =  0.33; BBOA2: 20 % of total OA, O / C  =  0.60) most likely

  19. Influences of emission sources and meteorology on aerosol chemistry in a polluted urban environment: results from DISCOVER-AQ California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, D. E.; Kim, H.; Parworth, C.; Zhou, S.; Zhang, X.; Cappa, C. D.; Seco, R.; Kim, S.; Zhang, Q.

    2015-12-01

    The San Joaquin Valley (SJV) in California experiences persistent air quality problems associated with elevated particulate matter (PM) concentrations due to anthropogenic emissions, topography, and meteorological conditions. Thus it is important to unravel the various sources and processes that affect the physico-chemical properties of PM in order to better inform pollution abatement strategies and improve parameterizations in air quality models. Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and an Ionicon Proton Transfer Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) as part of the NASA Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) campaign. The average submicron aerosol (PM1) concentration was 31.0 μg m-3 and the total mass was dominated by organic aerosols (OA, 55 %), followed by ammonium nitrate (35 %). High PM pollution events were commonly associated with elevated OA concentrations, mostly from primary sources. Organic aerosols had average atomic oxygen-to-carbon (O / C), hydrogen-to-carbon (H / C), and nitrogen-to-carbon (N / C) ratios of 0.42, 1.70, and 0.017, respectively. Six distinct sources of organic aerosol were identified from positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis of the AMS data: hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA; 9 % of total OA; O / C = 0.09) associated with local traffic, cooking OA (COA; 28 % of total OA; O / C = 0.19) associated with food cooking activities, two biomass burning OAs (BBOA1; 13 % of total OA; O / C = 0.33 and BBOA2; 20 % of total OA; O / C = 0.60) most likely associated with residential space heating from wood combustion, and semi

  20. Influences of emission sources and meteorology on aerosol chemistry in a polluted urban environment: results from DISCOVER-AQ California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Dominique E.; Kim, Hwajin; Parworth, Caroline; Zhou, Shan; Zhang, Xiaolu; Cappa, Christopher D.; Seco, Roger; Kim, Saewung; Zhang, Qi

    2016-05-01

    The San Joaquin Valley (SJV) in California experiences persistent air-quality problems associated with elevated particulate matter (PM) concentrations due to anthropogenic emissions, topography, and meteorological conditions. Thus it is important to unravel the various sources and processes that affect the physicochemical properties of PM in order to better inform pollution abatement strategies and improve parameterizations in air-quality models. During January and February 2013, a ground supersite was installed at the Fresno-Garland California Air Resources Board (CARB) monitoring station, where comprehensive, real-time measurements of PM and trace gases were performed using instruments including an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and an Ionicon proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) as part of the NASA Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) campaign. The average submicron aerosol (PM1) concentration was 31.0 µg m-3 and the total mass was dominated by organic aerosols (OA, 55 %), followed by ammonium nitrate (35 %). High PM pollution events were commonly associated with elevated OA concentrations, mostly from primary sources. Organic aerosols had average atomic oxygen-to-carbon (O / C), hydrogen-to-carbon (H / C), and nitrogen-to-carbon (N / C) ratios of 0.42, 1.70, and 0.017, respectively. Six distinct sources of organic aerosol were identified from positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis of the AMS data: hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA; 9 % of total OA, O / C = 0.09) associated with local traffic, cooking OA (COA; 18 % of total OA, O / C = 0.19) associated with food cooking activities, two biomass burning OA (BBOA1: 13 % of total OA, O / C = 0.33; BBOA2: 20 % of total OA, O / C = 0.60) most likely associated with residential space heating from wood combustion, and semivolatile oxygenated OA (SV

  1. Inorganic Components of Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wexler, Anthony Stein

    The inorganic components comprise 15% to 50% of the mass of atmospheric aerosols. For about the past 10 years the mass of these components was predicted assuming thermodynamic equilibrium between the volatile aerosol -phase inorganic species NH_4NO _3 and NH_4Cl and their gas-phase counterparts NH_3, HNO_3, and HCl. In this thesis I examine this assumption and prove that (1) the time scales for equilibration between the gas and aerosol phases are often too long for equilibrium to hold, and (2) even when equilibrium holds, transport considerations often govern the size distribution of these aerosol components. Water can comprise a significant portion of atmospheric aerosols under conditions of high relative humidity, whereas under conditions of sufficiently low relative humidity atmospheric aerosols tend to be dry. The deliquescence point is the relative humidity where the aerosol goes from a solid dry phase to an aqueous or mixed solid-aqueous phase. In this thesis I derive the temperature dependence of the deliquescence point and prove that in multicomponent solutions the deliquescence point is lower than for corresponding single component solutions. These theories of the transport, thermodynamic, and deliquescent properties of atmospheric aerosols are integrated into an aerosol inorganics model, AIM. The predictions of AIM compare well to fundamental thermodynamic measurements. Comparison of the prediction of AIM to those of other aerosol equilibrium models shows substantial disagreement in the predicted water content at lower relative humidities. The disagreement is due the improved treatment in AIM of the deliquescence properties of multicomponent solutions. In the summer and fall of 1987 the California Air Resources Board conducted the Southern California Air Quality Study, SCAQS, during which atmospheric aerosols were measured in Los Angeles. The size and composition of the aerosol and the concentrations of their gas phase counterparts were measured. When the

  2. International Cooperative for Aerosol Prediction Workshop on Aerosol Forecast Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benedetti, Angela; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Colarco, Peter R.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this workshop was to reinforce the working partnership between centers who are actively involved in global aerosol forecasting, and to discuss issues related to forecast verification. Participants included representatives from operational centers with global aerosol forecasting requirements, a panel of experts on Numerical Weather Prediction and Air Quality forecast verification, data providers, and several observers from the research community. The presentations centered on a review of current NWP and AQ practices with subsequent discussion focused on the challenges in defining appropriate verification measures for the next generation of aerosol forecast systems.

  3. SAGE II aerosol data validation based on retrieved aerosol model size distribution from SAGE II aerosol measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Pi-Huan; Mccormick, M. P.; Mcmaster, L. R.; Chu, W. P.; Swissler, T. J.; Osborn, M. T.; Russell, P. B.; Oberbeck, V. R.; Livingston, J.; Rosen, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to aerosol correlative measurements experiments for the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II, conducted between November 1984 and July 1986. The correlative measurements were taken with an impactor/laser probe, a dustsonde, and an airborne 36-cm lidar system. The primary aerosol quantities measured by the ground-based instruments are compared with those calculated from the aerosol size distributions from SAGE II aerosol extinction measurements. Good agreement is found between the two sets of measurements.

  4. Aerosol Optical Extinction during the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment (FRAPPE) 2014 Summertime Field Campaign, Colorado U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingle, J. H.; Vu, K. K. T.; Bahreini, R.; Apel, E. C.; Campos, T. L.; Cantrell, C. A.; Cohen, R. C.; Ebben, C. J.; Flocke, F. M.; Fried, A.; Herndon, S. C.; Hills, A. J.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Huey, L. G.; Kaser, L.; Mauldin, L.; Montzka, D. D.; Nowak, J. B.; Richter, D.; Roscioli, J. R.; Shertz, S.; Stell, M. H.; Tanner, D.; Tyndall, G. S.; Walega, J.; Weibring, P.; Weinheimer, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol optical extinction (βext) was measured in the Colorado Front Range Denver Metropolitan Area as part of the summertime air quality airborne field campaign to characterize the influence of sources, photochemical processing, and transport of pollution on local air quality. An Aerodyne Cavity Attenuated Phase Shift particle light extinction monitor (CAPS-PMex) was deployed to measure dry βext at λ=632 nm at 1 Hz. Data from a suite of gas-phase instrumentation were used to interpret the βext under various categories of aged air masses and sources. Extinction enhancement ratios of Δβext/ΔCO were evaluated under 3 differently aged air mass categories (fresh, intermediately aged, and aged) to investigate impacts of photochemistry on βext. Δβext/ΔCO was significantly increased in heavily aged air masses compared to fresh air masses (0.17 Mm-1/ppbv and 0.094 Mm-1/ppbv respectively). The resulting increase in Δβext/ΔCO under heavily aged air masses was represented by secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formation. Aerosol composition and sources from urban, natural oil and gas wells (OG), and agriculture and livestock operations were also evaluated for their impacts on βext. Linear regression fits to βext vs. organic aerosol mass showed higher correlation coefficients under the urban and OG plumes (r=0.55 and r=0.71 respectively) and weakest under agricultural and livestock plumes (r=0.28). The correlation between βext and nitrate aerosol mass however was best under the agriculture and livestock plumes (r=0.81), followed by OG plumes (r=0.74), suggesting co-location of aerosol nitrate precursor sources with OG emissions. Finally, non-refractory mass extinction efficiency (MEE) was analyzed. MEE was observed to be 1.37 g/m2 and 1.30 g/m2 in OG and urban+OG plumes, respectively.

  5. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) derived from isoprene epoxydiols: Insights into formation, aging and distribution over the continental US from the DC3 and SEAC4RS campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campuzano Jost, P.; Palm, B. B.; Day, D. A.; Hu, W.; Ortega, A. M.; Jimenez, J. L.; Liao, J.; Froyd, K. D.; Pollack, I. B.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; St Clair, J. M.; Crounse, J.; Wennberg, P. O.; Mikoviny, T.; Wisthaler, A.; Ziemba, L. D.; Anderson, B. E.

    2014-12-01

    Isoprene-derived SOA formation has been studied extensively in the laboratory. However, it is still unclear to what extent isoprene contributes to the overall SOA burden over the southeastern US, an area with both strong isoprene emissions as well as large discrepancies between modeled and observed aerosol optical depth. For the low-NO isoprene oxidation pathway, the key gas-phase intermediate is believed to be isoprene epoxide (IEPOX), which can be incorporated into the aerosol phase by either sulfate ester formation (IEPOX sulfate) or direct hydrolysis. As first suggested by Robinson et al, the SOA formed by this mechanism (IEPOX-SOA) has a characteristic fragmentation pattern when analyzed by an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) with enhanced relative abundances of the C5H6O+ ion (fC5H6O). Based on data from previous ground campaigns and chamber studies, we have developed a empirical method to quantify IEPOX-SOA and have applied it to the data from the DC3 and SEAC4RS aircraft campaigns that sampled the SE US during the Spring of 2012 and the Summer of 2013. We used Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) to extract IEPOX-SOA factors that show good correlation with inside or downwind of high isoprene emitting areas and in general agree well with the IEPOX-SOA mass predicted by the empirical expression. According to this analysis, the empirical method performs well regardless of (at times very strong) BBOA or urban OA influences. On average 17% of SOA in the SE US boundary layer was IEPOX-SOA. Overall, the highest concentrations of IEPOX-SOA were typically found around 1-2 km AGL, several hours downwind of the isoprene source areas with high gas-phase IEPOX present. IEPOX-SOA was also detected up to altitudes of 6 km, with a clear trend towards more aged aerosol at altitude, likely a combination of chemical aging and physical airmass mixing. The unique instrument package aboard the NASA-DC8 allows us to examine the influence of multiple factors (aerosol

  6. Observations of fluorescent and biological aerosol at a high-altitude site in central France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabey, A. M.; Vaitilingom, M.; Freney, E.; Boulon, J.; Sellegri, K.; Gallagher, M. W.; Crawford, I. P.; Robinson, N. H.; Stanley, W. R.; Kaye, P. H.

    2013-08-01

    an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS; Aerodyne Inc.) suggests that aerosol reaching the site at night was more aged than that during the day, indicative of sampling the residual layer at night. Supplementary meteorological data and previous work also show that PdD lies in the residual layer/free troposphere at night, and this is thought to cause the observed diurnal cycles in organic-type and fluorescent aerosol particles. Based on the observed disparity between bacteria and fluorescent particle concentrations, fluorescent non-PBA is likely to be important in the WIBS-3 data and the surprisingly high fluorescent concentration in the residual layer/free troposphere raises questions about a ubiquitous background in continental air during the summer.

  7. Observations of fluorescent and biological aerosol at a high-altitude site in Central France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabey, A. M.; Vaitilingom, M.; Freney, E.; Boulon, J.; Sellegri, K.; Gallagher, M. W.; Crawford, I. P.; Robinson, N. H.; Stanley, W. R.; Kaye, P. H.

    2013-01-01

    Total bacteria, fungal spore and yeast counts were compared with UV Light-Induced Fluorescence (UV-LIF) measurements of ambient aerosol at the summit of the Puy de Dôme (pdD) mountain in Central France (1465 m a.s.l), which represents a background elevated site. Bacteria, fungal spores and yeast were enumerated by epifluorescence microscopy (EFM) and found to number 2.2 to 23 L-1 and 0.8 to 2 L-1, respectively. Bacteria counts on two successive nights were an order of magnitude larger than in the intervening day. A Wide Issue Bioaerosol Spectrometer, version 3 (WIBS-3) was used to perform UV-LIF measurements on ambient aerosol sized 0.8 to 20 μm. Mean total number concentration was 270 L-1 (σ = 66 L-1) found predominantly in a size mode at 2 μm for most of the campaign. Total concentration (fluorescent + non-fluorescent aerosol) peaked at 500 L-1 with a size mode at 1 μm because of a change in air mass origin lasting around 48 h. The WIBS-3 features two excitation and fluorescence detection wavelengths corresponding to different biological molecules. The mean fluorescent particle concentration after short-wave (280 nm; Tryptophan) excitation was 12 L-1 (σ = 6 L-1), and did not vary much through the campaign. In contrast the mean concentration of particles fluorescent after long-wave (370 nm; NADH) excitation was 95 L-1 (σ = 25 L-1), and a nightly rise and subsequent fall of up to 100 L-1 formed a strong diurnal cycle in the latter. The fluorescent populations exhibited size modes at 3 μm and 2 to 3 μm, respectively. A hierarchical agglomerative cluster analysis algorithm was applied to the data and used to extract different particle factors. A cluster concentration time series representative of bacteria was identified. This was found to exhibit a diurnal cycle with a maximum peak appearing during the day. Analysis of organic mass spectra recorded using an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS; Aerodyne Inc.) suggests that aerosol reaching the site at night was

  8. A dichotomy in primary marine organic aerosol-cloud-climate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceburnis, D.; Ovadnevaite, J.; Martucci, G.; Bialek, J.; Monahan, C.; Rinaldi, M.; Facchini, C.; Berresheim, H.; Worsnop, D. R.; O'Dowd, C.

    2011-12-01

    D. Ceburnis1, J. Ovadnevaite1, G. Martucci1, J. Bialek1, C. Monahan1, M. Rinaldi2, M. C. Facchini2, H. Berresheim1, D. R. Worsnop3,4 and C. D. O'Dowd1 1School of Physics & Centre for Climate and Air Pollution Studies, National University of Ireland Galway, University Road, Galway, Ireland 2Institute of Atmospheric Sciences and Climate, National Research Council, Bologna, 20129, Italy. 3 Aerodyne Research, Inc., 45 Manning Road, Billerica, MA 01821-3976, USA 4 Physics Department, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 64, 00014, Helsinki, Finland Organic matter has been observed to significantly contribute to particulate matter in every environment including pristine remote oceans. A significant if not dominant contribution of insoluble organic matter to marine aerosol has been proved to be of biogenic origin1,2. High time resolution measurements of marine organic matter have demonstrated a dynamic system with regular organic matter plume events occurring during summer3 as well as frequent open ocean particle formation events4. High-time resolution measurements of primary marine organic sea-spray physico-chemical properties reveal an apparent dichotomous behavior in terms of water uptake: specifically sea-spray aerosol enriched in organic matter possesses a low hygroscopic Growth Factor (GF~1.25) while simultaneously having a cloud condensation nucleus/condensation nuclei (CCN/CN) activation efficiency of between 83% at 0.25% supersaturation and 100% at 0.75%5. Simultaneous retrieval of Cloud Droplet Number Concentration (CDNC) during primary organic aerosol plumes reveal CDNC concentrations of 350 cm-3 in newly formed marine stratocumulus cloud for boundary layer organic mass concentrations of 3-4 ug m-36. It is suggested that marine hydrogels are responsible for this dichotomous behavior which has profound impacts to aerosol-cloud-climate system along with a better understood process analysis of aerosol formation by sea-spray7. A hydrophobic character of organic matter

  9. Measurements of aerosol-cloud interactions, including on-line particle chemical composition, at the Jungfraujoch Global Atmospheric Watch Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, H.; Allan, J. D.; Alfarra, M. R.; Williams, P. I.; Bower, K. N.; Gallagher, M. W.; Choularton, T. W.; Weingartner, E.; Corrigan, C.; Baltensperger, U.

    2003-04-01

    The Global Atmospheric Watch research laboratory is located in the Sphinx building, 3580 m asl; 46.55oN, 7.98oE on the Jungfraujoch in the Swiss Alps. The site is exposed to a wide range of conditions and frequently samples long range transported lower free tropospheric air, and is exposed to cloudy conditions. The Paul Scherrer Institute have previously developed a dual inlet system that allows measurements of the total sub-micron aerosol population (dry residuals and interstitial particles) and interstitial particles alone to be made alternately every few minutes. During July 2002 an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer was coupled to the dual inlet and was used to sample the composition of both the total particle distribution and the interstitial fraction and hence derive the mass loadings of the dry droplet residuals. In out of cloud conditions the aerosol composition can be linked to air mass history and age of the air mass. Microphysical measurements include cloud droplet size distributions made using an FSSP and also a new phase Doppler anemometry system. A comparison between these probes will be made. Two different types of cloud droplet spectra were observed. In the first type a large number of cloud droplets were measured with a single, narrow drop size distribution and modal diameter of around 10 um. In the second type, a bimodal cloud droplet spectrum occurred with a smaller mode (by number) at around 20 um, in addition to the 10 um mode. The aerosol mass spectrometry shows that the composition of the residuals from the two spectrum types is very different, the former type being composed mainly of sulphate, the latter a combination of nitrate, sulphate and organic material. We have also shown that the organic material observed is highly oxidized. We argue that the bimodality arises as a result of mixing of cloud droplets below the site that have been activated separately: the larger a less numerous mode in the widespread strato-cumulus forming under low

  10. Detecting body cavity bombs with nuclear quadrupole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Michael London

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is a technology with great potential for detecting hidden explosives. Past NQR research has studied the detection of land mines and bombs concealed within luggage and packages. This thesis focuses on an NQR application that has received less attention and little or no publicly available research: detecting body cavity bombs (BCBs). BCBs include explosives that have been ingested, inserted into orifices, or surgically implanted. BCBs present a threat to aviation and secure facilities. They are extremely difficult to detect with the technology currently employed at security checkpoints. To evaluate whether or not NQR can be used to detect BCBs, a computational model is developed to assess how the dielectric properties of biological tissue affect the radio frequency magnetic field employed in NQR (0.5-5MHz). The relative permittivity of some biological tissue is very high (over 1,000 at 1MHz), making it conceivable that there is a significant effect on the electromagnetic field. To study this effect, the low-frequency approximation known as the Darwin model is employed. First, the electromagnetic field of a coil is calculated in free space. Second, a dielectric object or set of objects is introduced, and the free-space electric field is modified to accommodate the dielectric object ensuring that the relevant boundary conditions are obeyed. Finally, the magnetic field associated with the corrected electric field is calculated. This corrected magnetic field is evaluated with an NQR simulation to estimate the impact of dielectric tissue on NQR measurements. The effect of dielectric tissue is shown to be small, thus obviating a potential barrier to BCB detection. The NQR model presented may assist those designing excitation and detection coils for NQR. Some general coil design considerations and strategies are discussed.

  11. Two-point anisotropies in WMAP and the cosmic quadrupole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaztañaga, E.; Wagg, J.; Multamäki, T.; Montaña, A.; Hughes, D. H.

    2003-11-01

    Large-scale modes in the temperature anisotropy power spectrum Cl measured by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) seem to have lower amplitudes (C2, C3 and C4) than that expected in the so-called concordance Λ-cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model. In particular, the quadrupole C2 is reported to have a smaller value than allowed by cosmic variance. This has been interpreted as a possible indication of new physics. In this paper, we re-analyse the WMAP data using the two-point angular correlation and its higher-order moments. This method, which requires a full covariance analysis, is more direct and provides better sampling of the largest modes than the standard harmonic decomposition. We show that the WMAP data are in good agreement (~=30 per cent probability) with a ΛCDM model when the WMAP data are considered as a particular realization drawn from a set of realistic ΛCDM simulations with the corresponding covariance. This is also true for the higher-order moments, shown here up to sixth order, which are consistent with the Gaussian hypothesis. The sky mask plays a major role in assessing the significance of these agreements. We recover the best-fitting model for the low-order multipoles based on the two-point correlation with different assumptions for the covariance. Assuming that the observations are a fair sample of the true model, we find C2= 123 +/- 233, C3= 217 +/- 241 and C4= 212 +/- 162 (in μK2). The errors increase by about a factor of 5 if we assume the ΛCDM model. If we exclude the Galactic plane |b| < 30 from our analysis, we recover very similar values within the errors (i.e. C2= 172, C3= 89, C4= 129). This indicates that the Galactic plane is not responsible for the lack of large-scale power in the WMAP data.

  12. AERONET: The Aerosol Robotic Network

    DOE Data Explorer

    The AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) program is a federation of ground-based remote sensing aerosol networks established by NASA and LOA-PHOTONS (CNRS) and is greatly expanded by collaborators from national agencies, institutes, universities, individual scientists, and partners. The program provides a long-term, continuous and readily accessible public domain database of aerosol optical, mircrophysical and radiative properties for aerosol research and characterization, validation of satellite retrievals, and synergism with other databases. The network imposes standardization of instruments, calibration, processing and distribution. AERONET collaboration provides globally distributed observations of spectral aerosol optical Depth (AOD), inversion products, and precipitable water in diverse aerosol regimes. Aerosol optical depth data are computed for three data quality levels: Level 1.0 (unscreened), Level 1.5 (cloud-screened), and Level 2.0 (cloud screened and quality-assured). Inversions, precipitable water, and other AOD-dependent products are derived from these levels and may implement additional quality checks.[Copied from http://aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov/new_web/system_descriptions.html

  13. Two Alternate High Gradient Quadrupoles; An Upgraded Tevatron IR and A"Pipe" Design

    SciTech Connect

    McInturff, A.D.; Oort, J.M. van; Scanlan, R.M.

    1995-04-01

    With the U.S. cancellation of the SSC project, the only large approved hadron accelerator project is CERN's LHC. One of the more critical elements in the performance of a collider is the quadrupole lens at the beam collision points. These quadrupoles, usually referred to as the 'insertion quads' normally form a set of triplets around the interaction region. Their focal power directly affects the luminosity available at the crossing point In order to achieve as high a gradient as possible, the CERN design team has proposed a very efficient high gradient quadrupole which is based on a graded four-layer winding structure. At Fermilab's Tevatron, an upgraded two layer winding quadrupole has been in operation since 1989, and has provided a 50% higher gradient than its predecessor. The quadrupole was basically state of the art when it was designed in 1985. Since then however, improvements have been made in cabling, conductor perfonnance, etc. Naturally, operation of a modernized version of this .design can provide higher capabilities. This improved two layer design can serve as an alternative to the more intricate graded four layer design now envisioned for the LHC, provided it can obtain the proposed gradient. A high gradient quadrupole with a 'pipe' layout can be considered as a possible candidate for future large collider insertion regions. It is possible to fine-tune the design to obtain a good field-quality, the conductor is well cooled in case of a large radiation heat load, and the overall structure is smaller than a conventional quadrupole with a comparable field gradient.

  14. Aerosol growth in Titan's ionosphere.

    PubMed

    Lavvas, Panayotis; Yelle, Roger V; Koskinen, Tommi; Bazin, Axel; Vuitton, Véronique; Vigren, Erik; Galand, Marina; Wellbrock, Anne; Coates, Andrew J; Wahlund, Jan-Erik; Crary, Frank J; Snowden, Darci

    2013-02-19

    Photochemically produced aerosols are common among the atmospheres of our solar system and beyond. Observations and models have shown that photochemical aerosols have direct consequences on atmospheric properties as well as important astrobiological ramifications, but the mechanisms involved in their formation remain unclear. Here we show that the formation of aerosols in Titan's upper atmosphere is directly related to ion processes, and we provide a complete interpretation of observed mass spectra by the Cassini instruments from small to large masses. Because all planetary atmospheres possess ionospheres, we anticipate that the mechanisms identified here will be efficient in other environments as well, modulated by the chemical complexity of each atmosphere. PMID:23382231

  15. eDPS Aerosol Collection

    SciTech Connect

    Venzie, J.

    2015-10-13

    The eDPS Aerosol Collection project studies the fundamental physics of electrostatic aerosol collection for national security applications. The interpretation of aerosol data requires understanding and correcting for biases introduced from particle genesis through collection and analysis. The research and development undertaken in this project provides the basis for both the statistical correction of existing equipment and techniques; as well as, the development of new collectors and analytical techniques designed to minimize unwanted biases while improving the efficiency of locating and measuring individual particles of interest.

  16. Aerosol Climate Time Series Evaluation In ESA Aerosol_cci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popp, T.; de Leeuw, G.; Pinnock, S.

    2015-12-01

    Within the ESA Climate Change Initiative (CCI) Aerosol_cci (2010 - 2017) conducts intensive work to improve algorithms for the retrieval of aerosol information from European sensors. By the end of 2015 full mission time series of 2 GCOS-required aerosol parameters are completely validated and released: Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) from dual view ATSR-2 / AATSR radiometers (3 algorithms, 1995 - 2012), and stratospheric extinction profiles from star occultation GOMOS spectrometer (2002 - 2012). Additionally, a 35-year multi-sensor time series of the qualitative Absorbing Aerosol Index (AAI) together with sensitivity information and an AAI model simulator is available. Complementary aerosol properties requested by GCOS are in a "round robin" phase, where various algorithms are inter-compared: fine mode AOD, mineral dust AOD (from the thermal IASI spectrometer), absorption information and aerosol layer height. As a quasi-reference for validation in few selected regions with sparse ground-based observations the multi-pixel GRASP algorithm for the POLDER instrument is used. Validation of first dataset versions (vs. AERONET, MAN) and inter-comparison to other satellite datasets (MODIS, MISR, SeaWIFS) proved the high quality of the available datasets comparable to other satellite retrievals and revealed needs for algorithm improvement (for example for higher AOD values) which were taken into account for a reprocessing. The datasets contain pixel level uncertainty estimates which are also validated. The paper will summarize and discuss the results of major reprocessing and validation conducted in 2015. The focus will be on the ATSR, GOMOS and IASI datasets. Pixel level uncertainties validation will be summarized and discussed including unknown components and their potential usefulness and limitations. Opportunities for time series extension with successor instruments of the Sentinel family will be described and the complementarity of the different satellite aerosol products

  17. Stratospheric aerosol geoengineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robock, Alan

    2015-03-01

    The Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project, conducting climate model experiments with standard stratospheric aerosol injection scenarios, has found that insolation reduction could keep the global average temperature constant, but global average precipitation would reduce, particularly in summer monsoon regions around the world. Temperature changes would also not be uniform; the tropics would cool, but high latitudes would warm, with continuing, but reduced sea ice and ice sheet melting. Temperature extremes would still increase, but not as much as without geoengineering. If geoengineering were halted all at once, there would be rapid temperature and precipitation increases at 5-10 times the rates from gradual global warming. The prospect of geoengineering working may reduce the current drive toward reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and there are concerns about commercial or military control. Because geoengineering cannot safely address climate change, global efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to adapt are crucial to address anthropogenic global warming.

  18. Aerosols over Eastern Asia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) image of eastern Asia from October 14, 2001, shows large amounts of aerosol in the air. A few possible point sources of smoke, probably fires, are visible north of the Amur River at the very top of the image. One of the larger of these plumes can be seen down river of the confluence of the Songhua and Amur rivers. At lower left, the Yangtze River plume in the East China Sea is also very prominent. Sediment suspended in the ocean water is quite brown near the shore, but becomes much greener as it diffuses into the water. The increasing greenness of the river plume is probably an indication of enhanced phytoplankton growth driven by the nutrients in the river runoff. Image courtesy the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  19. Stratospheric aerosol geoengineering

    SciTech Connect

    Robock, Alan

    2015-03-30

    The Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project, conducting climate model experiments with standard stratospheric aerosol injection scenarios, has found that insolation reduction could keep the global average temperature constant, but global average precipitation would reduce, particularly in summer monsoon regions around the world. Temperature changes would also not be uniform; the tropics would cool, but high latitudes would warm, with continuing, but reduced sea ice and ice sheet melting. Temperature extremes would still increase, but not as much as without geoengineering. If geoengineering were halted all at once, there would be rapid temperature and precipitation increases at 5–10 times the rates from gradual global warming. The prospect of geoengineering working may reduce the current drive toward reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and there are concerns about commercial or military control. Because geoengineering cannot safely address climate change, global efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to adapt are crucial to address anthropogenic global warming.

  20. Aerosol lidar ``M4``

    SciTech Connect

    Shelevoy, C.D.; Andreev, Y.M. |

    1994-12-31

    Small carrying aerosol lidar in which is used small copper vapor laser ``Malachite`` as source of sounding optical pulses is described. The advantages of metal vapor laser and photon counting mode in acquisition system of lidar gave ability to get record results: when lidar has dimensions (1 x .6 x .3 m) and weight (65 kg), it provides the sounding of air industrial pollutions at up to 20 km range in scanning sector 90{degree}. Power feed is less than 800 Wt. Lidar can be disposed as stationary so on the car, helicopter, light plane. Results of location of smoke tails and city smog in situ experiments are cited. Showed advantages of work of acquisition system in photon counting mode when dynamic range of a signal is up to six orders.

  1. Aerosol Transmission of Filoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Mekibib, Berhanu; Ariën, Kevin K.

    2016-01-01

    Filoviruses have become a worldwide public health concern because of their potential for introductions into non-endemic countries through international travel and the international transport of infected animals or animal products. Since it was first identified in 1976, in the Democratic Republic of Congo (formerly Zaire) and Sudan, the 2013–2015 western African Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak is the largest, both by number of cases and geographical extension, and deadliest, recorded so far in medical history. The source of ebolaviruses for human index case(s) in most outbreaks is presumptively associated with handling of bush meat or contact with fruit bats. Transmission among humans occurs easily when a person comes in contact with contaminated body fluids of patients, but our understanding of other transmission routes is still fragmentary. This review deals with the controversial issue of aerosol transmission of filoviruses. PMID:27223296

  2. Aerosol Transmission of Filoviruses.

    PubMed

    Mekibib, Berhanu; Ariën, Kevin K

    2016-01-01

    Filoviruses have become a worldwide public health concern because of their potential for introductions into non-endemic countries through international travel and the international transport of infected animals or animal products. Since it was first identified in 1976, in the Democratic Republic of Congo (formerly Zaire) and Sudan, the 2013-2015 western African Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak is the largest, both by number of cases and geographical extension, and deadliest, recorded so far in medical history. The source of ebolaviruses for human index case(s) in most outbreaks is presumptively associated with handling of bush meat or contact with fruit bats. Transmission among humans occurs easily when a person comes in contact with contaminated body fluids of patients, but our understanding of other transmission routes is still fragmentary. This review deals with the controversial issue of aerosol transmission of filoviruses. PMID:27223296

  3. Fabrication and Test of 90-mm Nb3Sn Quadrupole Model Based on Dipole-type Collar

    SciTech Connect

    Bossert, R.; Andreev, N.; Chlachidze, G.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Lamm, M.J.; Nobrega, F.; Novitski, I.; Tartaglia, M.; Velev, G.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

    2010-07-29

    A series of 90-mm TQC quadrupole models with a collar-based mechanical structure has been fabricated and tested within the framework of the US-LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) using quadrupole-symmetric stainless steel collar laminations. This paper describes the design features, construction and test of TQC02Eb, the first TQC made with dipole-type collar and collaring techniques. Magnet test includes quench performance and field quality measurements at 4.5 and 1.9 K. Results of model performance for TQC quadrupoles based on dipole-type and quadrupole-type collars are compared and discussed.

  4. Secondary organic aerosol formation and composition from the photo-oxidation of methyl chavicol (estragole)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, K. L.; Hamilton, J. F.; Rickard, A. R.; Bloss, W. J.; Alam, M. S.; Camredon, M.; Muñoz, A.; Vásquez, M.; Borrás, E.; Ródenas, M.

    2013-12-01

    The increasing demand for palm oil for uses in biofuel and food products is leading to rapid expansion of oil palm agriculture. Methyl chavicol (also known as estragole and 1-allyl-4-methoxybenzene) is an oxygenated biogenic volatile organic compound that was recently identified as the main floral emission from an oil palm plantation in Malaysian Borneo. The emissions of methyl chavicol observed may impact regional atmospheric chemistry, but little is known of its ability to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The photo-oxidation of methyl chavicol was investigated at the European Photoreactor chamber as a part of the atmospheric chemistry of methyl chavicol (ATMECH) project. Aerosol samples were collected using a particle into liquid sampler (PILS) and analysed offline using an extensive range of instruments including; high performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (HPLC-ITMS), high performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-QTOFMS) and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). The SOA yield was determined as 18-29% depending on initial precursor (VOC : NOx) mixing ratios. In total, 59 SOA compounds were observed and the structures of 10 compounds have been identified using high resolution tandem mass spectrometry. The addition of hydroxyl and/or nitro functional groups to the aromatic ring appears to be an important mechanistic pathway for aerosol formation. This results in the formation of compounds with both low volatility and high O : C ratios, where functionalisation rather than fragmentation is mainly observed as a~result of the stability of the ring. The SOA species observed can be characterized as semi-volatile to low volatile oxygenated organic aerosol (SVOOA and LVOOA) components and therefore may be important in aerosol formation and growth.

  5. Secondary organic aerosol formation and composition from the photo-oxidation of methyl chavicol (estragole)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, K. L.; Hamilton, J. F.; Rickard, A. R.; Bloss, W. J.; Alam, M. S.; Camredon, M.; Muñoz, A.; Vázquez, M.; Borrás, E.; Ródenas, M.

    2014-06-01

    The increasing demand for palm oil for uses in biofuel and food products is leading to rapid expansion of oil palm agriculture. Methyl chavicol (also known as estragole and 1-allyl-4-methoxybenzene) is an oxygenated biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) that was recently identified as the main floral emission from an oil palm plantation in Malaysian Borneo. The emissions of methyl chavicol observed may impact regional atmospheric chemistry, but little is known of its ability to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The photo-oxidation of methyl chavicol was investigated at the European Photoreactor chamber as a part of the atmospheric chemistry of methyl chavicol (ATMECH) project. Aerosol samples were collected using a particle into liquid sampler (PILS) and analysed offline using an extensive range of instruments including; high-performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (HPLC-ITMS), high-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-QTOFMS) and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). The SOA yield was determined as 18 and 29% for an initial VOC mixing ratio of 212 and 460 ppbv (parts per billion by volume) respectively; using a VOC:NOx ratio of ~5:1. In total, 59 SOA compounds were observed and the structures of 10 compounds have been identified using high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry. The addition of hydroxyl and/or nitro-functional groups to the aromatic ring appears to be an important mechanistic pathway for aerosol formation. This results in the formation of compounds with both low volatility and high O:C ratios, where functionalisation rather than fragmentation is mainly observed as a result of the stability of the ring. The SOA species observed can be characterised as semi-volatile to low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (SVOOA and LVOOA) components and therefore may be important in aerosol formation and growth.

  6. Origin-independent calculation of quadrupole intensities in X-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bernadotte, Stephan; Atkins, Andrew J.; Jacob, Christoph R.

    2012-11-28

    For electronic excitations in the ultraviolet and visible range of the electromagnetic spectrum, the intensities are usually calculated within the dipole approximation, which assumes that the oscillating electric field is constant over the length scale of the transition. For the short wavelengths used in hard X-ray spectroscopy, the dipole approximation may not be adequate. In particular, for metal K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), it becomes necessary to include higher-order contributions. In quantum-chemical approaches to X-ray spectroscopy, these so-called quadrupole intensities have so far been calculated by including contributions depending on the square of the electric-quadrupole and magnetic-dipole transition moments. However, the resulting quadrupole intensities depend on the choice of the origin of the coordinate system. Here, we show that for obtaining an origin-independent theory, one has to include all contributions that are of the same order in the wave vector consistently. This leads to two additional contributions depending on products of the electric-dipole and electric-octupole and of the electric-dipole and magnetic-quadrupole transition moments, respectively. We have implemented such an origin-independent calculation of quadrupole intensities in XAS within time-dependent density-functional theory, and demonstrate its usefulness for the calculation of metal and ligand K-edge XAS spectra of transition metal complexes.

  7. Design of large aperture superferric quadrupole magnets for an in-flight fragment separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaghloul, Aziz; Kim, Dogyun; Kim, Jangyoul; Kim, Mijung; Kim, Myeongjin; Yun, Chongcheoul; Kim, Jongwon

    2014-01-01

    Superferric quadrupole magnets to be used for in-flight fragment separator have been designed. A quadrupole magnet triplet for beam focusing is placed in a cryostat together with superconducting correction coils. To maximize acceptance of rare isotope beams produced by projectile fragmentation, it is essential to use large-aperture quadrupole magnets. The pole tip radius is 17 cm in the current design, and we tried to enlarge the aperture with 3D analysis on magnetic fields. In the front end of the separator, where a target and beam dump are located, we plan to use two sets of quadrupole triplets made of high-Tc superconductor (HTS) operating at 20-50 K considering high radiation heat load. The HTS magnet will use warm iron poles. Both low-Tc and high-Tc superconductors are acquired for test winding, and two kinds of dewar and cryostat are under construction to perform the coil and magnet tests. The magnetic design of superferric quadrupole is mainly discussed.

  8. Origin-independent calculation of quadrupole intensities in X-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bernadotte, Stephan; Atkins, Andrew J; Jacob, Christoph R

    2012-11-28

    For electronic excitations in the ultraviolet and visible range of the electromagnetic spectrum, the intensities are usually calculated within the dipole approximation, which assumes that the oscillating electric field is constant over the length scale of the transition. For the short wavelengths used in hard X-ray spectroscopy, the dipole approximation may not be adequate. In particular, for metal K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), it becomes necessary to include higher-order contributions. In quantum-chemical approaches to X-ray spectroscopy, these so-called quadrupole intensities have so far been calculated by including contributions depending on the square of the electric-quadrupole and magnetic-dipole transition moments. However, the resulting quadrupole intensities depend on the choice of the origin of the coordinate system. Here, we show that for obtaining an origin-independent theory, one has to include all contributions that are of the same order in the wave vector consistently. This leads to two additional contributions depending on products of the electric-dipole and electric-octupole and of the electric-dipole and magnetic-quadrupole transition moments, respectively. We have implemented such an origin-independent calculation of quadrupole intensities in XAS within time-dependent density-functional theory, and demonstrate its usefulness for the calculation of metal and ligand K-edge XAS spectra of transition metal complexes.

  9. Design of large aperture superferric quadrupole magnets for an in-flight fragment separator

    SciTech Connect

    Zaghloul, Aziz; Kim, Dogyun; Kim, Jangyoul; Kim, Mijung; Kim, Myeongjin; Yun, Chongcheoul; Kim, Jongwon

    2014-01-29

    Superferric quadrupole magnets to be used for in-flight fragment separator have been designed. A quadrupole magnet triplet for beam focusing is placed in a cryostat together with superconducting correction coils. To maximize acceptance of rare isotope beams produced by projectile fragmentation, it is essential to use large-aperture quadrupole magnets. The pole tip radius is 17 cm in the current design, and we tried to enlarge the aperture with 3D analysis on magnetic fields. In the front end of the separator, where a target and beam dump are located, we plan to use two sets of quadrupole triplets made of high-Tc superconductor (HTS) operating at 20-50 K considering high radiation heat load. The HTS magnet will use warm iron poles. Both low-Tc and high-Tc superconductors are acquired for test winding, and two kinds of dewar and cryostat are under construction to perform the coil and magnet tests. The magnetic design of superferric quadrupole is mainly discussed.

  10. Design desiderata for a laminar flow quadrupole-focused acceleration column

    SciTech Connect

    Maschke, A.W.

    1983-01-01

    The Pierce design acceleration column has been widely used to accelerate high current beams. It operates well in the space charge limited condition, and will produce beams with a temperature comparable with that of the source. It is restricted in current density, however, by the Child-Langmuir relation. If the ion source itself is not the limiting constraint, then the achievable current density is limited by the electric field at which sparking occurs. One sees clearly that the achievable current density decreases as one goes to higher voltages. This can be easily overcome by using electrostatic quadrupole focusing in the acceleration column. Now it can be shown that the space charge limited current density in a constant energy quadrupole transport channel is greater than that if one assumes that the electric fields on the quadrupoles can be as high in the ion source extraction electric fields. In practice, this is a conservative assumption. It follows that if the beam can be transported a large distance at the C-L current density limit, it can surely be accelerated as it goes from quadrupole to quadrupole. Hence, the necessity of having a high gradient acceleration column goes away.

  11. Background stratospheric aerosol reference model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. P.; Wang, P.

    1989-01-01

    In this analysis, a reference background stratospheric aerosol optical model is developed based on the nearly global SAGE 1 satellite observations in the non-volcanic period from March 1979 to February 1980. Zonally averaged profiles of the 1.0 micron aerosol extinction for the tropics and the mid- and high-altitudes for both hemispheres are obtained and presented in graphical and tabulated form for the different seasons. In addition, analytic expressions for these seasonal global zonal means, as well as the yearly global mean, are determined according to a third order polynomial fit to the vertical profile data set. This proposed background stratospheric aerosol model can be useful in modeling studies of stratospheric aerosols and for simulations of atmospheric radiative transfer and radiance calculations in atmospheric remote sensing.

  12. Mycobacterial Aerosols and Respiratory Disease

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Environmental opportunistic mycobacteria, including Mycobacterium avium, M. terrae, and the new species M. immunogenum, have been implicated in outbreaks of hypersensitivity pneumonitis or respiratory problems in a wide variety of settings. One common feature of the outbreaks has been exposure to aerosols. Aerosols have been generated from metalworking fluid during machining and grinding operations as well as from indoor swimming pools, hot tubs, and water-damaged buildings. Environmental opportunistic mycobacteria are present in drinking water, resistant to disinfection, able to provoke inflammatory reactions, and readily aerosolized. In all outbreaks, the water sources of the aerosols were disinfected. Disinfection may select for the predominance and growth of mycobacteria. Therefore, mycobacteria may be responsible, in part, for many outbreaks of hypersensitivity pneumonitis and other respiratory problems in the workplace and home. PMID:12890314

  13. Stratospheric aerosols and climatic change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, B.; Pollack, J. B.; Summers, A.; Toon, O. B.; Sagan, C.; Van Camp, W.

    1976-01-01

    Generated primarily by volcanic explosions, a layer of submicron silicate particles and particles made of concentrated sulfuric acids solution is present in the stratosphere. Flights through the stratosphere may be a future source of stratospheric aerosols, since the effluent from supersonic transports contains sulfurous gases (which will be converted to H2SO4) while the exhaust from Space Shuttles contains tiny aluminum oxide particles. Global heat balance calculations have shown that the stratospheric aerosols have made important contributions to some climatic changes. In the present paper, accurate radiative transfer calculations of the globally-averaged surface temperature (T) are carried out to estimate the sensitivity of the climate to changes in the number of stratospheric aerosols. The results obtained for a specified model atmosphere, including a vertical profile of the aerosols, indicate that the climate is unlikely to be affected by supersonic transports and Space Shuttles, during the next decades.

  14. Satellite measurements of tropospheric aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griggs, M.

    1981-01-01

    This investigation uses LANDSAT 2 radiance data and ground-truth measurements of the aerosol optical thickness, obtained previously from five inland sites, to study the usefulness and limitations of the near infrared radiance over inland bodies of water. The linear relationship between LANDSAT 2 MSS7 and aerosol content found in this study can be used to estimate the aerosol content with a standard deviation of 0.42N. Analysis of the data for MSS6 and MSS7 suggest that the larger uncertainty is mostly due to water turbidity, with little contribution from the adjacency effect. The relationship found is best applied to determine an average aerosol content over a period of time at a given target, or an area average at a given time over several targets close together.

  15. Ion cloud model for a linear quadrupole ion trap.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Don J; Konenkov, Nikolai V

    2012-01-01

    If large numbers of ions are stored in a linear quadrupole ion trap, space charge causes the oscillation frequencies of ions to decrease. Ions then appear at higher apparent masses when resonantly ejected for mass analysis. In principle, to calculate mass shifts requires calculating the positions of all ions, interacting with each other, at all times, with a self-consistent space charge field. Here, we propose a simpler model for the ion cloud in the case where mass shifts and frequency shifts are relatively small (ca 0.2% and 0.4%, respectively), the trapping field is much stronger (ca × 10(2)) than the space charge field and space charge only causes small perturbations to the ion motion. The self-consistent field problem need not be considered. As test ions move with times long compared to a cycle of the trapping field, the motion of individual ions can be ignored. Static positions of the ions in the cloud are used. To generate an ion cloud, trajectories of N (ca 10,000) ions are calculated for random times between 10 and 100 cycles of the trapping radio frequency field. The ions are then distributed axially randomly in a trap four times the field radius, r(0) in length. The potential and electric field from the ion cloud are calculated from the ion positions. Near the trap center (distances r< 1r(0)), the potential and electric fields from space charge are not cylindrically symmetric, but are quite symmetric for greater values of r. Trajectories of test ions, oscillation frequencies and mass shifts can then be calculated in the trapping field, including the space charge field. Mass shifts are in good agreement with experiments for reasonable values of the initial positions and speeds of the ions. Agreement with earlier analytical models for the ion cloud, based on a uniform occupation of phase space, or a thermal (Boltzmann) distribution of ions trapped in the effective potential [D. Douglas and N.V. Konenkov, Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 26, 2105 (2012)] is

  16. Rotating dipole and quadrupole field for a multiple cathode system

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, X.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Kewisch, J.; Litvinenko, V.; Meng, W.; Pikin, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Rao, T.; Sheehy, B.; Skarita, J.; Wang, E.; Wu, Q.; Xin, T.

    2011-03-28

    A multiple cathode system has been designed to provide the high average current polarized electron bunches for the future electron-ion collider eRHIC [1]. One of the key research topics in this design is the technique to generate a combined dipole and quadrupole rotating field at high frequency (700 kHz). This type of field is necessary for combining bunches from different cathodes to the same axis with minimum emittance growth. Our simulations and the prototype test results to achieve this will be presented. The future eRHIC project, next upgrade of EHIC, will be the first electron-heavy ion collider in the world. For polarized-electron and polarized proton collisions, it requires a polarized electron source with high average current ({approx}50 mA), short bunch ({approx}3 mm), emittance of about 20 {micro}m and energy spread of {approx}1% at 10 MeV. The state-of-art polarized electron cathode can generate average current of about more than 1 mA, but much less than 50 mA. The current is limited by the quantum efficiency, lifetime, space charge and ultra-high vacuum requirement of the polarized cathode. A possible approach to achieve the 50 mA beam is to employ multiple cathodes, such as 20 cathodes, and combine the multiple bunched beams from cathodes to the same axis. We name it as 'Gatling gun' because its operations bear similarity to a multi-barrel Gatling gun. The electron spin direction is not affected by electric field but will follow to the direction of the magnetic bending. This requires that, to preserve the spin polarization from cathode, the fixed bending field after the solenoid and the rotating bending field in combiner must be either a pair of electric bendings or a pair of magnetic bendings. We choose the scheme with a pair of magnetic bendings because it is much easier than the scheme with a pair of electric bendings at our 200 keV electron energy level.

  17. AEROSOL, CLOUDS, AND CLIMATE CHANGE

    SciTech Connect

    SCHWARTZ, S.E.

    2005-09-01

    Earth's climate is thought to be quite sensitive to changes in radiative fluxes that are quite small in absolute magnitude, a few watts per square meter, and in relation to these fluxes in the natural climate. Atmospheric aerosol particles exert influence on climate directly, by scattering and absorbing radiation, and indirectly by modifying the microphysical properties of clouds and in turn their radiative effects and hydrology. The forcing of climate change by these indirect effects is thought to be quite substantial relative to forcing by incremental concentrations of greenhouse gases, but highly uncertain. Quantification of aerosol indirect forcing by satellite- or ground-based remote sensing has proved quite difficult in view of inherent large variation in the pertinent observables such as cloud optical depth, which is controlled mainly by liquid water path and only secondarily by aerosols. Limited work has shown instances of large magnitude of aerosol indirect forcing, with local instantaneous forcing upwards of 50 W m{sup 66}-2. Ultimately it will be necessary to represent aerosol indirect effects in climate models to accurately identify the anthropogenic forcing at present and over secular time and to assess the influence of this forcing in the context of other forcings of climate change. While the elements of aerosol processes that must be represented in models describing the evolution and properties of aerosol particles that serve as cloud condensation particles are known, many important components of these processes remain to be understood and to be represented in models, and the models evaluated against observation, before such model-based representations can confidently be used to represent aerosol indirect effects in climate models.

  18. Method for producing monodisperse aerosols

    DOEpatents

    Ortiz, Lawrence W.; Soderholm, Sidney C.

    1990-01-01

    An aerosol generator is described which is capable of producing a monodisperse aerosol within narrow limits utilizing an aqueous solution capable of providing a high population of seed nuclei and an organic solution having a low vapor pressure. The two solutions are cold nebulized, mixed, vaporized, and cooled. During cooling, particles of the organic vapor condense onto the excess seed nuclei, and grow to a uniform particle size.

  19. Satellite Remote Sensing: Aerosol Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph A.

    2013-01-01

    Aerosols are solid or liquid particles suspended in the air, and those observed by satellite remote sensing are typically between about 0.05 and 10 microns in size. (Note that in traditional aerosol science, the term "aerosol" refers to both the particles and the medium in which they reside, whereas for remote sensing, the term commonly refers to the particles only. In this article, we adopt the remote-sensing definition.) They originate from a great diversity of sources, such as wildfires, volcanoes, soils and desert sands, breaking waves, natural biological activity, agricultural burning, cement production, and fossil fuel combustion. They typically remain in the atmosphere from several days to a week or more, and some travel great distances before returning to Earth's surface via gravitational settling or washout by precipitation. Many aerosol sources exhibit strong seasonal variability, and most experience inter-annual fluctuations. As such, the frequent, global coverage that space-based aerosol remote-sensing instruments can provide is making increasingly important contributions to regional and larger-scale aerosol studies.

  20. Climate forcing by anthropogenic aerosols.

    PubMed

    Charlson, R J; Schwartz, S E; Hales, J M; Cess, R D; Coakley, J A; Hansen, J E; Hofmann, D J

    1992-01-24

    Although long considered to be of marginal importance to global climate change, tropospheric aerosol contributes substantially to radiative forcing, and anthropogenic sulfate aerosol in particular has imposed a major perturbation to this forcing. Both the direct scattering of shortwavelength solar radiation and the modification of the shortwave reflective properties of clouds by sulfate aerosol particles increase planetary albedo, thereby exerting a cooling influence on the planet. Current climate forcing due to anthropogenic sulfate is estimated to be -1 to -2 watts per square meter, globally averaged. This perturbation is comparable in magnitude to current anthropogenic greenhouse gas forcing but opposite in sign. Thus, the aerosol forcing has likely offset global greenhouse warming to a substantial degree. However, differences in geographical and seasonal distributions of these forcings preclude any simple compensation. Aerosol effects must be taken into account in evaluating anthropogenic influences on past, current, and projected future climate and in formulating policy regarding controls on emission of greenhouse gases and sulfur dioxide. Resolution of such policy issues requires integrated research on the magnitude and geographical distribution of aerosol climate forcing and on the controlling chemical and physical processes.

  1. Climate Forcing by Anthropogenic Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlson, R. J.; Schwartz, S. E.; Hales, J. M.; Cess, R. D.; Coakley, J. A., Jr.; Hansen, J. E.; Hofmann, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Although long considered to be of marginal importance to global climate change, tropospheric aerosol contributes substantially to radiative forcing, and anthropogenic sulfate aerosol in particular has imposed a major perturbation to this forcing. Both the direct scattering of short-wavelength solar radiation and the modification of the shortwave reflective properties of clouds by sulfate aerosol particles increase planetary albedo, thereby exerting a cooling influence on the planet. Current climate forcing due to anthropogenic sulfate is estimated to be -1 to -2 watts per square meter, globally averaged. This perturbation is comparable in magnitude to current anthropogenic greenhouse gas forcing but opposite in sign. Thus, the aerosol forcing has likely offset global greenhouse warming to a substantial degree. However, differences in geographical and seasonal distributions of these forcings preclude any simple compensation. Aerosol effects must be taken into account in evaluating anthropogenic influences on past, current, and projected future climate and in formulating policy regarding controls on emission of greenhouse gases and sulfur dioxide. Resolution of such policy issues requires integrated research on the magnitude and geographical distribution of aerosol climate forcing and on the controlling chemical and physical processes.

  2. Passive Remote Sensing of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    Remote sensing of aerosol optical and microphysical properties got a resurgence in the 1970s when John Reagan and Ben Herman initiated a program to develop and implement a surface-based sunphotometer system to monitor spectral aerosol optical thickness at the University of Arizona. In this presentation I will review the state of the technology used to monitor aerosol optical and microphysical properties, including the determination of spectral aerosol optical thickness and total ozone content. This work continued with John Reagan developed a surface-based spectral flux radiometer to implement Ben Herman's idea to determine the imaginary part of the complex refractive index of aerosols using the recently developed diffuse-direct technique. Progress made both in surface-based instrumentation, inversion theory for analyzing such data, and in satellite observations of aerosol optical and microphysical properties will be reviewed to highlight the state of knowledge after 30 years of expanded capability and introduction of novel new capabilities, both from the ground and from spacecraft.

  3. Climate forcing by anthropogenic aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charlson, R. J.; Schwartz, S. E.; Hales, J. M.; Cess, R. D.; Coakley, J. A., Jr.; Hansen, J. E.; Hofmann, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Although long considered to be of marginal importance to global climate change, tropospheric aerosol contributes substantially to radiative forcing, and anthropogenic sulfate aerosol, in particular, has imposed a major perturbation to this forcing. Both the direct scattering of short-wavelength solar radiation and the modification of the shortwave reflective properties of clouds by sulfate aerosol particles increase planetary albedo, thereby exerting a cooling influence on the planet. Current climate forcing due to anthropogenic sulfate is estimated to be -1 to -2 watts per square meter, globally averaged. This perturbation is comparable in magnitude to current anthropogenic greenhouse gas forcing but opposite in sign. Thus, the aerosol forcing has likely offset global greenhouse warming to a substantial degree. However, differences in geographical and seasonal distributions of these forcings preclude any simple compensation. Aerosol effects must be taken into account in evaluating anthropogenic influences on past, current, and projected future climate and in formulating policy regarding controls on emission of greenhouse gases and sulfur dioxide. Resolution of such policy issues requires integrated research on the magnitude and geographical distribution of aerosol climate forcing and on the controlling chemical and physical processes.

  4. Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds (Including Dimethyl Sulfide), Aerosol Particles, and CCN in the Canadian Arctic: Preliminary Results from the Summer 2014 NETCARE Expedition Aboard the CCGS Amundsen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mungall, E. L.; Abbatt, J.; Lee, A.; Ladino Moreno, L.

    2014-12-01

    The Arctic in summer is a cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) limited environment, and the controls on aerosol number and composition, and thus cloud formation, are poorly understood. A better understanding of these controls and their consequences is required in order to understand the region's changing climate. In order to advance that understanding, during Summer 2014 we deployed instrumentation aboard the CCGS Amundsen, the Canadian research icebreaker. We participated in Legs 1a and 1b of the cruise, affording us observations in locations as varied as the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Lancaster Sound, and the Nares Strait. We collected on-line measurements with high time resolution of particle number, size and CCN activity as well as mixing ratios of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) including dimethyl sulfide, which has been implicated as an important contributor to the CCN population in the Arctic. We also attempted to directly measure air-sea fluxes of dimethyl sulfide using a high resolution time of flight mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS, Aerodyne) sampling at 10 Hz. Here, we report preliminary results from those measurements.

  5. Chemical Characteristics of Particulate Matter from Vehicle emission using High Resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, T.; Lee, T.; Kang, S.; Lee, J.; Kim, J.; Son, J.; Yoo, H. M.; Kim, K.; Park, G.

    2015-12-01

    Car emissions are major contributors of particulate matter (PM) in the urban environment and effects of air pollution, climate change, and human activities. By increasing of interest in research of car emission for assessment of the PM control, it became require to understand the chemical composition and characteristics of the car exhaust gases and particulate matter. To understand car emission characteristics of PM, we will study PM of car emissions for five driving modes (National Institute Environmental Research (NIER)-5, NIER-9, NIER-12, NIER-14) and three fixed speed driving modes (30km/h, 70km/h, 110km/h) using different fuel types (gasoline, diesel, and LPG) at Transportation Pollution Research Center (TPRC) of NIER in Incheon, South Korea. PM chemical composition of car emission was measured for concentrations of organics, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, PAHs, oxidation states and size distribution using an Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and engine exhaust particle sizer (EEPS) on real-time. In the study, organics concentration was dominated for all cases of driving modes and the concentration of organics was increased in 110km/h fixed speed mode for gasoline and diesel. The presentation will provide an overview of the chemical composition of PM in the car emissions.

  6. Seasonal variability of crustal and marine trace elements in the aerosol at Neumayer station, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, Rolf; Wöltjen, Janina; Piel, Claudia; Resenberg, Rosa; Wagenbach, Dietmar; König-Langlo, Gert; Kriews, Michael

    2008-11-01

    Atmospheric trace element concentrations were measured from March 1999 to December 2003 at the Air Chemistry Observatory of the German Antarctic station Neumayer, by inductively coupled plasma-quadrupol mass spectrometry (ICP-QMS) and ion chromatography (IC). This continuous five-year long record derived from weekly aerosol sampling revealed a distinct seasonal summer maximum for elements linked with mineral dust entry (Al, La, Ce, Nd) and a winter maximum for the mostly sea salt derived elements Li, Na, K, Mg, Ca and Sr. The relative seasonal amplitude was around 1.7 and 1.4 for mineral dust (La) and sea salt aerosol (Na), respectively. On average, a significant deviation regarding mean ocean water composition was apparent for Li, Mg and Sr, which could hardly be explained by mirabilite precipitation on freshly formed sea ice. In addition, we observed all over the year, a not clarified high variability of element ratios Li/Na, K/Na, Mg/Na, Ca/Na and Sr/Na. We found an intriguing co-variation of Se concentrations with biogenic sulphur aerosols (methane sulphonate and non-sea salt sulphate), indicating a dominant marine biogenic source for this element, linked with the marine biogenic sulphur source.

  7. Holistic aerosol evaluation using synthesized aerosol aircraft measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson-Parris, Duncan; Reddington, Carly; Schutgens, Nick; Stier, Philip; Carslaw, Ken; Liu, Dantong; Allan, James; Coe, Hugh

    2016-04-01

    Despite ongoing efforts there are still large uncertainties in aerosol concentrations and loadings across many commonly used GCMs. This in turn leads to large uncertainties in the contributions of the direct and indirect aerosol forcing on climate. However, constraining these fields using earth observation data, although providing global coverage, is problematic for many reasons, including the large uncertainties in retrieving aerosol loadings. Additionally, the inability to retrieve aerosols in or around cloudy scenes leads to further sampling biases (Gryspeerdt 2015). Many in-situ studies have used regional datasets to attempt to evaluate the model uncertainties, but these are unable to provide an assessment of the models ability to represent aerosols properties on a global scale. Within the Global Aerosol Synthesis and Science Project (GASSP) we have assembled the largest collection of quality controlled, in-situ aircraft observations ever synthesized to a consistent format. This provides a global set of in-situ measurements of Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) and Black Carbon (BC), amongst others. In particular, the large number of vertical profiles provided by this aircraft data allows us to investigate the vertical structure of aerosols across a wide range of regions and environments. These vertical distributions are particularly valuable when investigating the dominant processes above or below clouds where remote sensing data is not available. Here we present initial process-based assessments of the BC lifetimes and vertical distributions of CCN in the HadGEM-UKCA and ECHAM-HAM models using this data. We use point-by-point based comparisons to avoid the sampling issues associated with comparing spatio-temporal aggregations.

  8. Characteristics of aerosol particles and trace gases in ship exhaust plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewnick, F.; Diesch, J.; Borrmann, S.

    2011-12-01

    Gaseous and particulate matter from marine vessels gain increasing attention due to their significant contribution to the anthropogenic burden of the atmosphere, implying the change of the atmospheric composition and the impact on local and regional air quality and climate (Eyring et al., 2010). As ship emissions significantly affect air quality of onshore regions, this study deals with various aspects of gas and particulate plumes from marine traffic measured near the Elbe river mouth in northern Germany. In addition to a detailed investigation of the chemical and physical particle properties from different types of commercial marine vessels, we will focus on the chemistry of ship plumes and their changes while undergoing atmospheric processing. Measurements of the ambient aerosol, various trace gases and meteorological parameters using a mobile laboratory (MoLa) were performed on the banks of the Lower Elbe which is passed on average, daily by 30 ocean-going vessels reaching the port of Hamburg, the second largest freight port of Europe. During 5 days of sampling from April 25-30, 2011 170 commercial marine vessels were probed at a distance of about 1.5-2 km with high temporal resolution. Mass concentrations in PM1, PM2.5 and PM10 and number as well as PAH and black carbon (BC) concentrations in PM1 were measured; size distribution instruments covered the size range from 6 nm up to 32 μm. The chemical composition of the non-refractory aerosol in the submicron range was measured by means of an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (Aerodyne HR-ToF-AMS). Gas phase species analyzers monitored various trace gas concentrations in the air and a weather station provided meteorological parameters. Additionally, a wide spectrum of ship information for each vessel including speed, size, vessel type, fuel type, gross tonnage and engine power was recorded via Automatic Identification System (AIS) broadcasts. Although commercial marine vessels powered by diesel engines consume high

  9. Test results of the LARP Nb$_3$Sn quadrupole HQ03a

    DOE PAGES

    DiMarco, J.; G. Ambrosio; Chlachidze, G.; Bossert, R.; Holik, T.; Orris, D.; Stoynev, S.; Strauss, T.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.; et al

    2016-03-09

    The US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) has been developing $Nb_3Sn$ quadrupoles of progressively increasing performance for the high luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider. The 120 mm aperture High-field Quadrupole (HQ) models are the last step in the R&D phase supporting the development of the new IR Quadrupoles (MQXF). Three series of HQ coils were fabricated and assembled in a shell-based support structure, progressively optimizing the design and fabrication process. The final set of coils consistently applied the optimized design solutions, and was assembled in the HQ03a model. Furthermore, this paper reports a summary of the HQ03a testmore » results, including training, mechanical performance, field quality and quench studies.« less

  10. Effects of Large Nuclear Quadrupoles on Dielectric Properties of Glasses at Very Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luck, A.; Fleischmann, A.; Reiser, A.; Enss, C.

    2014-12-01

    The universal behaviour of amorphous solids at low temperatures, governed by atomic tunneling systems as described by the standard tunneling model, has long been a generally accepted fact. In the last years, however, measurements of dielectric two-pulse polarization echoes have revealed that nuclear quadrupole moments involved in atomic tunneling systems can cause specific material-dependent effects in magnetic fields. We have performed measurements of the dielectric properties of the two multicomponent glasses N-KZFS11 and HY-1, containing several percent of tantalum oxide and holmium oxide respectively. As 181Ta and 165Ho both carry very large nuclear quadrupole moments, these glasses are ideal candidates to study the influence of nuclear quadrupole moments on the properties of glasses at very low temperatures. Our measurements not only show unique dielectric behaviour in both glasses, but also differ significantly from various predictions of the standard tunneling model.

  11. Calculations and measurements for the SLAC SLC positron return quadrupole magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Early, R.A.; Cobb, J.K.

    1986-09-01

    The three-dimensional magnetostatic computer program TOSCA, running on the NMFECC CRAY X-MP computer, was used to compute the integral of gradient length for the SLC type QT4 positron return line quadrupole magnet. Since the bore diameter of the magnet is 12.7 centimeters, and the length is only 10.16 centimeters, three dimensional effects are important. POISSON calculations were done on a two-dimensional model to obtain magnetic shimming which assured enough positive twelve pole to offset end effects, while TOSCA was used to estimate the effective length of the quadrupole. No corrections were required on the magnet as built. Measurements showed that the required integrated gradient was achieved for the given current, and that integrated higher harmonics were generally less than 0.1% of the quadrupole component.

  12. SU(6) quadrupole phonon model for even and odd nuclei and the SU(3) limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paar, V.; Brant, S.; Canto, L. F.; Leander, G.; Vouk, M.

    1982-04-01

    Analogous to the equivalence between the SU(6) quadrupole-phonon model (TQM) and the interacting boson model (IBM), the equivalence is pointed out for odd systems between the SU(6) particle quadrupole-phonon coupling model (PTQM) and the interacting boson-fermion model (IBFM). PTQM is formulated starting from the Dyson representation for the odd system. Different aspects of the SU(3) limit of TQM and PTQM are studied; the quadrupole-phonon block structure of rotational bands in even and odd nuclei and analytic expressions based on the coherent state; signature effects generated in PTQM; electromagnetic properties and correction factors for PTQM; overlaps of the PTQM analogs of Nilsson states with Coriolis-coupled Nilsson states and the relation to the rotational model representation.

  13. Test-Aerosol Generator For Calibrating Particle Counters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mogan, Paul A.; Adams, Alois J.; Schwindt, Christian J.; Hodge, Timothy R.; Mallow, Tim J.; Duong, Anh A.; Bukauskas, Vyto V.

    1996-01-01

    Apparatus generates clean, stable aerosol stream for use in testing and calibrating laser-based aerosol-particle counter. Size and concentration of aerosol particles controlled to ensure accurate calibration. Cheap, widely available medical nebulizers used to generate aerosols.

  14. Are anthropogenic aerosols affecting rainfall?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junkermann, Wolfgang; Hacker, Jorg

    2013-04-01

    Modification of cloud microphysics by anthropogenic aerosols is well known since several decades. Whether the underlying processes leads to changes in precipitation is by far less confirmed. Several different factors affect the production of rain in a way that a causality between increasing aerosol load in the atmosphere and a change of annual rainfall is very difficult to confirm. What would be expected as an effect of additional cloud condensation nuclei is a shift in the spatial and temporal rainfall distribution towards a lower number of days with low rain intensity and more frequent or more vigorous single events. In fact such a shift has been observed in several locations worldwide and has been suggested to be caused by increasing aerosol load, however, without further specification of the nature and number of the aerosols involved. Measurements of aerosols which might be important for cloud properties are extremely sparse and no long term monitoring data sets are available up to now. The problem of missing long term aerosol data that could be compared to available long term meteorological data sets can possibly be resolved in certain areas where well characterized large anthropogenic aerosol sources were installed in otherwise pristine areas without significant changes in land use over several decades. We investigated aerosol sources and current aerosol number, size and spatial distributions with airborne measurements in the planetary boundary layer over two regions in Australia that are reported to suffer from extensive drought despite the fact that local to regional scale water vapor in the atmosphere is slowly and constantly increasing. Such an increase of the total water in the planetary boundary layer would imply also an increase in annual precipitation as observed in many other locations elsewhere. The observed decline of rainfall in these areas thus requires a local to regional scale physical process modifying cloud properties in a way that rain

  15. Development of integrated superconducting quadrupole doublet modules for operation in the SIS100 accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, J.; Bleile, A.; Ceballos Velasco, J.; Fischer, E.; Hess, G.; Macavei, J.; Spiller, P.

    2015-12-01

    The FAIR project (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) evolves and builds an international accelerator- and experimental facility for basic research activities in various fields of modern physics. Within the course of this project, integrated quadrupole doublet modules are in development. The quadrupole doublet modules provide a pair of superconducting main quadrupoles (focusing and defocusing), corrector magnets, cryogenic collimators and beam position monitors as integrated sets of ion-optical elements. Furthermore LHe cooled beam pipes and vacuum cold-warm transitions are used as ultra-high vacuum components for beam transportation. Superconducting bus bars are used for 13 kA current supply of the main quadrupole magnets. All components are integrated as one common cold mass into one cryostat. High temperature super conductor local current leads will be applied for the low current supply of corrector magnets. The quadrupole doublet modules will be operated in the SIS100 heavy ion accelerator, the core component of the FAIR project. A first version of a corrector magnet has already been manufactured at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Russia, and is now ready for testing. The ion-optical lattice structure of SIS100 requires multiple configurations of named components. Eleven different configurations, organized in four categories, provide the required quadrupole doublet module setups. The high integration level of multiple ion-optical, mechanical and cryogenic functions, based on requirements of operation safety, is leading towards a sophisticated mechanical structure and cooling solution, to satisfy the demanding requirements on position preservation during thermal cycling. The mechanical and cryogenic design solutions will be discussed.

  16. Simple expressions of the nuclear relaxation rate enhancement due to quadrupole nuclei in slowly tumbling molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Fries, Pascal H.; Belorizky, Elie

    2015-07-28

    For slowly tumbling entities or quasi-rigid lattices, we derive very simple analytical expressions of the quadrupole relaxation enhancement (QRE) of the longitudinal relaxation rate R{sub 1} of nuclear spins I due to their intramolecular magnetic dipolar coupling with quadrupole nuclei of arbitrary spins S ≥ 1. These expressions are obtained by using the adiabatic approximation for evaluating the time evolution operator of the quantum states of the quadrupole nuclei S. They are valid when the gyromagnetic ratio of the spin S is much smaller than that of the spin I. The theory predicts quadrupole resonant peaks in the dispersion curve of R{sub 1} vs magnetic field. The number, positions, relative intensities, Lorentzian shapes, and widths of these peaks are explained in terms of the following properties: the magnitude of the quadrupole Hamiltonian and the asymmetry parameter of the electric field gradient (EFG) acting on the spin S, the S-I inter-spin orientation with respect to the EFG principal axes, the rotational correlation time of the entity carrying the S–I pair, and/or the proper relaxation time of the spin S. The theory is first applied to protein amide protons undergoing dipolar coupling with fast-relaxing quadrupole {sup 14}N nuclei and mediating the QRE to the observed bulk water protons. The theoretical QRE agrees well with its experimental counterpart for various systems such as bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and cartilages. The anomalous behaviour of the relaxation rate of protons in synthetic aluminium silicate imogolite nano-tubes due to the QRE of {sup 27}Al (S = 5/2) nuclei is also explained.

  17. Simple expressions of the nuclear relaxation rate enhancement due to quadrupole nuclei in slowly tumbling molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fries, Pascal H.; Belorizky, Elie

    2015-07-01

    For slowly tumbling entities or quasi-rigid lattices, we derive very simple analytical expressions of the quadrupole relaxation enhancement (QRE) of the longitudinal relaxation rate R1 of nuclear spins I due to their intramolecular magnetic dipolar coupling with quadrupole nuclei of arbitrary spins S ≥ 1. These expressions are obtained by using the adiabatic approximation for evaluating the time evolution operator of the quantum states of the quadrupole nuclei S. They are valid when the gyromagnetic ratio of the spin S is much smaller than that of the spin I. The theory predicts quadrupole resonant peaks in the dispersion curve of R1 vs magnetic field. The number, positions, relative intensities, Lorentzian shapes, and widths of these peaks are explained in terms of the following properties: the magnitude of the quadrupole Hamiltonian and the asymmetry parameter of the electric field gradient (EFG) acting on the spin S, the S-I inter-spin orientation with respect to the EFG principal axes, the rotational correlation time of the entity carrying the S-I pair, and/or the proper relaxation time of the spin S. The theory is first applied to protein amide protons undergoing dipolar coupling with fast-relaxing quadrupole 14N nuclei and mediating the QRE to the observed bulk water protons. The theoretical QRE agrees well with its experimental counterpart for various systems such as bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and cartilages. The anomalous behaviour of the relaxation rate of protons in synthetic aluminium silicate imogolite nano-tubes due to the QRE of 27Al (S = 5/2) nuclei is also explained.

  18. Hydrogen bonding at the aerosol interface

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.X.; Aiello, D.; Aker, P.M. )

    1995-01-12

    Morphology-dependent stimulated Raman scattering (MDSRS) has been used to monitor the degree of hydrogen bonding in water aerosols generated by a vibrating orifice aerosol generator (VOAG). The results show that aerosols created by a VOAG suffer extensive structural disruption and that the disruption is most pronounced at the aerosol surface. Laboratory aerosols prepared in this way do not appropriately mimic those found in the atmosphere, and the mass accommodation coefficients measured using such aerosols should not be used in global climate modeling calculations. 25 refs., 10 figs.

  19. Two years of near real-time observations of the chemical composition of submicron aerosols in Cape Corsica obtained by Q-ACSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciare, Jean; Dulac, François; Crenn, Vincent; Hamonou, Eric; Baisnée, Dominique; Nicolas, José B.; Pont, Véronique; Lambert, Dominique; Gheusi, François; Mallet, Marc; Tison, Emmanuel; Sauvage, Stéphane; Bourrianne, Thierry; Roberts, Gregory; Colomb, Aurélie; Pichon, Jean-Marc; Sellegri, Karine; Savelli, Jean-Luc

    2015-04-01

    As part of the MISTRALS/ChArMEx (Mediterranean Integrated Studies aT Regional And Local Scales/the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment; http://www.mistrals-home.org; http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr) and the CORSiCA (http://www.obs-mip.fr/corsica) programs, 2-year continuous observations of near real-time chemical composition of submicron aerosols were performed between June 2012 & July 2014 at the Cape Corsica atmospheric supersite (http://gaw.empa.ch/gawsis/reports.asp?StationID=2076203042), a remote marine site in the Western Mediterranean. Submicron organic aerosols (OA) and the major inorganic salts (sulfate, ammonium, nitrate) were monitored every 30 min using a Quadripole Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (Q-ACSM; Aerodyne Res. Inc. MA, USA). Quality control of this large dataset (24-month continuous observations) was performed through closure studies (using co-located SMPS and TEOM-FDMS measurements), direct comparisons with other on-line / off-line instruments running in parallel (filter sampling, OPC, nephelometer …), and large intercomparison of 13 Q-ACSM performed within the EU-FP7 ACTRIS program (http://www.actris.net/). Source apportionment of OA was then performed on a monthly basis using the SourceFinder software (SoFi, http://www.psi.ch/acsm-stations/me-2) allowing the distinction between hydrogen- and oxygen-like organic aerosols (HOA and OOA, respectively). This monthly resolved source apportionment was first compared with co-located real-time tracer measurements (NOx, BC, CO, VOC …) available at the Cape Corsica station. Seasonal patterns of the various properties of (secondary) OOA (OSc, O/C ratio …) were then investigated from monthly resolved source apportionment results (monthly OOA mass spectra) obtained over the period June 2012 - July 2014. Acknowledgements: Atmospheric measurements performed at Cape Corsica Station were funded by CNRS-INSU, ADEME, CEA, and METEO-FRANCE. This work was carried out in the framework of the CORSi