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Sample records for aeroelastic coupling procedure

  1. A Coupled Aeroelastic Model for Launch Vehicle Stability Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, Jeb S.

    2010-01-01

    A technique for incorporating distributed aerodynamic normal forces and aeroelastic coupling effects into a stability analysis model of a launch vehicle is presented. The formulation augments the linear state-space launch vehicle plant dynamics that are compactly derived as a system of coupled linear differential equations representing small angular and translational perturbations of the rigid body, nozzle, and sloshing propellant coupled with normal vibration of a set of orthogonal modes. The interaction of generalized forces due to aeroelastic coupling and thrust can be expressed as a set of augmenting non-diagonal stiffness and damping matrices in modal coordinates with no penalty on system order. While the eigenvalues of the structural response in the presence of thrust and aeroelastic forcing can be predicted at a given flight condition independent of the remaining degrees of freedom, the coupled model provides confidence in closed-loop stability in the presence of rigid-body, slosh, and actuator dynamics. Simulation results are presented that characterize the coupled dynamic response of the Ares I launch vehicle and the impact of aeroelasticity on control system stability margins.

  2. Inertial Force Coupling to Nonlinear Aeroelasticity of Flexible Wing Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Ting, Eric

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the inertial force effect on nonlinear aeroelasticity of flexible wing aircraft. The geometric are nonlinearity due to rotational and tension stiffening. The effect of large bending deflection will also be investigated. Flutter analysis will be conducted for a truss-braced wing aircraft concept with tension stiffening and inertial force coupling.

  3. Efficient Cfd/csd Coupling Methods for Aeroelastic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Long; Xu, Tianhao; Xie, Jing

    2016-06-01

    A fast aeroelastic numerical simulation method using CFD/CSD coupling are developed. Generally, aeroelastic numerical simulation costs much time and significant hardware resources with CFD/CSD coupling. In this paper, dynamic grid method, full implicit scheme, parallel technology and improved coupling method are researched for efficiency simulation. An improved Delaunay graph mapping method is proposed for efficient dynamic grid deform. Hybrid grid finite volume method is used to solve unsteady flow fields. The dual time stepping method based on parallel implicit scheme is used in temporal discretization for efficiency simulation. An approximate system of linear equations is solved by the GMRES algorithm with a LU-SGS preconditioner. This method leads to a significant increase in performance over the explicit and LU-SGS implicit methods. A modification of LU-SGS is proposed to improve the parallel performance. Parallel computing overs a very effective way to improve our productivity in doing CFD/CFD coupling analysis. Improved loose coupling method is an efficiency way over the loose coupling method and tight coupling method. 3D wing's aeroelastic phenomenon is simulated by solving Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations using improved loose coupling method. The flutter boundary is calculated and agrees well with experimental data. The transonic hole is very clear in numerical simulation results.

  4. Rotor aeroelastic stability coupled with helicopter body motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miao, W. L.; Huber, H. B.

    1974-01-01

    A 5.5-foot-diameter, soft-in-plane, hingeless-rotor system was tested on a gimbal which allowed the helicopter rigid-body pitch and roll motions. Coupled rotor/airframe aeroelastic stability boundaries were explored and the modal damping ratios were measured. The time histories were correlated with analysis with excellent agreement. The effects of forward speed and some rotor design parameters on the coupled rotor/airframe stability were explored both by model and analysis. Some physical insights into the coupled stability phenomenon are suggested.

  5. Aeroelastic behavior of twist-coupled HAWT blades

    SciTech Connect

    Lobitz, D.W.; Veers, P.S.

    1998-12-31

    As the technology for horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWT) development matures, more novel techniques are required for the capture of additional amounts of energy, alleviation of loads and control of the rotor. One such technique employs the use of an adaptive blade that could sense the wind velocity or rotational speed in some fashion and accordingly modify its aerodynamic configuration to meet a desired objective. This could be achieved in either an active or passive manner, although the passive approach is much more attractive due to its simplicity and economy. As an example, a blade design might employ coupling between bending and/or extension, and twisting so that, as it bends and extends due to the action of the aerodynamic and inertial loads, it also twists modifying the aerodynamic performance in some way. These performance modifications also have associated aeroelastic effects, including effects on aeroelastic instability. To address the scope and magnitude of these effects a tool has been developed for investigating classical flutter and divergence of HAWT blades. As a starting point, an adaptive version of the uniform Combined Experiment Blade will be investigated. Flutter and divergence airspeeds will be reported as a function of the strength of the coupling and also be compared to those of generic blade counterparts.

  6. Coupled nonlinear aeroelasticity and flight dynamics of fully flexible aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Weihua

    This dissertation introduces an approach to effectively model and analyze the coupled nonlinear aeroelasticity and flight dynamics of highly flexible aircraft. A reduced-order, nonlinear, strain-based finite element framework is used, which is capable of assessing the fundamental impact of structural nonlinear effects in preliminary vehicle design and control synthesis. The cross-sectional stiffness and inertia properties of the wings are calculated along the wing span, and then incorporated into the one-dimensional nonlinear beam formulation. Finite-state unsteady subsonic aerodynamics is used to compute airloads along lifting surfaces. Flight dynamic equations are then introduced to complete the aeroelastic/flight dynamic system equations of motion. Instead of merely considering the flexibility of the wings, the current work allows all members of the vehicle to be flexible. Due to their characteristics of being slender structures, the wings, tail, and fuselage of highly flexible aircraft can be modeled as beams undergoing three dimensional displacements and rotations. New kinematic relationships are developed to handle the split beam systems, such that fully flexible vehicles can be effectively modeled within the existing framework. Different aircraft configurations are modeled and studied, including Single-Wing, Joined-Wing, Blended-Wing-Body, and Flying-Wing configurations. The Lagrange Multiplier Method is applied to model the nodal displacement constraints at the joint locations. Based on the proposed models, roll response and stability studies are conducted on fully flexible and rigidized models. The impacts of the flexibility of different vehicle members on flutter with rigid body motion constraints, flutter in free flight condition, and roll maneuver performance are presented. Also, the static stability of the compressive member of the Joined-Wing configuration is studied. A spatially-distributed discrete gust model is incorporated into the time simulation

  7. Computational aeroelasticity study of horizontal axis wind turbines with coupled bending - torsion blade dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeev, Timur

    With the increasing size of wind turbines and the use of flexible and light materials in aerodynamic applications, aeroelastic tailoring for power generation and blade stability has become an important subject in the study of wind turbine dynamics. To this day, coupling of bending and torsion in wind turbine rotor blades has been studied primarily as an elastic mechanism due to a coupling laminate construction. In this report, inertial coupling of bending and torsion, due to offset of axis of elasticity and axis of center of mass, is investigated and numerical simulations are performed to test the validity of the constructed model using an in-house developed aeroelastic numerical tool. A computationally efficient aeroelastic numerical tool, based on Goldstein's helicoidal vortex model with a prescribed wake model and modal coupling of bending and torsion in the blades, is developed for 2-bladed horizontal axis wind turbines and a conceptual study is performed in order to argue the validity of the proposed formulation and numerical construction. The aeroelastic numerical tool, without bending-torsion coupling, was validated (Chattot 2007) using NREL Phase VI wind turbine data, which has become the baseline model in the wind turbine community. Due to novelty of the proposed inertial bending-torsion coupling in the aeroelastic model of the rotor and lack of field data, as well as, other numerical tools available for code to code comparison studies, a thorough numerical investigation of the proposed formulation is performed in order to validate the aeroelastic numerical tool Finally, formulations of geometrically nonlinear beams, elastically nonlinear plates and shells, and a piecewise linear, two degree of freedom, quasi steady, aerodynamic model are presented as an extension for nonlinear wind turbine aeroelastic simulations. Preliminary results of nonlinear beams, plates, shells, and 2 DOF NACA0012 aeroelastic model are presented.

  8. Formulation of the aeroelastic stability and response problem of coupled rotor/support systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warmbrodt, W.; Friedmann, P.

    1979-01-01

    The consistent formulation of the governing nonlinear equations of motion for a coupled rotor/support system is presented. Rotor/support coupling is clearly documented by enforcing dynamic equilibrium between the rotor and the moving flexible support. The nonlinear periodic coefficient equations of motion are applicable to both coupled rotor/fuselage aeroelastic problems of helicopters in hover or forward flight and coupled rotor/tower dynamics of a large horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT). Finally, the equations of motion are used to study the influence of flexible supports and nonlinear terms on rotor aeroelastic stability and response of a large two-bladed HAWT.

  9. Development of Fully Coupled Aeroelastic and Hydrodynamic Models for Offshore Wind Turbines: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Jonkman, J. M.; Sclavounos, P. D.

    2006-01-01

    Aeroelastic simulation tools are routinely used to design and analyze onshore wind turbines, in order to obtain cost effective machines that achieve favorable performance while maintaining structural integrity. These tools employ sophisticated models of wind-inflow; aerodynamic, gravitational, and inertial loading of the rotor, nacelle, and tower; elastic effects within and between components; and mechanical actuation and electrical responses of the generator and of control and protection systems. For offshore wind turbines, additional models of the hydrodynamic loading in regular and irregular seas, the dynamic coupling between the support platform motions and wind turbine motions, and the dynamic characterization of mooring systems for compliant floating platforms are also important. Hydrodynamic loading includes contributions from hydrostatics, wave radiation, and wave scattering, including free surface memory effects. The integration of all of these models into comprehensive simulation tools, capable of modeling the fully coupled aeroelastic and hydrodynamic responses of floating offshore wind turbines, is presented.

  10. User's manual for the coupled mode version of the normal modes rotor aeroelastic analysis computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergquist, R. R.; Carlson, R. G.; Landgrebe, A. J.; Egolf, T. A.

    1974-01-01

    This User's Manual was prepared to provide the engineer with the information required to run the coupled mode version of the Normal Modes Rotor Aeroelastic Analysis Computer Program. The manual provides a full set of instructions for running the program, including calculation of blade modes, calculations of variable induced velocity distribution and the calculation of the time history of the response for either a single blade or a complete rotor with an airframe (the latter with constant inflow).

  11. An efficient procedure for cascade aeroelastic stability determination using nonlinear, time-marching aerodynamic solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahajan, Aparajit J.; Bakhle, Milind A.; Dowell, Earl H.

    1993-01-01

    A numerical eigenvalue problem formulation and a practical calculation procedure for exact eigenvalues and corresponding eigenvectors are developed and applied to a nonlinear, two-dimensional, time-marching full potential solver for cascade aeroelastic stability analysis. This procedure is based on the Lanczos recursive method and it directly calculates stability information about a nonlinear steady state. It is compared to conventional approaches in the frequency and time domains developed earlier and is found to be 100-10.000 times more computationally efficient. Eigenvalue constellations and the flutter results for flow through a cascade SR5 propfan airfoil are presented.

  12. Wing-Body Aeroelasticity on Parallel Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.; Byun, Chansup

    1996-01-01

    This article presents a procedure for computing the aeroelasticity of wing-body configurations on multiple-instruction, multiple-data parallel computers. In this procedure, fluids are modeled using Euler equations discretized by a finite difference method, and structures are modeled using finite element equations. The procedure is designed in such a way that each discipline can be developed and maintained independently by using a domain decomposition approach. A parallel integration scheme is used to compute aeroelastic responses by solving the coupled fluid and structural equations concurrently while keeping modularity of each discipline. The present procedure is validated by computing the aeroelastic response of a wing and comparing with experiment. Aeroelastic computations are illustrated for a high speed civil transport type wing-body configuration.

  13. Aeroelastic Analysis of Rotor Blades Using Cfd/csd Coupling in Hover Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Long; Wu, Yizhao; Xia, Jian

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is coupled with a computational structural dynamics (CSD) to simulate the unsteady rotor flow with aeroelasticity effects. An unstructured upwind Navier-Stokes solver was developed for this simulation, with 2nd order time-accurate dual-time stepping method for temporal discretization and low Mach number preconditioning method. For turbulent flows, both the Spalart-Allmaras and Menter's SST model are available. Mesh deformation is achieved through a fast dynamic grid method called Delaunay graph map method for unsteady flow simulation. The rotor blades are modeled as Hodges & Dowell's nonlinear beams coupled flap-lag-torsion. The rotorcraft computational structural dynamics code employs the 15-dof beam finite element formulation for modeling. The structure code was validated by comparing the natural frequencies of a rotor model with UMARC. The flow and structure codes are coupled tightly with information exchange several times at every time step. A rotor blade model's unsteady flow field in the hover mode is simulated using the coupling method. Effect of blade elasticity with aerodynamic loads was compared with rigid blade.

  14. Static Aeroelastic and Longitudinal Trim Model of Flexible Wing Aircraft Using Finite-Element Vortex-Lattice Coupled Solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, Eric; Nguyen, Nhan; Trinh, Khanh

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a static aeroelastic model and longitudinal trim model for the analysis of a flexible wing transport aircraft. The static aeroelastic model is built using a structural model based on finite-element modeling and coupled to an aerodynamic model that uses vortex-lattice solution. An automatic geometry generation tool is used to close the loop between the structural and aerodynamic models. The aeroelastic model is extended for the development of a three degree-of-freedom longitudinal trim model for an aircraft with flexible wings. The resulting flexible aircraft longitudinal trim model is used to simultaneously compute the static aeroelastic shape for the aircraft model and the longitudinal state inputs to maintain an aircraft trim state. The framework is applied to an aircraft model based on the NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM) with wing structures allowed to flexibly deformed referred to as the Elastically Shaped Aircraft Concept (ESAC). The ESAC wing mass and stiffness properties are based on a baseline "stiff" values representative of current generation transport aircraft.

  15. Time-accurate aeroelastic simulations of a wind turbine in yaw and shear using a coupled CFD-CSD method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, D. O.; Kwon, O. J.

    2014-06-01

    In the present study, aeroelastic simulations of horizontal-axis wind turbine rotor blades were conducted using a coupled CFD-CSD method. The unsteady blade aerodynamic loads and the dynamic blade response due to yaw misalignment and non-uniform sheared wind were investigated. For this purpose, a CFD code solving the RANS equations on unstructured meshes and a FEM-based CSD beam solver were used. The coupling of the CFD and CSD solvers was made by exchanging the data between the two solvers in a loosely coupled manner. The present coupled CFD-CSD method was applied to the NREL 5MW reference wind turbine rotor, and the results were compared with those of CFD-alone rigid blade calculations. It was found that aeroelastic blade deformation leads to a significant reduction of blade aerodynamic loads, and alters the unsteady load behaviours, mainly due to the torsional deformation. The reduction of blade aerodynamic loads is particularly significant at the advancing rotor blade side for yawed flow conditions, and at the upper half of rotor disk where wind velocity is higher due to wind shear.

  16. Aeroelastic effects in multirotor vehicles. Part 2: Methods of solution and results illustrating coupled rotor/body aeromechanical stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatesan, C.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1987-01-01

    This report is a sequel to the earlier report titled, Aeroelastic Effects in Multi-Rotor Vehicles with Application to Hybrid Heavy Lift System, Part 1: Formulation of Equations of Motion (NASA CR-3822). The trim and stability equations are presented for a twin rotor system with a buoyant envelope and an underslung load attached to a flexible supporting structure. These equations are specialized for the case of hovering flight. A stability analysis, for such a vehicle with 31 degrees of freedom, yields a total of 62 eigenvalues. A careful parametric study is performed to identify the various blade and vehicle modes, as well as the coupling between various modes. Finally, it is shown that the coupled rotor/vehicle stability analysis provides information on both the aeroelastic stability as well as complete vehicle dynamic stability. Also presented are the results of an analytical study aimed at predicting the aeromechanical stability of a single rotor helicopter in ground resonance. The theoretical results are found to be in good agreement with the experimental results, thereby validating the analytical model for the dynamics of the coupled rotor/support system.

  17. Aeroelastic response and stability of tiltrotors with elastically-coupled composite rotor blades. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, Mark W.

    1993-01-01

    There is a potential for improving the performance and aeroelastic stability of tiltrotors through the use of elastically-coupled composite rotor blades. To study the characteristics of tiltrotors with these types of rotor blades it is necessary to formulate a new analysis which has the capabilities of modeling both a tiltrotor configuration and an anisotropic rotor blade. Background for these formulations is established in two preliminary investigations. In the first, the influence of several system design parameters on tiltrotor aeroelastic stability is examined for the high-speed axial flight mode using a newly-developed rigid-blade analysis with an elastic wing finite element model. The second preliminary investigation addresses the accuracy of using a one-dimensional beam analysis to predict frequencies of elastically-coupled highly-twisted rotor blades. Important aspects of the new aeroelastic formulations are the inclusion of a large steady pylon angle which controls tilt of the rotor system with respect to the airflow, the inclusion of elastic pitch-lag coupling terms related to rotor precone, the inclusion of hub-related degrees of freedom which enable modeling of a gimballed rotor system and engine drive-train dynamics, and additional elastic coupling terms which enable modeling of the anisotropic features for both the rotor blades and the tiltrotor wing. Accuracy of the new tiltrotor analysis is demonstrated by a comparison of the results produced for a baseline case with analytical and experimental results reported in the open literature. Two investigations of elastically tailored blades on a baseline tiltrotor are then conducted. One investigation shows that elastic bending-twist coupling of the rotor blade is a very effective means for increasing the flutter velocity of a tiltrotor, and the magnitude of coupling required does not have an adverse effect on performance or blade loads. The second investigation shows that passive blade twist control via

  18. Coupled Vortex-Lattice Flight Dynamic Model with Aeroelastic Finite-Element Model of Flexible Wing Transport Aircraft with Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap for Drag Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Ting, Eric; Nguyen, Daniel; Dao, Tung; Trinh, Khanh

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a coupled vortex-lattice flight dynamic model with an aeroelastic finite-element model to predict dynamic characteristics of a flexible wing transport aircraft. The aircraft model is based on NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM) with representative mass and stiffness properties to achieve a wing tip deflection about twice that of a conventional transport aircraft (10% versus 5%). This flexible wing transport aircraft is referred to as an Elastically Shaped Aircraft Concept (ESAC) which is equipped with a Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap (VCCTEF) system for active wing shaping control for drag reduction. A vortex-lattice aerodynamic model of the ESAC is developed and is coupled with an aeroelastic finite-element model via an automated geometry modeler. This coupled model is used to compute static and dynamic aeroelastic solutions. The deflection information from the finite-element model and the vortex-lattice model is used to compute unsteady contributions to the aerodynamic force and moment coefficients. A coupled aeroelastic-longitudinal flight dynamic model is developed by coupling the finite-element model with the rigid-body flight dynamic model of the GTM.

  19. Coupled aeroelastic oscillations of a turbine blade row in 3D transonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnesin, Vitaly; Kolodyazhnaya, Lyubov; Rzadkowski, Romuald

    2001-10-01

    This paper presents the mutual time - marching method to predict the aeroelastic stability of an oscillating blade row in 3D transonic flow. The ideal gas flow through a blade row is governed by the time dependent Euler equations in conservative form which are integrated by using the explicit monotonous second order accurate Godunov-Kolgan finite volume scheme and moving hybrid H-O grid. The structure analysis uses the modal approach and 3D finite element dynamic model of blade. The blade movement is assumed as a linear combination of the first modes of blade natural oscillations with the modal coefficients depending on time. To demonstrate the capability and correctness of the method, two experimentally investigated test cases have been selected, in which the blades had performed tuned harmonic bending or torsional vibrations (The 1st and 4th standard configurations of the “Workshop on Aeroelasticity in Turbomachines” by Bolcs and Fransson, 1986). The calculated results of aeroelastic behaviour of the blade row (4th standard configuration), are presented over a wide frequency range under different start regimes of interblade phase angle.

  20. Coupled finite-difference/finite-element approach for wing-body aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.

    1992-01-01

    Computational methods using finite-difference approaches for fluids and finite-element approaches for structures have individually advanced to solve almost full-aircraft configurations. However, coupled approaches to solve fluid/structural interaction problems are still in their early stages of development, particularly for complex geometries using complete equations such as the Euler/Navier-Stokes equations. Earlier work demonstrated the success of coupling finite-difference and finite-element methods for simple wing configurations using the Euler/Navier-Stokes equations. In this paper, the same approach is extended for general wing-body configurations. The structural properties are represented by beam-type finite elements. The flow is modeled using the Euler/Navier-Stokes equations. A general procedure to fully couple structural finite-element boundary conditions with fluid finite-difference boundary conditions is developed for wing-body configurations. Computations are made using moving grids that adapt to wing-body structural deformations. Results are illustrated for a typical wing-body configuration.

  1. Wing-Body Aeroelasticity Using Finite-Difference Fluid/Finite-Element Structural Equations on Parallel Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byun, Chansup; Guruswamy, Guru P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a procedure for computing the aeroelasticity of wing-body configurations on multiple-instruction, multiple-data (MIMD) parallel computers. In this procedure, fluids are modeled using Euler equations discretized by a finite difference method, and structures are modeled using finite element equations. The procedure is designed in such a way that each discipline can be developed and maintained independently by using a domain decomposition approach. A parallel integration scheme is used to compute aeroelastic responses by solving the coupled fluid and structural equations concurrently while keeping modularity of each discipline. The present procedure is validated by computing the aeroelastic response of a wing and comparing with experiment. Aeroelastic computations are illustrated for a High Speed Civil Transport type wing-body configuration.

  2. Understanding the Potential of Aeroelastic Couplings to Stabilize Ground and Air Resonance in a Soft-Inplane Tiltrotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Anna K. T.

    1999-01-01

    The tiltrotor offers the best mix of hovering and cruise flight of any of the current V/STOL configurations. One possible improvement on the tiltrotors of today designs would be using a soft-inplane hingeless hub. The advantages to a soft-inplane hingeless hub range from reduced weight and maintenance to reduced vibration and loads. However, soft-inplane rotor systems are inherently in danger of the aeromechanical instabilities of ground and air resonance. Furthermore tiltrotors can be subject to whirl flutter. At least in part because of the potential for air and ground resonance in a soft-inplane rotor, the Bell XV-15, the Bell-Boeing V-22 Osprey, and the new Bell Augusta 609 have stiff-inplane, gimballed rotors which do not experience these instabilities. In order to design soft-inplane V/STOL aircraft that do not experience ground or air resonance, it is important to be able to predict these instabilities accurately. Much of the research studying the stability of tiltrotors has been focused on the understanding and prediction of whirl flutter. As this instability is increasingly well understood, air and ground resonance for a tiltrotor need to be investigated. Once we understand the problems of air and ground resonance in a tiltrotor, we must look for solutions to these instabilities. Other researchers have found composite or kinematic couplings in the blades of a helicopter helpful for ground and air resonance stability. Tiltrotor research has shown composite couplings in the wing to be helpful for whirl flutter. Therefore, this project will undertake to model ground and air resonance of a soft-inplane hingeless tiltrotor to understand the mechanisms involved and to evaluate whether aeroelastic couplings in the wing or kinematic couplings in the blades would aid in stabilizing these instabilities in a tiltrotor.

  3. Development of a coupled fluid/structure aeroelastic solver with applications to vortex breakdown-induced twin tail buffeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Steven James

    Simulation of tail buffet is studied for several delta wing-vertical tail configurations. Flow conditions are chosen such that the wing primary-vortex cores experience vortex breakdown and the resulting turbulent wake flow impinges on the vertical tail. The dimensions and material properties of the vertical tails are chosen such that the deflections are large enough to insure interaction with the flow, and the natural frequencies are high enough to facilitate a practical computational solution. This multi-disciplinary problem is solved sequentially for the fluid flow, the elastic deformations and the grid displacements. The flow is simulated by time accurately solving the laminar, unsteady, compressible, Navier-Stokes equations using an implicit, upwind, flux-difference splitting, finite volume scheme. The elastic vibrations of the tail are modeled by coupled bending and torsion beam equations. These equations are solved accurately in time using the Galerkin method and a five-stage, Runge-Kutta-Verner scheme. The grid for the fluid dynamics calculations is continuously deformed using interpolation functions to smoothly disperse the displacements throughout the computational domain. Tail buffet problems are solved for single tail cases, twin F/A-18 tail cases and twin highly swept generic tail cases. The use of an apex flap for buffet control is also computationally studied. The results demonstrate the effects of inertial structural coupling, Reynolds number, aft fuselage geometry and spanwise tail location on the tail buffet loads and response. Favorable comparisons with experimental data indicate that the present aeroelastic method is well suited to providing qualitative insight into the tail buffet problem, as well as quantitative data for refined long duration simulations.

  4. Development of a Rotor-Body Coupled Analysis for an Active Mount Aeroelastic Rotor Testbed. Degree awarded by George Washington Univ., May 1996

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, Matthew L.

    1998-01-01

    At the Langley Research Center an active mount rotorcraft testbed is being developed for use in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. This testbed, the second generation version of the Aeroelastic Rotor Experimental System (ARES-II), can impose rotor hub motions and measure the response so that rotor-body coupling phenomena may be investigated. An analytical method for coupling an aeroelastically scaled model rotor system to the ARES-II is developed in the current study. Models of the testbed and the rotor system are developed in independent analyses, and an impedance-matching approach is used to couple the rotor system to the testbed. The development of the analytical models and the coupling method is examined, and individual and coupled results are presented for the testbed and rotor system. Coupled results are presented with and without applied hub motion, and system loads and displacements are examined. The results show that a closed-loop control system is necessary to achieve desired hub motions, that proper modeling requires including the loads at the rotor hub and rotor control system, and that the strain-gauge balance placed in the rotating system of the ARES-II provided the best loads results.

  5. Procedural Concerns in Couple Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atwood, Joan D.; Meyer, George

    This document presents a theoretical approach to couple counseling, a systemic approach which views each spouse as having a personal and relationship history that transcends the present marital one. It notes that this approach views a person's life style along two dimensions: the first dimension examines the person's relational experiences at the…

  6. Aeroelastic System Development Using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition and Volterra Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucia, David J.; Beran, Philip S.; Silva, Walter A.

    2003-01-01

    This research combines Volterra theory and proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) into a hybrid methodology for reduced-order modeling of aeroelastic systems. The out-come of the method is a set of linear ordinary differential equations (ODEs) describing the modal amplitudes associated with both the structural modes and the POD basis functions for the uid. For this research, the structural modes are sine waves of varying frequency, and the Volterra-POD approach is applied to the fluid dynamics equations. The structural modes are treated as forcing terms which are impulsed as part of the uid model realization. Using this approach, structural and uid operators are coupled into a single aeroelastic operator. This coupling converts a free boundary uid problem into an initial value problem, while preserving the parameter (or parameters) of interest for sensitivity analysis. The approach is applied to an elastic panel in supersonic cross ow. The hybrid Volterra-POD approach provides a low-order uid model in state-space form. The linear uid model is tightly coupled with a nonlinear panel model using an implicit integration scheme. The resulting aeroelastic model provides correct limit-cycle oscillation prediction over a wide range of panel dynamic pressure values. Time integration of the reduced-order aeroelastic model is four orders of magnitude faster than the high-order solution procedure developed for this research using traditional uid and structural solvers.

  7. Computational Aeroelasticity: Success, Progress, Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, David M.; Liu, Danny D.; Huttsell, Lawrence J.

    2003-01-01

    The formal term Computational Aeroelasticity (CAE) has only been recently adopted to describe aeroelastic analysis methods coupling high-level computational fluid dynamics codes with structural dynamics techniques. However, the general field of aeroelastic computations has enjoyed a rich history of development and application since the first hand-calculations performed in the mid 1930 s. This paper portrays a much broader definition of Computational Aeroelasticity; one that encompasses all levels of aeroelastic computation from the simplest linear aerodynamic modeling to the highest levels of viscous unsteady aerodynamics, from the most basic linear beam structural models to state-of-the-art Finite Element Model (FEM) structural analysis. This paper is not written as a comprehensive history of CAE, but rather serves to review the development and application of aeroelastic analysis methods. It describes techniques and example applications that are viewed as relatively mature and accepted, the "successes" of CAE. Cases where CAE has been successfully applied to unique or emerging problems, but the resulting techniques have proven to be one-of-a-kind analyses or areas where the techniques have yet to evolve into a routinely applied methodology are covered as "progress" in CAE. Finally the true value of this paper is rooted in the description of problems where CAE falls short in its ability to provide relevant tools for industry, the so-called "challenges" to CAE.

  8. Rotorcraft aeroelastic stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormiston, Robert A.; Warmbrodt, William G.; Hodges, Dewey H.; Peters, David A.

    1988-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental developments in the aeroelastic and aeromechanical stability of helicopters and tilt-rotor aircraft are addressed. Included are the underlying nonlinear structural mechanics of slender rotating beams, necessary for accurate modeling of elastic cantilever rotor blades, and the development of dynamic inflow, an unsteady aerodynamic theory for low-frequency aeroelastic stability applications. Analytical treatment of isolated rotor stability in hover and forward flight, coupled rotor-fuselage stability in hover and forward flight, and analysis of tilt-rotor dynamic stability are considered. Results of parametric investigations of system behavior are presented, and correlation between theoretical results and experimental data from small and large scale wind tunnel and flight testing are discussed.

  9. Implementation of a Forth-Order Aeroelastic Coupling into a Viscous-Inviscid Flow Solver with Experimental Validation (for One Degree of Freedom)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholomay, Sirko; Ramos-García, Néstor; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming; Technical University of Denmark (DTU)-WInd Energy Team

    2014-11-01

    The viscous-inviscid flow solver Q3UIC for 2D aerodynamics has recently been developed at the Technical University of Denmark. The Q3UIC solver takes viscous and unsteady effects into account by coupling an unsteady inviscid panel method with the integral boundary layer equations by means of a strong coupling between the viscous and inviscid parts, and in this respect differs from other classic panel codes e.g. Xfoil. In the current work a Runge-Kutta-Nyström scheme was employed to couple inertial, elastic and aerodynamical forces and moments calculated by Q3UIC for a two-dimensional blade section in the time-domain. Numerical simulations are validated by a three step experimental verification process carried out in the low-turbulence wind tunnel at DTU. First, a comparison against steady experiments for a NACA 64418 profile and a flexible trailing edge flap is presented for different fixed flap angles, and second, the measured aerodynamic characteristics considering prescribed motion of the airfoil with a moving flap are compared to the Q3UIC predictions. Finally, an aeroelastic experiment for one degree of freedom-airfoil pitching- is used to evaluate the accuracy of aeroelastic coupling.

  10. Static aeroelastic analysis of wings using Euler/Navier-Stokes equations coupled with improved wing-box finite element structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.; MacMurdy, Dale E.; Kapania, Rakesh K.

    1994-01-01

    Strong interactions between flow about an aircraft wing and the wing structure can result in aeroelastic phenomena which significantly impact aircraft performance. Time-accurate methods for solving the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations have matured to the point where reliable results can be obtained with reasonable computational costs for complex non-linear flows with shock waves, vortices and separations. The ability to combine such a flow solver with a general finite element structural model is key to an aeroelastic analysis in these flows. Earlier work involved time-accurate integration of modal structural models based on plate elements. A finite element model was developed to handle three-dimensional wing boxes, and incorporated into the flow solver without the need for modal analysis. Static condensation is performed on the structural model to reduce the structural degrees of freedom for the aeroelastic analysis. Direct incorporation of the finite element wing-box structural model with the flow solver requires finding adequate methods for transferring aerodynamic pressures to the structural grid and returning deflections to the aerodynamic grid. Several schemes were explored for handling the grid-to-grid transfer of information. The complex, built-up nature of the wing-box complicated this transfer. Aeroelastic calculations for a sample wing in transonic flow comparing various simple transfer schemes are presented and discussed.

  11. Aeroelastic stability of coupled flap-lag motion of hingeless helicopter blades at arbitrary advance ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, P.; Silverthorn, L. J.

    1974-01-01

    Equations for large amplitude coupled flap-lag motion of a hingeless elastic helicopter blade in forward flight are derived. Only a torsionally rigid blade excited by quasi-steady aerodynamic loads is considered. The effects of reversed flow together with some new terms due to radial flow are included. Using Galerkin's method the spatial dependence is eliminated and the equations are linearized about a suitable equilibrium position. The resulting system of homogeneous periodic equations is solved using multivariable Floquet-Liapunov theory, and the transition matrix at the end of the period is evaluated by two separate methods. Computational efficiency of the two numerical methods is compared. Results illustrating the effects of forward flight and various important blade parameters on the stability boundaries are presented.

  12. An Aeroelastic Analysis of a Thin Flexible Membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Robert C.; Bartels, Robert E.; Kandil, Osama A.

    2007-01-01

    Studies have shown that significant vehicle mass and cost savings are possible with the use of ballutes for aero-capture. Through NASA's In-Space Propulsion program, a preliminary examination of ballute sensitivity to geometry and Reynolds number was conducted, and a single-pass coupling between an aero code and a finite element solver was used to assess the static aeroelastic effects. There remain, however, a variety of open questions regarding the dynamic aeroelastic stability of membrane structures for aero-capture, with the primary challenge being the prediction of the membrane flutter onset. The purpose of this paper is to describe and begin addressing these issues. The paper includes a review of the literature associated with the structural analysis of membranes and membrane utter. Flow/structure analysis coupling and hypersonic flow solver options are also discussed. An approach is proposed for tackling this problem that starts with a relatively simple geometry and develops and evaluates analysis methods and procedures. This preliminary study considers a computationally manageable 2-dimensional problem. The membrane structural models used in the paper include a nonlinear finite-difference model for static and dynamic analysis and a NASTRAN finite element membrane model for nonlinear static and linear normal modes analysis. Both structural models are coupled with a structured compressible flow solver for static aeroelastic analysis. For dynamic aeroelastic analyses, the NASTRAN normal modes are used in the structured compressible flow solver and 3rd order piston theories were used with the finite difference membrane model to simulate utter onset. Results from the various static and dynamic aeroelastic analyses are compared.

  13. A closed loop experiment of collective bounce aeroelastic Rotorcraft-Pilot Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masarati, Pierangelo; Quaranta, Giuseppe; Lu, Linghai; Jump, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This work presents an experimental study that investigated the possibility of destabilising a rotorcraft by coupling the biomechanical behaviour of human subjects with the dynamics of the vehicle. The results of a study focused on the behaviour of pilots holding the collective control inceptor in a flight simulator are discussed. The motion of the flight simulation model was restricted to the heave axis, and augmented to include an elastic mode of vibration in addition to the rigid heave degree of freedom. Four different pilots flew several alternative model configurations with different elastic mode frequency and different collective pitch gearing ratios. This resulted in several observable unstable pilot-vehicle interactions at frequencies that cannot be traced back to the rotorcraft dynamics. Unstable oscillatory events evolving into limit cycle oscillations occurred most often at frequencies related to the biomechanics of the flight simulator occupant. They appeared to be task dependent and, in some cases, the trigger could be attributed to specific events. Additionally, it was found that the presence of collective friction alleviates but does not completely eliminate the unstable interactions between the pilot and the rotorcraft. Although not statistically meaningful because of the small set of human subjects available for the study, the results confirmed that the biomechanics transfer function of the pilot is the most influential aspect of the pilot-vehicle system that gives rise to the adverse vertical bounce phenomenon. Additionally, this study gave useful insight into the vehicle parameters that can adversely influence the involuntary interaction of pilots with rotorcraft.

  14. Aeroelasticity Benchmark Assessment: Subsonic Fixed Wing Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florance, Jennifer P.; Chwalowski, Pawel; Wieseman, Carol D.

    2010-01-01

    The fundamental technical challenge in computational aeroelasticity is the accurate prediction of unsteady aerodynamic phenomena and the effect on the aeroelastic response of a vehicle. Currently, a benchmarking standard for use in validating the accuracy of computational aeroelasticity codes does not exist. Many aeroelastic data sets have been obtained in wind-tunnel and flight testing throughout the world; however, none have been globally presented or accepted as an ideal data set. There are numerous reasons for this. One reason is that often, such aeroelastic data sets focus on the aeroelastic phenomena alone (flutter, for example) and do not contain associated information such as unsteady pressures and time-correlated structural dynamic deflections. Other available data sets focus solely on the unsteady pressures and do not address the aeroelastic phenomena. Other discrepancies can include omission of relevant data, such as flutter frequency and / or the acquisition of only qualitative deflection data. In addition to these content deficiencies, all of the available data sets present both experimental and computational technical challenges. Experimental issues include facility influences, nonlinearities beyond those being modeled, and data processing. From the computational perspective, technical challenges include modeling geometric complexities, coupling between the flow and the structure, grid issues, and boundary conditions. The Aeroelasticity Benchmark Assessment task seeks to examine the existing potential experimental data sets and ultimately choose the one that is viewed as the most suitable for computational benchmarking. An initial computational evaluation of that configuration will then be performed using the Langley-developed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software FUN3D1 as part of its code validation process. In addition to the benchmarking activity, this task also includes an examination of future research directions. Researchers within the

  15. Aeroelastic characteristics of composite bearingless rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielawa, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    Owing to the inherent unique structural features of composite bearingless rotors, various assumptions upon which conventional rotor aeroelastic analyses are formulated, are violated. Three such features identified are highly nonlinear and time-varying structural twist, structural redundancy in bending and torsion, and for certain configurations a strongly coupled low frequency bending-torsion mode. An examination of these aeroelastic considerations and appropriate formulations required for accurate analyses of such rotor systems is presented. Also presented are test results from a dynamically scaled model rotor and complementary analytic results obtained with the appropriately reformulated aeroelastic analysis.

  16. Computational aeroelastic analysis of aircraft wings including geometry nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Binyu

    The objective of the present study is to show the ability of solving fluid structural interaction problems more realistically by including the geometric nonlinearity of the structure so that the aeroelastic analysis can be extended into the onset of flutter, or in the post flutter regime. A nonlinear Finite Element Analysis software is developed based on second Piola-Kirchhoff stress and Green-Lagrange strain. The second Piola-Kirchhoff stress and Green-Lagrange strain is a pair of energetically conjugated tensors that can accommodate arbitrary large structural deformations and deflection, to study the flutter phenomenon. Since both of these tensors are objective tensors, i.e., the rigid-body motion has no contribution to their components, the movement of the body, including maneuvers and deformation, can be included. The nonlinear Finite Element Analysis software developed in this study is verified with ANSYS, NASTRAN, ABAQUS, and IDEAS for the linear static, nonlinear static, linear dynamic and nonlinear dynamic structural solutions. To solve the flow problems by Euler/Navier equations, the current nonlinear structural software is then embedded into ENSAERO, which is an aeroelastic analysis software package developed at NASA Ames Research Center. The coupling of the two software, both nonlinear in their own field, is achieved by domain decomposition method first proposed by Guruswamy. A procedure has been set for the aeroelastic analysis process. The aeroelastic analysis results have been obtained for fight wing in the transonic regime for various cases. The influence dynamic pressure on flutter has been checked for a range of Mach number. Even though the current analysis matches the general aeroelastic characteristic, the numerical value not match very well with previous studies and needs farther investigations. The flutter aeroelastic analysis results have also been plotted at several time points. The influences of the deforming wing geometry can be well seen

  17. Rotary-wing aeroelasticity with application to VTOL vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, Peretz P.

    1993-01-01

    A concise assessment is presented of the state of the art in the field of rotary-wing aeroelasticity (RWE). The basic ingredients of RWE are reviewed, including structural modeling, unsteady aerodynamic modeling, formulation of the equations of motion, and solution methods. Results illustrating these methods are presented for isolated blades and coupled rotor-fuselage problems. The application of active controls to suppress aeromechanical and aeroelastic instabilities and to reduce vibration in rotorcraft is discussed. Structural optimization with aeroelastic constraints, gust response analysis of helicopters, and aeroelastic problems in special VTOL vehicles are briefly examined.

  18. A Taguchi study of the aeroelastic tailoring design process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohlmann, Jonathan D.; Scott, Robert C.

    1991-01-01

    A Taguchi study was performed to determine the important players in the aeroelastic tailoring design process and to find the best composition of the optimization's objective function. The Wing Aeroelastic Synthesis Procedure (TSO) was used to ascertain the effects that factors such as composite laminate constraints, roll effectiveness constraints, and built-in wing twist and camber have on the optimum, aeroelastically tailored wing skin design. The results show the Taguchi method to be a viable engineering tool for computational inquiries, and provide some valuable lessons about the practice of aeroelastic tailoring.

  19. Studies in hypersonic aeroelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nydick, Ira Harvey

    2000-11-01

    This dissertation describes the aeroelastic analysis of a generic hypersonic vehicle, focusing on two specific problems: (1) hypersonic panel flutter, and (2) aeroelastic behavior of a complete unrestrained generic hypersonic vehicle operating at very high Mach numbers. The panels are modeled as shallow shells using Marguerre nonlinear shallow shell theory for orthotropic panels and the aerodynamic loads are obtained from third order piston theory. Two models of curvature, several applied temperature distributions, and the presence of a shock are also included in the model. Results indicate that the flutter speed of the panel is significantly reduced by temperature variations comparable to the buckling temperature and by the presence of a shock. A panel with initial curvature can be more stable than the flat panel but the increase in stability depends in a complex way on the material properties of the panel and the amount of curvature. At values of dynamic pressure above critical, aperiodic motion was observed. The value of dynamic pressure for which this occurs in both heated panels and curved panels is much closer to the critical dynamic pressure than for the flat, unheated panel. A comparison of piston theory aerodynamics and Euler and Navier-Stokes aerodynamics was performed for a two dimensional panel with prescribed motion and the results indicate that while 2nd or higher order piston theory agrees very well with the Euler solution for the frequencies seen in hypersonic panel flutter, it differs substantially from the Navier-Stokes solution. The aeroelastic behavior of the complete vehicle was simulated using the unrestrained equations of motion, utilizing the method of quasi-coordinates. The unrestrained mode shapes of the vehicle were obtained from an equivalent plate analysis using an available code (ELAPS). The effects of flexible trim and rigid body degrees of freedom are carefully incorporated in the mathematical model. This model was applied to a

  20. Modeling and Analysis of Composite Wing Sections for Improved Aeroelastic and Vibration Characteristics Using Smart Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Aditi

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop analysis procedures to investigate the coupling of composite and smart materials to improve aeroelastic and vibratory response of aerospace structures. The structural modeling must account for arbitrarily thick geometries, embedded and surface bonded sensors and actuators and imperfections, such as delamination. Changes in the dynamic response due to the presence of smart materials and delaminations is investigated. Experiments are to be performed to validate the proposed mathematical model.

  1. Unsteady Aerodynamic Validation Experiences From the Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heeg, Jennifer; Chawlowski, Pawel

    2014-01-01

    The AIAA Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop (AePW) was held in April 2012, bringing together communities of aeroelasticians, computational fluid dynamicists and experimentalists. The extended objective was to assess the state of the art in computational aeroelastic methods as practical tools for the prediction of static and dynamic aeroelastic phenomena. As a step in this process, workshop participants analyzed unsteady aerodynamic and weakly-coupled aeroelastic cases. Forced oscillation and unforced system experiments and computations have been compared for three configurations. This paper emphasizes interpretation of the experimental data, computational results and their comparisons from the perspective of validation of unsteady system predictions. The issues examined in detail are variability introduced by input choices for the computations, post-processing, and static aeroelastic modeling. The final issue addressed is interpreting unsteady information that is present in experimental data that is assumed to be steady, and the resulting consequences on the comparison data sets.

  2. Role of HPC in Advancing Computational Aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.

    2004-01-01

    On behalf of the High Performance Computing and Modernization Program (HPCMP) and NASA Advanced Supercomputing Division (NAS) a study is conducted to assess the role of supercomputers on computational aeroelasticity of aerospace vehicles. The study is mostly based on the responses to a web based questionnaire that was designed to capture the nuances of high performance computational aeroelasticity, particularly on parallel computers. A procedure is presented to assign a fidelity-complexity index to each application. Case studies based on major applications using HPCMP resources are presented.

  3. Airloads, wakes, and aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wayne

    1990-01-01

    Fundamental considerations regarding the theory of modeling of rotary wing airloads, wakes, and aeroelasticity are presented. The topics covered are: airloads and wakes, including lifting-line theory, wake models and nonuniform inflow, free wake geometry, and blade-vortex interaction; aerodynamic and wake models for aeroelasticity, including two-dimensional unsteady aerodynamics and dynamic inflow; and airloads and structural dynamics, including comprehensive airload prediction programs. Results of calculations and correlations are presented.

  4. Coupling procedure for TRANSURANUS and KTF codes

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, J.; Alglave, S.; Avramova, M.

    2012-07-01

    The nuclear industry aims to ensure safe and economic operation of each single fuel rod introduced in the reactor core. This goal is even more challenging nowadays due to the current strategy of going for higher burn-up (fuel cycles of 18 or 24 months) and longer residence time. In order to achieve that goal, fuel modeling is the key to predict the fuel rod behavior and lifetime under thermal and pressure loads, corrosion and irradiation. In this context, fuel performance codes, such as TRANSURANUS, are used to improve the fuel rod design. The modeling capabilities of the above mentioned tools can be significantly improved if they are coupled with a thermal-hydraulic code in order to have a better description of the flow conditions within the rod bundle. For LWR applications, a good representation of the two phase flow within the fuel assembly is necessary in order to have a best estimate calculation of the heat transfer inside the bundle. In this paper we present the coupling methodology of TRANSURANUS with KTF (Karlsruhe Two phase Flow subchannel code) as well as selected results of the coupling proof of principle. (authors)

  5. Computational Aeroelastic Analysis of the Ares Launch Vehicle During Ascent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert E.; Chwalowski, Pawel; Massey, Steven J.; Vatsa, Veer N.; Heeg, Jennifer; Wieseman, Carol D.; Mineck, Raymond E.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the static and dynamic computational aeroelastic (CAE) analyses of the Ares crew launch vehicle (CLV) during atmospheric ascent. The influence of launch vehicle flexibility on the static aerodynamic loading and integrated aerodynamic force and moment coefficients is discussed. The ultimate purpose of this analysis is to assess the aeroelastic stability of the launch vehicle along the ascent trajectory. A comparison of analysis results for several versions of the Ares CLV will be made. Flexible static and dynamic analyses based on rigid computational fluid dynamic (CFD) data are compared with a fully coupled aeroelastic time marching CFD analysis of the launch vehicle.

  6. Helicopter rotor dynamics and aeroelasticity - Some key ideas and insights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, Peretz P.

    1990-01-01

    Four important current topics in helicopter rotor dynamics and aeroelasticity are discussed: (1) the role of geometric nonlinearities in rotary-wing aeroelasticity; (2) structural modeling, free vibration, and aeroelastic analysis of composite rotor blades; (3) modeling of coupled rotor/fuselage areomechanical problems and their active control; and (4) use of higher-harmonic control for vibration reduction in helicopter rotors in forward flight. The discussion attempts to provide an improved fundamental understanding of the current state of the art. In this way, future research can be focused on problems which remain to be solved instead of producing marginal improvements on problems which are already understood.

  7. Aeroelastic Analysis for Aeropropulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Bakhle, Milind A.

    2002-01-01

    Aeroelastic codes with advanced capabilities for modeling flow require substantial computational time. On the other hand, fast-running linear aeroelastic codes lack the capability to model three-dimensional, transonic, vortical, and viscous flows. The goal of this work was to develop an aeroelastic code with accurate modeling capabilities and small computational requirements.

  8. Aeroelastic Analysis of Modern Complex Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapania, Rakesh K.; Bhardwaj, Manoj K.; Reichenbach, Eric; Guruswamy, Guru P.

    1996-01-01

    A process is presented by which aeroelastic analysis is performed by using an advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code coupled with an advanced computational structural dynamics (CSD) code. The process is demonstrated on an F/A-18 Stabilator using NASTD (an in-house McDonnell Douglas Aerospace East CFD code) coupled with NASTRAN. The process is also demonstrated on an aeroelastic research wing (ARW-2) using ENSAERO (an in-house NASA Ames Research Center CFD code) coupled with a finite element wing-box structures code. Good results have been obtained for the F/A-18 Stabilator while results for the ARW-2 supercritical wing are still being obtained.

  9. A study of modal coupling procedures for the space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldenberg, S.; Shapiro, M.

    1972-01-01

    Various procedures for analytically coupling two or more substructures to obtain modal data for assembly, using data obtained from mode surveys of the individual components are discussed. Particular attention was paid to the applicability of the techniques investigated to the space shuttle, with the possible replacement of full scale mode surveys of the shuttle assembly by component mode surveys along with analytical coupling. The synthesis procedures formulated in this report can all handle redundant connections, although the presence of redundancies does add complication to one of the techniques. All of the procedures use the test data directly, without going through an intermediate analytical model, and no analytical stiffness data is required to supplement the mode survey data. The coupling precedures were initially verified and evaluated by applying them to analytical check problems.

  10. Localization of aeroelastic modes in mistuned high-energy turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre, Christophe; Smith, Todd E.; Murthy, Durbha V.

    1994-05-01

    The effects of blade mistuning on the aeroelastic vibration characteristics of high-energy turbines are investigated, using the first stage of the oxidizer turbopump in the Space Shuttle main rocket engine as an example. A modal aeroelastic analysis procedure is used in concert with a linearized unsteady aerodynamic theory that accounts for the effects of blade thickness, camber, and steady loading. High sensitivity of the dynamic characteristics of mistuned rotors is demonstrated. In particular, the aeroelastic free vibration modes become localized to a few blades, possibly leading to rogue blade failure, and the locus of the aeroelastic eigenvalues loses its regular structure when small mistuning (of the order usually present in actual rotors) is introduced. Perturbation analyses that yield physical insights into these phenomena are presented. A powerful but easily calculated stochastic sensitivity measure that allows the global prediction of mistuning effects is developed.

  11. Full potential unsteady computations including aeroelastic effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shankar, Vijaya; Ide, Hiroshi

    1989-01-01

    A unified formulation is presented based on the full potential framework coupled with an appropriate structural model to compute steady and unsteady flows over rigid and flexible configurations across the Mach number range. The unsteady form of the full potential equation in conservation form is solved using an implicit scheme maintaining time accuracy through internal Newton iterations. A flux biasing procedure based on the unsteady sonic reference conditions is implemented to compute hyperbolic regions with moving sonic and shock surfaces. The wake behind a trailing edge is modeled using a mathematical cut across which the pressure is satisfied to be continuous by solving an appropriate vorticity convection equation. An aeroelastic model based on the generalized modal deflection approach interacts with the nonlinear aerodynamics and includes both static as well as dynamic structural analyses capability. Results are presented for rigid and flexible configurations at different Mach numbers ranging from subsonic to supersonic conditions. The dynamic response of a flexible wing below and above its flutter point is demonstrated.

  12. Experimental and theoretical studies in nonlinear aeroelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attar, Peter Joseph

    Experimental and theoretical studies are conducted in the field of nonlinear aeroelasticity. Specifically two aeroelastic configurations, a flapping flag and a delta wing, are investigated and correlations between theory and experiment are presented. Two nonlinear structural theories are used to describe the structural behavior of the two models which are studied. The delta wing structural behavior is modeled using the nonlinear plate theory of von Karman. The nonlinearity in this model is due to the coupling between the out-of-plane and in-plane deflections and the model allows for moderately large out-of-plane plate deflections. The flapping flag structural model is a nonlinear beam theory which includes nonlinearities due to both large curvature and inertia. The axial deflection in this model is related to the out-of-plane deflection using an axially inextensible theory. The aerodynamic theory used is potential flow theory, which is applicable to low speed flows. The equation which describes potential flow is the Laplace equation, which is a linear partial differential equation. The Laplace equation is solved using a vortex lattice method. Aeroelastic solutions are found using both the classic small disturbance linearized fluid-structure interface boundary condition and the exact nonlinear boundary condition. The aeroelastic model which includes the nonlinear boundary conditions also includes a free wake solution. Several reduced order methods are explored. Normal mode solutions, both for the structural and aerodynamic models, are studied along with a proper orthogonal decomposition model for the aerodynamic flow. A brief description of a parallel implementation of the aeroelastic simulation code is also given and the parallel speedup is shown to be nearly linear for a certain class of problems. Correlation between theory and experiment is presented for both the delta wing and flapping flag model. Several steady angle of attack cases were investigated for the

  13. Aeroelastic tailoring in wind-turbine blade applications

    SciTech Connect

    Veers, P.; Lobitz, D.; Bir, G.

    1998-04-01

    This paper reviews issues related to the use of aeroelastic tailoring as a cost-effective, passive means to shape the power curve and reduce loads. Wind turbine blades bend and twist during operation, effectively altering the angle of attack, which in turn affects loads and energy production. There are blades now in use that have significant aeroelastic couplings, either on purpose or because of flexible and light-weight designs. Since aeroelastic effects are almost unavoidable in flexible blade designs, it may be desirable to tailor these effects to the authors advantage. Efforts have been directed at adding flexible devices to a blade, or blade tip, to passively regulate power (or speed) in high winds. It is also possible to build a small amount of desirable twisting into the load response of a blade with proper asymmetric fiber lay up in the blade skin. (Such coupling is akin to distributed {delta}{sub 3} without mechanical hinges.) The tailored twisting can create an aeroelastic effect that has payoff in either better power production or in vibration alleviation, or both. Several research efforts have addressed different parts of this issue. Research and development in the use of aeroelastic tailoring on helicopter rotors is reviewed. Potential energy gains as a function of twist coupling are reviewed. The effects of such coupling on rotor stability have been studied and are presented here. The ability to design in twist coupling with either stretching or bending loads is examined also.

  14. Aeroelastic problems in turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bendiksen, Oddvar O.

    1990-01-01

    A review of the field of turbomachinery aeroelasticity is presented. Developments over the past decade are emphasized, and an assessment of possible future directions of research is offered. The paper reviews the areas of unsteady cascade flows, structural modeling, and flutter prediction methods. Representative results for unsteady flow calculations and flutter boundary predictions in subsonic, transonic, and supersonic flows are discussed, including recent calculations based on the methods of computational fluid mechanics. Results from current attempts to correlate experimental data with theoretical predictions are discussed briefly. It is recommended that future research include investigations of novel approaches to flutter calculations that can take full advantage of parallel processing supercomputers. The feasibility of using mistuning and aeroelastic tailoring as passive flutter suppression techniques should also be pursued.

  15. A General Interface Method for Aeroelastic Analysis of Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tzong, T.; Chen, H. H.; Chang, K. C.; Wu, T.; Cebeci, T.

    1996-01-01

    The aeroelastic analysis of an aircraft requires an accurate and efficient procedure to couple aerodynamics and structures. The procedure needs an interface method to bridge the gap between the aerodynamic and structural models in order to transform loads and displacements. Such an interface method is described in this report. This interface method transforms loads computed by any aerodynamic code to a structural finite element (FE) model and converts the displacements from the FE model to the aerodynamic model. The approach is based on FE technology in which virtual work is employed to transform the aerodynamic pressures into FE nodal forces. The displacements at the FE nodes are then converted back to aerodynamic grid points on the aircraft surface through the reciprocal theorem in structural engineering. The method allows both high and crude fidelities of both models and does not require an intermediate modeling. In addition, the method performs the conversion of loads and displacements directly between individual aerodynamic grid point and its corresponding structural finite element and, hence, is very efficient for large aircraft models. This report also describes the application of this aero-structure interface method to a simple wing and an MD-90 wing. The results show that the aeroelastic effect is very important. For the simple wing, both linear and nonlinear approaches are used. In the linear approach, the deformation of the structural model is considered small, and the loads from the deformed aerodynamic model are applied to the original geometry of the structure. In the nonlinear approach, the geometry of the structure and its stiffness matrix are updated in every iteration and the increments of loads from the previous iteration are applied to the new structural geometry in order to compute the displacement increments. Additional studies to apply the aero-structure interaction procedure to more complicated geometry will be conducted in the second phase

  16. Anisotropic piezoelectric twist actuation of helicopter rotor blades: Aeroelastic analysis and design optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkie, William Keats

    1997-12-01

    An aeroelastic model suitable for control law and preliminary structural design of composite helicopter rotor blades incorporating embedded anisotropic piezoelectric actuator laminae is developed. The aeroelasticity model consists of a linear, nonuniform beam representation of the blade structure, including linear piezoelectric actuation terms, coupled with a nonlinear, finite-state unsteady aerodynamics model. A Galerkin procedure and numerical integration in the time domain are used to obtain a soluti An aeroelastic model suitable for control law and preliminary structural design of composite helicopter rotor blades incorporating embedded anisotropic piezoelectric actuator laminae is developed. The aeroelasticity model consists of a linear, nonuniform beam representation of the blade structure, including linear piezoelectric actuation terms, coupled with a nonlinear, finite-state unsteady aerodynamics model. A Galerkin procedure and numerical integration in the time domain are used to obtain amited additional piezoelectric material mass, it is shown that blade twist actuation approaches which exploit in-plane piezoelectric free-stain anisotropies are capable of producing amplitudes of oscillatory blade twisting sufficient for rotor vibration reduction applications. The second study examines the effectiveness of using embedded piezoelectric actuator laminae to alleviate vibratory loads due to retreating blade stall. A 10 to 15 percent improvement in dynamic stall limited forward flight speed, and a 5 percent improvement in stall limited rotor thrust were numerically demonstrated for the active twist rotor blade relative to a conventional blade design. The active twist blades are also demonstrated to be more susceptible than the conventional blades to dynamic stall induced vibratory loads when not operating with twist actuation. This is the result of designing the active twist blades with low torsional stiffness in order to maximize piezoelectric twist authority

  17. Coupling procedure modification improves sealing integrity of API connections

    SciTech Connect

    Chelette, K.D.; Bollfrass, C.A.

    1983-04-04

    This paper presents and recommends a pipe coupling procedure which provides several new options for improving the pressure sealing integrity of APILTC and Buttress casing connections. The combination of close tolerance control of taper and multiple tapers along the coupling thread length will ensure proper thread engagement and interference to produce the necessary surface contact pressures to seal and rate the coupling at the API pipe body internal yield pressure without the increased coupling OD values that will otherwise be required. The taper control of the first few threads of the coupling together with the steeper taper in the region of the pipe end, power-tight position ensures that sealing will occur at the extremes of the engaged thread length. This will exclude well bore pressures from the threaded region, thus reducing a tendency for jumpout at tensile loads less than the rated tensile failure load. The close taper tolerances and steeper taper section of the coupling will introduce a new capability to control the location of the final assembly position of the pipe in the coupling, providing for positive positional control of assembly without turn measure equipment.

  18. Vibration and aeroelastic analysis of highly flexible HALE aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chong-Seok

    The highly flexible HALE (High Altitude Long Endurance) aircraft analysis methodology is of interest because early studies indicated that HALE aircraft might have different vibration and aeroelastic characteristics from those of conventional aircraft. Recently the computer code Nonlinear Aeroelastic Trim And Stability of HALE Aircraft (NATASHA) was developed under NASA sponsorship. NATASHA can predict the flight dynamics and aeroelastic behavior for HALE aircraft with a flying wing configuration. Further analysis improvements for NATASHA were required to extend its capability to the ground vibration test (GVT) environment and to both GVT and aeroelastic behavior of HALE aircraft with other configurations. First, the analysis methodology, based on geometrically exact fully intrinsic beam theory, was extended to treat other aircraft cofigurations. Conventional aircraft with flexible fuselage and tail can now be modeled by treating the aircraft as an assembly of beam elements. NATASHA is now applicable to any aircraft cofiguration that can be modeled this way. The intrinsic beam formulation, which is a fundamental structural modeling approach, is now capable of being applying to a structure consisting of multiple beams by relating the virtual displacements and rotations at points where two or more beam elements are connected to each other. Additional aspects are also considered in the analysis such as auxiliary elevator input in the horizontal tail and fuselage aerodynamics. Second, the modeling approach was extended to treat the GVT environment for HALE aircraft, which have highly flexible wings. GVT has its main purpose to provide modal characteristics for model validation. A bungee formulation was developed by the augmented Lagrangian method and coupled to the intrinsic beam formulation for the GVT modeling. After the coupling procedure, the whole formulation cannot be fully intrinsic because the geometric constraint by bungee cords makes the system statically

  19. Technical activities of the configuration aeroelasticity branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Stanley R. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    A number of recent technical activities of the Configuration Aeroelasticity Branch of the NASA Langley Research Center are discussed in detail. The information on the research branch is compiled in twelve separate papers. The first of these topics is a summary of the purpose of the branch, including a full description of the branch and its associated projects and program efforts. The next ten papers cover specific projects and are as follows: Experimental transonic flutter characteristics of supersonic cruise configurations; Aeroelastic effects of spoiler surfaces mounted on a low aspect ratio rectangular wing; Planform curvature effects on flutter of 56 degree swept wing determined in Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT); An introduction to rotorcraft testing in TDT; Rotorcraft vibration reduction research at the TDT; A preliminary study to determine the effects of tip geometry on the flutter of aft swept wings; Aeroelastic models program; NACA 0012 pressure model and test plan; Investigation of the use of extension twist coupling in composite rotor blades; and Improved finite element methods for rotorcraft structures. The final paper describes the primary facility operation by the branch, the Langley TDT.

  20. Aeroelasticity - Frontiers and beyond /von Karman Lecture/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrick, I. E.

    1976-01-01

    The lecture aims at giving a broad survey of the current reaches of aeroelasticity with some narrower views for the specialist. After a short historical review of concepts for orientation, several topics are briefly presented. These touch on current flight vehicles having special points of aeroelastic interest; recent developments in the active control of aeroelastic response including control of flutter; remarks on the unsteady aerodynamics of arbitrary configurations; problems of the space shuttle related to aeroelasticity; and aeroelastic response in flight.

  1. Strain actuated aeroelastic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazarus, Kenneth B.

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on strain actuated aeroelastic control are presented. Topics covered include: structural and aerodynamic modeling; control law design methodology; system block diagram; adaptive wing test article; bench-top experiments; bench-top disturbance rejection: open and closed loop response; bench-top disturbance rejection: state cost versus control cost; wind tunnel experiments; wind tunnel gust alleviation: open and closed loop response at 60 mph; wind tunnel gust alleviation: state cost versus control cost at 60 mph; wind tunnel command following: open and closed loop error at 60 mph; wind tunnel flutter suppression: open loop flutter speed; and wind tunnel flutter suppression: closed loop state cost curves.

  2. Predicting the aeroelastic behavior of a wind-tunnel model using transonic small disturbance theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Bennett, Robert M.

    1990-01-01

    The CAP-TSD (Computational Aeroelasticity Program - Transonic Small Disturbance) code, developed at the NASA-Langley Research Center, is applied to the Active Flexible Wing (AFW) wind-tunnel model for prediction of the model's transonic aeroelastic behavior. Static aeroelastic solutions using CAP-TSD are computed. Dynamic (flutter) analyses are then performed as perturbations about the static aeroelastic deformations of the AFW. The accuracy of the static aeroelastic procedure is investigated by comparing analytical results to those from AFW wind-tunnel experiments. Dynamic results are presented in the form of root loci at different Mach numbers for a heavy gas and for air test mediums. The resultant flutter boundaries for both gases, and the effects of viscous damping and angle of attack on the flutter boundary in air, are also presented.

  3. Synchronized charge extraction for aeroelastic energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liya; Tang, Lihua; Wu, Hao; Yang, Yaowen

    2014-03-01

    Aeroelastic instabilities have been frequently exploited for energy harvesting purpose to power standalone electronic systems, such as wireless sensors. Meanwhile, various energy harvesting interface circuits, such as synchronized charge extraction (SCE) and synchronized switching harvesting on inductor (SSHI), have been widely pursued in the literature for efficiency enhancement of energy harvesting from existing base vibrations. These interfaces, however, have not been applied for aeroelastic energy harvesting. This paper investigates the feasibility of the SCE interface in galloping-based piezoelectric energy harvesting, with a focus on its benefit for performance improvement and influence on the galloping dynamics in different electromechanical coupling regimes. A galloping-based piezoelectric energy harvester (GPEH) is prototyped with an aluminum cantilever bonded with a piezoelectric sheet. Wind tunnel test is conducted with a simple electrical interface composed of a resistive load. Circuit simulation is performed with equivalent circuit representation of the GPEH system and confirmed by experimental results. Consequently, a self-powered SCE interface is implemented with the capability of self peak-detecting and switching. Circuit simulation for various electromechanical coupling cases shows that the harvested power with SCE interface for GPEH is independent of the electrical load, similar to that for a vibration-based piezoelectric energy harvester (VPEH). The SCE interface outperforms the standard interface if the electromechanical coupling is weak, and requires much less piezoelectric material to achieve the maximum power output. Moreover, influence of electromechanical coupling on the dynamics of GPEH with SCE is found sensitive to the wind speed.

  4. Survey of Army/NASA rotorcraft aeroelastic stability research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormiston, Robert A.; Warmbrodt, William G.; Hodges, Dewey H.; Peters, David A.

    1988-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental developments in the aeroelastic and aeromechanical stability of helicopters and tilt-rotor aircraft are addressed. Included are the underlying nonlinear structural mechanics of slender rotating beams, necessary for accurate modeling of elastic cantilever rotor blades, and the development of dynamic inflow, an unsteady aerodynamic theory for low frequency aeroelastic stability applications. Analytical treatment of isolated rotor stability in hover and forward flight, coupled rotor-fuselage stability are considered. Results of parametric investigations of system behavior are presented, and correlations between theoretical results and experimental data from small- and large-scale wind tunnel and flight testing are discussed.

  5. Data Comparisons and Summary of the Second Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heeg, Jennifer; Wieseman, Carol D.; Chwalowski, Pawel

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the computational results generated by participating teams of the second Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop and compare them with experimental data. Aeroelastic and rigid configurations of the Benchmark Supercritical Wing (BSCW) wind tunnel model served as the focus for the workshop. The comparison data sets include unforced ("steady") system responses, forced pitch oscillations and coupled fluid-structure responses. Integrated coefficients, frequency response functions, and flutter onset conditions are compared. The flow conditions studied were in the transonic range, including both attached and separated flow conditions. Some of the technical discussions that took place at the workshop are summarized.

  6. Simplified aeroelastic modeling of horizontal axis wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendell, J. H.

    1982-09-01

    Certain aspects of the aeroelastic modeling and behavior of the horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) are examined. Two simple three degree of freedom models are described in this report, and tools are developed which allow other simple models to be derived. The first simple model developed is an equivalent hinge model to study the flap-lag-torsion aeroelastic stability of an isolated rotor blade. The model includes nonlinear effects, preconing, and noncoincident elastic axis, center of gravity, and aerodynamic center. A stability study is presented which examines the influence of key parameters on aeroelastic stability. Next, two general tools are developed to study the aeroelastic stability and response of a teetering rotor coupled to a flexible tower. The first of these tools is an aeroelastic model of a two-bladed rotor on a general flexible support. The second general tool is a harmonic balance solution method for the resulting second order system with periodic coefficients. The second simple model developed is a rotor-tower model which serves to demonstrate the general tools. This model includes nacelle yawing, nacelle pitching, and rotor teetering. Transient response time histories are calculated and compared to a similar model in the literature. Agreement between the two is very good, especially considering how few harmonics are used. Finally, a stability study is presented which examines the effects of support stiffness and damping, inflow angle, and preconing.

  7. Simplified aeroelastic modeling of horizontal axis wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wendell, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    Certain aspects of the aeroelastic modeling and behavior of the horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) are examined. Two simple three degree of freedom models are described in this report, and tools are developed which allow other simple models to be derived. The first simple model developed is an equivalent hinge model to study the flap-lag-torsion aeroelastic stability of an isolated rotor blade. The model includes nonlinear effects, preconing, and noncoincident elastic axis, center of gravity, and aerodynamic center. A stability study is presented which examines the influence of key parameters on aeroelastic stability. Next, two general tools are developed to study the aeroelastic stability and response of a teetering rotor coupled to a flexible tower. The first of these tools is an aeroelastic model of a two-bladed rotor on a general flexible support. The second general tool is a harmonic balance solution method for the resulting second order system with periodic coefficients. The second simple model developed is a rotor-tower model which serves to demonstrate the general tools. This model includes nacelle yawing, nacelle pitching, and rotor teetering. Transient response time histories are calculated and compared to a similar model in the literature. Agreement between the two is very good, especially considering how few harmonics are used. Finally, a stability study is presented which examines the effects of support stiffness and damping, inflow angle, and preconing.

  8. Problems and progress in aeroelasticity for interdisciplinary design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, E. Carson, Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Some problems and progress in the development of aerodynamic and aeroelastic computational capabilities are reviewed with emphasis on needs for use in current interdisciplinary design procedures as well as for stand-alone analyses. The primary focus is on integral-equation methods which are well suited for general, accurate, efficient, and unified treatment of flow around vehicles having arbitrary shapes, motions, and deformations at subsonic, transonic, and supersonic speeds up to high angles of attack. Computational methods for potential flows and viscous flows are discussed, and some applications are shown. Calculation of steady and unsteady aeroelastic characteristics of aircraft with nonlinear aerodynamic behavior is also addressed briefly.

  9. Aeroelastic behavior of composite rotor blades with swept tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Kuo-An; Friedmann, Peretz P.; Venkatesan, Comandur

    This paper presents an analytical study of the aeroelastic behavior of composite rotor blades with straight and swept tips. The blade is modeled by beam type finite elements. A single finite element is used to model the swept tip. The nonlinear equations of motion for the finite element model are derived using Hamilton's principle and based on a moderate deflection theory and accounts for: arbitrary cross-sectional shape, pretwist, generally anisotropic material behavior, transverse shears and out-of-plane warping. Numerical results illustrating the effects of tip sweep, anhedral and composite ply orientation on blade aeroelastic behavior are presented. It is shown that composite ply orientation has a substantial effect on blade stability. At low thrust conditions, certain ply orientations can cause instability in the lag mode. The flap-torsion coupling associated with tip sweep can also induce aeroelastic instability in the blade. This instability can be removed by appropriate ply orientation in the composite construction.

  10. Application of the Finite Element Method to Rotary Wing Aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straub, F. K.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1982-01-01

    A finite element method for the spatial discretization of the dynamic equations of equilibrium governing rotary-wing aeroelastic problems is presented. Formulation of the finite element equations is based on weighted Galerkin residuals. This Galerkin finite element method reduces algebraic manipulative labor significantly, when compared to the application of the global Galerkin method in similar problems. The coupled flap-lag aeroelastic stability boundaries of hingeless helicopter rotor blades in hover are calculated. The linearized dynamic equations are reduced to the standard eigenvalue problem from which the aeroelastic stability boundaries are obtained. The convergence properties of the Galerkin finite element method are studied numerically by refining the discretization process. Results indicate that four or five elements suffice to capture the dynamics of the blade with the same accuracy as the global Galerkin method.

  11. Aeroelastic behavior of composite rotor blades with swept tips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, Kuo-An; Friedmann, Peretz P.; Venkatesan, Comandur

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical study of the aeroelastic behavior of composite rotor blades with straight and swept tips. The blade is modeled by beam type finite elements. A single finite element is used to model the swept tip. The nonlinear equations of motion for the finite element model are derived using Hamilton's principle and based on a moderate deflection theory and accounts for: arbitrary cross-sectional shape, pretwist, generally anisotropic material behavior, transverse shears and out-of-plane warping. Numerical results illustrating the effects of tip sweep, anhedral and composite ply orientation on blade aeroelastic behavior are presented. It is shown that composite ply orientation has a substantial effect on blade stability. At low thrust conditions, certain ply orientations can cause instability in the lag mode. The flap-torsion coupling associated with tip sweep can also induce aeroelastic instability in the blade. This instability can be removed by appropriate ply orientation in the composite construction.

  12. Wing Weight Optimization Under Aeroelastic Loads Subject to Stress Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapania, Rakesh K.; Issac, J.; Macmurdy, D.; Guruswamy, Guru P.

    1997-01-01

    A minimum weight optimization of the wing under aeroelastic loads subject to stress constraints is carried out. The loads for the optimization are based on aeroelastic trim. The design variables are the thickness of the wing skins and planform variables. The composite plate structural model incorporates first-order shear deformation theory, the wing deflections are expressed using Chebyshev polynomials and a Rayleigh-Ritz procedure is adopted for the structural formulation. The aerodynamic pressures provided by the aerodynamic code at a discrete number of grid points is represented as a bilinear distribution on the composite plate code to solve for the deflections and stresses in the wing. The lifting-surface aerodynamic code FAST is presently being used to generate the pressure distribution over the wing. The envisioned ENSAERO/Plate is an aeroelastic analysis code which combines ENSAERO version 3.0 (for analysis of wing-body configurations) with the composite plate code.

  13. Aeroelastic Deflection of NURBS Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh, Jamshid A.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present an algorithm for using NonUniform Rational B-Spline (NURBS) representation in an aeroelastic loop. The algorithm is based on creating a least-squares NURBS surface representing the aeroelastic defection. The resulting NURBS surfaces are used to update either the original Computer- Aided Design (CAD) model, Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM) grid or the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) grid. Results are presented for a generic High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT).

  14. Aeroelastic-Acoustics Simulation of Flight Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, kajal K.; Choi, S.; Ibrahim, A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the details of a numerical finite element (FE) based analysis procedure and a resulting code for the simulation of the acoustics phenomenon arising from aeroelastic interactions. Both CFD and structural simulations are based on FE discretization employing unstructured grids. The sound pressure level (SPL) on structural surfaces is calculated from the root mean square (RMS) of the unsteady pressure and the acoustic wave frequencies are computed from a fast Fourier transform (FFT) of the unsteady pressure distribution as a function of time. The resulting tool proves to be unique as it is designed to analyze complex practical problems, involving large scale computations, in a routine fashion.

  15. AEROELASTIC SIMULATION TOOL FOR INFLATABLE BALLUTE AEROCAPTURE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liever, P. A.; Sheta, E. F.; Habchi, S. D.

    2006-01-01

    A multidisciplinary analysis tool is under development for predicting the impact of aeroelastic effects on the functionality of inflatable ballute aeroassist vehicles in both the continuum and rarefied flow regimes. High-fidelity modules for continuum and rarefied aerodynamics, structural dynamics, heat transfer, and computational grid deformation are coupled in an integrated multi-physics, multi-disciplinary computing environment. This flexible and extensible approach allows the integration of state-of-the-art, stand-alone NASA and industry leading continuum and rarefied flow solvers and structural analysis codes into a computing environment in which the modules can run concurrently with synchronized data transfer. Coupled fluid-structure continuum flow demonstrations were conducted on a clamped ballute configuration. The feasibility of implementing a DSMC flow solver in the simulation framework was demonstrated, and loosely coupled rarefied flow aeroelastic demonstrations were performed. A NASA and industry technology survey identified CFD, DSMC and structural analysis codes capable of modeling non-linear shape and material response of thin-film inflated aeroshells. The simulation technology will find direct and immediate applications with NASA and industry in ongoing aerocapture technology development programs.

  16. Aeroelastic Model Structure Computation for Envelope Expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kukreja, Sunil L.

    2007-01-01

    Structure detection is a procedure for selecting a subset of candidate terms, from a full model description, that best describes the observed output. This is a necessary procedure to compute an efficient system description which may afford greater insight into the functionality of the system or a simpler controller design. Structure computation as a tool for black-box modelling may be of critical importance in the development of robust, parsimonious models for the flight-test community. Moreover, this approach may lead to efficient strategies for rapid envelope expansion which may save significant development time and costs. In this study, a least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) technique is investigated for computing efficient model descriptions of nonlinear aeroelastic systems. The LASSO minimises the residual sum of squares by the addition of an l(sub 1) penalty term on the parameter vector of the traditional 2 minimisation problem. Its use for structure detection is a natural extension of this constrained minimisation approach to pseudolinear regression problems which produces some model parameters that are exactly zero and, therefore, yields a parsimonious system description. Applicability of this technique for model structure computation for the F/A-18 Active Aeroelastic Wing using flight test data is shown for several flight conditions (Mach numbers) by identifying a parsimonious system description with a high percent fit for cross-validated data.

  17. Aeroelastic Model Structure Computation for Envelope Expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kukreja, Sunil L.

    2007-01-01

    Structure detection is a procedure for selecting a subset of candidate terms, from a full model description, that best describes the observed output. This is a necessary procedure to compute an efficient system description which may afford greater insight into the functionality of the system or a simpler controller design. Structure computation as a tool for black-box modeling may be of critical importance in the development of robust, parsimonious models for the flight-test community. Moreover, this approach may lead to efficient strategies for rapid envelope expansion that may save significant development time and costs. In this study, a least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) technique is investigated for computing efficient model descriptions of non-linear aeroelastic systems. The LASSO minimises the residual sum of squares with the addition of an l(Sub 1) penalty term on the parameter vector of the traditional l(sub 2) minimisation problem. Its use for structure detection is a natural extension of this constrained minimisation approach to pseudo-linear regression problems which produces some model parameters that are exactly zero and, therefore, yields a parsimonious system description. Applicability of this technique for model structure computation for the F/A-18 (McDonnell Douglas, now The Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois) Active Aeroelastic Wing project using flight test data is shown for several flight conditions (Mach numbers) by identifying a parsimonious system description with a high percent fit for cross-validated data.

  18. Analyzing Aeroelasticity in Turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.; Srivastava, R.

    2003-01-01

    ASTROP2-LE is a computer program that predicts flutter and forced responses of blades, vanes, and other components of such turbomachines as fans, compressors, and turbines. ASTROP2-LE is based on the ASTROP2 program, developed previously for analysis of stability of turbomachinery components. In developing ASTROP2- LE, ASTROP2 was modified to include a capability for modeling forced responses. The program was also modified to add a capability for analysis of aeroelasticity with mistuning and unsteady aerodynamic solutions from another program, LINFLX2D, that solves the linearized Euler equations of unsteady two-dimensional flow. Using LINFLX2D to calculate unsteady aerodynamic loads, it is possible to analyze effects of transonic flow on flutter and forced response. ASTROP2-LE can be used to analyze subsonic, transonic, and supersonic aerodynamics and structural mistuning for rotors with blades of differing structural properties. It calculates the aerodynamic damping of a blade system operating in airflow so that stability can be assessed. The code also predicts the magnitudes and frequencies of the unsteady aerodynamic forces on the airfoils of a blade row from incoming wakes. This information can be used in high-cycle fatigue analysis to predict the fatigue lives of the blades.

  19. Stepwise calibration procedure for regional coupled hydrological-hydrogeological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labarthe, Baptiste; Abasq, Lena; de Fouquet, Chantal; Flipo, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    Stream-aquifer interaction is a complex process depending on regional and local processes. Indeed, the groundwater component of hydrosystem and large scale heterogeneities control the regional flows towards the alluvial plains and the rivers. In second instance, the local distribution of the stream bed permeabilities controls the dynamics of stream-aquifer water fluxes within the alluvial plain, and therefore the near-river piezometric head distribution. In order to better understand the water circulation and pollutant transport in watersheds, the integration of these multi-dimensional processes in modelling platform has to be performed. Thus, the nested interfaces concept in continental hydrosystem modelling (where regional fluxes, simulated by large scale models, are imposed at local stream-aquifer interfaces) has been presented in Flipo et al (2014). This concept has been implemented in EauDyssée modelling platform for a large alluvial plain model (900km2) part of a 11000km2 multi-layer aquifer system, located in the Seine basin (France). The hydrosystem modelling platform is composed of four spatially distributed modules (Surface, Sub-surface, River and Groundwater), corresponding to four components of the terrestrial water cycle. Considering the large number of parameters to be inferred simultaneously, the calibration process of coupled models is highly computationally demanding and therefore hardly applicable to a real case study of 10000km2. In order to improve the efficiency of the calibration process, a stepwise calibration procedure is proposed. The stepwise methodology involves determining optimal parameters of all components of the coupled model, to provide a near optimum prior information for the global calibration. It starts with the surface component parameters calibration. The surface parameters are optimised based on the comparison between simulated and observed discharges (or filtered discharges) at various locations. Once the surface parameters

  20. Plans for Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heeg, Jennifer; Ballmann, Josef; Bhatia, Kumar; Blades, Eric; Boucke, Alexander; Chwalowski, Pawel; Dietz, Guido; Dowell, Earl; Florance, Jennifer P.; Hansen, Thorsten; Mani, Mori; Marvriplis, Dimitri; Perry, Boyd, III; Ritter, Markus; Schuster, David M.; Smith, Marilyn; Taylor, Paul; Whiting, Brent; Wieseman, Carol C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes the plans for the first Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop. The workshop is designed to assess the state of the art of computational methods for predicting unsteady flow fields and aeroelastic response. The goals are to provide an impartial forum to evaluate the effectiveness of existing computer codes and modeling techniques, and to identify computational and experimental areas needing additional research and development. Three subject configurations have been chosen from existing wind tunnel data sets where there is pertinent experimental data available for comparison. For each case chosen, the wind tunnel testing was conducted using forced oscillation of the model at specified frequencies

  1. Aeroelastic Modeling of a Nozzle Startup Transient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Zhao, Xiang; Zhang, Sijun; Chen, Yen-Sen

    2014-01-01

    Lateral nozzle forces are known to cause severe structural damage to any new rocket engine in development during test. While three-dimensional, transient, turbulent, chemically reacting computational fluid dynamics methodology has been demonstrated to capture major side load physics with rigid nozzles, hot-fire tests often show nozzle structure deformation during major side load events, leading to structural damages if structural strengthening measures were not taken. The modeling picture is incomplete without the capability to address the two-way responses between the structure and fluid. The objective of this study is to develop a tightly coupled aeroelastic modeling algorithm by implementing the necessary structural dynamics component into an anchored computational fluid dynamics methodology. The computational fluid dynamics component is based on an unstructured-grid, pressure-based computational fluid dynamics formulation, while the computational structural dynamics component is developed under the framework of modal analysis. Transient aeroelastic nozzle startup analyses at sea level were performed, and the computed transient nozzle fluid-structure interaction physics presented,

  2. Aeroelastic simulation of higher harmonic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Lawson H.; Friedmann, Peretz P.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes the development of an aeroelastic analysis of a helicopter rotor and its application to the simulation of helicopter vibration reduction through higher harmonic control (HHC). An improved finite-state, time-domain model of unsteady aerodynamics is developed to capture high frequency aerodynamic effects. An improved trim procedure is implemented which accounts for flap, lead-lag, and torsional deformations of the blade. The effect of unsteady aerodynamics is studied and it is found that its impact on blade aeroelastic stability and low frequency response is small, but it has a significant influence on rotor hub vibrations. Several different HHC algorithms are implemented on a hingeless rotor and their effectiveness in reducing hub vibratory shears is compared. All the controllers are found to be quite effective, but very differing HHC inputs are required depending on the aerodynamic model used. Effects of HHC on rotor stability and power requirements are found to be quite small. Simulations of roughly equivalent articulated and hingeless rotors are carried out, and it is found that hingeless rotors can require considerably larger HHC inputs to reduce vibratory shears. This implies that the practical implementation of HHC on hingeless rotors might be considerably more difficult than on articulated rotors.

  3. Performance of an angular flange aeroelastic wind energy converter

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmadi, G.

    1983-05-01

    ALL conventional wind turbines operate on the principles of turbomachinaries, with wind being made to flow over a set of rotating vanes. Recently, a new concept for wind energy conversion based on aeroelastic instability was introduced. It is well known that couplings between the vibration of an elastic structure and fluid stream may lead to aeroelastic instability. Energy then is transferred from the airstream into the elastic structure, which results in a destructive monotonic increase of the vibration amplitude of the structure. The failure of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge is one of the well-known examples of such a disaster. The use of an aeroelastic instability (or flutter) mechanism for constructing a wind energy converter was suggested. The theory for a torsional wind energy converter and the results of some model tests were also presented. Recently, some studies on similar types of wind energy converters using oscillating airfoils were reported. In the present study an angular flange H-section model of a torsional aeroelastic wind energy converter is constructed, and its performances under various conditions are investigated. The effects of the variations of the flange angle and the flange width on the performance of the model are studied. The weight of the pendulum is also varied, and its effects on the power coefficient of the model are investigated. It is observed that the efficiency of energy conversion decreases with an increase in wind speed. A method for possible improvement of the theoretical prediction is suggested and discussed.

  4. Rotary-wing aeroelasticity with application to VTOL vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, Peretz P.

    1990-01-01

    This survey presents an assessment of the state of the art in rotary-wing aeroelasticity as applied to conventional helicopters as well as other VTOL vehicles such as tilting prop-rotors, the X-wing and a hybrid heavy lift vehicle. The objective is to enable the reader to develop an awareness of what has been accomplished, what remains to be done, and where to find more comprehensive treatments of the various topics discussed. The main topics discussed are: (1) structural modeling; (2) unsteady aerodynamic modeling; (3) formulation of the equations of motion and their solutions; (4) illustrative results for isolated blades in hover and forward flight; (5) illustrative results for coupled rotor/fuselage problems; (6) active control of aeromechanical and aeroelastic problems; (7) active controls for vibration reduction; (8) structural optimization with aeroelastic constraints; (9) gust response analysis of rotors; and (10) aeroelastic problems in special VTOL vehicles. These topics are reviewed with different levels of detail and some useful observation on potentially rewarding areas of future research are made.

  5. Wind Tunnel to Atmospheric Mapping for Static Aeroelastic Scaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heeg, Jennifer; Spain, Charles V.; Rivera, J. A.

    2004-01-01

    Wind tunnel to Atmospheric Mapping (WAM) is a methodology for scaling and testing a static aeroelastic wind tunnel model. The WAM procedure employs scaling laws to define a wind tunnel model and wind tunnel test points such that the static aeroelastic flight test data and wind tunnel data will be correlated throughout the test envelopes. This methodology extends the notion that a single test condition - combination of Mach number and dynamic pressure - can be matched by wind tunnel data. The primary requirements for affecting this extension are matching flight Mach numbers, maintaining a constant dynamic pressure scale factor and setting the dynamic pressure scale factor in accordance with the stiffness scale factor. The scaling is enabled by capabilities of the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) and by relaxation of scaling requirements present in the dynamic problem that are not critical to the static aeroelastic problem. The methodology is exercised in two example scaling problems: an arbitrarily scaled wing and a practical application to the scaling of the Active Aeroelastic Wing flight vehicle for testing in the TDT.

  6. Application of a Navier-Stokes aeroelastic method to improve fighter wing performance at maneuver flight conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, David M.

    1993-01-01

    An aeroelastic analysis method, based on three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equation aerodynamics, has been applied to improve the performance of fighter wings operating at sustained maneuver flight conditions. The scheme reduces the trimmed pressure drag of wings performing high-g maneuvers through a simultaneous application of control surface deflection and aeroelastic twist. The aerodynamic and structural interactions are decoupled by assuming an aeroelastic twist mode shape and optimizing the aerodynamic performance based on this aeroelastic mode. The wing structural stiffness properties are then determined through an inverse scheme based on the aerodynamic loads and desired twist at the maneuver flight condition. The decoupled technique is verified by performing a fully coupled aeroelastic analysis using the maneuver flight conditions and the optimized structural stiffness distributions.

  7. Using transonic small disturbance theory for predicting the aeroelastic stability of a flexible wind-tunnel model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Bennett, Robert M.

    1990-01-01

    The CAP-TSD (Computational Aeroelasticity Program - Transonic Small Disturbance) code, developed at the NASA - Langley Research Center, is applied to the Active Flexible Wing (AFW) wind tunnel model for prediction of the model's transonic aeroelastic behavior. Static aeroelastic solutions using CAP-TSD are computed. Dynamic (flutter) analyses are then performed as perturbations about the static aeroelastic deformations of the AFW. The accuracy of the static aeroelastic procedure is investigated by comparing analytical results to those from previous AFW wind tunnel experiments. Dynamic results are presented in the form of root loci at different Mach numbers for a heavy gas and air. The resultant flutter boundaries for both gases are also presented. The effects of viscous damping and angle-of-attack, on the flutter boundary in air, are presented as well.

  8. Static Aeroelastic Analysis with an Inviscid Cartesian Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, David L.; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Nemec, Marian; Smith, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    An embedded-boundary, Cartesian-mesh flow solver is coupled with a three degree-of-freedom structural model to perform static, aeroelastic analysis of complex aircraft geometries. The approach solves a nonlinear, aerostructural system of equations using a loosely-coupled strategy. An open-source, 3-D discrete-geometry engine is utilized to deform a triangulated surface geometry according to the shape predicted by the structural model under the computed aerodynamic loads. The deformation scheme is capable of modeling large deflections and is applicable to the design of modern, very-flexible transport wings. The coupling interface is modular so that aerodynamic or structural analysis methods can be easily swapped or enhanced. After verifying the structural model with comparisons to Euler beam theory, two applications of the analysis method are presented as validation. The first is a relatively stiff, transport wing model which was a subject of a recent workshop on aeroelasticity. The second is a very flexible model recently tested in a low speed wind tunnel. Both cases show that the aeroelastic analysis method produces results in excellent agreement with experimental data.

  9. A comparative study of serial and parallel aeroelastic computations of wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byun, Chansup; Guruswamy, Guru P.

    1994-01-01

    A procedure for computing the aeroelasticity of wings on parallel multiple-instruction, multiple-data (MIMD) computers is presented. In this procedure, fluids are modeled using Euler equations, and structures are modeled using modal or finite element equations. The procedure is designed in such a way that each discipline can be developed and maintained independently by using a domain decomposition approach. In the present parallel procedure, each computational domain is scalable. A parallel integration scheme is used to compute aeroelastic responses by solving fluid and structural equations concurrently. The computational efficiency issues of parallel integration of both fluid and structural equations are investigated in detail. This approach, which reduces the total computational time by a factor of almost 2, is demonstrated for a typical aeroelastic wing by using various numbers of processors on the Intel iPSC/860.

  10. Static Aeroelastic Predictions for a Transonic Transport Model Using an Unstructured-Grid Flow Solver Coupled With a Structural Plate Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Dennis O.; Cavallo, Peter A.

    2003-01-01

    An equivalent-plate structural deformation technique was coupled with a steady-state unstructured-grid three-dimensional Euler flow solver and a two-dimensional strip interactive boundary-layer technique. The objective of the research was to assess the extent to which a simple accounting for static model deformations could improve correlations with measured wing pressure distributions and lift coefficients at transonic speeds. Results were computed and compared to test data for a wing-fuselage model of a generic low-wing transonic transport at a transonic cruise condition over a range of Reynolds numbers and dynamic pressures. The deformations significantly improved correlations with measured wing pressure distributions and lift coefficients. This method provided a means of quantifying the role of dynamic pressure in wind-tunnel studies of Reynolds number effects for transonic transport models.

  11. Flight Dynamics of Flexible Aircraft with Aeroelastic and Inertial Force Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Tuzcu, Ilhan

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated flight dynamic modeling method for flexible aircraft that captures coupled physics effects due to inertial forces, aeroelasticity, and propulsive forces that are normally present in flight. The present approach formulates the coupled flight dynamics using a structural dynamic modeling method that describes the elasticity of a flexible, twisted, swept wing using an equivalent beam-rod model. The structural dynamic model allows for three types of wing elastic motion: flapwise bending, chordwise bending, and torsion. Inertial force coupling with the wing elasticity is formulated to account for aircraft acceleration. The structural deflections create an effective aeroelastic angle of attack that affects the rigid-body motion of flexible aircraft. The aeroelastic effect contributes to aerodynamic damping forces that can influence aerodynamic stability. For wing-mounted engines, wing flexibility can cause the propulsive forces and moments to couple with the wing elastic motion. The integrated flight dynamics for a flexible aircraft are formulated by including generalized coordinate variables associated with the aeroelastic-propulsive forces and moments in the standard state-space form for six degree-of-freedom flight dynamics. A computational structural model for a generic transport aircraft has been created. The eigenvalue analysis is performed to compute aeroelastic frequencies and aerodynamic damping. The results will be used to construct an integrated flight dynamic model of a flexible generic transport aircraft.

  12. Finite element procedures for coupled linear analysis of heat transfer, fluid and solid mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutjahjo, Edhi; Chamis, Christos C.

    1993-01-01

    Coupled finite element formulations for fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and solid mechanics are derived from the conservation laws for energy, mass, and momentum. To model the physics of interactions among the participating disciplines, the linearized equations are coupled by combining domain and boundary coupling procedures. Iterative numerical solution strategy is presented to solve the equations, with the partitioning of temporal discretization implemented.

  13. Aeroelastic behavior of composite helicopter rotor blades with advanced geometry tips

    SciTech Connect

    Friedmann, P.P.; Yuan, K.A.

    1995-12-31

    A new structural and aeroelastic model capable of representing the aeroelastic stability and response of composite helicopter rotor blades with advanced geometry tips is presented. Where it is understood that advanced geometry tips are blade tips having sweep, anhedral and taper in the outboard 10% segment of the blade. The blade is modeled by beam finite elements. A single element is used to represent the swept tip. The nonlinear equations of motion are derived using the Hamilton`s principle and are based on moderate deflection theory. Thus, the nonlinearities are of the geometric type. The important structural blade attributes captured by the model are arbitrary cross-sectional shape, general anisotropic material behavior, transverse shear and out-of-plane warping. The aerodynamic loads are based on quasi-steady Greenberg theory with reverse flow effects, using an implicit formulation. The nonlinear aeroelastic response of the blade is obtained from a fully coupled propulsive trim/aeroelastic response analysis. Aeroelastic stability is obtained from linearizing the equations of motion about the steady state response of the blade and using Floquet theory. Numerical results for the aeroelastic stability and response of a hingeless composite blade with two cell type cross section are presented, together with vibratory hub shears and moments. The influence of ply orientation and tip sweep is clearly illustrated by the results.

  14. Sensitivity Analysis of Wing Aeroelastic Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Issac, Jason Cherian

    1995-01-01

    Design for prevention of aeroelastic instability (that is, the critical speeds leading to aeroelastic instability lie outside the operating range) is an integral part of the wing design process. Availability of the sensitivity derivatives of the various critical speeds with respect to shape parameters of the wing could be very useful to a designer in the initial design phase, when several design changes are made and the shape of the final configuration is not yet frozen. These derivatives are also indispensable for a gradient-based optimization with aeroelastic constraints. In this study, flutter characteristic of a typical section in subsonic compressible flow is examined using a state-space unsteady aerodynamic representation. The sensitivity of the flutter speed of the typical section with respect to its mass and stiffness parameters, namely, mass ratio, static unbalance, radius of gyration, bending frequency, and torsional frequency is calculated analytically. A strip theory formulation is newly developed to represent the unsteady aerodynamic forces on a wing. This is coupled with an equivalent plate structural model and solved as an eigenvalue problem to determine the critical speed of the wing. Flutter analysis of the wing is also carried out using a lifting-surface subsonic kernel function aerodynamic theory (FAST) and an equivalent plate structural model. Finite element modeling of the wing is done using NASTRAN so that wing structures made of spars and ribs and top and bottom wing skins could be analyzed. The free vibration modes of the wing obtained from NASTRAN are input into FAST to compute the flutter speed. An equivalent plate model which incorporates first-order shear deformation theory is then examined so it can be used to model thick wings, where shear deformations are important. The sensitivity of natural frequencies to changes in shape parameters is obtained using ADIFOR. A simple optimization effort is made towards obtaining a minimum weight

  15. Swept Blade Aero-Elastic Model for a Small Wind Turbine (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Damiani, R.; Lee, S.; Larwood, S.

    2014-07-01

    A preprocessor for analyzing preswept wind turbines using the in-house aero-elastic tool coupled with a multibody dynamic simulator was developed. A baseline 10-kW small wind turbine with straight blades and various configurations that featured bend-torsion coupling via blade-tip sweep were investigated to study their impact on ultimate loads and fatigue damage equivalent loads.

  16. Prediction of wing aeroelastic effects on aircraft life and pitching moment characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckstrom, Clinton V.

    1987-01-01

    The distribution of flight loads on an aircraft structure determine the lift and pitching moment characteristics of the aircraft. When the load distribution changes due to the aeroelastic response of the structure, the lift and pitching moment characteristics also change. An estimate of the effect of aeroelasticity on stability and control characteristics is often required for the development of aircraft simulation models of evaluation of flight characteristics. This presentation outlines a procedure for incorporating calculated linear aeroelastic effects into measured nonlinear lift and pitching moment data from wind tunnel tests. Results are presented which were obtained from applying this procedure to data for an aircraft with a very flexible transport type research wing. The procedure described is generally applicable to all types of aircraft.

  17. Prediction of wing aeroelastic effects on aircraft lift and pitching moment characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckstrom, C. V.

    1985-01-01

    The distribution of flight loads on an aircraft structure determines the lift and pitching moment characteristics of the aircraft. When the load distribution changes due to the aeroelastic response of the structure, the lift and pitching moment characteristics also change. Some estimate of the effect of aeroelasticity on stability and control characteristics, particularly lift and pitching moment, is required for use in aircraft simulation models for evaluation of flight characteristics. This presentation outlines a procedure to incorporate aeroelastic effects into lift and pitching moment data from wind tunnel tests. Results are presented which were obtained from applying this procedure to an aircraft with a very flexible transport-type research wing. The procedure described is generally applicable to all types of aircraft.

  18. Prediction of wing aeroelastic effects on aircraft lift and pitching moment characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckstrom, Clinton V.

    1986-01-01

    The distribution of flight loads on an aircraft structure determine the lift and pitching moment characteristics of the aircraft. When the load distribution changes due to the aeroelastic response of the structure, the lift and pitching moment characteristics also change. An estimate of the effect of aeroelasticity on stability and control characteristics is often required for the development of aircraft simulation models of evaluation of flight characteristics. This presentation outlines a procedure for incorporating calculated linear aeroelastic effects into measured nonlinear lift and pitching moment data from wind tunnel tests. Results are presented which were obtained from applying this procedure to data for an aircraft with a very flexible transport type research wing. The procedure described is generally applicable to all types of aircraft.

  19. Flutter and Divergence Analysis using the Generalized Aeroelastic Analysis Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, John W.; Wieseman, Carol D.

    2003-01-01

    The Generalized Aeroelastic Analysis Method (GAAM) is applied to the analysis of three well-studied checkcases: restrained and unrestrained airfoil models, and a wing model. An eigenvalue iteration procedure is used for converging upon roots of the complex stability matrix. For the airfoil models, exact root loci are given which clearly illustrate the nature of the flutter and divergence instabilities. The singularities involved are enumerated, including an additional pole at the origin for the unrestrained airfoil case and the emergence of an additional pole on the positive real axis at the divergence speed for the restrained airfoil case. Inconsistencies and differences among published aeroelastic root loci and the new, exact results are discussed and resolved. The generalization of a Doublet Lattice Method computer code is described and the code is applied to the calculation of root loci for the wing model for incompressible and for subsonic flow conditions. The error introduced in the reduction of the singular integral equation underlying the unsteady lifting surface theory to a linear algebraic equation is discussed. Acknowledging this inherent error, the solutions of the algebraic equation by GAAM are termed 'exact.' The singularities of the problem are discussed and exponential series approximations used in the evaluation of the kernel function shown to introduce a dense collection of poles and zeroes on the negative real axis. Again, inconsistencies and differences among published aeroelastic root loci and the new 'exact' results are discussed and resolved. In all cases, aeroelastic flutter and divergence speeds and frequencies are in good agreement with published results. The GAAM solution procedure allows complete control over Mach number, velocity, density, and complex frequency. Thus all points on the computed root loci can be matched-point, consistent solutions without recourse to complex mode tracking logic or dataset interpolation, as in the k and p

  20. Aeroelastic analysis of wind energy conversion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugundji, J.

    1978-01-01

    An aeroelastic investigation of horizontal axis wind turbines is described. The study is divided into two simpler areas; (1) the aeroelastic stability of a single blade on a rigid tower; and (2) the mechanical vibrations of the rotor system on a flexible tower. Some resulting instabilities and forced vibration behavior are described.

  1. A bidirectional coupling procedure applied to multiscale respiratory modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuprat, A. P.; Kabilan, S.; Carson, J. P.; Corley, R. A.; Einstein, D. R.

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we present a novel multiscale computational framework for efficiently linking multiple lower-dimensional models describing the distal lung mechanics to imaging-based 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFDs) models of the upper pulmonary airways in order to incorporate physiologically appropriate outlet boundary conditions. The framework is an extension of the modified Newton's method with nonlinear Krylov accelerator developed by Carlson and Miller [1], Miller [2] and Scott and Fenves [3]. Our extensions include the retention of subspace information over multiple timesteps, and a special correction at the end of a timestep that allows for corrections to be accepted with verified low residual with as little as a single residual evaluation per timestep on average. In the case of a single residual evaluation per timestep, the method has zero additional computational cost compared to uncoupled or unidirectionally coupled simulations. We expect these enhancements to be generally applicable to other multiscale coupling applications where timestepping occurs. In addition we have developed a "pressure-drop" residual which allows for stable coupling of flows between a 3D incompressible CFD application and another (lower-dimensional) fluid system. We expect this residual to also be useful for coupling non-respiratory incompressible fluid applications, such as multiscale simulations involving blood flow. The lower-dimensional models that are considered in this study are sets of simple ordinary differential equations (ODEs) representing the compliant mechanics of symmetric human pulmonary airway trees. To validate the method, we compare the predictions of hybrid CFD-ODE models against an ODE-only model of pulmonary airflow in an idealized geometry. Subsequently, we couple multiple sets of ODEs describing the distal lung to an imaging-based human lung geometry. Boundary conditions in these models consist of atmospheric pressure at the mouth and intrapleural

  2. A Bidirectional Coupling Procedure Applied to Multiscale Respiratory Modeling.

    PubMed

    Kuprat, A P; Kabilan, S; Carson, J P; Corley, R A; Einstein, D R

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we present a novel multiscale computational framework for efficiently linking multiple lower-dimensional models describing the distal lung mechanics to imaging-based 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of the upper pulmonary airways in order to incorporate physiologically appropriate outlet boundary conditions. The framework is an extension of the Modified Newton's Method with nonlinear Krylov accelerator developed by Carlson and Miller [1, 2, 3]. Our extensions include the retention of subspace information over multiple timesteps, and a special correction at the end of a timestep that allows for corrections to be accepted with verified low residual with as little as a single residual evaluation per timestep on average. In the case of a single residual evaluation per timestep, the method has zero additional computational cost compared to uncoupled or unidirectionally coupled simulations. We expect these enhancements to be generally applicable to other multiscale coupling applications where timestepping occurs. In addition we have developed a "pressure-drop" residual which allows for stable coupling of flows between a 3D incompressible CFD application and another (lower-dimensional) fluid system. We expect this residual to also be useful for coupling non-respiratory incompressible fluid applications, such as multiscale simulations involving blood flow. The lower-dimensional models that are considered in this study are sets of simple ordinary differential equations (ODEs) representing the compliant mechanics of symmetric human pulmonary airway trees. To validate the method, we compare the predictions of hybrid CFD-ODE models against an ODE-only model of pulmonary airflow in an idealized geometry. Subsequently, we couple multiple sets of ODEs describing the distal lung to an imaging-based human lung geometry. Boundary conditions in these models consist of atmospheric pressure at the mouth and intrapleural pressure applied to the multiple sets

  3. A Bidirectional Coupling Procedure Applied to Multiscale Respiratory Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Kuprat, Andrew P.; Kabilan, Senthil; Carson, James P.; Corley, Richard A.; Einstein, Daniel R.

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we present a novel multiscale computational framework for efficiently linking multiple lower-dimensional models describing the distal lung mechanics to imaging-based 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of the upper pulmonary airways in order to incorporate physiologically appropriate outlet boundary conditions. The framework is an extension of the Modified Newton’s Method with nonlinear Krylov accelerator developed by Carlson and Miller [1, 2, 3]. Our extensions include the retention of subspace information over multiple timesteps, and a special correction at the end of a timestep that allows for corrections to be accepted with verified low residual with as little as a single residual evaluation per timestep on average. In the case of a single residual evaluation per timestep, the method has zero additional computational cost compared to uncoupled or unidirectionally coupled simulations. We expect these enhancements to be generally applicable to other multiscale coupling applications where timestepping occurs. In addition we have developed a “pressure-drop” residual which allows for stable coupling of flows between a 3D incompressible CFD application and another (lower-dimensional) fluid system. We expect this residual to also be useful for coupling non-respiratory incompressible fluid applications, such as multiscale simulations involving blood flow. The lower-dimensional models that are considered in this study are sets of simple ordinary differential equations (ODEs) representing the compliant mechanics of symmetric human pulmonary airway trees. To validate the method, we compare the predictions of hybrid CFD-ODE models against an ODE-only model of pulmonary airflow in an idealized geometry. Subsequently, we couple multiple sets of ODEs describing the distal lung to an imaging-based human lung geometry. Boundary conditions in these models consist of atmospheric pressure at the mouth and intrapleural pressure applied to the multiple

  4. A bidirectional coupling procedure applied to multiscale respiratory modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Kuprat, A.P.; Kabilan, S.; Carson, J.P.; Corley, R.A.; Einstein, D.R.

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we present a novel multiscale computational framework for efficiently linking multiple lower-dimensional models describing the distal lung mechanics to imaging-based 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFDs) models of the upper pulmonary airways in order to incorporate physiologically appropriate outlet boundary conditions. The framework is an extension of the modified Newton’s method with nonlinear Krylov accelerator developed by Carlson and Miller [1], Miller [2] and Scott and Fenves [3]. Our extensions include the retention of subspace information over multiple timesteps, and a special correction at the end of a timestep that allows for corrections to be accepted with verified low residual with as little as a single residual evaluation per timestep on average. In the case of a single residual evaluation per timestep, the method has zero additional computational cost compared to uncoupled or unidirectionally coupled simulations. We expect these enhancements to be generally applicable to other multiscale coupling applications where timestepping occurs. In addition we have developed a “pressure-drop” residual which allows for stable coupling of flows between a 3D incompressible CFD application and another (lower-dimensional) fluid system. We expect this residual to also be useful for coupling non-respiratory incompressible fluid applications, such as multiscale simulations involving blood flow. The lower-dimensional models that are considered in this study are sets of simple ordinary differential equations (ODEs) representing the compliant mechanics of symmetric human pulmonary airway trees. To validate the method, we compare the predictions of hybrid CFD–ODE models against an ODE-only model of pulmonary airflow in an idealized geometry. Subsequently, we couple multiple sets of ODEs describing the distal lung to an imaging-based human lung geometry. Boundary conditions in these models consist of atmospheric pressure at the mouth and intrapleural

  5. A Bidirectional Coupling Procedure Applied to Multiscale Respiratory Modeling☆

    PubMed Central

    Kuprat, A.P.; Kabilan, S.; Carson, J.P.; Corley, R.A.; Einstein, D.R.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we present a novel multiscale computational framework for efficiently linking multiple lower-dimensional models describing the distal lung mechanics to imaging-based 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of the upper pulmonary airways in order to incorporate physiologically appropriate outlet boundary conditions. The framework is an extension of the Modified Newton’s Method with nonlinear Krylov accelerator developed by Carlson and Miller [1, 2, 3]. Our extensions include the retention of subspace information over multiple timesteps, and a special correction at the end of a timestep that allows for corrections to be accepted with verified low residual with as little as a single residual evaluation per timestep on average. In the case of a single residual evaluation per timestep, the method has zero additional computational cost compared to uncoupled or unidirectionally coupled simulations. We expect these enhancements to be generally applicable to other multiscale coupling applications where timestepping occurs. In addition we have developed a “pressure-drop” residual which allows for stable coupling of flows between a 3D incompressible CFD application and another (lower-dimensional) fluid system. We expect this residual to also be useful for coupling non-respiratory incompressible fluid applications, such as multiscale simulations involving blood flow. The lower-dimensional models that are considered in this study are sets of simple ordinary differential equations (ODEs) representing the compliant mechanics of symmetric human pulmonary airway trees. To validate the method, we compare the predictions of hybrid CFD-ODE models against an ODE-only model of pulmonary airflow in an idealized geometry. Subsequently, we couple multiple sets of ODEs describing the distal lung to an imaging-based human lung geometry. Boundary conditions in these models consist of atmospheric pressure at the mouth and intrapleural pressure applied to the multiple

  6. A new aeroelastic model for composite rotor blades with straight and swept tips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, Kuo-An; Friedmann, Peretz P.; Venkatesan, Comandur

    1992-01-01

    An analytical model for predicting the aeroelastic behavior of composite rotor blades with straight and swept tips is presented. The blade is modeled by beam type finite elements along the elastic axis. A single finite element is used to model the swept tip. The nonlinear equations of motion for the finite element model are derived using Hamilton's principle and based on a moderate deflection theory and accounts for: arbitrary cross-sectional shape, pretwist, generally anisotropic material behavior, transverse shears and out-of-plane warping. Numerical results illustrating the effects of tip sweep, anhedral and composite ply orientation on blade aeroelastic behavior are presented. Tip sweep can induce aeroelastic instability by flap-twist coupling. Tip anhedral causes lag-torsion and flap-axial couplings, however, its effects on blade stability is less pronounced than the effect due to sweep. Composite ply orientation has a substantial effect on blade stability.

  7. Optimal aeroelastic design of an oblique wing structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwin, L. B.

    1974-01-01

    A procedure is presented for determining the optimal cover panel thickness of a wing structure to meet specified strength and static aeroelastic divergence requirements for minimum weight. Efficient reanalysis techniques using discrete structural and aerodynamic methods are used in conjunction with redesign algorithms driven by optimality criteria. The optimality conditions for the divergence constraint are established, and expressions are obtained for derivatives of the dynamic pressure at divergence with respect to design variables. The procedure is applied to an oblique wing aircraft where strength and stiffness are critical design considerations for sizing the cover thickness of the wing structure.

  8. Fast-Running Aeroelastic Code Based on Unsteady Linearized Aerodynamic Solver Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.; Bakhle, Milind A.; Keith, T., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has been developing aeroelastic analyses for turbomachines for use by NASA and industry. An aeroelastic analysis consists of a structural dynamic model, an unsteady aerodynamic model, and a procedure to couple the two models. The structural models are well developed. Hence, most of the development for the aeroelastic analysis of turbomachines has involved adapting and using unsteady aerodynamic models. Two methods are used in developing unsteady aerodynamic analysis procedures for the flutter and forced response of turbomachines: (1) the time domain method and (2) the frequency domain method. Codes based on time domain methods require considerable computational time and, hence, cannot be used during the design process. Frequency domain methods eliminate the time dependence by assuming harmonic motion and, hence, require less computational time. Early frequency domain analyses methods neglected the important physics of steady loading on the analyses for simplicity. A fast-running unsteady aerodynamic code, LINFLUX, which includes steady loading and is based on the frequency domain method, has been modified for flutter and response calculations. LINFLUX, solves unsteady linearized Euler equations for calculating the unsteady aerodynamic forces on the blades, starting from a steady nonlinear aerodynamic solution. First, we obtained a steady aerodynamic solution for a given flow condition using the nonlinear unsteady aerodynamic code TURBO. A blade vibration analysis was done to determine the frequencies and mode shapes of the vibrating blades, and an interface code was used to convert the steady aerodynamic solution to a form required by LINFLUX. A preprocessor was used to interpolate the mode shapes from the structural dynamic mesh onto the computational dynamics mesh. Then, we used LINFLUX to calculate the unsteady aerodynamic forces for a given mode, frequency, and phase angle. A postprocessor read these unsteady pressures and

  9. Integrated multidisciplinary design optimization using discrete sensitivity analysis for geometrically complex aeroelastic configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, James Charles, III

    1997-10-01

    practical interest, the sensitivity analysis and shape optimization has been performed for several two- and three-dimensional cases. In twodimensions, an initially symmetric NACA-0012 airfoil and a high-lift multielement airfoil were examined. For the three-dimensional configurations, an initially rectangular wing with uniform NACA-0012 cross-sections was optimized; in addition, a complete Boeing 747-200 aircraft was studied. Furthermore, the current study also examines the effect of inconsistency in the order of spatial accuracy between the nonlinear fluid and linear shape sensitivity equations. The second step was to develop a computationally efficient, high-fidelity, integrated static aeroelastic analysis procedure. To accomplish this, a structural analysis code was coupled with the aforementioned unstructured grid aerodynamic analysis solver. The use of an unstructured grid scheme for the aerodynamic analysis enhances the interaction compatibility with the wing structure. The structural analysis utilizes finite elements to model the wing so that accurate structural deflections may be obtained. In the current work, parameters have been introduced to control the interaction of the computational fluid dynamics and structural analyses; these control parameters permit extremely efficient static aeroelastic computations. To demonstrate and evaluate this procedure, static aeroelastic analysis results for a flexible wing in low subsonic, high subsonic (subcritical), transonic (supercritical), and supersonic flow conditions are presented.

  10. Aeroelastic airfoil smart spar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhalgh, Skott; Pastore, Christopher M.; Garfinkle, Moishe

    1993-01-01

    Aircraft wings and rotor-blades are subject to undesirable bending and twisting excursions that arise from unsteady aerodynamic forces during high speed flight, abrupt maneuvers, or hard landings. These bending excursions can range in amplitude from wing-tip flutter to failure. A continuous-filament construction 'smart' laminated composite box-beam spar is described which corrects itself when subject to undesirable bending excursions or flutter. The load-bearing spar is constructed so that any tendency for the wing or rotor-blade to bend from its normal position is met by opposite twisting of the spar to restore the wing to its normal position. Experimental and theoretical characterization of these spars was made to evaluate the torsion-flexure coupling associated with symmetric lay-ups. The materials used were uniweave AS-4 graphite and a matrix comprised of Shell 8132 resin and U-40 hardener. Experimental tests were conducted on five spars to determine spar twist and bend as a function of load for 0, 17, 30, 45 and 60 deg fiber angle lay-ups. Symmetric fiber lay-ups do exhibit torsion-flexure couplings. Predictions of the twist and bend versus load were made for different fiber orientations in laminated spars using a spline function structural analysis. The analytical results were compared with experimental results for validation. Excellent correlation between experimental and analytical values was found.

  11. Non-linear aeroelastic prediction for aircraft applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de C. Henshaw, M. J.; Badcock, K. J.; Vio, G. A.; Allen, C. B.; Chamberlain, J.; Kaynes, I.; Dimitriadis, G.; Cooper, J. E.; Woodgate, M. A.; Rampurawala, A. M.; Jones, D.; Fenwick, C.; Gaitonde, A. L.; Taylor, N. V.; Amor, D. S.; Eccles, T. A.; Denley, C. J.

    2007-05-01

    in this domain. This is set within the context of a generic industrial process and the requirements of UK and US aeroelastic qualification. A range of test cases, from simple small DOF cases to full aircraft, have been used to evaluate and validate the non-linear methods developed and to make comparison with the linear methods in everyday use. These have focused mainly on aerodynamic non-linearity, although some results for structural non-linearity are also presented. The challenges associated with time domain (coupled computational fluid dynamics-computational structural model (CFD-CSM)) methods have been addressed through the development of grid movement, fluid-structure coupling, and control surface movement technologies. Conclusions regarding the accuracy and computational cost of these are presented. The computational cost of time-domain methods, despite substantial improvements in efficiency, remains high. However, significant advances have been made in reduced order methods, that allow non-linear behaviour to be modelled, but at a cost comparable with that of the regular linear methods. Of particular note is a method based on Hopf bifurcation that has reached an appropriate maturity for deployment on real aircraft configurations, though only limited results are presented herein. Results are also presented for dynamically linearised CFD approaches that hold out the possibility of non-linear results at a fraction of the cost of time coupled CFD-CSM methods. Local linearisation approaches (higher order harmonic balance and continuation method) are also presented; these have the advantage that no prior assumption of the nature of the aeroelastic instability is required, but currently these methods are limited to low DOF problems and it is thought that these will not reach a level of maturity appropriate to real aircraft problems for some years to come. Nevertheless, guidance on the most likely approaches has been derived and this forms the basis for ongoing

  12. Harmonic Balance Computations of Fan Aeroelastic Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakhle, Milind A.; Reddy, T. S. R.

    2010-01-01

    A harmonic balance (HB) aeroelastic analysis, which has been recently developed, was used to determine the aeroelastic stability (flutter) characteristics of an experimental fan. To assess the numerical accuracy of this HB aeroelastic analysis, a time-domain aeroelastic analysis was also used to determine the aeroelastic stability characteristics of the same fan. Both of these three-dimensional analysis codes model the unsteady flowfield due to blade vibrations using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. In the HB analysis, the unsteady flow equations are converted to a HB form and solved using a pseudo-time marching method. In the time-domain analysis, the unsteady flow equations are solved using an implicit time-marching approach. Steady and unsteady computations for two vibration modes were carried out at two rotational speeds: 100 percent (design) and 70 percent (part-speed). The steady and unsteady results obtained from the two analysis methods compare well, thus verifying the recently developed HB aeroelastic analysis. Based on the results, the experimental fan was found to have no aeroelastic instability (flutter) at the conditions examined in this study.

  13. Wing-Body Aeroelasticity Using Finite-Difference Fluid/Finite-Element Structural Equations on Parallel Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byun, Chansup; Guruswamy, Guru P.; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    In recent years significant advances have been made for parallel computers in both hardware and software. Now parallel computers have become viable tools in computational mechanics. Many application codes developed on conventional computers have been modified to benefit from parallel computers. Significant speedups in some areas have been achieved by parallel computations. For single-discipline use of both fluid dynamics and structural dynamics, computations have been made on wing-body configurations using parallel computers. However, only a limited amount of work has been completed in combining these two disciplines for multidisciplinary applications. The prime reason is the increased level of complication associated with a multidisciplinary approach. In this work, procedures to compute aeroelasticity on parallel computers using direct coupling of fluid and structural equations will be investigated for wing-body configurations. The parallel computer selected for computations is an Intel iPSC/860 computer which is a distributed-memory, multiple-instruction, multiple data (MIMD) computer with 128 processors. In this study, the computational efficiency issues of parallel integration of both fluid and structural equations will be investigated in detail. The fluid and structural domains will be modeled using finite-difference and finite-element approaches, respectively. Results from the parallel computer will be compared with those from the conventional computers using a single processor. This study will provide an efficient computational tool for the aeroelastic analysis of wing-body structures on MIMD type parallel computers.

  14. Vertical axis wind turbine turbulent response model. Part 2: Response of Sandia National laboratories' 34-meter VAWT with aeroelastic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-01-01

    The dynamic response of Sandia National Laboratories' 34-m Darrieus rotor wind turbine at Bushland, Texas, is presented. The formulation used a double-multiple streamtube aerodynamic model with a turbulent airflow and included the effects of linear aeroelastic forces. The structural analysis used established procedures with the program MSC/NASTRAN. The effects of aeroelastic forces on the damping of natural modes agree well with previous results at operating rotor speeds, but show some discrepancies at very high rotor speeds. A number of alternative expressions for the spectrum of turbulent wind were investigated. The model loading represented by each does not differ significantly; a more significant difference is caused by imposing a full lateral coherence of the turbulent flow. Spectra of the predicted stresses at various locations show that without aeroelastic forces, very severe resonance is likely to occur at certain natural frequencies. Inclusion of aeroelastic effects greatly attenuates this stochastic response, especially in modes involving in-plane blade bending.

  15. Comparison of Curvilinear Stiffeners and Tow Steered Composites for Aeroelastic Tailoring of Transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, Bret K.; Jutte, Christine V.

    2016-01-01

    A series of aeroelastic optimization problems are solved on a high aspect ratio wingbox of the Common Research Model, in an effort to minimize structural mass under coupled stress, buckling, and flutter constraints. Two technologies are of particular interest: tow steered composite laminate skins and curvilinear stiffeners. Both methods are found to afford feasible reductions in mass over their non-curvilinear structural counterparts, through both distinct and shared mechanisms for passively controlling aeroelastic performance. Some degree of diminishing returns are seen when curvilinear stiffeners and curvilinear fiber tow paths are used simultaneously.

  16. First-order aerodynamic and aeroelastic behavior of a single-blade installation setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaunaa, M.; Bergami, L.; Guntur, S.; Zahle, F.

    2014-06-01

    Limitations on the wind speed at which blade installation can be performed bears important financial consequences. The installation cost of a wind farm could be significantly reduced by increasing the wind speed at which blade mounting operations can be carried out. This work characterizes the first-order aerodynamic and aeroelastic behavior of a single blade installation system, where the blade is grabbed by a yoke, which is lifted by the crane and stabilized by two taglines. A simple engineering model is formulated to describe the aerodynamic forcing on the blade subject to turbulent wind of arbitrary direction. The model is coupled with a schematic aeroelastic representation of the taglines system, which returns the minimum line tension required to compensate for the aerodynamic forcing. The simplified models are in excellent agreement with the aeroelastic code HAWC2, and provide a solid basis for future design of an upgraded single blade installation system able to operate at higher wind speeds.

  17. Aeroelastic stability of forward swept composite winged aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisshaar, T. A.

    1983-01-01

    This paper reviews the author's past and present aeroelastic stability and performance studies related to forward swept, composite wing aircraft. The influence of laminate elastic bend/twist coupling upon wing divergence, lateral control, and lift effectiveness will be illustrated by means of closed-form solutions, numerical analysis and simple wind-tunnel experiments. In addition, results of analyses of a freely flying flexible FSW aircraft are discussed to indicate the possible effects of the flexible forward swept wing on aircraft dynamic stability. These studies show, both theoretically and experimentally, that, if the aircraft is not carefully designed, a phenomenon referred to as body freedom flutter may appear.

  18. Aeroelastic Wing Shaping Control Subject to Actuation Constraints.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swei, Sean Shan-Min; Nguyen, Nhan

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers the control of coupled aeroelastic aircraft model which is configured with Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap (VCCTEF) system. The relative deflection between two adjacent flaps is constrained and this actuation constraint is accounted for when designing an effective control law for suppressing the wing vibration. A simple tuned-mass damper mechanism with two attached masses is used as an example to demonstrate the effectiveness of vibration suppression with confined motion of tuned masses. In this paper, a dynamic inversion based pseudo-control hedging (PCH) and bounded control approach is investigated, and for illustration, it is applied to the NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM) configured with VCCTEF system.

  19. Aeroelastic Analysis of Aircraft: Wing and Wing/Fuselage Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, H. H.; Chang, K. C.; Tzong, T.; Cebeci, T.

    1997-01-01

    A previously developed interface method for coupling aerodynamics and structures is used to evaluate the aeroelastic effects for an advanced transport wing at cruise and under-cruise conditions. The calculated results are compared with wind tunnel test data. The capability of the interface method is also investigated for an MD-90 wing/fuselage configuration. In addition, an aircraft trim analysis is described and applied to wing configurations. The accuracy of turbulence models based on the algebraic eddy viscosity formulation of Cebeci and Smith is studied for airfoil flows at low Mach numbers by using methods based on the solutions of the boundary-layer and Navier-Stokes equations.

  20. Three-dimensional time-marching aeroelastic analyses using an unstructured-grid Euler method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rausch, Russ D.; Batina, John T.; Yang, Henry T. Y.

    1992-01-01

    Modifications to a three dimensional, implicit, upwind, unstructured-grid Euler code for aeroelastic analysis of complete aircraft configurations are described. The modifications involve the addition of the structural equations of motion for their simultaneous time integration with the governing flow equations. The paper presents a detailed description of the time marching aeroelastic procedure and presents comparisons with experimental data to provide an assessment of the capability. Flutter results are shown for an isolated 45 degree swept-back wing and a supersonic transport configuration with a fuselage, clipped delta wing, and two identical rearward-mounted nacelles. Comparisons between computed and experimental flutter characteristics show good agreement, giving confidence in the accuracy of the aeroelastic capability that was developed.

  1. High Performance Parallel Analysis of Coupled Problems for Aircraft Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felippa, C. A.; Farhat, C.; Lanteri, S.; Maman, N.; Piperno, S.; Gumaste, U.

    1994-01-01

    In order to predict the dynamic response of a flexible structure in a fluid flow, the equations of motion of the structure and the fluid must be solved simultaneously. In this paper, we present several partitioned procedures for time-integrating this focus coupled problem and discuss their merits in terms of accuracy, stability, heterogeneous computing, I/O transfers, subcycling, and parallel processing. All theoretical results are derived for a one-dimensional piston model problem with a compressible flow, because the complete three-dimensional aeroelastic problem is difficult to analyze mathematically. However, the insight gained from the analysis of the coupled piston problem and the conclusions drawn from its numerical investigation are confirmed with the numerical simulation of the two-dimensional transient aeroelastic response of a flexible panel in a transonic nonlinear Euler flow regime.

  2. Ongoing Fixed Wing Research within the NASA Langley Aeroelasticity Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert; Chwalowski, Pawel; Funk, Christie; Heeg, Jennifer; Hur, Jiyoung; Sanetrik, Mark; Scott, Robert; Silva, Walter; Stanford, Bret; Wiseman, Carol

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Langley Aeroelasticity Branch is involved in a number of research programs related to fixed wing aeroelasticity and aeroservoelasticity. These ongoing efforts are summarized here, and include aeroelastic tailoring of subsonic transport wing structures, experimental and numerical assessment of truss-braced wing flutter and limit cycle oscillations, and numerical modeling of high speed civil transport configurations. Efforts devoted to verification, validation, and uncertainty quantification of aeroelastic physics in a workshop setting are also discussed. The feasibility of certain future civil transport configurations will depend on the ability to understand and control complex aeroelastic phenomena, a goal that the Aeroelasticity Branch is well-positioned to contribute through these programs.

  3. Some experiences with active control of aeroelastic response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, J. R.; Abel, I.

    1981-01-01

    Flight and wind tunnel tests were conducted and multidiscipline computer programs were developed as part of investigations of active control technology conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center. Unsteady aerodynamics approximation, optimal control theory, optimal controller design, and the Delta wing and DC-10 models are described. The drones for aerodynamics and structural testing (DAST program) for evaluating procedures for aerodynamic loads prediction and the design of active control systems on wings with significant aeroelastic effects is described as well as the DAST model used in the wind tunnel tests.

  4. Overview of the Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heeg, Jennifer; Chwalowski, Pawel; Schuster, David M.; Dalenbring, Mats

    2013-01-01

    The AIAA Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop (AePW) was held in April, 2012, bringing together communities of aeroelasticians and computational fluid dynamicists. The objective in conducting this workshop on aeroelastic prediction was to assess state-of-the-art computational aeroelasticity methods as practical tools for the prediction of static and dynamic aeroelastic phenomena. No comprehensive aeroelastic benchmarking validation standard currently exists, greatly hindering validation and state-of-the-art assessment objectives. The workshop was a step towards assessing the state of the art in computational aeroelasticity. This was an opportunity to discuss and evaluate the effectiveness of existing computer codes and modeling techniques for unsteady flow, and to identify computational and experimental areas needing additional research and development. Three configurations served as the basis for the workshop, providing different levels of geometric and flow field complexity. All cases considered involved supercritical airfoils at transonic conditions. The flow fields contained oscillating shocks and in some cases, regions of separation. The computational tools principally employed Reynolds-Averaged Navier Stokes solutions. The successes and failures of the computations and the experiments are examined in this paper.

  5. Recent Applications of the Volterra Theory to Aeroelastic Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Haji, Muhammad R; Prazenica, Richard J.

    2005-01-01

    The identification of nonlinear aeroelastic systems based on the Volterra theory of nonlinear systems is presented. Recent applications of the theory to problems in experimental aeroelasticity are reviewed. These results include the identification of aerodynamic impulse responses, the application of higher-order spectra (HOS) to wind-tunnel flutter data, and the identification of nonlinear aeroelastic phenomena from flight flutter test data of the Active Aeroelastic Wing (AAW) aircraft.

  6. Analytic investigation of helicopter rotor blade appended aeroelastic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielawa, Richard L.

    1984-01-01

    Analytic evaluations of four different passive aeroelastic devices appended to helicopter rotor blades are presented. The devices consist of a passive tuned tab, a control coupled tab, an all-flying tip and a harmonic dilational airfoil tip. Each device was conceived for improving either aerodynamic performance or reducing vibratory control loads or hub shears. The evaluation was performed using a comprehensive rotor aeroelastic analysis (the G400PA code with appropriate modifications), together with data for a realistic helicopter rotor blade (the UH-60A Blackhawk), in high speed flight (90 m/s, 175 kts). The results of this study show that significant performance (L/(D sub e)) gains can be achieved with the all-flying free tip. Results from the harmonic dilational airfoil tip show the potential for moderate improvements in L/(D sub e). Finally, the results for the passive tuned tab and the control coupled tab, as configured for this study, show these devices to be impractical. Sections are included which describe the operation of each device, the required G400PA modifications, and the detailed results obtained for each device.

  7. Aeroelasticity and structural optimization of composite helicopter rotor blades with swept tips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, K. A.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the development of an aeroelastic analysis capability for composite helicopter rotor blades with straight and swept tips, and its application to the simulation of helicopter vibration reduction through structural optimization. A new aeroelastic model is developed in this study which is suitable for composite rotor blades with swept tips in hover and in forward flight. The hingeless blade is modeled by beam type finite elements. A single finite element is used to model the swept tip. Arbitrary cross-sectional shape, generally anisotropic material behavior, transverse shears and out-of-plane warping are included in the blade model. The nonlinear equations of motion, derived using Hamilton's principle, are based on a moderate deflection theory. Composite blade cross-sectbnal properties are calculated by a separate linear, two-dimensional cross section analysis. The aerodynamic loads are obtained from quasi-steady, incompressible aerodynamics, based on an implicit formulation. The trim and steady state blade aeroelastic response are solved in a fully coupled manner. In forward flight, where the blade equations of motion are periodic, the coupled trim-aeroelastic response solution is obtained from the harmonic balance method. Subsequently, the periodic system is linearized about the steady state response, and its stability is determined from Floquet theory.

  8. Development of an Aeroelastic Modeling Capability for Transient Nozzle Side Load Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Zhao, Xiang; Zhang, Sijun; Chen, Yen-Sen

    2013-01-01

    Lateral nozzle forces are known to cause severe structural damage to any new rocket engine in development. Currently there is no fully coupled computational tool to analyze this fluid/structure interaction process. The objective of this study was to develop a fully coupled aeroelastic modeling capability to describe the fluid/structure interaction process during the transient nozzle operations. The aeroelastic model composes of three components: the computational fluid dynamics component based on an unstructured-grid, pressure-based computational fluid dynamics formulation, the computational structural dynamics component developed in the framework of modal analysis, and the fluid-structural interface component. The developed aeroelastic model was applied to the transient nozzle startup process of the Space Shuttle Main Engine at sea level. The computed nozzle side loads and the axial nozzle wall pressure profiles from the aeroelastic nozzle are compared with those of the published rigid nozzle results, and the impact of the fluid/structure interaction on nozzle side loads is interrogated and presented.

  9. Aeroelastic, CFD, and Dynamic Computation and Optimization for Buffet and Flutter Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.

    1997-01-01

    The work presented in this paper include: 'Coupled and Uncoupled Bending-Torsion Responses of Twin-Tail Buffet'; 'Fluid/Structure Twin Tail Buffet Response Over a Wide Range of Angles of Attack'; 'Resent Advances in Multidisciplinary Aeronautical Problems of Fluids/Structures/Dynamics Interaction'; and'Development of a Coupled Fluid/Structure Aeroelastic Solver with Applications to Vortex Breakdown induced Twin Tail Buffeting.

  10. Probabilistic Aeroelastic Analysis Developed for Turbomachinery Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.; Mital, Subodh K.; Stefko, George L.; Pai, Shantaram S.

    2003-01-01

    Aeroelastic analyses for advanced turbomachines are being developed for use at the NASA Glenn Research Center and industry. However, these analyses at present are used for turbomachinery design with uncertainties accounted for by using safety factors. This approach may lead to overly conservative designs, thereby reducing the potential of designing higher efficiency engines. An integration of the deterministic aeroelastic analysis methods with probabilistic analysis methods offers the potential to design efficient engines with fewer aeroelastic problems and to make a quantum leap toward designing safe reliable engines. In this research, probabilistic analysis is integrated with aeroelastic analysis: (1) to determine the parameters that most affect the aeroelastic characteristics (forced response and stability) of a turbomachine component such as a fan, compressor, or turbine and (2) to give the acceptable standard deviation on the design parameters for an aeroelastically stable system. The approach taken is to combine the aeroelastic analysis of the MISER (MIStuned Engine Response) code with the FPI (fast probability integration) code. The role of MISER is to provide the functional relationships that tie the structural and aerodynamic parameters (the primitive variables) to the forced response amplitudes and stability eigenvalues (the response properties). The role of FPI is to perform probabilistic analyses by utilizing the response properties generated by MISER. The results are a probability density function for the response properties. The probabilistic sensitivities of the response variables to uncertainty in primitive variables are obtained as a byproduct of the FPI technique. The combined analysis of aeroelastic and probabilistic analysis is applied to a 12-bladed cascade vibrating in bending and torsion. Out of the total 11 design parameters, 6 are considered as having probabilistic variation. The six parameters are space-to-chord ratio (SBYC), stagger angle

  11. A methodology for aeroelastic constraint analysis in a conceptual design environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Baets, Peter Wilfried Gaston

    The objective of this study is the infusion of aeroelastic constraint knowledge into the design space. The mapping of such aeroelastic information in the conceptual design space has long been a desire of the design community. The conceptual design phase of an aircraft is a multidisciplinary environment and has the most influence on the future design of the vehicle. However, sufficient results cannot he obtained in a timely enough manner to materially contribute to early design decisions. Furthermore, the natural division of the engineering team into specialty groups is not well supported by the monolithic aerodynamic-structures codes typically used in modern aeroelastic analysis. The research examines how the Bi-Level Integrated System Synthesis decomposition technique can be adapted to perform as the conceptual aeroelastic design tool. The study describes a comprehensive solution of the aeroelastic coupled problem cast in this decomposition format and implemented in an integrated framework. The method is supported by application details of a proof of concept high speed vehicle. Physics-based codes such as finite element and an aerodynamic panel method are used to model the high-definition geometric characteristics of the vehicle. A synthesis and sizing code was added to referee the conflicts that arise between the two disciplines. This research's novelty lies in four points. First is the use of physics-based tools at the conceptual design phase to calculate the aeroelastic properties. Second is the projection of flutter and divergence velocity constraint lines in a power loading versus wing loading graph. Third is the aeroelastic assessment time reduction, which has moved from a matter of years to months. Lastly, this assessment allowed verification of the impact of changing velocity, altitude, and angle of attack on the aeroelastic properties. This then allowed identification of robust design space with respect to these three mission properties. The method

  12. Centrifugal Compressor Aeroelastic Analysis Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Srivastava, Rakesh

    2002-01-01

    Centrifugal compressors are very widely used in the turbomachine industry where low mass flow rates are required. Gas turbine engines for tanks, rotorcraft and small jets rely extensively on centrifugal compressors for rugged and compact design. These compressors experience problems related with unsteadiness of flowfields, such as stall flutter, separation at the trailing edge over diffuser guide vanes, tip vortex unsteadiness, etc., leading to rotating stall and surge. Considerable interest exists in small gas turbine engine manufacturers to understand and eventually eliminate the problems related to centrifugal compressors. The geometric complexity of centrifugal compressor blades and the twisting of the blade passages makes the linear methods inapplicable. Advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods are needed for accurate unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analysis of centrifugal compressors. Most of the current day industrial turbomachines and small aircraft engines are designed with a centrifugal compressor. With such a large customer base and NASA Glenn Research Center being, the lead center for turbomachines, it is important that adequate emphasis be placed on this area as well. Currently, this activity is not supported under any project at NASA Glenn.

  13. Centrifugal Compressor Aeroelastic Analysis Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Srivastava, Rakesh

    2002-01-01

    Centrifugal compressors are very widely used in the turbomachine industry where low mass flow rates are required. Gas turbine engines for tanks, rotorcraft and small jets rely extensively on centrifugal compressors for rugged and compact design. These compressors experience problems related with unsteadiness of flowfields, such as stall flutter, separation at the trailing edge over diffuser guide vanes, tip vortex unsteadiness, etc., leading to rotating stall and surge. Considerable interest exists in small gas turbine engine manufacturers to understand and eventually eliminate the problems related to centrifugal compressors. The geometric complexity of centrifugal compressor blades and the twisting of the blade passages makes the linear methods inapplicable. Advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods are needed for accurate unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analysis of centrifugal compressors. Most of the current day industrial turbomachines and small aircraft engines are designed with a centrifugal compressor. With such a large customer base and NASA Glenn Research Center being, the lead center for turbomachines, it is important that adequate emphasis be placed on this area as well. Currently, this activity is not supported under any project at NASA Glenn.

  14. Aeroelastic Tailoring via Tow Steered Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, Bret K.; Jutte, Christine V.

    2014-01-01

    The use of tow steered composites, where fibers follow prescribed curvilinear paths within a laminate, can improve upon existing capabilities related to aeroelastic tailoring of wing structures, though this tailoring method has received relatively little attention in the literature. This paper demonstrates the technique for both a simple cantilevered plate in low-speed flow, as well as the wing box of a full-scale high aspect ratio transport configuration. Static aeroelastic stresses and dynamic flutter boundaries are obtained for both cases. The impact of various tailoring choices upon the aeroelastic performance is quantified: curvilinear fiber steering versus straight fiber steering, certifiable versus noncertifiable stacking sequences, a single uniform laminate per wing skin versus multiple laminates, and identical upper and lower wing skins structures versus individual tailoring.

  15. Recent advances in transonic computational aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, John T.; Bennett, Robert M.; Seidel, David A.; Cunningham, Herbert J.; Bland, Samuel R.

    1988-01-01

    A transonic unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelasticity code called CAP-TSD was developed for application to realistic aircraft configurations. The code permits the calculation of steady and unsteady flows about complete aircraft configurations for aeroelastic analysis in the flutter critical transonic speed range. The CAP-TSD code uses a time accurate approximate factorization algorithm for solution of the unsteady transonic small disturbance potential equation. An overview is given of the CAP-TSD code development effort and results are presented which demonstrate various capabilities of the code. Calculations are presented for several configurations including the General Dynamics 1/9 scale F-16 aircraft model and the ONERA M6 wing. Calculations are also presented from a flutter analysis of a 45 deg sweptback wing which agrees well with the experimental data. Descriptions are presented of the CAP-TSD code and algorithm details along with results and comparisons which demonstrate these recent developments in transonic computational aeroelasticity.

  16. Finite state aeroelastic model for use in rotor design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Chengjian; Peters, David A.

    1993-01-01

    In this article, a rotor aeroelastic model based on a newly developed finite state dynamic wake, coupled with blade finite element analysis, is described. The analysis is intended for application in rotor blade design optimization. A coupled simultaneous system of differential equations combining blade structural dynamics and aerodynamics is established in a formulation well-suited for design sensitivity computation. Each blade is assumed to be an elastic beam undergoing flap bending, lead-lag bending, elastic twist, and axial deflections. Aerodynamic loads are computed from unsteady blade element theory where the rotor three-dimensional unsteady wake is described by a generalized dynamic wake model. Correlation of results obtained from the analysis with flight test data is provided to assess model accuracy.

  17. Chemical recoveries of technetium-99 for various procedures using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ihsanullah; East, B.W.

    1993-12-31

    The procedure for the determination of {sup 99}Tc inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was based on the modification of a variety of available separation techniques. Standard Ru and Rh solutions were used for checking decontaminations and instrument response respectively. Technetium-99 and {sup 95m}Tc tracers were applied as yield monitors using ICP-MS and gamma-ray spectrometry respectively. Percent recoveries are reported for a variety of radiochemical separation procedures for water (58-83%), seaweed (10-76%), and for soil matrices (19-79%).

  18. OVERAERO-MPI: Parallel Overset Aeroelasticity Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gee, Ken; Rizk, Yehia M.

    1999-01-01

    An overset modal structures analysis code was integrated with a parallel overset Navier-Stokes flow solver to obtain a code capable of static aeroelastic computations. The new code was used to compute the static aeroelastic deformation of an arrow-wing-body geometry and a complex, full aircraft configuration. For the simple geometry, the results were similar to the results obtained with the ENSAERO code and the PVM version of OVERAERO. The full potential of this code suite was illustrated in the complex, full aircraft computations.

  19. Aeroelastic Stability and Response of Rotating Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Reddy, Tondapu

    2004-01-01

    A summary of the work performed under NASA grant is presented. More details can be found in the cited references. This grant led to the development of relatively faster aeroelastic analysis methods for predicting flutter and forced response in fans, compressors, and turbines using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) methods. These methods are based on linearized two- and three-dimensional, unsteady, nonlinear aerodynamic equations. During the period of the grant, aeroelastic analysis that includes the effects of uncertainties in the design variables has also been developed.

  20. Method of performing computational aeroelastic analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Computational aeroelastic analyses typically use a mathematical model for the structural modes of a flexible structure and a nonlinear aerodynamic model that can generate a plurality of unsteady aerodynamic responses based on the structural modes for conditions defining an aerodynamic condition of the flexible structure. In the present invention, a linear state-space model is generated using a single execution of the nonlinear aerodynamic model for all of the structural modes where a family of orthogonal functions is used as the inputs. Then, static and dynamic aeroelastic solutions are generated using computational interaction between the mathematical model and the linear state-space model for a plurality of periodic points in time.

  1. Aeroelastic Analysis of the NASA/ARMY/MIT Active Twist Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkie, W. Keats; Wilbur, Matthew L.; Mirick, Paul H.; Cesnik, Carlos E. S.; Shin, Sangloon

    1999-01-01

    Aeroelastic modeling procedures used in the design of a piezoelectric controllable twist helicopter rotor wind tunnel model are described. Two aeroelastic analysis methods developed for active twist rotor studies, and used in the design of the model blade, are described in this paper. The first procedure uses a simple flap-torsion dynamic representation of the active twist blade, and is intended for rapid and efficient control law and design optimization studies. The second technique employs a commercially available comprehensive rotor analysis package, and is used for more detailed analytical studies. Analytical predictions of hovering flight twist actuation frequency responses are presented for both techniques. Forward flight fixed system nP vibration suppression capabilities of the model active twist rotor system are also presented. Frequency responses predicted using both analytical procedures agree qualitatively for all design cases considered, with best correlation for cases where uniform blade properties are assumed.

  2. Parametric design study of an aeroelastic flutter energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, Matthew; Wolff, Eric; Garcia, Ephrahim

    2011-03-01

    This paper investigates a novel mechanism for powering wireless sensors or low power electronics by extracting energy from an ambient fluid flow using a piezoelectric energy harvester driven by aeroelastic flutter vibrations. The energy harvester makes use of a modal convergence flutter instability to generate limit cycle bending oscillations of a cantilevered piezoelectric beam with a small flap connected to its free end by a revolute joint. The critical flow speed at which destabilizing aerodynamic effects cause self-excited vibrations of the structure to emerge is essential to the design of the energy harvester. This value sets the lower bound on the operating wind speed and frequency range of the system. A system of coupled equations that describe the structural, aerodynamic, and electromechanical aspects of the system are used to model the system dynamics. The model uses unsteady aerodynamic modeling to predict the aerodynamic forces and moments acting on the structure and to account for the effects of vortices shed by the flapping wing, while a modal summation technique is used to model the flexible piezoelectric structure. This model is applied to examine the effects on the cut-in wind speed of the system when several design parameters are tuned and the size and mass of the system is held fixed. The effects on the aeroelastic system dynamics and relative sensitivity of the flutter stability boundary are presented and discussed. Experimental wind tunnel results are included to validate the model predictions.

  3. An Eulerian/Lagrangian coupling procedure for three-dimensional vortical flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felici, Helene M.; Drela, Mark

    1993-01-01

    A coupled Eulerian/Lagrangian method is presented for the reduction of numerical diffusion observed in solutions of 3D vortical flows using standard Eulerian finite-volume time-marching procedures. A Lagrangian particle tracking method, added to the Eulerian time-marching procedure, provides a correction of the Eulerian solution. In turn, the Eulerian solution is used to integrate the Lagrangian state-vector along the particles trajectories. While the Eulerian solution ensures the conservation of mass and sets the pressure field, the particle markers describe accurately the convection properties and enhance the vorticity and entropy capturing capabilities of the Eulerian solver. The Eulerian/Lagrangian coupling strategies are discussed and the combined scheme is tested on a constant stagnation pressure flow in a 90 deg bend and on a swirling pipe flow. As the numerical diffusion is reduced when using the Lagrangian correction, a vorticity gradient augmentation is identified as a basic problem of this inviscid calculation.

  4. A parametric study of planform and aeroelastic effects on aerodynamic center, alpha- and q- stability derivatives. Appendix D: Procedures used to determine the mass distribution for idealized low aspect ratio two spar fighter wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roskam, J.; Hamler, F. R.; Reynolds, D.

    1972-01-01

    The procedures used to establish the mass matrices characteristics for the fighter type wings studied are given. A description of the procedure used to find the mass associated with a specific aerodynamic panel is presented and some examples of the application of the procedure are included.

  5. Aeroelastic modeling of composite rotor blades with straight and swept tips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, Kuo-An; Friedmann, Peretz P.; Venkatesan, Comandur

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical study of the aeroelastic behavior of composite rotor blades with straight and swept tips. The blade is modeled by beam type finite elements. A single finite element is used to model the swept tip. The nonlinear equations of motion for the FEM are derived using Hamilton's principle and based on a moderate deflection theory and accounts for: arbitrary cross-sectional shape, pretwist, generally anisotropic material behavior, transverse shears and out-of-plane warping. Numerical results illustrating the effects of tip sweep, anhedral and composite ply orientation on blade aeroelastic behavior are presented. It is shown that composite ply orientation has a substantial effect on blade stability. At low thrust conditions, certain ply orientations can cause instability in the lag mode. The flap-torsion coupling associated with tip sweep can also induce aeroelastic instability in the blade. This instability can be removed by appropriate ply orientation in the composite construction. These results illustrate the inherent potential for aeroelastic tailoring present in composite rotor blades with swept tips, which still remains to be exploited in the design process.

  6. A coupled multi-block solution procedure for spray combustion in complex geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Kuo-Huey; Shuen, Jian-Shun

    1993-01-01

    Turbulent spray-combusting flow in complex geometries is presently treated by a coupled implicit procedure that employs finite-rate chemistry and real gas properties for combustion, as well as the stochastic separated model for spray and a multiblock treatment for complex geometries. Illustrative numerical tests conducted encompass a steady-state nonreacting backward-facing step flow, a premixed single-phase combustion flow, and spray combustion flow in a gas turbine combustor.

  7. Static Aeroelastic Scaling and Analysis of a Sub-Scale Flexible Wing Wind Tunnel Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, Eric; Lebofsky, Sonia; Nguyen, Nhan; Trinh, Khanh

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to the development of a scaled wind tunnel model for static aeroelastic similarity with a full-scale wing model. The full-scale aircraft model is based on the NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM) with flexible wing structures referred to as the Elastically Shaped Aircraft Concept (ESAC). The baseline stiffness of the ESAC wing represents a conventionally stiff wing model. Static aeroelastic scaling is conducted on the stiff wing configuration to develop the wind tunnel model, but additional tailoring is also conducted such that the wind tunnel model achieves a 10% wing tip deflection at the wind tunnel test condition. An aeroelastic scaling procedure and analysis is conducted, and a sub-scale flexible wind tunnel model based on the full-scale's undeformed jig-shape is developed. Optimization of the flexible wind tunnel model's undeflected twist along the span, or pre-twist or wash-out, is then conducted for the design test condition. The resulting wind tunnel model is an aeroelastic model designed for the wind tunnel test condition.

  8. Power extraction from aeroelastic limit cycle oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunnmon, J. A.; Stanton, S. C.; Mann, B. P.; Dowell, E. H.

    2011-11-01

    Nonlinear limit cycle oscillations of an aeroelastic energy harvester are exploited for enhanced piezoelectric power generation from aerodynamic flows. Specifically, a flexible beam with piezoelectric laminates is excited by a uniform axial flow field in a manner analogous to a flapping flag such that the system delivers power to an electrical impedance load. Fluid-structure interaction is modeled by augmenting a system of nonlinear equations for an electroelastic beam with a discretized vortex-lattice potential flow model. Experimental results from a prototype aeroelastic energy harvester are also presented. Root mean square electrical power on the order of 2.5 mW was delivered below the flutter boundary of the test apparatus at a comparatively low wind speed of 27 m/s and a chord normalized limit cycle amplitude of 0.33. Moreover, subcritical limit cycles with chord normalized amplitudes of up to 0.46 were observed. Calculations indicate that the system tested here was able to access over 17% of the flow energy to which it was exposed. Methods for designing aeroelastic energy harvesters by exploiting nonlinear aeroelastic phenomena and potential improvements to existing relevant aerodynamic models are also discussed.

  9. Aeroelastic Stability and Response of Rotating Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Reddy, T. S. R.

    1998-01-01

    A summary of the work performed from 1996 to 1997 is presented. More details can be found in the cited references. This grant led to the development of aeroelastic analyses methods for predicting flutter and forced response in fans, compressors, and turbines using computational

  10. Aeroelastic Stability & Response of Rotating Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Reddy, T. S. R.

    2001-01-01

    A summary of the work performed under NASA grant NCC3-605 is presented. More details can be found in the cited references. This grant led to the development of relatively faster aeroelastic analyses methods for predicting flutter and forced response in fans, compressors, and turbines using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) methods.

  11. Aeroelastic Analysis of Helicopter Rotor Blades Incorporating Anisotropic Piezoelectric Twist Actuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkie, W. Keats; Belvin, W. Keith; Park, K. C.

    1996-01-01

    A simple aeroelastic analysis of a helicopter rotor blade incorporating embedded piezoelectric fiber composite, interdigitated electrode blade twist actuators is described. The analysis consists of a linear torsion and flapwise bending model coupled with a nonlinear ONERA based unsteady aerodynamics model. A modified Galerkin procedure is performed upon the rotor blade partial differential equations of motion to develop a system of ordinary differential equations suitable for dynamics simulation using numerical integration. The twist actuation responses for three conceptual fullscale blade designs with realistic constraints on blade mass are numerically evaluated using the analysis. Numerical results indicate that useful amplitudes of nonresonant elastic twist, on the order of one to two degrees, are achievable under one-g hovering flight conditions for interdigitated electrode poling configurations. Twist actuation for the interdigitated electrode blades is also compared with the twist actuation of a conventionally poled piezoelectric fiber composite blade. Elastic twist produced using the interdigitated electrode actuators was found to be four to five times larger than that obtained with the conventionally poled actuators.

  12. An aeroelastic analysis of helicopter rotor blades incorporating piezoelectric fiber composite twist actuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkie, W. Keats; Park, K. C.

    1996-01-01

    A simple aeroelastic analysis of a helicopter rotor blade incorporating embedded piezoelectric fiber composite, interdigitated electrode blade twist actuators is described. The analysis consist of a linear torsion and flapwise bending model coupled with a nonlinear ONERA based unsteady aerodynamics model. A modified Galerkin procedure is performed upon the rotor blade partial differential equations of motion to develop a system of ordinary differential equations suitable for numerical integration. The twist actuation responses for three conceptual full-scale blade designs with realistic constraints on blade mass are numerically evaluated using the analysis. Numerical results indicate that useful amplitudes of nonresonant elastic twist, on the order of one to two degrees, are achievable under one-g hovering flight conditions for interdigitated electrode poling configurations. Twist actuation for the interdigitated electrode blades is also compared with the twist actuation of a conventionally poled piezoelectric fiber composite blade. Elastic twist produced using the interdigitated electrode actuators was found to be four to five times larger than that obtained with the conventionally poled actuators.

  13. Aeroelastic Analysis of Counter Rotation Fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Murthy, Durbha V.

    1997-01-01

    Aeroelastic problems in turbomachinery and propfans can be static or dynamic in nature. The analysis of static aeroelastic problems is involved primarily with determination: (a) of the shape of the blades and the steady aerodynamic loads on the blades (which are inter-dependent), (b) of the resultant steady stresses and (c) of the static instability (divergence) margin, if applicable. In this project, we were concerned exclusively with dynamic aeroelastic behavior. The analysis of dynamic aeroelastic problems is involved with the determination: (a) of the unsteady aerodynamic loads on blades and the dynamic motion of the blades (which are again inter-dependent), (b) of the resultant dynamic stresses and their effect on fatigue life and (c) of the dynamic instability (flutter), if applicable. There are two primary dynamic aeroelastic phenomena of interest to designers of turbomachinery and propfans: flutter and forced response. Flutter generally refers to the occurrence of rapidly growing self-excited oscillations leading to catastrophic failure of the blade. When certain nonlinear phenomena are present, flutter response may lead to a potentially dangerous limit cycle oscillation rather than an immediate catastrophic failure. Forced response generally refers to the steady-state oscillations that occur as a consequence of excitations external to the rotor in question. These excitations typically result from the presence of upstream obstructions, inflow distortions, downstream obstructions, or mechanical sources such as tip-casing contact or shaft and gear meshing. Significant forced response leads to blade fatigue, and at design conditions, generally contributes to a degradation of blade life. At other operating conditions, forced response may lead to catastrophic failure due to severe blade fatigue in a short duration of time.

  14. Development of an aeroelastic methodology for surface morphing rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, James R.

    Helicopter performance capabilities are limited by maximum lift characteristics and vibratory loading. In high speed forward flight, dynamic stall and transonic flow greatly increase the amplitude of vibratory loads. Experiments and computational simulations alike have indicated that a variety of active rotor control devices are capable of reducing vibratory loads. For example, periodic blade twist and flap excitation have been optimized to reduce vibratory loads in various rotors. Airfoil geometry can also be modified in order to increase lift coefficient, delay stall, or weaken transonic effects. To explore the potential benefits of active controls, computational methods are being developed for aeroelastic rotor evaluation, including coupling between computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and computational structural dynamics (CSD) solvers. In many contemporary CFD/CSD coupling methods it is assumed that the airfoil is rigid to reduce the interface by single dimension. Some methods retain the conventional one-dimensional beam model while prescribing an airfoil shape to simulate active chord deformation. However, to simulate the actual response of a compliant airfoil it is necessary to include deformations that originate not only from control devices (such as piezoelectric actuators), but also inertial forces, elastic stresses, and aerodynamic pressures. An accurate representation of the physics requires an interaction with a more complete representation of loads and geometry. A CFD/CSD coupling methodology capable of communicating three-dimensional structural deformations and a distribution of aerodynamic forces over the wetted blade surface has not yet been developed. In this research an interface is created within the Fully Unstructured Navier-Stokes (FUN3D) solver that communicates aerodynamic forces on the blade surface to University of Michigan's Nonlinear Active Beam Solver (UM/NLABS -- referred to as NLABS in this thesis). Interface routines are developed for

  15. Application of a transonic potential flow code to the static aeroelastic analysis of three-dimensional wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlow, W., Jr.; Bennett, R. M.

    1982-01-01

    Since the aerodynamic theory is nonlinear, the method requires the coupling of two iterative processes - an aerodynamic analysis and a structural analysis. A full potential analysis code, FLO22, is combined with a linear structural analysis to yield aerodynamic load distributions on and deflections of elastic wings. This method was used to analyze an aeroelastically-scaled wind tunnel model of a proposed executive-jet transport wing and an aeroelastic research wing. The results are compared with the corresponding rigid-wing analyses, and some effects of elasticity on the aerodynamic loading are noted.

  16. Generic Procedure for Coupling the PHREEQC Geochemical Modeling Framework with Flow and Solute Transport Simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wissmeier, L. C.; Barry, D. A.

    2009-12-01

    Computer simulations of water availability and quality play an important role in state-of-the-art water resources management. However, many of the most utilized software programs focus either on physical flow and transport phenomena (e.g., MODFLOW, MT3DMS, FEFLOW, HYDRUS) or on geochemical reactions (e.g., MINTEQ, PHREEQC, CHESS, ORCHESTRA). In recent years, several couplings between both genres of programs evolved in order to consider interactions between flow and biogeochemical reactivity (e.g., HP1, PHWAT). Software coupling procedures can be categorized as ‘close couplings’, where programs pass information via the memory stack at runtime, and ‘remote couplings’, where the information is exchanged at each time step via input/output files. The former generally involves modifications of software codes and therefore expert programming skills are required. We present a generic recipe for remotely coupling the PHREEQC geochemical modeling framework and flow and solute transport (FST) simulators. The iterative scheme relies on operator splitting with continuous re-initialization of PHREEQC and the FST of choice at each time step. Since PHREEQC calculates the geochemistry of aqueous solutions in contact with soil minerals, the procedure is primarily designed for couplings to FST’s for liquid phase flow in natural environments. It requires the accessibility of initial conditions and numerical parameters such as time and space discretization in the input text file for the FST and control of the FST via commands to the operating system (batch on Windows; bash/shell on Unix/Linux). The coupling procedure is based on PHREEQC’s capability to save the state of a simulation with all solid, liquid and gaseous species as a PHREEQC input file by making use of the dump file option in the TRANSPORT keyword. The output from one reaction calculation step is therefore reused as input for the following reaction step where changes in element amounts due to advection

  17. Meeting the challenges with the Douglas Aircraft Company Aeroelastic Design Optimization Program (ADOP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rommel, Bruce A.

    1989-01-01

    An overview of the Aeroelastic Design Optimization Program (ADOP) at the Douglas Aircraft Company is given. A pilot test program involving the animation of mode shapes with solid rendering as well as wire frame displays, a complete aircraft model of a high-altitude hypersonic aircraft to test ADOP procedures, a flap model, and an aero-mesh modeler for doublet lattice aerodynamics are discussed.

  18. Parametric study of the aeroelastic stability of a bearingless rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooper, W. E.

    1985-01-01

    A trade study was conducted to illustrate the sensitivity of the aeroelastic stability of a bearingless main rotor to the rotor hub coupling parameters that are available for the designer. The results are presented over the complete range of rotor speed and collective pitch available and the effects on air resonance of the 6 beam installation angles are compared together with the results of offsetting the cuff snubber attachment. The major part of the study was conducted using the FLAIR analysis which incorporates a uniform representation of the flexbeam. Results are also shown for a modified version of FLAIR in which the uniform beam is replaced by a member having the geometric tailoring resulting from structural optimization.

  19. Enhanced aeroelastic energy harvesting with a beam stiffener

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liya; Yang, Yaowen

    2015-03-01

    In this article, we propose an easy but quite effective method to significantly enhance the power generation capability of an aeroelastic energy harvester. The method is to attach a beam stiffener to the substrate of the harvester, which works as an electromechanical coupling magnifier. It is shown to be effective for all three considered types of harvesters based on galloping, vortex-induced vibration and flutter, leading to a superior performance over the conventional designs without the beam stiffener, with dozens of times the increase in power and an almost 100% increase in the power extraction efficiency yet with comparable or even smaller transverse displacement. Choice guidelines of optimal types of energy harvesters are also suggested based on the given wind situations where the electronic device is located.

  20. Results of including geometric nonlinearities in an aeroelastic model of an F/A-18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buttrill, Carey S.

    1989-01-01

    An integrated, nonlinear simulation model suitable for aeroelastic modeling of fixed-wing aircraft has been developed. While the author realizes that the subject of modeling rotating, elastic structures is not closed, it is believed that the equations of motion developed and applied herein are correct to second order and are suitable for use with typical aircraft structures. The equations are not suitable for large elastic deformation. In addition, the modeling framework generalizes both the methods and terminology of non-linear rigid-body airplane simulation and traditional linear aeroelastic modeling. Concerning the importance of angular/elastic inertial coupling in the dynamic analysis of fixed-wing aircraft, the following may be said. The rigorous inclusion of said coupling is not without peril and must be approached with care. In keeping with the same engineering judgment that guided the development of the traditional aeroelastic equations, the effect of non-linear inertial effects for most airplane applications is expected to be small. A parameter does not tell the whole story, however, and modes flagged by the parameter as significant also need to be checked to see if the coupling is not a one-way path, i.e., the inertially affected modes can influence other modes.

  1. Optimal design application on the advanced aeroelastic rotor blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, F. S.; Jones, R.

    1985-01-01

    The vibration and performance optimization procedure using regression analysis was successfully applied to an advanced aeroelastic blade design study. The major advantage of this regression technique is that multiple optimizations can be performed to evaluate the effects of various objective functions and constraint functions. The data bases obtained from the rotorcraft flight simulation program C81 and Myklestad mode shape program are analytically determined as a function of each design variable. This approach has been verified for various blade radial ballast weight locations and blade planforms. This method can also be utilized to ascertain the effect of a particular cost function which is composed of several objective functions with different weighting factors for various mission requirements without any additional effort.

  2. Optimal mistuning for enhanced aeroelastic stability of transonic fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, K. C.; Crawley, E. F.

    1983-01-01

    An inverse design procedure was developed for the design of a mistuned rotor. The design requirements are that the stability margin of the eigenvalues of the aeroelastic system be greater than or equal to some minimum stability margin, and that the mass added to each blade be positive. The objective was to achieve these requirements with a minimal amount of mistuning. Hence, the problem was posed as a constrained optimization problem. The constrained minimization problem was solved by the technique of mathematical programming via augmented Lagrangians. The unconstrained minimization phase of this technique was solved by the variable metric method. The bladed disk was modelled as being composed of a rigid disk mounted on a rigid shaft. Each of the blades were modelled with a single tosional degree of freedom.

  3. A study of aeroelastic and structural dynamic effects in multi-rotor systems with application to hybrid heavy lift vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, P. P.

    1984-01-01

    An aeroelastic model suitable for the study of aeroelastic and structural dynamic effects in multirotor vehicles simulating a hybrid heavy lift vehicle was developed and applied to the study of a number of diverse problems. The analytical model developed proved capable of modeling a number of aeroelastic problems, namely: (1) isolated blade aeroelastic stability in hover and forward flight, (2) coupled rotor/fuselage aeromechanical problem in air or ground resonance, (3) tandem rotor coupled rotor/fuselage problems, and (4) the aeromechanical stability of a multirotor vehicle model representing a hybrid heavy lift airship (HHLA). The model was used to simulate the ground resonance boundaries of a three bladed hingeless rotor model, including the effect of aerodynamic loads, and the theoretical predictions compared well with experimental results. Subsequently the model was used to study the aeromechanical stability of a vehicle representing a hybrid heavy lift airship, and potential instabilities which could occur for this type of vehicle were identified. The coupling between various blade, supporting structure and rigid body modes was identified.

  4. An analytical study of effects of aeroelasticity on control effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehrotra, S. C.

    1975-01-01

    Structural influence coefficients were calculated for various wing planforms using the KU Aeroelastic and NASTRAN programs. The resulting matrices are compared with experimental results. Conclusions are given.

  5. Comparative study of coupling coefficients in Dirichlet-Robin procedure for fluid-structure aerothermal simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Errera, M.-P.; Duchaine, F.

    2016-05-01

    This paper tests the performance of coupling coefficients of a Dirichlet-Robin transmission procedure in the context of steady conjugate heat transfer (CHT). Particular emphasis is put on the optimal coefficients highlighted recently in a theoretical study based on a normal mode stability analysis. This work can be seen as the logical continuation of that study in order to assess the relevance of the coefficients provided by the model problem in a realistic aerothermal computation. First, the numerical and physical CHT modeling methodologies are presented. Then, the optimal procedure applied to a Dirichlet-Robin algorithm (one-coefficient method) is briefly described. In order to gauge the ability of this model to predict the stability and convergence properties of a realistic case, it is compared on a heated cylinder in a flowfield test case. A series of five coupling coefficients and three Fourier numbers are considered. These parameters are introduced into the model problem as data to compute the amplification factor and the stability limits. The stability and convergence properties predicted by the model problem are then compared to those obtained in the CHT computation. This comparison shows an excellent overall agreement. Moreover, for all the Fourier numbers considered, the numerical solution is stable and oscillation-free when the optimal coefficient of the model problem is used. This would suggest that the one-dimensional normal mode analysis can provide relevant coefficients directly applicable to real CHT problems.

  6. Probabilistic Aeroelastic Analysis of Turbomachinery Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.; Mital, S. K.; Stefko, G. L.

    2004-01-01

    A probabilistic approach is described for aeroelastic analysis of turbomachinery blade rows. Blade rows with subsonic flow and blade rows with supersonic flow with subsonic leading edge are considered. To demonstrate the probabilistic approach, the flutter frequency, damping and forced response of a blade row representing a compressor geometry is considered. The analysis accounts for uncertainties in structural and aerodynamic design variables. The results are presented in the form of probabilistic density function (PDF) and sensitivity factors. For subsonic flow cascade, comparisons are also made with different probabilistic distributions, probabilistic methods, and Monte-Carlo simulation. The approach shows that the probabilistic approach provides a more realistic and systematic way to assess the effect of uncertainties in design variables on the aeroelastic instabilities and response.

  7. Aeroelastic instability stoppers for wind tunnel models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doggett, R. V., Jr.; Ricketts, R. H. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A mechanism for constraining models or sections thereof, was wind tunnel tested, deployed at the onset of aeroelastic instability, to forestall destructive vibrations in the model is described. The mechanism includes a pair of arms pivoted to the tunnel wall and straddling the model. Rollers on the ends of the arms contact the model, and are pulled together against the model by a spring stretched between the arms. An actuator mechanism swings the arms into place and back as desired.

  8. Advanced Aeroelastic Technologies for Turbomachinery Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, Kenneth; Srivastava, Rakesh; Reddy, T. S. R.

    2004-01-01

    A summary of the work performed under the grant NCC-1068 is presented. More details can be found in the cited references. The summary is presented in two parts to represent two areas of research. In the first part, methods to analyze a high temperature ceramic guide vane subjected to cooling jets are presented, and in the second part, the effect of unsteady aerodynamic forces on aeroelastic stability as implemented into the turbo-REDUCE code are presented

  9. Adaptive neural control of aeroelastic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenwalner, Peter F.; Little, Gerald R.; Scott, Robert C.

    1996-05-01

    The Adaptive Neural Control of Aeroelastic Response (ANCAR) program is a joint research and development effort conducted by McDonnell Douglas Aerospace (MDA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC) under a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA). The purpose of the MOA is to cooperatively develop the smart structure technologies necessary for alleviating undesirable vibration and aeroelastic response associated with highly flexible structures. Adaptive control can reduce aeroelastic response associated with buffet and atmospheric turbulence, it can increase flutter margins, and it may be able to reduce response associated with nonlinear phenomenon like limit cycle oscillations. By reducing vibration levels and loads, aircraft structures can have lower acquisition cost, reduced maintenance, and extended lifetimes. Phase I of the ANCAR program involved development and demonstration of a neural network-based semi-adaptive flutter suppression system which used a neural network for scheduling control laws as a function of Mach number and dynamic pressure. This controller was tested along with a robust fixed-gain control law in NASA's Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) utilizing the Benchmark Active Controls Testing (BACT) wing. During Phase II, a fully adaptive on-line learning neural network control system has been developed for flutter suppression which will be tested in 1996. This paper presents the results of Phase I testing as well as the development progress of Phase II.

  10. Overview of the Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heeg, Jennifer; Chwalowski, Pawel; Florance, Jennifer P.; Wieseman, Carol D.; Schuster, David M.; Perry, Raleigh B.

    2013-01-01

    The Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop brought together an international community of computational fluid dynamicists as a step in defining the state of the art in computational aeroelasticity. This workshop's technical focus was prediction of unsteady pressure distributions resulting from forced motion, benchmarking the results first using unforced system data. The most challenging aspects of the physics were identified as capturing oscillatory shock behavior, dynamic shock-induced separated flow and tunnel wall boundary layer influences. The majority of the participants used unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes codes. These codes were exercised at transonic Mach numbers for three configurations and comparisons were made with existing experimental data. Substantial variations were observed among the computational solutions as well as differences relative to the experimental data. Contributing issues to these differences include wall effects and wall modeling, non-standardized convergence criteria, inclusion of static aeroelastic deflection, methodology for oscillatory solutions, post-processing methods. Contributing issues pertaining principally to the experimental data sets include the position of the model relative to the tunnel wall, splitter plate size, wind tunnel expansion slot configuration, spacing and location of pressure instrumentation, and data processing methods.

  11. Preliminary Assessment of Optimal Longitudinal-Mode Control for Drag Reduction through Distributed Aeroelastic Shaping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ippolito, Corey; Nguyen, Nhan; Lohn, Jason; Dolan, John

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of advanced lightweight materials is resulting in a new generation of lighter, flexible, more-efficient airframes that are enabling concepts for active aeroelastic wing-shape control to achieve greater flight efficiency and increased safety margins. These elastically shaped aircraft concepts require non-traditional methods for large-scale multi-objective flight control that simultaneously seek to gain aerodynamic efficiency in terms of drag reduction while performing traditional command-tracking tasks as part of a complete guidance and navigation solution. This paper presents results from a preliminary study of a notional multi-objective control law for an aeroelastic flexible-wing aircraft controlled through distributed continuous leading and trailing edge control surface actuators. This preliminary study develops and analyzes a multi-objective control law derived from optimal linear quadratic methods on a longitudinal vehicle dynamics model with coupled aeroelastic dynamics. The controller tracks commanded attack-angle while minimizing drag and controlling wing twist and bend. This paper presents an overview of the elastic aircraft concept, outlines the coupled vehicle model, presents the preliminary control law formulation and implementation, presents results from simulation, provides analysis, and concludes by identifying possible future areas for research

  12. Aeroelastic Computations of a Compressor Stage Using the Harmonic Balance Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.

    2010-01-01

    The aeroelastic characteristics of a compressor stage were analyzed using a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) solver that uses the harmonic balance method to solve the governing equations. The three dimensional solver models the unsteady flow field due to blade vibration using the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The formulation enables the study of the effect of blade row interaction through the inclusion of coupling modes between blade rows. It also enables the study of nonlinear effects of high amplitude blade vibration by the inclusion of higher harmonics of the fundamental blade vibration frequency. In the present work, the solver is applied to study in detail the aeroelastic characteristics of a transonic compressor stage. Various parameters were included in the study: number of coupling modes, blade row axial spacing, and operating speeds. Only the first vibration mode is considered with amplitude of oscillation in the linear range. Both aeroelastic stability (flutter) of rotor blade and unsteady loading on the stator are calculated. The study showed that for the stage considered, the rotor aerodynamic damping is not influenced by the presence of the stator even when the axial spacing is reduced by nearly 25 percent. However, the study showed that blade row interaction effects become important for the unsteady loading on the stator when the axial spacing is reduced by the same amount.

  13. Parametric studies for tiltrotor aeroelastic stability in high-speed flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, Mark W.

    1992-01-01

    The influence of several system design parameters on tiltrotor aeroelastic stability is examined for the high-speed (axial) flight mode. Coupling of the rotor flapping modes with the wing elastic modes produces a whirl motion, typical of tiltrotors, that can become unstable at high speeds. The sensitivity of this instability with respect to rotor frequencies, wing stiffness, forward wing sweep, and rotor thrust level is examined. Some important new trends are identified regarding the role of blade lag dynamics and forward wing sweep in tiltrotor aeroelastic stability. The blade lag frequency may be tuned to improve tiltrotor stability, and forward wing sweep is destabilizing because of changes in rotor force components associated with the sweep.

  14. Aeroelastic Flutter Behavior of Cantilever within a Nozzle-Diffuser Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, Luis Phillipe; Colonius, Tim; Sherrit, Stewart; Lee, Hyeong Jae

    2015-11-01

    Aeroelastic flutter arises when the motion of a structure and its surrounding flowing fluid are coupled in a constructive manner, causing large amplitudes of vibration in the immersed solid. A cantilevered beam in axial flow within a nozzle-diffuser geometry exhibits interesting resonance behavior that presents good prospects for internal flow energy harvesting. Different modes can be excited as a function of throat velocity, nozzle geometry, fluid and cantilever material parameters. This work explores the relationship between the aeroelastic flutter instability boundaries and relevant non-dimensional parameters via experiments. Results suggest that for a linear expansion diffuser geometry, a non-dimensional stiffness, non-dimensional mass, and non-dimensional throat size are the critical parameters in mapping the instability. This map can serve as a guide to future work concerning possible electrical output and failure prediction in energy harvesters.

  15. An overview of selected NASP aeroelastic studies at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spain, Charles V.; Soistmann, David L.; Parker, Ellen C.; Gibbons, Michael D.; Gilbert, Michael G.

    1990-01-01

    Following an initial discussion of the NASP flight environment, the results of recent aeroelastic testing of NASP-type highly swept delta-wing models in Langley's Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) are summarized. Subsonic and transonic flutter characteristics of a variety of these models are described, and several analytical codes used to predict flutter of these models are evaluated. These codes generally provide good, but conservative predictions of subsonic and transonic flutter. Also, test results are presented on a nonlinear transonic phenomena known as aileron buzz which occurred in the wind tunnel on highly swept delta wings with full-span ailerons. An analytical procedure which assesses the effects of hypersonic heating on aeroelastic instabilities (aerothermoelasticity) is also described. This procedure accurately predicted flutter of a heated aluminum wing on which experimental data exists. Results are presented on the application of this method to calculate the flutter characteristics of a fine-element model of a generic NASP configuration. Finally, it is demonstrated analytically that active controls can be employed to improve the aeroelastic stability and ride quality of a generic NASP vehicle flying at hypersonic speeds.

  16. A wind turbine hybrid simulation framework considering aeroelastic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wei; Su, Weihua

    2015-04-01

    In performing an effective structural analysis for wind turbine, the simulation of turbine aerodynamic loads is of great importance. The interaction between the wake flow and the blades may impact turbine blades loading condition, energy yield and operational behavior. Direct experimental measurement of wind flow field and wind profiles around wind turbines is very helpful to support the wind turbine design. However, with the growth of the size of wind turbines for higher energy output, it is not convenient to obtain all the desired data in wind-tunnel and field tests. In this paper, firstly the modeling of dynamic responses of large-span wind turbine blades will consider nonlinear aeroelastic effects. A strain-based geometrically nonlinear beam formulation will be used for the basic structural dynamic modeling, which will be coupled with unsteady aerodynamic equations and rigid-body rotations of the rotor. Full wind turbines can be modeled by using the multi-connected beams. Then, a hybrid simulation experimental framework is proposed to potentially address this issue. The aerodynamic-dominant components, such as the turbine blades and rotor, are simulated as numerical components using the nonlinear aeroelastic model; while the turbine tower, where the collapse of failure may occur under high level of wind load, is simulated separately as the physical component. With the proposed framework, dynamic behavior of NREL's 5MW wind turbine blades will be studied and correlated with available numerical data. The current work will be the basis of the authors' further studies on flow control and hazard mitigation on wind turbine blades and towers.

  17. 14 CFR 25.629 - Aeroelastic stability requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Aeroelastic stability requirements. 25.629 Section 25.629 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction General § 25.629 Aeroelastic stability requirements. (a)...

  18. Evaluation of Aeroelastically Tailored Small Wind Turbine Blades Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, Dayton A.

    2005-09-29

    Evaluation of Aeroelastically Tailored Small Wind Turbine Blades Final Report Global Energy Concepts, LLC (GEC) has performed a conceptual design study concerning aeroelastic tailoring of small wind turbine blades. The primary objectives were to evaluate ways that blade/rotor geometry could be used to enable cost-of-energy reductions by enhancing energy capture while constraining or mitigating blade costs, system loads, and related component costs. This work builds on insights developed in ongoing adaptive-blade programs but with a focus on application to small turbine systems with isotropic blade material properties and with combined blade sweep and pre-bending/pre-curving to achieve the desired twist coupling. Specific goals of this project are to: (A) Evaluate and quantify the extent to which rotor geometry can be used to realize load-mitigating small wind turbine rotors. Primary aspects of the load mitigation are: (1) Improved overspeed safety affected by blades twisting toward stall in response to speed increases. (2) Reduced fatigue loading affected by blade twisting toward feather in response to turbulent gusts. (B) Illustrate trade-offs and design sensitivities for this concept. (C) Provide the technical basis for small wind turbine manufacturers to evaluate this concept and commercialize if the technology appears favorable. The SolidWorks code was used to rapidly develop solid models of blade with varying shapes and material properties. Finite element analyses (FEA) were performed using the COSMOS code modeling with tip-loads and centripetal accelerations. This tool set was used to investigate the potential for aeroelastic tailoring with combined planform sweep and pre-curve. An extensive matrix of design variables was investigated, including aerodynamic design, magnitude and shape of planform sweep, magnitude and shape of blade pre-curve, material stiffness, and rotor diameter. The FEA simulations resulted in substantial insights into the structural

  19. Loads and aeroelasticity division research and technology accomplishments for FY 1982 and plans for FY 1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    Accomplishments of the past year and plans for the coming year are highlighted as they relate to five year plans and the objectives of the following technical areas: aerothermal loads; multidisciplinary analysis and optimization; unsteady aerodynamics; and configuration aeroelasticity. Areas of interest include thermal protection system concepts, active control, nonlinear aeroelastic analysis, aircraft aeroelasticity, and rotorcraft aeroelasticity and vibrations.

  20. APPLE - An aeroelastic analysis system for turbomachines and propfans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.; Bakhle, Milind A.; Srivastava, R.; Mehmed, Oral

    1992-01-01

    This paper reviews aeroelastic analysis methods for propulsion elements (advanced propellers, compressors and turbines) being developed and used at NASA Lewis Research Center. These aeroelastic models include both structural and aerodynamic components. The structural models include the typical section model, the beam model with and without disk flexibility, and the finite element blade model with plate bending elements. The aerodynamic models are based on the solution of equations ranging from the two-dimensional linear potential equation for a cascade to the three-dimensional Euler equations for multi-blade configurations. Typical results are presented for each aeroelastic model. Suggestions for further research are indicated. All the available aeroelastic models and analysis methods are being incorporated into a unified computer program named APPLE (Aeroelasticity Program for Propulsion at LEwis).

  1. Reduced-Order Models for the Aeroelastic Analysis of Ares Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Vatsa, Veer N.; Biedron, Robert T.

    2010-01-01

    This document presents the development and application of unsteady aerodynamic, structural dynamic, and aeroelastic reduced-order models (ROMs) for the ascent aeroelastic analysis of the Ares I-X flight test and Ares I crew launch vehicles using the unstructured-grid, aeroelastic FUN3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. The purpose of this work is to perform computationally-efficient aeroelastic response calculations that would be prohibitively expensive via computation of multiple full-order aeroelastic FUN3D solutions. These efficient aeroelastic ROM solutions provide valuable insight regarding the aeroelastic sensitivity of the vehicles to various parameters over a range of dynamic pressures.

  2. Optimization procedure to control the coupling of vibration modes in flexible space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Joanne L.

    1987-01-01

    As spacecraft structural concepts increase in size and flexibility, the vibration frequencies become more closely-spaced. The identification and control of such closely-spaced frequencies present a significant challenge. To validate system identification and control methods prior to actual flight, simpler space structures will be flown. To challenge the above technologies, it will be necessary to design these structures with closely-spaced or coupled vibration modes. Thus, there exists a need to develop a systematic method to design a structure which has closely-spaced vibration frequencies. This paper describes an optimization procedure which is used to design a large flexible structure to have closely-spaced vibration frequencies. The procedure uses a general-purpose finite element analysis program for the vibration and sensitivity analyses and a general-purpose optimization program. Results are presented from two studies. The first study uses a detailed model of a large flexible structure to design a structure with one pair of closely-spaced frequencies. The second study uses a simple equivalent beam model of a large flexible structure to obtain a design with two pairs of closely-spaced frequencies.

  3. Development of an Aeroelastic Modeling Capability for Transient Nozzle Side Load Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Zhao, Xiang; Zhang, Sijun; Chen, Yen-Sen

    2013-01-01

    Lateral nozzle forces are known to cause severe structural damage to any new rocket engine in development during test. While three-dimensional, transient, turbulent, chemically reacting computational fluid dynamics methodology has been demonstrated to capture major side load physics with rigid nozzles, hot-fire tests often show nozzle structure deformation during major side load events, leading to structural damages if structural strengthening measures were not taken. The modeling picture is incomplete without the capability to address the two-way responses between the structure and fluid. The objective of this study is to develop a coupled aeroelastic modeling capability by implementing the necessary structural dynamics component into an anchored computational fluid dynamics methodology. The computational fluid dynamics component is based on an unstructured-grid, pressure-based computational fluid dynamics formulation, while the computational structural dynamics component is developed in the framework of modal analysis. Transient aeroelastic nozzle startup analyses of the Block I Space Shuttle Main Engine at sea level were performed. The computed results from the aeroelastic nozzle modeling are presented.

  4. ASTROP2-LE: A Mistuned Aeroelastic Analysis System Based on a Two Dimensional Linearized Euler Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.; Srivastava, R.; Mehmed, Oral

    2002-01-01

    An aeroelastic analysis system for flutter and forced response analysis of turbomachines based on a two-dimensional linearized unsteady Euler solver has been developed. The ASTROP2 code, an aeroelastic stability analysis program for turbomachinery, was used as a basis for this development. The ASTROP2 code uses strip theory to couple a two dimensional aerodynamic model with a three dimensional structural model. The code was modified to include forced response capability. The formulation was also modified to include aeroelastic analysis with mistuning. A linearized unsteady Euler solver, LINFLX2D is added to model the unsteady aerodynamics in ASTROP2. By calculating the unsteady aerodynamic loads using LINFLX2D, it is possible to include the effects of transonic flow on flutter and forced response in the analysis. The stability is inferred from an eigenvalue analysis. The revised code, ASTROP2-LE for ASTROP2 code using Linearized Euler aerodynamics, is validated by comparing the predictions with those obtained using linear unsteady aerodynamic solutions.

  5. Transonic aeroelastic analysis of launch vehicle configurations. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filgueirasdeazevedo, Joao Luiz

    1988-01-01

    A numerical study of the aeroelastic stability of typical launch vehicle configurations in transonic flight is performed. Recent computational fluid dynamics techniques are used to simulate the transonic aerodynamic flow fields, as opposed to relying on experimental data for the unsteady aerodynamic pressures. The flow solver is coupled to an appropriate structural representation of the vehicle. The aerodynamic formulation is based on the thin layer approximation to the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations, where the account for turbulent mixing is done by the two-layer Baldwin and Lomax algebraic eddy viscosity model. The structural-dynamic equations are developed considering free-free flexural vibration of an elongated beam with variable properties and are cast in modal form. Aeroelastic analyses are performed by integrating simultaneously in the two sets of equations. By tracing the growth or decay of a perturbed oscillation, the aeroelastic stability of a given constant configuration can be ascertained. The method is described in detail, and results that indicate its application are presented. Applications include some validation cases for the algorithm developed, as well as the study of configurations known to have presented flutter programs in the past.

  6. An Aeroelastic Perspective of Floating Offshore Wind Turbine Wake Formation and Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Steven N.; Jaworski, Justin W.

    2015-11-01

    The wake formation and wake stability of floating offshore wind turbines are investigated from an aeroelastic perspective. The aeroelastic model is composed of the Sebastian-Lackner free-vortex wake aerodynamic model coupled to the nonlinear Hodges-Dowell beam equations, which are extended to include the effects of blade profile asymmetry, higher-order torsional effects, and kinetic energy components associated with periodic rigid-body motions of floating platforms. Rigid-body platform motions are also assigned to the aerodynamic model as varying inflow conditions to emulate operational rotor-wake interactions. Careful attention is given to the wake formation within operational states where the ratio of inflow velocity to induced velocity is over 50%. These states are most susceptible to aerodynamic instabilities, and provide a range of states about which a wake stability analysis can be performed. In addition, the stability analysis used for the numerical framework is implemented into a standalone free-vortex wake aerodynamic model. Both aeroelastic and standalone aerodynamic results are compared to evaluate the level of impact that flexible blades have on the wake formation and wake stability.

  7. Calculations in bridge aeroelasticity via CFD

    SciTech Connect

    Brar, P.S.; Raul, R.; Scanlan, R.H.

    1996-12-31

    The central focus of the present study is the numerical calculation of flutter derivatives. These aeroelastic coefficients play an important role in determining the stability or instability of long, flexible structures under ambient wind loading. A class of Civil Engineering structures most susceptible to such an instability are long-span bridges of the cable-stayed or suspended-span variety. The disastrous collapse of the Tacoma Narrows suspension bridge in the recent past, due to a flutter instability, has been a big impetus in motivating studies in flutter of bridge decks.

  8. Rotorcraft Technology for HALE Aeroelastic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry; Johnson, Wayne

    2008-01-01

    Much of technology needed for analysis of HALE nonlinear aeroelastic problems is available from rotorcraft methodologies. Consequence of similarities in operating environment and aerodynamic surface configuration. Technology available - theory developed, validated by comparison with test data, incorporated into rotorcraft codes. High subsonic to transonic rotor speed, low to moderate Reynolds number. Structural and aerodynamic models for high aspect-ratio wings and propeller blades. Dynamic and aerodynamic interaction of wing/airframe and propellers. Large deflections, arbitrary planform. Steady state flight, maneuvers and response to turbulence. Linearized state space models. This technology has not been extensively applied to HALE configurations. Correlation with measured HALE performance and behavior required before can rely on tools.

  9. Dynamic Deformation Measurements of an Aeroelastic Semispan Model. [conducted in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Sharon S.; Burner, Alpheus W.; Edwards, John W.; Schuster, David M.

    2001-01-01

    The techniques used to acquire, reduce, and analyze dynamic deformation measurements of an aeroelastic semispan wind tunnel model are presented. Single-camera, single-view video photogrammetry (also referred to as videogrammetric model deformation, or VMD) was used to determine dynamic aeroelastic deformation of the semispan 'Models for Aeroelastic Validation Research Involving Computation' (MAVRIC) model in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center. Dynamic deformation was determined from optical retroreflective tape targets at five semispan locations located on the wing from the root to the tip. Digitized video images from a charge coupled device (CCD) camera were recorded and processed to automatically determine target image plane locations that were then corrected for sensor, lens, and frame grabber spatial errors. Videogrammetric dynamic data were acquired at a 60-Hz rate for time records of up to 6 seconds during portions of this flutter/Limit Cycle Oscillation (LCO) test at Mach numbers from 0.3 to 0.96. Spectral analysis of the deformation data is used to identify dominant frequencies in the wing motion. The dynamic data will be used to separate aerodynamic and structural effects and to provide time history deflection data for Computational Aeroelasticity code evaluation and validation.

  10. The effects of aeroelastic deformation on the unaugmented stopped-rotor dynamics of an X-Wing aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Michael G.; Silva, Walter A.

    1987-01-01

    A new design concept in the development of VTOL aircraft with high forward flight speed capability is that of the X-Wing, a stiff, bearingless helicopter rotor system which can be stopped in flight and the blades used as two forward-swept and two aft-swept wings. Because of the usual configuration in the fixed-wing mode, there is a high potential for aeroelastic divergence or flutter and coupling of blade vibration modes with rigid-body modes. An aeroelastic stability analysis of an X-Wing configuration aircraft was undertaken to determine if these problems could exist. This paper reports on the results of dynamic stability analyses in the lateral and longitudinal directions including the vehicle rigid-body and flexible modes. A static aeroelastic analysis using the normal vibration mode equations of motion was performed to determine the cause of a loss of longitudinal static margin with increasing airspeed. This loss of static margin was found to be due to aeroelastic washin of the forward-swept blades and washout of the aft-swept blades moving the aircraft aerodynamic center forward of the center of gravity. This phenomenon is likely to be generic to X-Wing aircraft.

  11. The effects of aeroelastic deformation on the unaugmented stopped-rotor dynamics of an X-Wing aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Michael G.; Silva, Walter A.

    1987-01-01

    A new design concept in the development of vertical takeoff and landing aircraft with high forward flight speed capability is that of the X-Wing. The X-Wing is a stiff, bearingless helicopter rotor system which can be stopped in flight and the blades used as two forward-swept wings and two aft-swept wings. Because of the unusual configuration in the fixed-wing mode, there is a high potential for aeroelastic divergence or flutter and coupling of blade vibration modes with rigid-body modes. An aeroelastic stability analysis of an X-Wing configuration aircraft was undertaken to determine if these problems could exist. This paper reports on the results of dynamic stability analyses in the lateral and longitudinal directions including the vehicle rigid-body and flexible modes. A static aeroelastic analysis using the normal vibration mode equations of motion was performed to determine the cause of a loss of longitudinal static margin with increasing airspeed. This loss of static margin was found to be due to aeroelastic 'washin' of the forward-swept blades and 'washout' of the aft-swept blades moving the aircraft aerodynamic center forward of the center of gravity. This phenomenon is likely to be generic to X-Wing aircraft.

  12. Static Aeroelastic Analysis with an Inviscid Cartesian Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, David L.; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Nemec, Marian; Smith, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    An embedded-boundary Cartesian-mesh flow solver is coupled with a three degree-offreedom structural model to perform static, aeroelastic analysis of complex aircraft geometries. The approach solves the complete system of aero-structural equations using a modular, loosely-coupled strategy which allows the lower-fidelity structural model to deform the highfidelity CFD model. The approach uses an open-source, 3-D discrete-geometry engine to deform a triangulated surface geometry according to the shape predicted by the structural model under the computed aerodynamic loads. The deformation scheme is capable of modeling large deflections and is applicable to the design of modern, very-flexible transport wings. The interface is modular so that aerodynamic or structural analysis methods can be easily swapped or enhanced. This extended abstract includes a brief description of the architecture, along with some preliminary validation of underlying assumptions and early results on a generic 3D transport model. The final paper will present more concrete cases and validation of the approach. Preliminary results demonstrate convergence of the complete aero-structural system and investigate the accuracy of the approximations used in the formulation of the structural model.

  13. Mach number effects on transonic aeroelastic forces and flutter characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohr, Ross W.; Batina, John T.; Yang, Henry T. Y.

    1988-01-01

    Transonic aeroelastic stability analysis and flutter calculations are presented for a generic transport-type wing based on the use of the CAP-TSD (Computational Aeroelasticity Program - Transonic Small Disturbance) finite-difference code. The CAP-TSD code was recently developed for transonic unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analysis of complete aircraft configurations. A binary aeroelastic system consisting of simple bending and torsion modes was used to study aeroelastic behavior at transonic speeds. Generalized aerodynamic forces are presented for a wide range of Mach number and reduced frequency. Aeroelastic characteristics are presented for variations in freestream Mach number, mass ratio, and bending-torsion frequency ratio. Flutter boundaries are presented which have two transonic dips in flutter speed. The first dip is the usual transonic dip involving a bending-dominated flutter mode. The second dip is characterized by a single degree-of-freedom torsion oscillation. These aeroelastic results are physically interpreted and shown to be related to the steady state shock location and changes in generalized aerodynamic forces due to freestream Mach number.

  14. Computational Aeroelastic Analyses of a Low-Boom Supersonic Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Sanetrik, Mark D.; Chwalowski, Pawel; Connolly, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    An overview of NASA's Commercial Supersonic Technology (CST) Aeroservoelasticity (ASE) element is provided with a focus on recent computational aeroelastic analyses of a low-boom supersonic configuration developed by Lockheed-Martin and referred to as the N+2 configuration. The overview includes details of the computational models developed to date including a linear finite element model (FEM), linear unsteady aerodynamic models, unstructured CFD grids, and CFD-based aeroelastic analyses. In addition, a summary of the work involving the development of aeroelastic reduced-order models (ROMs) and the development of an aero-propulso-servo-elastic (APSE) model is provided.

  15. Experimental aeroelasticity history, status and future in brief

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricketts, Rodney H.

    1990-01-01

    NASA conducts wind tunnel experiments to determine and understand the aeroelastic characteristics of new and advanced flight vehicles, including fixed-wing, rotary-wing and space-launch configurations. Review and assessments are made of the state-of-the-art in experimental aeroelasticity regarding available facilities, measurement techniques, and other means and devices useful in testing. In addition, some past experimental programs are described which assisted in the development of new technology, validated new analysis codes, or provided needed information for clearing flight envelopes of unwanted aeroelastic response. Finally, needs and requirements for advances and improvements in testing capabilities for future experimental research and development programs are described.

  16. Advanced Models for Aeroelastic Analysis of Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Mahajan, Aparajit

    1996-01-01

    This report describes an integrated, multidisciplinary simulation capability for aeroelastic analysis and optimization of advanced propulsion systems. This research is intended to improve engine development, acquisition, and maintenance costs. One of the proposed simulations is aeroelasticity of blades, cowls, and struts in an ultra-high bypass fan. These ducted fans are expected to have significant performance, fuel, and noise improvements over existing engines. An interface program was written to use modal information from COBSTAN and NASTRAN blade models in aeroelastic analysis with a single rotation ducted fan aerodynamic code.

  17. 40 CFR 201.26 - Procedures for the measurement on receiving property of retarder and car coupling noise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Procedures for the measurement on receiving property of retarder and car coupling noise. 201.26 Section 201.26 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS NOISE EMISSION STANDARDS FOR TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT; INTERSTATE RAIL...

  18. 40 CFR 201.26 - Procedures for the measurement on receiving property of retarder and car coupling noise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Procedures for the measurement on receiving property of retarder and car coupling noise. 201.26 Section 201.26 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS NOISE EMISSION STANDARDS FOR TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT; INTERSTATE RAIL...

  19. Reduced-Order Aerodynamic Model and Its Application to a Nonlinear Aeroelastic System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Deman; Conner, Mark D.; Dowell, Earl H.

    1998-01-01

    Starting from a finite state model for a two-dimensional aerodynamic flow over an airfoil, the eigenmodes of the aerodynamic flow are determined. Using a small number of these aerodynamic eigenmodes, ie., a reduced-order model, the aeroelastic model is formed by coupling them to a typical section structural model with a trailing-edge flap. A free-play nonlinearity is modeled. Results are shown from the finite state model, the reduced-order model, and previous theoretical and experimental work. All results are in good agreement.

  20. Unified Formulation of the Aeroelasticity of Swept Lifting Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter; Marzocca, Piergiovanni; Librescu, Liviu

    2001-01-01

    An unified approach for dealing with stability and aeroelastic response to time-dependent pressure pulses of swept wings in an incompressible flow is developed. To this end the indicial function concept in time and frequency domains, enabling one to derive the proper unsteady aerodynamic loads is used. Results regarding stability in the frequency and time domains, and subcritical aeroelastic response to arbitrary time-dependent external excitation obtained via the direct use of the unsteady aerodynamic derivatives for 3-D wings are supplied. Closed form expressions for unsteady aerodynamic derivatives using this unified approach have been derived and used to illustrate their application to flutter and aeroelastic response to blast and sonic-boom signatures. In this context, an original representation of the aeroelastic response in the phase space was presented and pertinent conclusions on the implications of some basic parameters have been outlined.

  1. Aeroelastic Response of Nonlinear Wing Section By Functional Series Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzocca, Piergiovanni; Librescu, Liviu; Silva, Walter A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of the determination of the subcritical aeroelastic response and flutter instability of nonlinear two-dimensional lifting surfaces in an incompressible flow-field via indicial functions and Volterra series approach. The related aeroelastic governing equations are based upon the inclusion of structural and damping nonlinearities in plunging and pitching, of the linear unsteady aerodynamics and consideration of an arbitrary time-dependent external pressure pulse. Unsteady aeroelastic nonlinear kernels are determined, and based on these, frequency and time histories of the subcritical aeroelastic response are obtained, and in this context the influence of the considered nonlinearities is emphasized. Conclusions and results displaying the implications of the considered effects are supplied.

  2. Aeroelastic Response of Nonlinear Wing Section by Functional Series Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Marzocca, Piergiovanni

    2001-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of the determination of the subcritical aeroelastic response and flutter instability of nonlinear two-dimensional lifting surfaces in an incompressible flow-field via indicial functions and Volterra series approach. The related aeroelastic governing equations are based upon the inclusion of structural and damping nonlinearities in plunging and pitching, of the linear unsteady aerodynamics and consideration of an arbitrary time-dependent external pressure pulse. Unsteady aeroelastic nonlinear kernels are determined, and based on these, frequency and time histories of the subcritical aeroelastic response are obtained, and in this context the influence of the considered nonlinearities is emphasized. Conclusions and results displaying the implications of the considered effects are supplied.

  3. Static aeroelastic behavior of an adaptive laminated piezoelectric composite wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisshaar, T. A.; Ehlers, S. M.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of using an adaptive material to modify the static aeroelastic behavior of a uniform wing is examined. The wing structure is idealized as a laminated sandwich structure with piezoelectric layers in the upper and lower skins. A feedback system that senses the wing root loads applies a constant electric field to the piezoelectric actuator. Modification of pure torsional deformaton behavior and pure bending deformation are investigated, as is the case of an anisotropic composite swept wing. The use of piezoelectric actuators to create an adaptive structure is found to alter static aeroelastic behavior in that the proper choice of the feedback gain can increase or decrease the aeroelastic divergence speed. This concept also may be used to actively change the lift effectiveness of a wing. The ability to modify static aeroelastic behavior is limited by physical limitations of the piezoelectric material and the manner in which it is integrated into the parent structure.

  4. Transonic Unsteady Aerodynamics and Aeroelasticity 1987, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bland, Samuel R. (Compiler)

    1989-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics methods have been widely accepted for transonic aeroelastic analysis. Previously, calculations with the TSD methods were used for 2-D airfoils, but now the TSD methods are applied to the aeroelastic analysis of the complete aircraft. The Symposium papers are grouped into five subject areas, two of which are covered in this part: (1) Transonic Small Disturbance (TSD) theory for complete aircraft configurations; and (2) Full potential and Euler equation methods.

  5. 2005 PathfinderPlus Aero-Elastic Research Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro, Robert

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the 2005 Pathfinder along with an investigation of its aeroelastic responses. The contents include: 1) HALE Class of Vehicles; 2) Aero-elastic Research Flights Overall Objective; 3) General Arrangement; 4) Sensor Locations; 5) NASA Ramp Operations; 6) Lakebed Operations; 7) 1st Flight Data Set; 8) Tool development / data usage; 9) HALE Tool Development & Validation; 10) Building a HALE Foundation; 11) Compelling Needs Drive HALE Efforts; and 12) Team Photo

  6. Activities in Aeroelasticity at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Boyd, III; Noll, Thomas E.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the results of recently-completed research and presents status reports of current research being performed within the Aeroelasticity Branch of the NASA Langley Research Center. Within the paper this research is classified as experimental, analytical, and theoretical aeroelastic research. The paper also describes the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel, its features, capabilities, a new open-architecture data acquisition system, ongoing facility modifications, and the subsequent calibration of the facility.

  7. Some experiences using wind-tunnel models in active control studies. [minimization of aeroelastic response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doggett, R. V., Jr.; Abel, I.; Ruhlin, C. L.

    1976-01-01

    A status report and review of wind tunnel model experimental techniques that have been developed to study and validate the use of active control technology for the minimization of aeroelastic response are presented. Modeling techniques, test procedures, and data analysis methods used in three model studies are described. The studies include flutter mode suppression on a delta-wing model, flutter mode suppression and ride quality control on a 1/30-size model of the B-52 CCV airplane, and an active lift distribution control system on a 1/22 size C-5A model.

  8. Simplified sample preparation procedure for measuring isotope-enriched methylmercury by gas chromatography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Avramescu, Mary-Luyza; Zhu, Joy; Yumvihoze, Emmanuel; Hintelmann, Holger; Fortin, Danielle; Lean, David R S

    2010-06-01

    Many procedures have been developed to measure the concentration of monomethylmercury (MeHg) from different sample matrices, and the use of stable isotopes of mercury now provides opportunities to determine its formation and degradation rates. Here, a modified procedure for measuring mercury isotopes in sediment samples that uses acid leaching-ion exchange-thiosulfate extraction (TSE) to isolate and purify the methylated mercury from the matrix is proposed. The latter is followed by aqueous-phase ethylation, purge and trap on Tenax, gas chromatography separation of ethylated mercury compounds, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry detection. The new TSE procedure bridges together two well-known methods, the acid-leaching and distillation-derivatization procedures, offering the advantages of artifact-free formation of the first, and low detection limits and the possibility of quantification of individual isotopes of mercury of the second. The modified procedure retains the derivatization, purge and trap, and gas chromatography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (GC-ICP-MS) detection steps from the distillation-derivatization procedure, and eliminates the distillation step, which is not only laborious but also expensive, due to the high cost of installation and time-consuming cleaning process. Major advantages of the TSE procedure proposed include the extraction and analysis of a large number of samples in a short time, excellent analyte recoveries, and the lack of artifact formation. Sediment certified reference materials (CRMs), BCR 580 and IAEA 405, were used to test the TSE procedure accuracy. Recoveries between 94 to 106% and 95 to 96% were obtained for CRMs and spiked samples (Milli-Q(R) water), respectively. Comparisons among thiosulfate extraction, distillation, and acid-leaching procedures have shown good agreement of methylmercury values. PMID:20821567

  9. Aeroelastic stability and response of horizontal axis wind turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kottapalli, S. B. R.; Friedmann, P. P.; Rosen, A.

    1978-01-01

    The coupled flap-lag-torsion equations of motion of an isolated horizontal axis wind turbine blade are formulated. Quasi-steady blade-element strip theory was applied to derive the aerodynamic operator which includes boundary layer type gradient winds. The final equations which have periodic coefficients were solved in order to obtain the aeroelastic response and stability of large horizontal axis wind turbine blade. A new method of generating an appropriate time-dependent equilibrium position (required for the stability analysis) has been implemented. Representative steady-state responses and stability boundaries, applicable mainly to an existing blade design (NASA/-ERDA MOD-0), are presented. The results indicate that the MOD-0 configuration is a basically stable design and that blade stability is not sensitive to offsets between blade elastic axis and aerodynamic center. Blade stability appears to be sensitive to precone. The tower shadow (or wake) has a considerable effect on the flap response but leaves blade stability unchanged. Finally, it was found that non linear terms in the equations of motion can significantly affect the linearized stability boundaries, however, these terms have a negligible effect on blade response at operating conditions.

  10. Static Aeroelastic Effects of Formation Flight for Slender Unswept Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Curtis E.

    2009-01-01

    The static aeroelastic equilibrium equations for slender, straight wings are modified to incorporate the effects of aerodynamically-coupled formation flight. A system of equations is developed by applying trim constraints and is solved for component lift distribution, trim angle-of-attack, and trim aileron deflection. The trim values are then used to calculate the elastic twist distribution of the wing box. This system of equations is applied to a formation of two gliders in trimmed flight. Structural and aerodynamic properties are assumed for the gliders, and solutions are calculated for flexible and rigid wings in solo and formation flight. It is shown for a sample application of two gliders in formation flight, that formation disturbances produce greater twist in the wingtip immersed in the vortex than for either the opposing wingtip or the wings of a similar airplane in solo flight. Changes in the lift distribution, resulting from wing twist, increase the performance benefits of formation flight. A flexible wing in formation flight will require greater aileron deflection to achieve roll trim than a rigid wing.

  11. Aeroelastic characteristics of the AH-64 bearingless tail rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjee, D.

    1988-01-01

    The results of a wind tunnel test program to determine the performance loads and dynamic characteristics of the Composite Flexbeam Tail Rotor (CFTR) for the AH-64 Advanced Attack Helicopter are reported. The CFTR uses an elastomeric shear attachment of the flexbeam to the hub to provide soft-inplane S-mode and stiff-inplane C-mode configuration. The properties of the elastomer were selected for proper frequency placement and scale damping of the inplane S-mode. Kinematic pitch-lag coupling was introduced to provide the first cyclic inplane C-mode damping at high collective pitch. The CFTR was tested in a wind tunnel over the full slideslip envelop of the AH-64. It is found that the rotor was aeroelastically stable throughout the complete collective pitch range and up to rotor speeds of 1403 rpm. The dynamic characteristics of the rotor were found to be satisfactory at all pitch angles and rotor speeds of the tunnel tests. The design characteristics of the rotor which permit the high performance characteristics are discussed. Several schematic drawings and photographs of the rotor are provided.

  12. Aeroelastic Stability of Modern Bearingless Rotors: A Parametric Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Khanh Q.

    1994-01-01

    The University of Maryland Advanced Rotorcraft Code (UMARC) is utilized to study the effects of blade design parameters on the aeroelastic stability of an isolated modern bearingless rotor blade in hover. The McDonnell Douglas Advanced Rotor Technology (MDART) Rotor is the baseline rotor investigated. Results indicate that kinematic pitch-lag coupling introduced through the control system geometry and the damping levels of the shear lag dampers strongly affect the hover inplane damping of the baseline rotor blade. Hub precone, pitchcase chordwise stiffness, and blade fundamental torsion frequency have small to moderate influence on the inplane damping, while blade pre-twist and placements of blade fundamental flapwise and chord-wise frequencies have negligible effects. A damperless configuration with a leading edge pitch-link, 15 deg of pitch-link cant angle, and reduced pitch-link stiffness is shown to be stable with an inplane damping level in excess of 2.7 percent critical at the full hover tip speed.

  13. Gust Buffeting and Aeroelastic Behaviour of Poles and Monotubular Towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solari, G.; Pagnini, L. C.

    1999-10-01

    The evolution in the constructional field and the realization of ever more slender and light structures have emphasized the increasing difficulty of properly evaluating the actions and effects of wind on poles and monotubular towers. Faced with this situation the Italian constructors, united in a consortium coordinated by ACS ACAI Servizi, entrusted the Department of Structural and Geotechnical Engineering of Genova University with the task of formulating an ad hoc calculation procedure for this type of structure. This gave rise to a wide-ranging research project in which theoretical models, experimental evaluations and engineering methods were developed in parallel through an effective and quite a unique co-operation between researchers, designers and builders. This paper illustrates the physical aspects, the general principles and the basic formulation of the method proposed, with special emphasis on gust buffeting and aeroelastic phenomena. Preliminary results of full-scale measurements of the structural damping are also presented. The conclusions highlight the scientific and technical perspectives of this research.

  14. Unsteady aerodynamic modeling and active aeroelastic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    Unsteady aerodynamic modeling techniques are developed and applied to the study of active control of elastic vehicles. The problem of active control of a supercritical flutter mode poses a definite design goal stability, and is treated in detail. The transfer functions relating the arbitrary airfoil motions to the airloads are derived from the Laplace transforms of the linearized airload expressions for incompressible two dimensional flow. The transfer function relating the motions to the circulatory part of these loads is recognized as the Theodorsen function extended to complex values of reduced frequency, and is termed the generalized Theodorsen function. Inversion of the Laplace transforms yields exact transient airloads and airfoil motions. Exact root loci of aeroelastic modes are calculated, providing quantitative information regarding subcritical and supercritical flutter conditions.

  15. Sensitivity analysis of a wing aeroelastic response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapania, Rakesh K.; Eldred, Lloyd B.; Barthelemy, Jean-Francois M.

    1991-01-01

    A variation of Sobieski's Global Sensitivity Equations (GSE) approach is implemented to obtain the sensitivity of the static aeroelastic response of a three-dimensional wing model. The formulation is quite general and accepts any aerodynamics and structural analysis capability. An interface code is written to convert one analysis's output to the other's input, and visa versa. Local sensitivity derivatives are calculated by either analytic methods or finite difference techniques. A program to combine the local sensitivities, such as the sensitivity of the stiffness matrix or the aerodynamic kernel matrix, into global sensitivity derivatives is developed. The aerodynamic analysis package FAST, using a lifting surface theory, and a structural package, ELAPS, implementing Giles' equivalent plate model are used.

  16. Analysis of the Hessian for aeroelastic optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arian, Eyal

    1995-01-01

    The symbol of the Hessian for an aeroelastic optimization model problem is analyzed. The flow is modeled by the small-disturbance full potential equation and the structure is modeled by an isotropic (von Karman) plate equation. The cost function consists of both aerodynamic and structural terms. In the new analysis the symbol of the cost function Hessian near the minimum is computed. The result indicates that under some conditions, which are likely fulfilled in most applications, the system is decoupled for the non-smooth components. The result also shows that the structure part in the Hessian is well-conditioned while the aerodynamic part is ill-conditioned. Applications of the result to optimization strategies are discussed.

  17. In-flight aeroelastic measurement technique development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burner, Alpheus W.; Lokos, William A.; Barrows, Danny A.

    2003-11-01

    The initial concept and development of a low-cost, adaptable method for the measurement of static and dynamic aeroelastic deformation of aircraft during flight testing is presented. The method is adapted from a proven technique used in wind tunnel testing to measure model deformation, often referred to as the videogrammetric model deformation (or VMD) technique. The requirements for in-flight measurements are compared and contrasted with those for wind tunnel testing. The methodology for the proposed measurements and differences compared with that used for wind tunnel testing is given. Several error sources and their effects are identified. Measurement examples using the new technique, including change in wing twist and deflection as a function of time, from an F/A-18 research aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center are presented.

  18. Aeroservoelastic Model Validation and Test Data Analysis of the F/A-18 Active Aeroelastic Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, Martin J.; Prazenica, Richard J.

    2003-01-01

    Model validation and flight test data analysis require careful consideration of the effects of uncertainty, noise, and nonlinearity. Uncertainty prevails in the data analysis techniques and results in a composite model uncertainty from unmodeled dynamics, assumptions and mechanics of the estimation procedures, noise, and nonlinearity. A fundamental requirement for reliable and robust model development is an attempt to account for each of these sources of error, in particular, for model validation, robust stability prediction, and flight control system development. This paper is concerned with data processing procedures for uncertainty reduction in model validation for stability estimation and nonlinear identification. F/A-18 Active Aeroelastic Wing (AAW) aircraft data is used to demonstrate signal representation effects on uncertain model development, stability estimation, and nonlinear identification. Data is decomposed using adaptive orthonormal best-basis and wavelet-basis signal decompositions for signal denoising into linear and nonlinear identification algorithms. Nonlinear identification from a wavelet-based Volterra kernel procedure is used to extract nonlinear dynamics from aeroelastic responses, and to assist model development and uncertainty reduction for model validation and stability prediction by removing a class of nonlinearity from the uncertainty.

  19. A liquid state least-squares procedure for obtaining solid state multicomponent diffusion coefficients from diffusion couples

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.G.

    1998-11-02

    A procedure is developed for analyzing combined concentration profiles from multicomponent solid-state diffusion data obtained with free-diffusion boundary conditions. This procedure is exactly analogous to the analysis of liquid-state diffusion data obtained from free-diffusion refractive-index profiles (e.g. from Rayleigh interferometry). All data from all couples are least-squared together to characterize the diffusion coefficient matrix. Different profile weightings provide interesting alternatives, as well as diagnostics. Symmetric averagings are shown to eliminate or reduce effects of concentration dependence.

  20. An Aeroelastic Evaluation of the Flexible Thermal Protection System for an Inatable Aerodynamic Decelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Benjamin D.

    asymmetric flutter at high dynamic pressures relative to the single shell models. Parameter studies also examine the effects of tension, shear modulus reduction, and elastic support stiffness. Limitations of a linear structural model and piston theory aerodynamics prompted a more elaborate evaluation of the flight configuration. Using nonlinear Donnell conical shell theory for the FTPS structure, the pressure buckling and aeroelastic limit cycle oscillations were studied for a single elastically-supported conical shell. While piston theory was used initially, a time-dependent correction factor was derived using transform methods and potential flow theory to calculate more accurately the low Mach number supersonic flow. Three conical shell geometries were considered: a 3-meter diameter 70° shell, a 3.7-meter 70° shell, and a 6-meter diameter 70° shell. The 6-meter configuration was loaded statically and the results were compared with an experimental load test of a 6-meter HIAD vehicle. Though agreement between theoretical and experimental strains was poor, circumferential wrinkling phenomena observed during the experiments was captured by the theory and axial deformations were qualitatively similar in shape. With piston theory aerodynamics, the nonlinear flutter dynamic pressures of the 3-meter configuration were in agreement with the values calculated using linear theory, and the limit cycle amplitudes were generally on the order of the shell thickness. Pre-buckling pressure loads and the aerodynamic pressure correction factor were studied for all geometries, and these effects resulted in significantly lower flutter boundaries compared with piston theory alone. In the final phase of this work, the existing linear and nonlinear FTPS shell models were coupled with NASA's FUN3D Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes CFD code, allowing for the most physically realistic flight predictions. For the linear shell structural model, the elastically-supported shell natural modes were

  1. Theoretical and experimental investigation of the aeroelastic stability of an advanced bearingless rotor in hover and forward flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, James M.; Chopra, Inderjit; Samak, D. K.; Green, Michael; Graham, Todd

    1989-01-01

    The aeroelastic stability of a shaft-fixed, 1/8th Froude scaled bearingless rotor was investigated in a series of wind tunnel experiments simulating a wide range of operating conditions. A finite element formulation was used to perform a parallel theoretical analysis, with the goal of determining whether a bearingless rotor system could be made aeroelastically stable without the incorporation of auxilliary dampers. A quick estimate of lag mode damping was provided by a refined moving-block analysis implemented in real time which predicted similar damping values. Model rotor and blade properties were also determined, and these properties were used as inputs for a newly refined bearingless rotor analysis. Predicted results were compared with experimental results in hover and forward flight. Results indicated that soft pitch link stiffness increases pitch-lag coupling and stabilizes lag mode stability in hover and at low advance ratios, but destabilizes at higher advance ratios.

  2. Nonlinear Aeroelastic Analysis of Joined-Wing Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavallaro, Rauno

    Aeroelastic design of joined-wing configurations is yet a relatively unexplored topic which poses several difficulties. Due to the overconstrained nature of the system combined with structural geometric nonlinearities, the behavior of Joined Wings is often counterintuitive and presents challenges not seen in standard layouts. In particular, instability observed on detailed aircraft models but never thoroughly investigated, is here studied with the aid of a theoretical/computational framework. Snap-type of instabilities are shown for both pure structural and aeroelastic cases. The concept of snap-divergence is introduced to clearly identify the true aeroelastic instability, as opposed to the usual aeroelastic divergence evaluated through eigenvalue approach. Multi-stable regions and isola-type of bifurcations are possible characterizations of the nonlinear response of Joined Wings, and may lead to branch-jumping phenomena well below nominal critical load condition. Within this picture, sensitivity to (unavoidable) manufacturing defects could have potential catastrophic effects. The phenomena studied in this work suggest that the design process for Joined Wings needs to be revisited and should focus, when instability is concerned, on nonlinear post-critical analysis since linear methods may provide wrong trend indications and also hide potentially catastrophical situations. Dynamic aeroelastic analyses are also performed. Flutter occurrence is critically analyzed with frequency and time-domain capabilities. Sensitivity to different-fidelity aeroelastic modeling (fluid-structure interface algorithm, aerodynamic solvers) is assessed showing that, for some configurations, wake modeling (rigid versus free) has a strong impact on the results. Post-flutter regimes are also explored. Limit cycle oscillations are observed, followed, in some cases, by flip bifurcations (period doubling) and loss of periodicity of the solution. Aeroelastic analyses are then carried out on a

  3. Three-Dimensional Aeroelastic and Aerothermoelastic Behavior in Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNamara, Jack J.; Friedmann, Peretz P.; Powell, Kenneth G.; Thuruthimattam, Biju J.; Bartels, Robert E.

    2005-01-01

    The aeroelastic and aerothermoelastic behavior of three-dimensional configurations in hypersonic flow regime are studied. The aeroelastic behavior of a low aspect ratio wing, representative of a fin or control surface on a generic hypersonic vehicle, is examined using third order piston theory, Euler and Navier-Stokes aerodynamics. The sensitivity of the aeroelastic behavior generated using Euler and Navier-Stokes aerodynamics to parameters governing temporal accuracy is also examined. Also, a refined aerothermoelastic model, which incorporates the heat transfer between the fluid and structure using CFD generated aerodynamic heating, is used to examine the aerothermoelastic behavior of the low aspect ratio wing in the hypersonic regime. Finally, the hypersonic aeroelastic behavior of a generic hypersonic vehicle with a lifting-body type fuselage and canted fins is studied using piston theory and Euler aerodynamics for the range of 2.5 less than or equal to M less than or equal to 28, at altitudes ranging from 10,000 feet to 80,000 feet. This analysis includes a study on optimal mesh selection for use with Euler aerodynamics. In addition to the aeroelastic and aerothermoelastic results presented, three time domain flutter identification techniques are compared, namely the moving block approach, the least squares curve fitting method, and a system identification technique using an Auto-Regressive model of the aeroelastic system. In general, the three methods agree well. The system identification technique, however, provided quick damping and frequency estimations with minimal response record length, and therefore o ers significant reductions in computational cost. In the present case, the computational cost was reduced by 75%. The aeroelastic and aerothermoelastic results presented illustrate the applicability of the CFL3D code for the hypersonic flight regime.

  4. Aeroelasticity of wing and wing-body configurations on parallel computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byun, Chansup

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop computationally efficient methods for solving aeroelasticity problems on parallel computers. Both uncoupled and coupled methods are studied in this research. For the uncoupled approach, the conventional U-g method is used to determine the flutter boundary. The generalized aerodynamic forces required are obtained by the pulse transfer-function analysis method. For the coupled approach, the fluid-structure interaction is obtained by directly coupling finite difference Euler/Navier-Stokes equations for fluids and finite element dynamics equations for structures. This capability will significantly impact many aerospace projects of national importance such as Advanced Subsonic Civil Transport (ASCT), where the structural stability margin becomes very critical at the transonic region. This research effort will have direct impact on the High Performance Computing and Communication (HPCC) Program of NASA in the area of parallel computing.

  5. Experimental procedure for the evaluation of tooth stiffness in spline coupling including angular misalignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curà, Francesca; Mura, Andrea

    2013-11-01

    Tooth stiffness is a very important parameter in studying both static and dynamic behaviour of spline couplings and gears. Many works concerning tooth stiffness calculation are available in the literature, but experimental results are very rare, above all considering spline couplings. In this work experimental values of spline coupling tooth stiffness have been obtained by means of a special hexapod measuring device. Experimental results have been compared with the corresponding theoretical and numerical ones. Also the effect of angular misalignments between hub and shaft has been investigated in the experimental planning.

  6. Aeroelastically coupled blades for vertical axis wind turbines

    DOEpatents

    Paquette, Joshua; Barone, Matthew F.

    2016-02-23

    Various technologies described herein pertain to a vertical axis wind turbine blade configured to rotate about a rotation axis. The vertical axis wind turbine blade includes at least an attachment segment, a rear swept segment, and optionally, a forward swept segment. The attachment segment is contiguous with the forward swept segment, and the forward swept segment is contiguous with the rear swept segment. The attachment segment includes a first portion of a centroid axis, the forward swept segment includes a second portion of the centroid axis, and the rear swept segment includes a third portion of the centroid axis. The second portion of the centroid axis is angularly displaced ahead of the first portion of the centroid axis and the third portion of the centroid axis is angularly displaced behind the first portion of the centroid axis in the direction of rotation about the rotation axis.

  7. TURBO-AE: An Aeroelastic Code for Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakhle, Milind A.

    1997-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) program is developing new technologies to increase the fuel efficiency of commercial aircraft engines, improve the safety of engine operation, and reduce engine emissions and noise. With the development of new designs for ducted fans, compressors, and turbines to achieve these goals, a basic aeroelastic requirement is that there should be no flutter or high resonant blade stresses in the operating regime. To verify the aeroelastic soundness of these designs, we need an accurate prediction and analysis code. Such a two-dimensional viscous propulsion aeroelastic code, named TURBO-AE, is being developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The TURBO-AE aeroelastic code is based on a three-dimensional unsteady aerodynamic Euler/Navier-Stokes turbomachinery code TURBO, developed under a grant from NASA Lewis. TURBO-AE can model viscous flow effects that play an important role in certain aeroelastic problems, such as flutter with flow separation (or stall flutter) and flutter in the presence of shock and boundary-layer interaction. The structural dynamics representation of the blade in the TURBO-AE code is based on a normal mode representation. A finite element analysis code, such as NASTRAN, is used to calculate in-vacuum vibration modes and the associated natural frequency. A work-per-cycle approach is used to determine aeroelastic (flutter) stability. With this approach, the motion of the blade is prescribed to be a harmonic vibration in a specified in vacuum normal mode. The aerodynamic forces acting on the vibrating blade and the work done by these forces on the vibrating blade during a cycle of vibration are calculated. If positive work is being done on the blade by the aerodynamic forces, the blade is dynamically unstable, since it will extract energy from the flow, leading to an increase in the amplitude of the blade's oscillation. Initial calculations have been done for a configuration representative of the Energy

  8. Design and Analysis of AN Static Aeroelastic Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Ying-Yu; Yuan, Kai-Hua; Lv, Ji-Nan; Liu, Zi-Qiang

    2016-06-01

    Static aeroelastic experiments are very common in the United States and Russia. The objective of static aeroelastic experiments is to investigate deformation and loads of elastic structure in flow field. Generally speaking, prerequisite of this experiment is that the stiffness distribution of structure is known. This paper describes a method for designing experimental models, in the case where the stiffness distribution and boundary condition of a real aircraft are both uncertain. The stiffness distribution form of the structure can be calculated via finite element modeling and simulation calculation and F141 steels and rigid foam are used to make elastic model. In this paper, the design and manufacturing process of static aeroelastic models is presented and a set of experiment model was designed to simulate the stiffness of the designed wings, a set of experiments was designed to check the results. The test results show that the experimental method can effectively complete the design work of elastic model. This paper introduces the whole process of the static aeroelastic experiment, and the experimental results are analyzed. This paper developed a static aeroelasticity experiment technique and established an experiment model targeting at the swept wing of a certain kind of large aspect ratio aircraft.

  9. NASA Aeroelasticity Handbook Volume 2: Design Guides Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, John K. (Editor)

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Aeroelasticity Handbook comprises a database (in three formats) of NACA and NASA aeroelasticity flutter data through 1998 and a collection of aeroelasticity design guides. The Microsoft Access format provides the capability to search for specific data, retrieve it, and present it in a tabular or graphical form unique to the application. The full-text NACA and NASA documents from which the data originated are provided in portable document format (PDF), and these are hyperlinked to their respective data records. This provides full access to all available information from the data source. Two other electronic formats, one delimited by commas and the other by spaces, are provided for use with other software capable of reading text files. To the best of the author s knowledge, this database represents the most extensive collection of NACA and NASA flutter data in electronic form compiled to date by NASA. Volume 2 of the handbook contains a convenient collection of aeroelastic design guides covering fixed wings, turbomachinery, propellers and rotors, panels, and model scaling. This handbook provides an interactive database and design guides for use in the preliminary aeroelastic design of aerospace systems and can also be used in validating or calibrating flutter-prediction software.

  10. Control Law Design in a Computational Aeroelasticity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, Jerry R.; Robertshaw, Harry H.; Kapania, Rakesh K.

    2003-01-01

    A methodology for designing active control laws in a computational aeroelasticity environment is given. The methodology involves employing a systems identification technique to develop an explicit state-space model for control law design from the output of a computational aeroelasticity code. The particular computational aeroelasticity code employed in this paper solves the transonic small disturbance aerodynamic equation using a time-accurate, finite-difference scheme. Linear structural dynamics equations are integrated simultaneously with the computational fluid dynamics equations to determine the time responses of the structure. These structural responses are employed as the input to a modern systems identification technique that determines the Markov parameters of an "equivalent linear system". The Eigensystem Realization Algorithm is then employed to develop an explicit state-space model of the equivalent linear system. The Linear Quadratic Guassian control law design technique is employed to design a control law. The computational aeroelasticity code is modified to accept control laws and perform closed-loop simulations. Flutter control of a rectangular wing model is chosen to demonstrate the methodology. Various cases are used to illustrate the usefulness of the methodology as the nonlinearity of the aeroelastic system is increased through increased angle-of-attack changes.

  11. Interactive aircraft flight control and aeroelastic stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisshaar, T. A.

    1985-01-01

    Aeroservoelastic optimization techniques were studied to determine a methodology for maximization of the stable flight envelope of an idealized, actively controlled, flexible airfoil. The equations of motion for the airfoil were developed in state-space form to include time-domain representations of aerodynamic forces and active control. The development of an optimization scheme to stabilize the aeroelastic system over a range of airspeeds, including the design airspeed is outlined. The solution approach was divided in two levels: (1) the airfoil structure, with a design variable represented by the shear center position; and (2) the control system. An objective was stated in mathematical form and a search was conducted with the restriction that each subsystem be constrained to be optimal in some sense. Analytical expressions are developed to compute the changes in the eigenvalues of the closed-loop, actively controlled system. A stability index is constructed to ensure that stability is present at the design speed and at other airspeeds away from the design speed.

  12. Unsteady aerodynamic analyses for turbomachinery aeroelastic predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verdon, Joseph M.; Barnett, M.; Ayer, T. C.

    1994-01-01

    Applications for unsteady aerodynamics analysis in this report are: (1) aeroelastic: blade flutter and forced vibration; (2) aeroacoustic: noise generation; (3) vibration and noise control; and (4) effects of unsteadiness on performance. This requires that the numerical simulations and analytical modeling be accurate and efficient and contain realistic operating conditions and arbitrary modes of unsteady excitation. The assumptions of this application contend that: (1) turbulence and transition can be modeled with the Reynolds averaged and using Navier-Stokes equations; (2) 'attached' flow with high Reynolds number will require thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations, or inviscid/viscid interaction analyses; (3) small-amplitude unsteady excitations will need nonlinear steady and linearized unsteady analyses; and (4) Re to infinity will concern inviscid flow. Several computer programs (LINFLO, CLT, UNSVIS, AND SFLOW-IVI) are utilized for these analyses. Results and computerized grid examples are shown. This report was given during NASA LeRC Workshop on Forced Response in Turbomachinery in August of 1993.

  13. Aeroelasticity of Nonlinear Tail / Rudder Systems with Freeplay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rishel, Evan

    This thesis details the development of a linear/nonlinear three degree of freedom aeroelastic system designed and manufactured at the University of Washington (UW). Describing function analysis was carried out in the frequency domain. Time domain simulations were carried out to account for all types of motion. Nonlinear aeroelastic behavior may lead to limit cycles which can be captured in the frequency domain using describing function approximation and numerically using Runga-Kutta integration. Linear and nonlinear aeroelastic tests were conducted in the UW 3x3 low-speed wind tunnel to determine the linear flutter speed and frequency of the system as well as its nonlinear behavior when freeplay is introduced. The test data is presented along with the results of the MATLAB-based simulations. The correlation between test and numerical results is very high.

  14. Recent rotorcraft aeroelastic testing in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeager, William T., Jr.; Mirick, Paul H.; Wilbur, Matthew L.; Singleton, Jeffrey D.; Wilkie, W. K.; Hamouda, M.-N. H.

    1991-01-01

    Wind-tunnel testing of a properly scaled aeroelastic model helicopter rotor is considered a necessary phase in the design and development of new rotor systems. For this reason, extensive testing of aeroelastically scaled model rotors is done in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) located at the Langley Research Center. A unique capability of this facility, which enables proper dynamic scaling, is the use of diflourodichloromethane, or Refrigerant-12 (R-12) as a test medium. The paper presents a description of the TDT and a discussion of the benefits of using R-12 as a test medium. A description of the system used to conduct model tests is provided and examples of recent rotor tests are cited to illustrate the types of aeroelastic model rotor tests conducted in the TDT.

  15. Impact of Parallel Computing on Large Scale Aeroelastic Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Aeroelasticity is computationally one of the most intensive fields in aerospace engineering. Though over the last three decades the computational speed of supercomputers have substantially increased, they are still inadequate for large scale aeroelastic computations using high fidelity flow and structural equations. In addition to reaching a saturation in computational speed because of changes in economics, computer manufactures are stopping the manufacturing of mainframe type supercomputers. This has led computational aeroelasticians to face the gigantic task of finding alternate approaches for fulfilling their needs. The alternate path to over come speed and availability limitations of mainframe type supercomputers is to use parallel computers. During this decade several different architectures have evolved. In FY92 the US Government started the High Performance Computing and Communication (HPCC) program. As a participant in this program NASA developed several parallel computational tools for aeroelastic applications. This talk describes the impact of those application tools on high fidelity based multidisciplinary analysis.

  16. Aeroelastic Tailoring of a Plate Wing with Functionally Graded Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunning, Peter D.; Stanford, Bret K.; Kim, H. Alicia; Jutte, Christine V.

    2014-01-01

    This work explores the use of functionally graded materials for the aeroelastic tailoring of a metallic cantilevered plate-like wing. Pareto trade-off curves between dynamic stability (flutter) and static aeroelastic stresses are obtained for a variety of grading strategies. A key comparison is between the effectiveness of material grading, geometric grading (i.e., plate thickness variations), and using both simultaneously. The introduction of material grading does, in some cases, improve the aeroelastic performance. This improvement, and the physical mechanism upon which it is based, depends on numerous factors: the two sets of metallic material parameters used for grading, the sweep of the plate, the aspect ratio of the plate, and whether the material is graded continuously or discretely.

  17. An inverse method for computation of structural stiffness distributions of aeroelastically optimized wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, David M.

    1993-01-01

    An inverse method has been developed to compute the structural stiffness properties of wings given a specified wing loading and aeroelastic twist distribution. The method directly solves for the bending and torsional stiffness distribution of the wing using a modal representation of these properties. An aeroelastic design problem involving the use of a computational aerodynamics method to optimize the aeroelastic twist distribution of a tighter wing operating at maneuver flight conditions is used to demonstrate the application of the method. This exercise verifies the ability of the inverse scheme to accurately compute the structural stiffness distribution required to generate a specific aeroelastic twist under a specified aeroelastic load.

  18. An inverse method for computation of structural stiffness distributions of aeroelastically optimized wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, David M.

    1993-04-01

    An inverse method has been developed to compute the structural stiffness properties of wings given a specified wing loading and aeroelastic twist distribution. The method directly solves for the bending and torsional stiffness distribution of the wing using a modal representation of these properties. An aeroelastic design problem involving the use of a computational aerodynamics method to optimize the aeroelastic twist distribution of a tighter wing operating at maneuver flight conditions is used to demonstrate the application of the method. This exercise verifies the ability of the inverse scheme to accurately compute the structural stiffness distribution required to generate a specific aeroelastic twist under a specified aeroelastic load.

  19. COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, B.C.

    1963-02-26

    This patent relates to a releasable coupling connecting a control rod to a control rod drive. This remotely operable coupling mechanism can connect two elements which are laterally and angviarly misaligned, and provides a means for sensing the locked condition of the elements. The coupling utilizes a spherical bayonet joint which is locked against rotation by a ball detent lock. (AEC)

  20. Propulsion Aeroelastic Analysis Developed for Flutter and Forced Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakhle, Milind A.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field develops new technologies to increase the fuel efficiency of aircraft engines, improve the safety of engine operation, reduce emissions, and reduce engine noise. With the development of new designs for fans, compressors, and turbines to achieve these goals, the basic aeroelastic requirements are that there should be no flutter (self-excited vibrations) or high resonant blade stresses (due to forced response) in the operating regime. Therefore, an accurate prediction and analysis capability is required to verify the aeroelastic soundness of the designs. Such a three-dimensional viscous propulsion aeroelastic analysis capability has been developed at Glenn with support from the Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) program. This newly developed aeroelastic analysis capability is based on TURBO, a threedimensional unsteady aerodynamic Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes turbomachinery code developed previously under a grant from Glenn. TURBO can model the viscous flow effects that play an important role in certain aeroelastic problems such as flutter with flow separation, flutter at high loading conditions near the stall line (stall flutter), flutter in the presence of shock and boundary-layer interaction, and forced response due to wakes and shock impingement. In aeroelastic analysis, the structural dynamics representation of the blades is based on normal modes. A finite-element analysis code is used to calculate these in-vacuum vibration modes and the associated natural frequencies. In an aeroelastic analysis using the TURBO code, flutter and forced response are modeled as being uncoupled. To calculate if a blade row will flutter, one prescribes the motion of the blade to be a harmonic vibration in a specified in-vacuum normal mode. An aeroelastic analysis preprocessor is used to generate the displacement field required for the analysis. The work done by aerodynamic forces on the vibrating blade during a cycle of vibration is

  1. Computational, unsteady transonic aerodynamics and aeroelasticity about airfoils and wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goorjian, Peter M.; Guruswamy, Guru P.

    1987-01-01

    Research in the area of computational, unsteady transonic flows about airfoils and wings, including aeroelastic effects is reviewed. In the last decade, there have been extensive developments in computational methods in response to the need for computer codes with which to study fundamental aerodynamic and aeroelastic problems in the critical transonic regime. For example, large commercial aircraft cruise most effectively in the transonic flight regime and computational fluid dynamics (CDF) provides a new tool, which can be used in combination with test facilities to reduce the costs, time, and risks of aircraft development.

  2. Aeroelastic flutter energy harvester design: the sensitivity of the driving instability to system parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, Matthew; Wolff, Eric; Garcia, Ephrahim

    2011-12-01

    This study examines the design parameters affecting the stability characteristics of a novel fluid flow energy harvesting device powered by aeroelastic flutter vibrations. The energy harvester makes use of a modal convergence flutter instability to generate limit cycle bending oscillations of a cantilevered piezoelectric beam with a small flap connected to its free end by a revolute joint. The critical flow speed at which destabilizing aerodynamic effects cause self-excited vibrations of the structure to emerge is essential to the design of the energy harvester because it sets the lower bound on the operating wind speed and frequency range of the system. A linearized analytic model of the device that accounts for the three-way coupling between the structural, unsteady aerodynamic, and electrical aspects of the system is used to examine tuning several design parameters while the size of the system is held fixed. The effects on the aeroelastic system dynamics and relative sensitivity of the flutter stability boundary are presented and discussed. A wind tunnel experiment is performed to validate the model predictions for the most significant system parameters.

  3. Aeroelastic Analysis for Rotorcraft in Flight or in a Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical model is developed for the aeroelastic behavior of a rotorcraft in flight or in a wind tunnel. A unified development is presented for a wide class of rotors, helicopters, and operating conditions. The equations of motion for the rotor are derived using an integral Newtonian method, which gives considerable physical insight into the blade inertial and aerodynamic forces. The rotor model includes coupled flap-lag bending and blade torsion degrees of freedom, and is applicable to articulated, hingeless, gimballed, and teetering rotors with an arbitrary number of blades. The aerodynamic model is valid for both high and low inflow, and for axial and nonaxial flight. The rotor rotational speed dynamics, including engine inertia and damping, and the perturbation inflow dynamics are included. For a rotor on a wind-tunnel support, a normal mode representation of the test module, strut, and balance system is used. The aeroelastic analysis for the rotorcraft in flight is applicable to a general two-rotor aircraft, including single main-rotor and tandem helicopter configurations, and side-by-side or tilting proprotor aircraft configurations.

  4. Aeroelastic response and blade loads of a composite rotor in forward flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Edward C.; Chopra, Inderjit

    1992-01-01

    The aeroelastic response, blade and hub loads, and shaft-fixed aeroelastic stability is investigated for a helicopter with elastically tailored composite rotor blades. A new finite element based structural analysis including nonclassical effects such as transverse shear, torsion related warping and inplane elasticity is integrated with the University of Maryland Advanced Rotorcraft Code. The structural dynamics analysis is correlated against both experimental data and detailed finite element results. Correlation of rotating natural frequencies of coupled composite box-beams is generally within 5-10 percent. The analysis is applied to a soft-inplane hingeless rotor helicopter in free flight propulsive trim. For example, lag mode damping can be increased 300 percent over a range of thrust conditions and forward speeds. The influence of unsteady aerodynamics on the blade response and vibratory hub loads is also investigated. The magnitude and phase of the flap response is substantially altered by the unsteady aerodynamic effects. Vibratory hub loads increase up to 30 percent due to unsteady aerodynamic effects.

  5. An electrochemical procedure coupled with a Schiff base method; application to electroorganic synthesis of new nitrogen-containing heterocycles

    SciTech Connect

    Dowlati, Bahram; Othman, Mohamed Rozali

    2013-11-27

    The synthesis of Nitrogen-containing heterocycles has been achieved using chemical and electrochemical methods, respectively. The direct chemical synthesis of nucleophiles proceeds through the Schiff base chemical reaction. This procedure offers an alternate reaction between dicarbonyl compounds and diamines leads to the formation of products. The results indicate that the Schiff base chemical method for synthesis of the product has successfully performed in excellent overall yield. In the electrochemical step, a series of Nitrogen-containing compounds were electrosynthesized. Various parameters such as the applied potential, pH of the electrolytic solution, cell configuration and also purification techniques, were carried out to optimize the yields of corresponding products. New Nitrogen-containing heterocycle derivatives were synthesized using an electrochemical procedure coupled with a Schiff base as a facile, efficient and practical method. The products have been characterized after purification by IR, {sup 1}H NMR, {sup 13}C NMR and ESI-MS{sup 2}.

  6. Structure Detection of Nonlinear Aeroelastic Systems with Application to Aeroelastic Flight Test Data. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kukreja, Sunil L.; Brenner, martin J.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the 1. Motivation for the study 2. Nonlinear Model Form 3. Structure Detection 4. Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator (LASSO) 5. Objectives 6. Results 7. Assess LASSO as a Structure Detection Tool: Simulated Nonlinear Models 8. Applicability to Complex Systems: F/A-18 Active Aeroelastic Wing Flight Test Data. The authors conclude that 1. this is a novel approach for detecting the structure of highly over-parameterised nonlinear models in situations where other methods may be inadequate 2. that it is a practical significance in the analysis of aircraft dynamics during envelope expansion and could lead to more efficient control strategies and 3. this could allow greater insight into the functionality of various systems dynamics, by providing a quantitative model which is easily interpretable

  7. Structure Detection of Nonlinear Aeroelastic Systems with Application to Aeroelastic Flight Test Data. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kukreja, Sunil L.; Brenner, Martin J.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the applicability of NARMAX structure detection to aeroelastic systems. In conclusion, the simulation results demonstrate bootstrap approach for structure computation of aircraft structural stiffness provided a high rate of true model selection: 1. T-test and stepwise regression methods had difficulty providing accurate results 2. Work contributes to understanding of the use of structure detection for modelling and identification of aerospace systems. 3. Limitation of model complexity that can be studied with these structure computation techniques 4. Result of the large number of candidate terms, for a given model order, and the data length required to guarantee convergence 5. Another approach to structure computation problem uses a least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO)

  8. Nonlinear and chaotic vibration and stability analysis of an aero-elastic piezoelectric FG plate under parametric and primary excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaee, Mousa; Jahangiri, Reza

    2015-05-01

    In this study, in the presence of supersonic aerodynamic loading, the nonlinear and chaotic vibrations and stability of a simply supported Functionally Graded Piezoelectric (FGP) rectangular plate with bonded piezoelectric layer have been investigated. It is assumed that the plate is simultaneously exposed to the effects of harmonic uniaxial in-plane force and transverse piezoelectric excitations and aerodynamic loading. It is considered that the potential distribution varies linearly through the piezoelectric layer thickness, and the aerodynamic load is modeled by the first order piston theory. The von-Karman nonlinear strain-displacement relations are used to consider the geometrical nonlinearity. Based on the Classical Plate Theory (CPT) and applying the Hamilton's principle, the nonlinear coupled partial differential equations of motion are derived. The Galerkin's procedure is used to reduce the equations of motion to nonlinear ordinary differential Mathieu equations. The validity of the formulation for analyzing the Limit Cycle Oscillation (LCO), aero-elastic stability boundaries is accomplished by comparing the results with those of the literature, and the convergence study of the FGP plate is performed. By applying the Multiple Scales Method, the case of 1:2 internal resonance and primary parametric resonance are taken into account and the corresponding averaged equations are derived and analyzed numerically. The results are provided to investigate the effects of the forcing/piezoelectric detuning parameter, amplitude of forcing/piezoelectric excitation and dynamic pressure, on the nonlinear dynamics and chaotic behavior of the FGP plate. It is revealed that under the certain conditions, due to the existence of bi-stable region of non-trivial solutions, system shows the hysteretic behavior. Moreover, in absence of airflow, it is observed that variation of control parameters leads to the multi periodic and chaotic motions.

  9. 14 CFR 25.629 - Aeroelastic stability requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... result of structural deformation. The aeroelastic evaluation must include whirl modes associated with any... condition, required or selected for investigation by § 25.571. The single structural failures described in... if; (i) The structural element could not fail due to discrete source damage resulting from...

  10. 14 CFR 25.629 - Aeroelastic stability requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... result of structural deformation. The aeroelastic evaluation must include whirl modes associated with any... condition, required or selected for investigation by § 25.571. The single structural failures described in... if; (i) The structural element could not fail due to discrete source damage resulting from...

  11. 14 CFR 25.629 - Aeroelastic stability requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... result of structural deformation. The aeroelastic evaluation must include whirl modes associated with any... condition, required or selected for investigation by § 25.571. The single structural failures described in... if; (i) The structural element could not fail due to discrete source damage resulting from...

  12. 14 CFR 25.629 - Aeroelastic stability requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... result of structural deformation. The aeroelastic evaluation must include whirl modes associated with any... condition, required or selected for investigation by § 25.571. The single structural failures described in... if; (i) The structural element could not fail due to discrete source damage resulting from...

  13. Status of NASA full-scale engine aeroelasticity research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubomski, J. F.

    1980-01-01

    Data relevant to several types of aeroelastic instabilities were obtained using several types of turbojet and turbofan engines. In particular, data relative to separated flow (stall) flutter, choke flutter, and system mode instabilities are presented. The unique characteristics of these instabilities are discussed, and a number of correlations are presented that help identify the nature of the phenomena.

  14. Status of NASA full-scale engine aeroelasticity research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubomski, J. F.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents data relevant to several types of aeroelastic instabilities which have been obtained using several types of turbojet and turbofan engines. Special attention is given to data relative to separated flow (stall) flutter, choke flutter, and system mode instabilities. The discussion covers the characteristics of these instabilities, and a number of correlations are presented that help identify the nature of the phenomena.

  15. Development of an Aeroelastic Analysis Including a Viscous Flow Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Bakhle, Milind A.

    2001-01-01

    Under this grant, Version 4 of the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes aeroelastic code (TURBO-AE) has been developed and verified. The TURBO-AE Version 4 aeroelastic code allows flutter calculations for a fan, compressor, or turbine blade row. This code models a vibrating three-dimensional bladed disk configuration and the associated unsteady flow (including shocks, and viscous effects) to calculate the aeroelastic instability using a work-per-cycle approach. Phase-lagged (time-shift) periodic boundary conditions are used to model the phase lag between adjacent vibrating blades. The direct-store approach is used for this purpose to reduce the computational domain to a single interblade passage. A disk storage option, implemented using direct access files, is available to reduce the large memory requirements of the direct-store approach. Other researchers have implemented 3D inlet/exit boundary conditions based on eigen-analysis. Appendix A: Aeroelastic calculations based on three-dimensional euler analysis. Appendix B: Unsteady aerodynamic modeling of blade vibration using the turbo-V3.1 code.

  16. Aeroelastic Analysis of Modern Complex Wings Using ENSAERO and NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhardwaj, Manoj

    1995-01-01

    A process is presented by which static aeroelastic analysis is performed using Euler flow equations in conjunction with an advanced structural analysis tool, NASTRAN. The process deals with the interfacing of two separate codes in the fields of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and computational structural dynamics (CSD). The process is demonstrated successfully on an F/A-18 Stabilator (horizontal tail).

  17. Aeroelastic analysis of a troposkien-type wind turbine blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nitzsche, F.

    1981-01-01

    The linear aeroelastic equations for one curved blade of a vertical axis wind turbine in state vector form are presented. The method is based on a simple integrating matrix scheme together with the transfer matrix idea. The method is proposed as a convenient way of solving the associated eigenvalue problem for general support conditions.

  18. Toward efficient aeroelastic energy harvesting through limit cycle shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschmeier, Benjamin; Bryant, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    Increasing demand to harvest energy from renewable resources has caused significant research interest in unsteady aerodynamic and hydrodynamic phenomena. Apart from the traditional horizontal axis wind turbines, there has been significant growth in the study of bio-inspired oscillating wings for energy harvesting. These systems are being built to harvest electricity for wireless devices, as well as for large scale mega-watt power generation. Such systems can be driven by aeroelastic flutter phenomena which, beyond a critical wind speed, will cause the system to enter into limitcycle oscillations. When the airfoil enters large amplitude, high frequency motion, leading and trailing edge vortices form and, when properly synchronized with the airfoil kinematics, enhance the energy extraction efficiency of the device. A reduced order dynamic stall model is employed on a nonlinear aeroelastic structural model to investigate whether the parameters of a fully passive aeroelastic device can be tuned to produce limit cycle oscillations at desired kinematics. This process is done through an optimization technique to find the necessary structural parameters to achieve desired structural forces and moments corresponding to a target limit cycle. Structural nonlinearities are explored to determine the essential nonlinearities such that the system's limit cycle closely matches the desired kinematic trajectory. The results from this process demonstrate that it is possible to tune system parameters such that a desired limit cycle trajectory can be achieved. The simulations also demonstrate that the high efficiencies predicted by previous computational aerodynamics studies can be achieved in fully passive aeroelastic devices.

  19. Transonic Unsteady Aerodynamics and Aeroelasticity 1987, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bland, Samuel R. (Compiler)

    1989-01-01

    This two part document contains copies of the text and figures for the papers presented at the symposium held at NASA Langley on 20 to 22 May, 1987. The papers are grouped in five subject areas. The areas covered by this part includes the following: Methods for vortex and viscous flows; Aeroelastic applications, and Experimental results and cascade flows.

  20. Computed Aeroelastic Motions Of Wings In Transonic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.; Obayashi, Shigeru

    1995-01-01

    Report describes computational simulations of aeroelastic motions of delta and swept wings in transonic flows. Study directed toward understanding aerodynamic behavior and enhancing maneuverability of fighter airplanes equipped with such wings. Also has implications for gas pumps and turbines, in which flows near tips of vanes and blades reach supersonic speeds.

  1. Static aeroelastic analysis of a three-dimensional generic wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, John A.; Lee, IN; Miura, Hirokazu

    1990-01-01

    A continuation of research on the static aeroelastic analysis of a generic wing configuration is presented. Results of the study of the asymmetric oblique wing model developed by Rockwell International, in conjunction with the NASA Oblique Wing Research Aircraft Program, are reported. The capability to perform static aeroelastic analyses of an oblique wing at arbitrary skew positions is demonstrated by applying the MSC/NASTRAN static analysis scheme modified by the aerodynamic influence coefficient matrix created by the NASA Ames aerodynamic panel codes. The oblique wing is studied at two skew angles, and in particular, the capability to calculate 3-D thickness effects on the aerodynamic properties of the wing is investigated. The ability to model asymmetric wings in both subsonic and supersonic Mach numbers is shown. The aerodynamic influence coefficient matrix computed by the external programs is inserted in MSC/NASTRAN static aeroelasticity analysis run stream to compute the aeroelastic deformation and internal forces. Various aerodynamic coefficients of the oblique wing were computed for two Mach numbers, 0.7 and 1.4, and the angle of attach -5 through 15 deg.

  2. Static aeroelastic analysis of a three-dimensional oblique wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, I.; Miura, H.; Chargin, M. K.

    1990-01-01

    A capability to perform static aeroelastic analyses of an oblique wing at arbitrary skew positions was developed based on the framework of the MSC/NASTRAN static aeroelastic analysis. By means of DMAP alterations, a portion of the subsonic static aeroelastic analysis scheme was modified to insert an aerodynamic influence coefficient matrix created externally by the NASA-Ames aerodynamic panel codes. The modified scheme can cover the subsonic as well as the supersonic range for both symmetric and asymmetric configurations. Static aeroelastic responses of the oblique wing are studied at two skew angles and, in particular, the capability to calculate 3D camber effects on the aerodynamic properties of the wing is investigated. Various aerodynamic coefficients of the rigid oblique wing are computed for two Mach numbers, 0.7 and 1.4, and the angle of attack is varied from -5 through 15 deg. Also, the wing flexibility effects on the aerodynamic coefficients and the displacement are examined at a Mach number of 0.7 for a 45-deg swept wing.

  3. Aeroelastic Flight Data Analysis with the Hilbert-Huang Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, Martin J.; Prazenica, Chad

    2006-01-01

    This report investigates the utility of the Hilbert Huang transform for the analysis of aeroelastic flight data. It is well known that the classical Hilbert transform can be used for time-frequency analysis of functions or signals. Unfortunately, the Hilbert transform can only be effectively applied to an extremely small class of signals, namely those that are characterized by a single frequency component at any instant in time. The recently-developed Hilbert Huang algorithm addresses the limitations of the classical Hilbert transform through a process known as empirical mode decomposition. Using this approach, the data is filtered into a series of intrinsic mode functions, each of which admits a well-behaved Hilbert transform. In this manner, the Hilbert Huang algorithm affords time-frequency analysis of a large class of signals. This powerful tool has been applied in the analysis of scientific data, structural system identification, mechanical system fault detection, and even image processing. The purpose of this report is to demonstrate the potential applications of the Hilbert Huang algorithm for the analysis of aeroelastic systems, with improvements such as localized online processing. Applications for correlations between system input and output, and amongst output sensors, are discussed to characterize the time-varying amplitude and frequency correlations present in the various components of multiple data channels. Online stability analyses and modal identification are also presented. Examples are given using aeroelastic test data from the F-18 Active Aeroelastic Wing airplane, an Aerostructures Test Wing, and pitch plunge simulation.

  4. Aeroelastic Calculations of Quiet High- Speed Fan Performed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakhle, Milind A.; Srivastava, Rakesh; Mehmed, Oral; Min, James B.

    2002-01-01

    An advanced high-speed fan was recently designed under a cooperative effort between the NASA Glenn Research Center and Honeywell Engines & Systems. The principal design goals were to improve performance and to reduce fan noise at takeoff. Scale models of the Quiet High-Speed Fan were tested for operability, performance, and acoustics. During testing, the fan showed significantly improved noise characteristics, but a self-excited aeroelastic vibration known as flutter was encountered in the operating range. Flutter calculations were carried out for the Quiet High-Speed Fan using a three-dimensional, unsteady aerodynamic, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes turbomachinery code named "TURBO." The TURBO code can accurately model the viscous flow effects that can play an important role in various aeroelastic problems such as flutter with flow separation, flutter at high loading conditions near the stall line (stall flutter), and flutter in the presence of shock and boundary-layer interaction. Initially, calculations were performed with no blade vibrations. These calculations were at a constant rotational speed and a varying mass flow rate. The mass flow rate was varied by changing the backpressure at the exit boundary of the computational domain. These initial steady calculations were followed by aeroelastic calculations in which the blades were prescribed to vibrate harmonically in a natural mode, at a natural frequency, and with a fixed interblade phase angle between adjacent blades. The AE-prep preprocessor was used to interpolate the in-vacuum mode shapes from the structural dynamics mesh onto the computational fluid dynamics mesh and to smoothly propagate the grid deformations from the blade surface to the interior points of the grid. The aeroelastic calculations provided the unsteady aerodynamic forces on the blade surface due to blade vibrations. These forces were vector multiplied with the structural dynamic mode shape to calculate the work done on the blade during

  5. Study of modal coupling procedures for the shuttle: A matrix method for damping synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasselman, T. K.

    1972-01-01

    The damping method was applied successfully to real structures as well as analytical models. It depends on the ability to determine an appropriate modal damping matrix for each substructure. In the past, modal damping matrices were assumed diagonal for lack of being able to determine the coupling terms which are significant in the general case of nonproportional damping. This problem was overcome by formulating the damped equations of motion as a linear perturbation of the undamped equations for light structural damping. Damped modes are defined as complex vectors derived from the complex frequency response vectors of each substructure and are obtained directly from sinusoidal vibration tests. The damped modes are used to compute first order approximations to the modal damping matrices. The perturbation approach avoids ever having to solve a complex eigenvalue problem.

  6. A substructure coupling procedure applicable to general linear time-invariant dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howsman, T. G.; Craig, R. R., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A substructure synthesis procedure applicable to structural systems containing general nonconservative terms is presented. In their final form, the nonself-adjoint substructure equations of motion are cast in state vector form through the use of a variational principle. A reduced-order mode for each substructure is implemented by representing the substructure as a combination of a small number of Ritz vectors. For the method presented, the substructure Ritz vectors are identified as a truncated set of substructure eigenmodes, which are typically complex, along with a set of generalized real attachment modes. The formation of the generalized attachment modes does not require any knowledge of the substructure flexible modes; hence, only the eigenmodes used explicitly as Ritz vectors need to be extracted from the substructure eigenproblem. An example problem is presented to illustrate the method.

  7. A substructure coupling procedure applicable to general linear time-invariant dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howsman, T. G.; Craig, R. R., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A substructure synthesis procedure applicable to structural systems containing general nonconservative terms is presented. In their final form, the non-self-adjoint substructure equations of motion are cast in state vector form through the use of a variational principle. A reduced-order model for each substructure is implemented by representing the substructure as a combination of a small number of Ritz vectors. For the method presented, the substructure Ritz vectors are identified as a truncated set of substructure eigenmodes, which are typically complex, along with a set of generalized real attachment modes. The formation of the generalized attachment modes does not require any knowledge of the substructure flexible modes; hence, only the eigenmodes used explicitly as Ritz vectors need to be extracted from the substructure eigenproblem. An example problem is presented to illustrate the method.

  8. Effect of follower forces on aeroelastic stability of flexible structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Seungmook

    Missile bodies and wings are typical examples of structures that can be represented by beam models. Such structures, loaded by follower forces along with aerodynamics, exhibit the vehicle's aeroelastic instabilities. The current research integrates a nonlinear beam dynamics and unsteady aerodynamics to conduct aeroelastic studies of missile bodies and wings subjected to follower forces. The structural formulations are based on a geometrically-exact, mixed finite element method. Slender-body theory and thin-airfoil theory are used for the missile aerodynamics, and two-dimensional finite-state unsteady aerodynamics is used for wing aerodynamics. The aeroelastic analyses are performed using time-marching scheme for the missile body stability, and eigenvalue analysis for the wing flutter, respectively. Results from the time-marching formulation agree with published results for dynamic stability and show the development of limit cycle oscillations for disturbed flight near and above the critical thrust. Parametric studies of the aeroelastic behavior of specific flexible missile configurations are presented, including effects of flexibility on stability, limit-cycle amplitudes, and missile loads. The results do yield a significant interaction between the thrust, which is a follower force, and the aeroelastic stability. Parametric studies based on the eigenvalue analysis for the wing flutter, show that the predicted stability boundaries are very sensitive to the ratio of bending stiffness to torsional stiffness. The effect of thrust can be either stabilizing or destabilizing, depending on the value of this parameter. An assessment whether or not the magnitude of thrust needed to influence the flutter speed is practical is made for one configuration. The flutter speed is shown to change by 11% for this specific wing configuration.

  9. Application of Aeroelastic Solvers Based on Navier Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Srivastava, Rakesh

    2001-01-01

    The propulsion element of the NASA Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) initiative is directed towards increasing the overall efficiency of current aircraft engines. This effort requires an increase in the efficiency of various components, such as fans, compressors, turbines etc. Improvement in engine efficiency can be accomplished through the use of lighter materials, larger diameter fans and/or higher-pressure ratio compressors. However, each of these has the potential to result in aeroelastic problems such as flutter or forced response. To address the aeroelastic problems, the Structural Dynamics Branch of NASA Glenn has been involved in the development of numerical capabilities for analyzing the aeroelastic stability characteristics and forced response of wide chord fans, multi-stage compressors and turbines. In order to design an engine to safely perform a set of desired tasks, accurate information of the stresses on the blade during the entire cycle of blade motion is required. This requirement in turn demands that accurate knowledge of steady and unsteady blade loading is available. To obtain the steady and unsteady aerodynamic forces for the complex flows around the engine components, for the flow regimes encountered by the rotor, an advanced compressible Navier-Stokes solver is required. A finite volume based Navier-Stokes solver has been developed at Mississippi State University (MSU) for solving the flow field around multistage rotors. The focus of the current research effort, under NASA Cooperative Agreement NCC3- 596 was on developing an aeroelastic analysis code (entitled TURBO-AE) based on the Navier-Stokes solver developed by MSU. The TURBO-AE code has been developed for flutter analysis of turbomachine components and delivered to NASA and its industry partners. The code has been verified. validated and is being applied by NASA Glenn and by aircraft engine manufacturers to analyze the aeroelastic stability characteristics of modem fans, compressors

  10. A numerical procedure for the analysis of the hydromechanical coupling in fractured rock masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte Azevedo, I. C.; Vaz, L. E.; Vargas, E. A.

    1998-11-01

    This work presents a finite element implementation to treat the Hydromechanical Coupling (HM) in fractured rock masses under the framework of the so-called equivalent continuum' approach. The multilaminar concept, introduced by Zienkiewicz and Pande, is used to simulate the mechanical behaviour of both the intact rock and the families of fractures. In that concept, the non-linearities in the constitutive relations are dealt by means of fictitious viscoplasticity. In the present implementation, the mechanical behaviour of the fractures is modelled by means of Barton-Bandis model. The shear stress/shear displacement/dilatancy relationship is modelled as viscoplastic and the normal stress/normal displacement as non-linear viscoelastic. Flow along fractures is considered to occur as a sequence of permanent states. The permeability tensor of the equivalent continuum is determined from the hydraulic apertures, in accordance of Barton et al. From the numerical point of view, the basic aim of the work is the implementation of an efficient scheme to solve the above described problem. This is done by designing a self-adaptive time step control, transparent to the user, which determines the highest possible time step while assuming the conditions of precision, stability and convergence. The paper presents the numerical details of such scheme together with validation/comparative examples and the results obtained on the analysis of the fractured rock foundation of a hypothetical dam.

  11. COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Frisch, E.; Johnson, C.G.

    1962-05-15

    A detachable coupling arrangement is described which provides for varying the length of the handle of a tool used in relatively narrow channels. The arrangement consists of mating the key and keyhole formations in the cooperating handle sections. (AEC)

  12. Aeroelastic modeling for the FIT team F/A-18 simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeiler, Thomas A.; Wieseman, Carol D.

    1989-01-01

    Some details of the aeroelastic modeling of the F/A-18 aircraft done for the Functional Integration Technology (FIT) team's research in integrated dynamics modeling and how these are combined with the FIT team's integrated dynamics model are described. Also described are mean axis corrections to elastic modes, the addition of nonlinear inertial coupling terms into the equations of motion, and the calculation of internal loads time histories using the integrated dynamics model in a batch simulation program. A video tape made of a loads time history animation was included as a part of the oral presentation. Also discussed is work done in one of the areas of unsteady aerodynamic modeling identified as needing improvement, specifically, in correction factor methodologies for improving the accuracy of stability derivatives calculated with a doublet lattice code.

  13. Extended aeroelastic analysis for helicopter rotors with prescribed hub motion and blade appended penduluum vibration absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielawa, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    The mathematical development for the expanded capabilities of the G400 rotor aeroelastic analysis was examined. The G400PA expanded analysis simulates the dynamics of all conventional rotors, blade pendulum vibration absorbers, and the higher harmonic excitations resulting from prescribed vibratory hub motions and higher harmonic blade pitch control. The methodology for modeling the unsteady stalled airloads of two dimensional airfoils is discussed. Formulations for calculating the rotor impedance matrix appropriate to the higher harmonic blade excitations are outlined. This impedance matrix, and the associated vibratory hub loads, are the rotor dynamic characteristic elements for use in the simplified coupled rotor/fuselage vibration analysis (SIMVIB). Updates to the development of the original G400 theory, program documentation, user instructions and information are presented.

  14. Wing Torsional Stiffness Tests of the Active Aeroelastic Wing F/A-18 Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lokos, William A.; Olney, Candida D.; Crawford, Natalie D.; Stauf, Rick; Reichenbach, Eric Y.

    2002-01-01

    The left wing of the Active Aeroelastic Wing (AAW) F/A-18 airplane has been ground-load-tested to quantify its torsional stiffness. The test has been performed at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center in November 1996, and again in April 2001 after a wing skin modification was performed. The primary objectives of these tests were to characterize the wing behavior before the first flight, and provide a before-and-after measurement of the torsional stiffness. Two streamwise load couples have been applied. The wing skin modification is shown to have more torsional flexibility than the original configuration has. Additionally, structural hysteresis is shown to be reduced by the skin modification. Data comparisons show good repeatability between the tests.

  15. Aeroelastic Response of Swept Aircraft Wings in a Compressible Flow Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzocca, Piergiovanni; Librescu, Liviu; Silva, Walter A.

    2000-01-01

    The present study addresses the subcritical aeroelastic response of swept wings, in various flight speed regimes, to arbitrary time-dependent external excitations. The methodology based on the concept of indicial functions is carried out in time and frequency domains. As a result of this approach, the proper unsteady aerodynamic loads necessary to study the subcritical aeroelastic response of the open/closed loop aeroelastic systems, and of flutter instability, respectively are obtained. Validation of the aeroelastic model is provided, and applications to subcritical aeroelastic response to blast pressure signatures are illustrated. In this context, an original representation of the aeroelastic response in the phase-space is displayed, and pertinent conclusions on the implications of a number of selected parameters of the system are outlined.

  16. Aeroelasticity matters: Some reflections on two decades of testing in the NASA Langley transonic dynamics tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, W. H., III

    1981-01-01

    Testing of wind-tunnel aeroelastic models is a well established, widely used means of studying flutter trends, validating theory and investigating flutter margins of safety of new vehicle designs. The Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel was designed specifically for work on dynamics and aeroelastic problems of aircraft and space vehicles. A cross section of aeroelastic research and testing in the facility since it became operational more than two decades ago is presented. Examples selected from a large store of experience illustrate the nature and purpose of some major areas of work performed in the tunnel. These areas include: specialized experimental techniques; development testing of new aircraft and launch vehicle designs; evaluation of proposed "fixes" to solve aeroelastic problems uncovered during development testing; study of unexpected aeroelastic phenomena (i.e., "surprises"); control of aeroelastic effects by active and passive means; and, finally, fundamental research involving measurement of unsteady pressures on oscillating wings and control surface.

  17. Flap-lag-torsion aeroelastic stability of a circulation control rotor in forward flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chopra, Inderjit; Hong, Chang-Ho

    1987-01-01

    The aeroelastic stability of a circulation control rotor blade undergoing three degrees of motion (flap, lag, and torsion) is investigated in forward flight. Quasi-steady strip theory is used to evaluate the aerodynamics forces; and the airfoil characteristics are from data tables. The propulsive and the auxiliary power trims are calculated from vehicle and rotor equilibrium equations through the numerical integration of element forces in azimuth as well as in radial directions. The nonlinear time dependent periodic blade response is calculated using an iterative procedure based on Floquet theory. The periodic perturbation equations are solved for stability using Floquet transition matrix theory. The effects of several parameters on blade stability are examined, including advance ratio, collective pitch, thrust level, shaft tilt, structural stiffnesses variation, and propulsive and auxiliary power trims.

  18. Observed acoustic and aeroelastic spectral responses of a MOD-2 turbine blade to turbulence excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, N. D.; Mckenna, H. E.; Jacobs, E. W.

    1995-01-01

    Early results from a recent experiment designed to directly evaluate the aeroacoustic/elastic spectral responses of a MOD-2 turbine blade to turbulence-induced unsteady blade loads are discussed. The experimental procedure consisted of flying a hot-film anemometer from a tethered balloon in the turbine inflow and simultaneously measuring the fluctuating airload and aeroelastic response at two blade span stations (65% and 87% spans) using surface-mounted, subminiature pressure transducers and standard strain gage instrumentation. The radiated acoustic pressure field was measured with a triad of very-low-frequency microphones placed at ground level, 1.5 rotor diameters upwind of the disk. Initial transfer function estimates for acoustic radiation, blade normal forces, flapwise acceleration/displacement, and chord/flapwise moments are presented.

  19. Volterra Series Approach for Nonlinear Aeroelastic Response of 2-D Lifting Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Marzocca, Piergiovanni; Librescu, Liviu

    2001-01-01

    The problem of the determination of the subcritical aeroelastic response and flutter instability of nonlinear two-dimensional lifting surfaces in an incompressible flow-field via Volterra series approach is addressed. The related aeroelastic governing equations are based upon the inclusion of structural nonlinearities, of the linear unsteady aerodynamics and consideration of an arbitrary time-dependent external pressure pulse. Unsteady aeroelastic nonlinear kernels are determined, and based on these, frequency and time histories of the subcritical aeroelastic response are obtained, and in this context the influence of geometric nonlinearities is emphasized. Conclusions and results displaying the implications of the considered effects are supplied.

  20. Multi-fidelity construction of explicit boundaries: Application to aeroelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dribusch, Christoph

    Wings, control surfaces and rotor blades subject to aerodynamic forces may exhibit aeroelastic instabilities such as flutter, divergence and limit cycle oscillations which generally reduce their life and functionality. This possibility of instability must be taken into account during the design process and numerical simulation models may be used to predict aeroelastic stability. Aeroelastic stability is a design requirement that encompasses several difficulties also found in other areas of design. For instance, the large computational time associated with stability analysis is also found in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models. It is a major hurdle in numerical optimization and reliability analysis, which generally require large numbers of call to the simulation code. Similarly, the presence of bifurcations and discontinuities is also encountered in structural impact analysis based on nonlinear dynamic simulations and renders traditional approximation techniques such as Kriging ineffective. Finally, for a given component or system, aeroelastic instability is only one of multiple failure modes which must be accounted for during design and reliability studies. To address the above challenges, this dissertation proposes a novel algorithm to predict, over a range of parameters, the qualitative outcomes (pass/fail) of simulations based on relatively few, classified (pass/fail) simulation results. This is different from traditional approximation techniques that seek to predict simulation outcomes quantitatively, for example by fitting a response surface. The predictions of the proposed algorithm are based on the theory of support vector machines (SVM), a machine learning method originated in the field of pattern recognition. This process yields an analytical function that explicitly defines the boundary between feasible and infeasible regions of the parameter space and has the ability to reproduce nonlinear, disjoint boundaries in n dimensions. Since training the

  1. CFD and Aeroelastic Analysis of the MEXICO Wind Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrión, M.; Woodgate, M.; Steijl, R.; Barakos, G.; Gómez-Iradi, S.; Munduate, X.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents an aerodynamic and aeroelastic analysis of the MEXICO wind turbine, using the compressible HMB solver of Liverpool. The aeroelasticity of the blade, as well as the effect of a low-Mach scheme were studied for the zero-yaw 15m/s wind case and steady- state computations. The wake developed behind the rotor was also extracted and compared with the experimental data, using the compressible solver and a low-Mach scheme. It was found that the loads were not sensitive to the Mach number effects, although the low-Mach scheme improved the wake predictions. The sensitivity of the results to the blade structural properties was also highlighted.

  2. Aeroelastic analysis for propellers - mathematical formulations and program user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielawa, R. L.; Johnson, S. A.; Chi, R. M.; Gangwani, S. T.

    1983-01-01

    Mathematical development is presented for a specialized propeller dedicated version of the G400 rotor aeroelastic analysis. The G400PROP analysis simulates aeroelastic characteristics particular to propellers such as structural sweep, aerodynamic sweep and high subsonic unsteady airloads (both stalled and unstalled). Formulations are presented for these expanded propeller related methodologies. Results of limited application of the analysis to realistic blade configurations and operating conditions which include stable and unstable stall flutter test conditions are given. Sections included for enhanced program user efficiency and expanded utilization include descriptions of: (1) the structuring of the G400PROP FORTRAN coding; (2) the required input data; and (3) the output results. General information to facilitate operation and improve efficiency is also provided.

  3. Aeroelastic Optimization Study Based on X-56A Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wesley; Pak, Chan-Gi

    2014-01-01

    A design process which incorporates the object-oriented multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization (MDAO) tool and the aeroelastic effects of high fidelity finite element models to characterize the design space was successfully developed and established. Two multidisciplinary design optimization studies using an object-oriented MDAO tool developed at NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center were presented. The first study demonstrates the use of aeroelastic tailoring concepts to minimize the structural weight while meeting the design requirements including strength, buckling, and flutter. A hybrid and discretization optimization approach was implemented to improve accuracy and computational efficiency of a global optimization algorithm. The second study presents a flutter mass balancing optimization study. The results provide guidance to modify the fabricated flexible wing design and move the design flutter speeds back into the flight envelope so that the original objective of X-56A flight test can be accomplished.

  4. Level-Set Topology Optimization with Aeroelastic Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunning, Peter D.; Stanford, Bret K.; Kim, H. Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Level-set topology optimization is used to design a wing considering skin buckling under static aeroelastic trim loading, as well as dynamic aeroelastic stability (flutter). The level-set function is defined over the entire 3D volume of a transport aircraft wing box. Therefore, the approach is not limited by any predefined structure and can explore novel configurations. The Sequential Linear Programming (SLP) level-set method is used to solve the constrained optimization problems. The proposed method is demonstrated using three problems with mass, linear buckling and flutter objective and/or constraints. A constraint aggregation method is used to handle multiple buckling constraints in the wing skins. A continuous flutter constraint formulation is used to handle difficulties arising from discontinuities in the design space caused by a switching of the critical flutter mode.

  5. An Overview of Recent Developments in Computational Aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Robert M.; Edwards, John W.

    2004-01-01

    The motivation for Computational Aeroelasticity (CA) and the elements of one type of the analysis or simulation process are briefly reviewed. The need for streamlining and improving the overall process to reduce elapsed time and improve overall accuracy is discussed. Further effort is needed to establish the credibility of the methodology, obtain experience, and to incorporate the experience base to simplify the method for future use. Experience with the application of a variety of Computational Aeroelasticity programs is summarized for the transonic flutter of two wings, the AGARD 445.6 wing and a typical business jet wing. There is a compelling need for a broad range of additional flutter test cases for further comparisons. Some existing data sets that may offer CA challenges are presented.

  6. A Nonlinear Modal Aeroelastic Solver for FUN3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, Benjamin D.; Bartels, Robert E.; Biedron, Robert T.; Scott, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    A nonlinear structural solver has been implemented internally within the NASA FUN3D computational fluid dynamics code, allowing for some new aeroelastic capabilities. Using a modal representation of the structure, a set of differential or differential-algebraic equations are derived for general thin structures with geometric nonlinearities. ODEPACK and LAPACK routines are linked with FUN3D, and the nonlinear equations are solved at each CFD time step. The existing predictor-corrector method is retained, whereby the structural solution is updated after mesh deformation. The nonlinear solver is validated using a test case for a flexible aeroshell at transonic, supersonic, and hypersonic flow conditions. Agreement with linear theory is seen for the static aeroelastic solutions at relatively low dynamic pressures, but structural nonlinearities limit deformation amplitudes at high dynamic pressures. No flutter was found at any of the tested trajectory points, though LCO may be possible in the transonic regime.

  7. Aerodynamic, aeroacoustic, and aeroelastic investigations of airfoil-vortex interaction using large-eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilie, Marcel

    In helicopters, vortices (generated at the tip of the rotor blades) interact with the next advancing blades during certain flight and manoeuvring conditions, generating undesirable levels of acoustic noise and vibration. These Blade-Vortex Interactions (BVIs), which may cause the most disturbing acoustic noise, normally occur in descent or high-speed forward flight. Acoustic noise characterization (and potential reduction) is one the areas generating intensive research interest to the rotorcraft industry. Since experimental investigations of BVI are extremely costly, some insights into the BVI or AVI (2-D Airfoil-Vortex Interaction) can be gained using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) numerical simulations. Numerical simulation of BVI or AVI has been of interest to CFD for many years. There are still difficulties concerning an accurate numerical prediction of BVI. One of the main issues is the inherent dissipation of CFD turbulence models, which severely affects the preservation of the vortex characteristics. Moreover this is not an issue only for aerodynamic and aeroacoustic analysis but also for aeroelastic investigations as well, especially when the strong (two-way) aeroelastic coupling is of interest. The present investigation concentrates mainly on AVI simulations. The simulations are performed for Mach number, Ma = 0.3, resulting in a Reynolds number, Re = 1.3 x 106, which is based on the chord, c, of the airfoil (NACA0012). Extensive literature search has indicated that the present work represents the first comprehensive investigation of AVI using the LES numerical approach, in the rotorcraft research community. The major factor affecting the aerodynamic coefficients and aeroacoustic field as a result of airfoil-vortex interaction is observed to be the unsteady pressure generated at the location of the interaction. The present numerical results show that the aerodynamic coefficients (lift, moment, and drag) and aeroacoustic field are strongly dependent on

  8. Aeroelastic Flight Data Analysis with the Hilbert-Huang Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, Marty; Prazenica, Chad

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates the utility of the Hilbert-Huang transform for the analysis of aeroelastic flight data. It is well known that the classical Hilbert transform can be used for time-frequency analysis of functions or signals. Unfortunately, the Hilbert transform can only be effectively applied to an extremely small class of signals, namely those that are characterized by a single frequency component at any instant in time. The recently-developed Hilbert-Huang algorithm addresses the limitations of the classical Hilbert transform through a process known as empirical mode decomposition. Using this approach, the data is filtered into a series of intrinsic mode functions, each of which admits a well-behaved Hilbert transform. In this manner, the Hilbert-Huang algorithm affords time-frequency analysis of a large class of signals. This powerful tool has been applied in the analysis of scientific data, structural system identification, mechanical system fault detection, and even image processing. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the potential applications of the Hilbert-Huang algorithm for the analysis of aeroelastic systems, with improvements such as localized/online processing. Applications for correlations between system input and output, and amongst output sensors, are discussed to characterize the time-varying amplitude and frequency correlations present in the various components of multiple data channels. Online stability analyses and modal identification are also presented. Examples are given using aeroelastic test data from the F/A-18 Active Aeroelastic Wing aircraft, an Aerostructures Test Wing, and pitch-plunge simulation.

  9. Aeroelastic Airworthiness Assesment of the Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge Flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrera, Claudia Y.; Spivey, Natalie D.; Lung, Shun-fat; Ervin, Gregory; Flick, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge (ACTE) demonstrator is a joint task under the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project in partnership with the Air Force Research Laboratory and FlexSys, Inc. (Ann Arbor, Michigan). The project goal is to develop advanced technologies that enable environmentally friendly aircraft, such as adaptive compliant technologies. The ACTE demonstrator flight-test program encompassed replacing the Fowler flaps on the SubsoniC Aircraft Testbed, a modified Gulfstream III (Gulfstream Aerospace, Savannah, Georgia) aircraft, with control surfaces developed by FlexSys. The control surfaces developed by FlexSys are a pair of uniquely-designed unconventional flaps to be used as lifting surfaces during flight-testing to validate their structural effectiveness. The unconventional flaps required a multidisciplinary airworthiness assessment to prove they could withstand the prescribed flight envelope. Several challenges were posed due to the large deflections experienced by the structure, requiring non-linear analysis methods. The aeroelastic assessment necessitated both conventional and extensive testing and analysis methods. A series of ground vibration tests (GVTs) were conducted to provide modal characteristics to validate and update finite element models (FEMs) used for the flutter analyses for a subset of the various flight configurations. Numerous FEMs were developed using data from FlexSys and the ground tests. The flap FEMs were then attached to the aircraft model to generate a combined FEM that could be analyzed for aeroelastic instabilities. The aeroelastic analysis results showed the combined system of aircraft and flaps were predicted to have the required flutter margin to successfully demonstrate the adaptive compliant technology. This paper documents the details of the aeroelastic airworthiness assessment described, including the ground testing and analyses, and subsequent flight

  10. Structural dynamic and aeroelastic considerations for hypersonic vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cazier, F. W., Jr.; Doggett, Robert V., Jr.; Ricketts, Rodney H.

    1991-01-01

    The specific geometrical, structural, and operational environment characteristics of hypersonic vehicles are discussed with particular reference to aerospace plane type configurations. A discussion of the structural dynamic and aeroelastic phenomena that must be addressed for this class of vehicles is presented. These phenomena are in the aeroservothermoelasticity technical area. Some illustrative examples of recent experimental and analytical work are given. Some examples of current research are pointed out.

  11. Aeroelastic stability analysis of a Darrieus wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Popelka, D.

    1982-02-01

    An aeroelastic stability analysis has been developed for predicting flutter instabilities on vertical axis wind turbines. The analytical model and mathematical formulation of the problem are described as well as the physical mechanism that creates flutter in Darrieus turbines. Theoretical results are compared with measured experimental data from flutter tests of the Sandia 2 Meter turbine. Based on this comparison, the analysis appears to be an adequate design evaluation tool.

  12. High-performance parallel analysis of coupled problems for aircraft propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felippa, C. A.; Farhat, C.; Chen, P.-S.; Gumaste, U.; Leoinne, M.; Stern, P.

    1995-01-01

    This research program deals with the application of high-performance computing methods to the numerical simulation of complete jet engines. The program was initiated in 1993 by applying two-dimensional parallel aeroelastic codes to the interior gas flow problem of a by-pass jet engine. The fluid mesh generation, domain decomposition and solution capabilities were successfully tested. Attention was then focused on methodology for the partitioned analysis of the interaction of the gas flow with a flexible structure and with the fluid mesh motion driven by these structural displacements. The latter is treated by an ALE technique that models the fluid mesh motion as that of a fictitious mechanical network laid along the edges of near-field fluid elements. New partitioned analysis procedures to treat this coupled 3-component problem were developed in 1994. These procedures involved delayed corrections and subcycling, and have been successfully tested on several massively parallel computers. For the global steady-state axisymmetric analysis of a complete engine we have decided to use the NASA-sponsored ENG10 program, which uses a regular FV-multiblock-grid discretization in conjunction with circumferential averaging to include effects of blade forces, loss, combustor heat addition, blockage, bleeds and convective mixing. A load-balancing preprocessor for parallel versions of ENG10 has been developed. It is planned to use the steady-state global solution provided by ENG10 as input to a localized three-dimensional FSI analysis for engine regions where aeroelastic effects may be important.

  13. A Proposed Role of Aeroelasticity in NASA's New Exploration Vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert E.; Moses, Robert W.; Scott, Robert C.; Templeton, Justin D.; Cheatwood, F. McNeil; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Buck, Greg M.

    2005-01-01

    On 14 January 2004, NASA received a mandate to return astronauts to the Moon, evolve a sustained presence there, then head out into the solar system to Mars and perhaps beyond. This new space exploration initiative directs NASA to develop human and robotic technologies that can deliver payloads larger than Apollo to the Moon, to Mars, and bring astronauts and samples safely back to Earth at costs much lower than Apollo. These challenges require creative aerospace systems. On proposed technology for safely delivering payloads to the surface of Mars and returning samples to Earth involves deployed flexible and inflatable decelerators for atmospheric entry. Because inflatable decelerators provide the entry vehicle more drag surface area at smaller mass than traditional ablative devices, this class of decelerators can potentially accomodate larger mass payloads. The flexibility of these lightweight aeroshells can pose both vehicle and aeroelastic stability problems if not properly designed for the expected flight regimes. Computational tools need to be developed for modelling the large and nonlinear deformations of these highly flexible structures. Unlike wind tunnel testing, an integrated and efficient aeroelastic analysis tool can explore the entire flight environment. This paper will provide some background on flexible deployable decelerators, survey the current state of technology and outline the proposed development of an aeroelastic analysis and capability.

  14. Role of computational fluid dynamics in unsteady aerodynamics for aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.; Goorjian, Peter M.

    1989-01-01

    In the last two decades there have been extensive developments in computational unsteady transonic aerodynamics. Such developments are essential since the transonic regime plays an important role in the design of modern aircraft. Therefore, there has been a large effort to develop computational tools with which to accurately perform flutter analysis at transonic speeds. In the area of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), unsteady transonic aerodynamics are characterized by the feature of modeling the motion of shock waves over aerodynamic bodies, such as wings. This modeling requires the solution of nonlinear partial differential equations. Most advanced codes such as XTRAN3S use the transonic small perturbation equation. Currently, XTRAN3S is being used for generic research in unsteady aerodynamics and aeroelasticity of almost full aircraft configurations. Use of Euler/Navier Stokes equations for simple typical sections has just begun. A brief history of the development of CFD for aeroelastic applications is summarized. The development of unsteady transonic aerodynamics and aeroelasticity are also summarized.

  15. Transonic aeroelastic analysis of the B-1 wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, G. P.; Goorjian, P. M.; Ide, H.; Miller, G. D.

    1986-01-01

    The flow over the B-1 wing is studied computationally, including the aeroelastic response of the wing. Computed results are compared with results from wind tunnel and flight tests for both low- and high-sweep cases, at 25.0 and 67.5 deg, respectively, for selected transonic Mach numbers. The aerodynamic and aeroelastic computations are made by using the transonic unsteady code ATRAN3S. Steady aerodynamic computations compare well with wind tunnel results for the 25.0 deg sweep case and also for small angles of attack at 67.5 deg sweep case. The aeroelastic response results show that the wing is stable at the low-sweep angle for the calculation at the Mach number at which there is a shock wave. In the higher-sweep case, for the higher angle of attack at which oscillations were observed in the flight and wind tunnel tests, the calculations do not show any shock waves. Their absence lends support to the hypothesis that the observed oscillations are due to the presence of leading-edge separation vortices and not to shock wave motion, as was previously proposed.

  16. Transonic aerodynamic and aeroelastic characteristics of a variable sweep wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goorjian, P. M.; Guruswamy, G. P.; Ide, H.; Miller, G.

    1985-01-01

    The flow over the B-1 wing is studied computationally, including the aeroelastic response of the wing. Computed results are compared with results from wind tunnel and flight tests for both low-sweep and high-sweep cases, at 25.0 and 67.5 deg., respectively, for selected transonic Mach numbers. The aerodynamic and aeroelastic computations are made by using the transonic unsteady code ATRAN3S. Steady aerodynamic computations compare well with wind tunnel results for the 25.0 deg sweep case and also for small angles of attack at the 67.5 deg sweep case. The aeroelastic response results show that the wing is stable at the low sweep angle for the calculation at the Mach number at which there is a shock wave. In the higher sweep case, for the higher angle of attack at which oscillations were observed in the flight and wind tunnel tests, the calculations do not show any shock waves. Their absence lends support to the hypothesis that the observed oscillations are due to the presence of leading edge separation vortices and are not due to shock wave motion as was previously proposed.

  17. Transonic aerodynamic and aeroelastic characteristics of a variable sweep wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goorjian, P. M.; Guruswamy, G. P.; Ide, H.; Miller, G.

    1985-01-01

    The flow over the B-1 wing is studied computationally, including the aeroelastic response of the wing. Computed results are compared with results from wind tunnel and flight tests for both low-sweep and high-sweep cases, at 25.0 deg. and 67.5 deg., respectively, for selected transonic Mach numbers. The aerodynamic and aeroelastic computations are made by using the transonic unsteady code ATRAN3S. Steady aerodynamic computations compare well with wind tunnel results for the 25.0 deg. sweep case and also for small angles of attack at the 67.5 deg. sweep case. The aeroelastic response results show that the wing is stable at the low sweep angle for the calculation at the Mach number at which there is a shock wave. In the higher sweep case, for the higher angle of attack at which oscillations were observed in the flight and wind tunnel tests, the calculations do not show any shock waves. Their absence lends support to the hypothesis that the observed oscillations are due to the presence of leading edge separation vortices and are not due to shock wave motion as was previously proposed.

  18. Aeroelastic Optimization Study Based on the X-56A Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wesley W.; Pak, Chan-Gi

    2014-01-01

    One way to increase the aircraft fuel efficiency is to reduce structural weight while maintaining adequate structural airworthiness, both statically and aeroelastically. A design process which incorporates the object-oriented multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization (MDAO) tool and the aeroelastic effects of high fidelity finite element models to characterize the design space was successfully developed and established. This paper presents two multidisciplinary design optimization studies using an object-oriented MDAO tool developed at NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center. The first study demonstrates the use of aeroelastic tailoring concepts to minimize the structural weight while meeting the design requirements including strength, buckling, and flutter. Such an approach exploits the anisotropic capabilities of the fiber composite materials chosen for this analytical exercise with ply stacking sequence. A hybrid and discretization optimization approach improves accuracy and computational efficiency of a global optimization algorithm. The second study presents a flutter mass balancing optimization study for the fabricated flexible wing of the X-56A model since a desired flutter speed band is required for the active flutter suppression demonstration during flight testing. The results of the second study provide guidance to modify the wing design and move the design flutter speeds back into the flight envelope so that the original objective of X-56A flight test can be accomplished successfully. The second case also demonstrates that the object-oriented MDAO tool can handle multiple analytical configurations in a single optimization run.

  19. An improved stability characterization for aeroelastic energy harvesting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javed, U.; Abdelkefi, A.; Akhtar, I.

    2016-07-01

    An enhanced stability characterization for aeroelastic energy harvesters is introduced by using both the normal form of the Hopf bifurcation and shooting method. Considering a triangular cylinder subjected to transverse galloping oscillations and a piezoelectric transducer to convert mechanical vibrations to electrical power, it is demonstrated that the nonlinear normal form is very beneficial to characterize the type of instability near bifurcation and determine the influence of structural and/or aerodynamic nonlinearities on the performance of the harvester. It is also shown that this tool is strong in terms of designing reliable aeroelastic energy harvesters. The results show that this technique can accurately predict the harvester's response only near bifurcation, however, cannot predict the stable solutions of the harvester when subcritical Hopf bifurcation takes place. To cover these drawbacks, the shooting method is employed. It turns out that this approach is beneficial in determining the stable and unstable solutions of the system and associated turning points. The results also show that the Floquet multipliers, obtained as the by-product of this method, can be used to characterize the response's type of the harvester. Thus, the normal form of the Hopf bifurcation and shooting method predictions can supplement each other to design stable and reliable aeroelastic energy harvesters.

  20. Using FUN3D for Aeroelastic, Sonic Boom, and AeroPropulsoServoElastic (APSE) Analyses of a Supersonic Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Sanetrik, Mark D.; Chwalowski, Pawel; Connolly, Joseph; Kopasakis, George

    2016-01-01

    An overview of recent applications of the FUN3D CFD code to computational aeroelastic, sonic boom, and aeropropulsoservoelasticity (APSE) analyses of a low-boom supersonic configuration is presented. The overview includes details of the computational models developed including multiple unstructured CFD grids suitable for aeroelastic and sonic boom analyses. In addition, aeroelastic Reduced-Order Models (ROMs) are generated and used to rapidly compute the aeroelastic response and utter boundaries at multiple flight conditions.

  1. Applications of the unsteady vortex-lattice method in aircraft aeroelasticity and flight dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murua, Joseba; Palacios, Rafael; Graham, J. Michael R.

    2012-11-01

    The unsteady vortex-lattice method provides a medium-fidelity tool for the prediction of non-stationary aerodynamic loads in low-speed, but high-Reynolds-number, attached flow conditions. Despite a proven track record in applications where free-wake modelling is critical, other less-computationally expensive potential-flow models, such as the doublet-lattice method and strip theory, have long been favoured in fixed-wing aircraft aeroelasticity and flight dynamics. This paper presents how the unsteady vortex-lattice method can be implemented as an enhanced alternative to those techniques for diverse situations that arise in flexible-aircraft dynamics. A historical review of the methodology is included, with latest developments and practical applications. Different formulations of the aerodynamic equations are outlined, and they are integrated with a nonlinear beam model for the full description of the dynamics of a free-flying flexible vehicle. Nonlinear time-marching solutions capture large wing excursions and wake roll-up, and the linearisation of the equations lends itself to a seamless, monolithic state-space assembly, particularly convenient for stability analysis and flight control system design. The numerical studies emphasise scenarios where the unsteady vortex-lattice method can provide an advantage over other state-of-the-art approaches. Examples of this include unsteady aerodynamics in vehicles with coupled aeroelasticity and flight dynamics, and in lifting surfaces undergoing complex kinematics, large deformations, or in-plane motions. Geometric nonlinearities are shown to play an instrumental, and often counter-intuitive, role in the aircraft dynamics. The unsteady vortex-lattice method is unveiled as a remarkable tool that can successfully incorporate all those effects in the unsteady aerodynamics modelling.

  2. Pretreatment procedures for characterization of arsenic and selenium species in complex samples utilizing coupled techniques with mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Wrobel, Katarzyna; Wrobel, Kazimierz; Caruso, Joseph A

    2005-01-01

    Research interest in analyzing arsenic and selenium is dictated by their species-dependent behavior in the environment and in living organisms. Different analytical methodologies for known species in relatively simple chemical systems are well established, yet the analysis of complex samples is still a challenge. Owing to the complex matrix and low concentrations of target species that may be chemically labile, suitable pretreatment of the sample becomes a critical step in any speciation procedure. In this paper, the pretreatment procedures used for arsenic and selenium speciation are reviewed with the emphasis on the link between the analytical protocol applied and the biologically-significant information provided by the results obtained. In the first approach, the aim of pretreatment is to convert the original sample into a form that can be analyzed by a coupled (hyphenated) technique, preventing possible losses and/or species interconversion. Common techniques include different leaching and extraction modes, enzymatic hydrolysis, species volatilization, and so on, with or without species preconcentration. On the other hand, if the speciation analysis is performed for elucidation of elemental pathways and specific functions in a living system, more conscious pretreatment and/or fractionation is needed. The macroscopic separation of organs and tissues, isolation of certain types of cells, cell disruption and separation of sub-cellular fractions, as well as isolation of a specific biomolecules become important. Furthermore, to understand molecular mechanisms, the identification of intermediate-often highly instable--metabolites is necessary. Real life applications are reviewed in this work for aquatic samples, soils and sediments, plants, yeast, and urine. PMID:15662512

  3. Aeroelastic and Flight Dynamics Analysis of Folding Wing Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ivan

    This dissertation explores the aeroelastic stability of a folding wing using both theoretical and experimental methods. The theoretical model is based on the existing clamped-wing aeroelastic model that uses beam theory structural dynamics and strip theory aerodynamics. A higher-fidelity theoretical model was created by adding several improvements to the existing model, namely a structural model that uses ANSYS for individual wing segment modes and an unsteady vortex lattice aerodynamic model. The comparison with the lower-fidelity model shows that the higher-fidelity model typical provides better agreement between theory and experiment, but the predicted system behavior in general does not change, reinforcing the effectiveness of the low-fidelity model for preliminary design of folding wings. The present work also conducted more detailed aeroelastic analyses of three-segment folding wings, and in particular considers the Lockheed-type configurations to understand the existence of sudden changes in predicted aeroelastic behavior with varying fold angle for certain configurations. These phenomena were observed in carefully conducted experiments, and nonlinearities---structural and geometry---were shown to suppress the phenomena. Next, new experimental models with better manufacturing tolerances are designed to be tested in the Duke University Wind Tunnel. The testing focused on various configurations of three-segment folding wings in order to obtain higher quality data. Next, the theoretical model was further improved by adding aircraft longitudinal degrees of freedom such that the aeroelastic model may predict the instabilities for the entire aircraft and not just a clamped wing. The theoretical results show that the flutter instabilities typically occur at a higher air speed due to greater frequency separation between modes for the aircraft system than a clamped wing system, but the divergence instabilities occur at a lower air speed. Lastly, additional

  4. High-performance parallel analysis of coupled problems for aircraft propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felippa, C. A.; Farhat, C.; Lanteri, S.; Maman, N.; Piperno, S.; Gumaste, U.

    1994-01-01

    This research program deals with the application of high-performance computing methods for the analysis of complete jet engines. We have entitled this program by applying the two dimensional parallel aeroelastic codes to the interior gas flow problem of a bypass jet engine. The fluid mesh generation, domain decomposition, and solution capabilities were successfully tested. We then focused attention on methodology for the partitioned analysis of the interaction of the gas flow with a flexible structure and with the fluid mesh motion that results from these structural displacements. This is treated by a new arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) technique that models the fluid mesh motion as that of a fictitious mass-spring network. New partitioned analysis procedures to treat this coupled three-component problem are developed. These procedures involved delayed corrections and subcycling. Preliminary results on the stability, accuracy, and MPP computational efficiency are reported.

  5. Experimental aeroelasticity in wind tunnels - History, status, and future in brief

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricketts, Rodney H.

    1993-01-01

    The state of the art of experimental aeroelasticity in the United States is assessed. A brief history of the development of ground test facilities, apparatus, and testing methods is presented. Several experimental programs are described that were previously conducted and helped to improve the state of the art. Some specific future directions for improving and enhancing experimental aeroelasticity are suggested.

  6. Determination of metal concentrations in lichen samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy technique after applying different digestion procedures.

    PubMed

    Tuncel, S G; Yenisoy-Karakas, S; Dogangün, A

    2004-05-28

    Three digestion procedures have been tested on lichen samples for application in the determination of major, minor and trace elements (Al, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, V and Zn) in lichen samples collected in Aegean Region of Turkey by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES). The acid mixture of concentrated HNO(3), H(2)O(2) and HF were used. The instrument was optimized using lichen matrix considering RF power, nebulizer pressure, auxiliary flow rate and pump rate. The accuracy of the overall analyses was first estimated by analysis of two certified reference materials. Good agreement between measured and reference values were found for almost all elements. As the second way of determining the accuracy, results obtained from independent analytical techniques (ICP-AES and instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA)) were compared for all elements by analyzing real samples. Correlation coefficients of two techniques for the elements ranged between 0.70 (Mg) and 0.96 (Fe). Among the three digestion systems, namely microwave, open vessel and acid bomb, microwave digestion system gave the best recovery results. The method detection limit (MDL) was computed using reagent blanks of microwave digestion system since it provides cleaner sample preparation. Detection limit is adequate for all elements to determine the elements in lichen samples. The precision was assessed from the replicate analyses of reagent blanks of microwave digestion system and was found to be less than 1.5% relative standard deviation (R.S.D.). PMID:18969428

  7. Recent Applications of Higher-Order Spectral Analysis to Nonlinear Aeroelastic Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Hajj, Muhammad R.; Dunn, Shane; Strganac, Thomas W.; Powers, Edward J.; Stearman, Ronald

    2005-01-01

    Recent applications of higher-order spectral (HOS) methods to nonlinear aeroelastic phenomena are presented. Applications include the analysis of data from a simulated nonlinear pitch and plunge apparatus and from F-18 flight flutter tests. A MATLAB model of the Texas A&MUniversity s Nonlinear Aeroelastic Testbed Apparatus (NATA) is used to generate aeroelastic transients at various conditions including limit cycle oscillations (LCO). The Gaussian or non-Gaussian nature of the transients is investigated, related to HOS methods, and used to identify levels of increasing nonlinear aeroelastic response. Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) F/A-18 flight flutter test data is presented and analyzed. The data includes high-quality measurements of forced responses and LCO phenomena. Standard power spectral density (PSD) techniques and HOS methods are applied to the data and presented. The goal of this research is to develop methods that can identify the onset of nonlinear aeroelastic phenomena, such as LCO, during flutter testing.

  8. Past, Present, and Future Capabilities of the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel from an Aeroelasticity Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Stanley R.; Garcia, Jerry L.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) has provided a unique capability for aeroelastic testing for forty years. The facility has a rich history of significant contributions to the design of many United States commercial transports, military aircraft, launch vehicles, and spacecraft. The facility has many features that contribute to its uniqueness for aeroelasticity testing, perhaps the most important feature being the use of a heavy gas test medium to achieve higher test densities. Higher test medium densities substantially improve model-building requirements and therefore simplify the fabrication process for building aeroelastically scaled wind tunnel models. Aeroelastic scaling for the heavy gas results in lower model structural frequencies. Lower model frequencies tend to a make aeroelastic testing safer. This paper will describe major developments in the testing capabilities at the TDT throughout its history, the current status of the facility, and planned additions and improvements to its capabilities in the near future.

  9. Aeroelastic Tailoring of Transport Aircraft Wings: State-of-the-Art and Potential Enabling Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jutte, Christine; Stanford, Bret K.

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides a brief overview of the state-of-the-art for aeroelastic tailoring of subsonic transport aircraft and offers additional resources on related research efforts. Emphasis is placed on aircraft having straight or aft swept wings. The literature covers computational synthesis tools developed for aeroelastic tailoring and numerous design studies focused on discovering new methods for passive aeroelastic control. Several new structural and material technologies are presented as potential enablers of aeroelastic tailoring, including selectively reinforced materials, functionally graded materials, fiber tow steered composite laminates, and various nonconventional structural designs. In addition, smart materials and structures whose properties or configurations change in response to external stimuli are presented as potential active approaches to aeroelastic tailoring.

  10. Aeroelasticity matters - Some reflections on two decades of testing in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, W. H., III

    1981-01-01

    In 1955, work was started on the conversion of a subsonic wind tunnel to a 16-foot transonic tunnel with Freon-12 or air as the test medium. The new facility, designated the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT), became fully operational in 1960. A description is presented of aeroelastic testing and research performed in the TDT since 1960. It is pointed out that wind-tunnel tests of aeroelastic models require specialized experimental techniques seldom found in other types of wind-tunnel studies. Attention is given to model mount systems, launch vehicle models, aircraft models, aircraft buffet, gust response, stability derivative measurements, and subcritical testing techniques. Aspects of vehicle development testing are considered along with aeroelastic 'fixes', aeroelastic 'surprises', approaches for controlling aeroelastic effects, and unsteady pressure measurements.

  11. A Review of Recent Aeroelastic Analysis Methods for Propulsion at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.; Bakhle, Milind A.; Srivastava, R.; Mehmed, Oral; Stefko, George L.

    1993-01-01

    This report reviews aeroelastic analyses for propulsion components (propfans, compressors and turbines) being developed and used at NASA LeRC. These aeroelastic analyses include both structural and aerodynamic models. The structural models include a typical section, a beam (with and without disk flexibility), and a finite-element blade model (with plate bending elements). The aerodynamic models are based on the solution of equations ranging from the two-dimensional linear potential equation to the three-dimensional Euler equations for multibladed configurations. Typical calculated results are presented for each aeroelastic model. Suggestions for further research are made. Many of the currently available aeroelastic models and analysis methods are being incorporated in a unified computer program, APPLE (Aeroelasticity Program for Propulsion at LEwis).

  12. Development of an Aeroelastic Code Based on an Euler/Navier-Stokes Aerodynamic Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakhle, Milind A.; Srivastava, Rakesh; Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Stefko, George L.; Janus, Mark J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an aeroelastic code (TURBO-AE) based on an Euler/Navier-Stokes unsteady aerodynamic analysis. A brief review of the relevant research in the area of propulsion aeroelasticity is presented. The paper briefly describes the original Euler/Navier-Stokes code (TURBO) and then details the development of the aeroelastic extensions. The aeroelastic formulation is described. The modeling of the dynamics of the blade using a modal approach is detailed, along with the grid deformation approach used to model the elastic deformation of the blade. The work-per-cycle approach used to evaluate aeroelastic stability is described. Representative results used to verify the code are presented. The paper concludes with an evaluation of the development thus far, and some plans for further development and validation of the TURBO-AE code.

  13. Aeroelasticity at the NASA Langley Research Center Recent progress, new challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    Recent progress in aeroelasticity, particularly at the NASA Langley Research Center is reviewed to look at the questions answered and questions raised, and to attempt to define appropriate research emphasis needed in the near future and beyond. The paper is focused primarily on the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) Program because Langley is the lead NASA center for aerospace structures research, and essentially is the only one working in depth in the area of aeroelasticity. Historical trends in aeroelasticity are reviewed broadly in terms of technology and staffing particularly at the LaRC. Then, selected studies of the Loads and Aeroelasticity Division at LaRC and others over the past three years are presented with attention paid to unresolved questions. Finally, based on the results of these studies and on perceptions of design trends and aircraft operational requirements, future research needs in aeroelasticity are discussed.

  14. Aeroelastic Tailoring for Stability Augmentation and Performance Enhancements of Tiltrotor Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, Mark W.; Piatak, David J.; Corso, Lawrence M.; Popelka, David A.

    1999-01-01

    The requirements for increased speed and productivity for tiltrotors has spawned several investigations associated with proprotor aeroelastic stability augmentation and aerodynamic performance enhancements. Included among these investigations is a focus on passive aeroelastic tailoring concepts which exploit the anisotropic capabilities of fiber composite materials. Researchers at Langley Research Center and Bell Helicopter have devoted considerable effort to assess the potential for using these materials to obtain aeroelastic responses which are beneficial to the important stability and performance considerations of tiltrotors. Both experimental and analytical studies have been completed to examine aeroelastic tailoring concepts for the tiltrotor, applied either to the wing or to the rotor blades. This paper reviews some of the results obtained in these aeroelastic tailoring investigations and discusses the relative merits associated with these approaches.

  15. Flight-vehicle materials, structures, and dynamics - Assessment and future directions. Vol. 5 - Structural dynamics and aeroelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Venneri, Samuel L.

    Various papers on flight vehicle materials, structures, and dynamics are presented. Individual topics addressed include: general modeling methods, component modeling techniques, time-domain computational techniques, dynamics of articulated structures, structural dynamics in rotating systems, structural dynamics in rotorcraft, damping in structures, structural acoustics, structural design for control, structural modeling for control, control strategies for structures, system identification, overall assessment of needs and benefits in structural dynamics and controlled structures. Also discussed are: experimental aeroelasticity in wind tunnels, aeroservoelasticity, nonlinear aeroelasticity, aeroelasticity problems in turbomachines, rotary-wing aeroelasticity with application to VTOL vehicles, computational aeroelasticity, structural dynamic testing and instrumentation.

  16. A new, simplified procedure, for separating Lu, Hf, Sm, and Nd, in preparation for coupled geochronology by ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arauza, S. J.; Kylander-Clark, A. R.; Hacker, B. R.

    2010-12-01

    The ubiquitous presence of garnet at high pressure and its chemical variability with pressure and temperature make garnet a widely-utilized phase for thermobarometric studies. An opportunity to further constrain P-T-t paths with geochronology also arises due to the presence of radiogenic daughter-isotopes (i.e. Hf and Nd) that allow for the use of Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd decay to directly date metamorphic mineral assemblages, which is an advantage over the use of accessory phases. Because of the different distribution coefficients of Lu and Sm in garnet, a coupled-geochronometer approach offers the opportunity to constrain a minimum time-span for garnet stability (Lapen et al. 2003, Kylander-Clark et al. 2007). Unfortunately, the overwhelming abundance of Ti and Zr in dissolved separates results in inaccurate measurements of Hf isotopic concentration (Scherer et al. 2000), necessitating the development of a sophisticated method of elemental separation. Here we present a simple method for the separation of Lu, Hf, Sm, and Nd from whole-rock samples of garnet-bearing rocks that provides a promising separation of Ti and Zr from Hf and sufficient rare-earth element separation for analysis by MC-ICPMS. Bulk chemical separation (REE from major elements) experiments were run using 0.7 x 20 cm glass columns with Dowex 50WX8 ion-exchange resin (200-400 mesh). These columns were run with variable abundances of HCl/HF in variable concentrations to test the ability of these resins to separate Hf from major elements, Ti, Zr, and the REEs from one another. Element concentrations of each aliquot were measured on the Nu Instruments AttoM single collector ICPMS. Results show that Hf is separated best from Ti and Zr when eluted with Lu in 2.5N HCl; Sm is also eluted in the same acid, and Nd is eluted last in 6N HCl. A simple, single-step chemistry further isolates Lu, Hf, Sm and Nd in smaller columns (Bio-Rad polyprep 0.8 x 4 cm), filled with Eichrom Ln-spec resin (50-100 um), via a

  17. Analytical procedures for the determination of selected trace elements in peat and plant samples by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krachler, Michael; Mohl, Carola; Emons, Hendrik; Shotyk, William

    2002-08-01

    A simple, robust and reliable analytical procedure for the determination of 15 elements, namely Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, Ag, Cd, Ba, Tl, Th and U in peat and plant materials by inductively coupled plasma-quadrupole mass spectrometry (ICP-QMS) was developed. Powdered sample aliquots of approximately 220 mg were dissolved with various acid mixtures in a microwave heated high-pressure autoclave capable to digest 40 samples simultaneously. The selection of appropriate amounts of digestion acids (nitric acid, hydrofluoric acid or tetrafluoroboric acid) was crucial to obtain accurate results. The optimized acid mixture for digestion of plant and peat samples consisted of 3 ml HNO 3 and 0.1 ml HBF 4. An ultrasonic nebulizer with an additional membrane desolvation unit was found beneficial for the determination of Co, Ni, Ag, Tl, Th and U, allowing to aspirate a dry sample aerosol into the ICP-QMS. A pneumatic cross flow nebulizer served as sample introduction device for the other elements. Internal standardization was achieved with 103Rh for all elements, except for Th whose ICP-QMS signals were corrected by 103Rh and 185Re. Quality control was ascertained by analysis of the certified plant reference material GBW 07602 Bush Branches and Leaves. In almost all cases HNO 3 alone could not fully liberate the analytes of interest from the peat or plant matrix, probably because of the silicates present. After adding small amounts (0.05-0.1 ml) of either HF or HBF 4 to the digestion mixture, concentrations quantified by ICP-QMS generally increased significantly, in the case of Rb up to 80%. Further increasing the volumes of HF or HBF 4 in turn, resulted in a loss of recoveries of almost all elements, some of which amounted to approximately 60%. The successful analytical procedures were applied to the determination of two bulk peat materials. In general, good agreement between the found concentrations and results from an inter-laboratory trial or from instrumental

  18. Innovative scaling laws for aeroelastic and aeroservoelastic problems in compressible flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Presente, Eyal

    Active flutter suppression of a two dimensional wing section in subsonic flow is studied. The equations of motion of a typical cross section are presented in nondimensional form. A two degree of freedom problem, with pitch and plunge dynamics, combined with a trailing-edge control surface is considered. Aerodynamic loads are expressed in the time-domain using Roger's approximation. Augmented aerodynamic states are reconstructed using a Kalman filter, and linear optimal control is used to design a full-state feedback regulator for flutter suppression. Recent advances in the area of adaptive materials, smart structures, have led to the use of such materials as actuators for aeroservoelastic applications. The attractiveness of such materials consists of their potential to introduce continuous structural deformations of the lifting surface that can be exploited to manipulate the unsteady aerodynamic loads and prevent undesirable aeroelastic effects such as flutter. A general formulation of the aerodynamic loads, based on thin airfoil theory, and the deformation of a flat plate wing section are used to calculate the amount of power required to twist a wing along its span with piezoelectric patches. Composite materials enhance bend/twist coupling, which is used to modify the aerodynamic loads for the purpose of flutter suppression. Scaling laws of aeroservoelastic systems are addressed. Scaling parameters required for maintaining similarity between a full-scale system and a model are studied. An innovative two-pronged approach is used to obtain "similarity solutions" of the aeroservoelastic problem. Changes of structural and aerodynamic variables between a full scale configuration and its scaled models facilitate similarity between the systems. Two cases of scaled models are examined, a geometrically scaled model and an aeroelastically scaled one. Flutter suppression of a typical cross section employing a trailing edge control surface is compared with that of a typical

  19. Aeroelastic stability analysis of a high-energy turbine blade. [for SSME High Pressure Oxidizer TurboPump first stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Todd E.

    1990-01-01

    The dynamic analysis for the SSME HPOTP first stage turbine blade is presented wherein the rotor aeroelastic stability is assessed. The method employs normal modes analysis to simulate the coupled blade/fluid system. A three-dimensional finite element model of the blade is used in conjunction with a two-dimensional linearized unsteady aerodynamic theory which accounts for steady aerodynamic loading effects. This unsteady aerodynamic model is applied in stacked axisymmetric strips along the airfoil span. The blade dynamic and aerodynamic behaviors are coupled within modal space by expressing the unsteady aerodynamic forces in the frequency domain. A complex eigenvalue problem is solved to determine the stability of the rotor assuming tuned blades. The present analysis indicates that the HPOTP rotor experiences very low aerodynamic damping in the first four vibrational modes. The edgewise mode was found to be dynamically unstable. This mode of the blade became stable when the effect of mechanical damping was considered.

  20. 40 CFR 201.26 - Procedures for the measurement on receiving property of retarder and car coupling noise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... performance as appropriate. (2) Data. The maximum A-weighted sound levels (FAST) for every car coupling impact... receiving property of retarder and car coupling noise. 201.26 Section 201.26 Protection of Environment... receiving property of retarder and car coupling noise. (a) Retarders—(1) Microphone. The microphone must...

  1. 40 CFR 201.26 - Procedures for the measurement on receiving property of retarder and car coupling noise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... performance as appropriate. (2) Data. The maximum A-weighted sound levels (FAST) for every car coupling impact... receiving property of retarder and car coupling noise. 201.26 Section 201.26 Protection of Environment... receiving property of retarder and car coupling noise. (a) Retarders—(1) Microphone. The microphone must...

  2. 40 CFR 201.26 - Procedures for the measurement on receiving property of retarder and car coupling noise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... performance as appropriate. (2) Data. The maximum A-weighted sound levels (FAST) for every car coupling impact... receiving property of retarder and car coupling noise. 201.26 Section 201.26 Protection of Environment... receiving property of retarder and car coupling noise. (a) Retarders—(1) Microphone. The microphone must...

  3. Aeroelastic Analyses of the SemiSpan SuperSonic Transport (S4T) Wind Tunnel Model at Mach 0.95

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hur, Jiyoung

    2014-01-01

    Detailed aeroelastic analyses of the SemiSpan SuperSonic Transport (S4T) wind tunnel model at Mach 0.95 with a 1.75deg fixed angle of attack are presented. First, a numerical procedure using the Computational Fluids Laboratory 3-Dimensional (CFL3D) Version 6.4 flow solver is investigated. The mesh update method for structured multi-block grids was successfully applied to the Navier-Stokes simulations. Second, the steady aerodynamic analyses with a rigid structure of the S4T wind tunnel model are reviewed in transonic flow. Third, the static analyses were performed for both the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. Both the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations predicted a significant increase of lift forces, compared to the results from the rigid structure of the S4T wind-tunnel model, over various dynamic pressures. Finally, dynamic aeroelastic analyses were performed to investigate the flutter condition of the S4T wind tunnel model at the transonic Mach number. The condition of flutter was observed at a dynamic pressure of approximately 75.0-psf for the Navier-Stokes simulations. However, it was observed that the flutter condition occurred a dynamic pressure of approximately 47.27-psf for the Euler simulations. Also, the computational efficiency of the aeroelastic analyses for the S4T wind tunnel model has been assessed.

  4. Determination of Diniconazole in Agricultural Samples by Sol-Gel Immunoaffinity Extraction Procedure Coupled with HPLC and ELISA

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenjiang; Jin, Yahui; Wang, Minghua

    2012-01-01

    Background In the European Union (EU), the use of diniconazole-M is no longer authorized. However, residues of diniconazole-M occur in various plant commodities. Methodology/Principal Findings A selective and simple analytical method for the trace level determination of diniconazole in soil, fruit, vegetables and water samples was developed based on immunoaffinity extraction followed by Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. The ELISA was based on monoclonal antibodies highly specific to diniconazole and was a fast, cost-effective, and selective screening method for the detection of diniconazole. The results of the ELISA correlated well with gas chromatography (GC) results, with the correlation coefficient of 0.9879 (n = 19). A simple gel permeation chromato- graphy clean-up method was developed to purify extracts from matrices containing high amounts of fat and natural pigments, without the need for a large dilution of the sample. The immunoaffinity column (IAC) capacity was 0.180 mg g−1. The columns could be re-used approximately 20 times with no significant alteration in capacity. The recoveries from complex samples were in the range of 89.2% to 96.1% with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 0.770%–6.11% by ELISA. The results were in good agreement with those obtained by HPLC method. Conclusion/Significance The IAC extraction procedure coupled with HPLC and ELISA analysis could be also used as alternative effective analytical methods for the determination of diniconazole concentrations in complex samples. PMID:23056532

  5. Aeroelastic Tailoring of Transport Wings Including Transonic Flutter Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, Bret K.; Wieseman, Carol D.; Jutte, Christine V.

    2015-01-01

    Several minimum-mass optimization problems are solved to evaluate the effectiveness of a variety of novel tailoring schemes for subsonic transport wings. Aeroelastic stress and panel buckling constraints are imposed across several trimmed static maneuver loads, in addition to a transonic flutter margin constraint, captured with aerodynamic influence coefficient-based tools. Tailoring with metallic thickness variations, functionally graded materials, balanced or unbalanced composite laminates, curvilinear tow steering, and distributed trailing edge control effectors are all found to provide reductions in structural wing mass with varying degrees of success. The question as to whether this wing mass reduction will offset the increased manufacturing cost is left unresolved for each case.

  6. NRT Rotor Structural / Aeroelastic Analysis for the Preliminary Design Review

    SciTech Connect

    Ennis, Brandon Lee; Paquette, Joshua A.

    2015-10-01

    This document describes the initial structural design for the National Rotor Testbed blade as presented during the preliminary design review at Sandia National Laboratories on October 28- 29, 2015. The document summarizes the structural and aeroelastic requirements placed on the NRT rotor for satisfactory deployment at the DOE/SNL SWiFT experimental facility to produce high-quality datasets for wind turbine model validation. The method and result of the NRT blade structural optimization is also presented within this report, along with analysis of its satisfaction of the design requirements.

  7. Bayesian inference of nonlinear unsteady aerodynamics from aeroelastic limit cycle oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhu, Rimple; Poirel, Dominique; Pettit, Chris; Khalil, Mohammad; Sarkar, Abhijit

    2016-07-01

    A Bayesian model selection and parameter estimation algorithm is applied to investigate the influence of nonlinear and unsteady aerodynamic loads on the limit cycle oscillation (LCO) of a pitching airfoil in the transitional Reynolds number regime. At small angles of attack, laminar boundary layer trailing edge separation causes negative aerodynamic damping leading to the LCO. The fluid-structure interaction of the rigid, but elastically mounted, airfoil and nonlinear unsteady aerodynamics is represented by two coupled nonlinear stochastic ordinary differential equations containing uncertain parameters and model approximation errors. Several plausible aerodynamic models with increasing complexity are proposed to describe the aeroelastic system leading to LCO. The likelihood in the posterior parameter probability density function (pdf) is available semi-analytically using the extended Kalman filter for the state estimation of the coupled nonlinear structural and unsteady aerodynamic model. The posterior parameter pdf is sampled using a parallel and adaptive Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm. The posterior probability of each model is estimated using the Chib-Jeliazkov method that directly uses the posterior MCMC samples for evidence (marginal likelihood) computation. The Bayesian algorithm is validated through a numerical study and then applied to model the nonlinear unsteady aerodynamic loads using wind-tunnel test data at various Reynolds numbers.

  8. Application of constrained optimization to active control of aeroelastic response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, J. R.; Mukhopadhyay, V.

    1981-01-01

    Active control of aeroelastic response is a complex in which the designer usually tries to satisfy many criteria which are often conflicting. To further complicate the design problem, the state space equations describing this type of control problem are usually of high order, involving a large number of states to represent the flexible structure and unsteady aerodynamics. Control laws based on the standard Linear-Quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) method are of the same high order as the aeroelastic plant. To overcome this disadvantage of the LQG mode, an approach developed for designing low order optimal control laws which uses a nonlinear programming algorithm to search for the values of the control law variables that minimize a composite performance index, was extended to the constrained optimization problem. The method involves searching for the values of the control law variables that minimize a basic performance index while satisfying several inequality constraints that describe the design criteria. The method is applied to gust load alleviation of a drone aircraft.

  9. On the optimization of discrete structures with aeroelastic constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintosh, S. C., Jr.; Ashley, H.

    1978-01-01

    The paper deals with the problem of dynamic structural optimization where constraints relating to flutter of a wing (or other dynamic aeroelastic performance) are imposed along with conditions of a more conventional nature such as those relating to stress under load, deflection, minimum dimensions of structural elements, etc. The discussion is limited to a flutter problem for a linear system with a finite number of degrees of freedom and a single constraint involving aeroelastic stability, and the structure motion is assumed to be a simple harmonic time function. Three search schemes are applied to the minimum-weight redesign of a particular wing: the first scheme relies on the method of feasible directions, while the other two are derived from necessary conditions for a local optimum so that they can be referred to as optimality-criteria schemes. The results suggest that a heuristic redesign algorithm involving an optimality criterion may be best suited for treating multiple constraints with large numbers of design variables.

  10. Data acquisition for aeroelastic testing at the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doggett, Robert V., Jr.; Rosser, David C., Jr.; Bryant, Charles S.

    1993-01-01

    Aeroelasticity is defined and different types of aeroelastic tests are described. The instrumentation and data acquisition requirements dictated by the time varying characteristics of aeroelastic phenomena are pointed out. Instrumentation needs for various types of tests are discussed. The hardware components and operational features of the real-time, digital-computer-controlled data acquisition system used to support testing at the Langley Transonic Dynamics Facility, which includes a major wind-tunnel, a helicopter-model hover facility, and two model setup and calibration laboratories are described.

  11. Nonlinear Time Delayed Feedback Control of Aeroelastic Systems: A Functional Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzocca, Piergiovanni; Librescu, Liviu; Silva, Walter A.

    2003-01-01

    In addition to its intrinsic practical importance, nonlinear time delayed feedback control applied to lifting surfaces can result in interesting aeroelastic behaviors. In this paper, nonlinear aeroelastic response to external time-dependent loads and stability boundary for actively controlled lifting surfaces, in an incompressible flow field, are considered. The structural model and the unsteady aerodynamics are considered linear. The implications of the presence of time delays in the linear/nonlinear feedback control and of geometrical parameters on the aeroelasticity of lifting surfaces are analyzed and conclusions on their implications are highlighted.

  12. NASTRAN level 16 programmer's manual updates for aeroelastic analysis of bladed discs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallo, A. M.; Dale, B.

    1980-01-01

    The programming routines for the NASTRAN Level 16program are presented. Particular emphasis is placed on its application to aeroelastic analyses, mode development, and flutter analysis for turbomachine blades.

  13. Aeroelastic effects in the structural dynamic analysis of vertical axis wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Lobitz, D.W.; Ashwill, T.D.

    1985-01-01

    Aeroelastic effects impact the structural dynamic behavior of vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) in two major ways. First the stability phenomena of flutter and divergence are direct results of the aeroelasticity of the structure. Secondly, aerodynamic damping can be important for predicting response levels particularly near resonance but also for off resonance conditions. The inclusion of the aeroelasticity is carried out by modifying the damping and stiffness matrices in the NASTRAN finite element code. Through the use of a specially designed preprocessor which reads the usual NASTRAN input deck and adds appropriate cards to it the incorporation of the aeroelastic effects has been made relatively transparent to the user NASTRAN flutter predictions are validated using field measurements and the effect of aerodynamic damping is demonstrated through an application to the Test Bed VAWT being designed at Sandia.

  14. Aeroelastic effects in the structural dynamic analysis of vertical axis wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Lobitz, D.W.; Ashwill, T.D.

    1986-04-01

    Aeroelastic effects impact the structural dynamic behavior of vertical axis wind turbines (VAWRs) in two major ways. First, the stability phenomena of flutter and divergence are direct results of the aeroelasticity of the structure. Secondly, aerodynamic damping can be important for predicting response levels, particularly near resonance, but also for off-resonance conditions. The inclusion of the aeroelasticity is carried out by modifying the damping and stiffness matrices in the NASTRAN finite element code. Through the use of a specially designed preprocessor, which reads the usual NASTRAN input deck and adds appropriate cards to it, the incorporation of the aeroelastic effects has been made relatively transparent to the user. NASTRAN flutter predictions are validated using field measurements and the effect of aerodynamic damping is demonstrated through an application to the Test Bed VAWT being designed at Sandia.

  15. Investigation of the aeroelastic stability of the AFW wind-tunnel model using CAP-TSD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Bennett, Robert M.

    1992-01-01

    The Computational Aeroelasticity Program - Transonic Small Disturbance (CAP-TSD) code is applied to the Active Flexible Wing (AFW) wind tunnel model for prediction of the model's transonic aeroelastic behavior. A semi-span computational model is used for evaluation of symmetric motions and a full span model is used for evaluation of antisymmetric motions. Static aeroelastic solutions using CAP-TSD are computed. Dynamic flutter analyses are then performed as perturbations about the static aeroelastic deformations and presented as flutter boundaries in terms of Mach number and dynamic pressure. Flutter boundaries that take into account modal refinements, vorticity, and entropy corrections, antisymmetric motions and sensitivity to the modeling of the wing tip ballast stores are also presented and compared with experimental flutter results.

  16. Investigation of the aeroelastic stability of the AFW wind-tunnel model using CAP-TSD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Bennett, Robert M.

    1991-01-01

    The Computational Aeroelasticity Program - Transonic Small Disturbance (CAP-TSD) code, developed at the NASA Langley Research Center, is applied to the Active Flexible Wing (AFW) wind tunnel model for prediction of the model's transonic aeroelastic behavior. A semi-span computational model is used for evaluation of symmetric motions and a full span model is used for evaluation of antisymmetric motions. Static aeroelastic solutions using CAP-TSD are computed. Dynamic (flutter) analyses are then performed as perturbations about the static aeroelastic deformations and presented as flutter boundaries in terms of Mach number and dynamic pressure. Flutter boundaries that take into account modal refinements, vorticity and entropy corrections, antisymmetric motions and sensitivity to the modeling of the wing tip ballast stores are also presented and compared with experimental flutter results.

  17. Refined methods of aeroelastic analysis and optimization. [swept wings, propeller theory, and subsonic flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashley, H.

    1984-01-01

    Graduate research activity in the following areas is reported: the divergence of laminated composite lifting surfaces, subsonic propeller theory and aeroelastic analysis, and cross sectional resonances in wind tunnels.

  18. Nastran level 16 theoretical manual updates for aeroelastic analysis of bladed discs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elchuri, V.; Smith, G. C. C.

    1980-01-01

    A computer program based on state of the art compressor and structural technologies applied to bladed shrouded disc was developed and made operational in NASTRAN Level 16. Aeroelastic analyses, modes and flutter. Theoretical manual updates are included.

  19. Including Aeroelastic Effects in the Calculation of X-33 Loads and Control Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeiler, Thomas A.

    1998-01-01

    Up until now, loads analyses of the X-33 RLV have been done at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) using aerodynamic loads derived from CFD and wind tunnel models of a rigid vehicle. Control forces and moments are determined using a rigid vehicle trajectory analysis and the detailed control load distributions for achieving the desired control forces and moments, again on the rigid vehicle, are determined by Lockheed Martin Skunk Works. However, static aeroelastic effects upon the load distributions are not known. The static aeroelastic effects will generally redistribute external loads thereby affecting both the internal structural loads as well as the forces and moments generated by aerodynamic control surfaces. Therefore, predicted structural sizes as well as maneuvering requirements can be altered by consideration of static aeroelastic effects. The objective of the present work is the development of models and solutions for including static aeroelasticity in the calculation of X-33 loads and in the determination of stability and control derivatives.

  20. A Summary of Data and Findings from the First Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, David M.; Chwalowski, Pawel.; Heeg, Jennifer; Wieseman, Carol D.

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes data and findings from the first Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop (AePW) held in April, 2012. The workshop has been designed as a series of technical interchange meetings to assess the state of the art of computational methods for predicting unsteady flowfields and static and dynamic aeroelastic response. The goals are to provide an impartial forum to evaluate the effectiveness of existing computer codes and modeling techniques to simulate aeroelastic problems, and to identify computational and experimental areas needing additional research and development. For this initial workshop, three subject configurations have been chosen from existing wind tunnel data sets where there is pertinent experimental data available for comparison. Participant researchers analyzed one or more of the subject configurations and results from all of these computations were compared at the workshop. Keywords: Unsteady Aerodynamics, Aeroelasticity, Computational Fluid Dynamics, Transonic Flow, Separated Flow.

  1. Dynamic structural aeroelastic stability testing of the XV-15 tilt rotor research aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroers, L. G.

    1982-01-01

    For the past 20 years, a significant effort has been made to understand and predict the structural aeroelastic stability characteristics of the tilt rotor concept. Beginning with the rotor-pylon oscillation of the XV-3 aircraft, the problem was identified and then subjected to a series of theoretical studies, plus model and full-scale wind tunnel tests. From this data base, methods were developed to predict the structural aeroelastic stability characteristics of the XV-15 Tilt Rotor Research Aircraft. The predicted aeroelastic characteristics are examined in light of the major parameters effecting rotor-pylon-wing stability. Flight test techniques used to obtain XV-15 aeroelastic stability are described. Flight test results are summarized and compared to the predicted values. Wind tunnel results are compared to flight test results and correlated with predicted values.

  2. Aeroelastic and dynamic finite element analyses of a bladder shrouded disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. C. C.; Elchuri, V.

    1980-01-01

    The delivery and demonstration of a computer program for the analysis of aeroelastic and dynamic properties is reported. Approaches to flutter and forced vibration of mistuned discs, and transient aerothermoelasticity are described.

  3. Aeroelastic stability analyses of two counter rotating propfan designs for a cruise missile model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahajan, Aparajit J.; Lucero, John M.; Mehmed, Oral; Stefko, George L.

    1992-01-01

    A modal aeroelastic analysis combining structural and aerodynamic models is applied to counterrotating propfans to evaluate their structural integrity for wind-tunnel testing. The aeroelastic analysis code is an extension of the 2D analysis code called the Aeroelastic Stability and Response of Propulsion Systems. Rotational speed and freestream Mach number are the parameters for calculating the stability of the two blade designs with a modal method combining a finite-element structural model with 2D steady and unsteady cascade aerodynamic models. The model demonstrates convergence to the least stable aeroelastic mode, describes the effects of a nonuniform inflow, and permits the modification of geometry and rotation. The analysis shows that the propfan designs are suitable for the wind-tunnel test and confirms that the propfans should be flutter-free under the range of conditions of the testing.

  4. In-flight gust monitoring and aeroelasticity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Salazar, Oscar Salvador

    An in-flight gust monitoring and aeroelasticity study was conducted on board NASA Dryden's F15-B/FTF-II test platform (``FTF''). A total of four flights were completed. This study is the first in a series of flight experiments being conducted jointly by NASA Dryden Flight Research Center and UCLA's Flight Systems Research Center. The first objective of the in-flight gust- monitoring portion of the study was to demonstrate for the first time anywhere the measurability of intensity variations of a collimated Helium-Neon laser beam due to atmospheric air turbulence while having both the source and target apertures mounted outside an airborne aircraft. Intensity beam variations are the result of forward scattering of the beam by variations in the air's index of refraction, which are carried across the laser beam's path by a cross flow or air (i.e., atmospheric turbulence shifting vertically in the atmosphere). A laser beam was propagated parallel to the direction of flight for 1/2 meter outside the flight test fixture and its intensity variations due to atmospheric turbulence were successfully measured by a photo- detector. When the aircraft did not fly through a field of atmospheric turbulence, the laser beam proved to be insensitive to the stream velocity's cross component to the path of the beam. The aeroelasticity portion of the study consisted of measurements of the dynamic response of a straight, 18.25 inch span, 4.00 inch chord, NACA 0006 airfoil thickness profile, one sided wing to in-flight aircraft maneuvers, landing gear buffeting, unsteady aerodynamics, atmospheric turbulence, and aircraft vibration in general. These measurements were accomplished through the use of accelerometers, strain gauges and in-flight video cameras. Data collected will be used to compute in-flight root loci for the wing as functions of the aircraft's stream velocity. The data may also be used to calibrate data collected by the gust-monitoring system flown, and help verify the

  5. Computer program for definition of transonic axial-flow compressor blade rows. [computer program for fabrication and aeroelastic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouse, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    A method is presented for designing axial-flow compressor blading from blade elements defined on cones which pass through the blade-edge streamline locations. Each blade-element centerline is composed of two segments which are tangent to each other. The centerline and surfaces of each segment have constant change of angle with path distance. The stacking line for the blade elements can be leaned in both the axial and tangential directions. The output of the computer program gives coordinates for fabrication and properties for aeroelastic analysis for planar blade sections. These coordinates and properties are obtained by interpolation across conical blade elements. The program is structured to be coupled with an aerodynamic design program.

  6. CEAS/AIAA/ICASE/NASA Langley International Forum on Aeroelasticity and Structural Dynamics 1999. Pt. 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodrow Whitlow, Jr. (Editor); Todd, Emily N. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    These proceedings represent a collection of the latest advances in aeroelasticity and structural dynamics from the world community. Research in the areas of unsteady aerodynamics and aeroelasticity, structural modeling and optimization, active control and adaptive structures, landing dynamics, certification and qualification, and validation testing are highlighted in the collection of papers. The wide range of results will lead to advances in the prediction and control of the structural response of aircraft and spacecraft.

  7. ASTROP2 users manual: A program for aeroelastic stability analysis of propfans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, G. V.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1991-01-01

    A user's manual is presented for the aeroelastic stability and response of propulsion systems computer program called ASTROP2. The ASTROP2 code preforms aeroelastic stability analysis of rotating propfan blades. This analysis uses a two-dimensional, unsteady cascade aerodynamics model and a three-dimensional, normal-mode structural model. Analytical stability results from this code are compared with published experimental results of a rotating composite advanced turboprop model and of nonrotating metallic wing model.

  8. Prediction of aeroelastic response of a model X-wing rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dopher, Robert; Duh, James E.

    1987-01-01

    The rotorcraft dynamics analysis was used to predict the aeroelastic responses of a representative X-wing model with a 10 ft diameter rotor. The aeroelastic methodology used and the tests and assumptions involved are reviewed. Results are reported on the findings concerning control power and higher harmonic control in hover, transition flight, vibratory loads at forward speed, and responses in conversion. It is concluded that the analysis can give satisfactory predictions of X-wing behavior.

  9. Parallel Nonlinear Aeroelastic Computation for Fighter Wings in the Transonic Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Bradley Robert

    In this dissertation, a parallel three-dimensional aeroelastic simulation is applied to current and next generation fighter aircraft wings. The computational model is a nonlinear fluid and structural mesh coupled using the Direct Eulerian-Langrangian method. This method attaches unique local coordinates to each node and connects the fluid mesh to the structure in such a way that a transformation preserved to the global coordinates. This allows the fluid and structure to be updated in the same time step and maintains spatial accuracy at their interface. The structural mesh is modeled using modified nonlinear von Karman finite elements and is discretized using the Galerkin finite element method. The fluid mesh also used the Galerkin finite element method to discretize the unsteady Euler equations. Computational results over a large range of Mach numbers and densities are presented for two candidate fighter wing models for transonic wing tunnel testing. The FX-35 is a trapezoidal wing based on the F-35A, and the F-Wing is a truncated delta wing similar to the F-16. Both wings exhibit a variety of flutter behaviors including strong bending-torsion flutter, limit-cycle oscillations, and essentially single degree-of-freedom responses.

  10. Aeroelastic prediction of the limit cycle oscillations of a cropped delta wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attar, P. J.; Gordnier, R. E.

    2006-01-01

    The flutter and limit cycle oscillation (LCO) behavior of a cropped delta wing are investigated using a newly developed computational aeroelastic solver. This computational model includes a well-validated Euler finite difference solver coupled to a high-fidelity finite element structural solver. The nonlinear structural model includes geometric nonlinearities which are modelled using a co-rotational formulation. The LCOs of the cropped delta wing are computed and the results are compared to previous computations and to experiment. Over the range of dynamic pressures for which experimental results are reported, the LCO magnitudes computed using the current model are comparable to those from a previous computation which used a lower-order von Karman structural model. However, for larger dynamic pressures, the current computational model and the model which used the von Karman theory start to differ significantly, with the current model predicting larger deflections for a given dynamic pressure. This results in a LCO curve which is in better qualitative agreement with experiment. Flow features which were present in the previous computational model such as a leading edge vortex and a shock wave are enhanced in the current model due to the prediction of larger deflections and rotations at the higher dynamic pressures.

  11. Physical mechanisms of phonation onset: a linear stability analysis of an aeroelastic continuum model of phonation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaoyan; Neubauer, Juergen; Berry, David A

    2007-10-01

    In an investigation of phonation onset, a linear stability analysis was performed on a two-dimensional, aeroelastic, continuum model of phonation. The model consisted of a vocal fold-shaped constriction situated in a rigid pipe coupled to a potential flow which separated at the superior edge of the vocal fold. The vocal fold constriction was modeled as a plane-strain linear elastic layer. The dominant eigenvalues and eigenmodes of the fluid-structure-interaction system were investigated as a function of glottal airflow. To investigate specific aerodynamic mechanisms of phonation onset, individual components of the glottal airflow (e.g., flow-induced stiffness, inertia, and damping) were systematically added to the driving force. The investigations suggested that flow-induced stiffness was the primary mechanism of phonation onset, involving the synchronization of two structural eigenmodes. Only under conditions of negligible structural damping and a restricted set of vocal fold geometries did flow-induced damping become the primary mechanism of phonation onset. However, for moderate to high structural damping and a more generalized set of vocal fold geometries, flow-induced stiffness remained the primary mechanism of phonation onset. PMID:17902864

  12. A Numerical Model of Unsteady, Subsonic Aeroelastic Behavior. Ph.D Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strganac, Thomas W.

    1987-01-01

    A method for predicting unsteady, subsonic aeroelastic responses was developed. The technique accounts for aerodynamic nonlinearities associated with angles of attack, vortex-dominated flow, static deformations, and unsteady behavior. The fluid and the wing together are treated as a single dynamical system, and the equations of motion for the structure and flow field are integrated simultaneously and interactively in the time domain. The method employs an iterative scheme based on a predictor-corrector technique. The aerodynamic loads are computed by the general unsteady vortex-lattice method and are determined simultaneously with the motion of the wing. Because the unsteady vortex-lattice method predicts the wake as part of the solution, the history of the motion is taken into account; hysteresis is predicted. Two models are used to demonstrate the technique: a rigid wing on an elastic support experiencing plunge and pitch about the elastic axis, and an elastic wing rigidly supported at the root chord experiencing spanwise bending and twisting. The method can be readily extended to account for structural nonlinearities and/or substitute aerodynamic load models. The time domain solution coupled with the unsteady vortex-lattice method provides the capability of graphically depicting wing and wake motion.

  13. Analysis and control of the transient aeroelastic response of rotors during shipboard engagement and disengagement operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Jonathan Allen

    2001-11-01

    An analysis has been developed to predict the transient aeroelastic response of a helicopter rotor system during shipboard engagement and disengagement operations. The coupled flap-lag-torsion equations of motion were developed using Hamilton's Principle and discretized spatially using the finite element method. Aerodynamics were simulated using nonlinear quasi-steady or time domain nonlinear unsteady models. The ship airwake environment was simulated with simple deterministic airwake distributions, results from experimental measurements or numerical predictions. The transient aeroelastic response of the rotor blades was then time-integrated along a specified rotor speed profile. The control of the rotor response for an analytic model of the H-46 Sea Knight rotor system was investigated with three different passive control techniques. Collective pitch scheduling was only successful in reducing the blade flapping response in a few isolated cases. In the majority of cases, the blade transient response was increased. The use of a discrete flap damper in the very low rotor speed region was also investigated. Only by raising the flap stop setting and using a flap damper four times the strength of the lag damper could the downward flap deflections be reduced. However, because the flap stop setting was raised the upward flap deflections were often increased. The use of extendable/retractable, gated leading-edge spoilers in the low rotor speed region was also investigated. Spoilers covering the outer 15% R of the rotor blade were shown to significantly reduce both the upward and downward flap response without increasing rotor torque. Previous aeroelastic analyses developed at the University of Southampton and at Penn State University were completed with flap-torsion degrees of freedom only. The addition of the lag degree of freedom was shown to significantly influence the blade response. A comparison of the two aerodynamic models showed that the nonlinear quasi

  14. Development of an improved aeroelastic model for the investigation of vibration reduction in helicopter rotors using trailing edge flaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myrtle, Timothy Fitzgerald

    1998-12-01

    This dissertation describes the development of an aeroelastic model of a helicopter rotor incorporating partial span trailing edge flaps on the blade and its application to the investigation of vibration reduction using active control. A new two-dimensional unsteady aerodynamic model for an airfoil/flap combination is described that includes compressibility and unsteady freestream effects. This new aerodynamic model is based on a rational function approximation (RFA) approach. In this approach, oscillatory response data obtained for a selected set of generalized airfoil and flap motions is used to generate an approximate aerodynamic transfer function which can be transformed to the time domain to form a state space aerodynamic model. In this dissertation, a method is described for adapting the conventional RFA approach to include unsteady freestream effects. Excellent agreement is demonstrated between the response of the new aerodynamic model and an exact incompressible solution to the unsteady freestream case. This model provides a complete description of the unsteady flap hinge moments due to airfoil and flap motion, allowing a complete and accurate characterization of control actuation requirements. The structural model utilizes an elastic blade model which includes fully coupled flap-lag-torsional dynamics and includes the effects of moderate deflections. The aeroelastic model is formulated in the time domain, with the coupled trim/response solution obtained using direct numerical integration in combination with autopilot type controller. A conventional higher harmonic control approach is used to investigate vibration reduction. Vibration control studies are performed which compare results using the new aerodynamic model and incompressible quasisteady Theodorsen aerodynamics. Significant differences were observed in the required deflections and control moments, indicating that compressibility and unsteady effects are necessary to properly characterize the

  15. Experimental Results from the Active Aeroelastic Wing Wind Tunnel Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heeg, Jennifer; Spain, Charles V.; Florance, James R.; Wieseman, Carol D.; Ivanco, Thomas G.; DeMoss, Joshua; Silva, Walter A.; Panetta, Andrew; Lively, Peter; Tumwa, Vic

    2005-01-01

    The Active Aeroelastic Wing (AAW) program is a cooperative effort among NASA, the Air Force Research Laboratory and the Boeing Company, encompassing flight testing, wind tunnel testing and analyses. The objective of the AAW program is to investigate the improvements that can be realized by exploiting aeroelastic characteristics, rather than viewing them as a detriment to vehicle performance and stability. To meet this objective, a wind tunnel model was crafted to duplicate the static aeroelastic behavior of the AAW flight vehicle. The model was tested in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel in July and August 2004. The wind tunnel investigation served the program goal in three ways. First, the wind tunnel provided a benchmark for comparison with the flight vehicle and various levels of theoretical analyses. Second, it provided detailed insight highlighting the effects of individual parameters upon the aeroelastic response of the AAW vehicle. This parameter identification can then be used for future aeroelastic vehicle design guidance. Third, it provided data to validate scaling laws and their applicability with respect to statically scaled aeroelastic models.

  16. Exploratory Studies in Generalized Predictive Control for Active Aeroelastic Control of Tiltrotor Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvaternik, Raymond G.; Juang, Jer-Nan; Bennett, Richard L.

    2000-01-01

    The Aeroelasticity Branch at NASA Langley Research Center has a long and substantive history of tiltrotor aeroelastic research. That research has included a broad range of experimental investigations in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) using a variety of scale models and the development of essential analyses. Since 1994, the tiltrotor research program has been using a 1/5-scale, semispan aeroelastic model of the V-22 designed and built by Bell Helicopter Textron Inc. (BHTI) in 1981. That model has been refurbished to form a tiltrotor research testbed called the Wing and Rotor Aeroelastic Test System (WRATS) for use in the TDT. In collaboration with BHTI, studies under the current tiltrotor research program are focused on aeroelastic technology areas having the potential for enhancing the commercial and military viability of tiltrotor aircraft. Among the areas being addressed, considerable emphasis is being directed to the evaluation of modern adaptive multi-input multi- output (MIMO) control techniques for active stability augmentation and vibration control of tiltrotor aircraft. As part of this investigation, a predictive control technique known as Generalized Predictive Control (GPC) is being studied to assess its potential for actively controlling the swashplate of tiltrotor aircraft to enhance aeroelastic stability in both helicopter and airplane modes of flight. This paper summarizes the exploratory numerical and experimental studies that were conducted as part of that investigation.

  17. Comparison between computations and experimental data in unsteady three-dimensional transonic aerodynamics, including aeroelastic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, P.; Goorjian, P. M.

    1982-01-01

    Comparisons were made of computed and experimental data in three-dimensional unsteady transonic aerodynamics, including aeroelastic applications. The computer code LTRAN3, which is based on small-disturbance aerodynamic theory, was used to obtain the aerodynamic data. A procedure based on the U-g method was developed to compute flutter boundaries by using the unsteady aerodynamic coefficients obtained from LTRAN3. The experimental data were obtained from available NASA publications. All the studies were conducted for thin, unswept, rectangular wings with circular-arc cross sections. Numerical and experimental steady and unsteady aerodynamic data were compared for a wing with an aspect ratio of 3 and a thickness ratio of 5% at Mach numbers of 0.7 and 0.9. Flutter data were compared for a wing with an aspect ratio of 5. Two thickness ratios, 6% at Mach numbers of 0.715, 0.851, and 0.913, and 4% at Mach number of 0.904, were considered. Based on the unsteady aerodynamic data obtained from LTRAN3, flutter boundaries were computed; they were compared with those obtained from experiments and the code NASTRAN, which uses linear aerodynamics.

  18. Advance finite element modeling of rotor blade aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straub, F. K.; Sangha, K. B.; Panda, B.

    1994-01-01

    An advanced beam finite element has been developed for modeling rotor blade dynamics and aeroelasticity. This element is part of the Element Library of the Second Generation Comprehensive Helicopter Analysis System (2GCHAS). The element allows modeling of arbitrary rotor systems, including bearingless rotors. It accounts for moderately large elastic deflections, anisotropic properties, large frame motion for maneuver simulation, and allows for variable order shape functions. The effects of gravity, mechanically applied and aerodynamic loads are included. All kinematic quantities required to compute airloads are provided. In this paper, the fundamental assumptions and derivation of the element matrices are presented. Numerical results are shown to verify the formulation and illustrate several features of the element.

  19. Small Engine Technology (Set) Task 8 Aeroelastic Prediction Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eick, Chris D.; Liu, Jong-Shang

    1998-01-01

    AlliedSignal Engines, in cooperation with NASA LeRC, completed an evaluation of recently developed aeroelastic computer codes using test cases from the AlliedSignal Engines fan blisk database. Test data for this task includes strain gage, light probe, performance, and steady-state pressure information obtained for conditions where synchronous or flutter vibratory conditions were found to occur. Aeroelastic codes evaluated include the quasi 3-D UNSFLO (developed at MIT and modified to include blade motion by AlliedSignal), the 2-D FREPS (developed by NASA LeRC), and the 3-D TURBO-AE (under development at NASA LeRC). Six test cases each where flutter and synchronous vibrations were found to occur were used for evaluation of UNSFLO and FREPS. In addition, one of the flutter cases was evaluated using TURBO-AE. The UNSFLO flutter evaluations were completed for 75 percent radial span and provided good agreement with the experimental test data. Synchronous evaluations were completed for UNSFLO but further enhancement needs to be added to the code before the unsteady pressures can be used to predict forced response vibratory stresses. The FREPS evaluations were hindered as the steady flow solver (SFLOW) was unable to converge to a solution for the transonic flow conditions in the fan blisk. This situation resulted in all FREPS test cases being attempted but no results were obtained during the present program. Currently, AlliedSignal is evaluating integrating FREPS with our existing steady flow solvers to bypass the SFLOW difficulties. ne TURBO-AE steady flow solution provided an excellent match with the AlliedSignal Engines calibrated DAWES 3-D viscous solver. Finally, the TURBO-AE unsteady analyses also matched experimental observations by predicting flutter for the single test case evaluated.

  20. Aeroelastic Response of the Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge Transtition Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrera, Claudia Y.; Spivey, Natalie D.; Lung, Shun-fat

    2016-01-01

    The Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge demonstrator was a joint task under the Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project in partnership with the Air Force Research Laboratory and FlexSys, Inc. (Ann Arbor, Michigan), chartered by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to develop advanced technologies that enable environmentally friendly aircraft, such as continuous mold-line technologies. The Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge demonstrator encompassed replacing the Fowler flaps on the SubsoniC Aircraft Testbed, a Gulfstream III (Gulfstream Aerospace, Savannah, Georgia) aircraft, with control surfaces developed by FlexSys, Inc., a pair of uniquely-designed, unconventional flaps to be used as lifting surfaces during flight-testing to substantiate their structural effectiveness. The unconventional flaps consisted of a main flap section and two transition sections, inboard and outboard, which demonstrated the continuous mold-line technology. Unique characteristics of the transition sections provided a challenge to the airworthiness assessment for this part of the structure. A series of build-up tests and analyses were conducted to ensure the data required to support the airworthiness assessment were acquired and applied accurately. The transition sections were analyzed both as individual components and as part of the flight-test article assembly. Instrumentation was installed in the transition sections based on the analysis to best capture the in-flight aeroelastic response. Flight-testing was conducted and flight data were acquired to validate the analyses. This paper documents the details of the aeroelastic assessment and in-flight response of the transition sections of the unconventional Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge flaps.

  1. Stiffness Characteristics of Composite Rotor Blades With Elastic Couplings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piatak, David J.; Nixon, Mark W.; Kosmatka, John B.

    1997-01-01

    Recent studies on rotor aeroelastic response and stability have shown the beneficial effects of incorporating elastic couplings in composite rotor blades. However, none of these studies have clearly identified elastic coupling limits and the effects of elastic couplings on classical beam stiffnesses of representative rotor blades. Knowledge of these limits and effects would greatly enhance future aeroelastic studies involving composite rotor blades. The present study addresses these voids and provides a preliminary design database for investigators who may wish to study the effects of elastic couplings on representative blade designs. The results of the present study should provide a basis for estimating the potential benefits associated with incorporating elastic couplings without the need for first designing a blade cross section and then performing a cross-section analysis to obtain the required beam section properties as is customary in the usual one-dimensional beam-type approach.

  2. Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) Area of Interest (AOI) 6: Develop and Validate Aeroelastic Codes for Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Kevin D.; Liu, Jong-Shang; Murthy, Durbha V.; Kruse, Marlin J.; James, Darrell

    1999-01-01

    AlliedSignal Engines, in cooperation with NASA GRC (National Aeronautics and Space Administration Glenn Research Center), completed an evaluation of recently-developed aeroelastic computer codes using test cases from the AlliedSignal Engines fan blisk and turbine databases. Test data included strain gage, performance, and steady-state pressure information obtained for conditions where synchronous or flutter vibratory conditions were found to occur. Aeroelastic codes evaluated included quasi 3-D UNSFLO (MIT Developed/AE Modified, Quasi 3-D Aeroelastic Computer Code), 2-D FREPS (NASA-Developed Forced Response Prediction System Aeroelastic Computer Code), and 3-D TURBO-AE (NASA/Mississippi State University Developed 3-D Aeroelastic Computer Code). Unsteady pressure predictions for the turbine test case were used to evaluate the forced response prediction capabilities of each of the three aeroelastic codes. Additionally, one of the fan flutter cases was evaluated using TURBO-AE. The UNSFLO and FREPS evaluation predictions showed good agreement with the experimental test data trends, but quantitative improvements are needed. UNSFLO over-predicted turbine blade response reductions, while FREPS under-predicted them. The inviscid TURBO-AE turbine analysis predicted no discernible blade response reduction, indicating the necessity of including viscous effects for this test case. For the TURBO-AE fan blisk test case, significant effort was expended getting the viscous version of the code to give converged steady flow solutions for the transonic flow conditions. Once converged, the steady solutions provided an excellent match with test data and the calibrated DAWES (AlliedSignal 3-D Viscous Steady Flow CFD Solver). However, efforts expended establishing quality steady-state solutions prevented exercising the unsteady portion of the TURBO-AE code during the present program. AlliedSignal recommends that unsteady pressure measurement data be obtained for both test cases examined

  3. Aeroelastic analysis for helicopter rotor blades with time-variable, non-linear structural twist and multiple structural redundancy: Mathematical derivation and program user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielawa, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    The differential equations of motion for the lateral and torsional deformations of a nonlinearly twisted rotor blade in steady flight conditions together with those additional aeroelastic features germane to composite bearingless rotors are derived. The differential equations are formulated in terms of uncoupled (zero pitch and twist) vibratory modes with exact coupling effects due to finite, time variable blade pitch and, to second order, twist. Also presented are derivations of the fully coupled inertia and aerodynamic load distributions, automatic pitch change coupling effects, structural redundancy characteristics of the composite bearingless rotor flexbeam - torque tube system in bending and torsion, and a description of the linearized equations appropriate for eigensolution analyses. Three appendixes are included presenting material appropriate to the digital computer program implementation of the analysis, program G400.

  4. Sensitivity analysis for aeroacoustic and aeroelastic design of turbomachinery blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorence, Christopher B.; Hall, Kenneth C.

    1995-01-01

    A new method for computing the effect that small changes in the airfoil shape and cascade geometry have on the aeroacoustic and aeroelastic behavior of turbomachinery cascades is presented. The nonlinear unsteady flow is assumed to be composed of a nonlinear steady flow plus a small perturbation unsteady flow that is harmonic in time. First, the full potential equation is used to describe the behavior of the nonlinear mean (steady) flow through a two-dimensional cascade. The small disturbance unsteady flow through the cascade is described by the linearized Euler equations. Using rapid distortion theory, the unsteady velocity is split into a rotational part that contains the vorticity and an irrotational part described by a scalar potential. The unsteady vorticity transport is described analytically in terms of the drift and stream functions computed from the steady flow. Hence, the solution of the linearized Euler equations may be reduced to a single inhomogeneous equation for the unsteady potential. The steady flow and small disturbance unsteady flow equations are discretized using bilinear quadrilateral isoparametric finite elements. The nonlinear mean flow solution and streamline computational grid are computed simultaneously using Newton iteration. At each step of the Newton iteration, LU decomposition is used to solve the resulting set of linear equations. The unsteady flow problem is linear, and is also solved using LU decomposition. Next, a sensitivity analysis is performed to determine the effect small changes in cascade and airfoil geometry have on the mean and unsteady flow fields. The sensitivity analysis makes use of the nominal steady and unsteady flow LU decompositions so that no additional matrices need to be factored. Hence, the present method is computationally very efficient. To demonstrate how the sensitivity analysis may be used to redesign cascades, a compressor is redesigned for improved aeroelastic stability and two different fan exit guide

  5. Improved Aerodynamic Influence Coefficients for Dynamic Aeroelastic Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratton, Patrice

    2011-12-01

    Currently at Bombardier Aerospace, aeroelastic analyses are performed using the Doublet Lattice Method (DLM) incorporated in the NASTRAN solver. This method proves to be very reliable and fast in preliminary design stages where wind tunnel experimental results are often not available. Unfortunately, the geometric simplifications and limitations of the DLM, based on the lifting surfaces theory, reduce the ability of this method to give reliable results for all flow conditions, particularly in transonic flow. Therefore, a new method has been developed involving aerodynamic data from high-fidelity CFD codes which solve the Euler or Navier-Stokes equations. These new aerodynamic loads are transmitted to the NASTRAN aeroelastic module through improved aerodynamic influence coefficients (AIC). A cantilevered wing model is created from the Global Express structural model and a set of natural modes is calculated for a baseline configuration of the structure. The baseline mode shapes are then combined with an interpolation scheme to deform the 3-D CFD mesh necessary for Euler and Navier-Stokes analyses. An uncoupled approach is preferred to allow aerodynamic information from different CFD codes. Following the steady state CFD analyses, pressure differences ( DeltaCp), calculated between the deformed models and the original geometry, lead to aerodynamic loads which are transferred to the DLM model. A modal-based AIC method is applied to the aerodynamic matrices of NASTRAN based on a least-square approximation to evaluate aerodynamic loads of a different wing configuration which displays similar types of mode shapes. The methodology developed in this research creates weighting factors based on steady CFD analyses which have an equivalent reduced frequency of zero. These factors are applied to both the real and imaginary part of the aerodynamic matrices as well as all reduced frequencies used in the PK-Method which solves flutter problems. The modal-based AIC method

  6. Controlled Aeroelastic Response and Airfoil Shaping Using Adaptive Materials and Integrated Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinkerton, Jennifer L.; McGowan, Anna-Maria R.; Moses, Robert W.; Scott, Robert C.; Heeg, Jennifer

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of several activities of the Aeroelasticity Branch at the NASA Langley Research Center in the area of applying adaptive materials and integrated systems for controlling both aircraft aeroelastic response and airfoil shape. The experimental results of four programs are discussed: the Piezoelectric Aeroelastic Response Tailoring Investigation (PARTI); the Adaptive Neural Control of Aeroelastic Response (ANCAR) program; the Actively Controlled Response of Buffet Affected Tails (ACROBAT) program; and the Airfoil THUNDER Testing to Ascertain Characteristics (ATTACH) project. The PARTI program demonstrated active flutter control and significant rcductions in aeroelastic response at dynamic pressures below flutter using piezoelectric actuators. The ANCAR program seeks to demonstrate the effectiveness of using neural networks to schedule flutter suppression control laws. Th,e ACROBAT program studied the effectiveness of a number of candidate actuators, including a rudder and piezoelectric actuators, to alleviate vertical tail buffeting. In the ATTACH project, the feasibility of using Thin-Layer Composite-Uimorph Piezoelectric Driver and Sensor (THUNDER) wafers to control airfoil aerodynamic characteristics was investigated. Plans for future applications are also discussed.

  7. Controlled aeroelastic response and airfoil shaping using adaptive materials and integrated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkerton, Jennifer L.; McGowan, Anna-Maria R.; Moses, Robert W.; Scott, Robert C.; Heeg, Jennifer

    1996-05-01

    This paper presents an overview of several activities of the Aeroelasticity Branch at the NASA Langley Research Center in the area of applying adaptive materials and integrated systems for controlling both aircraft aeroelastic response and airfoil shape. The experimental results of four programs are discussed: the Piezoelectric Aeroelastic Response Tailoring Investigation (PARTI); the adaptive neural control of aeroelastic response (ANCAR) program; the actively controlled response of buffet affected tails (ACROBAT) program; and the Airfoil THUNDER Testing to ascertain charcteristics (ATTACH) project. The PARTI program demonstrated active flutter control and significant reductions in aeroelastic response at dynamic pressures below flutter using piezoelectric actuators. The ANCAR program seeks to demonstrate the effectiveness of using neural networks to schedule flutter suppression control laws. The ACROBAT program studied the effectiveness of a number of candidate actuators, including a rudder and piezoelectric actuators, to alleviate vertical tail buffeting. In the ATTACH project, the feasibility of using thin-layer composite-unimorph piezoelectric driver and sensor (THUNDER) wafers to control airfoil aerodynamic characteristics was investigated. Plans for future applications are also discussed.

  8. Aeroelastic stability analyses of two counter rotating propfan designs for a cruise missile model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahajan, Aparajit J.; Lucero, John M.; Mehmed, Oral; Stefko, George L.

    1992-01-01

    Aeroelastic stability analyses were performed to insure structural integrity of two counterrotating propfan blade designs for a NAVY/Air Force/NASA cruise missile model wind tunnel test. This analysis predicted if the propfan designs would be flutter free at the operating conditions of the wind tunnel test. Calculated stability results are presented for the two blade designs with rotational speed and Mach number as the parameters. A aeroelastic analysis code ASTROP2 (Aeroelastic Stability and Response of Propulsion Systems - 2 Dimensional Analysis), developed at LeRC, was used in this project. The aeroelastic analysis is a modal method and uses the combination of a finite element structural model and two dimensional steady and unsteady cascade aerodynamic models. This code was developed to analyze single rotation propfans but was modified and applied to counterrotating propfans for the present work. Modifications were made to transform the geometry and rotation of the aft rotor to the same reference frame as the forward rotor, to input a non-uniform inflow into the rotor being analyzed, and to automatically converge to the least stable aeroelastic mode.

  9. The Wing-Body Aeroelastic Analyses Using the Inverse Design Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung Jun; Im, Dong-Kyun; Lee, In; Kwon, Jang-Hyuk

    Flutter phenomenon is one of the most dangerous problems in aeroelasticity. When it occurs, the aircraft structure can fail in a few second. In recent aeroelastic research, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques become important means to predict the aeroelastic unstable responses accurately. Among various flow equations like Navier-Stokes, Euler, full potential and so forth, the transonic small disturbance (TSD) theory is widely recognized as one of the most efficient theories. However, the small disturbance assumption limits the applicable range of the TSD theory to the thin wings. For a missile which usually has small aspect ratio wings, the influence of body aerodynamics on the wing surface may be significant. Thus, the flutter stability including the body effect should be verified. In this research an inverse design method is used to complement the aerodynamic deficiency derived from the fuselage. MGM (modified Garabedian-McFadden) inverse design method is used to optimize the aerodynamic field of a full aircraft model. Furthermore, the present TSD aeroelastic analyses do not require the grid regeneration process. The MGM inverse design method converges faster than other conventional aerodynamic theories. Consequently, the inverse designed aeroelastic analyses show that the flutter stability has been lowered by the body effect.

  10. Aeroelastic Stability Investigations for Large-scale Vertical Axis Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, B. C.; Griffith, D. T.

    2014-06-01

    The availability of offshore wind resources in coastal regions, along with a high concentration of load centers in these areas, makes offshore wind energy an attractive opportunity for clean renewable electricity production. High infrastructure costs such as the offshore support structure and operation and maintenance costs for offshore wind technology, however, are significant obstacles that need to be overcome to make offshore wind a more cost-effective option. A vertical-axis wind turbine (VAWT) rotor configuration offers a potential transformative technology solution that significantly lowers cost of energy for offshore wind due to its inherent advantages for the offshore market. However, several potential challenges exist for VAWTs and this paper addresses one of them with an initial investigation of dynamic aeroelastic stability for large-scale, multi-megawatt VAWTs. The aeroelastic formulation and solution method from the BLade Aeroelastic STability Tool (BLAST) for HAWT blades was employed to extend the analysis capability of a newly developed structural dynamics design tool for VAWTs. This investigation considers the effect of configuration geometry, material system choice, and number of blades on the aeroelastic stability of a VAWT, and provides an initial scoping for potential aeroelastic instabilities in large-scale VAWT designs.

  11. Computational Aeroelastic Modeling of Airframes and TurboMachinery: Progress and Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, R. E.; Sayma, A. I.

    2006-01-01

    Computational analyses such as computational fluid dynamics and computational structural dynamics have made major advances toward maturity as engineering tools. Computational aeroelasticity is the integration of these disciplines. As computational aeroelasticity matures it too finds an increasing role in the design and analysis of aerospace vehicles. This paper presents a survey of the current state of computational aeroelasticity with a discussion of recent research, success and continuing challenges in its progressive integration into multidisciplinary aerospace design. This paper approaches computational aeroelasticity from the perspective of the two main areas of application: airframe and turbomachinery design. An overview will be presented of the different prediction methods used for each field of application. Differing levels of nonlinear modeling will be discussed with insight into accuracy versus complexity and computational requirements. Subjects will include current advanced methods (linear and nonlinear), nonlinear flow models, use of order reduction techniques and future trends in incorporating structural nonlinearity. Examples in which computational aeroelasticity is currently being integrated into the design of airframes and turbomachinery will be presented.

  12. Aeroelastic analysis of wings using the Euler equations with a deforming mesh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Brian A.; Batina, John T.; Yang, Henry T. Y.

    1990-01-01

    Modifications to the CFL3D three dimensional unsteady Euler/Navier-Stokes code for the aeroelastic analysis of wings are described. The modifications involve including a deforming mesh capability which can move the mesh to continuously conform to the instantaneous shape of the aeroelastically deforming wing, and including the structural equations of motion for their simultaneous time-integration with the governing flow equations. Calculations were performed using the Euler equations to verify the modifications to the code and as a first step toward aeroelastic analysis using the Navier-Stokes equations. Results are presented for the NACA 0012 airfoil and a 45 deg sweptback wing to demonstrate applications of CFL3D for generalized force computations and aeroelastic analysis. Comparisons are made with published Euler results for the NACA 0012 airfoil and with experimental flutter data for the 45 deg sweptback wing to assess the accuracy of the present capability. These comparisons show good agreement and, thus, the CFL3D code may be used with confidence for aeroelastic analysis of wings.

  13. Reduction of numerical diffusion in three-dimensional vortical flows using a coupled Eulerian/Lagrangian solution procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felici, Helene M.; Drela, Mark

    1993-01-01

    A new approach based on the coupling of an Eulerian and a Lagrangian solver, aimed at reducing the numerical diffusion errors of standard Eulerian time-marching finite-volume solvers, is presented. The approach is applied to the computation of the secondary flow in two bent pipes and the flow around a 3D wing. Using convective point markers the Lagrangian approach provides a correction of the basic Eulerian solution. The Eulerian flow in turn integrates in time the Lagrangian state-vector. A comparison of coarse and fine grid Eulerian solutions makes it possible to identify numerical diffusion. It is shown that the Eulerian/Lagrangian approach is an effective method for reducing numerical diffusion errors.

  14. Analytical procedure for characterization of medieval wall-paintings by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syta, Olga; Rozum, Karol; Choińska, Marta; Zielińska, Dobrochna; Żukowska, Grażyna Zofia; Kijowska, Agnieszka; Wagner, Barbara

    2014-11-01

    Analytical procedure for the comprehensive chemical characterization of samples from medieval Nubian wall-paintings by means of portable X-ray fluorescence (pXRF), laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) and Raman spectroscopy (RS) was proposed in this work. The procedure was used for elemental and molecular investigations of samples from archeological excavations in Nubia (modern southern Egypt and northern Sudan). Numerous remains of churches with painted decorations dated back to the 7th-14th century were excavated in the region of medieval kingdoms of Nubia but many aspects of this art and its technology are still unknown. Samples from the selected archeological sites (Faras, Old Dongola and Banganarti) were analyzed in the form of transfers (n = 26), small fragments collected during the excavations (n = 35) and cross sections (n = 15). XRF was used to collect data about elemental composition, LA-ICPMS allowed mapping of selected elements, while RS was used to get the molecular information about the samples. The preliminary results indicated the usefulness of the proposed analytical procedure for distinguishing the substances, from both the surface and sub-surface domains of the wall-paintings. The possibility to identify raw materials from the wall-paintings will be used in the further systematic, archeometric studies devoted to the detailed comparison of various historic Nubian centers.

  15. Comparison of digestion procedures and methods for quantification of trace lead in breast milk by isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Amarasiriwardena, Chitra J.; Jayawardene, Innocent; Lupoli, Nicola; Barnes, Ramon M.; Hernandez-Avila, Mauricio; Hu, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of lead in breast milk is an important public health consideration and can be technically quite challenging. The reliable and accurate determination of trace lead in human breast milk is difficult for several reasons including: potential for contamination during sample collection, storage, and analysis; complexities related to the high fat content of human milk; and poor analytic sensitivity at low concentrations. Breast milk lead levels from previous published studies should therefore be reviewed with caution. Due to the difficulty in identifying a method that would successfully digest samples with 100% efficiency, we evaluated three different digestion procedures including: (1) dry ashing in a muffle furnace, (2) microwave oven digestion, and (3) digestion in high pressure asher. High temperature, high pressure asher digestion was selected as the procedure of choice for the breast milk samples. Trace lead analysis was performed using isotope dilution (ID) inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Measured lead concentrations in breast milk samples (n = 200) from Mexico ranged from 0.2 to 6.7 ng ml−1. The precision for these measurements ranged from 0.27–7.8% RSD. Use of strict contamination control techniques and of a very powerful digestion procedure, along with an ID-ICP-MS method for lead determination, enables us to measure trace lead levels as low as 0.2 ng ml−1 in milk (instrument detection limit = 0.01 ng ml−1). PMID:24808927

  16. Determination of heavy metals and their speciation in street dusts by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry after a Community Bureau of Reference sequential extraction procedure.

    PubMed

    Altundag, Huseyin; Imamoglu, Mustafa; Doganci, Secil; Baysal, Erkan; Albayrak, Sinem; Tuzen, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Sequential selective extraction techniques are commonly used to fractionate the solid-phase forms of metals in soils. This procedure provides measurements of extractable metals from media, such as acetic acid (0.11 M), hydroxyl ammonium chloride (0.1 M), hydrogen peroxide (8.8 M) plus ammonium acetate (1 M), and aqua regia stages of the sequential extraction procedure. In this work, the extractable Pb, Cu, Mn, Sr, Ni, V, Fe, Zn, and Cr were evaluated in street dust samples from Sakarya, Turkey, between May and October 2009 using the three-step sequential extraction procedure described by the Community Bureau of Reference (BCR, now the Standards, Measurements, and Testing Programme) of the European Union. The sampling sites were divided into 10 categories; a total of 50 street dusts were analyzed. The determination of multielements in the samples was performed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry. Validation of the proposed method was performed using BCR 701 certified reference material. The results showed good agreement between the obtained and the certified values for the metals analyzed. PMID:24000761

  17. Comparison of digestion procedures and methods for quantification of trace lead in breast milk by isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Amarasiriwardena, Chitra J; Jayawardene, Innocent; Lupoli, Nicola; Barnes, Ramon M; Hernandez-Avila, Mauricio; Hu, Howard; Ettinger, Adrienne S

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of lead in breast milk is an important public health consideration and can be technically quite challenging. The reliable and accurate determination of trace lead in human breast milk is difficult for several reasons including: potential for contamination during sample collection, storage, and analysis; complexities related to the high fat content of human milk; and poor analytic sensitivity at low concentrations. Breast milk lead levels from previous published studies should therefore be reviewed with caution. Due to the difficulty in identifying a method that would successfully digest samples with 100% efficiency, we evaluated three different digestion procedures including: (1) dry ashing in a muffle furnace, (2) microwave oven digestion, and (3) digestion in high pressure asher. High temperature, high pressure asher digestion was selected as the procedure of choice for the breast milk samples. Trace lead analysis was performed using isotope dilution (ID) inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Measured lead concentrations in breast milk samples (n = 200) from Mexico ranged from 0.2 to 6.7 ng ml(-1). The precision for these measurements ranged from 0.27-7.8% RSD. Use of strict contamination control techniques and of a very powerful digestion procedure, along with an ID-ICP-MS method for lead determination, enables us to measure trace lead levels as low as 0.2 ng ml(-1) in milk (instrument detection limit = 0.01 ng ml(-1)). PMID:24808927

  18. High-Performance Parallel Analysis of Coupled Problems for Aircraft Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felippa, C. A.; Farhat, C.; Park, K. C.; Gumaste, U.; Chen, P.-S.; Lesoinne, M.; Stern, P.

    1996-01-01

    This research program dealt with the application of high-performance computing methods to the numerical simulation of complete jet engines. The program was initiated in January 1993 by applying two-dimensional parallel aeroelastic codes to the interior gas flow problem of a bypass jet engine. The fluid mesh generation, domain decomposition and solution capabilities were successfully tested. Attention was then focused on methodology for the partitioned analysis of the interaction of the gas flow with a flexible structure and with the fluid mesh motion driven by these structural displacements. The latter is treated by a ALE technique that models the fluid mesh motion as that of a fictitious mechanical network laid along the edges of near-field fluid elements. New partitioned analysis procedures to treat this coupled three-component problem were developed during 1994 and 1995. These procedures involved delayed corrections and subcycling, and have been successfully tested on several massively parallel computers, including the iPSC-860, Paragon XP/S and the IBM SP2. For the global steady-state axisymmetric analysis of a complete engine we have decided to use the NASA-sponsored ENG10 program, which uses a regular FV-multiblock-grid discretization in conjunction with circumferential averaging to include effects of blade forces, loss, combustor heat addition, blockage, bleeds and convective mixing. A load-balancing preprocessor tor parallel versions of ENG10 was developed. During 1995 and 1996 we developed the capability tor the first full 3D aeroelastic simulation of a multirow engine stage. This capability was tested on the IBM SP2 parallel supercomputer at NASA Ames. Benchmark results were presented at the 1196 Computational Aeroscience meeting.

  19. Sensitivity Analysis of the Static Aeroelastic Response of a Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldred, Lloyd B.

    1993-01-01

    A technique to obtain the sensitivity of the static aeroelastic response of a three dimensional wing model is designed and implemented. The formulation is quite general and accepts any aerodynamic and structural analysis capability. A program to combine the discipline level, or local, sensitivities into global sensitivity derivatives is developed. A variety of representations of the wing pressure field are developed and tested to determine the most accurate and efficient scheme for representing the field outside of the aerodynamic code. Chebyshev polynomials are used to globally fit the pressure field. This approach had some difficulties in representing local variations in the field, so a variety of local interpolation polynomial pressure representations are also implemented. These panel based representations use a constant pressure value, a bilinearly interpolated value. or a biquadraticallv interpolated value. The interpolation polynomial approaches do an excellent job of reducing the numerical problems of the global approach for comparable computational effort. Regardless of the pressure representation used. sensitivity and response results with excellent accuracy have been produced for large integrated quantities such as wing tip deflection and trim angle of attack. The sensitivities of such things as individual generalized displacements have been found with fair accuracy. In general, accuracy is found to be proportional to the relative size of the derivatives to the quantity itself.

  20. New Flutter Analysis Technique for CFD-based Unsteady Aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-gi; Jutte, Christine V.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a flutter analysis technique for the transonic flight regime. The technique uses an iterative approach to determine the critical dynamic pressure for a given mach number. Unlike other CFD-based flutter analysis methods, each iteration solves for the critical dynamic pressure and uses this value in subsequent iterations until the value converges. This process reduces the iterations required to determine the critical dynamic pressure. To improve the accuracy of the analysis, the technique employs a known structural model, leaving only the aerodynamic model as the unknown. The aerodynamic model is estimated using unsteady aeroelastic CFD analysis combined with a parameter estimation routine. The technique executes as follows. The known structural model is represented as a finite element model. Modal analysis determines the frequencies and mode shapes for the structural model. At a given mach number and dynamic pressure, the unsteady CFD analysis is performed. The output time history of the surface pressure is converted to a nodal aerodynamic force vector. The forces are then normalized by the given dynamic pressure. A multi-input multi-output parameter estimation software, ERA, estimates the aerodynamic model through the use of time histories of nodal aerodynamic forces and structural deformations. The critical dynamic pressure is then calculated using the known structural model and the estimated aerodynamic model. This output is used as the dynamic pressure in subsequent iterations until the critical dynamic pressure is determined. This technique is demonstrated on the Aerostructures Test Wing-2 model at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center.

  1. Rapid Aeroelastic Analysis of Blade Flutter in Turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trudell, J. J.; Mehmed, O.; Stefko, G. L.; Bakhle, M. A.; Reddy, T. S. R.; Montgomery, M.; Verdon, J.

    2006-01-01

    The LINFLUX-AE computer code predicts flutter and forced responses of blades and vanes in turbomachines under subsonic, transonic, and supersonic flow conditions. The code solves the Euler equations of unsteady flow in a blade passage under the assumption that the blades vibrate harmonically at small amplitudes. The steady-state nonlinear Euler equations are solved by a separate program, then equations for unsteady flow components are obtained through linearization around the steady-state solution. A structural-dynamics analysis (see figure) is performed to determine the frequencies and mode shapes of blade vibrations, a preprocessor interpolates mode shapes from the structural-dynamics mesh onto the LINFLUX computational-fluid-dynamics mesh, and an interface code is used to convert the steady-state flow solution to a form required by LINFLUX. Then LINFLUX solves the linearized equations in the frequency domain to calculate the unsteady aerodynamic pressure distribution for a given vibration mode, frequency, and interblade phase angle. A post-processor uses the unsteady pressures to calculate generalized aerodynamic forces, response amplitudes, and eigenvalues (which determine the flutter frequency and damping). In comparison with the TURBO-AE aeroelastic-analysis code, which solves the equations in the time domain, LINFLUX-AE is 6 to 7 times faster.

  2. The SRB heat shield: Aeroelastic stability during reentry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ventres, C. S.; Dowell, E. H.

    1977-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests of a 3% scale model of the aft portion of the SRB equipped with partially scaled heat shields were conducted for the purpose of measuring fluctuating pressure levels in the aft skirt region. During these tests, the heat shields were observed to oscillate violently, the oscillations in some instances causing the heat shields to fail. High speed films taken during the tests reveal a regular pattern of waves in the fabric starting near the flow stagnation point and progressing around both sides of the annulus. The amplitude of the waves was too great, and their pattern too regular, for them to be attributed to the fluctuating pressure levels measured during the tests. The cause of the oscillations observed in the model heat shields, and whether or not similar oscillations will occur in the full scale SRB heat shield during reentry were investigated. Suggestions for modifying the heat shield so as to avoid the oscillations are provided, and recommendations are made for a program of vibration and wind tunnel tests of reduced-scale aeroelastic models of the heat shield.

  3. Unsteady Aerodynamic Models for Turbomachinery Aeroelastic and Aeroacoustic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verdon, Joseph M.; Barnett, Mark; Ayer, Timothy C.

    1995-01-01

    Theoretical analyses and computer codes are being developed for predicting compressible unsteady inviscid and viscous flows through blade rows of axial-flow turbomachines. Such analyses are needed to determine the impact of unsteady flow phenomena on the structural durability and noise generation characteristics of the blading. The emphasis has been placed on developing analyses based on asymptotic representations of unsteady flow phenomena. Thus, high Reynolds number flows driven by small amplitude unsteady excitations have been considered. The resulting analyses should apply in many practical situations and lead to a better understanding of the relevant flow physics. In addition, they will be efficient computationally, and therefore, appropriate for use in aeroelastic and aeroacoustic design studies. Under the present effort, inviscid interaction and linearized inviscid unsteady flow models have been formulated, and inviscid and viscid prediction capabilities for subsonic steady and unsteady cascade flows have been developed. In this report, we describe the linearized inviscid unsteady analysis, LINFLO, the steady inviscid/viscid interaction analysis, SFLOW-IVI, and the unsteady viscous layer analysis, UNSVIS. These analyses are demonstrated via application to unsteady flows through compressor and turbine cascades that are excited by prescribed vortical and acoustic excitations and by prescribed blade vibrations. Recommendations are also given for the future research needed for extending and improving the foregoing asymptotic analyses, and to meet the goal of providing efficient inviscid/viscid interaction capabilities for subsonic and transonic unsteady cascade flows.

  4. Static aeroelastic analysis and tailoring of missile control fins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintosh, S. C., Jr.; Dillenius, M. F. E.

    1989-01-01

    A concept for enhancing the design of control fins for supersonic tactical missiles is described. The concept makes use of aeroelastic tailoring to create fin designs (for given planforms) that limit the variations in hinge moments that can occur during maneuvers involving high load factors and high angles of attack. It combines supersonic nonlinear aerodynamic load calculations with finite-element structural modeling, static and dynamic structural analysis, and optimization. The problem definition is illustrated. The fin is at least partly made up of a composite material. The layup is fixed, and the orientations of the material principal axes are allowed to vary; these are the design variables. The objective is the magnitude of the difference between the chordwise location of the center of pressure and its desired location, calculated for a given flight condition. Three types of constraints can be imposed: upper bounds on static displacements for a given set of load conditions, lower bounds on specified natural frequencies, and upper bounds on the critical flutter damping parameter at a given set of flight speeds and altitudes. The idea is to seek designs that reduce variations in hinge moments that would otherwise occur. The block diagram describes the operation of the computer program that accomplishes these tasks. There is an option for a single analysis in addition to the optimization.

  5. Analysis of Test Case Computations and Experiments for the First Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, David M.; Heeg, Jennifer; Wieseman, Carol D.; Chwalowski, Pawel

    2013-01-01

    This paper compares computational and experimental data from the Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop (AePW) held in April 2012. This workshop was designed as a series of technical interchange meetings to assess the state of the art of computational methods for predicting unsteady flowfields and static and dynamic aeroelastic response. The goals are to provide an impartial forum to evaluate the effectiveness of existing computer codes and modeling techniques to simulate aeroelastic problems and to identify computational and experimental areas needing additional research and development. Three subject configurations were chosen from existing wind-tunnel data sets where there is pertinent experimental data available for comparison. Participant researchers analyzed one or more of the subject configurations, and results from all of these computations were compared at the workshop.

  6. Aeroelastic Deformation Measurements of Flap, Gap, and Overhang on a Semispan Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Liu, Tianshu; Garg, Sanjay; Ghee, Terence A.; Taylor, Nigel J.

    2000-01-01

    Single-camera, single-view videogrammetry has been used to determine static aeroelastic deformation of a slotted flap configuration on a semispan model at the National Transonic Facility (NTF). Deformation was determined by comparing wind-off to wind-on spatial data from targets placed on the main element, shroud, and flap of the model. Digitized video images from a camera were recorded and processed to automatically determine target image plane locations that were then corrected for sensor, lens, and frame grabber spatial errors. The videogrammetric technique has been established at NASA facilities as the technique of choice when high-volume static aeroelastic data with minimum impact on data taking is required. The primary measurement at the NTF with this technique in the past has been the measurement of static aeroelastic wing twist on full span models. The first results using the videogrammetric technique for the measurement of component deformation during semispan testing at the NTF are presented.

  7. Research and Applications in Aeroelasticity and Structural Dynamics at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abel, Irving

    1997-01-01

    An overview of recently completed programs in aeroelasticity and structural dynamics research at the NASA Langley Research Center is presented. Methods used to perform flutter clearance studies in the wind-tunnel on a high performance fighter are discussed. Recent advances in the use of smart structures and controls to solve aeroelastic problems, including flutter and gust response are presented. An aeroelastic models program designed to support an advanced high speed civil transport is described. An extension to transonic small disturbance theory that better predicts flows involving separation and reattachment is presented. The results of a research study to determine the effects of flexibility on the taxi and takeoff characteristics of a high speed civil transport are presented. The use of photogrammetric methods aboard Space Shuttle to measure spacecraft dynamic response is discussed. Issues associated with the jitter response of multi-payload spacecraft are discussed. Finally a Space Shuttle flight experiment that studied the control of flexible spacecraft is described.

  8. Non-Linear System Identification for Aeroelastic Systems with Application to Experimental Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kukreja, Sunil L.

    2008-01-01

    Representation and identification of a non-linear aeroelastic pitch-plunge system as a model of the NARMAX class is considered. A non-linear difference equation describing this aircraft model is derived theoretically and shown to be of the NARMAX form. Identification methods for NARMAX models are applied to aeroelastic dynamics and its properties demonstrated via continuous-time simulations of experimental conditions. Simulation results show that (i) the outputs of the NARMAX model match closely those generated using continuous-time methods and (ii) NARMAX identification methods applied to aeroelastic dynamics provide accurate discrete-time parameter estimates. Application of NARMAX identification to experimental pitch-plunge dynamics data gives a high percent fit for cross-validated data.

  9. Static Aeroelastic Analysis of Transonic Wind Tunnel Models Using Finite Element Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, John R.; Burner, Alpheus W.; Valla, Robert

    1997-01-01

    A computational method for accurately predicting the static aeroelastic deformations of typical transonic transport wind tunnel models is described. The method utilizes a finite element method (FEM) for predicting the deformations. Extensive calibration/validation of this method was carried out using a novel wind-off wind tunnel model static loading experiment and wind-on optical wing twist measurements obtained during a recent wind tunnel test in the National Transonic Facility (NTF) at NASA LaRC. Further validations were carried out using a Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics (CFD) flow solver to calculate wing pressure distributions about several aeroelastically deformed wings and comparing these predictions with NTF experimental data. Results from this aeroelastic deformation method are in good overall agreement with experimentally measured values. Including the predicted deformations significantly improves the correlation between CFD predicted and experimentally measured wing & pressures.

  10. Current status of computational methods for transonic unsteady aerodynamics and aeroelastic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, John W.; Malone, John B.

    1992-01-01

    The current status of computational methods for unsteady aerodynamics and aeroelasticity is reviewed. The key features of challenging aeroelastic applications are discussed in terms of the flowfield state: low-angle high speed flows and high-angle vortex-dominated flows. The critical role played by viscous effects in determining aeroelastic stability for conditions of incipient flow separation is stressed. The need for a variety of flow modeling tools, from linear formulations to implementations of the Navier-Stokes equations, is emphasized. Estimates of computer run times for flutter calculations using several computational methods are given. Applications of these methods for unsteady aerodynamic and transonic flutter calculations for airfoils, wings, and configurations are summarized. Finally, recommendations are made concerning future research directions.

  11. Plans and Example Results for the 2nd AIAA Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heeg, Jennifer; Chwalowski, Pawel; Schuster, David M.; Raveh, Daniella; Jirasek, Adam; Dalenbring, Mats

    2015-01-01

    This paper summarizes the plans for the second AIAA Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop. The workshop is designed to assess the state-of-the-art of computational methods for predicting unsteady flow fields and aeroelastic response. The goals are to provide an impartial forum to evaluate the effectiveness of existing computer codes and modeling techniques, and to identify computational and experimental areas needing additional research and development. This paper provides guidelines and instructions for participants including the computational aerodynamic model, the structural dynamic properties, the experimental comparison data and the expected output data from simulations. The Benchmark Supercritical Wing (BSCW) has been chosen as the configuration for this workshop. The analyses to be performed will include aeroelastic flutter solutions of the wing mounted on a pitch-and-plunge apparatus.

  12. FUN3D Analyses in Support of the Second Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chwalowski, Pawel; Heeg, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the computational aeroelastic results generated in support of the second Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop for the Benchmark Supercritical Wing (BSCW) configurations and compares them to the experimental data. The computational results are obtained using FUN3D, an unstructured grid Reynolds- Averaged Navier-Stokes solver developed at NASA Langley Research Center. The analysis results include aerodynamic coefficients and surface pressures obtained for steady-state, static aeroelastic equilibrium, and unsteady flow due to a pitching wing or flutter prediction. Frequency response functions of the pressure coefficients with respect to the angular displacement are computed and compared with the experimental data. The effects of spatial and temporal convergence on the computational results are examined.

  13. A Historical Overview of Aeroelasticity Branch and Transonic Dynamics Tunnel Contributions to Rotorcraft Technology and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeager, William T., Jr.; Kvaternik, Raymond G.

    2001-01-01

    A historical account of the contributions of the Aeroelasticity Branch (AB) and the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) to rotorcraft technology and development since the tunnel's inception in 1960 is presented. The paper begins with a summary of the major characteristics of the TDT and a description of the unique capability offered by the TDT for testing aeroelastic models by virtue of its heavy gas test medium. This is followed by some remarks on the role played by scale models in the design and development of rotorcraft vehicles and a review of the basic scaling relationships important for designing and building dynamic aeroelastic models of rotorcraft vehicles for testing in the TDT. Chronological accounts of helicopter and tiltrotor research conducted in AB/TDT are then described in separate sections. Both experimental and analytical studies are reported and include a description of the various physical and mathematical models employed, the specific objectives of the investigations, and illustrative experimental and analytical results.

  14. Structural Dynamics Modeling of HIRENASD in Support of the Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieseman, Carol; Chwalowski, Pawel; Heeg, Jennifer; Boucke, Alexander; Castro, Jack

    2013-01-01

    An Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop (AePW) was held in April 2012 using three aeroelasticity case study wind tunnel tests for assessing the capabilities of various codes in making aeroelasticity predictions. One of these case studies was known as the HIRENASD model that was tested in the European Transonic Wind Tunnel (ETW). This paper summarizes the development of a standardized enhanced analytical HIRENASD structural model for use in the AePW effort. The modifications to the HIRENASD finite element model were validated by comparing modal frequencies, evaluating modal assurance criteria, comparing leading edge, trailing edge and twist of the wing with experiment and by performing steady and unsteady CFD analyses for one of the test conditions on the same grid, and identical processing of results.

  15. Theoretical and experimental research in aeroelastic stability of an advanced bearingless rotor for future helicopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, James M.

    1991-01-01

    The aeroelastic stability of a shaft-fixed bearingless rotor is analyzed in wind-tunnel tests for a wide range of operating conditions in order to determine whether such a system could be made aeroelastically stable without incorporating auxiliary dampers. The model rotor and blade properties are determined and used as an input to a bearingless-rotor analysis. Theoretical predictions are compared with experimental results in hover and forward flights. The analysis predicts the lag mode damping satisfactorily for collective pitch between 5 deg and 10 deg; however, the quasi-steady linear aerodynamic modeling overpredicts the damping values for higher collective pitch settings. It is noted that soft blade pitch links improve aeroelastic stability in hover and at low advance ratio.

  16. Nonlinear System Identification for Aeroelastic Systems with Application to Experimental Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kukreja, Sunil L.

    2008-01-01

    Representation and identification of a nonlinear aeroelastic pitch-plunge system as a model of the Nonlinear AutoRegressive, Moving Average eXogenous (NARMAX) class is considered. A nonlinear difference equation describing this aircraft model is derived theoretically and shown to be of the NARMAX form. Identification methods for NARMAX models are applied to aeroelastic dynamics and its properties demonstrated via continuous-time simulations of experimental conditions. Simulation results show that (1) the outputs of the NARMAX model closely match those generated using continuous-time methods, and (2) NARMAX identification methods applied to aeroelastic dynamics provide accurate discrete-time parameter estimates. Application of NARMAX identification to experimental pitch-plunge dynamics data gives a high percent fit for cross-validated data.

  17. Current status of computational methods for transonic unsteady aerodynamics and aeroelastic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, John W.; Malone, John B.

    1992-01-01

    The status of computational methods for unsteady aerodynamics and aeroelasticity is reviewed. The key features of challenging aeroelastic applications is discussed in terms of the flowfield state - low angle high speed flows and high angle vortex dominated flows. The critical role played by viscous effects in determining aeroelastic stability for conditions of incipient flow separation is stressed. The need for a variety of flow modeling tools, from linear formulations to implementations of the Navier-Stokes equations, is emphasized. Estimates of computer run times for flutter calculations using several computational methods are given. Applications of these methods for unsteady aerodynamic and transonic flutter calculations for airfoils, wings, and configurations are summarized. Finally, recommendations are made concerning future research directions.

  18. Current status of computational methods for transonic unsteady aerodynamics and aeroelastic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, J. W.; Malone, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    The current status of computational methods for unsteady aerodynamics and aeroelasticity is reviewed. The key features of challenging aeroelastic applications are discussed in terms of the flowfield state: low-angle high speed flows and high-angle vortex-dominated flows. The critical role played by viscous effects in determining aeroelastic stability for conditions of incipient flow separation is stressed. The need for a variety of flow modeling tools, from linear formulations to implementations of the Navier-Stokes equations, is emphasized. Estimates of computer run times for flutter calculations using several computational methods are given. Application of these methods for unsteady aerodynamic and transonic flutter calculations for airfoils, wings, and configurations are summarized. Finally, recommendations are made concerning future research directions.

  19. A comprehensive aeroelastic analysis of helicopter main rotors with trailing edge flaps for vibration reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milgram, Judah Henry

    1997-08-01

    A comprehensive analysis is developed to evaluate main rotor blade trailing edge flap systems for helicopter vibration reduction. The analysis incorporates a nonlinear aeroelastic rotor model, response calculations via finite element in time method, coupled wind tunnel trim to prescribed operating conditions, unsteady compressible aerodynamics of the flap, and a multicyclic flap controller. An extensive validation study was performed using experimental wind tunnel data. Correlation between predicted and measured blade natural frequencies was generally fair. Results for hover thrust and power agreed well with the experimental data. Some discrepancy was observed near the low thrust conditions. In forward flight, fair correlation was observed for the power required and trim controls. For the rotor with no trailing edge flap motion, overall correlation of blade loads was fair good, although significant descrepancies were observed in individual cases. A parametric study was conducted for a four-bladed Sikorsky S-76 main rotor. The combination of trailing edge flap and multicyclic controller is predicted to provide significant reductions in fixed system 4/rev hub loads. The flap motions could be optimized to reduce either hub shears or hub moments through variation of a single scalar weighting parameter in the control algorithm. The effects of parametric variations of design parameters such as flap length, span-wise location, and chord could largely be offset by compensating adjustments to the flap motions as determined by the multicyclic algorithm, provided the flap motions did not become too large. The results suggest that a flap with the smallest possible chord and largest possible deflections is preferred.

  20. Advanced Small Perturbation Potential Flow Theory for Unsteady Aerodynamic and Aeroelastic Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, John T.

    2005-01-01

    An advanced small perturbation (ASP) potential flow theory has been developed to improve upon the classical transonic small perturbation (TSP) theories that have been used in various computer codes. These computer codes are typically used for unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analyses in the nonlinear transonic flight regime. The codes exploit the simplicity of stationary Cartesian meshes with the movement or deformation of the configuration under consideration incorporated into the solution algorithm through a planar surface boundary condition. The new ASP theory was developed methodically by first determining the essential elements required to produce full-potential-like solutions with a small perturbation approach on the requisite Cartesian grid. This level of accuracy required a higher-order streamwise mass flux and a mass conserving surface boundary condition. The ASP theory was further developed by determining the essential elements required to produce results that agreed well with Euler solutions. This level of accuracy required mass conserving entropy and vorticity effects, and second-order terms in the trailing wake boundary condition. Finally, an integral boundary layer procedure, applicable to both attached and shock-induced separated flows, was incorporated for viscous effects. The resulting ASP potential flow theory, including entropy, vorticity, and viscous effects, is shown to be mathematically more appropriate and computationally more accurate than the classical TSP theories. The formulaic details of the ASP theory are described fully and the improvements are demonstrated through careful comparisons with accepted alternative results and experimental data. The new theory has been used as the basis for a new computer code called ASP3D (Advanced Small Perturbation - 3D), which also is briefly described with representative results.

  1. Aeroelastic effects in multi-rotor vehicles with application to a hybrid heavy lift system. Part 1: Formulation of equations of motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatesan, C.; Friedman, P.

    1984-01-01

    This report presents a set of governing coupled differential equations for a model of a hybrid aircraft. The model consists of multiple rotor systems connected by an elastic interconnecting structure, with options to add any combination of or all of the following components; i.e., thrusters, a buoyant hull, and an underslung weight. The dynamic equations are written for the individual blade with hub motions, for the rigid body motions of the whole model, and also for the flexible modes of the interconnecting structure. One of the purposes of this study is to serve as the basis of a numerical study aimed at determining the aeroelastic stability and structural response characteristics of a Hybrid Heavy Lift Airship (HHLA). It is also expected that the formulation may be applicable to analyzing stability and responses of dual rotor helicopters such as a Heavy Lift Helicopter (HLH). Futhermore, the model is capable of representing coupled rotor/body aeromechanical problems of single rotor helicopters.

  2. A historical overview of tiltrotor aeroelastic research at Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvaternik, Raymond G.

    1992-01-01

    The Bell/Boeing V-22 Osprey which is being developed for the U.S. Military is a tiltrotor aircraft combining the versatility of a helicopter with the range and speed of a turboprop airplane. The V-22 represents a tiltrotor lineage which goes back over forty years, during which time contributions to the technology base needed for its development were made by both government and industry. NASA Langley Research Center has made substantial contributions to tiltrotor technology in several areas, in particular in the area of aeroelasticity. The purpose of this talk is to present a summary of the tiltrotor aeroelastic research conducted at Langley which has contributed to that technology.

  3. Trim and Structural Optimization of Subsonic Transport Wings Using Nonconventional Aeroelastic Tailoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, Bret K.; Jutte, Christine V.

    2014-01-01

    Several minimum-mass aeroelastic optimization problems are solved to evaluate the effectiveness of a variety of novel tailoring schemes for subsonic transport wings. Aeroelastic strength and panel buckling constraints are imposed across a variety of trimmed maneuver loads. Tailoring with metallic thickness variations, functionally graded materials, composite laminates, tow steering, and distributed trailing edge control effectors are all found to provide reductions in structural wing mass with varying degrees of success. The question as to whether this wing mass reduction will offset the increased manufacturing cost is left unresolved for each case.

  4. Stability and Control Properties of an Aeroelastic Fixed Wing Micro Aerial Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin R.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Ifju, Peter

    2001-01-01

    Micro aerial vehicles have been the subject of considerable interest and development over the last several years. The majority of current vehicle concepts rely on rigid fixed wings or rotors. An alternate design based on an aeroelastic membrane wing concept has also been developed that has exhibited desired characteristics in flight test demonstrations and competition. This paper presents results from a wind tunnel investigation that sought to quantify stability and control properties for a family of vehicles using the aeroelastic design. The results indicate that the membrane wing does exhibit potential benefits that could be exploited to enhance the design of future flight vehicles.

  5. Optimal Topology of Aircraft Rib and Spar Structures under Aeroelastic Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, Bret K.; Dunning, Peter D.

    2014-01-01

    Several topology optimization problems are conducted within the ribs and spars of a wing box. It is desired to locate the best position of lightening holes, truss/cross-bracing, etc. A variety of aeroelastic metrics are isolated for each of these problems: elastic wing compliance under trim loads and taxi loads, stress distribution, and crushing loads. Aileron effectiveness under a constant roll rate is considered, as are dynamic metrics: natural vibration frequency and flutter. This approach helps uncover the relationship between topology and aeroelasticity in subsonic transport wings, and can therefore aid in understanding the complex aircraft design process which must eventually consider all these metrics and load cases simultaneously.

  6. Development of Unsteady Aerodynamic and Aeroelastic Reduced-Order Models Using the FUN3D Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Vatsa, Veer N.; Biedron, Robert T.

    2009-01-01

    Recent significant improvements to the development of CFD-based unsteady aerodynamic reduced-order models (ROMs) are implemented into the FUN3D unstructured flow solver. These improvements include the simultaneous excitation of the structural modes of the CFD-based unsteady aerodynamic system via a single CFD solution, minimization of the error between the full CFD and the ROM unsteady aero- dynamic solution, and computation of a root locus plot of the aeroelastic ROM. Results are presented for a viscous version of the two-dimensional Benchmark Active Controls Technology (BACT) model and an inviscid version of the AGARD 445.6 aeroelastic wing using the FUN3D code.

  7. The benchmark aeroelastic models program: Description and highlights of initial results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Robert M.; Eckstrom, Clinton V.; Rivera, Jose A., Jr.; Dansberry, Bryan E.; Farmer, Moses G.; Durham, Michael H.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental effort was implemented in aeroelasticity called the Benchmark Models Program. The primary purpose of this program is to provide the necessary data to evaluate computational fluid dynamic codes for aeroelastic analysis. It also focuses on increasing the understanding of the physics of unsteady flows and providing data for empirical design. An overview is given of this program and some results obtained in the initial tests are highlighted. The tests that were completed include measurement of unsteady pressures during flutter of rigid wing with a NACA 0012 airfoil section and dynamic response measurements of a flexible rectangular wing with a thick circular arc airfoil undergoing shock boundary layer oscillations.

  8. Aeroelastic Stability of Rotor Blades Using Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chopra, I.; Sivaneri, N.

    1982-01-01

    The flutter stability of flap bending, lead-lag bending, and torsion of helicopter rotor blades in hover is investigated using a finite element formulation based on Hamilton's principle. The blade is divided into a number of finite elements. Quasi-steady strip theory is used to evaluate the aerodynamic loads. The nonlinear equations of motion are solved for steady-state blade deflections through an iterative procedure. The equations of motion are linearized assuming blade motion to be a small perturbation about the steady deflected shape. The normal mode method based on the coupled rotating natural modes is used to reduce the number of equations in the flutter analysis. First the formulation is applied to single-load-path blades (articulated and hingeless blades). Numerical results show very good agreement with existing results obtained using the modal approach. The second part of the application concerns multiple-load-path blades, i.e. bearingless blades. Numerical results are presented for several analytical models of the bearingless blade. Results are also obtained using an equivalent beam approach wherein a bearingless blade is modelled as a single beam with equivalent properties. Results show the equivalent beam model.

  9. Aeroelastic stability of wind turbine blade/aileron systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strain, J. C.; Mirandy, L.

    1995-01-01

    Aeroelastic stability analyses have been performed for the MOD-5A blade/aileron system. Various configurations having different aileron torsional stiffness, mass unbalance, and control system damping have been investigated. The analysis was conducted using a code recently developed by the General Electric Company - AILSTAB. The code extracts eigenvalues for a three degree of freedom system, consisting of: (1) a blade flapwise mode; (2) a blade torsional mode; and (3) an aileron torsional mode. Mode shapes are supplied as input and the aileron can be specified over an arbitrary length of the blade span. Quasi-steady aerodynamic strip theory is used to compute aerodynamic derivatives of the wing-aileron combination as a function of spanwise position. Equations of motion are summarized herein. The program provides rotating blade stability boundaries for torsional divergence, classical flutter (bending/torsion) and wing/aileron flutter. It has been checked out against fixed-wing results published by Theodorsen and Garrick. The MOD-5A system is stable with respect to divergence and classical flutter for all practical rotor speeds. Aileron torsional stiffness must exceed a minimum critical value to prevent aileron flutter. The nominal control system stiffness greatly exceeds this minimum during normal operation. The basic system, however, is unstable for the case of a free (or floating) aileron. The instability can be removed either by the addition of torsional damping or mass-balancing the ailerons. The MOD-5A design was performed by the General Electric Company, Advanced Energy Program Department under Contract DEN3-153 with NASA Lewis Research Center and sponsored by the Department of Energy.

  10. Proposed Wind Turbine Aeroelasticity Studies Using Helicopter Systems Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladkany, Samaan G.

    1998-01-01

    Advanced systems for the analysis of rotary wing aeroelastic structures (helicopters) are being developed at NASA Ames by the Rotorcraft Aeromechanics Branch, ARA. The research has recently been extended to the study of wind turbines, used for electric power generation Wind turbines play an important role in Europe, Japan & many other countries because they are non polluting & use a renewable source of energy. European countries such as Holland, Norway & France have been the world leaders in the design & manufacture of wind turbines due to their historical experience of several centuries, in building complex wind mill structures, which were used in water pumping, grain grinding & for lumbering. Fossil fuel cost in Japan & in Europe is two to three times higher than in the USA due to very high import taxes. High fuel cost combined with substantial governmental subsidies, allow wind generated power to be competitive with the more traditional sources of power generation. In the USA, the use of wind energy has been limited mainly because power production from wind is twice as expensive as from other traditional sources. Studies conducted at the National Renewable Energy Laboratories (NREL) indicate that the main cost in the production of wind turbines is due to the materials & the labor intensive processes used in the construction of turbine structures. Thus, for the US to assume world leadership in wind power generation, new lightweight & consequently very flexible wind turbines, that could be economically mass produced, would have to be developed [4,5]. This effort, if successful, would result in great benefit to the US & the developing nations that suffer from overpopulation & a very high cost of energy.

  11. Aeroelastic analysis of circular cylindrical and truncated conical shells subjected to a supersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabri, Farhad

    Shells of revolution, particularly cylindrical and conical shells, are one of the basic structural elements in the aerospace structures. With the advent of high speed aircrafts, these shells can show dynamic instabilities when they are exposed to a supersonic flow. Therefore, aeroelastic analysis of these elements is one of the primary design criteria which aeronautical engineers are dealing with. This analysis can be done with the help of finite element method (FEM) coupled with the computational fluid dynamic (CFD) or by experimental methods but it is time consuming and very expensive. The purpose of this dissertation is to develop such a numerical tool to do aeroelastic analysis in a fast and precise way. Meanwhile during the design stage, where the different configurations, loading and boundary conditions may need to be analyzed, this numerical method can be used very easily with the high order of reliability. In this study structural modeling is a combination of linear Sanders thin shell theory and classical finite element method. Based on this hybrid finite element method, the shell displacements are found from the exact solutions of shell theory rather than approximating by polynomial function done in traditional finite element method. This leads to a precise and fast convergence. Supersonic aerodynamic modeling is done based on the piston theory and modified piston theory with the shell curvature term. The stress stiffening due to lateral pressure and axial compression are also taken into accounts. Fluid-structure interaction in the presence of inside quiescent fluid is modeled based on the potential theory. In this method, fluid is considered as a velocity potential variable at each node of the shell element where its motion is expressed in terms of nodal elastic displacements at the fluid-structure interface. This proposed hybrid finite element has capabilities to do following analysis: (i) Buckling and vibration of an empty or partially fluid filled

  12. Improved Helicopter Rotor Performance Prediction through Loose and Tight CFD/CSD Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ickes, Jacob C.

    Helicopters and other Vertical Take-Off or Landing (VTOL) vehicles exhibit an interesting combination of structural dynamic and aerodynamic phenomena which together drive the rotor performance. The combination of factors involved make simulating the rotor a challenging and multidisciplinary effort, and one which is still an active area of interest in the industry because of the money and time it could save during design. Modern tools allow the prediction of rotorcraft physics from first principles. Analysis of the rotor system with this level of accuracy provides the understanding necessary to improve its performance. There has historically been a divide between the comprehensive codes which perform aeroelastic rotor simulations using simplified aerodynamic models, and the very computationally intensive Navier-Stokes Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solvers. As computer resources become more available, efforts have been made to replace the simplified aerodynamics of the comprehensive codes with the more accurate results from a CFD code. The objective of this work is to perform aeroelastic rotorcraft analysis using first-principles simulations for both fluids and structural predictions using tools available at the University of Toledo. Two separate codes are coupled together in both loose coupling (data exchange on a periodic interval) and tight coupling (data exchange each time step) schemes. To allow the coupling to be carried out in a reliable and efficient way, a Fluid-Structure Interaction code was developed which automatically performs primary functions of loose and tight coupling procedures. Flow phenomena such as transonics, dynamic stall, locally reversed flow on a blade, and Blade-Vortex Interaction (BVI) were simulated in this work. Results of the analysis show aerodynamic load improvement due to the inclusion of the CFD-based airloads in the structural dynamics analysis of the Computational Structural Dynamics (CSD) code. Improvements came in the form

  13. OC3 -- Benchmark Exercise of Aero-Elastic Offshore Wind Turbine Codes: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Passon, P.; Kuhn, M.; Butterfield, S.; Jonkman, J.; Camp, T.; Larsen, T. J.

    2007-08-01

    This paper introduces the work content and status of the first international investigation and verification of aero-elastic codes for offshore wind turbines as performed by the "Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration" (OC3) within the "IEA Wind Annex XXIII -- Subtask 2".

  14. NASTRAN level 16 user's manual updates for aeroelastic analysis of bladed discs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elchuri, V.; Gallo, A. M.

    1980-01-01

    The NASTRAN aeroelastic and flutter capability was extended to solve a class of problems associated with axial flow turbomachines. The capabilities of the program are briefly discussed. The aerodynamic data pertaining to the bladed disc sector, the associated aerodynamic modeling, the steady aerothermoelastic 'design/analysis' formulations, and the modal, flutter, and subcritical roots analyses are described. Sample problems and their solutions are included.

  15. Development and Analysis of a Swept Blade Aeroelastic Model for a Small Wind Turbine (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Preus, R.; Damiani, R.; Lee, S.; Larwood, S.

    2014-06-01

    As part of the U.S. Department-of-Energy-funded Competitiveness Improvement Project, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed new capabilities for aeroelastic modeling of precurved and preswept blades for small wind turbines. This presentation covers the quest for optimized rotors, computer-aided engineering tools, a case study, and summary of the results.

  16. Optimum Design of a Helicopter Rotor for Low Vibration Using Aeroelastic Analysis and Response Surface Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguli, R.

    2002-11-01

    An aeroelastic analysis based on finite elements in space and time is used to model the helicopter rotor in forward flight. The rotor blade is represented as an elastic cantilever beam undergoing flap and lag bending, elastic torsion and axial deformations. The objective of the improved design is to reduce vibratory loads at the rotor hub that are the main source of helicopter vibration. Constraints are imposed on aeroelastic stability, and move limits are imposed on the blade elastic stiffness design variables. Using the aeroelastic analysis, response surface approximations are constructed for the objective function (vibratory hub loads). It is found that second order polynomial response surfaces constructed using the central composite design of the theory of design of experiments adequately represents the aeroelastic model in the vicinity of the baseline design. Optimization results show a reduction in the objective function of about 30 per cent. A key accomplishment of this paper is the decoupling of the analysis problem and the optimization problems using response surface methods, which should encourage the use of optimization methods by the helicopter industry.

  17. Application of unsteady aeroelastic analysis techniques on the national aerospace plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pototzky, Anthony S.; Spain, Charles V.; Soistmann, David L.; Noll, Thomas E.

    1988-01-01

    A presentation provided at the Fourth National Aerospace Plane Technology Symposium held in Monterey, California, in February 1988 is discussed. The objective is to provide current results of ongoing investigations to develop a methodology for predicting the aerothermoelastic characteristics of NASP-type (hypersonic) flight vehicles. Several existing subsonic and supersonic unsteady aerodynamic codes applicable to the hypersonic class of flight vehicles that are generally available to the aerospace industry are described. These codes were evaluated by comparing calculated results with measured wind-tunnel aeroelastic data. The agreement was quite good in the subsonic speed range but showed mixed agreement in the supersonic range. In addition, a future endeavor to extend the aeroelastic analysis capability to hypersonic speeds is outlined. An investigation to identify the critical parameters affecting the aeroelastic characteristics of a hypersonic vehicle, to define and understand the various flutter mechanisms, and to develop trends for the important parameters using a simplified finite element model of the vehicle is summarized. This study showed the value of performing inexpensive and timely aeroelastic wind-tunnel tests to expand the experimental data base required for code validation using simple to complex models that are representative of the NASP configurations and root boundary conditions are discussed.

  18. Recent Enhancements to the Development of CFD-Based Aeroelastic Reduced-Order Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.

    2007-01-01

    Recent enhancements to the development of CFD-based unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic reduced-order models (ROMs) are presented. These enhancements include the simultaneous application of structural modes as CFD input, static aeroelastic analysis using a ROM, and matched-point solutions using a ROM. The simultaneous application of structural modes as CFD input enables the computation of the unsteady aerodynamic state-space matrices with a single CFD execution, independent of the number of structural modes. The responses obtained from a simultaneous excitation of the CFD-based unsteady aerodynamic system are processed using system identification techniques in order to generate an unsteady aerodynamic state-space ROM. Once the unsteady aerodynamic state-space ROM is generated, a method for computing the static aeroelastic response using this unsteady aerodynamic ROM and a state-space model of the structure, is presented. Finally, a method is presented that enables the computation of matchedpoint solutions using a single ROM that is applicable over a range of dynamic pressures and velocities for a given Mach number. These enhancements represent a significant advancement of unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic ROM technology.

  19. Maximized Gust Loads of a Closed-Loop, Nonlinear Aeroelastic System Using Nonlinear Systems Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.

    1999-01-01

    The problem of computing the maximized gust load for a nonlinear, closed-loop aeroelastic aircraft is discusses. The Volterra theory of nonlinear systems is applied in order to define a linearized system that provides a bounds on the response of the nonlinear system of interest. The method is applied to a simplified model of an Airbus A310.

  20. Preliminary Computational Analysis of the (HIRENASD) Configuration in Preparation for the Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chwalowski, Pawel; Florance, Jennifer P.; Heeg, Jennifer; Wieseman, Carol D.; Perry, Boyd P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary computational aeroelastic analysis results generated in preparation for the first Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop (AePW). These results were produced using FUN3D software developed at NASA Langley and are compared against the experimental data generated during the HIgh REynolds Number Aero- Structural Dynamics (HIRENASD) Project. The HIRENASD wind-tunnel model was tested in the European Transonic Windtunnel in 2006 by Aachen University0s Department of Mechanics with funding from the German Research Foundation. The computational effort discussed here was performed (1) to obtain a preliminary assessment of the ability of the FUN3D code to accurately compute physical quantities experimentally measured on the HIRENASD model and (2) to translate the lessons learned from the FUN3D analysis of HIRENASD into a set of initial guidelines for the first AePW, which includes test cases for the HIRENASD model and its experimental data set. This paper compares the computational and experimental results obtained at Mach 0.8 for a Reynolds number of 7 million based on chord, corresponding to the HIRENASD test conditions No. 132 and No. 159. Aerodynamic loads and static aeroelastic displacements are compared at two levels of the grid resolution. Harmonic perturbation numerical results are compared with the experimental data using the magnitude and phase relationship between pressure coefficients and displacement. A dynamic aeroelastic numerical calculation is presented at one wind-tunnel condition in the form of the time history of the generalized displacements. Additional FUN3D validation results are also presented for the AGARD 445.6 wing data set. This wing was tested in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel and is commonly used in the preliminary benchmarking of computational aeroelastic software.

  1. Further investigations of the aeroelastic behavior of the AFW wind-tunnel model using transonic small disturbance theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Bennett, Robert M.

    1992-01-01

    The CAP-TSD (Computational Aeroelasticity Program - Transonic Small Disturbance) code, developed at the NASA Langley Research Center, is applied to the Active Flexible Wing wind-tunnel model for prediction of transonic aeroelastic behavior. A semi-span computational model is used for evaluation of symmetric motions, and a full-span model is used for evaluation of antisymmetric motions. Static aeroelastic solutions using CAP-TSD are computed. Dynamic (flutter) analyses then are performed as perturbations about the static aeroelastic deformations and presented as flutter boundaries in terms of Mach number and dynamic pressure. Flutter boundaries that take into account modal refinements, vorticity and entropy corrections, antisymmetric motions and sensitivity to the modeling of the wing tip ballast stores also are presented and compared with experimental flutter results.

  2. Development of a structural optimization capability for the aeroelastic tailoring of composite rotor blades with straight and swept tips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, P. P.; Venkatesan, C.; Yuan, K.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a new structural optimization capability aimed at the aeroelastic tailoring of composite rotor blades with straight and swept tips. The primary objective is to reduce vibration levels in forward flight without diminishing the aeroelastic stability margins of the blade. In the course of this research activity a number of complicated tasks have been addressed: (1) development of a new, aeroelastic stability and response analysis; (2) formulation of a new comprehensive sensitive analysis, which facilitates the generation of the appropriate approximations for the objective and the constraints; (3) physical understanding of the new model and, in particular, determination of its potential for aeroelastic tailoring, and (4) combination of the newly developed analysis capability, the sensitivity derivatives and the optimizer into a comprehensive optimization capability. The first three tasks have been completed and the fourth task is in progress.

  3. Determination of quinolones and fluoroquinolones in hospital sewage water by off-line and on-line solid-phase extraction procedures coupled to HPLC-UV.

    PubMed

    Turiel, Esther; Bordin, Guy; Rodríguez, Adela Rosa

    2005-02-01

    In this work, the development of two solid-phase extraction procedures (off-line and on-line formats) for the identification and quantification of several (fluoro)quinolones in hospital sewage water by HPLC-UV is described. Both procedures are based on the use of C18 and anion exchange (SAX) sorbents for the preconcentration and clean-up steps, respectively, and all variables influencing both steps were optimised. In the off-line format, after its pH was adjusted to 2.5, sample was preconcentrated on a C18 cartridge and eluted with 4 mL of methanol/ammonia (94/6). The methanolic extract must be diluted up to 10 mL with water to allow quantitative retention of the analytes on the SAX cartridge. In the on-line format, the addition of 2.5% of NH4Cl to the sewage water sample (pH = 2.5) was necessary to increase the breakthrough volumes of the analytes in the C18 precolumn. Quantitative transfer of the (fluoro)quinolones from the C18 precolumn to the SAX precolumn was accomplished by pumping 2 mL of a mixture methanol/water (40/60, pH = 9.2) at 2 mL min(-1). Elution of the analytes from the SAX precolumn by means of the chromatographic mobile phase required the inclusion of an additional isocratic step at the beginning of the gradient program. Both off-line and on-line solid phase extraction procedures coupled to HPLC-UV were applied to the analysis of a sewage water sample collected in the sewer system at the output of the St Dimphna Hospital (Geel, Belgium). The fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin was found in this sample and quantified at 5.8 +/- 0.4 microg L(-1) (off-line method) and 5.6 +/- 0.5 microg L(-1) (on-line method). The analysis of spiked samples containing the seven (fluoro)quinolones studied provided quantitative recoveries in all cases with low RSD values (from 6 to 12%), and all the analytes could be identified by means of their UV spectra with match factors varying from 950 to 985 depending on the (fluoro)quinolone. PMID:15776928

  4. A study of the effects of aeroelastic divergence on the wing structure of an oblique-wing supersonic transport configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of transport aircraft with oblique wing flying at supersonic speeds are discussed. Aeroelastic divergence of the forward swept portion of the wing is analyzed. The effect of aspect ratio as a method for avoiding aeroelastic divergence is examined. A relatively low aspect ratio appears necessary for an oblique wing when constructed of conventional aluminum alloy materials. The aspect ratio may be increased by increasing the wing thickness ratio and by utilizing materials with higher moduli of elasticity and rigidity.

  5. A computational transonic flutter boundary tracking procedure. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallman, J. W.; Batina, J. T.; Yang, T. Y.

    1986-01-01

    An automated flutter boundary tracking procedure for the efficient calculation of transonic flutter boundaries is presented. The procedure uses aeroelastic responses to march along the boundary by taking steps in speed and Mach number, thereby reducing the number of response calculations previously required to determine a transonic flutter boundary. Flutter boundary results are presented for a typical airfoil section oscillating with pitch and plunge degrees of freedom. These transonic flutter boundaries are in good agreement with exact boundaries calculated using the conventional time-marching method. The tracking procedure is extended to include static aeroelastic twist as a simulation of the static deformation of a wing and contains all of the essential features that are required to apply it to practical three-dimensional cases. The procedure is also applied to flutter boundaries as a function of structural parameters.

  6. Evaluation of different extraction procedures for determination of organic Mercury species in petroleum by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yun, Zhaojun; He, Bin; Wang, Zhenhua; Wang, Thanh; Jiang, Guibin

    2013-03-15

    An extraction procedure for extracting organic mercury species including methylmercury (MeHg) and ethylmercury (EtHg) from petroleum samples was developed. Three extraction methods (shaking, ultrasonic and microwave assisted extraction) using different extraction solvents (TMAH, KOH/CH3OH, HCl and acidic CuSO4/KBr) were investigated by comparing the extraction efficiency of the organic mercury species. Microwave assisted extraction at 60 W for 5 min using TMAH (tetramethylammonium hydroxide, 25%, m/v) provided the most satisfactory extraction efficiency for MeHg and EtHg in petroleum at 86.7% ± 3.4% and 70.6% ± 5.9%, respectively. Speciation analysis of mercury was done by on-line coupling of high performance liquid chromatography with cold vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HPLC-CV-AFS). The proposed method was successfully applied to analyze several crude oil and light oil samples. The concentrations of MeHg ranged from under detection limit to 0.515 ng g(-1), whereas EtHg was not detected in the samples. This method can be a very useful tool in evaluating the risk of mercury emissions from petroleum. PMID:23598095

  7. Aeroelastic Analysis Of Joined Wing Of High Altitude Long Endurance (HALE) Aircraft Based On The Sensor-Craft Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marisarla, Soujanya; Ghia, Urmila; "Karman" Ghia, Kirti

    2002-11-01

    Towards a comprehensive aeroelastic analysis of a joined wing, fluid dynamics and structural analyses are initially performed separately. Steady flow calculations are currently performed using 3-D compressible Navier-Stokes equations. Flow analysis of M6-Onera wing served to validate the software for the fluid dynamics analysis. The complex flow field of the joined wing is analyzed and the prevailing fluid dynamic forces are computed using COBALT software. Currently, these forces are being transferred as fluid loads on the structure. For the structural analysis, several test cases were run considering the wing as a cantilever beam; these served as validation cases. A nonlinear structural analysis of the wing is being performed using ANSYS software to predict the deflections and stresses on the joined wing. Issues related to modeling, and selecting appropriate mesh for the structure were addressed by first performing a linear analysis. The frequencies and mode shapes of the deformed wing are obtained from modal analysis. Both static and dynamic analyses are carried out, and the results obtained are carefully analyzed. Loose coupling between the fluid and structural analyses is currently being examined.

  8. Small-Scale Vortical Motions induced by Aeroelastically Fluttering Reed for Enhanced Heat Transfer in a Rectangular Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Sourabh; Hidalgo, Pablo; Glezer, Ari

    2015-11-01

    Small-scale vortical motions effected by an aeroelastically fluttering thin reed cantilevered across the span of a rectangular channel are exploited for heat transfer enhancement at transitional Reynolds numbers. The reed's concave/convex surface undulations lead to the time-periodic formation, advection, and shedding of vorticity concentrations that scale with the motion amplitude. The reed motion is captured using phase-locked imaging and its interactions with the core flow and surface boundary layers are investigated using high-resolution PIV. Phase-averaged distributions of the reed's mechanical energy demonstrate variations of the vibration modes across the channel. The reed's impact on the surface is accompanied by transitory vorticity shedding coupled with a local increase in the turbulent kinetic energy that results in a strong increase in heat transfer. The reciprocal interactions between the reed dynamics and the channel flow are captured using cross stream velocity distributions along the channel (L/ W = 50) that link the kinetic energy shape factor to the rise in heat transfer (e.g., Nu) relative to the base flow. It is shown that the reed-induced heat transfer increases with Re and results in significant improvement in the global coefficient of performance. Supported by AFOSR.

  9. Aeroelastic analysis for helicopter rotors with blade appended pendulum vibration absorbers. Mathematical derivations and program user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielawa, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    Mathematical development is presented for the expanded capabilities of the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) G400 Rotor Aeroelastic Analysis. This expanded analysis, G400PA, simulates the dynamics of teetered rotors, blade pendulum vibration absorbers and the higher harmonic excitations resulting from prescribed vibratory hub motions and higher harmonic blade pitch control. Formulations are also presented for calculating the rotor impedance matrix appropriate to these higher harmonic blade excitations. This impedance matrix and the associated vibratory hub loads are intended as the rotor blade characteristics elements for use in the Simplified Coupled Rotor/Fuselage Vibration Analysis (SIMVIB). Sections are included presenting updates to the development of the original G400 theory, and material appropriate to the user of the G400PA computer program. This material includes: (1) a general descriptionof the tructuring of the G400PA FORTRAN coding, (2) a detaild description of the required input data and other useful information for successfully running the program, and (3) a detailed description of the output results.

  10. A modal aeroelastic analysis scheme for turbomachinery blading. M.S. Thesis - Case Western Reserve Univ. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Todd E.

    1991-01-01

    An aeroelastic analysis is developed which has general application to all types of axial-flow turbomachinery blades. The approach is based on linear modal analysis, where the blade's dynamic response is represented as a linear combination of contributions from each of its in-vacuum free vibrational modes. A compressible linearized unsteady potential theory is used to model the flow over the oscillating blades. The two-dimensional unsteady flow is evaluated along several stacked axisymmetric strips along the span of the airfoil. The unsteady pressures at the blade surface are integrated to result in the generalized force acting on the blade due to simple harmonic motions. The unsteady aerodynamic forces are coupled to the blade normal modes in the frequency domain using modal analysis. An iterative eigenvalue problem is solved to determine the stability of the blade when the unsteady aerodynamic forces are included in the analysis. The approach is demonstrated by applying it to a high-energy subsonic turbine blade from a rocket engine turbopump power turbine. The results indicate that this turbine could undergo flutter in an edgewise mode of vibration.

  11. Development of multidisciplinary design optimization procedures for smart composite wings and turbomachinery blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Ratneshwar

    Multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) procedures have been developed for smart composite wings and turbomachinery blades. The analysis and optimization methods used are computationally efficient and sufficiently rigorous. Therefore, the developed MDO procedures are well suited for actual design applications. The optimization procedure for the conceptual design of composite aircraft wings with surface bonded piezoelectric actuators involves the coupling of structural mechanics, aeroelasticity, aerodynamics and controls. The load carrying member of the wing is represented as a single-celled composite box beam. Each wall of the box beam is analyzed as a composite laminate using a refined higher-order displacement field to account for the variations in transverse shear stresses through the thickness. Therefore, the model is applicable for the analysis of composite wings of arbitrary thickness. Detailed structural modeling issues associated with piezoelectric actuation of composite structures are considered. The governing equations of motion are solved using the finite element method to analyze practical wing geometries. Three-dimensional aerodynamic computations are performed using a panel code based on the constant-pressure lifting surface method to obtain steady and unsteady forces. The Laplace domain method of aeroelastic analysis produces root-loci of the system which gives an insight into the physical phenomena leading to flutter/divergence and can be efficiently integrated within an optimization procedure. The significance of the refined higher-order displacement field on the aeroelastic stability of composite wings has been established. The effect of composite ply orientations on flutter and divergence speeds has been studied. The Kreisselmeier-Steinhauser (K-S) function approach is used to efficiently integrate the objective functions and constraints into a single envelope function. The resulting unconstrained optimization problem is solved using the

  12. U.S.-MEXICO BORDER PROGRAM ARIZONA BORDER STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR OPERATION, CALIBRATION, AND MAINTENANCE OF THE JOBIN-YVON MODEL 70 INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROMETER (BCO-L-7.1)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to detail the operation and maintenance of an Instruments, SA Inc., Jobin-Yvon Model 70 (JY-70) inductively coupled plasma atomic emissions spectrometry (ICP-AES). This procedure was followed to ensure consistent data retrieval during the Arizona NHEXA...

  13. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR OPERATION, CALIBRATION AND MAINTENANCE OF THE JOBIN-YVON MODEL 70 INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETER (BCO-L-7.1)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to detail the operation and maintenance of an Instruments, SA Inc., Jobin-Yvon Model 70 (JY-70) inductively coupled plasma atomic emissions spectrometry (ICP-AES). This procedure was followed to ensure consistent data retrieval during the Arizona NHEXA...

  14. Development of a Composite Tailoring Procedure for Airplane Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Aditi

    2000-01-01

    The quest for finding optimum solutions to engineering problems has existed for a long time. In modern times, the development of optimization as a branch of applied mathematics is regarded to have originated in the works of Newton, Bernoulli and Euler. Venkayya has presented a historical perspective on optimization in [1]. The term 'optimization' is defined by Ashley [2] as a procedure "...which attempts to choose the variables in a design process so as formally to achieve the best value of some performance index while not violating any of the associated conditions or constraints". Ashley presented an extensive review of practical applications of optimization in the aeronautical field till about 1980 [2]. It was noted that there existed an enormous amount of published literature in the field of optimization, but its practical applications in industry were very limited. Over the past 15 years, though, optimization has been widely applied to address practical problems in aerospace design [3-5]. The design of high performance aerospace systems is a complex task. It involves the integration of several disciplines such as aerodynamics, structural analysis, dynamics, and aeroelasticity. The problem involves multiple objectives and constraints pertaining to the design criteria associated with each of these disciplines. Many important trade-offs exist between the parameters involved which are used to define the different disciplines. Therefore, the development of multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) techniques, in which different disciplines and design parameters are coupled into a closed loop numerical procedure, seems appropriate to address such a complex problem. The importance of MDO in successful design of aerospace systems has been long recognized. Recent developments in this field have been surveyed by Sobieszczanski-Sobieski and Haftka [6].

  15. CEAS/AIAA/ICASE/NASA Langley International Forum on Aeroelasticity and Structural Dynamics 1999. Pt. 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlow, Jr., Woodrow (Editor); Todd, Emily N. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The proceedings of a workshop sponsored by the Confederation of European Aerospace Societies (CEAS), the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Washington, D.C., and the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering (ICASE), Hampton, Virginia, and held in Williamsburg, Virginia June 22-25, 1999 represent a collection of the latest advances in aeroelasticity and structural dynamics from the world community. Research in the areas of unsteady aerodynamics and aeroelasticity, structural modeling and optimization, active control and adaptive structures, landing dynamics, certification and qualification, and validation testing are highlighted in the collection of papers. The wide range of results will lead to advances in the prediction and control of the structural response of aircraft and spacecraft.

  16. Material and Thickness Grading for Aeroelastic Tailoring of the Common Research Model Wing Box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, Bret K.; Jutte, Christine V.

    2014-01-01

    This work quantifies the potential aeroelastic benefits of tailoring a full-scale wing box structure using tailored thickness distributions, material distributions, or both simultaneously. These tailoring schemes are considered for the wing skins, the spars, and the ribs. Material grading utilizes a spatially-continuous blend of two metals: Al and Al+SiC. Thicknesses and material fraction variables are specified at the 4 corners of the wing box, and a bilinear interpolation is used to compute these parameters for the interior of the planform. Pareto fronts detailing the conflict between static aeroelastic stresses and dynamic flutter boundaries are computed with a genetic algorithm. In some cases, a true material grading is found to be superior to a single-material structure.

  17. An improved CAMRAD model for aeroelastic stability analysis of the XV-15 with advanced technology blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acree, C. W., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    In pursuit of higher performance, the XV-15 Tiltrotor Research Aircraft was modified by the installation of new composite rotor blades. Initial flights with the Advanced Technology Blades (ATB's) revealed excessive rotor control loads that were traced to a dynamic mismatch between the blades and the aircraft control system. The analytical models of both the blades and the mechanical controls were extensively revised for use by the CAMRAD computer program to better predict aeroelastic stability and loads. This report documents the most important revisions and discusses their effects on aeroelastic stability predictions for airplane-mode flight. The ATB's may be flown in several different configurations for research, including changes in blade sweep and tip twist. The effects on stability of 1 deg and 0 deg sweep are illustrated, as are those of twisted and zero-twist tips. This report also discusses the effects of stiffening the rotor control system, which was done by locking out lateral cyclic swashplate motion with shims.

  18. Aeroelastic response of metallic and composite propfan models in yawed flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaza, Krishna Rao V.; Williams, Marc H.; Mehmed, Oral; Nerayanan, G. V.

    1988-01-01

    An analytical investigation of aeroelastic response of metallic and composite propfan models in yawed flow was performed. The analytical model is based on the normal modes of a rotating blade and the three dimensional unsteady lifting surface aerodynamic theory including blade mistuning. The calculated blade stresses or strains are compared with published wind tunnel data on two metallic and three composite propfan wind tunnel models. The comparison shows a good agreement between theory and experiment. Additional parametric results indicate that blade response is very sensitive to the blade stiffness and also to blade frequency and mode shape mistuning. From these findings, it is concluded that both frequency and mode shape mistuning should be included in aeroelastic response analysis. Furthermore, both calculated and measured strains show that combined blade frequency and mode shape mistuning has beneficial effects on response due to yawed flow.

  19. Effect of randomness on multi-frequency aeroelastic responses resolved by Unsteady Adaptive Stochastic Finite Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Witteveen, Jeroen A.S. Bijl, Hester

    2009-10-01

    The Unsteady Adaptive Stochastic Finite Elements (UASFE) method resolves the effect of randomness in numerical simulations of single-mode aeroelastic responses with a constant accuracy in time for a constant number of samples. In this paper, the UASFE framework is extended to multi-frequency responses and continuous structures by employing a wavelet decomposition pre-processing step to decompose the sampled multi-frequency signals into single-frequency components. The effect of the randomness on the multi-frequency response is then obtained by summing the results of the UASFE interpolation at constant phase for the different frequency components. Results for multi-frequency responses and continuous structures show a three orders of magnitude reduction of computational costs compared to crude Monte Carlo simulations in a harmonically forced oscillator, a flutter panel problem, and the three-dimensional transonic AGARD 445.6 wing aeroelastic benchmark subject to random fields and random parameters with various probability distributions.

  20. Aeroelastic Studies of a Rectangular Wing with a Hole: Correlation of Theory and Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conyers, Howard J.; Dowell, Earl H.; Hall, Kenneth C.

    2010-01-01

    Two rectangular wing models with a hole have been designed and tested in the Duke University wind tunnel to better understand the effects of damage. A rectangular hole is used to simulate damage. The wing with a hole is modeled structurally as a thin elastic plate using the finite element method. The unsteady aerodynamics of the plate-like wing with a hole is modeled using the doublet lattice method. The aeroelastic equations of motion are derived using Lagrange's equation. The flutter boundary is found using the V-g method. The hole's location effects the wing's mass, stiffness, aerodynamics and therefore the aeroelastic behavior. Linear theoretical models were shown to be capable of predicting the critical flutter velocity and frequency as verified by wind tunnel tests.

  1. Aeroelastic analysis and ground vibration survey of the NASA, Grumman American Yankee modified for spin testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroeger, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    A complete ground vibration and aeroelastic analysis was made of a modified version of the Grumman American Yankee. The aircraft had been modified for four empennage configurations, a wing boom was added, a spin chute installed and provisions included for large masses in the wing tip to vary the lateral and directional inertia. Other minor changes were made which have much less influence on the flutter and vibrations. Neither static divergence nor aileron reversal was considered since the wing structure was not sufficiently changed to affect its static aeroelastic qualities. The aircraft was found to be free from flutter in all of the normal modes explored in the ground shake test. The analysis demonstrated freedom from flutter up to 214 miles per hour.

  2. Aeroelastic stability and control of an oblique wing - Wind tunnel experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented for wind tunnel tests of an elastic wing model to verify the theoretical predictions for the aeroelastic instability of an oblique wing. The model wing has an elliptic planform of 10 to 1 axis ratio and a symmetrical airfoil section of 7-1/2% thickness/chord ratio. The wing is of wood and as may be seen in the photographs presented, slack wires are used to limit the amplitude of unstable motions. The fuselage is mounted on bearings permitting freedom of roll, but provision is made to clamp the fuselage for some of the tests. It is found that freedom in roll increases the dynamic pressure at which aeroelastic instability first appears. With the model free in roll, the effectiveness of the ailerons in maintaining trim is not noticeably affected by passage through the speed at which the wing would become unstable if clamped.

  3. Aeroelastic modeling for the FIT (Functional Integration Technology) team F/A-18 simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeiler, Thomas A.; Wieseman, Carol D.

    1989-01-01

    As part of Langley Research Center's commitment to developing multidisciplinary integration methods to improve aerospace systems, the Functional Integration Technology (FIT) team was established to perform dynamics integration research using an existing aircraft configuration, the F/A-18. An essential part of this effort has been the development of a comprehensive simulation modeling capability that includes structural, control, and propulsion dynamics as well as steady and unsteady aerodynamics. The structural and unsteady aerodynamics contributions come from an aeroelastic mode. Some details of the aeroelastic modeling done for the Functional Integration Technology (FIT) team research are presented. Particular attention is given to work done in the area of correction factors to unsteady aerodynamics data.

  4. Application of the ASP3D Computer Program to Unsteady Aerodynamic and Aeroelastic Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, John T.

    2006-01-01

    A new computer program has been developed called ASP3D (Advanced Small Perturbation - 3D), which solves the small perturbation potential flow equation in an advanced form including mass-consistent surface and trailing wake boundary conditions, and entropy, vorticity, and viscous effects. The purpose of the program is for unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analyses, especially in the nonlinear transonic flight regime. The program exploits the simplicity of stationary Cartesian meshes with the movement or deformation of the configuration under consideration incorporated into the solution algorithm through a planar surface boundary condition. The paper presents unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic applications of ASP3D to assess the time dependent capability and demonstrate various features of the code.

  5. Multivariable flight control synthesis and literal robustness analysis for an aeroelastic vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, David K.; Newman, Brett

    1990-01-01

    An integrated flight/aeroelastic control law is developed analytically for a hypothetical large supersonic transport aircraft in which the first aeroelastic mode frequency of the fuselage (6 rad/sec) is near the short-period mode (2 rad/sec). The approach employed is based on a linear-quadratic-regulator (LQR) formulation (yielding model-following state-feedback gains), followed by asymptotic loop-transfer recovery of LQR robustness (to produce an output-feedback control law). The derivation is outlined, and numerical results comparing the performance and multivariate stability robustness of the present controller with those of a classical controller are presented in graphs. The two controllers are shown to have similar characteristics, even with respect to the sources of limitations on robustness.

  6. Aeroelastic optimization of a helicopter rotor using an efficient sensitivity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Joon W.; Chopra, Inderjit

    1990-01-01

    To reduce oscillatory hub loads in forward flight, a structural optimization analysis of a hingeless helicopter rotor has been developed and applied. The aeroelastic analysis of the rotor is based on a finite element method in space and time, and linked with automated optimization algorithms. For the optimization analysis two types of structural representation are used: a generic stiffness-distribution and a single-cell thin-walled beam. For the first type, the design variables are nonstructural mass and its placement, chordwise center of gravity offset from the elastic axis, and stiffness. For the second type, width, height and thickness of spar are used as design variables. For the behavior constraints, frequency placement, autorotational inertia and aeroelastic stability of the blade are included. The required sensitivity derivatives are obtained using a direct analytical approach. An optimum oscillatory hub load shows a 25-77 percent reduction for the generic blade, and 30-50 percent reduction for the box-beam.

  7. Unsteady transonic flow calculations for two-dimensional canard-wing configurations with aeroelastic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, J. T.

    1985-01-01

    Unsteady transonic flow calculations for aerodynamically interfering airfoil configurations are performed as a first-step toward solving the three-dimensional canard-wing interaction problem. These calculations are performed by extending the XTRAN2L two-dimensional unsteady transonic small-disturbance code to include an additional airfoil. Unsteady transonic forces due to plunge and pitch motions of a two-dimensional canard and wing are presented. Results for a variety of canard-wing separation distances reveal the effects of aerodynamic interference on unsteady transonic airloads. Aeroelastic analyses employing these unsteady airloads demonstrate the effects of aerodynamic interference on aeroelastic stability and flutter. For the configurations studied, increases in wing flutter speed result with the inclusion of the aerodynamically interfering canard.

  8. Unsteady transonic flow calculations for two-dimensional canard-wing configurations with aeroelastic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, J. T.

    1985-01-01

    Unsteady transonic flow calculations for aerodynamically interfering airfoil configurations are performed as a first step toward solving the three dimensional canard wing interaction problem. These calculations are performed by extending the XTRAN2L two dimensional unsteady transonic small disturbance code to include an additional airfoil. Unsteady transonic forces due to plunge and pitch motions of a two dimensional canard and wing are presented. Results for a variety of canard wing separation distances reveal the effects of aerodynamic interference on unsteady transonic airloads. Aeroelastic analyses employing these unsteady airloads demonstrate the effects of aerodynamic interference on aeroelastic stability and flutter. For the configurations studied, increases in wing flutter speed result with the inclusion of the aerodynamically interfering canard.

  9. Determining XV-15 aeroelastic modes from flight data with frequency-domain methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acree, C. W., Jr.; Tischler, Mark B.

    1993-01-01

    The XV-15 tilt-rotor wing has six major aeroelastic modes that are close in frequency. To precisely excite individual modes during flight test, dual flaperon exciters with automatic frequency-sweep controls were installed. The resulting structural data were analyzed in the frequency domain (Fourier transformed). All spectral data were computed using chirp z-transforms. Modal frequencies and damping were determined by fitting curves to frequency-response magnitude and phase data. The results given in this report are for the XV-15 with its original metal rotor blades. Also, frequency and damping values are compared with theoretical predictions made using two different programs, CAMRAD and ASAP. The frequency-domain data-analysis method proved to be very reliable and adequate for tracking aeroelastic modes during flight-envelope expansion. This approach required less flight-test time and yielded mode estimations that were more repeatable, compared with the exponential-decay method previously used.

  10. Multi-mycotoxin analysis in eggs using a QuEChERS-based extraction procedure and ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Frenich, Antonia Garrido; Romero-González, Roberto; Gómez-Pérez, María Luz; Vidal, José Luis Martínez

    2011-07-15

    A reliable and rapid method has been developed for the determination of 10 mycotoxins (beauvericin, enniatin A, A1, B1, citrinin, aflatoxin B1, B2, G1, G2 and ochratoxin A) in eggs at trace levels. Ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) has been used for the analysis of these compounds in less than 7 min. Mycotoxins have been extracted from egg samples using a QuEChERS-based extraction procedure (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe) without applying any further clean-up step. Extraction, chromatographic and detection conditions were optimised in order to increase sample throughput and sensitivity. Matrix-matched calibration was used for quantification. Blank samples were fortified at 10, 25, 50 and 100 μg kg(-1), and recoveries ranged from 70% to 110%, except for ochratoxin A and aflatoxin G1 at 10 μg kg(-1), and aflatoxin G2 at 50 μg kg(-1). Relative standard deviations were lower than 25% in all the cases. Limits of detection ranged from 0.5 μg kg(-1) (for aflatoxins B1, B2 and G1) to 5 μg kg(-1) (for enniatin A, citrinin and ochratoxin A) and limits of quantification ranged from 1 μg kg(-1) (for aflatoxins B1, B2 and G1) to 10 μg kg(-1) (for enniatin A, citrinin and ochratoxin A). Seven samples were analyzed and aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, G2, and beauvericin were detected at trace levels. PMID:21621786

  11. A micro trapping system coupled with a high performance liquid chromatography procedure for methylamine determination in both tissue and cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongqian; Mao, Jian; Yu, Peter H; Xiao, Shengyuan

    2012-11-01

    Both endogenous and exogenous methylamine have been found to be involved in many human disorders. The quantitative assessment of methylamine has drawn considerable interest in recent years. Although there have been many papers about the determination of methylamine, only a few of them involved cigarette smoke or mammalian tissue analysis. The major hurdles of the determination of methylamine are the collection of methylamine from samples and the differentiation of methylamine from the background compounds, e.g., biogenic amines. We have solved this problem using a micro trapping system coupled with an HPLC procedure. The interference from other biogenic amines has been avoided. The high selectivity of this method was achieved using four techniques: distillation, trapping, HPLC separation and selective detection. The chromatograms of both mouse tissues and cigarette smoke are simple, with only a few peaks. The method is easy and efficient and it has been validated and applied to the determination of methylamine in tissues of normal CD 1 mice and cigarette smoke. The methylamine contents were determined to be approximately 268.3 ng g(-1) in the liver, 429.5 ng g(-1) in the kidney and 547.4 ng g(-1) in the brain respectively. The methylamine in the cigarette smoke was approximately 213 ng to 413 ng per cigarette. These results in tissues and in cigarette smoke were found to be consistent with the data in the previous literature. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on a method suitable for methylamine analysis in both mammalian tissue and cigarette smoke. PMID:23101659

  12. Loads and Aeroelasticity Division research and technology accomplishments for FY 1986 and plans for FY 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, James E.; Dixon, S. C.

    1987-01-01

    The Loads and Aeroelasticity Division's research accomplishments for FY 86 and research plans for FY 87 are presented. The work under each Branch (technical area) is described in terms of highlights of accomplishments during the past year and highlights of plans for the current year as they relate to five year plans for each technical area. This information will be useful in program coordination with other government organizations and industry in areas of mutual interest.

  13. Loads and aeroelasticity division research and technology accomplishments for FY 1987 and plans for FY 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, S. C.; Gardner, James E.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the Loads and Aeroelasticity Division's research accomplishments for FY87 and research plans for FY88. The work under each Branch (technical area) is described in terms of highlights of accomplishments during the past year and highlights of plans for the current year as they relate to five year plans for each technical area. This information will be useful in program coordination with other government organizations and industry in areas of mutual interest.

  14. Aeroelastic, CFD, and Dynamics Computation and Optimization for Buffet and Flutter Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.

    1997-01-01

    Accomplishments achieved during the reporting period are listed. These accomplishments included 6 papers published in various journals or presented at various conferences; 1 abstract submitted to a technical conference; production of 2 animated movies; and a proposal for use of the National Aerodynamic Simulation Facility at NASA Ames Research Center for further research. The published and presented papers and animated movies addressed the following topics: aeroelasticity, computational fluid dynamics, structural dynamics, wing and tail buffet, vortical flow interactions, and delta wings.

  15. Loads and aeroelasticity division research and technology accomplishments for FY 1983 and plans for FY 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, J. E.; Dixon, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    Research was done in the following areas: development and validation of solution algorithms, modeling techniques, integrated finite elements for flow-thermal-structural analysis and design, optimization of aircraft and spacecraft for the best performance, reduction of loads and increase in the dynamic structural stability of flexible airframes by the use of active control, methods for predicting steady and unsteady aerodynamic loads and aeroelastic characteristics of flight vehicles with emphasis on the transonic range, and methods for predicting and reducing helicoper vibrations.

  16. Development of Advanced Computational Aeroelasticity Tools at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, R. E.

    2008-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has continued to develop its long standing computational tools to address new challenges in aircraft and launch vehicle design. This paper discusses the application and development of those computational aeroelastic tools. Four topic areas will be discussed: 1) Modeling structural and flow field nonlinearities; 2) Integrated and modular approaches to nonlinear multidisciplinary analysis; 3) Simulating flight dynamics of flexible vehicles; and 4) Applications that support both aeronautics and space exploration.

  17. Loads and aeroelasticity division research and technology accomplishments for FY 1985 and plans for FY 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, J. E.; Dixon, S. C.

    1986-01-01

    The Langley Research Center Loads and Aeroelasticity Division's research accomplishments for FY85 and research plans for FY86 are presented. The rk under each branch (technical area) will be described in terms of highlights of accomplishments during the past year and highlights of plans for the current year as they relate to five year plans for each technical area. This information will be useful in program coordination with other government organizations and industry in areas of mutual interest.

  18. Loads and Aeroelasticity Division research and technology accomplishments for FY 1984 and plans for FY 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, J. E.; Dixon, S. C.

    1985-01-01

    The loads and aeroelasticity divisions research accomplishments are presented. The work under each branch or technical area, described in terms of highlights of accomplishments during the past year and highlights of plans for the current year as they relate to 5 year plans for each technical area. This information will be useful in program coordination with other government organizations and industry in areas of mutual interest.

  19. Aeroelastic loads prediction for an arrow wing. Task 2: Evaluation of semi-empirical methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wery, A. C.; Kulfan, R. M.; Manro, M. E.

    1983-01-01

    The development and evaluation of a semi empirical method to predict pressure distributions on a deformed wing by using an experimental data base in addition to a linear potential flow solution is described. The experimental data accounts for the effects of aeroelasticity by relating the pressures to a parameter which is influenced by the deflected shape. Several parameters were examined before the net leading edge suction coefficient was selected as the best.

  20. Optimum Aeroelastic Design of Resonance Type Flapping Wing for Micro Air Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isogai, Koji; Kamisawa, Yuichi; Sato, Hiroyuki

    The optimum aeroelastic design method for a resonance-type flapping wing for a Micro Air Vehicle (MAV) is presented. It uses Complex Method and 3D Navier-Stokes code to determine the optimum structural and aerodynamic parameters of a 2 DOF flapping wing system. The method is used to design a dragonfly-type MAV, and numerical simulation shows that the designed flapping wings can generate sufficient lift to sustain the weight and sufficient thrust to overcome the body drag.

  1. Aeroelastic Deformation Measurements of Flap, Gap, and Overhang on a Semispan Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Liu, Tian-Shu; Garg, Sanjay; Ghee, Terence A.; Taylor, Nigel J.

    2001-01-01

    Single-camera, single-view videogrammetry has been used for the first time to determine static aeroelastic deformation of a slotted flap configuration on a semispan model at the National Transonic Facility (NTF). Deformation was determined by comparing wind-off to wind-on spatial data from targets placed on the main element, shroud, and flap of the model. Digitized video images from a camera were recorded and processed to automatically determine target image plane locations that were then corrected for sensor, lens, and frame grabber spatial errors. The videogrammetric technique used for the measurements presented here has been established at NASA facilities as the technique of choice when high-volume static aeroelastic data with minimum impact on data taking is required. However, the primary measurement at the NTF with this technique in the past has been the measurement of the static aeroelastic wing twist of the main wing element on full span models rather than for the measurement of component deformation. Considerations for using the videogrammetric technique for semispan component deformation measurements as well as representative results are presented.

  2. Hybrid state vector methods for structural dynamic and aeroelastic boundary value problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehman, L. L.

    1982-01-01

    A computational technique is developed that is suitable for performing preliminary design aeroelastic and structural dynamic analyses of large aspect ratio lifting surfaces. The method proves to be quite general and can be adapted to solving various two point boundary value problems. The solution method, which is applicable to both fixed and rotating wing configurations, is based upon a formulation of the structural equilibrium equations in terms of a hybrid state vector containing generalized force and displacement variables. A mixed variational formulation is presented that conveniently yields a useful form for these state vector differential equations. Solutions to these equations are obtained by employing an integrating matrix method. The application of an integrating matrix provides a discretization of the differential equations that only requires solutions of standard linear matrix systems. It is demonstrated that matrix partitioning can be used to reduce the order of the required solutions. Results are presented for several example problems in structural dynamics and aeroelasticity to verify the technique and to demonstrate its use. These problems examine various types of loading and boundary conditions and include aeroelastic analyses of lifting surfaces constructed from anisotropic composite materials.

  3. FUN3D Analyses in Support of the First Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chwalowski, Pawel; Heeg, Jennifer; Wieseman, Carol D.; Florance, Jennifer P.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the computational aeroelastic results generated in support of the first Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop for the Benchmark Supercritical Wing (BSCW) and the HIgh REynolds Number AeroStructural Dynamics (HIRENASD) configurations and compares them to the experimental data. The computational results are obtained using FUN3D, an unstructured grid Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solver developed at NASA Langley Research Center. The analysis results for both configurations include aerodynamic coefficients and surface pressures obtained for steady-state or static aeroelastic equilibrium (BSCW and HIRENASD, respectively) and for unsteady flow due to a pitching wing (BSCW) or modally-excited wing (HIRENASD). Frequency response functions of the pressure coefficients with respect to displacement are computed and compared with the experimental data. For the BSCW, the shock location is computed aft of the experimentally-located shock position. The pressure distribution upstream of this shock is in excellent agreement with the experimental data, but the pressure downstream of the shock in the separated flow region does not match as well. For HIRENASD, very good agreement between the numerical results and the experimental data is observed at the mid-span wing locations.

  4. Internal Structural Design of the Common Research Model Wing Box for Aeroelastic Tailoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jutte, Christine V.; Stanford, Bret K.; Wieseman, Carol D.

    2015-01-01

    This work explores the use of alternative internal structural designs within a full-scale wing box structure for aeroelastic tailoring, with a focus on curvilinear spars, ribs, and stringers. The baseline wing model is a fully-populated, cantilevered wing box structure of the Common Research Model (CRM). Metrics of interest include the wing weight, the onset of dynamic flutter, and the static aeroelastic stresses. Twelve parametric studies alter the number of internal structural members along with their location, orientation, and curvature. Additional evaluation metrics are considered to identify design trends that lead to lighter-weight, aeroelastically stable wing designs. The best designs of the individual studies are compared and discussed, with a focus on weight reduction and flutter resistance. The largest weight reductions were obtained by removing the inner spar, and performance was maintained by shifting stringers forward and/or using curvilinear ribs: 5.6% weight reduction, a 13.9% improvement in flutter speed, but a 3.0% increase in stress levels. Flutter resistance was also maintained using straight-rotated ribs although the design had a 4.2% lower flutter speed than the curved ribs of similar weight and stress levels were higher. For some configurations, the differences between curved and straight ribs were smaller, which provides motivation for future optimization-based studies to fully exploit the trade-offs.

  5. Algorithm for Simulating Atmospheric Turbulence and Aeroelastic Effects on Simulator Motion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ercole, Anthony V.; Cardullo, Frank M.; Kelly, Lon C.; Houck, Jacob A.

    2012-01-01

    Atmospheric turbulence produces high frequency accelerations in aircraft, typically greater than the response to pilot input. Motion system equipped flight simulators must present cues representative of the aircraft response to turbulence in order to maintain the integrity of the simulation. Currently, turbulence motion cueing produced by flight simulator motion systems has been less than satisfactory because the turbulence profiles have been attenuated by the motion cueing algorithms. This report presents a new turbulence motion cueing algorithm, referred to as the augmented turbulence channel. Like the previous turbulence algorithms, the output of the channel only augments the vertical degree of freedom of motion. This algorithm employs a parallel aircraft model and an optional high bandwidth cueing filter. Simulation of aeroelastic effects is also an area where frequency content must be preserved by the cueing algorithm. The current aeroelastic implementation uses a similar secondary channel that supplements the primary motion cue. Two studies were conducted using the NASA Langley Visual Motion Simulator and Cockpit Motion Facility to evaluate the effect of the turbulence channel and aeroelastic model on pilot control input. Results indicate that the pilot is better correlated with the aircraft response, when the augmented channel is in place.

  6. Development and Testing of Control Laws for the Active Aeroelastic Wing Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dibley, Ryan P.; Allen, Michael J.; Clarke, Robert; Gera, Joseph; Hodgkinson, John

    2005-01-01

    The Active Aeroelastic Wing research program was a joint program between the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory and NASA established to investigate the characteristics of an aeroelastic wing and the technique of using wing twist for roll control. The flight test program employed the use of an F/A-18 aircraft modified by reducing the wing torsional stiffness and adding a custom research flight control system. The research flight control system was optimized to maximize roll rate using only wing surfaces to twist the wing while simultaneously maintaining design load limits, stability margins, and handling qualities. NASA Dryden Flight Research Center developed control laws using the software design tool called CONDUIT, which employs a multi-objective function optimization to tune selected control system design parameters. Modifications were made to the Active Aeroelastic Wing implementation in this new software design tool to incorporate the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center nonlinear F/A-18 simulation for time history analysis. This paper describes the design process, including how the control law requirements were incorporated into constraints for the optimization of this specific software design tool. Predicted performance is also compared to results from flight.

  7. Aeroelastic deployable wing simulation considering rotation hinge joint based on flexible multibody dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Keisuke; Makihara, Kanjuro

    2016-05-01

    Morphing wings have been developed by several organizations for a variety of applications including the changing of flight ability while in the air and reducing the amount of space required to store an aircraft. One such example of morphing wings is the deployable wing that is expected to be used for Mars exploration. When designing wings, aeroelastic simulation is important to prevent the occurrence of destructive phenomena while the wing is in use. Flutter and divergence are typical issues to be addressed. However, it has been difficult to simulate the aeroelastic motion of deployable wings because of the significant differences between these deployable wings and conventional designs. The most apparent difference is the kinematic constraints of deployment, typically a hinge joint. These constraints lead not only to deformation but also to rigid body rotation. This research provides a novel method of overcoming the difficulties associated with handling these kinematic constraints. The proposed method utilizes flexible multibody dynamics and absolute nodal coordinate formulation to describe the dynamic motion of a deployable wing. This paper presents the simulation of the rigid body rotation around the kinematic constraints as induced by the aeroelasticity. The practicality of the proposed method is confirmed.

  8. Aeroelastic Sizing for High-Speed Research (HSR) Longitudinal Control Alternatives Project (LCAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Joanne L.; Dunn, H. J.; Stroud, W. Jefferson; Barthelemy, J.-F.; Weston, Robert P.; Martin, Carl J.; Bennett, Robert M.

    2005-01-01

    The Longitudinal Control Alternatives Project (LCAP) compared three high-speed civil transport configurations to determine potential advantages of the three associated longitudinal control concepts. The three aircraft configurations included a conventional configuration with a layout having a horizontal aft tail, a configuration with a forward canard in addition to a horizontal aft tail, and a configuration with only a forward canard. The three configurations were aeroelastically sized and were compared on the basis of operational empty weight (OEW) and longitudinal control characteristics. The sized structure consisted of composite honeycomb sandwich panels on both the wing and the fuselage. Design variables were the core depth of the sandwich and the thicknesses of the composite material which made up the face sheets of the sandwich. Each configuration was sized for minimum structural weight under linear and nonlinear aeroelastic loads subject to strain, buckling, ply-mixture, and subsonic and supersonic flutter constraints. This report describes the methods that were used and the results that were generated for the aeroelastic sizing of the three configurations.

  9. LINFLUX-AE: A Turbomachinery Aeroelastic Code Based on a 3-D Linearized Euler Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.; Bakhle, M. A.; Trudell, J. J.; Mehmed, O.; Stefko, G. L.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the development and validation of LINFLUX-AE, a turbomachinery aeroelastic code based on the linearized unsteady 3-D Euler solver, LINFLUX. A helical fan with flat plate geometry is selected as the test case for numerical validation. The steady solution required by LINFLUX is obtained from the nonlinear Euler/Navier Stokes solver TURBO-AE. The report briefly describes the salient features of LINFLUX and the details of the aeroelastic extension. The aeroelastic formulation is based on a modal approach. An eigenvalue formulation is used for flutter analysis. The unsteady aerodynamic forces required for flutter are obtained by running LINFLUX for each mode, interblade phase angle and frequency of interest. The unsteady aerodynamic forces for forced response analysis are obtained from LINFLUX for the prescribed excitation, interblade phase angle, and frequency. The forced response amplitude is calculated from the modal summation of the generalized displacements. The unsteady pressures, work done per cycle, eigenvalues and forced response amplitudes obtained from LINFLUX are compared with those obtained from LINSUB, TURBO-AE, ASTROP2, and ANSYS.

  10. Unsteady aerodynamic flow field analysis of the space shuttle configuration. Part 2: Launch vehicle aeroelastic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reding, J. P.; Ericsson, L. E.

    1976-01-01

    An exploratory analysis has been made of the aeroelastic stability of the Space Shuttle Launch Configuration, with the objective of defining critical flow phenomena with adverse aeroelastic effects and developing simple analytic means of describing the time-dependent flow-interference effects so that they can be incorporated into a computer program to predict the aeroelastic stability of all free-free modes of the shuttle launch configuration. Three critical flow phenomana have been identified: (1) discontinuous jump of orbiter wing shock, (2) inlet flow between orbiter and booster, and (3) H.O. tank base flow. All involve highly nonlinear and often discontinuous aerodynamics which cause limit cycle oscillations of certain critical modes. Given the appropriate static data, the dynamic effects of the wing shock jump and the HO tank bulbous base effect can be analyzed using the developed quasi-steady techniques. However, further analytic and experimental efforts are required before the dynamic effects of the inlet flow phenomenon can be predicted for the shuttle launch configuration.

  11. Deflection-Based Structural Loads Estimation From the Active Aeroelastic Wing F/A-18 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lizotte, Andrew M.; Lokos, William A.

    2005-01-01

    Traditional techniques in structural load measurement entail the correlation of a known load with strain-gage output from the individual components of a structure or machine. The use of strain gages has proved successful and is considered the standard approach for load measurement. However, remotely measuring aerodynamic loads using deflection measurement systems to determine aeroelastic deformation as a substitute to strain gages may yield lower testing costs while improving aircraft performance through reduced instrumentation weight. This technique was examined using a reliable strain and structural deformation measurement system. The objective of this study was to explore the utility of a deflection-based load estimation, using the active aeroelastic wing F/A-18 aircraft. Calibration data from ground tests performed on the aircraft were used to derive left wing-root and wing-fold bending-moment and torque load equations based on strain gages, however, for this study, point deflections were used to derive deflection-based load equations. Comparisons between the strain-gage and deflection-based methods are presented. Flight data from the phase-1 active aeroelastic wing flight program were used to validate the deflection-based load estimation method. Flight validation revealed a strong bending-moment correlation and slightly weaker torque correlation. Development of current techniques, and future studies are discussed.

  12. Real-time simulation of aeroelastic rotor loads for horizontal axis wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marnett, M.; Wellenberg, S.; Schröder, W.

    2014-06-01

    Wind turbine drivetrain research and test facilities with hardware-in-the-loop capabilities require a robust and accurate aeroelastic real-time rotor simulation environment. Recent simulation environments do not guarantee a computational response at real-time. Which is why a novel simulation tool has been developed. It resolves the physical time domain of the turbulent wind spectra and the operational response of the turbine at real-time conditions. Therefore, there is a trade-off between accuracy of the physical models and the computational costs. However, the study shows the possibility to preserve the necessary computational accuracy while simultaneously granting dynamic interaction with the aeroelastic rotor simulation environment. The achieved computational costs allow a complete aeroelastic rotor simulation at a resolution frequency of 100 Hz on standard computer platforms. Results obtained for the 5-MW reference wind turbine by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are discussed and compared to NREL's fatigue, aerodynamics, structures, and turbulence (FAST)- Code. The rotor loads show a convincing match. The novel simulation tool is applied to the wind turbine drivetrain test facility at the Center for Wind Power Drives (CWD), RWTH Aachen University to show the real-time hardware-in-the-loop capabilities.

  13. Aeroelasticity of Axially Loaded Aerodynamic Structures for Truss-Braced Wing Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Ting, Eric; Lebofsky, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an aeroelastic finite-element formulation for axially loaded aerodynamic structures. The presence of axial loading causes the bending and torsional sitffnesses to change. For aircraft with axially loaded structures such as the truss-braced wing aircraft, the aeroelastic behaviors of such structures are nonlinear and depend on the aerodynamic loading exerted on these structures. Under axial strain, a tensile force is created which can influence the stiffness of the overall aircraft structure. This tension stiffening is a geometric nonlinear effect that needs to be captured in aeroelastic analyses to better understand the behaviors of these types of aircraft structures. A frequency analysis of a rotating blade structure is performed to demonstrate the analytical method. A flutter analysis of a truss-braced wing aircraft is performed to analyze the effect of geometric nonlinear effect of tension stiffening on the flutter speed. The results show that the geometric nonlinear tension stiffening effect can have a significant impact on the flutter speed prediction. In general, increased wing loading results in an increase in the flutter speed. The study illustrates the importance of accounting for the geometric nonlinear tension stiffening effect in analyzing the truss-braced wing aircraft.

  14. Enhanced Modeling of First-Order Plant Equations of Motion for Aeroelastic and Aeroservoelastic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pototzky, Anthony S.

    2010-01-01

    A methodology is described for generating first-order plant equations of motion for aeroelastic and aeroservoelastic applications. The description begins with the process of generating data files representing specialized mode-shapes, such as rigid-body and control surface modes, using both PATRAN and NASTRAN analysis. NASTRAN executes the 146 solution sequence using numerous Direct Matrix Abstraction Program (DMAP) calls to import the mode-shape files and to perform the aeroelastic response analysis. The aeroelastic response analysis calculates and extracts structural frequencies, generalized masses, frequency-dependent generalized aerodynamic force (GAF) coefficients, sensor deflections and load coefficients data as text-formatted data files. The data files are then re-sequenced and re-formatted using a custom written FORTRAN program. The text-formatted data files are stored and coefficients for s-plane equations are fitted to the frequency-dependent GAF coefficients using two Interactions of Structures, Aerodynamics and Controls (ISAC) programs. With tabular files from stored data created by ISAC, MATLAB generates the first-order aeroservoelastic plant equations of motion. These equations include control-surface actuator, turbulence, sensor and load modeling. Altitude varying root-locus plot and PSD plot results for a model of the F-18 aircraft are presented to demonstrate the capability.

  15. Flight Test of the F/A-18 Active Aeroelastic Wing Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Robert; Allen, Michael J.; Dibley, Ryan P.; Gera, Joseph; Hodgkinson, John

    2005-01-01

    Successful flight-testing of the Active Aeroelastic Wing airplane was completed in March 2005. This program, which started in 1996, was a joint activity sponsored by NASA, Air Force Research Laboratory, and industry contractors. The test program contained two flight test phases conducted in early 2003 and early 2005. During the first phase of flight test, aerodynamic models and load models of the wing control surfaces and wing structure were developed. Design teams built new research control laws for the Active Aeroelastic Wing airplane using these flight-validated models; and throughout the final phase of flight test, these new control laws were demonstrated. The control laws were designed to optimize strategies for moving the wing control surfaces to maximize roll rates in the transonic and supersonic flight regimes. Control surface hinge moments and wing loads were constrained to remain within hydraulic and load limits. This paper describes briefly the flight control system architecture as well as the design approach used by Active Aeroelastic Wing project engineers to develop flight control system gains. Additionally, this paper presents flight test techniques and comparison between flight test results and predictions.

  16. Twist Model Development and Results From the Active Aeroelastic Wing F/A-18 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lizotte, Andrew; Allen, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the wing twist of the active aeroelastic wing F/A-18 aircraft is a fundamental research objective for the program and offers numerous benefits. In order to clearly understand the wing flexibility characteristics, a model was created to predict real-time wing twist. A reliable twist model allows the prediction of twist for flight simulation, provides insight into aircraft performance uncertainties, and assists with computational fluid dynamic and aeroelastic issues. The left wing of the aircraft was heavily instrumented during the first phase of the active aeroelastic wing program allowing deflection data collection. Traditional data processing steps were taken to reduce flight data, and twist predictions were made using linear regression techniques. The model predictions determined a consistent linear relationship between the measured twist and aircraft parameters, such as surface positions and aircraft state variables. Error in the original model was reduced in some cases by using a dynamic pressure-based assumption and by using neural networks. These techniques produced excellent predictions for flight between the standard test points and accounted for nonlinearities in the data. This report discusses data processing techniques and twist prediction validation, and provides illustrative and quantitative results.

  17. Twist Model Development and Results from the Active Aeroelastic Wing F/A-18 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lizotte, Andrew M.; Allen, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the wing twist of the active aeroelastic wing (AAW) F/A-18 aircraft is a fundamental research objective for the program and offers numerous benefits. In order to clearly understand the wing flexibility characteristics, a model was created to predict real-time wing twist. A reliable twist model allows the prediction of twist for flight simulation, provides insight into aircraft performance uncertainties, and assists with computational fluid dynamic and aeroelastic issues. The left wing of the aircraft was heavily instrumented during the first phase of the active aeroelastic wing program allowing deflection data collection. Traditional data processing steps were taken to reduce flight data, and twist predictions were made using linear regression techniques. The model predictions determined a consistent linear relationship between the measured twist and aircraft parameters, such as surface positions and aircraft state variables. Error in the original model was reduced in some cases by using a dynamic pressure-based assumption. This technique produced excellent predictions for flight between the standard test points and accounted for nonlinearities in the data. This report discusses data processing techniques and twist prediction validation, and provides illustrative and quantitative results.

  18. Application of fluid-structure coupling to predict the dynamic behavior of turbine components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübner, B.; Seidel, U.; Roth, S.

    2010-08-01

    In hydro turbine design, fluid-structure interaction (FSI) may play an important role. Examples are flow induced inertia and damping effects, vortex induced vibrations in the lock-in vicinity, or hydroelastic instabilities of flows in deforming gaps (e.g. labyrinth seals). In contrast to aeroelasticity, hydroelastic systems require strongly (iteratively) coupled or even monolithic solution procedures, since the fluid mass which is moving with the structure (added-mass effect) is much higher and changes the dynamic behavior of submerged structures considerably. Depending on the mode shape, natural frequencies of a turbine runner in water may be reduced to less than 50% of the corresponding frequencies in air, and flow induced damping effects may become one or two orders of magnitude higher than structural damping. In order to reduce modeling effort and calculation time, the solution strategy has to be adapted precisely to a given application. Hence, depending on the problem to solve, different approximations may apply. Examples are the calculation of natural frequencies and response spectra in water using an acoustic fluid formulation, the determination of flow induced damping effects by means of partitioned FSI including complex turbulent flows, and the identification of hydroelastic instabilities using monolithic coupling of non-linear structural dynamics and water flow.

  19. An investigation of supersonic aeroelastic characteristics of oblique winged aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisshaar, T. A.

    1975-01-01

    Two formulations of the oblique wing flutter problem are presented: one formulation allows wing bending deformations and the rigid body roll degree of freedom while the second formulation includes bending-torsional deformation and roll degrees of freedom. Flutter is found to occur in two basic modes. The first mode is associated with bending-roll coupling and occurs at low reduced frequency values. The other instability mode is primarily one of classical bending-torsion with negligible roll coupling; this mode occurs at much higher reduced frequencies. The occurrence of bending-roll coupling mode leads to lower flutter speeds while the bending-torsion mode is associated with higher flutter speeds. The ratio of the wing mass moment of inertial in roll to the fuselage moment of inertia evidently plays a major role in the determination of which of the two instabilities is critical.

  20. High-Performance Parallel Analysis of Coupled Problems for Aircraft Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felippa, C. A.; Farhat, C.; Park, K. C.; Gumaste, U.; Chen, P.-S.; Lesoinne, M.; Stern, P.

    1997-01-01

    Applications are described of high-performance computing methods to the numerical simulation of complete jet engines. The methodology focuses on the partitioned analysis of the interaction of the gas flow with a flexible structure and with the fluid mesh motion driven by structural displacements. The latter is treated by a ALE technique that models the fluid mesh motion as that of a fictitious mechanical network laid along the edges of near-field elements. New partitioned analysis procedures to treat this coupled three-component problem were developed. These procedures involved delayed corrections and subcycling, and have been successfully tested on several massively parallel computers, including the iPSC-860, Paragon XP/S and the IBM SP2. The NASA-sponsored ENG10 program was used for the global steady state analysis of the whole engine. This program uses a regular FV-multiblock-grid discretization in conjunction with circumferential averaging to include effects of blade forces, loss, combustor heat addition, blockage, bleeds and convective mixing. A load-balancing preprocessor for parallel versions of ENG10 was developed as well as the capability for the first full 3D aeroelastic simulation of a multirow engine stage. This capability was tested on the IBM SP2 parallel supercomputer at NASA Ames.

  1. Subspace Iteration Method for Complex Eigenvalue Problems with Nonsymmetric Matrices in Aeroelastic System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-gi; Lung, Shu

    2009-01-01

    Modern airplane design is a multidisciplinary task which combines several disciplines such as structures, aerodynamics, flight controls, and sometimes heat transfer. Historically, analytical and experimental investigations concerning the interaction of the elastic airframe with aerodynamic and in retia loads have been conducted during the design phase to determine the existence of aeroelastic instabilities, so called flutter .With the advent and increased usage of flight control systems, there is also a likelihood of instabilities caused by the interaction of the flight control system and the aeroelastic response of the airplane, known as aeroservoelastic instabilities. An in -house code MPASES (Ref. 1), modified from PASES (Ref. 2), is a general purpose digital computer program for the analysis of the closed-loop stability problem. This program used subroutines given in the International Mathematical and Statistical Library (IMSL) (Ref. 3) to compute all of the real and/or complex conjugate pairs of eigenvalues of the Hessenberg matrix. For high fidelity configuration, these aeroelastic system matrices are large and compute all eigenvalues will be time consuming. A subspace iteration method (Ref. 4) for complex eigenvalues problems with nonsymmetric matrices has been formulated and incorporated into the modified program for aeroservoelastic stability (MPASES code). Subspace iteration method only solve for the lowest p eigenvalues and corresponding eigenvectors for aeroelastic and aeroservoelastic analysis. In general, the selection of p is ranging from 10 for wing flutter analysis to 50 for an entire aircraft flutter analysis. The application of this newly incorporated code is an experiment known as the Aerostructures Test Wing (ATW) which was designed by the National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA) Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California to research aeroelastic instabilities. Specifically, this experiment was used to study an instability

  2. Aeroelastic Analysis of a Flexible Wing Wind Tunnel Model with Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Ting, Eric; Lebofsky, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents data analysis of a flexible wing wind tunnel model with a variable camber continuous trailing edge flap (VCCTEF) design for drag minimization tested at the University of Washington Aeronautical Laboratory (UWAL). The wind tunnel test was designed to explore the relative merit of the VCCTEF concept for improved cruise efficiency through the use of low-cost aeroelastic model test techniques. The flexible wing model is a 10%-scale model of a typical transport wing and is constructed of woven fabric composites and foam core. The wing structural stiffness in bending is tailored to be half of the stiffness of a Boeing 757-era transport wing while the torsional stiffness is about the same. This stiffness reduction results in a wing tip deflection of about 10% of the wing semi-span. The VCCTEF is a multi-segment flap design having three chordwise camber segments and five spanwise flap sections for a total of 15 individual flap elements. The three chordwise camber segments can be positioned appropriately to create a desired trailing edge camber. Elastomeric material is used to cover the gaps in between the spanwise flap sections, thereby creating a continuous trailing edge. Wind tunnel data analysis conducted previously shows that the VCCTEF can achieve a drag reduction of up to 6.31% and an improvement in the lift-to-drag ratio (L=D) of up to 4.85%. A method for estimating the bending and torsional stiffnesses of the flexible wingUWAL wind tunnel model from static load test data is presented. The resulting estimation indicates that the stiffness of the flexible wing is significantly stiffer in torsion than in bending by as much as 9 to 1. The lift prediction for the flexible wing is computed by a coupled aerodynamic-structural model. The coupled model is developed by coupling a conceptual aerodynamic tool Vorlax with a finite-element model of the flexible wing via an automated geometry deformation tool. Based on the comparison of the lift curve slope

  3. Global Nonlinear Analysis of Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting from Ambient and Aeroelastic Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelkefi, Abdessattar

    Converting vibrations to a usable form of energy has been the topic of many recent investigations. The ultimate goal is to convert ambient or aeroelastic vibrations to operate low-power consumption devices, such as microelectromechanical systems, heath monitoring sensors, wireless sensors or replacing small batteries that have a finite life span or would require hard and expensive maintenance. The transduction mechanisms used for transforming vibrations to electric power include: electromagnetic, electrostatic, and piezoelectric mechanisms. Because it can be used to harvest energy over a wide range of frequencies and because of its ease of application, the piezoelectric option has attracted significant interest. In this work, we investigate the performance of different types of piezoelectric energy harvesters. The objective is to design and enhance the performance of these harvesters. To this end, distributed-parameter and phenomenological models of these harvesters are developed. Global analysis of these models is then performed using modern methods of nonlinear dynamics. In the first part of this Dissertation, global nonlinear distributed-parameter models for piezoelectric energy harvesters under direct and parametric excitations are developed. The method of multiple scales is then used to derive nonlinear forms of the governing equations and associated boundary conditions, which are used to evaluate their performance and determine the effects of the nonlinear piezoelectric coefficients on their behavior in terms of softening or hardening. In the second part, we assess the influence of the linear and nonlinear parameters on the dynamic behavior of a wing-based piezoaeroelastic energy harvester. The system is composed of a rigid airfoil that is constrained to pitch and plunge and supported by linear and nonlinear torsional and flexural springs with a piezoelectric coupling attached to the plunge degree of freedom. Linear analysis is performed to determine the

  4. Transonic and Low-Supersonic Aeroelastic Analysis of a Two-Degree Airfoil with a Freeplay Non-Linearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KIM, DONG-HYUN; LEE, IN

    2000-07-01

    A two-degree-of-freedom airfoil with a freeplay non-linearity in the pitch and plunge directions has been analyzed in the transonic and low-supersonic flow region, where aerodynamic non-linearities also exist. The primary purpose of this study is to show aeroelastic characteristics due to freeplay structural non-linearity in the transonic and low-supersonic regions. The unsteady aerodynamic forces on the airfoil were evaluated using two-dimensional unsteady Euler code, and the resulting aeroelastic equations are numerically integrated to obtain the aeroelastic time responses of the airfoil motions and to investigate the dynamic instability. The present model has been considered as a simple aeroelastic model, which is equivalent to the folding fin of an advanced generic missile. From the results of the present study, characteristics of important vibration responses and aeroelastic instabilities can be observed in the transonic and supersonic regions, especially considering the effect of structural non-linearity in the pitch and plunge directions. The regions of limit-cycle oscillation are shown at much lower velocities, especially in the supersonic flow region, than the divergent flutter velocities of the linear structure model. It is also shown that even small freeplay angles can lead to severe dynamic instabilities and dangerous fatigue conditions for the flight vehicle wings and control fins.

  5. Development of Reduced-Order Models for Aeroelastic and Flutter Prediction Using the CFL3Dv6.0 Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Bartels, Robert E.

    2002-01-01

    A reduced-order model (ROM) is developed for aeroelastic analysis using the CFL3D version 6.0 computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, recently developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. This latest version of the flow solver includes a deforming mesh capability, a modal structural definition for nonlinear aeroelastic analyses, and a parallelization capability that provides a significant increase in computational efficiency. Flutter results for the AGARD 445.6 Wing computed using CFL3D v6.0 are presented, including discussion of associated computational costs. Modal impulse responses of the unsteady aerodynamic system are then computed using the CFL3Dv6 code and transformed into state-space form. Important numerical issues associated with the computation of the impulse responses are presented. The unsteady aerodynamic state-space ROM is then combined with a state-space model of the structure to create an aeroelastic simulation using the MATLAB/SIMULINK environment. The MATLAB/SIMULINK ROM is used to rapidly compute aeroelastic transients including flutter. The ROM shows excellent agreement with the aeroelastic analyses computed using the CFL3Dv6.0 code directly.

  6. Study of the feasibility aspects of flight testing an aeroelastically tailored forward swept research wing on a BQM-34F drone vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mourey, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    The aspects of flight testing an aeroelastically tailored forward swept research wing on a BQM-34F drone vehicle are examined. The geometry of a forward swept wing, which is incorporated into the BQM-34F to maintain satisfactory flight performance, stability, and control is defined. A preliminary design of the aeroelastically tailored forward swept wing is presented.

  7. STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES FOR LEAD IN PAINT BY HOTPLATE - OR MICROWAVE-BASED ACID DIGESTIONS AND ATOMIC ABSORPTION OR INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA EMISSION SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two extraction and two quantitation procedures are given for the quantative determination of lead in paints along with recommended QA/QC practices. he procedures were evaluated with 0.10 g samples of synthetic or old real-world paints that had been crushed or pulverized. oth extr...

  8. Aeroelastic modeling of rotor blades with spanwise variable elastic axis offset: Classic issues revisited and new formulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielawa, Richard L.

    1988-01-01

    In response to a systematic methodology assessment program directed to the aeroelastic stability of hingeless helicopter rotor blades, improved basic aeroelastic reformulations and new formulations relating to structural sweep were achieved. Correlational results are presented showing the substantially improved performance of the G400 aeroelastic analysis incorporating these new formulations. The formulations pertain partly to sundry solutions to classic problem areas, relating to dynamic inflow with vortex-ring state operation and basic blade kinematics, but mostly to improved physical modeling of elastic axis offset (structural sweep) in the presence of nonlinear structural twist. Specific issues addressed are an alternate modeling of the delta EI torsional excitation due to compound bending using a force integration approach, and the detailed kinematic representation of an elastically deflected point mass of a beam with both structural sweep and nonlinear twist.

  9. An Elasticity-Based Mesh Scheme Applied to the Computation of Unsteady Three-Dimensional Spoiler and Aeroelastic Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert E.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a modification of the spring analogy scheme which uses axial linear spring stiffness with selective spring stiffening/relaxation. An alternate approach to solving the geometric conservation law is taken which eliminates the need for storage of metric Jacobians at previous time steps. Efficiency and verification are illustrated with several unsteady 2-D airfoil Euler computations. The method is next applied to the computation of the turbulent flow about a 2-D airfoil and wing with two and three- dimensional moving spoiler surfaces, and the results compared with Benchmark Active Controls Technology (BACT) experimental data. The aeroelastic response at low dynamic pressure of an airfoil to a single large scale oscillation of a spoiler surface is computed. This study confirms that it is possible to achieve accurate solutions with a very large time step for aeroelastic problems using the fluid solver and aeroelastic integrator as discussed in this paper.

  10. Nonlinear Aeroelastic Analysis of the HIAD TPS Coupon in the NASA 8' High Temperature Tunnel: Theory and Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, Benjamin D.; Scott, Robert C,; Dowell, Earl H.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a set of theoretical and experimental techniques to characterize the aeroelasticity of the thermal protection system (TPS) on the NASA Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD). A square TPS coupon experiences trailing edge oscillatory behavior during experimental testing in the 8' High Temperature Tunnel (HTT), which may indicate the presence of aeroelastic flutter. Several theoretical aeroelastic models have been developed, each corresponding to a different experimental test configuration. Von Karman large deflection theory is used for the plate-like components of the TPS, along with piston theory for the aerodynamics. The constraints between the individual TPS layers and the presence of a unidirectional foundation at the back of the coupon are included by developing the necessary energy expressions and using the Rayleigh Ritz method to derive the nonlinear equations of motion. Free vibrations and limit cycle oscillations are computed and the frequencies and amplitudes are compared with accelerometer and photogrammetry data from the experiments.

  11. Further investigations of the aeroelastic behavior of the AFW wind-tunnel model using transonic small disturbance theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Bennett, Robert M.

    1992-01-01

    The Computational Aeroelasticity Program-Transonic Small Disturbance (CAP-TSD) code, developed at LaRC, is applied to the active flexible wing wind-tunnel model for prediction of transonic aeroelastic behavior. A semi-span computational model is used for evaluation of symmetric motions, and a full-span model is used for evaluation of antisymmetric motions, and a full-span model is used for evaluation of antisymmetric motions. Static aeroelastic solutions using CAP-TSD are computed. Dynamic deformations are presented as flutter boundaries in terms of Mach number and dynamic pressure. Flutter boundaries that take into account modal refinements, vorticity and entropy corrections, antisymmetric motion, and sensitivity to the modeling of the wing tip ballast stores are also presented with experimental flutter results.

  12. Parallel aeroelastic computations for wing and wing-body configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byun, Chansup

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop computationally efficient methods for solving fluid-structural interaction problems by directly coupling finite difference Euler/Navier-Stokes equations for fluids and finite element dynamics equations for structures on parallel computers. This capability will significantly impact many aerospace projects of national importance such as Advanced Subsonic Civil Transport (ASCT), where the structural stability margin becomes very critical at the transonic region. This research effort will have direct impact on the High Performance Computing and Communication (HPCC) Program of NASA in the area of parallel computing.

  13. Aeroelasticity and mechanical stability report, 0.27 Mach scale model of the YAH-64 advanced attack helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straub, F. K.; Johnston, R. A.

    1987-01-01

    A 27% dynamically scaled model of the YAH-64 Advanced Attack Helicopter main rotor and hub has been designed and fabricated. The model will be tested in the NASA Langley Research Center V/STOL wind tunnel using the General Rotor Model System (GRMS). This report documents the studies performed to ensure dynamic similarity of the model with its full scale parent. It also contains a preliminary aeroelastic and aeromechanical substantiation for the rotor installation in the wind tunnel. From the limited studies performed no aeroelastic stability or load problems are projected. To alleviate a projected ground resonance problem, a modification of the roll characteristics of the GRMS is recommended.

  14. Aeroelastic character of a National Aerospace Plane demonstrator concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spain, Charles V.; Zeiler, Thomas A.; Gibbons, Michael D.; Soistmann, David L.; Pozefsky, Peter; Dejesus, Rafael O.; Brannon, Cyprian P.

    1993-01-01

    The paper provides an analytical assessment of the flutter character of an unclassified National Aerospace Plane configuration known as the demonstrator. Linear subsonic, supersonic, and hypersonic analysis indicate that the vehicle is prone to body-freedom flutter resulting from the decrease in vibration frequency of the all-moveable wing at high flight dynamic pressures. As the wing-pivot frequency decreases, it couples with the vehicle short-period mode resulting in dynamic instability. A similar instability sometimes occurs when the pivot mode couples with the fuselage-bending mode. Also assessed, for supersonic flight conditions, are configuration variations that include relocation of the wing further aft on the lifting-body fuselage, and the addition of body flaps to the rear of the vehicle. These changes are destabilizing because they result in severe wing-pivot/fuselage-bending instabilities at dynamic pressures lower than the instabilities indicated for the original demonstrator. Finally, a two-point wing support and actuation system concept is proposed for the National Aerospace Plane, which if developed may (according to cursory analysis) enhance overall stability.

  15. Aeroelastic stability and response of horizontal axis wind turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kottapalli, S. B. R.; Friedmann, P. P.; Rosen, A.

    1979-01-01

    Coupled flap-lag-torsion equations of motion of an isolated horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) blade have been formulated. The analysis neglects blade-tower coupling. The final nonlinear equations have periodic coefficients. A new and convenient method of generating an appropriate time-dependent equilibrium position, required for the stability analysis, has been implemented and found to be computationally efficient. Steady-state response and stability boundaries for an existing (typical) HAWT blade are presented. Such stability boundaries have never been published in the literature. The results show that the isolated blade under study is basically stable. The tower shadow (wake) has a considerable effect on the out-of-plane response but leaves blade stability unchanged. Nonlinear terms can significantly affect linearized stability boundaries; however, they have a negligible effect on response, thus implying that a time-dependent equilibrium position (or steady-state response), based completely on the linear system, is appropriate for the type of HAWT blades under study.

  16. Aeroelastic Response and Protection of Space Shuttle External Tank Cable Trays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, John W.; Keller, Donald F.; Schuster, David M.; Piatak, David J.; Rausch, Russ D.; Bartels, Robert E.; Ivanco, Thomas G.; Cole, Stanley R.; Spain, Charles V.

    2005-01-01

    Sections of the Space Shuttle External Tank Liquid Oxygen (LO2) and Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) cable trays are shielded from potentially damaging airloads with foam Protuberance Aerodynamic Load (PAL) Ramps. Flight standard design LO2 and LH2 cable tray sections were tested with and without PAL Ramp models in the United States Air Force Arnold Engineering Development Center s (AEDC) 16T transonic wind tunnel to obtain experimental data on the aeroelastic stability and response characteristics of the trays and as part of the larger effort to determine whether the PAL ramps can be safely modified or removed. Computational Fluid Dynamic simulations of the full-stack shuttle launch configuration were used to investigate the flow characeristics around and under the cable trays without the protective PAL ramps and to define maximum crossflow Mach numbers and dynamic pressures experienced during launch. These crossflow conditions were used to establish wind tunnel test conditions which also included conservative margins. For all of the conditions and configurations tested, no aeroelastic instabilities or unacceptable dynamic response levels were encountered and no visible structural damage was experienced by any of the tested cable tray sections. Based upon this aeroelastic characterization test, three potentially acceptable alternatives are available for the LO2 cable tray PAL Ramps: Mini-Ramps, Tray Fences, or No Ramps. All configurations were tested to maximum conditions, except the LH2 trays at -15 deg. crossflow angle. This exception is the only caveat preventing the proposal of acceptable alternative configurations for the LH2 trays as well. Structural assessment of all tray loads and tray response measurements from launches following the Shuttle Return To Flight with the existing PAL Ramps will determine the acceptability of these PAL Ramp alternatives.

  17. Aeroelastic Tailoring of the NASA Common Research Model via Novel Material and Structural Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jutte, Christine V.; Stanford, Bret K.; Wieseman, Carol D.; Moore, James B.

    2014-01-01

    This work explores the use of tow steered composite laminates, functionally graded metals (FGM), thickness distributions, and curvilinear rib/spar/stringer topologies for aeroelastic tailoring. Parameterized models of the Common Research Model (CRM) wing box have been developed for passive aeroelastic tailoring trade studies. Metrics of interest include the wing weight, the onset of dynamic flutter, and the static aeroelastic stresses. Compared to a baseline structure, the lowest aggregate static wing stresses could be obtained with tow steered skins (47% improvement), and many of these designs could reduce weight as well (up to 14%). For these structures, the trade-off between flutter speed and weight is generally strong, although one case showed both a 100% flutter improvement and a 3.5% weight reduction. Material grading showed no benefit in the skins, but moderate flutter speed improvements (with no weight or stress increase) could be obtained by grading the spars (4.8%) or ribs (3.2%), where the best flutter results were obtained by grading both thickness and material. For the topology work, large weight reductions were obtained by removing an inner spar, and performance was maintained by shifting stringers forward and/or using curvilinear ribs: 5.6% weight reduction, a 13.9% improvement in flutter speed, but a 3.0% increase in stress levels. Flutter resistance was also maintained using straightrotated ribs although the design had a 4.2% lower flutter speed than the curved ribs of similar weight and stress levels were higher. These results will guide the development of a future design optimization scheme established to exploit and combine the individual attributes of these technologies.

  18. Introduction of the ASP3D Computer Program for Unsteady Aerodynamic and Aeroelastic Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, John T.

    2005-01-01

    A new computer program has been developed called ASP3D (Advanced Small Perturbation 3D), which solves the small perturbation potential flow equation in an advanced form including mass-consistent surface and trailing wake boundary conditions, and entropy, vorticity, and viscous effects. The purpose of the program is for unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analyses, especially in the nonlinear transonic flight regime. The program exploits the simplicity of stationary Cartesian meshes with the movement or deformation of the configuration under consideration incorporated into the solution algorithm through a planar surface boundary condition. The new ASP3D code is the result of a decade of developmental work on improvements to the small perturbation formulation, performed while the author was employed as a Senior Research Scientist in the Configuration Aerodynamics Branch at the NASA Langley Research Center. The ASP3D code is a significant improvement to the state-of-the-art for transonic aeroelastic analyses over the CAP-TSD code (Computational Aeroelasticity Program Transonic Small Disturbance), which was developed principally by the author in the mid-1980s. The author is in a unique position as the developer of both computer programs to compare, contrast, and ultimately make conclusions regarding the underlying formulations and utility of each code. The paper describes the salient features of the ASP3D code including the rationale for improvements in comparison with CAP-TSD. Numerous results are presented to demonstrate the ASP3D capability. The general conclusion is that the new ASP3D capability is superior to the older CAP-TSD code because of the myriad improvements developed and incorporated.

  19. Aeroelastic flutter of feathers, flight and the evolution of non-vocal communication in birds.

    PubMed

    Clark, Christopher J; Prum, Richard O

    2015-11-01

    Tonal, non-vocal sounds are widespread in both ordinary bird flight and communication displays. We hypothesized these sounds are attributable to an aerodynamic mechanism intrinsic to flight feathers: aeroelastic flutter. Individual wing and tail feathers from 35 taxa (from 13 families) that produce tonal flight sounds were tested in a wind tunnel. In the wind tunnel, all of these feathers could flutter and generate tonal sound, suggesting that the capacity to flutter is intrinsic to flight feathers. This result implies that the aerodynamic mechanism of aeroelastic flutter is potentially widespread in flight of birds. However, the sounds these feathers produced in the wind tunnel replicated the actual flight sounds of only 15 of the 35 taxa. Of the 20 negative results, we hypothesize that 10 are false negatives, as the acoustic form of the flight sound suggests flutter is a likely acoustic mechanism. For the 10 other taxa, we propose our negative wind tunnel results are correct, and these species do not make sounds via flutter. These sounds appear to constitute one or more mechanism(s) we call 'wing whirring', the physical acoustics of which remain unknown. Our results document that the production of non-vocal communication sounds by aeroelastic flutter of flight feathers is widespread in birds. Across all birds, most evolutionary origins of wing- and tail-generated communication sounds are attributable to three mechanisms: flutter, percussion and wing whirring. Other mechanisms of sound production, such as turbulence-induced whooshes, have evolved into communication sounds only rarely, despite their intrinsic ubiquity in ordinary flight. PMID:26385327

  20. Aeroelastic control of flutter using trailing edge control surfaces powered by piezoelectric actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardelean, Emil Valentin

    Flutter is a rather spectacular phenomenon of aeroelastic instability that affects lifting and control surfaces, yet can also lead to catastrophic consequences for the aircraft. The idea of controlling flutter by using the same energy that causes it, namely airflow energy, through changing the aerodynamics in a controlled manner is not new. In the case of fixed wings, the use of trailing edge control surfaces (flaps) is an extremely effective method to alter the aerodynamics. This research presents the development of an actuation system for trailing edge control surfaces (flaps) used for aeroelastic flutter control of a typical section wing model. In order to be effective for aeroelastic control of flutter, flap deflection of +/-5-6° with adequate bandwidth (up to 25--30 Hz) is required. Classical solutions for flap actuation do not have the capabilities required for this task. Therefore actuation systems using active materials became the focus of this investigation. A new piezoelectric actuator (V-Stack Piezoelectric Actuator) was developed. This actuator meets the requirements for trailing edge flap actuation in both stroke and force over the bandwidth of interest. It is compact, simple, sturdy, and leverages stroke geometrically with minimum force penalties, while displaying linearity over a wide range of stroke. Integration of the actuator inside an existing structure requires minimal modifications of the structure. The shape of the actuator makes it very suitable for trailing edge flap actuation, eliminating the need for a push rod. The actuation solution presented here stands out because of its simplicity, compactness, small mass (compared to that of the actuated structure) and high reliability. Although the actuator was designed for flap actuation, other applications can also benefit from its capabilities. In order to demonstrate the actuation concept, a typical section prototype was constructed and tested experimentally in the wind tunnel at Duke