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Sample records for aeroelastic stability characteristics

  1. Aeroelastic Stability Computations for Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, R.; Bakhle, M. A.; Keith, T. G., Jr.; Stefko, G. L.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes an aeroelastic analysis program for turbomachines. Unsteady Navier-Stokes equations are solved on dynamically deforming, body fitted, grid to obtain the aeroelastic characteristics. Blade structural response is modeled using a modal representation of the blade and the work-per-cycle method is used to evaluate the stability characteristics. Nonzero interblade phase angle is modeled using phase-lagged boundary conditions. Results obtained showed good correlation with existing experimental, analytical, and numerical results. Numerical analysis also showed that given the computational resources available today, engineering solutions with good accuracy are possible using higher fidelity analyses.

  2. Rotorcraft aeroelastic stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormiston, Robert A.; Warmbrodt, William G.; Hodges, Dewey H.; Peters, David A.

    1988-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental developments in the aeroelastic and aeromechanical stability of helicopters and tilt-rotor aircraft are addressed. Included are the underlying nonlinear structural mechanics of slender rotating beams, necessary for accurate modeling of elastic cantilever rotor blades, and the development of dynamic inflow, an unsteady aerodynamic theory for low-frequency aeroelastic stability applications. Analytical treatment of isolated rotor stability in hover and forward flight, coupled rotor-fuselage stability in hover and forward flight, and analysis of tilt-rotor dynamic stability are considered. Results of parametric investigations of system behavior are presented, and correlation between theoretical results and experimental data from small and large scale wind tunnel and flight testing are discussed.

  3. Harmonic Balance Computations of Fan Aeroelastic Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakhle, Milind A.; Reddy, T. S. R.

    2010-01-01

    A harmonic balance (HB) aeroelastic analysis, which has been recently developed, was used to determine the aeroelastic stability (flutter) characteristics of an experimental fan. To assess the numerical accuracy of this HB aeroelastic analysis, a time-domain aeroelastic analysis was also used to determine the aeroelastic stability characteristics of the same fan. Both of these three-dimensional analysis codes model the unsteady flowfield due to blade vibrations using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. In the HB analysis, the unsteady flow equations are converted to a HB form and solved using a pseudo-time marching method. In the time-domain analysis, the unsteady flow equations are solved using an implicit time-marching approach. Steady and unsteady computations for two vibration modes were carried out at two rotational speeds: 100 percent (design) and 70 percent (part-speed). The steady and unsteady results obtained from the two analysis methods compare well, thus verifying the recently developed HB aeroelastic analysis. Based on the results, the experimental fan was found to have no aeroelastic instability (flutter) at the conditions examined in this study.

  4. 14 CFR 25.629 - Aeroelastic stability requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aeroelastic stability requirements. 25.629... Aeroelastic stability requirements. (a) General. The aeroelastic stability evaluations required under this section include flutter, divergence, control reversal and any undue loss of stability and control as...

  5. Dynamic structural aeroelastic stability testing of the XV-15 tilt rotor research aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroers, L. G.

    1982-01-01

    For the past 20 years, a significant effort has been made to understand and predict the structural aeroelastic stability characteristics of the tilt rotor concept. Beginning with the rotor-pylon oscillation of the XV-3 aircraft, the problem was identified and then subjected to a series of theoretical studies, plus model and full-scale wind tunnel tests. From this data base, methods were developed to predict the structural aeroelastic stability characteristics of the XV-15 Tilt Rotor Research Aircraft. The predicted aeroelastic characteristics are examined in light of the major parameters effecting rotor-pylon-wing stability. Flight test techniques used to obtain XV-15 aeroelastic stability are described. Flight test results are summarized and compared to the predicted values. Wind tunnel results are compared to flight test results and correlated with predicted values.

  6. Aeroelastic Stability of Idling Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kai; Riziotis, Vasilis A.; Voutsinas, Spyros G.

    2016-09-01

    Wind turbine rotors in idling operation mode can experience high angles of attack, within the post stall region that are capable of triggering stall-induced vibrations. In the present paper rotor stability in slow idling operation is assessed on the basis of non-linear time domain and linear eigenvalue analysis. Analysis is performed for a 10 MW conceptual wind turbine designed by DTU. First the flow conditions that are likely to favour stall induced instabilities are identified through non-linear time domain aeroelastic analysis. Next, for the above specified conditions, eigenvalue stability simulations are performed aiming at identifying the low damped modes of the turbine. Finally the results of the eigenvalue analysis are evaluated through computations of the work of the aerodynamic forces by imposing harmonic vibrations following the shape and frequency of the various modes. Eigenvalue analysis indicates that the asymmetric and symmetric out-of-plane modes have the lowest damping. The results of the eigenvalue analysis agree well with those of the time domain analysis.

  7. Helicopter aeroelastic stability and response - Current topics and future trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, Peretz P.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents several current topics in rotary wing aeroelasticity and concludes by attempting to anticipate future trends and developments. These topics are: (1) the role of geometric nonlinearities; (2) structural modeling, and aeroelastic analysis of composite rotor blades; (3) aeroelastic stability and response in forward flight; (4) modeling of coupled rotor/fuselage aeromechanical problems and their active control; and (5) the coupled rotor-fuselage vibration problem and its alleviation by higher harmonic control. Selected results illustrating the fundamental aspects of these topics are presented. Future developments are briefly discussed.

  8. Survey of Army/NASA rotorcraft aeroelastic stability research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormiston, Robert A.; Warmbrodt, William G.; Hodges, Dewey H.; Peters, David A.

    1988-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental developments in the aeroelastic and aeromechanical stability of helicopters and tilt-rotor aircraft are addressed. Included are the underlying nonlinear structural mechanics of slender rotating beams, necessary for accurate modeling of elastic cantilever rotor blades, and the development of dynamic inflow, an unsteady aerodynamic theory for low frequency aeroelastic stability applications. Analytical treatment of isolated rotor stability in hover and forward flight, coupled rotor-fuselage stability are considered. Results of parametric investigations of system behavior are presented, and correlations between theoretical results and experimental data from small- and large-scale wind tunnel and flight testing are discussed.

  9. Aeroelastic Stability & Response of Rotating Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Reddy, T. S. R.

    2001-01-01

    A summary of the work performed under NASA grant NCC3-605 is presented. More details can be found in the cited references. This grant led to the development of relatively faster aeroelastic analyses methods for predicting flutter and forced response in fans, compressors, and turbines using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) methods.

  10. Hammerhead and nose-cylinder-flare aeroelastic stability revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reding, J. Peter; Ericsson, Lars E.

    1995-01-01

    The flow mechanism responsible for the recently discovered buffet-producing critical cylinder length for hammerheads is discussed. For short cylinder lengths, the upstream effects of the hammerhead wake are able to affect the terminal shock location, driving flow separation to the nose-cylinder shoulder. This has the potential to cause aeroelastic instability leading to structural failure. A similar critical-cylinder-length effect exists for cone-cylinder-flare configurations. This too involves an upstream flow effect. In this case the flare-induced pressure rise drives the shock-induced flow separation to the cone-cylinder shoulder. Neither of these effects is recognized in the existing NASA guidelines for elastic vehicle design. Some currently proposed designs for heavy lift launch vehicles incorporate dangerously blunt noses, in violation of the NASA aeroelastic design criterion. A reexamination of these nose effects indicates the possibility of aeroelastic instability and structural failure. It is the conclusion of this study that it is imperative to consider aeroelastic stability effects early in the design process in order to avoid the possibility of a flight failure or a costly redesign later in the development cycle if the presence of an aeroelastic stability problem is discovered.

  11. Prediction of wing aeroelastic effects on aircraft life and pitching moment characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckstrom, Clinton V.

    1987-01-01

    The distribution of flight loads on an aircraft structure determine the lift and pitching moment characteristics of the aircraft. When the load distribution changes due to the aeroelastic response of the structure, the lift and pitching moment characteristics also change. An estimate of the effect of aeroelasticity on stability and control characteristics is often required for the development of aircraft simulation models of evaluation of flight characteristics. This presentation outlines a procedure for incorporating calculated linear aeroelastic effects into measured nonlinear lift and pitching moment data from wind tunnel tests. Results are presented which were obtained from applying this procedure to data for an aircraft with a very flexible transport type research wing. The procedure described is generally applicable to all types of aircraft.

  12. Stability and Control Properties of an Aeroelastic Fixed Wing Micro Aerial Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin R.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Ifju, Peter

    2001-01-01

    Micro aerial vehicles have been the subject of considerable interest and development over the last several years. The majority of current vehicle concepts rely on rigid fixed wings or rotors. An alternate design based on an aeroelastic membrane wing concept has also been developed that has exhibited desired characteristics in flight test demonstrations and competition. This paper presents results from a wind tunnel investigation that sought to quantify stability and control properties for a family of vehicles using the aeroelastic design. The results indicate that the membrane wing does exhibit potential benefits that could be exploited to enhance the design of future flight vehicles.

  13. Effect of follower forces on aeroelastic stability of flexible structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Seungmook

    Missile bodies and wings are typical examples of structures that can be represented by beam models. Such structures, loaded by follower forces along with aerodynamics, exhibit the vehicle's aeroelastic instabilities. The current research integrates a nonlinear beam dynamics and unsteady aerodynamics to conduct aeroelastic studies of missile bodies and wings subjected to follower forces. The structural formulations are based on a geometrically-exact, mixed finite element method. Slender-body theory and thin-airfoil theory are used for the missile aerodynamics, and two-dimensional finite-state unsteady aerodynamics is used for wing aerodynamics. The aeroelastic analyses are performed using time-marching scheme for the missile body stability, and eigenvalue analysis for the wing flutter, respectively. Results from the time-marching formulation agree with published results for dynamic stability and show the development of limit cycle oscillations for disturbed flight near and above the critical thrust. Parametric studies of the aeroelastic behavior of specific flexible missile configurations are presented, including effects of flexibility on stability, limit-cycle amplitudes, and missile loads. The results do yield a significant interaction between the thrust, which is a follower force, and the aeroelastic stability. Parametric studies based on the eigenvalue analysis for the wing flutter, show that the predicted stability boundaries are very sensitive to the ratio of bending stiffness to torsional stiffness. The effect of thrust can be either stabilizing or destabilizing, depending on the value of this parameter. An assessment whether or not the magnitude of thrust needed to influence the flutter speed is practical is made for one configuration. The flutter speed is shown to change by 11% for this specific wing configuration.

  14. Aeroelastic stability predictions for a MW-sized blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobitz, Don W.

    2004-07-01

    Classical aeroelastic flutter instability historically has not been a driving issue in wind turbine design. In fact, rarely has this issue even been addressed in the past. Commensurately, among the wind turbines that have been built, rarely has classical flutter ever been observed. However, with the advent of larger turbines fitted with relatively softer blades, classical flutter may become a more important design consideration. In addition, innovative blade designs involving the use of aeroelastic tailoring, wherein the blade twists as it bends under the action of aerodynamic loads to shed load resulting from wind turbulence, may increase the blade's proclivity for flutter. With these considerations in mind it is prudent to revisit aeroelastic stability issues for a MW-sized blade with and without aeroelastic tailoring. Focusing on aeroelastic stability associated with the shed wake from an individual blade turning in still air, the frequency domain technique developed by Theodorsen for predicting classical flutter in fixed wing aircraft has been adapted for use with a rotor blade. Results indicate that the predicted flutter speed of a MW-sized blade is slightly greater than twice the operational speed of the rotor. When a moderate amount of aeroelastic tailoring is added to the blade, a modest decrease (12%) in the flutter speed is predicted. By comparison, for a smaller rotor with relatively stiff blades the predicted flutter speed is approximately six times the operating speed. When frequently used approximations to Theodorsen's method are implemented, drastic underpredictions result, which, while conservative, may adversely impact blade design. These underpredictions are also evident when this MW-sized blade is analysed using time domain methods. Published in 2004 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. A Coupled Aeroelastic Model for Launch Vehicle Stability Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, Jeb S.

    2010-01-01

    A technique for incorporating distributed aerodynamic normal forces and aeroelastic coupling effects into a stability analysis model of a launch vehicle is presented. The formulation augments the linear state-space launch vehicle plant dynamics that are compactly derived as a system of coupled linear differential equations representing small angular and translational perturbations of the rigid body, nozzle, and sloshing propellant coupled with normal vibration of a set of orthogonal modes. The interaction of generalized forces due to aeroelastic coupling and thrust can be expressed as a set of augmenting non-diagonal stiffness and damping matrices in modal coordinates with no penalty on system order. While the eigenvalues of the structural response in the presence of thrust and aeroelastic forcing can be predicted at a given flight condition independent of the remaining degrees of freedom, the coupled model provides confidence in closed-loop stability in the presence of rigid-body, slosh, and actuator dynamics. Simulation results are presented that characterize the coupled dynamic response of the Ares I launch vehicle and the impact of aeroelasticity on control system stability margins.

  16. Aeroelastic stability analysis of flexible overexpanded rocket nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekka, N.; Sellam, M.; Chpoun, A.

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a new aeroelastic stability model taking into account the viscous effects for a supersonic nozzle flow in overexpanded regimes. This model is inspired by the Pekkari model which was developed initially for perfect fluid flow. The new model called the "Modified Pekkari Model" (MPM) considers a more realistic wall pressure profile for the case of a free shock separation inside the supersonic nozzle using the free interaction theory of Chapman. To reach this objective, a code for structure computation coupled with aerodynamic excitation effects is developed that allows the analysis of aeroelastic stability for the overexpanded nozzles. The main results are presented in a comparative manner using existing models (Pekkari model and its extended version) and the modified Pekkari model developed in this work.

  17. Aeroelastic stability analysis of a Darrieus wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Popelka, D.

    1982-02-01

    An aeroelastic stability analysis has been developed for predicting flutter instabilities on vertical axis wind turbines. The analytical model and mathematical formulation of the problem are described as well as the physical mechanism that creates flutter in Darrieus turbines. Theoretical results are compared with measured experimental data from flutter tests of the Sandia 2 Meter turbine. Based on this comparison, the analysis appears to be an adequate design evaluation tool.

  18. Study of Dynamic Characteristics of Aeroelastic Systems Utilizing Randomdec Signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. S.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of utilizing the random decrement method in conjunction with a signature analysis procedure to determine the dynamic characteristics of an aeroelastic system for the purpose of on-line prediction of potential on-set of flutter was examined. Digital computer programs were developed to simulate sampled response signals of a two-mode aeroelastic system. Simulated response data were used to test the random decrement method. A special curve-fit approach was developed for analyzing the resulting signatures. A number of numerical 'experiments' were conducted on the combined processes. The method is capable of determining frequency and damping values accurately from randomdec signatures of carefully selected lengths.

  19. Rotor aeroelastic stability coupled with helicopter body motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miao, W. L.; Huber, H. B.

    1974-01-01

    A 5.5-foot-diameter, soft-in-plane, hingeless-rotor system was tested on a gimbal which allowed the helicopter rigid-body pitch and roll motions. Coupled rotor/airframe aeroelastic stability boundaries were explored and the modal damping ratios were measured. The time histories were correlated with analysis with excellent agreement. The effects of forward speed and some rotor design parameters on the coupled rotor/airframe stability were explored both by model and analysis. Some physical insights into the coupled stability phenomenon are suggested.

  20. Aeroelastic stability of forward swept composite winged aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisshaar, T. A.

    1983-01-01

    This paper reviews the author's past and present aeroelastic stability and performance studies related to forward swept, composite wing aircraft. The influence of laminate elastic bend/twist coupling upon wing divergence, lateral control, and lift effectiveness will be illustrated by means of closed-form solutions, numerical analysis and simple wind-tunnel experiments. In addition, results of analyses of a freely flying flexible FSW aircraft are discussed to indicate the possible effects of the flexible forward swept wing on aircraft dynamic stability. These studies show, both theoretically and experimentally, that, if the aircraft is not carefully designed, a phenomenon referred to as body freedom flutter may appear.

  1. An improved stability characterization for aeroelastic energy harvesting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javed, U.; Abdelkefi, A.; Akhtar, I.

    2016-07-01

    An enhanced stability characterization for aeroelastic energy harvesters is introduced by using both the normal form of the Hopf bifurcation and shooting method. Considering a triangular cylinder subjected to transverse galloping oscillations and a piezoelectric transducer to convert mechanical vibrations to electrical power, it is demonstrated that the nonlinear normal form is very beneficial to characterize the type of instability near bifurcation and determine the influence of structural and/or aerodynamic nonlinearities on the performance of the harvester. It is also shown that this tool is strong in terms of designing reliable aeroelastic energy harvesters. The results show that this technique can accurately predict the harvester's response only near bifurcation, however, cannot predict the stable solutions of the harvester when subcritical Hopf bifurcation takes place. To cover these drawbacks, the shooting method is employed. It turns out that this approach is beneficial in determining the stable and unstable solutions of the system and associated turning points. The results also show that the Floquet multipliers, obtained as the by-product of this method, can be used to characterize the response's type of the harvester. Thus, the normal form of the Hopf bifurcation and shooting method predictions can supplement each other to design stable and reliable aeroelastic energy harvesters.

  2. Analyzing Aeroelastic Stability of a Tilt-Rotor Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvaternil, Raymond G.

    2006-01-01

    Proprotor Aeroelastic Stability Analysis, now at version 4.5 (PASTA 4.5), is a FORTRAN computer program for analyzing the aeroelastic stability of a tiltrotor aircraft in the airplane mode of flight. The program employs a 10-degree- of-freedom (DOF), discrete-coordinate, linear mathematical model of a rotor with three or more blades and its drive system coupled to a 10-DOF modal model of an airframe. The user can select which DOFs are included in the analysis. Quasi-steady strip-theory aerodynamics is employed for the aerodynamic loads on the blades, a quasi-steady representation is employed for the aerodynamic loads acting on the vibrational modes of the airframe, and a stability-derivative approach is used for the aerodynamics associated with the rigid-body DOFs of the airframe. Blade parameters that vary with the blade collective pitch can be obtained by interpolation from a user-defined table. Stability is determined by examining the eigenvalues that are obtained by solving the coupled equations of motions as a matrix eigenvalue problem. Notwithstanding the relative simplicity of its mathematical foundation, PASTA 4.5 and its predecessors have played key roles in a number of engineering investigations over the years.

  3. AEROELASTIC DIVERGENCE CHARACTERISTICS OF UNGUIDED, SLENDER BODY, MULTISTAGE LAUNCH VEHICLES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, C. P.

    1994-01-01

    The primary function of this computer program is the calculation of the divergence dynamic pressure and associated divergence modal characteristics of unguided, slender-body, multistage launch vehicles. The divergence dynamic pressure is obtained as the non-trivial solution to a homogenous stability equation using matrix recurrence techniques. Provision is made for modulating the distributed lift curve coefficient slope function and the stiffness function. The program also includes an option for calculating a generalized static margin which approximates the degeneration in rigid-body static margin due to aeroelasticity effects. Evaluated equations are also programmed to allow for the exclusion of the effect of aerodynamic crossflow resulting from vehicle angular velocities if desired. Other physical and aerodynamic properties calculated include total mass, center of mass, moments of inertia in pitch about the reference station, total aerodynamic lift curve slope, static aerodynamic center of pressure, rigid body static margin, and short period frequency. Input to the program is via the Fortran NAMELIST option with output printed. The program is written in CDC Fortran IV (Version 2.3) and has been implemented on a CDC 6600 computer under the SCOPE 3.2 monitor in central memory field lengths less than 57K octal 60 bit words.

  4. Optimal mistuning for enhanced aeroelastic stability of transonic fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, K. C.; Crawley, E. F.

    1983-01-01

    An inverse design procedure was developed for the design of a mistuned rotor. The design requirements are that the stability margin of the eigenvalues of the aeroelastic system be greater than or equal to some minimum stability margin, and that the mass added to each blade be positive. The objective was to achieve these requirements with a minimal amount of mistuning. Hence, the problem was posed as a constrained optimization problem. The constrained minimization problem was solved by the technique of mathematical programming via augmented Lagrangians. The unconstrained minimization phase of this technique was solved by the variable metric method. The bladed disk was modelled as being composed of a rigid disk mounted on a rigid shaft. Each of the blades were modelled with a single tosional degree of freedom.

  5. Aeroelastic stability and response of horizontal axis wind turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kottapalli, S. B. R.; Friedmann, P. P.; Rosen, A.

    1978-01-01

    The coupled flap-lag-torsion equations of motion of an isolated horizontal axis wind turbine blade are formulated. Quasi-steady blade-element strip theory was applied to derive the aerodynamic operator which includes boundary layer type gradient winds. The final equations which have periodic coefficients were solved in order to obtain the aeroelastic response and stability of large horizontal axis wind turbine blade. A new method of generating an appropriate time-dependent equilibrium position (required for the stability analysis) has been implemented. Representative steady-state responses and stability boundaries, applicable mainly to an existing blade design (NASA/-ERDA MOD-0), are presented. The results indicate that the MOD-0 configuration is a basically stable design and that blade stability is not sensitive to offsets between blade elastic axis and aerodynamic center. Blade stability appears to be sensitive to precone. The tower shadow (or wake) has a considerable effect on the flap response but leaves blade stability unchanged. Finally, it was found that non linear terms in the equations of motion can significantly affect the linearized stability boundaries, however, these terms have a negligible effect on blade response at operating conditions.

  6. Aeroelastic Tailoring for Stability Augmentation and Performance Enhancements of Tiltrotor Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, Mark W.; Piatak, David J.; Corso, Lawrence M.; Popelka, David A.

    1999-01-01

    The requirements for increased speed and productivity for tiltrotors has spawned several investigations associated with proprotor aeroelastic stability augmentation and aerodynamic performance enhancements. Included among these investigations is a focus on passive aeroelastic tailoring concepts which exploit the anisotropic capabilities of fiber composite materials. Researchers at Langley Research Center and Bell Helicopter have devoted considerable effort to assess the potential for using these materials to obtain aeroelastic responses which are beneficial to the important stability and performance considerations of tiltrotors. Both experimental and analytical studies have been completed to examine aeroelastic tailoring concepts for the tiltrotor, applied either to the wing or to the rotor blades. This paper reviews some of the results obtained in these aeroelastic tailoring investigations and discusses the relative merits associated with these approaches.

  7. ASTROP2 users manual: A program for aeroelastic stability analysis of propfans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, G. V.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1991-01-01

    A user's manual is presented for the aeroelastic stability and response of propulsion systems computer program called ASTROP2. The ASTROP2 code preforms aeroelastic stability analysis of rotating propfan blades. This analysis uses a two-dimensional, unsteady cascade aerodynamics model and a three-dimensional, normal-mode structural model. Analytical stability results from this code are compared with published experimental results of a rotating composite advanced turboprop model and of nonrotating metallic wing model.

  8. Shape sensitivity analysis of wing static aeroelastic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barthelemy, Jean-Francois M.; Bergen, Fred D.

    1988-01-01

    A method is presented to calculate analytically the sensitivity derivatives of wing static aeroelastic characteristics with respect to wing shape parameters. The wing aerodynamic response under fixed total load is predicted with Weissinger's L-method; its structural response is obtained with Giles' equivalent plate method. The characteristics of interest include the spanwise distribution of lift, trim angle of attack, rolling and pitching moments, wind induced drag, as well as the divergence dynamic pressure. The shape parameters considered are the wing area, aspect ratio, taper ratio, sweep angle, and tip twist angle. Results of sensitivity studies indicate that: (1) approximations based on analytical sensitivity derivatives can be used over wide ranges of variations of the shape parameters considered, and (2) the analytical calculation of sensitivity derivatives is significantly less expensive than the conventional finite-difference alternative.

  9. Aeroelastic Stability of Modern Bearingless Rotors: A Parametric Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Khanh Q.

    1994-01-01

    The University of Maryland Advanced Rotorcraft Code (UMARC) is utilized to study the effects of blade design parameters on the aeroelastic stability of an isolated modern bearingless rotor blade in hover. The McDonnell Douglas Advanced Rotor Technology (MDART) Rotor is the baseline rotor investigated. Results indicate that kinematic pitch-lag coupling introduced through the control system geometry and the damping levels of the shear lag dampers strongly affect the hover inplane damping of the baseline rotor blade. Hub precone, pitchcase chordwise stiffness, and blade fundamental torsion frequency have small to moderate influence on the inplane damping, while blade pre-twist and placements of blade fundamental flapwise and chord-wise frequencies have negligible effects. A damperless configuration with a leading edge pitch-link, 15 deg of pitch-link cant angle, and reduced pitch-link stiffness is shown to be stable with an inplane damping level in excess of 2.7 percent critical at the full hover tip speed.

  10. Aeroelastic stability of wind turbine blade/aileron systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strain, J. C.; Mirandy, L.

    1995-01-01

    Aeroelastic stability analyses have been performed for the MOD-5A blade/aileron system. Various configurations having different aileron torsional stiffness, mass unbalance, and control system damping have been investigated. The analysis was conducted using a code recently developed by the General Electric Company - AILSTAB. The code extracts eigenvalues for a three degree of freedom system, consisting of: (1) a blade flapwise mode; (2) a blade torsional mode; and (3) an aileron torsional mode. Mode shapes are supplied as input and the aileron can be specified over an arbitrary length of the blade span. Quasi-steady aerodynamic strip theory is used to compute aerodynamic derivatives of the wing-aileron combination as a function of spanwise position. Equations of motion are summarized herein. The program provides rotating blade stability boundaries for torsional divergence, classical flutter (bending/torsion) and wing/aileron flutter. It has been checked out against fixed-wing results published by Theodorsen and Garrick. The MOD-5A system is stable with respect to divergence and classical flutter for all practical rotor speeds. Aileron torsional stiffness must exceed a minimum critical value to prevent aileron flutter. The nominal control system stiffness greatly exceeds this minimum during normal operation. The basic system, however, is unstable for the case of a free (or floating) aileron. The instability can be removed either by the addition of torsional damping or mass-balancing the ailerons. The MOD-5A design was performed by the General Electric Company, Advanced Energy Program Department under Contract DEN3-153 with NASA Lewis Research Center and sponsored by the Department of Energy.

  11. Aeroelastic characteristics of the AH-64 bearingless tail rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjee, D.

    1988-01-01

    The results of a wind tunnel test program to determine the performance loads and dynamic characteristics of the Composite Flexbeam Tail Rotor (CFTR) for the AH-64 Advanced Attack Helicopter are reported. The CFTR uses an elastomeric shear attachment of the flexbeam to the hub to provide soft-inplane S-mode and stiff-inplane C-mode configuration. The properties of the elastomer were selected for proper frequency placement and scale damping of the inplane S-mode. Kinematic pitch-lag coupling was introduced to provide the first cyclic inplane C-mode damping at high collective pitch. The CFTR was tested in a wind tunnel over the full slideslip envelop of the AH-64. It is found that the rotor was aeroelastically stable throughout the complete collective pitch range and up to rotor speeds of 1403 rpm. The dynamic characteristics of the rotor were found to be satisfactory at all pitch angles and rotor speeds of the tunnel tests. The design characteristics of the rotor which permit the high performance characteristics are discussed. Several schematic drawings and photographs of the rotor are provided.

  12. Aeroelastic stability analyses of two counter rotating propfan designs for a cruise missile model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahajan, Aparajit J.; Lucero, John M.; Mehmed, Oral; Stefko, George L.

    1992-01-01

    Aeroelastic stability analyses were performed to insure structural integrity of two counterrotating propfan blade designs for a NAVY/Air Force/NASA cruise missile model wind tunnel test. This analysis predicted if the propfan designs would be flutter free at the operating conditions of the wind tunnel test. Calculated stability results are presented for the two blade designs with rotational speed and Mach number as the parameters. A aeroelastic analysis code ASTROP2 (Aeroelastic Stability and Response of Propulsion Systems - 2 Dimensional Analysis), developed at LeRC, was used in this project. The aeroelastic analysis is a modal method and uses the combination of a finite element structural model and two dimensional steady and unsteady cascade aerodynamic models. This code was developed to analyze single rotation propfans but was modified and applied to counterrotating propfans for the present work. Modifications were made to transform the geometry and rotation of the aft rotor to the same reference frame as the forward rotor, to input a non-uniform inflow into the rotor being analyzed, and to automatically converge to the least stable aeroelastic mode.

  13. Aeroelastic Stability Investigations for Large-scale Vertical Axis Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, B. C.; Griffith, D. T.

    2014-06-01

    The availability of offshore wind resources in coastal regions, along with a high concentration of load centers in these areas, makes offshore wind energy an attractive opportunity for clean renewable electricity production. High infrastructure costs such as the offshore support structure and operation and maintenance costs for offshore wind technology, however, are significant obstacles that need to be overcome to make offshore wind a more cost-effective option. A vertical-axis wind turbine (VAWT) rotor configuration offers a potential transformative technology solution that significantly lowers cost of energy for offshore wind due to its inherent advantages for the offshore market. However, several potential challenges exist for VAWTs and this paper addresses one of them with an initial investigation of dynamic aeroelastic stability for large-scale, multi-megawatt VAWTs. The aeroelastic formulation and solution method from the BLade Aeroelastic STability Tool (BLAST) for HAWT blades was employed to extend the analysis capability of a newly developed structural dynamics design tool for VAWTs. This investigation considers the effect of configuration geometry, material system choice, and number of blades on the aeroelastic stability of a VAWT, and provides an initial scoping for potential aeroelastic instabilities in large-scale VAWT designs.

  14. Computation of aeroelastic characteristics and stress-strained state of parachutes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dneprov, Igor'v.

    The paper presents computation results of the stress-strained state and aeroelastic characteristics of different types of parachutes in the process of their interaction with a flow. Simulation of the aerodynamic part of the aeroelastic problem is based on the discrete vortex method, while the elastic part of the problem is solved by employing either the finite element method, or the finite difference method. The research covers the following problems of the axisymmetric parachutes dynamic aeroelasticity: parachute inflation, forebody influence on the aerodynamic characteristics of the object-parachute system, parachute disreefing, parachute inflation in the presence of the engagement parachute. The paper also presents the solution of the spatial problem of static aeroelasticity for a single-envelope ram-air parachute. Some practical recommendations are suggested.

  15. Including Aeroelastic Effects in the Calculation of X-33 Loads and Control Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeiler, Thomas A.

    1998-01-01

    Up until now, loads analyses of the X-33 RLV have been done at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) using aerodynamic loads derived from CFD and wind tunnel models of a rigid vehicle. Control forces and moments are determined using a rigid vehicle trajectory analysis and the detailed control load distributions for achieving the desired control forces and moments, again on the rigid vehicle, are determined by Lockheed Martin Skunk Works. However, static aeroelastic effects upon the load distributions are not known. The static aeroelastic effects will generally redistribute external loads thereby affecting both the internal structural loads as well as the forces and moments generated by aerodynamic control surfaces. Therefore, predicted structural sizes as well as maneuvering requirements can be altered by consideration of static aeroelastic effects. The objective of the present work is the development of models and solutions for including static aeroelasticity in the calculation of X-33 loads and in the determination of stability and control derivatives.

  16. An investigation of aeroelastic phenomena associated with an oblique winged aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisshaar, T. A.

    1976-01-01

    Oblique wing aeroelasticity studies are reviewed. The static aeroelastic stability characteristics of oblique wing aircraft, lateral trim requirements for 1-g flight, and the dynamic aeroelastic stability behavior of oblique winged aircraft, primarily flutter, are among the topics studied. The similarities and differences between oblique winged aircraft and conventional, bilaterally symmetric, swept wing aircraft are emphasized.

  17. Formulation of the aeroelastic stability and response problem of coupled rotor/support systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warmbrodt, W.; Friedmann, P.

    1979-01-01

    The consistent formulation of the governing nonlinear equations of motion for a coupled rotor/support system is presented. Rotor/support coupling is clearly documented by enforcing dynamic equilibrium between the rotor and the moving flexible support. The nonlinear periodic coefficient equations of motion are applicable to both coupled rotor/fuselage aeroelastic problems of helicopters in hover or forward flight and coupled rotor/tower dynamics of a large horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT). Finally, the equations of motion are used to study the influence of flexible supports and nonlinear terms on rotor aeroelastic stability and response of a large two-bladed HAWT.

  18. Influence of time domain unsteady aerodynamics on coupled flap-lag-torsional aeroelastic stability and response of rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, P. P.; Robinson, L. H.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the incorporation of finite-state, time-domain aerodynamics in a flag-lag-torsional aeroelastic stability and response analysis in forward flight. Improvements to a previous formulation are introduced which eliminate spurious singularities. The methodology for solving the aeroelastic stability and response problems with augmented states, in the time domain, is presented using an implicit formulation. Results describing the aeroelastic behavior of soft and stiff in-plane hingeless rotor blades, in forward flight, are presented to illustrate the sensitivity of both the stability and response problems to time domain unsteady aerodynamics.

  19. An improved CAMRAD model for aeroelastic stability analysis of the XV-15 with advanced technology blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acree, C. W., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    In pursuit of higher performance, the XV-15 Tiltrotor Research Aircraft was modified by the installation of new composite rotor blades. Initial flights with the Advanced Technology Blades (ATB's) revealed excessive rotor control loads that were traced to a dynamic mismatch between the blades and the aircraft control system. The analytical models of both the blades and the mechanical controls were extensively revised for use by the CAMRAD computer program to better predict aeroelastic stability and loads. This report documents the most important revisions and discusses their effects on aeroelastic stability predictions for airplane-mode flight. The ATB's may be flown in several different configurations for research, including changes in blade sweep and tip twist. The effects on stability of 1 deg and 0 deg sweep are illustrated, as are those of twisted and zero-twist tips. This report also discusses the effects of stiffening the rotor control system, which was done by locking out lateral cyclic swashplate motion with shims.

  20. Transonic aerodynamic and aeroelastic characteristics of a variable sweep wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goorjian, P. M.; Guruswamy, G. P.; Ide, H.; Miller, G.

    1985-01-01

    The flow over the B-1 wing is studied computationally, including the aeroelastic response of the wing. Computed results are compared with results from wind tunnel and flight tests for both low-sweep and high-sweep cases, at 25.0 and 67.5 deg., respectively, for selected transonic Mach numbers. The aerodynamic and aeroelastic computations are made by using the transonic unsteady code ATRAN3S. Steady aerodynamic computations compare well with wind tunnel results for the 25.0 deg sweep case and also for small angles of attack at the 67.5 deg sweep case. The aeroelastic response results show that the wing is stable at the low sweep angle for the calculation at the Mach number at which there is a shock wave. In the higher sweep case, for the higher angle of attack at which oscillations were observed in the flight and wind tunnel tests, the calculations do not show any shock waves. Their absence lends support to the hypothesis that the observed oscillations are due to the presence of leading edge separation vortices and are not due to shock wave motion as was previously proposed.

  1. Transonic aerodynamic and aeroelastic characteristics of a variable sweep wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goorjian, P. M.; Guruswamy, G. P.; Ide, H.; Miller, G.

    1985-01-01

    The flow over the B-1 wing is studied computationally, including the aeroelastic response of the wing. Computed results are compared with results from wind tunnel and flight tests for both low-sweep and high-sweep cases, at 25.0 deg. and 67.5 deg., respectively, for selected transonic Mach numbers. The aerodynamic and aeroelastic computations are made by using the transonic unsteady code ATRAN3S. Steady aerodynamic computations compare well with wind tunnel results for the 25.0 deg. sweep case and also for small angles of attack at the 67.5 deg. sweep case. The aeroelastic response results show that the wing is stable at the low sweep angle for the calculation at the Mach number at which there is a shock wave. In the higher sweep case, for the higher angle of attack at which oscillations were observed in the flight and wind tunnel tests, the calculations do not show any shock waves. Their absence lends support to the hypothesis that the observed oscillations are due to the presence of leading edge separation vortices and are not due to shock wave motion as was previously proposed.

  2. Rotation in vibration, optimization, and aeroelastic stability problems. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaza, K. R. V.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of rotation in the areas of vibrations, dynamic stability, optimization, and aeroelasticity were studied. The governing equations of motion for the study of vibration and dynamic stability of a rapidly rotating deformable body were developed starting from the nonlinear theory of elasticity. Some common features such as the limitations of the classical theory of elasticity, the choice of axis system, the property of self-adjointness, the phenomenon of frequency splitting, shortcomings of stability methods as applied to gyroscopic systems, and the effect of internal and external damping on stability in gyroscopic systems are identified and discussed, and are then applied to three specific problems.

  3. The SRB heat shield: Aeroelastic stability during reentry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ventres, C. S.; Dowell, E. H.

    1977-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests of a 3% scale model of the aft portion of the SRB equipped with partially scaled heat shields were conducted for the purpose of measuring fluctuating pressure levels in the aft skirt region. During these tests, the heat shields were observed to oscillate violently, the oscillations in some instances causing the heat shields to fail. High speed films taken during the tests reveal a regular pattern of waves in the fabric starting near the flow stagnation point and progressing around both sides of the annulus. The amplitude of the waves was too great, and their pattern too regular, for them to be attributed to the fluctuating pressure levels measured during the tests. The cause of the oscillations observed in the model heat shields, and whether or not similar oscillations will occur in the full scale SRB heat shield during reentry were investigated. Suggestions for modifying the heat shield so as to avoid the oscillations are provided, and recommendations are made for a program of vibration and wind tunnel tests of reduced-scale aeroelastic models of the heat shield.

  4. Hover test of a full-scale hingeless helicopter rotor: Aeroelastic stability, performance and loads data. [wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, R. L.; Warmbrodt, W.

    1984-01-01

    A hover test of a full-scale, hingeless rotor system was conducted in the NASA Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel. The rotor was tested on the Ames rotor test apparatus. Rotor aeroelastic stability, performance, and loads at various rotational speeds and thrust coefficients were investigated. The primary objective was to determine the inplane stability characteristics of the rotor system. Rotor inplane damping data were obtained for operation between 350 and 425 rpm (design speed), and for thurst coefficients between 0.0 and 0.12. The rotor was stable for all conditions tested. At constant rotor rotational speed, a minimum inplane dampling level was obtained at a thrust coefficient approximately = 0.02. At constant rotor lift, a minimum in rotor inplane damping was measured at 400 rpm.

  5. Aeroelastic stability and response of horizontal axis wind turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kottapalli, S. B. R.; Friedmann, P. P.; Rosen, A.

    1979-01-01

    Coupled flap-lag-torsion equations of motion of an isolated horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) blade have been formulated. The analysis neglects blade-tower coupling. The final nonlinear equations have periodic coefficients. A new and convenient method of generating an appropriate time-dependent equilibrium position, required for the stability analysis, has been implemented and found to be computationally efficient. Steady-state response and stability boundaries for an existing (typical) HAWT blade are presented. Such stability boundaries have never been published in the literature. The results show that the isolated blade under study is basically stable. The tower shadow (wake) has a considerable effect on the out-of-plane response but leaves blade stability unchanged. Nonlinear terms can significantly affect linearized stability boundaries; however, they have a negligible effect on response, thus implying that a time-dependent equilibrium position (or steady-state response), based completely on the linear system, is appropriate for the type of HAWT blades under study.

  6. Aeroelastic response and stability of tiltrotors with elastically-coupled composite rotor blades. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, Mark W.

    1993-01-01

    There is a potential for improving the performance and aeroelastic stability of tiltrotors through the use of elastically-coupled composite rotor blades. To study the characteristics of tiltrotors with these types of rotor blades it is necessary to formulate a new analysis which has the capabilities of modeling both a tiltrotor configuration and an anisotropic rotor blade. Background for these formulations is established in two preliminary investigations. In the first, the influence of several system design parameters on tiltrotor aeroelastic stability is examined for the high-speed axial flight mode using a newly-developed rigid-blade analysis with an elastic wing finite element model. The second preliminary investigation addresses the accuracy of using a one-dimensional beam analysis to predict frequencies of elastically-coupled highly-twisted rotor blades. Important aspects of the new aeroelastic formulations are the inclusion of a large steady pylon angle which controls tilt of the rotor system with respect to the airflow, the inclusion of elastic pitch-lag coupling terms related to rotor precone, the inclusion of hub-related degrees of freedom which enable modeling of a gimballed rotor system and engine drive-train dynamics, and additional elastic coupling terms which enable modeling of the anisotropic features for both the rotor blades and the tiltrotor wing. Accuracy of the new tiltrotor analysis is demonstrated by a comparison of the results produced for a baseline case with analytical and experimental results reported in the open literature. Two investigations of elastically tailored blades on a baseline tiltrotor are then conducted. One investigation shows that elastic bending-twist coupling of the rotor blade is a very effective means for increasing the flutter velocity of a tiltrotor, and the magnitude of coupling required does not have an adverse effect on performance or blade loads. The second investigation shows that passive blade twist control via

  7. 14 CFR 25.629 - Aeroelastic stability requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... conditions, all combinations of altitudes and speeds encompassed by the VD/MD versus altitude envelope... constant altitude. In addition, a proper margin of stability must exist at all speeds up to VD/MD and... may be limited to Mach 1.0 when MD is less than 1.0 at all design altitudes, and (2) For...

  8. 14 CFR 25.629 - Aeroelastic stability requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... conditions, all combinations of altitudes and speeds encompassed by the VD/MD versus altitude envelope... constant altitude. In addition, a proper margin of stability must exist at all speeds up to VD/MD and... may be limited to Mach 1.0 when MD is less than 1.0 at all design altitudes, and (2) For...

  9. Aeroelastic stability of periodic systems with application to rotor blade flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, P.; Silverthorn, L. J.

    1974-01-01

    The dynamics of a helicopter blade in forward flight are described by a system of linear differential equations with periodic coefficients. The stability of this periodic aeroelastic system is determined, using multivariable Floquet-Liapunov theory. The transition matrix at the end of the period is evaluated by: (1) direct numerical integration, and (2) a new, approximate method, which consists in approximating a periodic function by a series of step functions. The numerical accuracy and efficiency of the methods is compared, and the second method is shown to be superior by far. Results illustrating the effect of the periodic coefficients and various blade parameters are presented.

  10. ASTROP2 Users Manual: A Program for Aeroelastic Stability Analysis of Propfans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.; Lucero, John M.

    1996-01-01

    This manual describes the input data required for using the second version of the ASTROP2 (Aeroelastic STability and Response Of Propulsion systems - 2 dimensional analysis) computer code. In ASTROP2, version 2.0, the program is divided into two modules: 2DSTRIP, which calculates the structural dynamic information; and 2DASTROP, which calculates the unsteady aerodynamic force coefficients from which the aeroelastic stability can be determined. In the original version of ASTROP2, these two aspects were performed in a single program. The improvements to version 2.0 include an option to account for counter rotation, improved numerical integration, accommodation for non-uniform inflow distribution, and an iterative scheme to flutter frequency convergence. ASTROP2 can be used for flutter analysis of multi-bladed structures such as those found in compressors, turbines, counter rotating propellers or propfans. The analysis combines a two-dimensional, unsteady cascade aerodynamics model and a three dimensional, normal mode structural model using strip theory. The flutter analysis is formulated in the frequency domain resulting in an eigenvalue determinant. The flutter frequency and damping can be inferred from the eigenvalues.

  11. Aeroelastic Stability of Rotor Blades Using Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chopra, I.; Sivaneri, N.

    1982-01-01

    The flutter stability of flap bending, lead-lag bending, and torsion of helicopter rotor blades in hover is investigated using a finite element formulation based on Hamilton's principle. The blade is divided into a number of finite elements. Quasi-steady strip theory is used to evaluate the aerodynamic loads. The nonlinear equations of motion are solved for steady-state blade deflections through an iterative procedure. The equations of motion are linearized assuming blade motion to be a small perturbation about the steady deflected shape. The normal mode method based on the coupled rotating natural modes is used to reduce the number of equations in the flutter analysis. First the formulation is applied to single-load-path blades (articulated and hingeless blades). Numerical results show very good agreement with existing results obtained using the modal approach. The second part of the application concerns multiple-load-path blades, i.e. bearingless blades. Numerical results are presented for several analytical models of the bearingless blade. Results are also obtained using an equivalent beam approach wherein a bearingless blade is modelled as a single beam with equivalent properties. Results show the equivalent beam model.

  12. FLUT - A program for aeroelastic stability analysis. [of aircraft structures in subsonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, E. H.

    1977-01-01

    A computer program (FLUT) that can be used to evaluate the aeroelastic stability of aircraft structures in subsonic flow is described. The algorithm synthesizes data from a structural vibration analysis with an unsteady aerodynamics analysis and then performs a complex eigenvalue analysis to assess the system stability. The theoretical basis of the program is discussed with special emphasis placed on some innovative techniques which improve the efficiency of the analysis. User information needed to efficiently and successfully utilize the program is provided. In addition to identifying the required input, the flow of the program execution and some possible sources of difficulty are included. The use of the program is demonstrated with a listing of the input and output for a simple example.

  13. Analysis of structures with rotating, flexible substructures applied to rotorcraft aeroelasticity in GRASP. [General Rotorcraft Aeromechanical Stability Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, Dewey H.; Hopkins, A. Stewart; Kunz, Donald L.

    1987-01-01

    Application to the General Rotorcraft Aeromechanical Stability Program (GRASP) of new methodology for structural dynamic analysis, including substructuring, frames of reference, nodes, finite elements, and constraints, is discussed. The structure is decomposed into a hierarchy of substructures, and discrete relative motion between substructures is analyzed exactly. The finite element method is used to treat deformation of continua, and the library of finite elements includes a nonlinear beam element incorporating aeroelastic effects. Analytical bases for the aeroelastic beam element and the screw constraint are considered, and the important role of geometric stiffness in the formulation is shown.

  14. Optimization of rotor blades for combined structural, performance, and aeroelastic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, David A.; Cheng, Y. P.

    1989-01-01

    The strategies whereby helicopter rotor blades can be optimized for combined structural, inertial, dynamic, aeroelastic, and aerodynamic performance characteristics are outlined. There are three key ingredients in the successful execution of such an interdisciplinary optimization. The first is the definition of a satisfactory performance index that combines all aspects of the problem without too many constraints. The second element is the judicious choice of computationally efficient analysis tools for the various quantitative components in both the cost functional and constraints. The third element is an effective strategy for combining the various disciplines either in parallel or sequential optimizations.

  15. An analysis of the effects of aeroelasticity on static longitudinal stability and control of a swept-back-wing airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoog, Richard B

    1951-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the effects of aeroelasticity on the stick-fixed static longitudinal stability and elevator angle required for balance of an airplane is presented together with calculated effects for a swept-wing bomber of relatively high flexibility. Although large changes in stability due to certain parameters are indicated for the example airplane, the over-all stability change after considering all parameters was quite small, compared to the individual effects, due to the counterbalancing of wing and tail contributions. The effect of flexibility on longitudinal control for the example airplane was found to be of little real importance.

  16. In-Flight Aeroelastic Stability of the Thermal Protection System on the NASA HIAD, Part I: Linear Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, Benjamin D.; Dowell, Earl H.; Scott, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Conical shell theory and piston theory aerodynamics are used to study the aeroelastic stability of the thermal protection system (TPS) on the NASA Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD). Structural models of the TPS consist of single or multiple orthotropic conical shell systems resting on several circumferential linear elastic supports. The shells in each model may have pinned (simply-supported) or elastically-supported edges. The Lagrangian is formulated in terms of the generalized coordinates for all displacements and the Rayleigh-Ritz method is used to derive the equations of motion. The natural modes of vibration and aeroelastic stability boundaries are found by calculating the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a large coefficient matrix. When the in-flight configuration of the TPS is approximated as a single shell without elastic supports, asymmetric flutter in many circumferential waves is observed. When the elastic supports are included, the shell flutters symmetrically in zero circumferential waves. Structural damping is found to be important in this case. Aeroelastic models that consider the individual TPS layers as separate shells tend to flutter asymmetrically at high dynamic pressures relative to the single shell models. Several parameter studies also examine the effects of tension, orthotropicity, and elastic support stiffness.

  17. Aeroelastic effects in multirotor vehicles. Part 2: Methods of solution and results illustrating coupled rotor/body aeromechanical stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatesan, C.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1987-01-01

    This report is a sequel to the earlier report titled, Aeroelastic Effects in Multi-Rotor Vehicles with Application to Hybrid Heavy Lift System, Part 1: Formulation of Equations of Motion (NASA CR-3822). The trim and stability equations are presented for a twin rotor system with a buoyant envelope and an underslung load attached to a flexible supporting structure. These equations are specialized for the case of hovering flight. A stability analysis, for such a vehicle with 31 degrees of freedom, yields a total of 62 eigenvalues. A careful parametric study is performed to identify the various blade and vehicle modes, as well as the coupling between various modes. Finally, it is shown that the coupled rotor/vehicle stability analysis provides information on both the aeroelastic stability as well as complete vehicle dynamic stability. Also presented are the results of an analytical study aimed at predicting the aeromechanical stability of a single rotor helicopter in ground resonance. The theoretical results are found to be in good agreement with the experimental results, thereby validating the analytical model for the dynamics of the coupled rotor/support system.

  18. Vibration, performance, flutter and forced response characteristics of a large-scale propfan and its aeroelastic model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    August, Richard; Kaza, Krishna Rao V.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation of the vibration, performance, flutter, and forced response of the large-scale propfan, SR7L, and its aeroelastic model, SR7A, has been performed by applying available structural and aeroelastic analytical codes and then correlating measured and calculated results. Finite element models of the blades were used to obtain modal frequencies, displacements, stresses and strains. These values were then used in conjunction with a 3-D, unsteady, lifting surface aerodynamic theory for the subsequent aeroelastic analyses of the blades. The agreement between measured and calculated frequencies and mode shapes for both models is very good. Calculated power coefficients correlate well with those measured for low advance ratios. Flutter results show that both propfans are stable at their respective design points. There is also good agreement between calculated and measured blade vibratory strains due to excitation resulting from yawed flow for the SR7A propfan. The similarity of structural and aeroelastic results show that the SR7A propfan simulates the SR7L characteristics.

  19. Aerodynamic and Aeroelastic Insights using Eigenanalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heeg, Jennifer; Dowell, Earl H.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents novel analytical results for eigenvalues and eigenvectors produced using discrete time aerodynamic and aeroelastic models. An unsteady, incompressible vortex lattice aerodynamic model is formulated in discrete time; the importance of several modeling parameters is examined. A detailed study is made of the behavior of the aerodynamic eigenvalues both in discrete and continuous time. The aerodynamic model is then incorporated into aeroelastic equations of motion. Eigenanalyses of the coupled equations produce stability results and modal characteristics which are valid for critical and non-critical velocities. Insight into the modeling and physics associated with aeroelastic system behavior is gained by examining both the eigenvalues and the eigenvectors. Potential pitfalls in discrete time model construction and analysis are examined.

  20. Aerodynamic and Aeroelastic Characteristics of a Tension Cone Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Ian G.; Cruz, Juan R.; Hughes, Monica F.; Ware, Joanne S.; Madlangbayan, Albert; Braun, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    The supersonic aerodynamic and aeroelastic characteristics of a tension cone inflatable aerodynamic decelerator were investigated by wind tunnel testing. Two sets of tests were conducted: one using rigid models and another using textile models. Tests using rigid models were conducted over a Mach number range from 1.65 to 4.5 at angles of attack from -12 to 20 degrees. The axial, normal, and pitching moment coefficients were found to be insensitive to Mach number over the tested range. The axial force coefficient was nearly constant (C(sub A) = 1.45 +/- 0.05) with respect to angle of attack. Both the normal and pitching moment coefficients were nearly linear with respect to angle of attack. The pitching moment coefficient showed the model to be statically stable about the reference point. Schlieren images and video showed a detached bow shock with no evidence of large regions of separated flow and/or embedded shocks at all Mach numbers investigated. Qualitatively similar static aerodynamic coefficient and flow visualization results were obtained using textile models at a Mach number of 2.5. Using inflatable textile models the torus pressure required to maintain the model in the fully-inflated configuration was determined. This pressure was found to be sensitive to details in the structural configuration of the inflatable models. Additional tests included surface pressure measurements on rigid models and deployment and inflation tests with inflatable models.

  1. An Experimental Evaluation of Generalized Predictive Control for Tiltrotor Aeroelastic Stability Augmentation in Airplane Mode of Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvaternik, Raymond G.; Piatak, David J.; Nixon, Mark W.; Langston, Chester W.; Singleton, Jeffrey D.; Bennett, Richard L.; Brown, Ross K.

    2001-01-01

    The results of a joint NASA/Army/Bell Helicopter Textron wind-tunnel test to assess the potential of Generalized Predictive Control (GPC) for actively controlling the swashplate of tiltrotor aircraft to enhance aeroelastic stability in the airplane mode of flight are presented. GPC is an adaptive time-domain predictive control method that uses a linear difference equation to describe the input-output relationship of the system and to design the controller. The test was conducted in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel using an unpowered 1/5-scale semispan aeroelastic model of the V-22 that was modified to incorporate a GPC-based multi-input multi-output control algorithm to individually control each of the three swashplate actuators. Wing responses were used for feedback. The GPC-based control system was highly effective in increasing the stability of the critical wing mode for all of the conditions tested, without measurable degradation of the damping in the other modes. The algorithm was also robust with respect to its performance in adjusting to rapid changes in both the rotor speed and the tunnel airspeed.

  2. Aeroelastic modal characteristics of mistuned blade assemblies: Mode localization and loss of eigenstructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierre, Christophe; Murthy, Durbha V.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation of the effects of small mistuning on the aeroelastic modes of bladed disk assemblies with aerodynamic coupling between blades is presented. The cornerstone of the approach is the use and development of perturbation methods that exhibit the crucial role of the interblade coupling and yield general findings regarding mistuning effects. It is shown that blade assemblies with weak aerodynamic interblade coupling are highly sensitive to small blade mistuning, and that their dynamics is quantitatively altered in the following ways: the regular pattern that characterizes the root locus of the tuned aeroelastic eigenvalues in the complex plane is totally lost; the aeroelastic mode shapes becomes severely localized to only a few blades of the assembly and lose their constant interblade phase angle feature; and curve veering phenomena take place when the eigenvalues are plotted versus a mistuning parameter.

  3. Modeling and Analysis of Composite Wing Sections for Improved Aeroelastic and Vibration Characteristics Using Smart Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Aditi

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop analysis procedures to investigate the coupling of composite and smart materials to improve aeroelastic and vibratory response of aerospace structures. The structural modeling must account for arbitrarily thick geometries, embedded and surface bonded sensors and actuators and imperfections, such as delamination. Changes in the dynamic response due to the presence of smart materials and delaminations is investigated. Experiments are to be performed to validate the proposed mathematical model.

  4. Using transonic small disturbance theory for predicting the aeroelastic stability of a flexible wind-tunnel model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Bennett, Robert M.

    1990-01-01

    The CAP-TSD (Computational Aeroelasticity Program - Transonic Small Disturbance) code, developed at the NASA - Langley Research Center, is applied to the Active Flexible Wing (AFW) wind tunnel model for prediction of the model's transonic aeroelastic behavior. Static aeroelastic solutions using CAP-TSD are computed. Dynamic (flutter) analyses are then performed as perturbations about the static aeroelastic deformations of the AFW. The accuracy of the static aeroelastic procedure is investigated by comparing analytical results to those from previous AFW wind tunnel experiments. Dynamic results are presented in the form of root loci at different Mach numbers for a heavy gas and air. The resultant flutter boundaries for both gases are also presented. The effects of viscous damping and angle-of-attack, on the flutter boundary in air, are presented as well.

  5. Thermistor Characteristics and Stability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fricker, H. S.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the uses of thermistors in teaching electronics and semiconductors. Describes how to experimentally measure and graph the characteristics of a thermistor. Suggests one possible approach to understand the shapes of the characteristics. (CW)

  6. Understanding the Potential of Aeroelastic Couplings to Stabilize Ground and Air Resonance in a Soft-Inplane Tiltrotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Anna K. T.

    1999-01-01

    The tiltrotor offers the best mix of hovering and cruise flight of any of the current V/STOL configurations. One possible improvement on the tiltrotors of today designs would be using a soft-inplane hingeless hub. The advantages to a soft-inplane hingeless hub range from reduced weight and maintenance to reduced vibration and loads. However, soft-inplane rotor systems are inherently in danger of the aeromechanical instabilities of ground and air resonance. Furthermore tiltrotors can be subject to whirl flutter. At least in part because of the potential for air and ground resonance in a soft-inplane rotor, the Bell XV-15, the Bell-Boeing V-22 Osprey, and the new Bell Augusta 609 have stiff-inplane, gimballed rotors which do not experience these instabilities. In order to design soft-inplane V/STOL aircraft that do not experience ground or air resonance, it is important to be able to predict these instabilities accurately. Much of the research studying the stability of tiltrotors has been focused on the understanding and prediction of whirl flutter. As this instability is increasingly well understood, air and ground resonance for a tiltrotor need to be investigated. Once we understand the problems of air and ground resonance in a tiltrotor, we must look for solutions to these instabilities. Other researchers have found composite or kinematic couplings in the blades of a helicopter helpful for ground and air resonance stability. Tiltrotor research has shown composite couplings in the wing to be helpful for whirl flutter. Therefore, this project will undertake to model ground and air resonance of a soft-inplane hingeless tiltrotor to understand the mechanisms involved and to evaluate whether aeroelastic couplings in the wing or kinematic couplings in the blades would aid in stabilizing these instabilities in a tiltrotor.

  7. Nonlinear and chaotic vibration and stability analysis of an aero-elastic piezoelectric FG plate under parametric and primary excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaee, Mousa; Jahangiri, Reza

    2015-05-01

    In this study, in the presence of supersonic aerodynamic loading, the nonlinear and chaotic vibrations and stability of a simply supported Functionally Graded Piezoelectric (FGP) rectangular plate with bonded piezoelectric layer have been investigated. It is assumed that the plate is simultaneously exposed to the effects of harmonic uniaxial in-plane force and transverse piezoelectric excitations and aerodynamic loading. It is considered that the potential distribution varies linearly through the piezoelectric layer thickness, and the aerodynamic load is modeled by the first order piston theory. The von-Karman nonlinear strain-displacement relations are used to consider the geometrical nonlinearity. Based on the Classical Plate Theory (CPT) and applying the Hamilton's principle, the nonlinear coupled partial differential equations of motion are derived. The Galerkin's procedure is used to reduce the equations of motion to nonlinear ordinary differential Mathieu equations. The validity of the formulation for analyzing the Limit Cycle Oscillation (LCO), aero-elastic stability boundaries is accomplished by comparing the results with those of the literature, and the convergence study of the FGP plate is performed. By applying the Multiple Scales Method, the case of 1:2 internal resonance and primary parametric resonance are taken into account and the corresponding averaged equations are derived and analyzed numerically. The results are provided to investigate the effects of the forcing/piezoelectric detuning parameter, amplitude of forcing/piezoelectric excitation and dynamic pressure, on the nonlinear dynamics and chaotic behavior of the FGP plate. It is revealed that under the certain conditions, due to the existence of bi-stable region of non-trivial solutions, system shows the hysteretic behavior. Moreover, in absence of airflow, it is observed that variation of control parameters leads to the multi periodic and chaotic motions.

  8. Aeroelastic analysis of wind energy conversion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugundji, J.

    1978-01-01

    An aeroelastic investigation of horizontal axis wind turbines is described. The study is divided into two simpler areas; (1) the aeroelastic stability of a single blade on a rigid tower; and (2) the mechanical vibrations of the rotor system on a flexible tower. Some resulting instabilities and forced vibration behavior are described.

  9. Vibration and aeroelasticity of advanced aircraft wings modeled as thin-walled beams: Dynamics, stability and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhanming

    Based on a refined analytical anisotropic thin-walled beam model, aeroelastic instability, dynamic aeroelastic response, active/passive aeroelastic control of advanced aircraft wings modeled as thin-walled beams are systematically addressed. The refined thin-walled beam model is based on an existing framework of the thin-walled beam model and a couple of non-classical effects that are usually also important are incorporated and the model herein developed is validated against the available experimental, Finite Element Analysis (FEA), Dynamic Finite Element (DFE), and other analytical predictions. The concept of indicial functions is used to develop unsteady aerodynamic model, which broadly encompasses the cases of incompressible, compressible subsonic, compressible supersonic and hypersonic flows. State-space conversion of the indicial function based unsteady aerodynamic model is also developed. Based on the piezoelectric material technology, a worst case control strategy based on the minimax theory towards the control of aeroelastic systems is further developed. Shunt damping within the aeroelastic tailoring environment is also investigated. The major part of this dissertation is organized in the form of self-contained chapters, each of which corresponds to a paper that has been or will be submitted to a journal for publication. In order to fullfil the requirement of having a continuous presentation of the topics, each chapter starts with the purely structural models and is gradually integrated with the involved interactive field disciplines.

  10. The Influence of Feedback on the Aeroelastic Behavior of Tilt Proprotor Aircraft Including the Effects of Fuselage Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtiss, H. C., Jr.; Komatsuzaki, T.; Traybar, J. J.

    1979-01-01

    The influence of single loop feedbacks to improve the stability of the system are considered. Reduced order dynamic models are employed where appropriate to promote physical insight. The influence of fuselage freedom on the aeroelastic stability, and the influence of the airframe flexibility on the low frequency modes of motion relevant to the stability and control characteristics of the vehicle were examined.

  11. Fundamental studies in hypersonic aeroelasticity using computational methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuruthimattam, Biju James

    This dissertation describes the aeroelastic analysis of a generic hypersonic vehicle using methods in computational aeroelasticity. This objective is achieved by first considering the behavior of a representative configuration, namely a two degree-of-freedom typical cross-section, followed by that of a three-dimensional model of the generic vehicle, operating at very high Mach numbers. The typical cross-section of a hypersonic vehicle is represented by a double-wedge cross-section, having pitch and plunge degrees of freedom. The flutter boundaries of the typical cross-section are first generated using third-order piston theory, to serve as a basis for comparison with the refined calculations. Prior to the refined calculations, the time-step requirements for the reliable computation of the unsteady airloads using Euler and Navier-Stokes aerodynamics are identified. Computational aeroelastic response results are used to obtain frequency and damping characteristics, and compared with those from piston theory solutions for a variety of flight conditions. A parametric study of offsets, wedge angles; and static angle of attack is conducted. All the solutions are fairly close below the flutter boundary, and differences between the various models increase when the flutter boundary is approached. For this geometry, differences between viscous and inviscid aeroelastic behavior are not substantial. The effects of aerodynamic heating on the aeroelastic behavior of the typical cross-section are incorporated in an approximate manner, by considering the response of a heated wing. Results indicate that aerodynamic heating reduces aeroelastic stability. This analysis was extended to a generic hypersonic vehicle, restrained such that the rigid-body degrees of freedom are absent. The aeroelastic stability boundaries of the canted fin alone were calculated using third-order piston theory. The stability boundaries for the generic vehicle were calculated at different altitudes using

  12. High Reynolds Number Effects on HSCT Stability and Control Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elzey, Michael B.; Owens, Lewis R., Jr.; Wahls, Richard A.; Wilson, Douglas L.

    1999-01-01

    Two wind tunnel tests during 1995 in the National Transonic Facility (NTF 070 and 073) served to define Reynolds number effects on longitudinal and lateral-directional stability and control. Testing was completed at both high lift and transonic conditions. The effect of Reynolds number on the total airplane configuration, horizontal and vertical tail effectiveness, forebody chine performance, rudder control and model aeroelastics was investigated. This paper will present pertinent stability and control results from these two test entries. Note that while model aeroelastic effects are examined in this presentation, no corrections for these effects have been made to the data.

  13. SR-7A aeroelastic model design report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagle, D.; Auyeung, S.; Turnberg, J.

    1986-01-01

    A scale model was designed to simulate the aeroelastic characteristics and performance of the 2.74 meter (9 ft.) diameter SR-7L blade. The procedures used in this model blade design are discussed. Included in this synopsis is background information concerning scaling parameters and an explanation of manufacturing limitations. A description of the final composite model blade, made of titanium, fiberglass, and graphite, is provided. Analytical methods for determining the blade stresses, natural frequencies and mode shapes, and stability are discussed at length.

  14. Aeroelastic Stability of A Soft-Inplane Gimballed Tiltrotor Model In Hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, Mark W.; Langston, Chester W.; Singleton, Jeffrey D.; Piatak, David J.; Kvaternik, Raymond G.; Corso, Lawrence M.; Brown, Ross

    2001-01-01

    Soft-inplane rotor systems can significantly reduce the inplane rotor loads generated during the maneuvers of large tiltrotors, thereby reducing the strength requirements and the associated structural weight of the hub. Soft-inplane rotor systems. however, are subject to instabilities associated with ground resonance, and for tiltrotors this instability has increased complexity as compared to a conventional helicopter. Researchers at Langley Research Center and Bell Helicopter-Textron, Inc. have completed ail initial study of a soft-inplane gimballed tiltrotor model subject to ground resonance conditions in hover. Parametric variations of the rotor collective pitch and blade root damping, and their associated effects oil the model stability were examined. Also considered in the study was the effectiveness of ail active swash-plate and a generalized predictive control (GPC) algorithm for stability augmentation of the ground resonance conditions. Results of this study show that the ground resonance behavior of a gimballed soft-inplane tiltrotor can be significantly different from that of a classical soft-inplane helicopter rotor. The GPC-based active swash-plate was successfully implemented, and served to significantly augment damping of the critical modes to an acceptable value.

  15. Experimental Results from the Active Aeroelastic Wing Wind Tunnel Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heeg, Jennifer; Spain, Charles V.; Florance, James R.; Wieseman, Carol D.; Ivanco, Thomas G.; DeMoss, Joshua; Silva, Walter A.; Panetta, Andrew; Lively, Peter; Tumwa, Vic

    2005-01-01

    The Active Aeroelastic Wing (AAW) program is a cooperative effort among NASA, the Air Force Research Laboratory and the Boeing Company, encompassing flight testing, wind tunnel testing and analyses. The objective of the AAW program is to investigate the improvements that can be realized by exploiting aeroelastic characteristics, rather than viewing them as a detriment to vehicle performance and stability. To meet this objective, a wind tunnel model was crafted to duplicate the static aeroelastic behavior of the AAW flight vehicle. The model was tested in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel in July and August 2004. The wind tunnel investigation served the program goal in three ways. First, the wind tunnel provided a benchmark for comparison with the flight vehicle and various levels of theoretical analyses. Second, it provided detailed insight highlighting the effects of individual parameters upon the aeroelastic response of the AAW vehicle. This parameter identification can then be used for future aeroelastic vehicle design guidance. Third, it provided data to validate scaling laws and their applicability with respect to statically scaled aeroelastic models.

  16. Application of Aeroelastic Solvers Based on Navier Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Srivastava, Rakesh

    2001-01-01

    The propulsion element of the NASA Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) initiative is directed towards increasing the overall efficiency of current aircraft engines. This effort requires an increase in the efficiency of various components, such as fans, compressors, turbines etc. Improvement in engine efficiency can be accomplished through the use of lighter materials, larger diameter fans and/or higher-pressure ratio compressors. However, each of these has the potential to result in aeroelastic problems such as flutter or forced response. To address the aeroelastic problems, the Structural Dynamics Branch of NASA Glenn has been involved in the development of numerical capabilities for analyzing the aeroelastic stability characteristics and forced response of wide chord fans, multi-stage compressors and turbines. In order to design an engine to safely perform a set of desired tasks, accurate information of the stresses on the blade during the entire cycle of blade motion is required. This requirement in turn demands that accurate knowledge of steady and unsteady blade loading is available. To obtain the steady and unsteady aerodynamic forces for the complex flows around the engine components, for the flow regimes encountered by the rotor, an advanced compressible Navier-Stokes solver is required. A finite volume based Navier-Stokes solver has been developed at Mississippi State University (MSU) for solving the flow field around multistage rotors. The focus of the current research effort, under NASA Cooperative Agreement NCC3- 596 was on developing an aeroelastic analysis code (entitled TURBO-AE) based on the Navier-Stokes solver developed by MSU. The TURBO-AE code has been developed for flutter analysis of turbomachine components and delivered to NASA and its industry partners. The code has been verified. validated and is being applied by NASA Glenn and by aircraft engine manufacturers to analyze the aeroelastic stability characteristics of modem fans, compressors

  17. Aeroelastic stability of coupled flap-lag motion of hingeless helicopter blades at arbitrary advance ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, P.; Silverthorn, L. J.

    1974-01-01

    Equations for large amplitude coupled flap-lag motion of a hingeless elastic helicopter blade in forward flight are derived. Only a torsionally rigid blade excited by quasi-steady aerodynamic loads is considered. The effects of reversed flow together with some new terms due to radial flow are included. Using Galerkin's method the spatial dependence is eliminated and the equations are linearized about a suitable equilibrium position. The resulting system of homogeneous periodic equations is solved using multivariable Floquet-Liapunov theory, and the transition matrix at the end of the period is evaluated by two separate methods. Computational efficiency of the two numerical methods is compared. Results illustrating the effects of forward flight and various important blade parameters on the stability boundaries are presented.

  18. Optimal aeroelastic vehicle sensor placement for root migration flight control applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Shehabi, Abdul Ghafoor

    2001-09-01

    An important step in control design for elastic systems is the determination of the number and location of control system components, namely sensors. The number and placement of sensors can be critical to the robust functioning of active control systems, especially when the system of interest is a large high-speed aeroelastic vehicle. The position of the sensors affects not only system stability, but also the performance of the closed-loop system. In this dissertation, a new approach for sensor placement in the integrated rigid and vibrational control of flexible aircraft structures is developed. Traditional rigid-body augmentation objectives are addressed indirectly through input-output pair and compensation selection. Aeroelastic control suppression objectives are addressed directly through sensor placement. A nonlinear programming problem is posed to minimize a cost function with specified constraints, where the cost function terms are multiplied by appropriate weighting factors. Cost function criteria are based on complex frequency domain geometric pole-zero structures in order to gain stabilize or phase stabilize the aeroelastic modes. Specifically, these criteria are based on dipole magnitude and complementary departure angle. In turn, the control design approach utilizes one of the classical methods known as Evans root migration to exploit the pole-zero structures resulting from sensor placement. Desirable complementary departure angles can lead to significant aeroelastic damping improvement as loop gain is increased, while favorable dipole magnitudes can virtually eliminate the effects of aeroelastics in a feedback loop. Appropriate constraints include minimum phase aeroelastic zeros to avoid common problems associated with right-half plane zeros. To achieve desirable flight control system characteristics via optimal sensor locations, different kinds of blending filters for multiple sensors are investigated. Static filters, as well as dynamic filters with

  19. Studies in hypersonic aeroelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nydick, Ira Harvey

    2000-11-01

    This dissertation describes the aeroelastic analysis of a generic hypersonic vehicle, focusing on two specific problems: (1) hypersonic panel flutter, and (2) aeroelastic behavior of a complete unrestrained generic hypersonic vehicle operating at very high Mach numbers. The panels are modeled as shallow shells using Marguerre nonlinear shallow shell theory for orthotropic panels and the aerodynamic loads are obtained from third order piston theory. Two models of curvature, several applied temperature distributions, and the presence of a shock are also included in the model. Results indicate that the flutter speed of the panel is significantly reduced by temperature variations comparable to the buckling temperature and by the presence of a shock. A panel with initial curvature can be more stable than the flat panel but the increase in stability depends in a complex way on the material properties of the panel and the amount of curvature. At values of dynamic pressure above critical, aperiodic motion was observed. The value of dynamic pressure for which this occurs in both heated panels and curved panels is much closer to the critical dynamic pressure than for the flat, unheated panel. A comparison of piston theory aerodynamics and Euler and Navier-Stokes aerodynamics was performed for a two dimensional panel with prescribed motion and the results indicate that while 2nd or higher order piston theory agrees very well with the Euler solution for the frequencies seen in hypersonic panel flutter, it differs substantially from the Navier-Stokes solution. The aeroelastic behavior of the complete vehicle was simulated using the unrestrained equations of motion, utilizing the method of quasi-coordinates. The unrestrained mode shapes of the vehicle were obtained from an equivalent plate analysis using an available code (ELAPS). The effects of flexible trim and rigid body degrees of freedom are carefully incorporated in the mathematical model. This model was applied to a

  20. Aeroelastic analysis of sounding rocket vehicles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, S. C.

    1973-01-01

    Rigid-body stability analysis can be extended to treat aeroelastic effects by allowing the structure to deflect under airloads as a simple beam. Linear aerodynamics and the bent shape then define the airloads. The resulting equations are indeterminant but can be manipulated to show the basic aeroelastic effects of flexibility, dynamic pressure, and angle of attack. The FLMD quasi-static program can solve these equations by iteration and compute stability for a specific vehicle/payload combination. Given the proper distributed inputs for the instant of time investigated, the FLMD predicts the center of pressure and related parameters, such as static margin.

  1. Characteristics of Stabilizer Muscles: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Green, Rodney A.; Taylor, Nicholas F.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To identify the main characteristics, based on available evidence, of stabilizer muscles to inform the development of a definition of stabilizer muscles. Methods: Electronic databases were systematically searched for relevant literature from the databases' inception to June 2013 using keywords related to stability, muscles, and characteristics of stabilizer muscles. Studies that provided at least one characteristic of a stabilizer muscle were included. For the quality assessment, all included articles were categorized as either experimental or opinion-based studies. Methodological quality was assessed using a customized checklist, and data were analyzed with a narrative synthesis involving content analysis. The number of articles providing either direct evidence supporting a link between the characteristic and joint stability or indirect evidence that a muscle considered to be a stabilizer has that characteristic determined the level of significance of that characteristic for stabilizer muscles. Results: A total of 77 studies met the inclusion criteria. The highest number of articles providing supporting evidence that a particular muscle characteristic plays a stabilizing role related to biomechanical characteristics (27 articles), followed by neurological characteristics (22 articles) and anatomical/physiological characteristics (4 articles). Conclusion: Based on a synthesis of supporting evidence from the literature, stabilizer muscles can be defined as muscles that contribute to joint stiffness by co-contraction and show an early onset of activation in response to perturbation via either a feed-forward or a feedback control mechanism. These results may guide researchers to investigate which muscles exhibit these characteristics to determine whether particular muscles have a stabilizer rather than a prime mover role during normal functioning. PMID:25922556

  2. Aeroelastic characteristics of a rapid prototype multi-material wind tunnel model of a mechanically deployable aerodynamic decelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raskin, Boris

    Scaled wind tunnel models are necessary for the development of aircraft and spacecraft to simulate aerodynamic behavior. This allows for testing multiple iterations of a design before more expensive full-scale aircraft and spacecraft are built. However, the cost of building wind tunnel models can still be high because they normally require costly subtractive manufacturing processes, such as machining, which can be time consuming and laborious due to the complex surfaces of aerodynamic models. Rapid prototyping, commonly known as 3D printing, can be utilized to save on wind tunnel model manufacturing costs. A rapid prototype multi-material wind tunnel model was manufactured for this thesis to investigate the possibility of using PolyJet 3D printing to create a model that exhibits aeroelastic behavior. The model is of NASA's Adaptable Deployable entry and Placement (ADEPT) aerodynamic decelerator, used to decelerate a spacecraft during reentry into a planet's atmosphere. It is a 60° cone with a spherically blunted nose that consists of a 12 flexible panels supported by a rigid structure of nose, ribs, and rim. The novel rapid prototype multi-material model was instrumented and tested in two flow conditions. Quantitative comparisons were made of the average forces and dynamic forces on the model, demonstrating that the model matched expected behavior for average drag, but not Strouhal number, indicating that there was no aeroelastic behavior in this particular case. It was also noted that the dynamic properties (e.g., resonant frequency) associated with the mounting scheme are very important and may dominate the measured dynamic response.

  3. Analyzing Aeroelasticity in Turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.; Srivastava, R.

    2003-01-01

    ASTROP2-LE is a computer program that predicts flutter and forced responses of blades, vanes, and other components of such turbomachines as fans, compressors, and turbines. ASTROP2-LE is based on the ASTROP2 program, developed previously for analysis of stability of turbomachinery components. In developing ASTROP2- LE, ASTROP2 was modified to include a capability for modeling forced responses. The program was also modified to add a capability for analysis of aeroelasticity with mistuning and unsteady aerodynamic solutions from another program, LINFLX2D, that solves the linearized Euler equations of unsteady two-dimensional flow. Using LINFLX2D to calculate unsteady aerodynamic loads, it is possible to analyze effects of transonic flow on flutter and forced response. ASTROP2-LE can be used to analyze subsonic, transonic, and supersonic aerodynamics and structural mistuning for rotors with blades of differing structural properties. It calculates the aerodynamic damping of a blade system operating in airflow so that stability can be assessed. The code also predicts the magnitudes and frequencies of the unsteady aerodynamic forces on the airfoils of a blade row from incoming wakes. This information can be used in high-cycle fatigue analysis to predict the fatigue lives of the blades.

  4. Loads and aeroelasticity division research and technology accomplishments for FY 1983 and plans for FY 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, J. E.; Dixon, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    Research was done in the following areas: development and validation of solution algorithms, modeling techniques, integrated finite elements for flow-thermal-structural analysis and design, optimization of aircraft and spacecraft for the best performance, reduction of loads and increase in the dynamic structural stability of flexible airframes by the use of active control, methods for predicting steady and unsteady aerodynamic loads and aeroelastic characteristics of flight vehicles with emphasis on the transonic range, and methods for predicting and reducing helicoper vibrations.

  5. Turbomachinery aeroelasticity at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaza, Krishna Rao V.

    1989-01-01

    The turbomachinery aeroelastic effort is focused on unstalled and stalled flutter, forced response, and whirl flutter of both single rotation and counter rotation propfans. It also includes forced response of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopump blades. Because of certain unique features of propfans and the SSME turbopump blades, it is not possible to directly use the existing aeroelastic technology of conventional propellers, turbofans or helicopters. Therefore, reliable aeroelastic stability and response analysis methods for these propulsion systems must be developed. The development of these methods for propfans requires specific basic technology disciplines, such as 2-D and 3-D steady and unsteady aerodynamic theories in subsonic, transonic and supersonic flow regimes; modeling of composite blades; geometric nonlinear effects; and passive and active control of flutter and response. These methods are incorporated in a computer program, ASTROP. The program has flexibility such that new and future models in basic disciplines can be easily implemented.

  6. Analytical aeroelastic stability considerations and conversion loads for an XV-15 tilt-rotor in a wind tunnel simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kottapalli, Sesi; Meza, Victor

    1992-01-01

    A rotorcraft analysis is conducted to assess tilt-rotor stability and conversion loads for the XV-15 rotor with metal blades within its specified test envelope. A 38-DOF flutter analysis based on the code by Johnson (1988) is developed to simulate a wind-tunnel test in which the rotor torque is constant and thereby study stability. The same analytical model provides the simulated loads including hub loads, blade loads, and oscillatory pitch-link loads with attention given to the nonuniform inflow through the proprotor in the presence of the wing. Tilt-rotor stability during the cruise mode is found to be sensitive to coupling effects in the control system stiffness, and a stability problem is identified in the XV-15 Advanced Technology Blades. The present analysis demonstrates that the tilt-rotor is stable within the specified test envelope of the NASA 40 x 80-ft wind tunnel.

  7. Airloads, wakes, and aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wayne

    1990-01-01

    Fundamental considerations regarding the theory of modeling of rotary wing airloads, wakes, and aeroelasticity are presented. The topics covered are: airloads and wakes, including lifting-line theory, wake models and nonuniform inflow, free wake geometry, and blade-vortex interaction; aerodynamic and wake models for aeroelasticity, including two-dimensional unsteady aerodynamics and dynamic inflow; and airloads and structural dynamics, including comprehensive airload prediction programs. Results of calculations and correlations are presented.

  8. Computational Aeroelastic Analysis of the Ares Launch Vehicle During Ascent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert E.; Chwalowski, Pawel; Massey, Steven J.; Vatsa, Veer N.; Heeg, Jennifer; Wieseman, Carol D.; Mineck, Raymond E.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the static and dynamic computational aeroelastic (CAE) analyses of the Ares crew launch vehicle (CLV) during atmospheric ascent. The influence of launch vehicle flexibility on the static aerodynamic loading and integrated aerodynamic force and moment coefficients is discussed. The ultimate purpose of this analysis is to assess the aeroelastic stability of the launch vehicle along the ascent trajectory. A comparison of analysis results for several versions of the Ares CLV will be made. Flexible static and dynamic analyses based on rigid computational fluid dynamic (CFD) data are compared with a fully coupled aeroelastic time marching CFD analysis of the launch vehicle.

  9. Aeroelastic Analysis for Aeropropulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Bakhle, Milind A.

    2002-01-01

    Aeroelastic codes with advanced capabilities for modeling flow require substantial computational time. On the other hand, fast-running linear aeroelastic codes lack the capability to model three-dimensional, transonic, vortical, and viscous flows. The goal of this work was to develop an aeroelastic code with accurate modeling capabilities and small computational requirements.

  10. Unified Formulation of the Aeroelasticity of Swept Lifting Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter; Marzocca, Piergiovanni; Librescu, Liviu

    2001-01-01

    An unified approach for dealing with stability and aeroelastic response to time-dependent pressure pulses of swept wings in an incompressible flow is developed. To this end the indicial function concept in time and frequency domains, enabling one to derive the proper unsteady aerodynamic loads is used. Results regarding stability in the frequency and time domains, and subcritical aeroelastic response to arbitrary time-dependent external excitation obtained via the direct use of the unsteady aerodynamic derivatives for 3-D wings are supplied. Closed form expressions for unsteady aerodynamic derivatives using this unified approach have been derived and used to illustrate their application to flutter and aeroelastic response to blast and sonic-boom signatures. In this context, an original representation of the aeroelastic response in the phase space was presented and pertinent conclusions on the implications of some basic parameters have been outlined.

  11. Experimental aeroelasticity history, status and future in brief

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricketts, Rodney H.

    1990-01-01

    NASA conducts wind tunnel experiments to determine and understand the aeroelastic characteristics of new and advanced flight vehicles, including fixed-wing, rotary-wing and space-launch configurations. Review and assessments are made of the state-of-the-art in experimental aeroelasticity regarding available facilities, measurement techniques, and other means and devices useful in testing. In addition, some past experimental programs are described which assisted in the development of new technology, validated new analysis codes, or provided needed information for clearing flight envelopes of unwanted aeroelastic response. Finally, needs and requirements for advances and improvements in testing capabilities for future experimental research and development programs are described.

  12. An overview of aeroelasticity studies for the National Aerospace Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricketts, Rodney H.; Noll, Thomas E.; Huttsell, Lawrence J.; Hutsell, Lawrence J.

    1993-01-01

    The National Aero-Space Plane (NASP), or X-30, is a single-stage-to-orbit vehicle that is designed to takeoff and land on conventional runways. Research in aeroelasticity was conducted by NASA and the Wright Laboratory to support the design of a flight vehicle by the national contractor team. This research includes the development of new computational codes for predicting unsteady aerodynamic pressures. In addition, studies were conducted to determine the aerodynamic heating effects on vehicle aeroelasticity and to determine the effects of fuselage flexibility on the stability of the control systems. It also includes the testing of scale models to better understand the aeroelastic behavior of the X-30 and to obtain data for code validation and correlation. This paper presents an overview of the aeroelastic research which has been conducted to support the airframe design.

  13. Aeroelastic Analysis of Modern Complex Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapania, Rakesh K.; Bhardwaj, Manoj K.; Reichenbach, Eric; Guruswamy, Guru P.

    1996-01-01

    A process is presented by which aeroelastic analysis is performed by using an advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code coupled with an advanced computational structural dynamics (CSD) code. The process is demonstrated on an F/A-18 Stabilator using NASTD (an in-house McDonnell Douglas Aerospace East CFD code) coupled with NASTRAN. The process is also demonstrated on an aeroelastic research wing (ARW-2) using ENSAERO (an in-house NASA Ames Research Center CFD code) coupled with a finite element wing-box structures code. Good results have been obtained for the F/A-18 Stabilator while results for the ARW-2 supercritical wing are still being obtained.

  14. Simplified aeroelastic modeling of horizontal axis wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wendell, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    Certain aspects of the aeroelastic modeling and behavior of the horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) are examined. Two simple three degree of freedom models are described in this report, and tools are developed which allow other simple models to be derived. The first simple model developed is an equivalent hinge model to study the flap-lag-torsion aeroelastic stability of an isolated rotor blade. The model includes nonlinear effects, preconing, and noncoincident elastic axis, center of gravity, and aerodynamic center. A stability study is presented which examines the influence of key parameters on aeroelastic stability. Next, two general tools are developed to study the aeroelastic stability and response of a teetering rotor coupled to a flexible tower. The first of these tools is an aeroelastic model of a two-bladed rotor on a general flexible support. The second general tool is a harmonic balance solution method for the resulting second order system with periodic coefficients. The second simple model developed is a rotor-tower model which serves to demonstrate the general tools. This model includes nacelle yawing, nacelle pitching, and rotor teetering. Transient response time histories are calculated and compared to a similar model in the literature. Agreement between the two is very good, especially considering how few harmonics are used. Finally, a stability study is presented which examines the effects of support stiffness and damping, inflow angle, and preconing.

  15. Simplified aeroelastic modeling of horizontal axis wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendell, J. H.

    1982-09-01

    Certain aspects of the aeroelastic modeling and behavior of the horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) are examined. Two simple three degree of freedom models are described in this report, and tools are developed which allow other simple models to be derived. The first simple model developed is an equivalent hinge model to study the flap-lag-torsion aeroelastic stability of an isolated rotor blade. The model includes nonlinear effects, preconing, and noncoincident elastic axis, center of gravity, and aerodynamic center. A stability study is presented which examines the influence of key parameters on aeroelastic stability. Next, two general tools are developed to study the aeroelastic stability and response of a teetering rotor coupled to a flexible tower. The first of these tools is an aeroelastic model of a two-bladed rotor on a general flexible support. The second general tool is a harmonic balance solution method for the resulting second order system with periodic coefficients. The second simple model developed is a rotor-tower model which serves to demonstrate the general tools. This model includes nacelle yawing, nacelle pitching, and rotor teetering. Transient response time histories are calculated and compared to a similar model in the literature. Agreement between the two is very good, especially considering how few harmonics are used. Finally, a stability study is presented which examines the effects of support stiffness and damping, inflow angle, and preconing.

  16. Advanced Aeroelastic Technologies for Turbomachinery Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, Kenneth; Srivastava, Rakesh; Reddy, T. S. R.

    2004-01-01

    A summary of the work performed under the grant NCC-1068 is presented. More details can be found in the cited references. The summary is presented in two parts to represent two areas of research. In the first part, methods to analyze a high temperature ceramic guide vane subjected to cooling jets are presented, and in the second part, the effect of unsteady aerodynamic forces on aeroelastic stability as implemented into the turbo-REDUCE code are presented

  17. Aeroelastic Computations of a Compressor Stage Using the Harmonic Balance Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.

    2010-01-01

    The aeroelastic characteristics of a compressor stage were analyzed using a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) solver that uses the harmonic balance method to solve the governing equations. The three dimensional solver models the unsteady flow field due to blade vibration using the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The formulation enables the study of the effect of blade row interaction through the inclusion of coupling modes between blade rows. It also enables the study of nonlinear effects of high amplitude blade vibration by the inclusion of higher harmonics of the fundamental blade vibration frequency. In the present work, the solver is applied to study in detail the aeroelastic characteristics of a transonic compressor stage. Various parameters were included in the study: number of coupling modes, blade row axial spacing, and operating speeds. Only the first vibration mode is considered with amplitude of oscillation in the linear range. Both aeroelastic stability (flutter) of rotor blade and unsteady loading on the stator are calculated. The study showed that for the stage considered, the rotor aerodynamic damping is not influenced by the presence of the stator even when the axial spacing is reduced by nearly 25 percent. However, the study showed that blade row interaction effects become important for the unsteady loading on the stator when the axial spacing is reduced by the same amount.

  18. An overview of selected NASP aeroelastic studies at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spain, Charles V.; Soistmann, David L.; Parker, Ellen C.; Gibbons, Michael D.; Gilbert, Michael G.

    1990-10-01

    Following an initial discussion of the NASP flight environment, the results of recent aeroelastic testing of NASP-type highly swept delta-wing models in Langley's Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) are summarized. Subsonic and transonic flutter characteristics of a variety of these models are described, and several analytical codes used to predict flutter of these models are evaluated. These codes generally provide good, but conservative predictions of subsonic and transonic flutter. Also, test results are presented on a nonlinear transonic phenomena known as aileron buzz which occurred in the wind tunnel on highly swept delta wings with full-span ailerons. An analytical procedure which assesses the effects of hypersonic heating on aeroelastic instabilities (aerothermoelasticity) is also described. This procedure accurately predicted flutter of a heated aluminum wing on which experimental data exists. Results are presented on the application of this method to calculate the flutter characteristics of a fine-element model of a generic NASP configuration. Finally, it is demonstrated analytically that active controls can be employed to improve the aeroelastic stability and ride quality of a generic NASP vehicle flying at hypersonic speeds.

  19. An overview of selected NASP aeroelastic studies at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spain, Charles V.; Soistmann, David L.; Parker, Ellen C.; Gibbons, Michael D.; Gilbert, Michael G.

    1990-01-01

    Following an initial discussion of the NASP flight environment, the results of recent aeroelastic testing of NASP-type highly swept delta-wing models in Langley's Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) are summarized. Subsonic and transonic flutter characteristics of a variety of these models are described, and several analytical codes used to predict flutter of these models are evaluated. These codes generally provide good, but conservative predictions of subsonic and transonic flutter. Also, test results are presented on a nonlinear transonic phenomena known as aileron buzz which occurred in the wind tunnel on highly swept delta wings with full-span ailerons. An analytical procedure which assesses the effects of hypersonic heating on aeroelastic instabilities (aerothermoelasticity) is also described. This procedure accurately predicted flutter of a heated aluminum wing on which experimental data exists. Results are presented on the application of this method to calculate the flutter characteristics of a fine-element model of a generic NASP configuration. Finally, it is demonstrated analytically that active controls can be employed to improve the aeroelastic stability and ride quality of a generic NASP vehicle flying at hypersonic speeds.

  20. Aeroelastic tailoring and structural optimization of joined-wing configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Hwan

    2002-08-01

    Methodology for integrated aero-structural design was developed using formal optimization. ASTROS (Automated STRuctural Optimization System) was used as an analyzer and an optimizer for performing joined-wing weight optimization with stress, displacement, cantilever or body-freedom flutter constraints. As a pre/post processor, MATLAB was used for generating input file of ASTROS and for displaying the results of the ASTROS. The effects of the aeroelastic constraints on the isotropic and composite joined-wing weight were examined using this developed methodology. The aeroelastic features of a joined-wing aircraft were examined using both the Rayleigh-Ritz method and a finite element based aeroelastic stability and weight optimization procedure. Aircraft rigid-body modes are included to analyze of body-freedom flutter of the joined-wing aircraft. Several parametric studies were performed to determine the most important parameters that affect the aeroelastic behavior of a joined-wing aircraft. The special feature of a joined-wing aircraft is body-freedom flutter involving frequency interaction of the first elastic mode and the aircraft short period mode. In most parametric study cases, the body-freedom flutter speed was less than the cantilever flutter speed that is independent of fuselage inertia. As fuselage pitching moment of inertia was increased, the body-freedom flutter speed increased. When the pitching moment of inertia reaches a critical value, transition from body-freedom flutter to cantilever flutter occurred. The effects of composite laminate orientation on the front and rear wings of a joined-wing configuration were studied. An aircraft pitch divergence mode, which occurred because of forward movement of center of pressure due to wing deformation, was found. Body-freedom flutter and cantilever-like flutter were also found depending on combination of front and rear wing ply orientations. Optimized wing weight behaviors of the planar and non

  1. Predicting Unsteady Aeroelastic Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strganac, Thomas W.; Mook, Dean T.

    1990-01-01

    New method for predicting subsonic flutter, static deflections, and aeroelastic divergence developed. Unsteady aerodynamic loads determined by unsteady-vortex-lattice method. Accounts for aspect ratio and angle of attack. Equations for motion of wing and flow field solved iteratively and simultaneously. Used to predict transient responses to initial disturbances, and to predict steady-state static and oscillatory responses. Potential application for research in such unsteady structural/flow interactions as those in windmills, turbines, and compressors.

  2. Vibration and aeroelastic analysis of highly flexible HALE aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chong-Seok

    The highly flexible HALE (High Altitude Long Endurance) aircraft analysis methodology is of interest because early studies indicated that HALE aircraft might have different vibration and aeroelastic characteristics from those of conventional aircraft. Recently the computer code Nonlinear Aeroelastic Trim And Stability of HALE Aircraft (NATASHA) was developed under NASA sponsorship. NATASHA can predict the flight dynamics and aeroelastic behavior for HALE aircraft with a flying wing configuration. Further analysis improvements for NATASHA were required to extend its capability to the ground vibration test (GVT) environment and to both GVT and aeroelastic behavior of HALE aircraft with other configurations. First, the analysis methodology, based on geometrically exact fully intrinsic beam theory, was extended to treat other aircraft cofigurations. Conventional aircraft with flexible fuselage and tail can now be modeled by treating the aircraft as an assembly of beam elements. NATASHA is now applicable to any aircraft cofiguration that can be modeled this way. The intrinsic beam formulation, which is a fundamental structural modeling approach, is now capable of being applying to a structure consisting of multiple beams by relating the virtual displacements and rotations at points where two or more beam elements are connected to each other. Additional aspects are also considered in the analysis such as auxiliary elevator input in the horizontal tail and fuselage aerodynamics. Second, the modeling approach was extended to treat the GVT environment for HALE aircraft, which have highly flexible wings. GVT has its main purpose to provide modal characteristics for model validation. A bungee formulation was developed by the augmented Lagrangian method and coupled to the intrinsic beam formulation for the GVT modeling. After the coupling procedure, the whole formulation cannot be fully intrinsic because the geometric constraint by bungee cords makes the system statically

  3. Development and Testing of Control Laws for the Active Aeroelastic Wing Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dibley, Ryan P.; Allen, Michael J.; Clarke, Robert; Gera, Joseph; Hodgkinson, John

    2005-01-01

    The Active Aeroelastic Wing research program was a joint program between the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory and NASA established to investigate the characteristics of an aeroelastic wing and the technique of using wing twist for roll control. The flight test program employed the use of an F/A-18 aircraft modified by reducing the wing torsional stiffness and adding a custom research flight control system. The research flight control system was optimized to maximize roll rate using only wing surfaces to twist the wing while simultaneously maintaining design load limits, stability margins, and handling qualities. NASA Dryden Flight Research Center developed control laws using the software design tool called CONDUIT, which employs a multi-objective function optimization to tune selected control system design parameters. Modifications were made to the Active Aeroelastic Wing implementation in this new software design tool to incorporate the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center nonlinear F/A-18 simulation for time history analysis. This paper describes the design process, including how the control law requirements were incorporated into constraints for the optimization of this specific software design tool. Predicted performance is also compared to results from flight.

  4. Application of the Finite Element Method to Rotary Wing Aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straub, F. K.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1982-01-01

    A finite element method for the spatial discretization of the dynamic equations of equilibrium governing rotary-wing aeroelastic problems is presented. Formulation of the finite element equations is based on weighted Galerkin residuals. This Galerkin finite element method reduces algebraic manipulative labor significantly, when compared to the application of the global Galerkin method in similar problems. The coupled flap-lag aeroelastic stability boundaries of hingeless helicopter rotor blades in hover are calculated. The linearized dynamic equations are reduced to the standard eigenvalue problem from which the aeroelastic stability boundaries are obtained. The convergence properties of the Galerkin finite element method are studied numerically by refining the discretization process. Results indicate that four or five elements suffice to capture the dynamics of the blade with the same accuracy as the global Galerkin method.

  5. In-Flight Aeroelastic Stability of the Thermal Protection System on the NASA HIAD, Part II: Nonlinear Theory and Extended Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, Benjamin D.; Dowell, Earl H.; Scott, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Conical shell theory and a supersonic potential flow aerodynamic theory are used to study the nonlinear pressure buckling and aeroelastic limit cycle behavior of the thermal protection system for NASA's Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator. The structural model of the thermal protection system consists of an orthotropic conical shell of the Donnell type, resting on several circumferential elastic supports. Classical Piston Theory is used initially for the aerodynamic pressure, but was found to be insufficient at low supersonic Mach numbers. Transform methods are applied to the convected wave equation for potential flow, and a time-dependent aerodynamic pressure correction factor is obtained. The Lagrangian of the shell system is formulated in terms of the generalized coordinates for all displacements and the Rayleigh-Ritz method is used to derive the governing differential-algebraic equations of motion. Aeroelastic limit cycle oscillations and buckling deformations are calculated in the time domain using a Runge-Kutta method in MATLAB. Three conical shell geometries were considered in the present analysis: a 3-meter diameter 70 deg. cone, a 3.7-meter 70 deg. cone, and a 6-meter diameter 70 deg. cone. The 6-meter configuration was loaded statically and the results were compared with an experimental load test of a 6-meter HIAD. Though agreement between theoretical and experimental strains was poor, the circumferential wrinkling phenomena observed during the experiments was captured by the theory and axial deformations were qualitatively similar in shape. With Piston Theory aerodynamics, the nonlinear flutter dynamic pressures of the 3-meter configuration were in agreement with the values calculated using linear theory, and the limit cycle amplitudes were generally on the order of the shell thickness. The effect of axial tension was studied for this configuration, and increasing tension was found to decrease the limit cycle amplitudes when the circumferential

  6. Aeroelasticity - Frontiers and beyond /von Karman Lecture/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrick, I. E.

    1976-01-01

    The lecture aims at giving a broad survey of the current reaches of aeroelasticity with some narrower views for the specialist. After a short historical review of concepts for orientation, several topics are briefly presented. These touch on current flight vehicles having special points of aeroelastic interest; recent developments in the active control of aeroelastic response including control of flutter; remarks on the unsteady aerodynamics of arbitrary configurations; problems of the space shuttle related to aeroelasticity; and aeroelastic response in flight.

  7. Coupled nonlinear aeroelasticity and flight dynamics of fully flexible aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Weihua

    This dissertation introduces an approach to effectively model and analyze the coupled nonlinear aeroelasticity and flight dynamics of highly flexible aircraft. A reduced-order, nonlinear, strain-based finite element framework is used, which is capable of assessing the fundamental impact of structural nonlinear effects in preliminary vehicle design and control synthesis. The cross-sectional stiffness and inertia properties of the wings are calculated along the wing span, and then incorporated into the one-dimensional nonlinear beam formulation. Finite-state unsteady subsonic aerodynamics is used to compute airloads along lifting surfaces. Flight dynamic equations are then introduced to complete the aeroelastic/flight dynamic system equations of motion. Instead of merely considering the flexibility of the wings, the current work allows all members of the vehicle to be flexible. Due to their characteristics of being slender structures, the wings, tail, and fuselage of highly flexible aircraft can be modeled as beams undergoing three dimensional displacements and rotations. New kinematic relationships are developed to handle the split beam systems, such that fully flexible vehicles can be effectively modeled within the existing framework. Different aircraft configurations are modeled and studied, including Single-Wing, Joined-Wing, Blended-Wing-Body, and Flying-Wing configurations. The Lagrange Multiplier Method is applied to model the nodal displacement constraints at the joint locations. Based on the proposed models, roll response and stability studies are conducted on fully flexible and rigidized models. The impacts of the flexibility of different vehicle members on flutter with rigid body motion constraints, flutter in free flight condition, and roll maneuver performance are presented. Also, the static stability of the compressive member of the Joined-Wing configuration is studied. A spatially-distributed discrete gust model is incorporated into the time simulation

  8. Technical activities of the configuration aeroelasticity branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Stanley R. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    A number of recent technical activities of the Configuration Aeroelasticity Branch of the NASA Langley Research Center are discussed in detail. The information on the research branch is compiled in twelve separate papers. The first of these topics is a summary of the purpose of the branch, including a full description of the branch and its associated projects and program efforts. The next ten papers cover specific projects and are as follows: Experimental transonic flutter characteristics of supersonic cruise configurations; Aeroelastic effects of spoiler surfaces mounted on a low aspect ratio rectangular wing; Planform curvature effects on flutter of 56 degree swept wing determined in Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT); An introduction to rotorcraft testing in TDT; Rotorcraft vibration reduction research at the TDT; A preliminary study to determine the effects of tip geometry on the flutter of aft swept wings; Aeroelastic models program; NACA 0012 pressure model and test plan; Investigation of the use of extension twist coupling in composite rotor blades; and Improved finite element methods for rotorcraft structures. The final paper describes the primary facility operation by the branch, the Langley TDT.

  9. Development of an Aeroelastic Code Based on an Euler/Navier-Stokes Aerodynamic Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakhle, Milind A.; Srivastava, Rakesh; Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Stefko, George L.; Janus, Mark J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an aeroelastic code (TURBO-AE) based on an Euler/Navier-Stokes unsteady aerodynamic analysis. A brief review of the relevant research in the area of propulsion aeroelasticity is presented. The paper briefly describes the original Euler/Navier-Stokes code (TURBO) and then details the development of the aeroelastic extensions. The aeroelastic formulation is described. The modeling of the dynamics of the blade using a modal approach is detailed, along with the grid deformation approach used to model the elastic deformation of the blade. The work-per-cycle approach used to evaluate aeroelastic stability is described. Representative results used to verify the code are presented. The paper concludes with an evaluation of the development thus far, and some plans for further development and validation of the TURBO-AE code.

  10. Aeroelastic tailoring in wind-turbine blade applications

    SciTech Connect

    Veers, P.; Lobitz, D.; Bir, G.

    1998-04-01

    This paper reviews issues related to the use of aeroelastic tailoring as a cost-effective, passive means to shape the power curve and reduce loads. Wind turbine blades bend and twist during operation, effectively altering the angle of attack, which in turn affects loads and energy production. There are blades now in use that have significant aeroelastic couplings, either on purpose or because of flexible and light-weight designs. Since aeroelastic effects are almost unavoidable in flexible blade designs, it may be desirable to tailor these effects to the authors advantage. Efforts have been directed at adding flexible devices to a blade, or blade tip, to passively regulate power (or speed) in high winds. It is also possible to build a small amount of desirable twisting into the load response of a blade with proper asymmetric fiber lay up in the blade skin. (Such coupling is akin to distributed {delta}{sub 3} without mechanical hinges.) The tailored twisting can create an aeroelastic effect that has payoff in either better power production or in vibration alleviation, or both. Several research efforts have addressed different parts of this issue. Research and development in the use of aeroelastic tailoring on helicopter rotors is reviewed. Potential energy gains as a function of twist coupling are reviewed. The effects of such coupling on rotor stability have been studied and are presented here. The ability to design in twist coupling with either stretching or bending loads is examined also.

  11. Aeroelastic Analysis of Modern Complex Wings Using ENSAERO and NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhardwaj, Manoj

    1995-01-01

    A process is presented by which static aeroelastic analysis is performed using Euler flow equations in conjunction with an advanced structural analysis tool, NASTRAN. The process deals with the interfacing of two separate codes in the fields of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and computational structural dynamics (CSD). The process is demonstrated successfully on an F/A-18 Stabilator (horizontal tail).

  12. Aeroelastic Tailoring of a Plate Wing with Functionally Graded Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunning, Peter D.; Stanford, Bret K.; Kim, H. Alicia; Jutte, Christine V.

    2014-01-01

    This work explores the use of functionally graded materials for the aeroelastic tailoring of a metallic cantilevered plate-like wing. Pareto trade-off curves between dynamic stability (flutter) and static aeroelastic stresses are obtained for a variety of grading strategies. A key comparison is between the effectiveness of material grading, geometric grading (i.e., plate thickness variations), and using both simultaneously. The introduction of material grading does, in some cases, improve the aeroelastic performance. This improvement, and the physical mechanism upon which it is based, depends on numerous factors: the two sets of metallic material parameters used for grading, the sweep of the plate, the aspect ratio of the plate, and whether the material is graded continuously or discretely.

  13. Calculations in bridge aeroelasticity via CFD

    SciTech Connect

    Brar, P.S.; Raul, R.; Scanlan, R.H.

    1996-12-31

    The central focus of the present study is the numerical calculation of flutter derivatives. These aeroelastic coefficients play an important role in determining the stability or instability of long, flexible structures under ambient wind loading. A class of Civil Engineering structures most susceptible to such an instability are long-span bridges of the cable-stayed or suspended-span variety. The disastrous collapse of the Tacoma Narrows suspension bridge in the recent past, due to a flutter instability, has been a big impetus in motivating studies in flutter of bridge decks.

  14. Computational Aeroelasticity: Success, Progress, Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, David M.; Liu, Danny D.; Huttsell, Lawrence J.

    2003-01-01

    The formal term Computational Aeroelasticity (CAE) has only been recently adopted to describe aeroelastic analysis methods coupling high-level computational fluid dynamics codes with structural dynamics techniques. However, the general field of aeroelastic computations has enjoyed a rich history of development and application since the first hand-calculations performed in the mid 1930 s. This paper portrays a much broader definition of Computational Aeroelasticity; one that encompasses all levels of aeroelastic computation from the simplest linear aerodynamic modeling to the highest levels of viscous unsteady aerodynamics, from the most basic linear beam structural models to state-of-the-art Finite Element Model (FEM) structural analysis. This paper is not written as a comprehensive history of CAE, but rather serves to review the development and application of aeroelastic analysis methods. It describes techniques and example applications that are viewed as relatively mature and accepted, the "successes" of CAE. Cases where CAE has been successfully applied to unique or emerging problems, but the resulting techniques have proven to be one-of-a-kind analyses or areas where the techniques have yet to evolve into a routinely applied methodology are covered as "progress" in CAE. Finally the true value of this paper is rooted in the description of problems where CAE falls short in its ability to provide relevant tools for industry, the so-called "challenges" to CAE.

  15. Nonlinear Time Delayed Feedback Control of Aeroelastic Systems: A Functional Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzocca, Piergiovanni; Librescu, Liviu; Silva, Walter A.

    2003-01-01

    In addition to its intrinsic practical importance, nonlinear time delayed feedback control applied to lifting surfaces can result in interesting aeroelastic behaviors. In this paper, nonlinear aeroelastic response to external time-dependent loads and stability boundary for actively controlled lifting surfaces, in an incompressible flow field, are considered. The structural model and the unsteady aerodynamics are considered linear. The implications of the presence of time delays in the linear/nonlinear feedback control and of geometrical parameters on the aeroelasticity of lifting surfaces are analyzed and conclusions on their implications are highlighted.

  16. Status of NASA full-scale engine aeroelasticity research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubomski, J. F.

    1980-01-01

    Data relevant to several types of aeroelastic instabilities were obtained using several types of turbojet and turbofan engines. In particular, data relative to separated flow (stall) flutter, choke flutter, and system mode instabilities are presented. The unique characteristics of these instabilities are discussed, and a number of correlations are presented that help identify the nature of the phenomena.

  17. Aeroelastic tailoring - Theory, practice, and promise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirk, M. H.; Hertz, T. J.; Weisshaar, T. A.

    1986-01-01

    Aeroelastic tailoring technology is reviewed with reference to the historical background, the underlying theory, current trends, and specific applications. The specific application discussed include the Transonic Aircraft Technology program, an Advanced Design Composite Aircraft, the Wing/Inlet Advanced Development program, and the forward-swept wing. Finally, the future of aeroelastic tailoring and the development of an aeroelastic tailoring analysis and design tool under the Automated Strength-Aeroelastic Design program are examined.

  18. Aeroelastic simulation of higher harmonic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Lawson H.; Friedmann, Peretz P.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes the development of an aeroelastic analysis of a helicopter rotor and its application to the simulation of helicopter vibration reduction through higher harmonic control (HHC). An improved finite-state, time-domain model of unsteady aerodynamics is developed to capture high frequency aerodynamic effects. An improved trim procedure is implemented which accounts for flap, lead-lag, and torsional deformations of the blade. The effect of unsteady aerodynamics is studied and it is found that its impact on blade aeroelastic stability and low frequency response is small, but it has a significant influence on rotor hub vibrations. Several different HHC algorithms are implemented on a hingeless rotor and their effectiveness in reducing hub vibratory shears is compared. All the controllers are found to be quite effective, but very differing HHC inputs are required depending on the aerodynamic model used. Effects of HHC on rotor stability and power requirements are found to be quite small. Simulations of roughly equivalent articulated and hingeless rotors are carried out, and it is found that hingeless rotors can require considerably larger HHC inputs to reduce vibratory shears. This implies that the practical implementation of HHC on hingeless rotors might be considerably more difficult than on articulated rotors.

  19. An experimental investigation of the flap-lag-torsion aeroelastic stability of a small-scale hingeless helicopter rotor in hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharpe, David L.

    1986-01-01

    A small scale, 1.92 m diam, torsionally soft, hingeless helicopter rotor was investigated in hover to determine isolated rotor stability characteristics. The two-bladed, untwisted rotor was tested on a rigid test stand at tip speeds up to 101 m/sec. The rotor mode of interest is the lightly damped lead-lag mode. The dimensionless lead-lag frequency of the mode is approximately 1.5 at the highest tip speed. The hub was designed to allow variation in precone, blade droop, pitch control stiffness, and blade pitch angle. Measurements of modal frequency and damping were obtained for several combinations of these hub parameters at several values of rotor speed. Steady blade bending moments were also measured. The lead-lag damping measurements were found to agree well with theoretical predictions for low values of blade pitch angle. The test data confirmed the predicted effects of precone, droop, and pitch control stiffness parameters on lead-lag damping. The correlation between theory and experiment was found to be poor for the mid-to-high range of pitch angles where the theory substantially overpredicted the experimental lead-lag damping. The poor correlation in the mid-to-high blade pitch angle range is attributed to low Reynolds number nonlinear aerodynamics effects not included in the theory. The experimental results also revealed an asymmetry in lead-lag damping between positive and negative thrust conditions.

  20. Aeroelastic analysis of hypersonic vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedmann, P. P.; McNamara, J. J.; Thuruthimattam, B. J.; Nydick, I.

    2004-06-01

    This paper presents a fundamental study of the aeroelastic behavior of hypersonic vehicles. Two separate configurations are examined. First, a typical cross-section analysis of a double-wedge airfoil in hypersonic flow is performed using three different types of unsteady airloads: piston theory and complete Euler and Navier-Stokes solutions based on computational fluid dynamics. The analysis of the double-wedge airfoil is used to justify the usage of the simple aerodynamics for a reusable launch vehicle (RLV). Subsequently, the aeroelastic problem for a complete vehicle that resembles an RLV in trimmed flight is considered, using approximate first-order piston theory aerodynamics. The results provided for these configurations provide guidelines for approximate aeroelastic modelling of hypersonic vehicles.

  1. Aeroelastic behavior of composite helicopter rotor blades with advanced geometry tips

    SciTech Connect

    Friedmann, P.P.; Yuan, K.A.

    1995-12-31

    A new structural and aeroelastic model capable of representing the aeroelastic stability and response of composite helicopter rotor blades with advanced geometry tips is presented. Where it is understood that advanced geometry tips are blade tips having sweep, anhedral and taper in the outboard 10% segment of the blade. The blade is modeled by beam finite elements. A single element is used to represent the swept tip. The nonlinear equations of motion are derived using the Hamilton`s principle and are based on moderate deflection theory. Thus, the nonlinearities are of the geometric type. The important structural blade attributes captured by the model are arbitrary cross-sectional shape, general anisotropic material behavior, transverse shear and out-of-plane warping. The aerodynamic loads are based on quasi-steady Greenberg theory with reverse flow effects, using an implicit formulation. The nonlinear aeroelastic response of the blade is obtained from a fully coupled propulsive trim/aeroelastic response analysis. Aeroelastic stability is obtained from linearizing the equations of motion about the steady state response of the blade and using Floquet theory. Numerical results for the aeroelastic stability and response of a hingeless composite blade with two cell type cross section are presented, together with vibratory hub shears and moments. The influence of ply orientation and tip sweep is clearly illustrated by the results.

  2. Development of an aeroelastic methodology for surface morphing rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, James R.

    Helicopter performance capabilities are limited by maximum lift characteristics and vibratory loading. In high speed forward flight, dynamic stall and transonic flow greatly increase the amplitude of vibratory loads. Experiments and computational simulations alike have indicated that a variety of active rotor control devices are capable of reducing vibratory loads. For example, periodic blade twist and flap excitation have been optimized to reduce vibratory loads in various rotors. Airfoil geometry can also be modified in order to increase lift coefficient, delay stall, or weaken transonic effects. To explore the potential benefits of active controls, computational methods are being developed for aeroelastic rotor evaluation, including coupling between computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and computational structural dynamics (CSD) solvers. In many contemporary CFD/CSD coupling methods it is assumed that the airfoil is rigid to reduce the interface by single dimension. Some methods retain the conventional one-dimensional beam model while prescribing an airfoil shape to simulate active chord deformation. However, to simulate the actual response of a compliant airfoil it is necessary to include deformations that originate not only from control devices (such as piezoelectric actuators), but also inertial forces, elastic stresses, and aerodynamic pressures. An accurate representation of the physics requires an interaction with a more complete representation of loads and geometry. A CFD/CSD coupling methodology capable of communicating three-dimensional structural deformations and a distribution of aerodynamic forces over the wetted blade surface has not yet been developed. In this research an interface is created within the Fully Unstructured Navier-Stokes (FUN3D) solver that communicates aerodynamic forces on the blade surface to University of Michigan's Nonlinear Active Beam Solver (UM/NLABS -- referred to as NLABS in this thesis). Interface routines are developed for

  3. Propulsion Aeroelastic Analysis Developed for Flutter and Forced Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakhle, Milind A.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field develops new technologies to increase the fuel efficiency of aircraft engines, improve the safety of engine operation, reduce emissions, and reduce engine noise. With the development of new designs for fans, compressors, and turbines to achieve these goals, the basic aeroelastic requirements are that there should be no flutter (self-excited vibrations) or high resonant blade stresses (due to forced response) in the operating regime. Therefore, an accurate prediction and analysis capability is required to verify the aeroelastic soundness of the designs. Such a three-dimensional viscous propulsion aeroelastic analysis capability has been developed at Glenn with support from the Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) program. This newly developed aeroelastic analysis capability is based on TURBO, a threedimensional unsteady aerodynamic Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes turbomachinery code developed previously under a grant from Glenn. TURBO can model the viscous flow effects that play an important role in certain aeroelastic problems such as flutter with flow separation, flutter at high loading conditions near the stall line (stall flutter), flutter in the presence of shock and boundary-layer interaction, and forced response due to wakes and shock impingement. In aeroelastic analysis, the structural dynamics representation of the blades is based on normal modes. A finite-element analysis code is used to calculate these in-vacuum vibration modes and the associated natural frequencies. In an aeroelastic analysis using the TURBO code, flutter and forced response are modeled as being uncoupled. To calculate if a blade row will flutter, one prescribes the motion of the blade to be a harmonic vibration in a specified in-vacuum normal mode. An aeroelastic analysis preprocessor is used to generate the displacement field required for the analysis. The work done by aerodynamic forces on the vibrating blade during a cycle of vibration is

  4. Plans for Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heeg, Jennifer; Ballmann, Josef; Bhatia, Kumar; Blades, Eric; Boucke, Alexander; Chwalowski, Pawel; Dietz, Guido; Dowell, Earl; Florance, Jennifer P.; Hansen, Thorsten; Mani, Mori; Marvriplis, Dimitri; Perry, Boyd, III; Ritter, Markus; Schuster, David M.; Smith, Marilyn; Taylor, Paul; Whiting, Brent; Wieseman, Carol C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes the plans for the first Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop. The workshop is designed to assess the state of the art of computational methods for predicting unsteady flow fields and aeroelastic response. The goals are to provide an impartial forum to evaluate the effectiveness of existing computer codes and modeling techniques, and to identify computational and experimental areas needing additional research and development. Three subject configurations have been chosen from existing wind tunnel data sets where there is pertinent experimental data available for comparison. For each case chosen, the wind tunnel testing was conducted using forced oscillation of the model at specified frequencies

  5. Aeroelastic Flight Data Analysis with the Hilbert-Huang Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, Martin J.; Prazenica, Chad

    2006-01-01

    This report investigates the utility of the Hilbert Huang transform for the analysis of aeroelastic flight data. It is well known that the classical Hilbert transform can be used for time-frequency analysis of functions or signals. Unfortunately, the Hilbert transform can only be effectively applied to an extremely small class of signals, namely those that are characterized by a single frequency component at any instant in time. The recently-developed Hilbert Huang algorithm addresses the limitations of the classical Hilbert transform through a process known as empirical mode decomposition. Using this approach, the data is filtered into a series of intrinsic mode functions, each of which admits a well-behaved Hilbert transform. In this manner, the Hilbert Huang algorithm affords time-frequency analysis of a large class of signals. This powerful tool has been applied in the analysis of scientific data, structural system identification, mechanical system fault detection, and even image processing. The purpose of this report is to demonstrate the potential applications of the Hilbert Huang algorithm for the analysis of aeroelastic systems, with improvements such as localized online processing. Applications for correlations between system input and output, and amongst output sensors, are discussed to characterize the time-varying amplitude and frequency correlations present in the various components of multiple data channels. Online stability analyses and modal identification are also presented. Examples are given using aeroelastic test data from the F-18 Active Aeroelastic Wing airplane, an Aerostructures Test Wing, and pitch plunge simulation.

  6. Aeroelastic Response and Protection of Space Shuttle External Tank Cable Trays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, John W.; Keller, Donald F.; Schuster, David M.; Piatak, David J.; Rausch, Russ D.; Bartels, Robert E.; Ivanco, Thomas G.; Cole, Stanley R.; Spain, Charles V.

    2005-01-01

    Sections of the Space Shuttle External Tank Liquid Oxygen (LO2) and Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) cable trays are shielded from potentially damaging airloads with foam Protuberance Aerodynamic Load (PAL) Ramps. Flight standard design LO2 and LH2 cable tray sections were tested with and without PAL Ramp models in the United States Air Force Arnold Engineering Development Center s (AEDC) 16T transonic wind tunnel to obtain experimental data on the aeroelastic stability and response characteristics of the trays and as part of the larger effort to determine whether the PAL ramps can be safely modified or removed. Computational Fluid Dynamic simulations of the full-stack shuttle launch configuration were used to investigate the flow characeristics around and under the cable trays without the protective PAL ramps and to define maximum crossflow Mach numbers and dynamic pressures experienced during launch. These crossflow conditions were used to establish wind tunnel test conditions which also included conservative margins. For all of the conditions and configurations tested, no aeroelastic instabilities or unacceptable dynamic response levels were encountered and no visible structural damage was experienced by any of the tested cable tray sections. Based upon this aeroelastic characterization test, three potentially acceptable alternatives are available for the LO2 cable tray PAL Ramps: Mini-Ramps, Tray Fences, or No Ramps. All configurations were tested to maximum conditions, except the LH2 trays at -15 deg. crossflow angle. This exception is the only caveat preventing the proposal of acceptable alternative configurations for the LH2 trays as well. Structural assessment of all tray loads and tray response measurements from launches following the Shuttle Return To Flight with the existing PAL Ramps will determine the acceptability of these PAL Ramp alternatives.

  7. An overview of aeroelasticity studies for the National Aero-Space Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricketts, Rodney H.; Noll, Thomas E.; Whitlow, Woodrow, Jr.; Huttsell, Lawrence J.

    1993-01-01

    The National Aero-Space Plane (NASP), or X-30, is a single-stage-to-orbit vehicle that is designed to takeoff and land on conventional runways. Research in aeroelasticity was conducted by the NASA and the Wright Laboratory to support the design of a flight vehicle by the national contractor team. This research includes the development of new computational codes for predicting unsteady aerodynamic pressures. In addition, studies were conducted to determine the aerodynamic heating effects on vehicle aeroelasticity and to determine the effects of fuselage flexibility on the stability of the control systems. It also includes the testing of scale models to better understand the aeroelastic behavior of the X-30 and to obtain data for code validation and correlation. This paper presents an overview of the aeroelastic research which has been conducted to support the airframe design.

  8. Exploratory Studies in Generalized Predictive Control for Active Aeroelastic Control of Tiltrotor Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvaternik, Raymond G.; Juang, Jer-Nan; Bennett, Richard L.

    2000-01-01

    The Aeroelasticity Branch at NASA Langley Research Center has a long and substantive history of tiltrotor aeroelastic research. That research has included a broad range of experimental investigations in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) using a variety of scale models and the development of essential analyses. Since 1994, the tiltrotor research program has been using a 1/5-scale, semispan aeroelastic model of the V-22 designed and built by Bell Helicopter Textron Inc. (BHTI) in 1981. That model has been refurbished to form a tiltrotor research testbed called the Wing and Rotor Aeroelastic Test System (WRATS) for use in the TDT. In collaboration with BHTI, studies under the current tiltrotor research program are focused on aeroelastic technology areas having the potential for enhancing the commercial and military viability of tiltrotor aircraft. Among the areas being addressed, considerable emphasis is being directed to the evaluation of modern adaptive multi-input multi- output (MIMO) control techniques for active stability augmentation and vibration control of tiltrotor aircraft. As part of this investigation, a predictive control technique known as Generalized Predictive Control (GPC) is being studied to assess its potential for actively controlling the swashplate of tiltrotor aircraft to enhance aeroelastic stability in both helicopter and airplane modes of flight. This paper summarizes the exploratory numerical and experimental studies that were conducted as part of that investigation.

  9. An Aeroelastic Analysis of a Thin Flexible Membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Robert C.; Bartels, Robert E.; Kandil, Osama A.

    2007-01-01

    Studies have shown that significant vehicle mass and cost savings are possible with the use of ballutes for aero-capture. Through NASA's In-Space Propulsion program, a preliminary examination of ballute sensitivity to geometry and Reynolds number was conducted, and a single-pass coupling between an aero code and a finite element solver was used to assess the static aeroelastic effects. There remain, however, a variety of open questions regarding the dynamic aeroelastic stability of membrane structures for aero-capture, with the primary challenge being the prediction of the membrane flutter onset. The purpose of this paper is to describe and begin addressing these issues. The paper includes a review of the literature associated with the structural analysis of membranes and membrane utter. Flow/structure analysis coupling and hypersonic flow solver options are also discussed. An approach is proposed for tackling this problem that starts with a relatively simple geometry and develops and evaluates analysis methods and procedures. This preliminary study considers a computationally manageable 2-dimensional problem. The membrane structural models used in the paper include a nonlinear finite-difference model for static and dynamic analysis and a NASTRAN finite element membrane model for nonlinear static and linear normal modes analysis. Both structural models are coupled with a structured compressible flow solver for static aeroelastic analysis. For dynamic aeroelastic analyses, the NASTRAN normal modes are used in the structured compressible flow solver and 3rd order piston theories were used with the finite difference membrane model to simulate utter onset. Results from the various static and dynamic aeroelastic analyses are compared.

  10. Unsteady aerodynamic modeling and active aeroelastic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    Unsteady aerodynamic modeling techniques are developed and applied to the study of active control of elastic vehicles. The problem of active control of a supercritical flutter mode poses a definite design goal stability, and is treated in detail. The transfer functions relating the arbitrary airfoil motions to the airloads are derived from the Laplace transforms of the linearized airload expressions for incompressible two dimensional flow. The transfer function relating the motions to the circulatory part of these loads is recognized as the Theodorsen function extended to complex values of reduced frequency, and is termed the generalized Theodorsen function. Inversion of the Laplace transforms yields exact transient airloads and airfoil motions. Exact root loci of aeroelastic modes are calculated, providing quantitative information regarding subcritical and supercritical flutter conditions.

  11. Aeroelastic Calculations of Quiet High- Speed Fan Performed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakhle, Milind A.; Srivastava, Rakesh; Mehmed, Oral; Min, James B.

    2002-01-01

    An advanced high-speed fan was recently designed under a cooperative effort between the NASA Glenn Research Center and Honeywell Engines & Systems. The principal design goals were to improve performance and to reduce fan noise at takeoff. Scale models of the Quiet High-Speed Fan were tested for operability, performance, and acoustics. During testing, the fan showed significantly improved noise characteristics, but a self-excited aeroelastic vibration known as flutter was encountered in the operating range. Flutter calculations were carried out for the Quiet High-Speed Fan using a three-dimensional, unsteady aerodynamic, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes turbomachinery code named "TURBO." The TURBO code can accurately model the viscous flow effects that can play an important role in various aeroelastic problems such as flutter with flow separation, flutter at high loading conditions near the stall line (stall flutter), and flutter in the presence of shock and boundary-layer interaction. Initially, calculations were performed with no blade vibrations. These calculations were at a constant rotational speed and a varying mass flow rate. The mass flow rate was varied by changing the backpressure at the exit boundary of the computational domain. These initial steady calculations were followed by aeroelastic calculations in which the blades were prescribed to vibrate harmonically in a natural mode, at a natural frequency, and with a fixed interblade phase angle between adjacent blades. The AE-prep preprocessor was used to interpolate the in-vacuum mode shapes from the structural dynamics mesh onto the computational fluid dynamics mesh and to smoothly propagate the grid deformations from the blade surface to the interior points of the grid. The aeroelastic calculations provided the unsteady aerodynamic forces on the blade surface due to blade vibrations. These forces were vector multiplied with the structural dynamic mode shape to calculate the work done on the blade during

  12. Computational aeroelastic analysis of aircraft wings including geometry nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Binyu

    The objective of the present study is to show the ability of solving fluid structural interaction problems more realistically by including the geometric nonlinearity of the structure so that the aeroelastic analysis can be extended into the onset of flutter, or in the post flutter regime. A nonlinear Finite Element Analysis software is developed based on second Piola-Kirchhoff stress and Green-Lagrange strain. The second Piola-Kirchhoff stress and Green-Lagrange strain is a pair of energetically conjugated tensors that can accommodate arbitrary large structural deformations and deflection, to study the flutter phenomenon. Since both of these tensors are objective tensors, i.e., the rigid-body motion has no contribution to their components, the movement of the body, including maneuvers and deformation, can be included. The nonlinear Finite Element Analysis software developed in this study is verified with ANSYS, NASTRAN, ABAQUS, and IDEAS for the linear static, nonlinear static, linear dynamic and nonlinear dynamic structural solutions. To solve the flow problems by Euler/Navier equations, the current nonlinear structural software is then embedded into ENSAERO, which is an aeroelastic analysis software package developed at NASA Ames Research Center. The coupling of the two software, both nonlinear in their own field, is achieved by domain decomposition method first proposed by Guruswamy. A procedure has been set for the aeroelastic analysis process. The aeroelastic analysis results have been obtained for fight wing in the transonic regime for various cases. The influence dynamic pressure on flutter has been checked for a range of Mach number. Even though the current analysis matches the general aeroelastic characteristic, the numerical value not match very well with previous studies and needs farther investigations. The flutter aeroelastic analysis results have also been plotted at several time points. The influences of the deforming wing geometry can be well seen

  13. Study of the feasibility aspects of flight testing an aeroelastically tailored forward swept research wing on a BQM-34F drone vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mourey, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    The aspects of flight testing an aeroelastically tailored forward swept research wing on a BQM-34F drone vehicle are examined. The geometry of a forward swept wing, which is incorporated into the BQM-34F to maintain satisfactory flight performance, stability, and control is defined. A preliminary design of the aeroelastically tailored forward swept wing is presented.

  14. Aeroelastic Analysis of a Trimmed Generic Hypersonic Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nydick, I.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1999-01-01

    The aeroelastic equations of motion governing a hypersonic vehicle in free flight are derived. The equations of motion for a translating and rotating flexible body using Lagrange's equations in terms of quasi-coordinates are presented. These equations are simplified for the case of a vehicle with pitch and plunge rigid body degrees of freedom and small elastic displacements. The displacements are approximated by a truncated series of the unrestrained mode shapes, which are obtained using equivalent plate theory. Subsequently, the nonlinear equations of motion are linearized about the trim state, which is obtained using a rigid body trim model and steady hypersonic aerodynamics. The appropriate flutter derivatives are calculated from piston theory. Results describing mode shapes, trim behavior, and aeroelastic stability of a generic hypersonic vehicle are presented.

  15. Level-Set Topology Optimization with Aeroelastic Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunning, Peter D.; Stanford, Bret K.; Kim, H. Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Level-set topology optimization is used to design a wing considering skin buckling under static aeroelastic trim loading, as well as dynamic aeroelastic stability (flutter). The level-set function is defined over the entire 3D volume of a transport aircraft wing box. Therefore, the approach is not limited by any predefined structure and can explore novel configurations. The Sequential Linear Programming (SLP) level-set method is used to solve the constrained optimization problems. The proposed method is demonstrated using three problems with mass, linear buckling and flutter objective and/or constraints. A constraint aggregation method is used to handle multiple buckling constraints in the wing skins. A continuous flutter constraint formulation is used to handle difficulties arising from discontinuities in the design space caused by a switching of the critical flutter mode.

  16. Transonic aeroelasticity analysis for rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Chuen-Yen; Chang, I-Chung; Gea, Lie-Mine

    1989-01-01

    A numerical method is presented for calculating the unsteady transonic rotor flow with aeroelasticity effects. The blade structural dynamic equations based on beam theory were formulated by FEM and were solved in the time domain, instead of the frequency domain. For different combinations of precone, droop, and pitch, the correlations are very good in the first three flapping modes and the first twisting mode. However, the predicted frequencies are too high for the first lagging mode at high rotational speeds. This new structure code has been coupled into a transonic rotor flow code, TFAR2, to demonstrate the capability of treating elastic blades in transonic rotor flow calculations. The flow fields for a model-scale rotor in both hover and forward flight are calculated. Results show that the blade elasticity significantly affects the flow characteristics in forward flight.

  17. Structural dynamic and aeroelastic considerations for hypersonic vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cazier, F. W., Jr.; Doggett, Robert V., Jr.; Ricketts, Rodney H.

    1991-01-01

    The specific geometrical, structural, and operational environment characteristics of hypersonic vehicles are discussed with particular reference to aerospace plane type configurations. A discussion of the structural dynamic and aeroelastic phenomena that must be addressed for this class of vehicles is presented. These phenomena are in the aeroservothermoelasticity technical area. Some illustrative examples of recent experimental and analytical work are given. Some examples of current research are pointed out.

  18. Practical considerations in aeroelastic design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rommel, B. A.; Dodd, A. J.

    1984-01-01

    The structural design process for large transport aircraft is described. Critical loads must be determined from a large number of load cases within the flight maneuver envelope. The structural design is also constrained by considerations of producibility, reliability, maintainability, durability, and damage tolerance, as well as impact dynamics and multiple constraints due to flutter and aeroelasticity. Aircraft aeroelastic design considerations in three distinct areas of product development (preliminary design, advanced design, and detailed design) are presented and contrasted. The present state of the art is challenged to solve the practical difficulties associated with design, analysis, and redesign within cost and schedule constraints. The current practice consists of largely independent engineering disciplines operating with unorganized data interfaces. The need is then demonstrated for a well-planned computerized aeroelastic structural design optimization system operating with a common interdisciplinary data base. This system must incorporate automated interfaces between modular programs. In each phase of the design process, a common finite-element model for static and dynamic optimization is required to reduce errors due to modeling discrepancies. As the design proceeds from the simple models in preliminary design to the more complex models in advanced and detailed design, a means of retrieving design data from the previous models must be established.

  19. Stability characteristics of a conical aerospace plane concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahne, David E.; Luckring, James M.; Covell, Peter F.; Phillips, W. Pelham; Gatlin, Gregory M.

    1989-01-01

    Data on stability characteristics of a conical aerospace plane concept were collected for a number of model geometry variations and test conditions, using several NASA-Langley wind tunnels spanning Mach range 0.1-6. The baseline configuration of this plane concept incorporated a 5-deg cone forebody, a 75.96-deg delta wing, a 16-deg leading-edge sweep deployable canard, and a centerline vertical tail. The key results pertinent to stability considerations about all three axes of the model are presented together with data on the effect of the canard on pitch stability, the effect of vertical tail on lateral-directional stability, and the effect of forebody geometry on yaw asymmetries. The experimental stability data are compared with the results from an engineering predictive code.

  20. Sensitivity Analysis of Wing Aeroelastic Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Issac, Jason Cherian

    1995-01-01

    Design for prevention of aeroelastic instability (that is, the critical speeds leading to aeroelastic instability lie outside the operating range) is an integral part of the wing design process. Availability of the sensitivity derivatives of the various critical speeds with respect to shape parameters of the wing could be very useful to a designer in the initial design phase, when several design changes are made and the shape of the final configuration is not yet frozen. These derivatives are also indispensable for a gradient-based optimization with aeroelastic constraints. In this study, flutter characteristic of a typical section in subsonic compressible flow is examined using a state-space unsteady aerodynamic representation. The sensitivity of the flutter speed of the typical section with respect to its mass and stiffness parameters, namely, mass ratio, static unbalance, radius of gyration, bending frequency, and torsional frequency is calculated analytically. A strip theory formulation is newly developed to represent the unsteady aerodynamic forces on a wing. This is coupled with an equivalent plate structural model and solved as an eigenvalue problem to determine the critical speed of the wing. Flutter analysis of the wing is also carried out using a lifting-surface subsonic kernel function aerodynamic theory (FAST) and an equivalent plate structural model. Finite element modeling of the wing is done using NASTRAN so that wing structures made of spars and ribs and top and bottom wing skins could be analyzed. The free vibration modes of the wing obtained from NASTRAN are input into FAST to compute the flutter speed. An equivalent plate model which incorporates first-order shear deformation theory is then examined so it can be used to model thick wings, where shear deformations are important. The sensitivity of natural frequencies to changes in shape parameters is obtained using ADIFOR. A simple optimization effort is made towards obtaining a minimum weight

  1. Vibration and flutter characteristics of the SR7L large-scale propfan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    August, Richard; Kaza, Krishna Rao V.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation of the vibration characteristics and aeroelastic stability of the SR7L Large-Scale Advanced Propfan was performed using a finite element blade model and an improved aeroelasticity code. Analyses were conducted for different blade pitch angles, blade support conditions, number of blades, rotational speeds, and freestream Mach numbers. A finite element model of the blade was used to determine the blade's vibration behavior and sensitivity to support stiffness. The calculated frequencies and mode shape obtained with this model agreed well with the published experimental data. A computer code recently developed at NASA Lewis Research Center and based on three-dimensional, unsteady, lifting surface aerodynamic theory was used for the aeroelastic analysis to examine the blade's stability at a cruise condition of Mach 0.8 at 1700 rpm. The results showed that the blade is stable for that operating point. However, a flutter condition was predicted if the cruise Mach number was increased to 0.9.

  2. Experimental aeroelasticity - History, status and future in brief

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricketts, Rodney H.

    1990-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) conducts wind-tunnel experiments to determine and understand the aerolastic characteristics of new and advanced flight vehicles, including fixed-wing, rotary-wing, and space-launch configurations. Review and assessments are made of the state-of-the-art in experimental aeroelasticity regarding available facilities, measurement techniques, and other means and devices useful in testing. In addition, some past experimental programs are described which assisted in the development of new technology, validated new analysis codes, or provided needed information for clearing flight envelopes of unwanted aeroelastic response. Finally, needs and requirements for advances and improvements in testing capabilities for future experimental research and development programs are described.

  3. Aeroelastic analysis for propellers - mathematical formulations and program user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielawa, R. L.; Johnson, S. A.; Chi, R. M.; Gangwani, S. T.

    1983-01-01

    Mathematical development is presented for a specialized propeller dedicated version of the G400 rotor aeroelastic analysis. The G400PROP analysis simulates aeroelastic characteristics particular to propellers such as structural sweep, aerodynamic sweep and high subsonic unsteady airloads (both stalled and unstalled). Formulations are presented for these expanded propeller related methodologies. Results of limited application of the analysis to realistic blade configurations and operating conditions which include stable and unstable stall flutter test conditions are given. Sections included for enhanced program user efficiency and expanded utilization include descriptions of: (1) the structuring of the G400PROP FORTRAN coding; (2) the required input data; and (3) the output results. General information to facilitate operation and improve efficiency is also provided.

  4. Aeroelasticity Benchmark Assessment: Subsonic Fixed Wing Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florance, Jennifer P.; Chwalowski, Pawel; Wieseman, Carol D.

    2010-01-01

    The fundamental technical challenge in computational aeroelasticity is the accurate prediction of unsteady aerodynamic phenomena and the effect on the aeroelastic response of a vehicle. Currently, a benchmarking standard for use in validating the accuracy of computational aeroelasticity codes does not exist. Many aeroelastic data sets have been obtained in wind-tunnel and flight testing throughout the world; however, none have been globally presented or accepted as an ideal data set. There are numerous reasons for this. One reason is that often, such aeroelastic data sets focus on the aeroelastic phenomena alone (flutter, for example) and do not contain associated information such as unsteady pressures and time-correlated structural dynamic deflections. Other available data sets focus solely on the unsteady pressures and do not address the aeroelastic phenomena. Other discrepancies can include omission of relevant data, such as flutter frequency and / or the acquisition of only qualitative deflection data. In addition to these content deficiencies, all of the available data sets present both experimental and computational technical challenges. Experimental issues include facility influences, nonlinearities beyond those being modeled, and data processing. From the computational perspective, technical challenges include modeling geometric complexities, coupling between the flow and the structure, grid issues, and boundary conditions. The Aeroelasticity Benchmark Assessment task seeks to examine the existing potential experimental data sets and ultimately choose the one that is viewed as the most suitable for computational benchmarking. An initial computational evaluation of that configuration will then be performed using the Langley-developed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software FUN3D1 as part of its code validation process. In addition to the benchmarking activity, this task also includes an examination of future research directions. Researchers within the

  5. Stability and morphing characteristics of bistable composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawfik, Samer A.

    The focus of the current research is to investigate the potential of using bistable unsymmetric cross-ply laminated composites as a means for achieving structures with morphed characteristics. To this end, an investigation of the design space for laminated composites exhibiting bistable behavior is undertaken and the key parameters controlling their behavior are identified. For this purpose a nonlinear Finite Element methodology using ABAQUS(TM) code is developed to predict both the cured shapes and the stability characteristics of unsymmetric cross-ply laminates. In addition, an experimental program is developed to validate the analytically predicted results through comparison with test data. A new method is proposed for attaching piezoelectric actuators to a bistable panel in order to preserve its favorable stability characteristics as well as optimizing the actuators performance. The developed nonlinear FE methodology is extended to predict the actuation requirements of bistable panels. Actuator requirements, predicted using the nonlinear FE analysis, are found to be in agreement with the test results. The current research also explores the potential for implementing bistable panels for Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle (UAV) wing configuration. To this end, a set of bistable panels is manufactured by combining symmetric and unsymmetric balanced and unbalanced stacking sequence and their stability characteristics are predicted. A preliminary analysis of the aerodynamic characteristics of the manufactured panels is carried out and the aerodynamic benefits of manufactured bistable panel are noted.

  6. Aeroelastic Flight Data Analysis with the Hilbert-Huang Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, Marty; Prazenica, Chad

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates the utility of the Hilbert-Huang transform for the analysis of aeroelastic flight data. It is well known that the classical Hilbert transform can be used for time-frequency analysis of functions or signals. Unfortunately, the Hilbert transform can only be effectively applied to an extremely small class of signals, namely those that are characterized by a single frequency component at any instant in time. The recently-developed Hilbert-Huang algorithm addresses the limitations of the classical Hilbert transform through a process known as empirical mode decomposition. Using this approach, the data is filtered into a series of intrinsic mode functions, each of which admits a well-behaved Hilbert transform. In this manner, the Hilbert-Huang algorithm affords time-frequency analysis of a large class of signals. This powerful tool has been applied in the analysis of scientific data, structural system identification, mechanical system fault detection, and even image processing. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the potential applications of the Hilbert-Huang algorithm for the analysis of aeroelastic systems, with improvements such as localized/online processing. Applications for correlations between system input and output, and amongst output sensors, are discussed to characterize the time-varying amplitude and frequency correlations present in the various components of multiple data channels. Online stability analyses and modal identification are also presented. Examples are given using aeroelastic test data from the F/A-18 Active Aeroelastic Wing aircraft, an Aerostructures Test Wing, and pitch-plunge simulation.

  7. Flutter and Divergence Analysis using the Generalized Aeroelastic Analysis Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, John W.; Wieseman, Carol D.

    2003-01-01

    The Generalized Aeroelastic Analysis Method (GAAM) is applied to the analysis of three well-studied checkcases: restrained and unrestrained airfoil models, and a wing model. An eigenvalue iteration procedure is used for converging upon roots of the complex stability matrix. For the airfoil models, exact root loci are given which clearly illustrate the nature of the flutter and divergence instabilities. The singularities involved are enumerated, including an additional pole at the origin for the unrestrained airfoil case and the emergence of an additional pole on the positive real axis at the divergence speed for the restrained airfoil case. Inconsistencies and differences among published aeroelastic root loci and the new, exact results are discussed and resolved. The generalization of a Doublet Lattice Method computer code is described and the code is applied to the calculation of root loci for the wing model for incompressible and for subsonic flow conditions. The error introduced in the reduction of the singular integral equation underlying the unsteady lifting surface theory to a linear algebraic equation is discussed. Acknowledging this inherent error, the solutions of the algebraic equation by GAAM are termed 'exact.' The singularities of the problem are discussed and exponential series approximations used in the evaluation of the kernel function shown to introduce a dense collection of poles and zeroes on the negative real axis. Again, inconsistencies and differences among published aeroelastic root loci and the new 'exact' results are discussed and resolved. In all cases, aeroelastic flutter and divergence speeds and frequencies are in good agreement with published results. The GAAM solution procedure allows complete control over Mach number, velocity, density, and complex frequency. Thus all points on the computed root loci can be matched-point, consistent solutions without recourse to complex mode tracking logic or dataset interpolation, as in the k and p

  8. Polymer stabilized vertical alignment liquid crystal display: effect of monomer structures and their stabilizing characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, You Ri; Choi, Young Eun; Wen, Pushen; Lee, Byeong Hoon; Kim, Jong Chan; Lee, Myong-Hoon; Jeong, Kwang-Un; Lee, Seung Hee

    2016-04-01

    A polymer-stabilized vertical alignment (PS-VA) mode using a new type of photoreactive monomer for polymer stabilization of the liquid crystal (LC) director was developed. Conventional reactive mesogens having a higher molecular weight than those of the host LC tend to aggregate and form large-sized polymer grains when exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light, subsequently deteriorating the quality of the dark state. To address these problems, bis(4-hydroxyphenyl) diacrylates were synthesized with four different linking groups as stabilizing monomers (SMs) which have molecular weights similar to that of the host LC. Their stabilizing characteristics with respect to the molecular size and polarity of SMs were evaluated by examining the electro-optic characteristics of LC cells after UV irradiation. The results showed that the SM containing a small linking group in size between biphenyls with high polarity was favored to achieve excellent polymer stabilization. The SM containing an ether linkage showed excellent electro-optic characteristics with no large-sized polymer grains even in the absence of a photo-initiator. Consequently, we anticipate that SMs, polar and smaller in size, can improve the electro-optic characteristics in PS-VA mode.

  9. Aeroelastic optimization of a composite tilt rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soykasap, Omer

    Composite tilt rotor aeroelastic optimization is performed by using a published formulation of mixed variational exact intrinsic equations of motion for dynamics of beams along with a finite-state dynamic inflow theory for rotors. A composite box beam model is used to represent the principal load carrying member of the rotor blade. The blade is discretized using finite elements. Each wall used to model the box beam is made of laminated composite plies. For the optimization, design variables are blade twist, box width and height, horizontal and vertical wall thicknesses, the ply angles of the laminated walls and nonstructural masses. The rotor is optimized for the figure of merit in hover and the axial efficiency in forward flight while keeping the same thrust levels in both flight modes. Blade weight, autorotational inertia, geometry, and aeroelastic stability are considered as constraints. The feasible direction technique is used for optimization. The results are validated by earlier test results. A trim calculation procedure is added to the analysis to keep the desired values of the thrust. Sensitivities of the rotor performance to design variables are studied. The effect of structural couplings on rotor performance is studied. Of all the couplings extension-torsion is found to be the most effective parameter to improve the performance. The ply angles of the laminates are assumed to be the same over the span and through the thickness of walls. Such a model can be built by the filament winding technique and offers manufacturing ease. Isolated rotor stability is investigated for both flight regimes. Some values of elastic coupling result in isolated rotor instability. However, the optimized configuration was free of instability. Optimization results are presented for effects such as extension-torsion coupling, choice of layups, twist distribution, and cross-sectional geometry of the blade. Optimum designs are compared with XV-15 tilt rotor performance, which is

  10. Aeroelastic Airworthiness Assesment of the Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge Flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrera, Claudia Y.; Spivey, Natalie D.; Lung, Shun-fat; Ervin, Gregory; Flick, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge (ACTE) demonstrator is a joint task under the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project in partnership with the Air Force Research Laboratory and FlexSys, Inc. (Ann Arbor, Michigan). The project goal is to develop advanced technologies that enable environmentally friendly aircraft, such as adaptive compliant technologies. The ACTE demonstrator flight-test program encompassed replacing the Fowler flaps on the SubsoniC Aircraft Testbed, a modified Gulfstream III (Gulfstream Aerospace, Savannah, Georgia) aircraft, with control surfaces developed by FlexSys. The control surfaces developed by FlexSys are a pair of uniquely-designed unconventional flaps to be used as lifting surfaces during flight-testing to validate their structural effectiveness. The unconventional flaps required a multidisciplinary airworthiness assessment to prove they could withstand the prescribed flight envelope. Several challenges were posed due to the large deflections experienced by the structure, requiring non-linear analysis methods. The aeroelastic assessment necessitated both conventional and extensive testing and analysis methods. A series of ground vibration tests (GVTs) were conducted to provide modal characteristics to validate and update finite element models (FEMs) used for the flutter analyses for a subset of the various flight configurations. Numerous FEMs were developed using data from FlexSys and the ground tests. The flap FEMs were then attached to the aircraft model to generate a combined FEM that could be analyzed for aeroelastic instabilities. The aeroelastic analysis results showed the combined system of aircraft and flaps were predicted to have the required flutter margin to successfully demonstrate the adaptive compliant technology. This paper documents the details of the aeroelastic airworthiness assessment described, including the ground testing and analyses, and subsequent flight

  11. Controlled Aeroelastic Response and Airfoil Shaping Using Adaptive Materials and Integrated Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinkerton, Jennifer L.; McGowan, Anna-Maria R.; Moses, Robert W.; Scott, Robert C.; Heeg, Jennifer

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of several activities of the Aeroelasticity Branch at the NASA Langley Research Center in the area of applying adaptive materials and integrated systems for controlling both aircraft aeroelastic response and airfoil shape. The experimental results of four programs are discussed: the Piezoelectric Aeroelastic Response Tailoring Investigation (PARTI); the Adaptive Neural Control of Aeroelastic Response (ANCAR) program; the Actively Controlled Response of Buffet Affected Tails (ACROBAT) program; and the Airfoil THUNDER Testing to Ascertain Characteristics (ATTACH) project. The PARTI program demonstrated active flutter control and significant rcductions in aeroelastic response at dynamic pressures below flutter using piezoelectric actuators. The ANCAR program seeks to demonstrate the effectiveness of using neural networks to schedule flutter suppression control laws. Th,e ACROBAT program studied the effectiveness of a number of candidate actuators, including a rudder and piezoelectric actuators, to alleviate vertical tail buffeting. In the ATTACH project, the feasibility of using Thin-Layer Composite-Uimorph Piezoelectric Driver and Sensor (THUNDER) wafers to control airfoil aerodynamic characteristics was investigated. Plans for future applications are also discussed.

  12. Aeroelastic Instabilities of Large Offshore and Onshore Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bir, Gunjit; Jonkman, Jason

    2007-07-01

    Offshore turbines are gaining attention as means to capture the immense and relatively calm wind resources available over deep waters. This paper examines the aeroelastic stability of a three-bladed 5MW conceptual wind turbine mounted atop a floating barge with catenary moorings. The barge platform was chosen from the possible floating platform concepts, because it is simple in design and easy to deploy. Aeroelastic instabilities are distinct from resonances and vibrations and are potentially more destructive. Future turbine designs will likely be stability-driven in contrast to the current loads-driven designs. Reasons include more flexible designs, especially the torsionally-flexible rotor blades, material and geometric couplings associated with smart structures, and hydrodynamic interactions brought on by the ocean currents and surface waves. Following a brief description of the stability concept and stability analysis approach, this paper presents results for both onshore and offshore configurations over a range of operating conditions. Results show that, unless special attention is paid, parked (idling) conditions can lead to instabilities involving side-to-side motion of the tower, edgewise motion of the rotor blades, and yawing of the platform.

  13. Application of the finite element method to rotary-wing aeroelasticity. [in helicopter hovering flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, P.; Straub, F.

    1978-01-01

    Recent research in rotary-wing aeroelasticity has indicated that all fundamental problems in this area are inherently nonlinear. The non-linearities in this problem are due to the inclusion of finite slopes, due to moderate deflections, in the structural, inertia and aerodynamic operators associated with this aeroelastic problem. In this paper the equations of motion, which are both time and space dependent, for the aeroelastic problem are first formulated in P.D.E. form. Next the equations are linearized about a suitable equilibrium position. The spatial dependence in these equations is discretized using a local Galerkin method of weighted residuals resulting in a finite element formulation of the aeroelastic problem. As an illustration the method is applied to the coupled flap-lag problem of a helicopter rotor blade in hover. Comparison of the solutions with previously published solutions establishes the convergence properties of the method. It is concluded that this formulation is a practical tool for solving rotary-wing aeroelastic stability or response problems.

  14. Flight Dynamics of Flexible Aircraft with Aeroelastic and Inertial Force Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Tuzcu, Ilhan

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated flight dynamic modeling method for flexible aircraft that captures coupled physics effects due to inertial forces, aeroelasticity, and propulsive forces that are normally present in flight. The present approach formulates the coupled flight dynamics using a structural dynamic modeling method that describes the elasticity of a flexible, twisted, swept wing using an equivalent beam-rod model. The structural dynamic model allows for three types of wing elastic motion: flapwise bending, chordwise bending, and torsion. Inertial force coupling with the wing elasticity is formulated to account for aircraft acceleration. The structural deflections create an effective aeroelastic angle of attack that affects the rigid-body motion of flexible aircraft. The aeroelastic effect contributes to aerodynamic damping forces that can influence aerodynamic stability. For wing-mounted engines, wing flexibility can cause the propulsive forces and moments to couple with the wing elastic motion. The integrated flight dynamics for a flexible aircraft are formulated by including generalized coordinate variables associated with the aeroelastic-propulsive forces and moments in the standard state-space form for six degree-of-freedom flight dynamics. A computational structural model for a generic transport aircraft has been created. The eigenvalue analysis is performed to compute aeroelastic frequencies and aerodynamic damping. The results will be used to construct an integrated flight dynamic model of a flexible generic transport aircraft.

  15. Current status of computational methods for transonic unsteady aerodynamics and aeroelastic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, John W.; Malone, John B.

    1992-01-01

    The current status of computational methods for unsteady aerodynamics and aeroelasticity is reviewed. The key features of challenging aeroelastic applications are discussed in terms of the flowfield state: low-angle high speed flows and high-angle vortex-dominated flows. The critical role played by viscous effects in determining aeroelastic stability for conditions of incipient flow separation is stressed. The need for a variety of flow modeling tools, from linear formulations to implementations of the Navier-Stokes equations, is emphasized. Estimates of computer run times for flutter calculations using several computational methods are given. Applications of these methods for unsteady aerodynamic and transonic flutter calculations for airfoils, wings, and configurations are summarized. Finally, recommendations are made concerning future research directions.

  16. First-order aerodynamic and aeroelastic behavior of a single-blade installation setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaunaa, M.; Bergami, L.; Guntur, S.; Zahle, F.

    2014-06-01

    Limitations on the wind speed at which blade installation can be performed bears important financial consequences. The installation cost of a wind farm could be significantly reduced by increasing the wind speed at which blade mounting operations can be carried out. This work characterizes the first-order aerodynamic and aeroelastic behavior of a single blade installation system, where the blade is grabbed by a yoke, which is lifted by the crane and stabilized by two taglines. A simple engineering model is formulated to describe the aerodynamic forcing on the blade subject to turbulent wind of arbitrary direction. The model is coupled with a schematic aeroelastic representation of the taglines system, which returns the minimum line tension required to compensate for the aerodynamic forcing. The simplified models are in excellent agreement with the aeroelastic code HAWC2, and provide a solid basis for future design of an upgraded single blade installation system able to operate at higher wind speeds.

  17. Dynamic response and aeroelastic analysis of a propeller blade of a prop-fan engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Gene; Lee, Hae-Kyung

    Blades are modeled as cantilevered sandwich plates with Gr/Ep composite faces and orthotropic cores and also as curved twisted beams for the aeroelastic analysis. A free vibration analysis for the cantilevered sandwich plate model is performed using Rayleigh-Ritz method. Calculated results are compared with FEM codes and free vibration test results. A free vibration equation for the aeroelastic analysis is obtained by small linear perturbation about the nonlinear static equilibrium position of the curved and twisted beam model. An aeroelastic stability is analyzed along with unsteady aerodynamic analysis results with 2-D cascade effects. For analyzing dynamic response of the real prop-fan blade mode, F.E.M. codes are used. In order to verify computed results, SR-3 composite prop-fan blades with various stacking sequencies are manufactured. Natural frequencies of prop-fan specimen are obtained by modal testing method using impact hammer and FFT analyzer.

  18. Transonic Aeroelasticity Analysis For Helicopter Rotor Blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, I-Chung; Gea, Lie-Mine; Chow, Chuen-Yen

    1991-01-01

    Numerical-simulation method for aeroelasticity analysis of helicopter rotor blade combines established techniques for analysis of aerodynamics and vibrations of blade. Application of method clearly shows elasticity of blade modifies flow and, consequently, aerodynamic loads on blade.

  19. Wing-Body Aeroelasticity on Parallel Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.; Byun, Chansup

    1996-01-01

    This article presents a procedure for computing the aeroelasticity of wing-body configurations on multiple-instruction, multiple-data parallel computers. In this procedure, fluids are modeled using Euler equations discretized by a finite difference method, and structures are modeled using finite element equations. The procedure is designed in such a way that each discipline can be developed and maintained independently by using a domain decomposition approach. A parallel integration scheme is used to compute aeroelastic responses by solving the coupled fluid and structural equations concurrently while keeping modularity of each discipline. The present procedure is validated by computing the aeroelastic response of a wing and comparing with experiment. Aeroelastic computations are illustrated for a high speed civil transport type wing-body configuration.

  20. Ongoing Fixed Wing Research within the NASA Langley Aeroelasticity Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert; Chwalowski, Pawel; Funk, Christie; Heeg, Jennifer; Hur, Jiyoung; Sanetrik, Mark; Scott, Robert; Silva, Walter; Stanford, Bret; Wiseman, Carol

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Langley Aeroelasticity Branch is involved in a number of research programs related to fixed wing aeroelasticity and aeroservoelasticity. These ongoing efforts are summarized here, and include aeroelastic tailoring of subsonic transport wing structures, experimental and numerical assessment of truss-braced wing flutter and limit cycle oscillations, and numerical modeling of high speed civil transport configurations. Efforts devoted to verification, validation, and uncertainty quantification of aeroelastic physics in a workshop setting are also discussed. The feasibility of certain future civil transport configurations will depend on the ability to understand and control complex aeroelastic phenomena, a goal that the Aeroelasticity Branch is well-positioned to contribute through these programs.

  1. Overview of the Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heeg, Jennifer; Chwalowski, Pawel; Schuster, David M.; Dalenbring, Mats

    2013-01-01

    The AIAA Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop (AePW) was held in April, 2012, bringing together communities of aeroelasticians and computational fluid dynamicists. The objective in conducting this workshop on aeroelastic prediction was to assess state-of-the-art computational aeroelasticity methods as practical tools for the prediction of static and dynamic aeroelastic phenomena. No comprehensive aeroelastic benchmarking validation standard currently exists, greatly hindering validation and state-of-the-art assessment objectives. The workshop was a step towards assessing the state of the art in computational aeroelasticity. This was an opportunity to discuss and evaluate the effectiveness of existing computer codes and modeling techniques for unsteady flow, and to identify computational and experimental areas needing additional research and development. Three configurations served as the basis for the workshop, providing different levels of geometric and flow field complexity. All cases considered involved supercritical airfoils at transonic conditions. The flow fields contained oscillating shocks and in some cases, regions of separation. The computational tools principally employed Reynolds-Averaged Navier Stokes solutions. The successes and failures of the computations and the experiments are examined in this paper.

  2. Controlled aeroelastic response and airfoil shaping using adaptive materials and integrated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkerton, Jennifer L.; McGowan, Anna-Maria R.; Moses, Robert W.; Scott, Robert C.; Heeg, Jennifer

    1996-05-01

    This paper presents an overview of several activities of the Aeroelasticity Branch at the NASA Langley Research Center in the area of applying adaptive materials and integrated systems for controlling both aircraft aeroelastic response and airfoil shape. The experimental results of four programs are discussed: the Piezoelectric Aeroelastic Response Tailoring Investigation (PARTI); the adaptive neural control of aeroelastic response (ANCAR) program; the actively controlled response of buffet affected tails (ACROBAT) program; and the Airfoil THUNDER Testing to ascertain charcteristics (ATTACH) project. The PARTI program demonstrated active flutter control and significant reductions in aeroelastic response at dynamic pressures below flutter using piezoelectric actuators. The ANCAR program seeks to demonstrate the effectiveness of using neural networks to schedule flutter suppression control laws. The ACROBAT program studied the effectiveness of a number of candidate actuators, including a rudder and piezoelectric actuators, to alleviate vertical tail buffeting. In the ATTACH project, the feasibility of using thin-layer composite-unimorph piezoelectric driver and sensor (THUNDER) wafers to control airfoil aerodynamic characteristics was investigated. Plans for future applications are also discussed.

  3. Review of Combustion Stability Characteristics of Swirl Coaxial Element Injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulka, J. R.; Casiano, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    Liquid propellant rocket engine injectors using coaxial elements where the center liquid is swirled have become more common in the United States over the past several decades, although primarily for technology or advanced development programs. Currently, only one flight engine operates with this element type in the United States (the RL10 engine), while the element type is very common in Russian (and ex-Soviet) liquid propellant rocket engines. In the United States, the understanding of combustion stability characteristics of swirl coaxial element injectors is still very limited, despite the influx of experimental and theoretical information from Russia. The empirical and theoretical understanding is much less advanced than for the other prevalent liquid propellant rocket injector element types, the shear coaxial and like-on-like paired doublet. This paper compiles, compares and explores the combustion stability characteristics of swirl coaxial element injectors tested in the United States, dating back to J-2 and RL-10 development, and extending to very recent programs at the NASA MSFC using liquid oxygen and liquid methane and kerosene propellants. Included in this study are several other relatively recent design and test programs, including the Space Transportation Main Engine (STME), COBRA, J-2X, and the Common Extensible Cryogenic Engine (CECE). A presentation of the basic data characteristics is included, followed by an evaluation by several analysis techniques, including those included in Rocket Combustor Interactive Design and Analysis Computer Program (ROCCID), and methodologies described by Hewitt and Bazarov.

  4. A Historical Overview of Aeroelasticity Branch and Transonic Dynamics Tunnel Contributions to Rotorcraft Technology and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeager, William T., Jr.; Kvaternik, Raymond G.

    2001-01-01

    A historical account of the contributions of the Aeroelasticity Branch (AB) and the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) to rotorcraft technology and development since the tunnel's inception in 1960 is presented. The paper begins with a summary of the major characteristics of the TDT and a description of the unique capability offered by the TDT for testing aeroelastic models by virtue of its heavy gas test medium. This is followed by some remarks on the role played by scale models in the design and development of rotorcraft vehicles and a review of the basic scaling relationships important for designing and building dynamic aeroelastic models of rotorcraft vehicles for testing in the TDT. Chronological accounts of helicopter and tiltrotor research conducted in AB/TDT are then described in separate sections. Both experimental and analytical studies are reported and include a description of the various physical and mathematical models employed, the specific objectives of the investigations, and illustrative experimental and analytical results.

  5. Research and Applications in Aeroelasticity and Structural Dynamics at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abel, Irving

    1997-01-01

    An overview of recently completed programs in aeroelasticity and structural dynamics research at the NASA Langley Research Center is presented. Methods used to perform flutter clearance studies in the wind-tunnel on a high performance fighter are discussed. Recent advances in the use of smart structures and controls to solve aeroelastic problems, including flutter and gust response are presented. An aeroelastic models program designed to support an advanced high speed civil transport is described. An extension to transonic small disturbance theory that better predicts flows involving separation and reattachment is presented. The results of a research study to determine the effects of flexibility on the taxi and takeoff characteristics of a high speed civil transport are presented. The use of photogrammetric methods aboard Space Shuttle to measure spacecraft dynamic response is discussed. Issues associated with the jitter response of multi-payload spacecraft are discussed. Finally a Space Shuttle flight experiment that studied the control of flexible spacecraft is described.

  6. Global and local dynamics of an aeroelastic system with a control surface freeplay nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trickey, Stephen T.

    2000-11-01

    The effects of a freeplay structural nonlinearity on an aeroelastic system comprised of a 2D typical section with an approximation of Theodorsen theory aerodynamics is presented. Particular attention is paid to the stability of a nonlinear aeroelastic response or limit cycle oscillation (LCO). The principal contribution of this work to the field of aeroelasticity lies in the migration of experimental testing and analysis methods from the fields of system identification and nonlinear dynamics to the arena of a nonlinear aeroelastic stability problem. Innovations from the field of nonlinear dynamics include the use of time delay embedded coordinates to reconstruct system dynamics, the use of a Poincare section to prescribe an operating point about which a linear description of the dynamics can be approximated, and the use of a basin of attraction measure to assess initial condition dependence. Two different system identification approaches are taken to generate a linear approximation of the experimental system dynamics about the limit cycle oscillation. A large scale perturbation method using a rotating slotted cylinder gust generator and using a least squares fit of the resulting transient dynamics was shown to be a viable method to ascertain stability information to within the limitations of the experimental setup. A small scale stochastic stability measurement technique using the natural turbulence in a low speed wind tunnel as the stochastic input and a subspace system identification method to estimate the dynamics of the system provided more repeatable and consistent results. Also in this work is a derivation of the analytical model and a description of the experimental model. Typical global dynamic features of the aeroelastic system are presented from both numerical simulation and experiments including periodic limit cycle oscillations (LCO), quasi-periodic responses and chaotic responses.

  7. Recent Applications of the Volterra Theory to Aeroelastic Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Haji, Muhammad R; Prazenica, Richard J.

    2005-01-01

    The identification of nonlinear aeroelastic systems based on the Volterra theory of nonlinear systems is presented. Recent applications of the theory to problems in experimental aeroelasticity are reviewed. These results include the identification of aerodynamic impulse responses, the application of higher-order spectra (HOS) to wind-tunnel flutter data, and the identification of nonlinear aeroelastic phenomena from flight flutter test data of the Active Aeroelastic Wing (AAW) aircraft.

  8. A parametric study of planform and aeroelastic effects on aerodynamic center, alpha- and q- stability derivatives. Appendix A: A computer program for calculating alpha- and q- stability derivatives and induced drag for thin elastic aeroplanes at subsonic and supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roskam, J.; Lan, C.; Mehrotra, S.

    1972-01-01

    The computer program used to determine the rigid and elastic stability derivatives presented in the summary report is listed in this appendix along with instructions for its use, sample input data and answers. This program represents the airplane at subsonic and supersonic speeds as (a) thin surface(s) (without dihedral) composed of discrete panels of constant pressure according to the method of Woodward for the aerodynamic effects and slender beam(s) for the structural effects. Given a set of input data, the computer program calculates an aerodynamic influence coefficient matrix and a structural influence coefficient matrix.

  9. Centrifugal Compressor Aeroelastic Analysis Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Srivastava, Rakesh

    2002-01-01

    Centrifugal compressors are very widely used in the turbomachine industry where low mass flow rates are required. Gas turbine engines for tanks, rotorcraft and small jets rely extensively on centrifugal compressors for rugged and compact design. These compressors experience problems related with unsteadiness of flowfields, such as stall flutter, separation at the trailing edge over diffuser guide vanes, tip vortex unsteadiness, etc., leading to rotating stall and surge. Considerable interest exists in small gas turbine engine manufacturers to understand and eventually eliminate the problems related to centrifugal compressors. The geometric complexity of centrifugal compressor blades and the twisting of the blade passages makes the linear methods inapplicable. Advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods are needed for accurate unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analysis of centrifugal compressors. Most of the current day industrial turbomachines and small aircraft engines are designed with a centrifugal compressor. With such a large customer base and NASA Glenn Research Center being, the lead center for turbomachines, it is important that adequate emphasis be placed on this area as well. Currently, this activity is not supported under any project at NASA Glenn.

  10. Dynamics and Stability and Control Characteristics of the X-37

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaudhary, Ashwani; Nguyen, Viet; Tran, Hoi; Poladian, David; Falangas, Eric; Turner, Susan G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the stability and control analysis and the control design results for the Boeing/NASA/AFRL X-37. The X-37 is a flight demonstrator vehicle that will go into space and after its mission, autonomously reenter and land on a conventional runway. This paper studies the dynamics and control of the X-37 from atmospheric reentry through landing. A nominal trajectory that lands on the Edwards Air Force Base Lakebed is considered for all the analysis and design. The X-37's longitudinal and lateral/directional bare-airframe characteristics are presented. The level of maneuvering control power is assessed. Vehicle trim with multiple surfaces is discussed. Special challenges where the wings loose roll effectiveness are discussed and solutions are presented. Aerodynamic uncertainties and flexibility modeling issues are presented. Control design results and robustness analysis methods are presented. Results are provided for the Entry, Terminal Area Energy Management (TAEM), and Approach and Land phases.

  11. Structural dynamic and aeroelastic considerations for hypersonic vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cazier, F. W., Jr.; Ricketts, Rodney H.; Doggett, Robert V., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Structural dynamic and aeroelastic considerations applicable to hypersonic vehicles are discussed. Emphasis is given to aerospace plane configurations. The definition of aerothermoelasticity and the operational flight environment are reviewed, and structural dynamic and aeroelastic areas of concern are individually discussed, including vibration, landing and taxiing, propellant dynamics, acoustics, lifting surface flutter, panel flutter, control surface buzz, buffeting, gust response, and static aeroelasticity. Recent research results from all-moveable delta-wing aerolastic studies, engine inlet lip aeroelastic analysis, and studies of thermal effects on vibration frequencies, aerodynamic heating effects on flutter, and active control of aeroelastic response are reviewed.

  12. Aeroelastic Tailoring via Tow Steered Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, Bret K.; Jutte, Christine V.

    2014-01-01

    The use of tow steered composites, where fibers follow prescribed curvilinear paths within a laminate, can improve upon existing capabilities related to aeroelastic tailoring of wing structures, though this tailoring method has received relatively little attention in the literature. This paper demonstrates the technique for both a simple cantilevered plate in low-speed flow, as well as the wing box of a full-scale high aspect ratio transport configuration. Static aeroelastic stresses and dynamic flutter boundaries are obtained for both cases. The impact of various tailoring choices upon the aeroelastic performance is quantified: curvilinear fiber steering versus straight fiber steering, certifiable versus noncertifiable stacking sequences, a single uniform laminate per wing skin versus multiple laminates, and identical upper and lower wing skins structures versus individual tailoring.

  13. Method of performing computational aeroelastic analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Computational aeroelastic analyses typically use a mathematical model for the structural modes of a flexible structure and a nonlinear aerodynamic model that can generate a plurality of unsteady aerodynamic responses based on the structural modes for conditions defining an aerodynamic condition of the flexible structure. In the present invention, a linear state-space model is generated using a single execution of the nonlinear aerodynamic model for all of the structural modes where a family of orthogonal functions is used as the inputs. Then, static and dynamic aeroelastic solutions are generated using computational interaction between the mathematical model and the linear state-space model for a plurality of periodic points in time.

  14. Role of HPC in Advancing Computational Aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.

    2004-01-01

    On behalf of the High Performance Computing and Modernization Program (HPCMP) and NASA Advanced Supercomputing Division (NAS) a study is conducted to assess the role of supercomputers on computational aeroelasticity of aerospace vehicles. The study is mostly based on the responses to a web based questionnaire that was designed to capture the nuances of high performance computational aeroelasticity, particularly on parallel computers. A procedure is presented to assign a fidelity-complexity index to each application. Case studies based on major applications using HPCMP resources are presented.

  15. Renaissance of Aeroelasticity and Its Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, Peretz P.

    1999-01-01

    The primary objective of this paper is to demonstrate that the field of aeroelasticity continues to play a critical role in the design of modern aerospace vehicles, and several important problems are still far from being well understood. Furthermore, the emergence of new technologies, such as the use of adaptive materials (sometimes denoted as smart structures technology), providing new actuator and sensor capabilities, has invigorated aeroelasticity, and generated a host of new and challenging research topics that can have a major impact on the design of a new generation of aerospace vehicles.

  16. Application of unsteady aeroelastic analysis techniques on the national aerospace plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pototzky, Anthony S.; Spain, Charles V.; Soistmann, David L.; Noll, Thomas E.

    1988-01-01

    A presentation provided at the Fourth National Aerospace Plane Technology Symposium held in Monterey, California, in February 1988 is discussed. The objective is to provide current results of ongoing investigations to develop a methodology for predicting the aerothermoelastic characteristics of NASP-type (hypersonic) flight vehicles. Several existing subsonic and supersonic unsteady aerodynamic codes applicable to the hypersonic class of flight vehicles that are generally available to the aerospace industry are described. These codes were evaluated by comparing calculated results with measured wind-tunnel aeroelastic data. The agreement was quite good in the subsonic speed range but showed mixed agreement in the supersonic range. In addition, a future endeavor to extend the aeroelastic analysis capability to hypersonic speeds is outlined. An investigation to identify the critical parameters affecting the aeroelastic characteristics of a hypersonic vehicle, to define and understand the various flutter mechanisms, and to develop trends for the important parameters using a simplified finite element model of the vehicle is summarized. This study showed the value of performing inexpensive and timely aeroelastic wind-tunnel tests to expand the experimental data base required for code validation using simple to complex models that are representative of the NASP configurations and root boundary conditions are discussed.

  17. Reflectance characteristics and surface processes in stabilized dune environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobberger, P. A.

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of multitemporal TM data for three environmentally related field areas yields information on the response characteristics of stabilized dunes and desert-fringe environments. The three field sites studied include dune fields in Egypt, Mali, and Botswana, ranging in climate from hyperarid to semiarid, and may be classed as an environmental series relating surface processes under Saharan, Sahelian, and Savanna conditions. Sites were field mapped and monitored with TM data for lengths of time up to a year. The complexity of spectral response characteristics is greatest where vegetation is dense and diverse, but study of the three environments together places constraints on the importance of vegetation to spectral response as well as to mechanisms of sand transport. In both Mali and Botswana, the Sahelian and Savanna environments, contrast reversals occur on dune crests and reflectance patterns change through the dry season to resemble the response curves of the hyperarid study site in Egypt. In these analyses, overall surface brightness is controlled by sand composition, while spectral features are controlled by vegetation dynamics.

  18. On the optimization of discrete structures with aeroelastic constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintosh, S. C., Jr.; Ashley, H.

    1978-01-01

    The paper deals with the problem of dynamic structural optimization where constraints relating to flutter of a wing (or other dynamic aeroelastic performance) are imposed along with conditions of a more conventional nature such as those relating to stress under load, deflection, minimum dimensions of structural elements, etc. The discussion is limited to a flutter problem for a linear system with a finite number of degrees of freedom and a single constraint involving aeroelastic stability, and the structure motion is assumed to be a simple harmonic time function. Three search schemes are applied to the minimum-weight redesign of a particular wing: the first scheme relies on the method of feasible directions, while the other two are derived from necessary conditions for a local optimum so that they can be referred to as optimality-criteria schemes. The results suggest that a heuristic redesign algorithm involving an optimality criterion may be best suited for treating multiple constraints with large numbers of design variables.

  19. Aeroelasticity and structural optimization of composite helicopter rotor blades with swept tips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, K. A.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the development of an aeroelastic analysis capability for composite helicopter rotor blades with straight and swept tips, and its application to the simulation of helicopter vibration reduction through structural optimization. A new aeroelastic model is developed in this study which is suitable for composite rotor blades with swept tips in hover and in forward flight. The hingeless blade is modeled by beam type finite elements. A single finite element is used to model the swept tip. Arbitrary cross-sectional shape, generally anisotropic material behavior, transverse shears and out-of-plane warping are included in the blade model. The nonlinear equations of motion, derived using Hamilton's principle, are based on a moderate deflection theory. Composite blade cross-sectbnal properties are calculated by a separate linear, two-dimensional cross section analysis. The aerodynamic loads are obtained from quasi-steady, incompressible aerodynamics, based on an implicit formulation. The trim and steady state blade aeroelastic response are solved in a fully coupled manner. In forward flight, where the blade equations of motion are periodic, the coupled trim-aeroelastic response solution is obtained from the harmonic balance method. Subsequently, the periodic system is linearized about the steady state response, and its stability is determined from Floquet theory.

  20. Optimum Design of a Helicopter Rotor for Low Vibration Using Aeroelastic Analysis and Response Surface Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguli, R.

    2002-11-01

    An aeroelastic analysis based on finite elements in space and time is used to model the helicopter rotor in forward flight. The rotor blade is represented as an elastic cantilever beam undergoing flap and lag bending, elastic torsion and axial deformations. The objective of the improved design is to reduce vibratory loads at the rotor hub that are the main source of helicopter vibration. Constraints are imposed on aeroelastic stability, and move limits are imposed on the blade elastic stiffness design variables. Using the aeroelastic analysis, response surface approximations are constructed for the objective function (vibratory hub loads). It is found that second order polynomial response surfaces constructed using the central composite design of the theory of design of experiments adequately represents the aeroelastic model in the vicinity of the baseline design. Optimization results show a reduction in the objective function of about 30 per cent. A key accomplishment of this paper is the decoupling of the analysis problem and the optimization problems using response surface methods, which should encourage the use of optimization methods by the helicopter industry.

  1. Transonic-Small-Disturbance and Linear Analyses for the Active Aeroelastic Wing Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiesman, Carol D.; Silva, Walter A.; Spain, Charles V.; Heeg, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    Analysis serves many roles in the Active Aeroelastic Wing (AAW) program. It has been employed to ensure safe testing of both a flight vehicle and wind tunnel model, has formulated models for control law design, has provided comparison data for validation of experimental methods and has addressed several analytical research topics. Aeroelastic analyses using mathematical models of both the flight vehicle and the wind tunnel model configurations have been conducted. Static aeroelastic characterizations of the flight vehicle and wind tunnel model have been produced in the transonic regime and at low supersonic Mach numbers. The flight vehicle has been analyzed using linear aerodynamic theory and transonic small disturbance theory. Analyses of the wind-tunnel model were performed using only linear methods. Research efforts conducted through these analyses include defining regions of the test space where transonic effects play an important role and investigating transonic similarity. A comparison of these aeroelastic analyses for the AAW flight vehicle is presented in this paper. Results from a study of transonic similarity are also presented. Data sets from these analyses include pressure distributions, stability and control derivatives, control surface effectiveness, and vehicle deflections.

  2. Aeroelastic effects in multi-rotor vehicles with application to a hybrid heavy lift system. Part 1: Formulation of equations of motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatesan, C.; Friedman, P.

    1984-01-01

    This report presents a set of governing coupled differential equations for a model of a hybrid aircraft. The model consists of multiple rotor systems connected by an elastic interconnecting structure, with options to add any combination of or all of the following components; i.e., thrusters, a buoyant hull, and an underslung weight. The dynamic equations are written for the individual blade with hub motions, for the rigid body motions of the whole model, and also for the flexible modes of the interconnecting structure. One of the purposes of this study is to serve as the basis of a numerical study aimed at determining the aeroelastic stability and structural response characteristics of a Hybrid Heavy Lift Airship (HHLA). It is also expected that the formulation may be applicable to analyzing stability and responses of dual rotor helicopters such as a Heavy Lift Helicopter (HLH). Futhermore, the model is capable of representing coupled rotor/body aeromechanical problems of single rotor helicopters.

  3. An Aeroelastic Perspective of Floating Offshore Wind Turbine Wake Formation and Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Steven N.; Jaworski, Justin W.

    2015-11-01

    The wake formation and wake stability of floating offshore wind turbines are investigated from an aeroelastic perspective. The aeroelastic model is composed of the Sebastian-Lackner free-vortex wake aerodynamic model coupled to the nonlinear Hodges-Dowell beam equations, which are extended to include the effects of blade profile asymmetry, higher-order torsional effects, and kinetic energy components associated with periodic rigid-body motions of floating platforms. Rigid-body platform motions are also assigned to the aerodynamic model as varying inflow conditions to emulate operational rotor-wake interactions. Careful attention is given to the wake formation within operational states where the ratio of inflow velocity to induced velocity is over 50%. These states are most susceptible to aerodynamic instabilities, and provide a range of states about which a wake stability analysis can be performed. In addition, the stability analysis used for the numerical framework is implemented into a standalone free-vortex wake aerodynamic model. Both aeroelastic and standalone aerodynamic results are compared to evaluate the level of impact that flexible blades have on the wake formation and wake stability.

  4. Aeroelastic modeling of rotor blades with spanwise variable elastic axis offset: Classic issues revisited and new formulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielawa, Richard L.

    1988-01-01

    In response to a systematic methodology assessment program directed to the aeroelastic stability of hingeless helicopter rotor blades, improved basic aeroelastic reformulations and new formulations relating to structural sweep were achieved. Correlational results are presented showing the substantially improved performance of the G400 aeroelastic analysis incorporating these new formulations. The formulations pertain partly to sundry solutions to classic problem areas, relating to dynamic inflow with vortex-ring state operation and basic blade kinematics, but mostly to improved physical modeling of elastic axis offset (structural sweep) in the presence of nonlinear structural twist. Specific issues addressed are an alternate modeling of the delta EI torsional excitation due to compound bending using a force integration approach, and the detailed kinematic representation of an elastically deflected point mass of a beam with both structural sweep and nonlinear twist.

  5. Aeroelastic model helicopter rotor testing in the Langley TDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantay, W. R.; Yeager, W. T., Jr.; Hamouda, M. N.; Cramer, R. G., Jr.; Langston, C. W.

    1985-01-01

    Wind-tunnel testing of a properly scaled aeroelastic model helicopter rotor is considered a necessary phase in the design development of new or existing rotor systems. For this reason, extensive testing of aeroelastically scaled model rotors is done in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) located at the NASA Langley Research Center. A unique capability of this facility, which enables proper dynamic scaling, is the use of Freon as a test medium. A description of the TDT and a discussion of the benefits of using Freon as a test medium are presented. A description of the model test bed used, the Aeroelastic Rotor Experimental System (ARES), is also provided and examples of recent rotor tests are cited to illustrate the advantages and capabilities of aeroelastic model rotor testing in the TDT. The importance of proper dynamic scaling in identifying and solving rotorcraft aeroelastic problems, and the importance of aeroelastic testing of model rotor systems in the design of advanced rotor systems are demonstrated.

  6. A study of aeroelastic and structural dynamic effects in multi-rotor systems with application to hybrid heavy lift vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, P. P.

    1984-01-01

    An aeroelastic model suitable for the study of aeroelastic and structural dynamic effects in multirotor vehicles simulating a hybrid heavy lift vehicle was developed and applied to the study of a number of diverse problems. The analytical model developed proved capable of modeling a number of aeroelastic problems, namely: (1) isolated blade aeroelastic stability in hover and forward flight, (2) coupled rotor/fuselage aeromechanical problem in air or ground resonance, (3) tandem rotor coupled rotor/fuselage problems, and (4) the aeromechanical stability of a multirotor vehicle model representing a hybrid heavy lift airship (HHLA). The model was used to simulate the ground resonance boundaries of a three bladed hingeless rotor model, including the effect of aerodynamic loads, and the theoretical predictions compared well with experimental results. Subsequently the model was used to study the aeromechanical stability of a vehicle representing a hybrid heavy lift airship, and potential instabilities which could occur for this type of vehicle were identified. The coupling between various blade, supporting structure and rigid body modes was identified.

  7. Flight-determined stability and control coefficients of the F-111A airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliff, K. W.; Maine, R. E.; Steers, S. T.

    1978-01-01

    A complete set of linear stability and control derivatives of the F-111A airplane was determined with a modified maximum likelihood estimator. The derivatives were determined at wing sweep angles of 26 deg, 35 deg, and 58 deg. The flight conditions included a Mach number range of 0.63 to 1.43 and an angle of attack range of 2 deg to 15 deg. Maneuvers were performed at normal accelerations from 0.9g to 3.8g during steady turns to assess the aeroelastic effects on the stability and control characteristics. The derivatives generally showed consistent trends and reasonable agreement with the wind tunnel estimates. Significant Mach effects were observed for Mach numbers as low as 0.82. No large effects attributable to aeroelasticity were noted.

  8. An analytical study of effects of aeroelasticity on control effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehrotra, S. C.

    1975-01-01

    Structural influence coefficients were calculated for various wing planforms using the KU Aeroelastic and NASTRAN programs. The resulting matrices are compared with experimental results. Conclusions are given.

  9. A Taguchi study of the aeroelastic tailoring design process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohlmann, Jonathan D.; Scott, Robert C.

    1991-01-01

    A Taguchi study was performed to determine the important players in the aeroelastic tailoring design process and to find the best composition of the optimization's objective function. The Wing Aeroelastic Synthesis Procedure (TSO) was used to ascertain the effects that factors such as composite laminate constraints, roll effectiveness constraints, and built-in wing twist and camber have on the optimum, aeroelastically tailored wing skin design. The results show the Taguchi method to be a viable engineering tool for computational inquiries, and provide some valuable lessons about the practice of aeroelastic tailoring.

  10. Evaluation of Linear, Inviscid, Viscous, and Reduced-Order Modeling Aeroelastic Solutions of the AGARD 445.6 Wing Using Root Locus Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Perry, Boyd III; Chwalowski, Pawel

    2014-01-01

    Reduced-order modeling (ROM) methods are applied to the CFD-based aeroelastic analysis of the AGARD 445.6 wing in order to gain insight regarding well-known discrepancies between the aeroelastic analyses and the experimental results. The results presented include aeroelastic solutions using the inviscid CAP-TSD code and the FUN3D code (Euler and Navier-Stokes). Full CFD aeroelastic solutions and ROM aeroelastic solutions, computed at several Mach numbers, are presented in the form of root locus plots in order to better reveal the aeroelastic root migrations with increasing dynamic pressure. Important conclusions are drawn from these results including the ability of the linear CAP-TSD code to accurately predict the entire experimental flutter boundary (repeat of analyses performed in the 1980's), that the Euler solutions at supersonic conditions indicate that the third mode is always unstable, and that the FUN3D Navier-Stokes solutions stabilize the unstable third mode seen in the Euler solutions.

  11. Stability and Load Sharing Characteristics of a Posterior Dynamic Stabilization Device

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Daniel J.; Yeager, Matthew S.; Thampi, Shankar S.; Whiting, Donald M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lumbar interbody fusion is a common treatment for a variety of spinal pathologies. It has been hypothesized that insufficient mechanical loading of the interbody graft can prevent proper fusion of the joint. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mechanical stability and anterior column loading sharing characteristics of a posterior dynamic system compared to titanium rods in an anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) model. Methods Range of motion, interpedicular kinematics and interbody graft loading were measured in human cadaveric lumbar segments tested under a pure moment flexibility testing protocol. Results Both systems provided significant fixation compared to the intact condition and to an interbody spacer alone in flexion extension and lateral bending. No significant differences in fixation were detected between the devices. A significant decrease in graft loading was detected in flexion for the titanium rod treatment compared to spacer alone. No significant differences in graft loading were detected between the spacer alone and posterior dynamic system or between the posterior dynamic system and the titanium rod. Conclusions The results of this study indicate that the posterior dynamic system provides similar fixation compared to that of a titanium rod, however, studies designed to evaluate the efficacy of fixation in a cadaver model may not be sufficiently powered to establish differences in load sharing using the techniques described here. PMID:26131403

  12. Probabilistic Aeroelastic Analysis of Turbomachinery Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.; Mital, S. K.; Stefko, G. L.

    2004-01-01

    A probabilistic approach is described for aeroelastic analysis of turbomachinery blade rows. Blade rows with subsonic flow and blade rows with supersonic flow with subsonic leading edge are considered. To demonstrate the probabilistic approach, the flutter frequency, damping and forced response of a blade row representing a compressor geometry is considered. The analysis accounts for uncertainties in structural and aerodynamic design variables. The results are presented in the form of probabilistic density function (PDF) and sensitivity factors. For subsonic flow cascade, comparisons are also made with different probabilistic distributions, probabilistic methods, and Monte-Carlo simulation. The approach shows that the probabilistic approach provides a more realistic and systematic way to assess the effect of uncertainties in design variables on the aeroelastic instabilities and response.

  13. In-flight gust monitoring and aeroelasticity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Salazar, Oscar Salvador

    accuracy of various aeroelastic modeling techniques for estimating the stability boundary of a flexible wing in flight (i.e., flutter).

  14. Unsteady aerodynamic flow field analysis of the space shuttle configuration. Part 2: Launch vehicle aeroelastic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reding, J. P.; Ericsson, L. E.

    1976-01-01

    An exploratory analysis has been made of the aeroelastic stability of the Space Shuttle Launch Configuration, with the objective of defining critical flow phenomena with adverse aeroelastic effects and developing simple analytic means of describing the time-dependent flow-interference effects so that they can be incorporated into a computer program to predict the aeroelastic stability of all free-free modes of the shuttle launch configuration. Three critical flow phenomana have been identified: (1) discontinuous jump of orbiter wing shock, (2) inlet flow between orbiter and booster, and (3) H.O. tank base flow. All involve highly nonlinear and often discontinuous aerodynamics which cause limit cycle oscillations of certain critical modes. Given the appropriate static data, the dynamic effects of the wing shock jump and the HO tank bulbous base effect can be analyzed using the developed quasi-steady techniques. However, further analytic and experimental efforts are required before the dynamic effects of the inlet flow phenomenon can be predicted for the shuttle launch configuration.

  15. ASTROP2-LE: A Mistuned Aeroelastic Analysis System Based on a Two Dimensional Linearized Euler Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.; Srivastava, R.; Mehmed, Oral

    2002-01-01

    An aeroelastic analysis system for flutter and forced response analysis of turbomachines based on a two-dimensional linearized unsteady Euler solver has been developed. The ASTROP2 code, an aeroelastic stability analysis program for turbomachinery, was used as a basis for this development. The ASTROP2 code uses strip theory to couple a two dimensional aerodynamic model with a three dimensional structural model. The code was modified to include forced response capability. The formulation was also modified to include aeroelastic analysis with mistuning. A linearized unsteady Euler solver, LINFLX2D is added to model the unsteady aerodynamics in ASTROP2. By calculating the unsteady aerodynamic loads using LINFLX2D, it is possible to include the effects of transonic flow on flutter and forced response in the analysis. The stability is inferred from an eigenvalue analysis. The revised code, ASTROP2-LE for ASTROP2 code using Linearized Euler aerodynamics, is validated by comparing the predictions with those obtained using linear unsteady aerodynamic solutions.

  16. Aeroelastic instability stoppers for wind tunnel models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doggett, R. V., Jr.; Ricketts, R. H. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A mechanism for constraining models or sections thereof, was wind tunnel tested, deployed at the onset of aeroelastic instability, to forestall destructive vibrations in the model is described. The mechanism includes a pair of arms pivoted to the tunnel wall and straddling the model. Rollers on the ends of the arms contact the model, and are pulled together against the model by a spring stretched between the arms. An actuator mechanism swings the arms into place and back as desired.

  17. Modeling composite wing aeroelastic behavior with uncertain damage severity and material properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiou, G.; Manan, A.; Cooper, J. E.

    2012-10-01

    The effect of uncertain material properties and severity of damage on the aeroelastic behavior of a finite element composite wing model are predicted by applying the Polynomial Chaos Expansion method (PCE). Different damage modes, including the transverse matrix cracking and broken fibers, are induced into pre-defined locations in the laminates and the aeroelastic stability and dynamic response of the wing due to "1-cosine" vertical gusts are evaluated. For this purpose, PCE models that predict the variation due to uncertainty of the flutter speed and an "Interesting Quantity" (root shear force) of the wing box are developed based upon a small sample of observations, exploiting the efficient Latin Hypercube sampling technique. The uncertainty propagation on the output responses, in the form of probability density functions, is evaluated at low computational cost, implementing the PCE models and verified successfully against the actual results.

  18. Unsteady transonic flow calculations for two-dimensional canard-wing configurations with aeroelastic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, J. T.

    1985-01-01

    Unsteady transonic flow calculations for aerodynamically interfering airfoil configurations are performed as a first-step toward solving the three-dimensional canard-wing interaction problem. These calculations are performed by extending the XTRAN2L two-dimensional unsteady transonic small-disturbance code to include an additional airfoil. Unsteady transonic forces due to plunge and pitch motions of a two-dimensional canard and wing are presented. Results for a variety of canard-wing separation distances reveal the effects of aerodynamic interference on unsteady transonic airloads. Aeroelastic analyses employing these unsteady airloads demonstrate the effects of aerodynamic interference on aeroelastic stability and flutter. For the configurations studied, increases in wing flutter speed result with the inclusion of the aerodynamically interfering canard.

  19. Unsteady transonic flow calculations for two-dimensional canard-wing configurations with aeroelastic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, J. T.

    1985-01-01

    Unsteady transonic flow calculations for aerodynamically interfering airfoil configurations are performed as a first step toward solving the three dimensional canard wing interaction problem. These calculations are performed by extending the XTRAN2L two dimensional unsteady transonic small disturbance code to include an additional airfoil. Unsteady transonic forces due to plunge and pitch motions of a two dimensional canard and wing are presented. Results for a variety of canard wing separation distances reveal the effects of aerodynamic interference on unsteady transonic airloads. Aeroelastic analyses employing these unsteady airloads demonstrate the effects of aerodynamic interference on aeroelastic stability and flutter. For the configurations studied, increases in wing flutter speed result with the inclusion of the aerodynamically interfering canard.

  20. Overview of the Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heeg, Jennifer; Chwalowski, Pawel; Florance, Jennifer P.; Wieseman, Carol D.; Schuster, David M.; Perry, Raleigh B.

    2013-01-01

    The Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop brought together an international community of computational fluid dynamicists as a step in defining the state of the art in computational aeroelasticity. This workshop's technical focus was prediction of unsteady pressure distributions resulting from forced motion, benchmarking the results first using unforced system data. The most challenging aspects of the physics were identified as capturing oscillatory shock behavior, dynamic shock-induced separated flow and tunnel wall boundary layer influences. The majority of the participants used unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes codes. These codes were exercised at transonic Mach numbers for three configurations and comparisons were made with existing experimental data. Substantial variations were observed among the computational solutions as well as differences relative to the experimental data. Contributing issues to these differences include wall effects and wall modeling, non-standardized convergence criteria, inclusion of static aeroelastic deflection, methodology for oscillatory solutions, post-processing methods. Contributing issues pertaining principally to the experimental data sets include the position of the model relative to the tunnel wall, splitter plate size, wind tunnel expansion slot configuration, spacing and location of pressure instrumentation, and data processing methods.

  1. Adaptive neural control of aeroelastic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenwalner, Peter F.; Little, Gerald R.; Scott, Robert C.

    1996-05-01

    The Adaptive Neural Control of Aeroelastic Response (ANCAR) program is a joint research and development effort conducted by McDonnell Douglas Aerospace (MDA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC) under a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA). The purpose of the MOA is to cooperatively develop the smart structure technologies necessary for alleviating undesirable vibration and aeroelastic response associated with highly flexible structures. Adaptive control can reduce aeroelastic response associated with buffet and atmospheric turbulence, it can increase flutter margins, and it may be able to reduce response associated with nonlinear phenomenon like limit cycle oscillations. By reducing vibration levels and loads, aircraft structures can have lower acquisition cost, reduced maintenance, and extended lifetimes. Phase I of the ANCAR program involved development and demonstration of a neural network-based semi-adaptive flutter suppression system which used a neural network for scheduling control laws as a function of Mach number and dynamic pressure. This controller was tested along with a robust fixed-gain control law in NASA's Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) utilizing the Benchmark Active Controls Testing (BACT) wing. During Phase II, a fully adaptive on-line learning neural network control system has been developed for flutter suppression which will be tested in 1996. This paper presents the results of Phase I testing as well as the development progress of Phase II.

  2. Computer Programs for Calculating and Plotting the Stability Characteristics of a Balloon Tethered in a Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, R. M.; Bland, S. R.; Redd, L. T.

    1973-01-01

    Computer programs for calculating the stability characteristics of a balloon tethered in a steady wind are presented. Equilibrium conditions, characteristic roots, and modal ratios are calculated for a range of discrete values of velocity for a fixed tether-line length. Separate programs are used: (1) to calculate longitudinal stability characteristics, (2) to calculate lateral stability characteristics, (3) to plot the characteristic roots versus velocity, (4) to plot the characteristic roots in root-locus form, (5) to plot the longitudinal modes of motion, and (6) to plot the lateral modes for motion. The basic equations, program listings, and the input and output data for sample cases are presented, with a brief discussion of the overall operation and limitations. The programs are based on a linearized, stability-derivative type of analysis, including balloon aerodynamics, apparent mass, buoyancy effects, and static forces which result from the tether line.

  3. The effects of drivers’ aggressive characteristics on traffic stability from a new car-following model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Guanghan; Qing, Li

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a new car-following model is proposed by considering the drivers’ aggressive characteristics. The stable condition and the modified Korteweg-de Vries (mKdV) equation are obtained by the linear stability analysis and nonlinear analysis, which show that the drivers’ aggressive characteristics can improve the stability of traffic flow. Furthermore, the numerical results show that the drivers’ aggressive characteristics increase the stable region of traffic flow and can reproduce the evolution and propagation of small perturbation.

  4. The effects of aeroelastic deformation on the unaugmented stopped-rotor dynamics of an X-Wing aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Michael G.; Silva, Walter A.

    1987-01-01

    A new design concept in the development of vertical takeoff and landing aircraft with high forward flight speed capability is that of the X-Wing. The X-Wing is a stiff, bearingless helicopter rotor system which can be stopped in flight and the blades used as two forward-swept wings and two aft-swept wings. Because of the unusual configuration in the fixed-wing mode, there is a high potential for aeroelastic divergence or flutter and coupling of blade vibration modes with rigid-body modes. An aeroelastic stability analysis of an X-Wing configuration aircraft was undertaken to determine if these problems could exist. This paper reports on the results of dynamic stability analyses in the lateral and longitudinal directions including the vehicle rigid-body and flexible modes. A static aeroelastic analysis using the normal vibration mode equations of motion was performed to determine the cause of a loss of longitudinal static margin with increasing airspeed. This loss of static margin was found to be due to aeroelastic 'washin' of the forward-swept blades and 'washout' of the aft-swept blades moving the aircraft aerodynamic center forward of the center of gravity. This phenomenon is likely to be generic to X-Wing aircraft.

  5. The effects of aeroelastic deformation on the unaugmented stopped-rotor dynamics of an X-Wing aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Michael G.; Silva, Walter A.

    1987-01-01

    A new design concept in the development of VTOL aircraft with high forward flight speed capability is that of the X-Wing, a stiff, bearingless helicopter rotor system which can be stopped in flight and the blades used as two forward-swept and two aft-swept wings. Because of the usual configuration in the fixed-wing mode, there is a high potential for aeroelastic divergence or flutter and coupling of blade vibration modes with rigid-body modes. An aeroelastic stability analysis of an X-Wing configuration aircraft was undertaken to determine if these problems could exist. This paper reports on the results of dynamic stability analyses in the lateral and longitudinal directions including the vehicle rigid-body and flexible modes. A static aeroelastic analysis using the normal vibration mode equations of motion was performed to determine the cause of a loss of longitudinal static margin with increasing airspeed. This loss of static margin was found to be due to aeroelastic washin of the forward-swept blades and washout of the aft-swept blades moving the aircraft aerodynamic center forward of the center of gravity. This phenomenon is likely to be generic to X-Wing aircraft.

  6. Loads and aeroelasticity division research and technology accomplishments for FY 1982 and plans for FY 1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    Accomplishments of the past year and plans for the coming year are highlighted as they relate to five year plans and the objectives of the following technical areas: aerothermal loads; multidisciplinary analysis and optimization; unsteady aerodynamics; and configuration aeroelasticity. Areas of interest include thermal protection system concepts, active control, nonlinear aeroelastic analysis, aircraft aeroelasticity, and rotorcraft aeroelasticity and vibrations.

  7. Stability Characteristics of Low Reynolds Number, Low Aspect Ratio Wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, Matthew; Mohseni, Kamran

    2010-11-01

    The recent interest in Micro Aerial Vehicles (MAVs) has led to the development of many different aircraft; however, little progress has been made in understanding the physics of MAV flow. MAVs aerodynamics is affected by low Reynolds number flow and low aspect ratios. As a result nonlinear effects due to tip vortices are quite important. We have developed a new experimental setup for measuring stability derivatives in a small wind tunnel. Using a four degree of freedom actuation system, a model can be placed in the test section and maneuvered in such a way to isolate the flow components responsible for creating stability derivatives. Accurate measurements of the aerodynamic loading can then be used to compute these values. Initial testing was conducted primarily on a series of flat plates of different aspect ratios. In addition, the CU MAV was tested as a specific case study. Test results indicate that some of the cross coupled stability derivatives, ignored for larger aircrafts, are on the same order of magnitude as standard derivatives and thus can not be ignored in the derivation of the linear equations of motion for a micro aerial vehicle. As a result, a more general set of equations of motion are derived based upon experimentally obtained stability derivatives.

  8. Process for stabilizing the viscosity characteristics of coal derived materials and the stabilized materials obtained thereby

    DOEpatents

    Bronfenbrenner, James C.; Foster, Edward P.; Tewari, Krishna

    1985-01-01

    A process is disclosed for stabilizing the viscosity of coal derived materials such as an SRC product by adding up to 5.0% by weight of a light volatile phenolic viscosity repressor. The viscosity will remain stabilized for a period of time of up to 4 months.

  9. Unsteady Aerodynamic Validation Experiences From the Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heeg, Jennifer; Chawlowski, Pawel

    2014-01-01

    The AIAA Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop (AePW) was held in April 2012, bringing together communities of aeroelasticians, computational fluid dynamicists and experimentalists. The extended objective was to assess the state of the art in computational aeroelastic methods as practical tools for the prediction of static and dynamic aeroelastic phenomena. As a step in this process, workshop participants analyzed unsteady aerodynamic and weakly-coupled aeroelastic cases. Forced oscillation and unforced system experiments and computations have been compared for three configurations. This paper emphasizes interpretation of the experimental data, computational results and their comparisons from the perspective of validation of unsteady system predictions. The issues examined in detail are variability introduced by input choices for the computations, post-processing, and static aeroelastic modeling. The final issue addressed is interpreting unsteady information that is present in experimental data that is assumed to be steady, and the resulting consequences on the comparison data sets.

  10. APPLE - An aeroelastic analysis system for turbomachines and propfans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.; Bakhle, Milind A.; Srivastava, R.; Mehmed, Oral

    1992-01-01

    This paper reviews aeroelastic analysis methods for propulsion elements (advanced propellers, compressors and turbines) being developed and used at NASA Lewis Research Center. These aeroelastic models include both structural and aerodynamic components. The structural models include the typical section model, the beam model with and without disk flexibility, and the finite element blade model with plate bending elements. The aerodynamic models are based on the solution of equations ranging from the two-dimensional linear potential equation for a cascade to the three-dimensional Euler equations for multi-blade configurations. Typical results are presented for each aeroelastic model. Suggestions for further research are indicated. All the available aeroelastic models and analysis methods are being incorporated into a unified computer program named APPLE (Aeroelasticity Program for Propulsion at LEwis).

  11. Aeroelastic Response of the Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge Transtition Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrera, Claudia Y.; Spivey, Natalie D.; Lung, Shun-fat

    2016-01-01

    The Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge demonstrator was a joint task under the Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project in partnership with the Air Force Research Laboratory and FlexSys, Inc. (Ann Arbor, Michigan), chartered by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to develop advanced technologies that enable environmentally friendly aircraft, such as continuous mold-line technologies. The Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge demonstrator encompassed replacing the Fowler flaps on the SubsoniC Aircraft Testbed, a Gulfstream III (Gulfstream Aerospace, Savannah, Georgia) aircraft, with control surfaces developed by FlexSys, Inc., a pair of uniquely-designed, unconventional flaps to be used as lifting surfaces during flight-testing to substantiate their structural effectiveness. The unconventional flaps consisted of a main flap section and two transition sections, inboard and outboard, which demonstrated the continuous mold-line technology. Unique characteristics of the transition sections provided a challenge to the airworthiness assessment for this part of the structure. A series of build-up tests and analyses were conducted to ensure the data required to support the airworthiness assessment were acquired and applied accurately. The transition sections were analyzed both as individual components and as part of the flight-test article assembly. Instrumentation was installed in the transition sections based on the analysis to best capture the in-flight aeroelastic response. Flight-testing was conducted and flight data were acquired to validate the analyses. This paper documents the details of the aeroelastic assessment and in-flight response of the transition sections of the unconventional Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge flaps.

  12. EBT reactor characteristics consistent with stability and power balance requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Uckan, N.A.; Santoro, R.T.

    1983-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a recent EBT reactor study that includes both ring and core plasma properties and consistent treatment of coupled ring-core stability criteria and power balance requirements. The principal finding is that constraints imposed by these coupling and other physics and technology considerations permit a broad operating window for reactor design optimization. A number of concept improvements are also proposed that are found to offer the potential for further improvement of the reactor size and parameters.

  13. Geotechnical characteristics and slope stability in the Gulf of Cadiz

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, H.; Baraza, J.

    1999-01-01

    Sedimentological and geotechnical analyses of thirty-seven core samples from the Gulf of Cadiz continental margin were used to define the regional variability of sediment properties and to assess slope stability. Considering the sediment property data set as a whole, there is an association between grain size, plasticity and water content. Any one of these properties can be mapped regionally to provide an indication of the dominant surface sediment lithology. Based on static sediment strength, a simplified slope stability analysis showed that only steep slopes (> 16??for even the most vulnerable sediment) can fail under static loading conditions. Accordingly, transient loads, such as earthquakes or storms, are needed to cause failure on more moderate slopes. A regional seismic slope stability analysis of the Cadiz margin was performed based on detailed geotechnical testing of four gravity core samples. The results showed that the stability of these slopes under seismic loading conditions depends upon sediment density, the cyclic loading shear strength, the slope steepness, and the regional seismicity. Sediment density and cyclic loading shear strength are dependent upon water content, which can act as a proxy for plasticity and texture effects. Specifically, Sediment in the water content range of 50-56% is most vulnerable to failure under cyclic loading within the Cadiz margin. As a result, for a uniform seismicity over the region, susceptibility to failure during seismic loading conditions increases with increasing slope steepness and is higher if the sediment water content is in the 50-56% range than if it is not. The only sampled zone of failure on the continental slope contains sediment with water content in this critical range. Storm-wave-induced instability was evaluated for the continental shelf. The evaluation showed that a storm having hundreds of waves with a height in the range of 16 m might be capable of causing failure on the shelf. However, no

  14. Short-Term Temporal Stability in Observed Retail Food Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zenk, Shannon N.; Grigsby-Toussaint, Diana S.; Curry, Susan J.; Berbaum, Michael; Schneider, Linda

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Use of direct observation to characterize neighborhood retail food environments is increasing, but to date most studies have relied on a single observation. If food availability, prices, and quality vary over short time periods, repeated measures may be needed to portray these food characteristics. This study evaluated short-term…

  15. Aeroelastic-Acoustics Simulation of Flight Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, kajal K.; Choi, S.; Ibrahim, A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the details of a numerical finite element (FE) based analysis procedure and a resulting code for the simulation of the acoustics phenomenon arising from aeroelastic interactions. Both CFD and structural simulations are based on FE discretization employing unstructured grids. The sound pressure level (SPL) on structural surfaces is calculated from the root mean square (RMS) of the unsteady pressure and the acoustic wave frequencies are computed from a fast Fourier transform (FFT) of the unsteady pressure distribution as a function of time. The resulting tool proves to be unique as it is designed to analyze complex practical problems, involving large scale computations, in a routine fashion.

  16. Static aeroelastic analysis for generic configuration wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, IN; Miura, Hirokazu; Chargin, Mladen K.

    1991-01-01

    A static aeroelastic analysis capability that calculates flexible air loads for generic configuration wings was developed. It was made possible by integrating a finite element structural analysis code (MSC/NASTRAN) and a panel code of aerodynamic analysis based on linear potential flow theory. The framework already built in MSC/NASTRAN was used, and the aerodynamic influence coefficient matrix was computed externally and inserted in the NASTRAN by means of a DMAP program. It was shown that deformation and flexible air loads of an oblique wing configuration including asymmetric wings can be calculated reliably by this code both in subsonic and supersonic speeds.

  17. Subspace Iteration Method for Complex Eigenvalue Problems with Nonsymmetric Matrices in Aeroelastic System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-gi; Lung, Shu

    2009-01-01

    Modern airplane design is a multidisciplinary task which combines several disciplines such as structures, aerodynamics, flight controls, and sometimes heat transfer. Historically, analytical and experimental investigations concerning the interaction of the elastic airframe with aerodynamic and in retia loads have been conducted during the design phase to determine the existence of aeroelastic instabilities, so called flutter .With the advent and increased usage of flight control systems, there is also a likelihood of instabilities caused by the interaction of the flight control system and the aeroelastic response of the airplane, known as aeroservoelastic instabilities. An in -house code MPASES (Ref. 1), modified from PASES (Ref. 2), is a general purpose digital computer program for the analysis of the closed-loop stability problem. This program used subroutines given in the International Mathematical and Statistical Library (IMSL) (Ref. 3) to compute all of the real and/or complex conjugate pairs of eigenvalues of the Hessenberg matrix. For high fidelity configuration, these aeroelastic system matrices are large and compute all eigenvalues will be time consuming. A subspace iteration method (Ref. 4) for complex eigenvalues problems with nonsymmetric matrices has been formulated and incorporated into the modified program for aeroservoelastic stability (MPASES code). Subspace iteration method only solve for the lowest p eigenvalues and corresponding eigenvectors for aeroelastic and aeroservoelastic analysis. In general, the selection of p is ranging from 10 for wing flutter analysis to 50 for an entire aircraft flutter analysis. The application of this newly incorporated code is an experiment known as the Aerostructures Test Wing (ATW) which was designed by the National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA) Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California to research aeroelastic instabilities. Specifically, this experiment was used to study an instability

  18. Aeroelastic Sizing for High-Speed Research (HSR) Longitudinal Control Alternatives Project (LCAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Joanne L.; Dunn, H. J.; Stroud, W. Jefferson; Barthelemy, J.-F.; Weston, Robert P.; Martin, Carl J.; Bennett, Robert M.

    2005-01-01

    The Longitudinal Control Alternatives Project (LCAP) compared three high-speed civil transport configurations to determine potential advantages of the three associated longitudinal control concepts. The three aircraft configurations included a conventional configuration with a layout having a horizontal aft tail, a configuration with a forward canard in addition to a horizontal aft tail, and a configuration with only a forward canard. The three configurations were aeroelastically sized and were compared on the basis of operational empty weight (OEW) and longitudinal control characteristics. The sized structure consisted of composite honeycomb sandwich panels on both the wing and the fuselage. Design variables were the core depth of the sandwich and the thicknesses of the composite material which made up the face sheets of the sandwich. Each configuration was sized for minimum structural weight under linear and nonlinear aeroelastic loads subject to strain, buckling, ply-mixture, and subsonic and supersonic flutter constraints. This report describes the methods that were used and the results that were generated for the aeroelastic sizing of the three configurations.

  19. Twist Model Development and Results From the Active Aeroelastic Wing F/A-18 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lizotte, Andrew; Allen, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the wing twist of the active aeroelastic wing F/A-18 aircraft is a fundamental research objective for the program and offers numerous benefits. In order to clearly understand the wing flexibility characteristics, a model was created to predict real-time wing twist. A reliable twist model allows the prediction of twist for flight simulation, provides insight into aircraft performance uncertainties, and assists with computational fluid dynamic and aeroelastic issues. The left wing of the aircraft was heavily instrumented during the first phase of the active aeroelastic wing program allowing deflection data collection. Traditional data processing steps were taken to reduce flight data, and twist predictions were made using linear regression techniques. The model predictions determined a consistent linear relationship between the measured twist and aircraft parameters, such as surface positions and aircraft state variables. Error in the original model was reduced in some cases by using a dynamic pressure-based assumption and by using neural networks. These techniques produced excellent predictions for flight between the standard test points and accounted for nonlinearities in the data. This report discusses data processing techniques and twist prediction validation, and provides illustrative and quantitative results.

  20. Unsteady transonic aerodynamics and aeroelastic calculations at low-supersonic freestreams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.; Goorjian, Peter M.

    1988-01-01

    A computational procedure is presented to simulate transonic unsteady flows and corresponding aeroelasticity of wings at low-supersonic freestreams. The flow is modeled by using the transonic small-perturbation theory. The structural equations of motions are modeled using modal equations of motion directly coupled with aerodynamics. Supersonic freestreams are simulated by properly accounting for the boundary conditions based on pressure waves along the flow characteristics in streamwise planes. The flow equations are solved using the time-accurate, alternating-direction implicit finite-difference scheme. The coupled aeroelastic equations of motion are solved by an integration procedure based on the time-accurate, linear-acceleration method. The flow modeling is verified by comparing calculations with experiments for both steady and unsteady flows at supersonic freestreams. The unsteady computations are made for oscillating wings. Comparisons of computed results with experiments show good agreement. Aeroelastic responses are computed for a rectangular wing at Mach numbers ranging from subtransonic to upper-transonic (supersonic) freestreams. The extension of the transonic dip into the upper transonic regime is illustrated.

  1. Aeroelastic Model Structure Computation for Envelope Expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kukreja, Sunil L.

    2007-01-01

    Structure detection is a procedure for selecting a subset of candidate terms, from a full model description, that best describes the observed output. This is a necessary procedure to compute an efficient system description which may afford greater insight into the functionality of the system or a simpler controller design. Structure computation as a tool for black-box modeling may be of critical importance in the development of robust, parsimonious models for the flight-test community. Moreover, this approach may lead to efficient strategies for rapid envelope expansion that may save significant development time and costs. In this study, a least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) technique is investigated for computing efficient model descriptions of non-linear aeroelastic systems. The LASSO minimises the residual sum of squares with the addition of an l(Sub 1) penalty term on the parameter vector of the traditional l(sub 2) minimisation problem. Its use for structure detection is a natural extension of this constrained minimisation approach to pseudo-linear regression problems which produces some model parameters that are exactly zero and, therefore, yields a parsimonious system description. Applicability of this technique for model structure computation for the F/A-18 (McDonnell Douglas, now The Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois) Active Aeroelastic Wing project using flight test data is shown for several flight conditions (Mach numbers) by identifying a parsimonious system description with a high percent fit for cross-validated data.

  2. Aeroelastic Model Structure Computation for Envelope Expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kukreja, Sunil L.

    2007-01-01

    Structure detection is a procedure for selecting a subset of candidate terms, from a full model description, that best describes the observed output. This is a necessary procedure to compute an efficient system description which may afford greater insight into the functionality of the system or a simpler controller design. Structure computation as a tool for black-box modelling may be of critical importance in the development of robust, parsimonious models for the flight-test community. Moreover, this approach may lead to efficient strategies for rapid envelope expansion which may save significant development time and costs. In this study, a least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) technique is investigated for computing efficient model descriptions of nonlinear aeroelastic systems. The LASSO minimises the residual sum of squares by the addition of an l(sub 1) penalty term on the parameter vector of the traditional 2 minimisation problem. Its use for structure detection is a natural extension of this constrained minimisation approach to pseudolinear regression problems which produces some model parameters that are exactly zero and, therefore, yields a parsimonious system description. Applicability of this technique for model structure computation for the F/A-18 Active Aeroelastic Wing using flight test data is shown for several flight conditions (Mach numbers) by identifying a parsimonious system description with a high percent fit for cross-validated data.

  3. Aeroelastic Modeling of a Nozzle Startup Transient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Zhao, Xiang; Zhang, Sijun; Chen, Yen-Sen

    2014-01-01

    Lateral nozzle forces are known to cause severe structural damage to any new rocket engine in development during test. While three-dimensional, transient, turbulent, chemically reacting computational fluid dynamics methodology has been demonstrated to capture major side load physics with rigid nozzles, hot-fire tests often show nozzle structure deformation during major side load events, leading to structural damages if structural strengthening measures were not taken. The modeling picture is incomplete without the capability to address the two-way responses between the structure and fluid. The objective of this study is to develop a tightly coupled aeroelastic modeling algorithm by implementing the necessary structural dynamics component into an anchored computational fluid dynamics methodology. The computational fluid dynamics component is based on an unstructured-grid, pressure-based computational fluid dynamics formulation, while the computational structural dynamics component is developed under the framework of modal analysis. Transient aeroelastic nozzle startup analyses at sea level were performed, and the computed transient nozzle fluid-structure interaction physics presented,

  4. AEROELASTIC SIMULATION TOOL FOR INFLATABLE BALLUTE AEROCAPTURE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liever, P. A.; Sheta, E. F.; Habchi, S. D.

    2006-01-01

    A multidisciplinary analysis tool is under development for predicting the impact of aeroelastic effects on the functionality of inflatable ballute aeroassist vehicles in both the continuum and rarefied flow regimes. High-fidelity modules for continuum and rarefied aerodynamics, structural dynamics, heat transfer, and computational grid deformation are coupled in an integrated multi-physics, multi-disciplinary computing environment. This flexible and extensible approach allows the integration of state-of-the-art, stand-alone NASA and industry leading continuum and rarefied flow solvers and structural analysis codes into a computing environment in which the modules can run concurrently with synchronized data transfer. Coupled fluid-structure continuum flow demonstrations were conducted on a clamped ballute configuration. The feasibility of implementing a DSMC flow solver in the simulation framework was demonstrated, and loosely coupled rarefied flow aeroelastic demonstrations were performed. A NASA and industry technology survey identified CFD, DSMC and structural analysis codes capable of modeling non-linear shape and material response of thin-film inflated aeroshells. The simulation technology will find direct and immediate applications with NASA and industry in ongoing aerocapture technology development programs.

  5. Transonic aeroelastic numerical simulation in aeronautical engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guowei

    2006-06-01

    A lower upper symmetric Gauss Seidel (LU-SGS) subiteration scheme is constructed for time-marching of the fluid equations. The Harten Lax van Leer Einfeldt Wada (HLLEW) scheme is used for the spatial discretization. The same subiteration formulation is applied directly to the structural equations of motion in generalized coordinates. Through subiteration between the fluid and structural equations, a fully implicit aeroelastic solver is obtained for the numerical simulation of fluid/structure interaction. To improve the ability for application to complex configurations, a multiblock grid is used for the flow field calculation and transfinite interpolation (TFI) is employed for the adaptive moving grid deformation. The infinite plate spline (IPS) and the principal of virtual work are utilized for the data transformation between the fluid and structure. The developed code was first validated through the comparison of experimental and computational results for the AGARD 445.6 standard aeroelastic wing. Then, the flutter character of a tail wing with control surface was analyzed. Finally, flutter boundaries of a complex aircraft configuration were predicted.

  6. Helicopter rotor dynamics and aeroelasticity - Some key ideas and insights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, Peretz P.

    1990-01-01

    Four important current topics in helicopter rotor dynamics and aeroelasticity are discussed: (1) the role of geometric nonlinearities in rotary-wing aeroelasticity; (2) structural modeling, free vibration, and aeroelastic analysis of composite rotor blades; (3) modeling of coupled rotor/fuselage areomechanical problems and their active control; and (4) use of higher-harmonic control for vibration reduction in helicopter rotors in forward flight. The discussion attempts to provide an improved fundamental understanding of the current state of the art. In this way, future research can be focused on problems which remain to be solved instead of producing marginal improvements on problems which are already understood.

  7. Computational Aeroelastic Analyses of a Low-Boom Supersonic Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Sanetrik, Mark D.; Chwalowski, Pawel; Connolly, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    An overview of NASA's Commercial Supersonic Technology (CST) Aeroservoelasticity (ASE) element is provided with a focus on recent computational aeroelastic analyses of a low-boom supersonic configuration developed by Lockheed-Martin and referred to as the N+2 configuration. The overview includes details of the computational models developed to date including a linear finite element model (FEM), linear unsteady aerodynamic models, unstructured CFD grids, and CFD-based aeroelastic analyses. In addition, a summary of the work involving the development of aeroelastic reduced-order models (ROMs) and the development of an aero-propulso-servo-elastic (APSE) model is provided.

  8. Advanced Models for Aeroelastic Analysis of Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Mahajan, Aparajit

    1996-01-01

    This report describes an integrated, multidisciplinary simulation capability for aeroelastic analysis and optimization of advanced propulsion systems. This research is intended to improve engine development, acquisition, and maintenance costs. One of the proposed simulations is aeroelasticity of blades, cowls, and struts in an ultra-high bypass fan. These ducted fans are expected to have significant performance, fuel, and noise improvements over existing engines. An interface program was written to use modal information from COBSTAN and NASTRAN blade models in aeroelastic analysis with a single rotation ducted fan aerodynamic code.

  9. Wind-tunnel procedure for determination of critical stability and control characteristics of airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goett, Harry J; Jackson, Roy P; Belsley, Steven E

    1944-01-01

    This report outlines the flight conditions that are usually critical in determining the design of components of an airplane which affect its stability and control characteristics. The wind-tunnel tests necessary to determine the pertinent data for these conditions are indicated, and the methods of computation used to translate these data into characteristics which define the flying qualities of the airplane are illustrated.

  10. Wind-Tunnel Procedure for Determination of Critical Stability and Control Characteristics of Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goett, Harry J.; Jackson, Roy P.; Belsley, Steven E.

    1944-01-01

    This report outlines the flight conditions that are usually critical in determining the design of components of an airplane which affect its stability and control characteristics. The wind-tunnel tests necessary to determine the pertinent data for these conditions are indicated, and the methods of computation used to translate these data into characteristics which define the flying qualities of the airplane are illustrated.

  11. Aeroservoelastic Model Validation and Test Data Analysis of the F/A-18 Active Aeroelastic Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, Martin J.; Prazenica, Richard J.

    2003-01-01

    Model validation and flight test data analysis require careful consideration of the effects of uncertainty, noise, and nonlinearity. Uncertainty prevails in the data analysis techniques and results in a composite model uncertainty from unmodeled dynamics, assumptions and mechanics of the estimation procedures, noise, and nonlinearity. A fundamental requirement for reliable and robust model development is an attempt to account for each of these sources of error, in particular, for model validation, robust stability prediction, and flight control system development. This paper is concerned with data processing procedures for uncertainty reduction in model validation for stability estimation and nonlinear identification. F/A-18 Active Aeroelastic Wing (AAW) aircraft data is used to demonstrate signal representation effects on uncertain model development, stability estimation, and nonlinear identification. Data is decomposed using adaptive orthonormal best-basis and wavelet-basis signal decompositions for signal denoising into linear and nonlinear identification algorithms. Nonlinear identification from a wavelet-based Volterra kernel procedure is used to extract nonlinear dynamics from aeroelastic responses, and to assist model development and uncertainty reduction for model validation and stability prediction by removing a class of nonlinearity from the uncertainty.

  12. The applicability of Lyapunov characteristic numbers in the study of the stability of satellite orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broucke, R.

    1982-01-01

    It is pointed out that the Lyapunov Characteristic Numbers constitute a new tool for determining stability of trajectories of dynamical systems, or, even more generally, of solutions of systems of ordinary differential equations. In contrast with the characteristic exponents, which apply only to periodic solutions, the Lyapunov Characteristic Numbers apply to arbitrary nonperiodic solutions as well. A description is presented of the numerical experiments which have been made in order to investigate the practical value of the Lyapunov Characteristic Number and the Kolmogorov Entropy for the purpose of estimating the stability of trajectories and/or numerical integration methods in celestial mechanics. It is found that the Lyapunov Characteristic Numbers are extremely useful for the classification of the solutions of nonintegrable dynamical systems, especially in order to distinguish between quasi-periodic and chaotic solutions. However, the Lyapunov Characteristics Numbers do not appear to be useful for the purpose of evaluating numerical integration methods.

  13. The applicability of Lyapunov characteristic numbers in the study of the stability of satellite orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broucke, R.

    1982-08-01

    It is pointed out that the Lyapunov Characteristic Numbers constitute a new tool for determining stability of trajectories of dynamical systems, or, even more generally, of solutions of systems of ordinary differential equations. In contrast with the characteristic exponents, which apply only to periodic solutions, the Lyapunov Characteristic Numbers apply to arbitrary nonperiodic solutions as well. A description is presented of the numerical experiments which have been made in order to investigate the practical value of the Lyapunov Characteristic Number and the Kolmogorov Entropy for the purpose of estimating the stability of trajectories and/or numerical integration methods in celestial mechanics. It is found that the Lyapunov Characteristic Numbers are extremely useful for the classification of the solutions of nonintegrable dynamical systems, especially in order to distinguish between quasi-periodic and chaotic solutions. However, the Lyapunov Characteristics Numbers do not appear to be useful for the purpose of evaluating numerical integration methods.

  14. Emission Characteristics and Stability of Laser Ion Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Krasa, J.; Velyhan, A.; Krousky, E.; Laska, L.; Rohlena, K.; Jungwirth, K.; Ullschmied, J.; Lorusso, A.; Velardi, L.; Nassisi, V.; Czarnecka, A.; Ryc, L.; Parys, P.; Wolowksi, J.

    2010-10-13

    A new classification of laser ion sources concerning their pulse-to-pulse reproducibility in the ion emission is proposed. In particular, we distinguish between plasmas according to the electron distribution changing its characteristics at a laser intensity threshold of 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. Well reproducible continuous pulsed ion currents are typical for the intensity below the threshold. In contrast to this plasma the 'two-temperature' plasma arising for the intensity above this threshold shows not only a separation of charges in space and time but it also shows irregular and intense outbursts of ions similar to a self pulsing instability leading to a chaos. The sequence of fast ion outbursts visible on time-of-flight spectra is sensitive to details of non-linear interaction of the sub-nanosecond laser beam with the generated plasma.

  15. A parametric study of planform and aeroelastic effects on aerodynamic center, alpha- and q- stability derivatures. Appendix B: Method for computing the strucutral influence coefficient matrix of nonplanar wing body tail configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roskam, J.; Smith, H.; Gibson, G.

    1972-01-01

    The method used in computing the structural influence coefficient matrix of the computer program of Reference 1 (appendix A of the Summary Report) is reported. This matrix is computed for complete wing-body-tail configurations by assuming that all major airplane components can be structurally represented by a slender beam called the elastic axis. A structural influence coefficient is defined as the rotation about the Y-stability axis at panel j induced by a unit load on panel k. A description of how a structural breakdown is performed in detail is included.

  16. Stability and Heat Transfer Characteristics of Condensing Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermanson, J. C.; Pedersen, P. C.; Allen, J. S.; Shear, M. A.; Chen, Z. Q.; Alexandrou, A. N.

    2002-01-01

    The overall objective of this research is to investigate the fundamental physics of film condensation in reduced gravity. The condensation of vapor on a cool surface is important in many engineering problems,including spacecraft thermal control and also the behavior of condensate films that may form on the interior surfaces of spacecraft. To examine the effects of body force on condensing films, two different geometries have been tested in the laboratory: (1) a stabilizing gravitational body force (+1g, or condensing surface facing 'upwards') and (2) de-stabilizing gravitational body force (-1g, or 'downwards'). For each geometry, different fluid configurations are employed to help isolate the fluid mechanical and thermal mechanisms operative in condensing films. The fluid configurations are (a) a condensing film, and (b) a non-condensing film with film growth by mass addition by through the plate surface. Condensation experiments are conducted in a test cell containing a cooled copper or brass plate with an exposed diameter of 12.7 cm. The metal surface is polished to allow for double-pass shadowgraph imaging, and the test surface is instrumented with imbedded heat transfer gauges and thermocouples. Representative shadowgraph images of a condensing, unstable (-1g) n-pentane film are shown. The interfacial disturbances associated with the de-stabilizing body force leading to droplet formation and break-off can be clearly seen. The heat transfer coefficient associated with the condensing film is shown. The heat transfer coefficient is seen to initially decrease, consistent with the increased thermal resistance due to layer growth. For sufficiently long time, a steady value of heat transfer is observed, accompanied by continuous droplet formation and break-off. The non-condensing cell consists of a stack of thin stainless steel disks 10 cm in diameter mounted in a brass enclosure. The disks are perforated with a regular pattern of 361 holes each 0.25 mm in diameter

  17. Anisotropic piezoelectric twist actuation of helicopter rotor blades: Aeroelastic analysis and design optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkie, William Keats

    1997-12-01

    . Determining the optimum tradeoff between blade torsional stiffness and piezoelectric twist actuation authority is the subject of the third study. For this investigation, a linearized hovering-flight eigenvalue analysis is developed. Linear optimal control theory is then utilized to develop an optimum active twist blade design in terms of reducing structural energy and control effort cost. The forward flight vibratory loads characteristics of the torsional stiffness optimized active twist blade are then examined using the nonlinear, forward flight aeroelastic analysis. The optimized active twist rotor blade is shown to have improved passive and active vibratory loads characteristics relative to the baseline active twist blades.

  18. Dynamic characteristics and seismic stability of expanded polystyrene geofoam embankments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Zahra A.

    Expanded Polystyrene (EPS) geofoam has become a preferred material in various construction applications due to its light weight. Application of EPS accelerates the projects particularly on soft soils. The focus of this research is on the application of the EPS in embankments and its behavior mainly under harmonic vibration. The goal of this study was to investigate dynamic characteristics of freestanding vertical EPS geofoam embankment and address potential seismic issues that result from the distinguished dynamic behavior of such systems due to the layered and discrete block structure. A series of experimental studies on EPS 19 and a commercially available adhesive was conducted. Two-dimensional numerical analyses were performed to replicate the response of EPS geofoam embankment to horizontal and vertical harmonic motions. The results of the analyses have shown that for some acceleration amplitude levels interlayer sliding is expected to occur in EPS geofoam embankments almost immediately after the start of the base excitation; however, as a highly efficient energy dissipation mechanism sliding ceases rapidly. Shear keys and adhesive may be used to prevent interlayer sliding if they cover the proper extent of area of the embankment. EPS blocks placed in the corners of the embankment and at the edges of the segment prohibited from sliding may experience high stress concentrations. The embankment may show horizontal sway and rocking once sliding is prevented.

  19. Aeroelastic Response of Nonlinear Wing Section By Functional Series Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzocca, Piergiovanni; Librescu, Liviu; Silva, Walter A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of the determination of the subcritical aeroelastic response and flutter instability of nonlinear two-dimensional lifting surfaces in an incompressible flow-field via indicial functions and Volterra series approach. The related aeroelastic governing equations are based upon the inclusion of structural and damping nonlinearities in plunging and pitching, of the linear unsteady aerodynamics and consideration of an arbitrary time-dependent external pressure pulse. Unsteady aeroelastic nonlinear kernels are determined, and based on these, frequency and time histories of the subcritical aeroelastic response are obtained, and in this context the influence of the considered nonlinearities is emphasized. Conclusions and results displaying the implications of the considered effects are supplied.

  20. Static aeroelastic behavior of an adaptive laminated piezoelectric composite wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisshaar, T. A.; Ehlers, S. M.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of using an adaptive material to modify the static aeroelastic behavior of a uniform wing is examined. The wing structure is idealized as a laminated sandwich structure with piezoelectric layers in the upper and lower skins. A feedback system that senses the wing root loads applies a constant electric field to the piezoelectric actuator. Modification of pure torsional deformaton behavior and pure bending deformation are investigated, as is the case of an anisotropic composite swept wing. The use of piezoelectric actuators to create an adaptive structure is found to alter static aeroelastic behavior in that the proper choice of the feedback gain can increase or decrease the aeroelastic divergence speed. This concept also may be used to actively change the lift effectiveness of a wing. The ability to modify static aeroelastic behavior is limited by physical limitations of the piezoelectric material and the manner in which it is integrated into the parent structure.

  1. Aeroelastic Response of Nonlinear Wing Section by Functional Series Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Marzocca, Piergiovanni

    2001-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of the determination of the subcritical aeroelastic response and flutter instability of nonlinear two-dimensional lifting surfaces in an incompressible flow-field via indicial functions and Volterra series approach. The related aeroelastic governing equations are based upon the inclusion of structural and damping nonlinearities in plunging and pitching, of the linear unsteady aerodynamics and consideration of an arbitrary time-dependent external pressure pulse. Unsteady aeroelastic nonlinear kernels are determined, and based on these, frequency and time histories of the subcritical aeroelastic response are obtained, and in this context the influence of the considered nonlinearities is emphasized. Conclusions and results displaying the implications of the considered effects are supplied.

  2. Dynamic stability of a bearingless circulation control rotor blade in hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chopra, I.

    1985-01-01

    The aeroelastic stability of flap bending, lead-lag bending and torsion of a bearingless circulation control rotor blade in hover is investigated using a finite element formulation based on Hamilton's principle. The flexbeam, the torque tube and the outboard blade are discretized into beam elements, each with fifteen nodal degrees of freedom. Quasisteady strip theory is used to evaluate the aerodynamic forces and the airfoil characteristics are represented either in the form of simple analytical expressions or in the form of data tables. A correlation study of analytical results with the experimental data is attempted for selected bearingless blade configurations with conventional airfoil characteristics.

  3. Activities in Aeroelasticity at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Boyd, III; Noll, Thomas E.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the results of recently-completed research and presents status reports of current research being performed within the Aeroelasticity Branch of the NASA Langley Research Center. Within the paper this research is classified as experimental, analytical, and theoretical aeroelastic research. The paper also describes the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel, its features, capabilities, a new open-architecture data acquisition system, ongoing facility modifications, and the subsequent calibration of the facility.

  4. 2005 PathfinderPlus Aero-Elastic Research Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro, Robert

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the 2005 Pathfinder along with an investigation of its aeroelastic responses. The contents include: 1) HALE Class of Vehicles; 2) Aero-elastic Research Flights Overall Objective; 3) General Arrangement; 4) Sensor Locations; 5) NASA Ramp Operations; 6) Lakebed Operations; 7) 1st Flight Data Set; 8) Tool development / data usage; 9) HALE Tool Development & Validation; 10) Building a HALE Foundation; 11) Compelling Needs Drive HALE Efforts; and 12) Team Photo

  5. Sensitivity analysis for aeroacoustic and aeroelastic design of turbomachinery blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorence, Christopher B.; Hall, Kenneth C.

    1995-01-01

    A new method for computing the effect that small changes in the airfoil shape and cascade geometry have on the aeroacoustic and aeroelastic behavior of turbomachinery cascades is presented. The nonlinear unsteady flow is assumed to be composed of a nonlinear steady flow plus a small perturbation unsteady flow that is harmonic in time. First, the full potential equation is used to describe the behavior of the nonlinear mean (steady) flow through a two-dimensional cascade. The small disturbance unsteady flow through the cascade is described by the linearized Euler equations. Using rapid distortion theory, the unsteady velocity is split into a rotational part that contains the vorticity and an irrotational part described by a scalar potential. The unsteady vorticity transport is described analytically in terms of the drift and stream functions computed from the steady flow. Hence, the solution of the linearized Euler equations may be reduced to a single inhomogeneous equation for the unsteady potential. The steady flow and small disturbance unsteady flow equations are discretized using bilinear quadrilateral isoparametric finite elements. The nonlinear mean flow solution and streamline computational grid are computed simultaneously using Newton iteration. At each step of the Newton iteration, LU decomposition is used to solve the resulting set of linear equations. The unsteady flow problem is linear, and is also solved using LU decomposition. Next, a sensitivity analysis is performed to determine the effect small changes in cascade and airfoil geometry have on the mean and unsteady flow fields. The sensitivity analysis makes use of the nominal steady and unsteady flow LU decompositions so that no additional matrices need to be factored. Hence, the present method is computationally very efficient. To demonstrate how the sensitivity analysis may be used to redesign cascades, a compressor is redesigned for improved aeroelastic stability and two different fan exit guide

  6. Effect of virtual mass on the characteristics and the numerical stability in two-phase flows

    SciTech Connect

    No, H.C.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1981-04-01

    It is known that the typical six equation two-fluid model of the two-phase flow possesses complex characteristics, exhibits unbounded instabilities in the short-wavelength limit and constitutes an ill-posed initial value problem. Among the suggestions to overcome these difficulties, one model for the virtual mass force terms were studied here, because the virtual mass represents real physical effects to accomplish the dissipation for numerical stability. It was found that the virtual mass has a profound effect upon the mathematical characteristic and numerical stability. Here a quantitative bound on the coefficient of the virtual mass terms was suggested for mathematical hyperbolicity and numerical stability. It was concluded that the finite difference scheme with the virtual mass model is restricted only by the convective stability conditions with the above suggested value.

  7. Static aeroelastic analysis for generic configuration aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, IN; Miura, Hirokazu; Chargin, Mladen K.

    1987-01-01

    A static aeroelastic analysis capability that can calculate flexible air loads for generic configuration aircraft was developed. It was made possible by integrating a finite element structural analysis code (MSC/NASTRAN) and a panel code of aerodynamic analysis based on linear potential flow theory. The framework already built in MSC/NASTRAN was used and the aerodynamic influence coefficient matrix is computed externally and inserted in the NASTRAN by means of a DMAP program. It was shown that deformation and flexible airloads of an oblique wing aircraft can be calculated reliably by this code both in subsonic and supersonic speeds. Preliminary results indicating importance of flexibility in calculating air loads for this type of aircraft are presented.

  8. Static aeroelastic analysis of composite wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, IN; Hong, Chang Sun; Miura, Hirokazu; Kim, Seung KO

    1990-01-01

    A static aeroelastic analysis capability that can predict aerodynamic loads for the deformed shape of the composite wing has been developed. The finite element method (FEM) was used for composite plate structural analysis, and the linear vortex lattice method (VLM) was used for steady aerodynamic analysis. The final deformed shape of the wing due to applied forces is determined by iterative manner using FEM and VLM. FEM and VLM analysis are related by a surface spline interpolation procedure. The wing with Gr/Ep composite material has been investigated to see the wing deformation effect. Aerodynamic load change due to wing flexibility has been investigated. Also, the effect of fiber orientation and sweep angle on the deformation pattern and aerodynamic coefficients are examined. For a certain fiber orientation, the deflection and aerodynamic loading of the composite wing is very much reduced. The swept forward wing has more significant effect of wing flexibility on aerodynamic coefficient than the swept back wing does.

  9. Sensitivity analysis of a wing aeroelastic response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapania, Rakesh K.; Eldred, Lloyd B.; Barthelemy, Jean-Francois M.

    1991-01-01

    A variation of Sobieski's Global Sensitivity Equations (GSE) approach is implemented to obtain the sensitivity of the static aeroelastic response of a three-dimensional wing model. The formulation is quite general and accepts any aerodynamics and structural analysis capability. An interface code is written to convert one analysis's output to the other's input, and visa versa. Local sensitivity derivatives are calculated by either analytic methods or finite difference techniques. A program to combine the local sensitivities, such as the sensitivity of the stiffness matrix or the aerodynamic kernel matrix, into global sensitivity derivatives is developed. The aerodynamic analysis package FAST, using a lifting surface theory, and a structural package, ELAPS, implementing Giles' equivalent plate model are used.

  10. An Aeroelastic Evaluation of the Flexible Thermal Protection System for an Inatable Aerodynamic Decelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Benjamin D.

    The purpose of this dissertation is to study the aeroelastic stability of a proposed flexible thermal protection system (FTPS) for the NASA Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD). A flat, square FTPS coupon exhibits violent oscillations during experimental aerothermal testing in NASA's 8 Foot High Temperature Tunnel, leading to catastrophic failure. The behavior of the structural response suggested that aeroelastic flutter may be the primary instability mechanism, prompting further experimental investigation and theoretical model development. Using Von Karman's plate theory for the panel-like structure and piston theory aerodynamics, a set of aeroelastic models were developed and limit cycle oscillations (LCOs) were calculated at the tunnel flow conditions. Similarities in frequency content of the theoretical and experimental responses indicated that the observed FTPS oscillations were likely aeroelastic in nature, specifically LCO/flutter. While the coupon models can be used for comparison with tunnel tests, they cannot predict accurately the aeroelastic behavior of the FTPS in atmospheric flight. This is because the geometry of the flight vehicle is no longer a flat plate, but rather (approximately) a conical shell. In the second phase of this work, linearized Donnell conical shell theory and piston theory aerodynamics are used to calculate natural modes of vibration and flutter dynamic pressures for various structural models composed of one or more conical shells resting on several circumferential elastic supports. When the flight vehicle is approximated as a single conical shell without elastic supports, asymmetric flutter in many circumferential waves is observed. When the elastic supports are included, the shell flutters symmetrically in zero circumferential waves. Structural damping is found to be important in this case, as "hump-mode" flutter is possible. Aeroelastic models that consider the individual FTPS layers as separate shells exhibit

  11. Unsteady Aerodynamic Models for Turbomachinery Aeroelastic and Aeroacoustic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verdon, Joseph M.; Barnett, Mark; Ayer, Timothy C.

    1995-01-01

    Theoretical analyses and computer codes are being developed for predicting compressible unsteady inviscid and viscous flows through blade rows of axial-flow turbomachines. Such analyses are needed to determine the impact of unsteady flow phenomena on the structural durability and noise generation characteristics of the blading. The emphasis has been placed on developing analyses based on asymptotic representations of unsteady flow phenomena. Thus, high Reynolds number flows driven by small amplitude unsteady excitations have been considered. The resulting analyses should apply in many practical situations and lead to a better understanding of the relevant flow physics. In addition, they will be efficient computationally, and therefore, appropriate for use in aeroelastic and aeroacoustic design studies. Under the present effort, inviscid interaction and linearized inviscid unsteady flow models have been formulated, and inviscid and viscid prediction capabilities for subsonic steady and unsteady cascade flows have been developed. In this report, we describe the linearized inviscid unsteady analysis, LINFLO, the steady inviscid/viscid interaction analysis, SFLOW-IVI, and the unsteady viscous layer analysis, UNSVIS. These analyses are demonstrated via application to unsteady flows through compressor and turbine cascades that are excited by prescribed vortical and acoustic excitations and by prescribed blade vibrations. Recommendations are also given for the future research needed for extending and improving the foregoing asymptotic analyses, and to meet the goal of providing efficient inviscid/viscid interaction capabilities for subsonic and transonic unsteady cascade flows.

  12. An Investigation of the Low-speed Static Stability Characteristics of Complete Models Having Sweptback and Sweptforward Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M Leroy; Comisarow, Paul

    1948-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley 300 MPH 7- by 10-foot tunnel to determine the static stability characteristics at low speeds of complete models with various swept wings so that comparisons might be made with available theoretical and empirical methods of predicting the stability characteristics. Longitudinal and lateral stability characteristics, flaps up and down, were obtained for models having 0 degree, 15 degrees, 30 degrees, and 45 degrees sweptforward and sweptback wings.

  13. NeoCASS: An integrated tool for structural sizing, aeroelastic analysis and MDO at conceptual design level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavagna, Luca; Ricci, Sergio; Travaglini, Lorenzo

    2011-11-01

    This paper presents a design framework called NeoCASS (Next generation Conceptual Aero-Structural Sizing Suite), developed at the Department of Aerospace Engineering of Politecnico di Milano in the frame of SimSAC (Simulating Aircraft Stability And Control Characteristics for Use in Conceptual Design) project, funded by EU in the context of 6th Framework Program. It enables the creation of efficient low-order, medium fidelity models particularly suitable for structural sizing, aeroelastic analysis and optimization at the conceptual design level. The whole methodology is based on the integration of geometry construction, aerodynamic and structural analysis codes that combine depictive, computational, analytical, and semi-empirical methods, validated in an aircraft design environment. The work here presented aims at including the airframe and its effect from the very beginning of the conceptual design. This aspect is usually not considered in this early phase. In most cases, very simplified formulas and datasheets are adopted, which implies a low level of detail and a poor accuracy. Through NeoCASS, a preliminar distribution of stiffness and inertias can be determined, given the initial layout. The adoption of empirical formulas is reduced to the minimum in favor of simple numerical methods. This allows to consider the aeroelastic behavior and performances, as well, improving the accuracy of the design tools during the iterative steps and lowering the development costs and reducing the time to market. The result achieved is a design tool based on computational methods for the aero-structural analysis and Multi-Disciplinary Optimization (MDO) of aircraft layouts at the conceptual design stage. A complete case study regarding the TransoniCRuiser aircraft, including validation of the results obtained using industrial standard tools like MSC/NASTRAN and a CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) code, is reported. As it will be shown, it is possible to improve the degree of

  14. Three-Dimensional Aeroelastic and Aerothermoelastic Behavior in Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNamara, Jack J.; Friedmann, Peretz P.; Powell, Kenneth G.; Thuruthimattam, Biju J.; Bartels, Robert E.

    2005-01-01

    The aeroelastic and aerothermoelastic behavior of three-dimensional configurations in hypersonic flow regime are studied. The aeroelastic behavior of a low aspect ratio wing, representative of a fin or control surface on a generic hypersonic vehicle, is examined using third order piston theory, Euler and Navier-Stokes aerodynamics. The sensitivity of the aeroelastic behavior generated using Euler and Navier-Stokes aerodynamics to parameters governing temporal accuracy is also examined. Also, a refined aerothermoelastic model, which incorporates the heat transfer between the fluid and structure using CFD generated aerodynamic heating, is used to examine the aerothermoelastic behavior of the low aspect ratio wing in the hypersonic regime. Finally, the hypersonic aeroelastic behavior of a generic hypersonic vehicle with a lifting-body type fuselage and canted fins is studied using piston theory and Euler aerodynamics for the range of 2.5 less than or equal to M less than or equal to 28, at altitudes ranging from 10,000 feet to 80,000 feet. This analysis includes a study on optimal mesh selection for use with Euler aerodynamics. In addition to the aeroelastic and aerothermoelastic results presented, three time domain flutter identification techniques are compared, namely the moving block approach, the least squares curve fitting method, and a system identification technique using an Auto-Regressive model of the aeroelastic system. In general, the three methods agree well. The system identification technique, however, provided quick damping and frequency estimations with minimal response record length, and therefore o ers significant reductions in computational cost. In the present case, the computational cost was reduced by 75%. The aeroelastic and aerothermoelastic results presented illustrate the applicability of the CFL3D code for the hypersonic flight regime.

  15. Nonlinear Aeroelastic Analysis of Joined-Wing Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavallaro, Rauno

    Aeroelastic design of joined-wing configurations is yet a relatively unexplored topic which poses several difficulties. Due to the overconstrained nature of the system combined with structural geometric nonlinearities, the behavior of Joined Wings is often counterintuitive and presents challenges not seen in standard layouts. In particular, instability observed on detailed aircraft models but never thoroughly investigated, is here studied with the aid of a theoretical/computational framework. Snap-type of instabilities are shown for both pure structural and aeroelastic cases. The concept of snap-divergence is introduced to clearly identify the true aeroelastic instability, as opposed to the usual aeroelastic divergence evaluated through eigenvalue approach. Multi-stable regions and isola-type of bifurcations are possible characterizations of the nonlinear response of Joined Wings, and may lead to branch-jumping phenomena well below nominal critical load condition. Within this picture, sensitivity to (unavoidable) manufacturing defects could have potential catastrophic effects. The phenomena studied in this work suggest that the design process for Joined Wings needs to be revisited and should focus, when instability is concerned, on nonlinear post-critical analysis since linear methods may provide wrong trend indications and also hide potentially catastrophical situations. Dynamic aeroelastic analyses are also performed. Flutter occurrence is critically analyzed with frequency and time-domain capabilities. Sensitivity to different-fidelity aeroelastic modeling (fluid-structure interface algorithm, aerodynamic solvers) is assessed showing that, for some configurations, wake modeling (rigid versus free) has a strong impact on the results. Post-flutter regimes are also explored. Limit cycle oscillations are observed, followed, in some cases, by flip bifurcations (period doubling) and loss of periodicity of the solution. Aeroelastic analyses are then carried out on a

  16. Growth and Stability Characteristics of Selected Revenue Sources in Florida. Florida School Finance Study. Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee.

    This study assesses the adequacy of Florida's tax structure to meet future demands for government services through an analysis of Florida's major revenue sources (sales tax, gasoline tax, beverage tax and licenses, motor vehicle licenses, racing tax, and cigarette tax) to determine their stability and growth characteristics. The analysis involved…

  17. Effects of nonlinear aerodynamics and static aeroelasticity on mission performance calculations for a fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, Gary L.; Tatum, Kenneth E.; Foss, Willard E., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    During conceptual design studies of advanced aircraft, the usual practice is to use linear theory to calculate the aerodynamic characteristics of candidate rigid (nonflexible) geometric external shapes. Recent developments and improvements in computational methods, especially computational fluid dynamics (CFD), provide significantly improved capability to generate detailed analysis data for the use of all disciplines involved in the evaluation of a proposed aircraft design. A multidisciplinary application of such analysis methods to calculate the effects of nonlinear aerodynamics and static aeroelasticity on the mission performance of a fighter aircraft concept is described. The aircraft configuration selected for study was defined in a previous study using linear aerodynamics and rigid geometry. The results from the previous study are used as a basis of comparison for the data generated herein. Aerodynamic characteristics are calculated using two different nonlinear theories, potential flow and rotational (Euler) flow. The aerodynamic calculations are performed in an iterative procedure with an equivalent plate structural analysis method to obtain lift and drag data for a flexible (nonrigid) aircraft. These static aeroelastic data are then used in calculating the combat and mission performance characteristics of the aircraft.

  18. Control Law Design in a Computational Aeroelasticity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, Jerry R.; Robertshaw, Harry H.; Kapania, Rakesh K.

    2003-01-01

    A methodology for designing active control laws in a computational aeroelasticity environment is given. The methodology involves employing a systems identification technique to develop an explicit state-space model for control law design from the output of a computational aeroelasticity code. The particular computational aeroelasticity code employed in this paper solves the transonic small disturbance aerodynamic equation using a time-accurate, finite-difference scheme. Linear structural dynamics equations are integrated simultaneously with the computational fluid dynamics equations to determine the time responses of the structure. These structural responses are employed as the input to a modern systems identification technique that determines the Markov parameters of an "equivalent linear system". The Eigensystem Realization Algorithm is then employed to develop an explicit state-space model of the equivalent linear system. The Linear Quadratic Guassian control law design technique is employed to design a control law. The computational aeroelasticity code is modified to accept control laws and perform closed-loop simulations. Flutter control of a rectangular wing model is chosen to demonstrate the methodology. Various cases are used to illustrate the usefulness of the methodology as the nonlinearity of the aeroelastic system is increased through increased angle-of-attack changes.

  19. NASA Aeroelasticity Handbook Volume 2: Design Guides Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, John K. (Editor)

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Aeroelasticity Handbook comprises a database (in three formats) of NACA and NASA aeroelasticity flutter data through 1998 and a collection of aeroelasticity design guides. The Microsoft Access format provides the capability to search for specific data, retrieve it, and present it in a tabular or graphical form unique to the application. The full-text NACA and NASA documents from which the data originated are provided in portable document format (PDF), and these are hyperlinked to their respective data records. This provides full access to all available information from the data source. Two other electronic formats, one delimited by commas and the other by spaces, are provided for use with other software capable of reading text files. To the best of the author s knowledge, this database represents the most extensive collection of NACA and NASA flutter data in electronic form compiled to date by NASA. Volume 2 of the handbook contains a convenient collection of aeroelastic design guides covering fixed wings, turbomachinery, propellers and rotors, panels, and model scaling. This handbook provides an interactive database and design guides for use in the preliminary aeroelastic design of aerospace systems and can also be used in validating or calibrating flutter-prediction software.

  20. Design and Analysis of AN Static Aeroelastic Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Ying-Yu; Yuan, Kai-Hua; Lv, Ji-Nan; Liu, Zi-Qiang

    2016-06-01

    Static aeroelastic experiments are very common in the United States and Russia. The objective of static aeroelastic experiments is to investigate deformation and loads of elastic structure in flow field. Generally speaking, prerequisite of this experiment is that the stiffness distribution of structure is known. This paper describes a method for designing experimental models, in the case where the stiffness distribution and boundary condition of a real aircraft are both uncertain. The stiffness distribution form of the structure can be calculated via finite element modeling and simulation calculation and F141 steels and rigid foam are used to make elastic model. In this paper, the design and manufacturing process of static aeroelastic models is presented and a set of experiment model was designed to simulate the stiffness of the designed wings, a set of experiments was designed to check the results. The test results show that the experimental method can effectively complete the design work of elastic model. This paper introduces the whole process of the static aeroelastic experiment, and the experimental results are analyzed. This paper developed a static aeroelasticity experiment technique and established an experiment model targeting at the swept wing of a certain kind of large aspect ratio aircraft.

  1. Longitudinal stability and control characteristics of the Quiet Short-Haul Research Aircraft (QSRA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephenson, Jack D.; Hardy, Gordon H.

    1989-01-01

    Flight experiments were conducted to evaluate various aerodynamic characteristics of the Quiet Short-Haul Research Aircraft (QSRA), an experimental aircraft that makes use of the upper-surface blown (USB) powered-lift concept. Time-history records from maneuvers performed with the aircraft in landing-approach and take-off configurations (with its stability augmentation system disengaged) were analyzed to obtain longitudinal stability and control derivatives and performance characteristics. The experiments included measuring the aircraft responses to variations in the deflection of direct-lift control spoilers and to thrust variations as well as to elevator inputs. The majority of the results are given for the aircraft in a landing configuration with the USB flaps at 50 degrees. For this configuration, if the static longitudinal stability is defined as the variation of the pitching-moment coefficient with the lift coefficient at a constant thrust coefficient, this stability decreases significantly with increasing angle of attack above 9 degrees. For this configuration, at small and negative angles of attack and high levels of thrust, the elevators and the horizontal stabilizer lost effectiveness owing to incipent stalling, but this occurred only during unsteady maneuvers and for brief time intervals.

  2. 14 CFR 25.629 - Aeroelastic stability requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... be shown by analyses, wind tunnel tests, ground vibration tests, flight tests, or other means found..., large auxiliary power unit, or large externally mounted aerodynamic body (such as an external fuel...

  3. 14 CFR 25.629 - Aeroelastic stability requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... correlation of the flight test data with other test data or analyses, that the airplane is free from any... be shown by analyses, wind tunnel tests, ground vibration tests, flight tests, or other means...

  4. Full potential unsteady computations including aeroelastic effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shankar, Vijaya; Ide, Hiroshi

    1989-01-01

    A unified formulation is presented based on the full potential framework coupled with an appropriate structural model to compute steady and unsteady flows over rigid and flexible configurations across the Mach number range. The unsteady form of the full potential equation in conservation form is solved using an implicit scheme maintaining time accuracy through internal Newton iterations. A flux biasing procedure based on the unsteady sonic reference conditions is implemented to compute hyperbolic regions with moving sonic and shock surfaces. The wake behind a trailing edge is modeled using a mathematical cut across which the pressure is satisfied to be continuous by solving an appropriate vorticity convection equation. An aeroelastic model based on the generalized modal deflection approach interacts with the nonlinear aerodynamics and includes both static as well as dynamic structural analyses capability. Results are presented for rigid and flexible configurations at different Mach numbers ranging from subsonic to supersonic conditions. The dynamic response of a flexible wing below and above its flutter point is demonstrated.

  5. An inverse method for computation of structural stiffness distributions of aeroelastically optimized wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, David M.

    1993-04-01

    An inverse method has been developed to compute the structural stiffness properties of wings given a specified wing loading and aeroelastic twist distribution. The method directly solves for the bending and torsional stiffness distribution of the wing using a modal representation of these properties. An aeroelastic design problem involving the use of a computational aerodynamics method to optimize the aeroelastic twist distribution of a tighter wing operating at maneuver flight conditions is used to demonstrate the application of the method. This exercise verifies the ability of the inverse scheme to accurately compute the structural stiffness distribution required to generate a specific aeroelastic twist under a specified aeroelastic load.

  6. Wing Weight Optimization Under Aeroelastic Loads Subject to Stress Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapania, Rakesh K.; Issac, J.; Macmurdy, D.; Guruswamy, Guru P.

    1997-01-01

    A minimum weight optimization of the wing under aeroelastic loads subject to stress constraints is carried out. The loads for the optimization are based on aeroelastic trim. The design variables are the thickness of the wing skins and planform variables. The composite plate structural model incorporates first-order shear deformation theory, the wing deflections are expressed using Chebyshev polynomials and a Rayleigh-Ritz procedure is adopted for the structural formulation. The aerodynamic pressures provided by the aerodynamic code at a discrete number of grid points is represented as a bilinear distribution on the composite plate code to solve for the deflections and stresses in the wing. The lifting-surface aerodynamic code FAST is presently being used to generate the pressure distribution over the wing. The envisioned ENSAERO/Plate is an aeroelastic analysis code which combines ENSAERO version 3.0 (for analysis of wing-body configurations) with the composite plate code.

  7. Contributions of Therapist Characteristics and Stability to Intensive In-home Therapy Youth Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Greeson, Johanna K. P.; Guo, Shenyang; Barth, Richard P.; Hurley, Sarah; Sisson, Jocelyn

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study examines the influence of therapist and youth characteristics on post-discharge outcomes from intensive in-home therapy. Method Data for 1,416 youth and 412 therapists were obtained from a behavioral health services provider. The Huber–White method was used to account for nested data; ordered logistic regression was employed to assess outcomes. Results Therapist gender and employment stability were significantly associated with youth outcomes. The likelihood of an undesirable outcome was significantly less for cases with female therapists. Conclusion Findings underscore the need for additional study concerning the impact of therapist characteristics and stability on youth outcomes, and to improve the understanding of the relationship between the two. Future studies in these areas would advance social work practice in family-based treatment programs. PMID:24944505

  8. Data Comparisons and Summary of the Second Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heeg, Jennifer; Wieseman, Carol D.; Chwalowski, Pawel

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the computational results generated by participating teams of the second Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop and compare them with experimental data. Aeroelastic and rigid configurations of the Benchmark Supercritical Wing (BSCW) wind tunnel model served as the focus for the workshop. The comparison data sets include unforced ("steady") system responses, forced pitch oscillations and coupled fluid-structure responses. Integrated coefficients, frequency response functions, and flutter onset conditions are compared. The flow conditions studied were in the transonic range, including both attached and separated flow conditions. Some of the technical discussions that took place at the workshop are summarized.

  9. Natural pigments: carotenoids, anthocyanins, and betalains--characteristics, biosynthesis, processing, and stability.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Vargas, F; Jiménez, A R; Paredes-López, O

    2000-05-01

    Pigments are present in all living matter and provide attractive colors and play basic roles in the development of organisms. Human beings, like most animals, come in contact with their surroundings through color, and things can or cannot be acceptable based on their color characteristics. This review presents the basic information about pigments focusing attention on the natural ones; it emphasizes the principal plant pigments: carotenoids, anthocyanins, and betalains. Special considerations are given to their salient characteristics; to their biosynthesis, taking into account the biochemical and molecular biology information generated in their elucidation; and to the processing and stability properties of these compounds as food colorants. PMID:10850526

  10. Assessing Videogrammetry for Static Aeroelastic Testing of a Wind-Tunnel Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spain, Charles V.; Heeg, Jennifer; Ivanco, Thomas G.; Barrows, Danny A.; Florance, James R.; Burner, Alpheus W.; DeMoss, Joshua; Lively, Peter S.

    2004-01-01

    The Videogrammetric Model Deformation (VMD) technique, developed at NASA Langley Research Center, was recently used to measure displacements and local surface angle changes on a static aeroelastic wind-tunnel model. The results were assessed for consistency, accuracy and usefulness. Vertical displacement measurements and surface angular deflections (derived from vertical displacements) taken at no-wind/no-load conditions were analyzed. For accuracy assessment, angular measurements were compared to those from a highly accurate accelerometer. Shewhart's Variables Control Charts were used in the assessment of consistency and uncertainty. Some bad data points were discovered, and it is shown that the measurement results at certain targets were more consistent than at other targets. Physical explanations for this lack of consistency have not been determined. However, overall the measurements were sufficiently accurate to be very useful in monitoring wind-tunnel model aeroelastic deformation and determining flexible stability and control derivatives. After a structural model component failed during a highly loaded condition, analysis of VMD data clearly indicated progressive structural deterioration as the wind-tunnel condition where failure occurred was approached. As a result, subsequent testing successfully incorporated near- real-time monitoring of VMD data in order to ensure structural integrity. The potential for higher levels of consistency and accuracy through the use of statistical quality control practices are discussed and recommended for future applications.

  11. A Theoretical Investigation of the Dynamic Lateral Stability Characteristics of the MX-838 (XB-51) Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulson, Jon W.

    1948-01-01

    At the request of the Air Material Command, U. S. Air Force, a theoretical study has been made of the dynamic lateral stability characteristics of the MX-838 (XB-51) airplane. The calculations included the determination of the neutral-oscillatory-stability boundary (R = 0), the period and time to damp to one-half amplitude of the lateral oscillation, end the time to damp to one-half amplitude for the spiral mode. Factors varied in the investigation were lift coefficient, wing incidence, wing loading, and altitude. The results of the investigation showed that the lateral oscillation of the airplane is unstable below a lift coefficient of 1.2 with flaps . deflected 40deg but is stable over the entire speed range with flaps deflected 20deg or 0deg. The results showed that satisfactory oscillatory stability can probably be obtained for all lift coefficients with the proper variation of flap deflection and wing incidence with airspeed. Reducing the positive wing incidence improved the oscillatory stability characteristics. The airplane is spirally unstable for most conditions but the instability is mild and the Air Force requirements are easily met.

  12. Hypersonic lateral and directional stability characteristics of aeroassist flight experiment configuration in air and CF4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micol, John R.; Wells, William L.

    1993-01-01

    Hypersonic lateral and directional stability characteristics measured on a 60 deg half-angle elliptical cone, which was raked at an angle of 73 deg from the cone centerline and with an ellipsoid nose (ellipticity equal to 2.0 in the symmetry plane), are presented for angles of attack from -10 to 10 deg. The high normal-shock density ratio of a real gas was simulated by tests at a Mach number of 6 in air and CF4 (density ratio equal to 5.25 and 12.0, respectively). Tests were conducted in air at Mach 6 and 10 and in CF4 at Mach 6 to examine the effects of Mach number, Reynolds number, and normal-shock density ratio. Changes in Mach number from 6 to 10 in air or in Reynolds number by a factor of 4 at Mach 6 had a negligible effect on lateral and directional stability characteristics. Variations in normal-shock density ratio had a measurable effect on lateral and directional aerodynamic coefficients, but no significant effect on lateral and directional stability characteristics. Tests in air and CF4 indicated that the configuration was laterally and directionally stable through the test range of angle of attack.

  13. Impact of aerobic stabilization on the characteristics of treatment sludge in the leather tanning industry.

    PubMed

    Cokgor, Emine Ubay; Aydinli, Ebru; Tas, Didem Okutman; Zengin, Gulsum Emel; Orhon, Derin

    2014-01-01

    The efficiency of aerobic stabilization on the treatment sludge generated from the leather industry was investigated to meet the expected characteristics and conditions of sludge prior to landfill. The sludge types subjected to aerobic stabilization were chemical treatment sludge, biological excess sludge, and the mixture of both chemical and biological sludges. At the end of 23 days of stabilization, suspended solids, volatile suspended solids and total organic carbon removal efficiencies were determined as 17%, 19% and 23% for biological sludge 31%, 35% and 54% for chemical sludge, and 32%, 34% and 63% for the mixture of both chemical and biological sludges, respectively. Model simulations of the respirometric oxygen uptake rate measurements showed that the ratio of active biomass remained the same at the end of the stabilization for all the sludge samples. Although mixing the chemical and biological sludges resulted in a relatively effective organic carbon and solids removal, the level of stabilization achieved remained clearly below the required level of organic carbon content for landfill. These findings indicate the potential risk of setting numerical restrictions without referring to proper scientific support.

  14. Quality characteristics and stability of Moringa oleifera seed oil of Indian origin.

    PubMed

    Ogunsina, Babatunde S; Indira, T N; Bhatnagar, A S; Radha, C; Debnath, S; Gopala Krishna, A G

    2014-03-01

    Cold pressed and hexane extracted moringa seed oils (CPMSO and HEMSO) were evaluated for their physico-chemical and stability characteristics. The iodine value, saponification value and unsaponifiable matter of CPMSO and HEMSO were found to be 67.8 and 68.5 g I2 / 100 g oil, 190.4 and 191.2 mg KOH / g oil and 0.59 and 0.65%, respectively. The total tocopherols of CPMSO and HEMSO were found to be 95.5 and 90.2 mg/Kg. The fatty acid composition of CPMSO and HEMSO showed oleic acid as the major fatty acid (78-79%). The oxidative, thermal and frying stabilities of the CPMSO were compared with commercial raw and refined groundnut oil (GNO and RGNO). The CPMSO was of adequate thermal stability and better oxidative stability as it showed 79% lesser peroxide formation than GNO. The frying stability of CPMSO was better as it showed lower increase in free fatty acid (28%), peroxide value (10 meq O2/Kg) and color (25%) than RGNO (48%, 22 meq O2/kg and 52%, respectively) after frying. PMID:24587525

  15. The effects of drivers’ aggressive characteristics on traffic stability from a new car-following model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Guanghan; Qing, Li

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a new car-following model is proposed by considering the drivers’ aggressive characteristics. The stable condition and the modified Korteweg-de Vries (mKdV) equation are obtained by the linear stability analysis and nonlinear analysis, which show that the drivers’ aggressive characteristics can improve the stability of traffic flow. Furthermore, the numerical results show that the drivers’ aggressive characteristics increase the stable region of traffic flow and can reproduce the evolution and propagation of small perturbation.

  16. Structure Detection of Nonlinear Aeroelastic Systems with Application to Aeroelastic Flight Test Data. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kukreja, Sunil L.; Brenner, Martin J.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the applicability of NARMAX structure detection to aeroelastic systems. In conclusion, the simulation results demonstrate bootstrap approach for structure computation of aircraft structural stiffness provided a high rate of true model selection: 1. T-test and stepwise regression methods had difficulty providing accurate results 2. Work contributes to understanding of the use of structure detection for modelling and identification of aerospace systems. 3. Limitation of model complexity that can be studied with these structure computation techniques 4. Result of the large number of candidate terms, for a given model order, and the data length required to guarantee convergence 5. Another approach to structure computation problem uses a least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO)

  17. Structure Detection of Nonlinear Aeroelastic Systems with Application to Aeroelastic Flight Test Data. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kukreja, Sunil L.; Brenner, martin J.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the 1. Motivation for the study 2. Nonlinear Model Form 3. Structure Detection 4. Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator (LASSO) 5. Objectives 6. Results 7. Assess LASSO as a Structure Detection Tool: Simulated Nonlinear Models 8. Applicability to Complex Systems: F/A-18 Active Aeroelastic Wing Flight Test Data. The authors conclude that 1. this is a novel approach for detecting the structure of highly over-parameterised nonlinear models in situations where other methods may be inadequate 2. that it is a practical significance in the analysis of aircraft dynamics during envelope expansion and could lead to more efficient control strategies and 3. this could allow greater insight into the functionality of various systems dynamics, by providing a quantitative model which is easily interpretable

  18. Aeroelastic System Development Using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition and Volterra Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucia, David J.; Beran, Philip S.; Silva, Walter A.

    2003-01-01

    This research combines Volterra theory and proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) into a hybrid methodology for reduced-order modeling of aeroelastic systems. The out-come of the method is a set of linear ordinary differential equations (ODEs) describing the modal amplitudes associated with both the structural modes and the POD basis functions for the uid. For this research, the structural modes are sine waves of varying frequency, and the Volterra-POD approach is applied to the fluid dynamics equations. The structural modes are treated as forcing terms which are impulsed as part of the uid model realization. Using this approach, structural and uid operators are coupled into a single aeroelastic operator. This coupling converts a free boundary uid problem into an initial value problem, while preserving the parameter (or parameters) of interest for sensitivity analysis. The approach is applied to an elastic panel in supersonic cross ow. The hybrid Volterra-POD approach provides a low-order uid model in state-space form. The linear uid model is tightly coupled with a nonlinear panel model using an implicit integration scheme. The resulting aeroelastic model provides correct limit-cycle oscillation prediction over a wide range of panel dynamic pressure values. Time integration of the reduced-order aeroelastic model is four orders of magnitude faster than the high-order solution procedure developed for this research using traditional uid and structural solvers.

  19. Development of an Aeroelastic Analysis Including a Viscous Flow Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Bakhle, Milind A.

    2001-01-01

    Under this grant, Version 4 of the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes aeroelastic code (TURBO-AE) has been developed and verified. The TURBO-AE Version 4 aeroelastic code allows flutter calculations for a fan, compressor, or turbine blade row. This code models a vibrating three-dimensional bladed disk configuration and the associated unsteady flow (including shocks, and viscous effects) to calculate the aeroelastic instability using a work-per-cycle approach. Phase-lagged (time-shift) periodic boundary conditions are used to model the phase lag between adjacent vibrating blades. The direct-store approach is used for this purpose to reduce the computational domain to a single interblade passage. A disk storage option, implemented using direct access files, is available to reduce the large memory requirements of the direct-store approach. Other researchers have implemented 3D inlet/exit boundary conditions based on eigen-analysis. Appendix A: Aeroelastic calculations based on three-dimensional euler analysis. Appendix B: Unsteady aerodynamic modeling of blade vibration using the turbo-V3.1 code.

  20. Toward efficient aeroelastic energy harvesting through limit cycle shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschmeier, Benjamin; Bryant, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    Increasing demand to harvest energy from renewable resources has caused significant research interest in unsteady aerodynamic and hydrodynamic phenomena. Apart from the traditional horizontal axis wind turbines, there has been significant growth in the study of bio-inspired oscillating wings for energy harvesting. These systems are being built to harvest electricity for wireless devices, as well as for large scale mega-watt power generation. Such systems can be driven by aeroelastic flutter phenomena which, beyond a critical wind speed, will cause the system to enter into limitcycle oscillations. When the airfoil enters large amplitude, high frequency motion, leading and trailing edge vortices form and, when properly synchronized with the airfoil kinematics, enhance the energy extraction efficiency of the device. A reduced order dynamic stall model is employed on a nonlinear aeroelastic structural model to investigate whether the parameters of a fully passive aeroelastic device can be tuned to produce limit cycle oscillations at desired kinematics. This process is done through an optimization technique to find the necessary structural parameters to achieve desired structural forces and moments corresponding to a target limit cycle. Structural nonlinearities are explored to determine the essential nonlinearities such that the system's limit cycle closely matches the desired kinematic trajectory. The results from this process demonstrate that it is possible to tune system parameters such that a desired limit cycle trajectory can be achieved. The simulations also demonstrate that the high efficiencies predicted by previous computational aerodynamics studies can be achieved in fully passive aeroelastic devices.

  1. Static aeroelastic analysis of a three-dimensional generic wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, John A.; Lee, IN; Miura, Hirokazu

    1990-01-01

    A continuation of research on the static aeroelastic analysis of a generic wing configuration is presented. Results of the study of the asymmetric oblique wing model developed by Rockwell International, in conjunction with the NASA Oblique Wing Research Aircraft Program, are reported. The capability to perform static aeroelastic analyses of an oblique wing at arbitrary skew positions is demonstrated by applying the MSC/NASTRAN static analysis scheme modified by the aerodynamic influence coefficient matrix created by the NASA Ames aerodynamic panel codes. The oblique wing is studied at two skew angles, and in particular, the capability to calculate 3-D thickness effects on the aerodynamic properties of the wing is investigated. The ability to model asymmetric wings in both subsonic and supersonic Mach numbers is shown. The aerodynamic influence coefficient matrix computed by the external programs is inserted in MSC/NASTRAN static aeroelasticity analysis run stream to compute the aeroelastic deformation and internal forces. Various aerodynamic coefficients of the oblique wing were computed for two Mach numbers, 0.7 and 1.4, and the angle of attach -5 through 15 deg.

  2. Transonic unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic calculations about airfoils and wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goorjian, Peter M.; Guruswamy, Guru P.

    1988-01-01

    Recent advances in the numerical simulation of unsteady transonic flow around airfoils and wings are surveyed, with an emphasis on the treatment of aeroelastic effects. The fundamental physical principles involved are discussed, and the numerical implementation of the methods is considered. Typical results are presented in extensive graphs and diagrams and briefly characterized, with reference to experimental data.

  3. Aeroelastic analysis of a troposkien-type wind turbine blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nitzsche, F.

    1981-01-01

    The linear aeroelastic equations for one curved blade of a vertical axis wind turbine in state vector form are presented. The method is based on a simple integrating matrix scheme together with the transfer matrix idea. The method is proposed as a convenient way of solving the associated eigenvalue problem for general support conditions.

  4. Inertial Force Coupling to Nonlinear Aeroelasticity of Flexible Wing Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Ting, Eric

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the inertial force effect on nonlinear aeroelasticity of flexible wing aircraft. The geometric are nonlinearity due to rotational and tension stiffening. The effect of large bending deflection will also be investigated. Flutter analysis will be conducted for a truss-braced wing aircraft concept with tension stiffening and inertial force coupling.

  5. Reynolds Number Effects on the Stability and Control Characteristics of a Supersonic Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, L. R.; Wahls, R. A.; Elzey, M. B.; Hamner, M. P.

    2002-01-01

    A High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) configuration was tested in the National Transonic Facility at the NASA Langley Research Center as part of NASA's High Speed Research Program. A series of tests included longitudinal and lateral/directional studies at transonic and low speed, high-lift conditions across a range of Reynolds numbers from that available in conventional wind tunnels to near flight conditions. Results presented focus on Reynolds number sensitivities of the stability and control characteristics at Mach 0.30 and 0.95 for a complete HSCT aircraft configuration including empennage. The angle of attack where the pitching-moment departure occurred increased with higher Reynolds numbers for both the landing and transonic configurations. The stabilizer effectiveness increased with Reynolds number for both configurations. The directional stability also increased with Reynolds number for both configurations. The landing configuration without forebody chines exhibited a large yawing-moment departure at high angles of attack and zero sideslip that varied with increasing Reynolds numbers. This departure characteristic nearly disappeared when forebody chines were added. The landing configuration's rudder effectiveness also exhibited sensitivities to changes in Reynolds number.

  6. Coupled Vortex-Lattice Flight Dynamic Model with Aeroelastic Finite-Element Model of Flexible Wing Transport Aircraft with Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap for Drag Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Ting, Eric; Nguyen, Daniel; Dao, Tung; Trinh, Khanh

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a coupled vortex-lattice flight dynamic model with an aeroelastic finite-element model to predict dynamic characteristics of a flexible wing transport aircraft. The aircraft model is based on NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM) with representative mass and stiffness properties to achieve a wing tip deflection about twice that of a conventional transport aircraft (10% versus 5%). This flexible wing transport aircraft is referred to as an Elastically Shaped Aircraft Concept (ESAC) which is equipped with a Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap (VCCTEF) system for active wing shaping control for drag reduction. A vortex-lattice aerodynamic model of the ESAC is developed and is coupled with an aeroelastic finite-element model via an automated geometry modeler. This coupled model is used to compute static and dynamic aeroelastic solutions. The deflection information from the finite-element model and the vortex-lattice model is used to compute unsteady contributions to the aerodynamic force and moment coefficients. A coupled aeroelastic-longitudinal flight dynamic model is developed by coupling the finite-element model with the rigid-body flight dynamic model of the GTM.

  7. Metastable Electrical Characteristics of Polycrystalline Thin-Film Photovoltaic Modules upon Exposure and Stabilization: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Deline, C. A.; del Cueto, J. A.; Albin, D. S.; Rummel, S. R.

    2011-09-01

    The significant features of a series of stabilization experiments conducted at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) between May 2009 and the present are reported. These experiments evaluated a procedure to stabilize the measured performance of thin-film polycrystalline cadmium telluride (CdTe) and copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) thin-film photovoltaic (PV) modules. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of CdTe and CIGS thin-film PV devices and modules exhibit transitory changes in electrical performance after thermal exposure in the dark and/or bias and light exposures. We present the results of our case studies of module performance versus exposure: light-soaked at 65 degrees C; exposed in the dark under forward bias at 65 degrees C; and, finally, longer-term outdoor exposure. We find that stabilization can be achieved to varying degrees using either light-soaking or dark bias methods and that the existing IEC 61646 light-soaking interval may be appropriate for CdTe and CIGS modules with one caveat: it is likely that at least three exposure intervals are required for stabilization.

  8. Stability and leakage characteristics of novel conducting PMOS based 8T SRAM cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Yeonbae

    2014-06-01

    The stability and leakage power of SRAMs have become an important issue with scaling of CMOS technology. This article reports a novel 8-transistor (8T) SRAM cell improving the read and write stability of data storage elements and reducing the leakage current in idle mode. In read operation, the bit-cell keeps the noise-vulnerable data 'low' node voltage close to the ground level and thus producing near-ideal voltage transfer characteristics essential for robust read functionality. In write operation, a negative bias on the cell facilitates to change contents of the bit. Unlike the conventional 6T cell, there is no conflicting read and write requirement on sizing the transistors. In standby mode, the built-in stacked device in the 8T cell reduces the leakage current significantly. The 8T SRAM cell implemented in a 130 nm CMOS technology demonstrates 2× higher read stability while bearing 20% better write-ability at 1.2 V typical condition and a reduction by 45% in leakage power consumption compared to the standard 6T cell. Results of the bit-cell architecture were also compared to the dual-port 8T SRAM cell. The stability enhancement and leakage power reduction provided with the proposed cell are confirmed under process, voltage and temperature variations.

  9. Effect of Reynolds number on stability characteristics of a cruciform wing-body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallings, R. L., Jr.; Lamb, M.; Watson, C. B.

    1980-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the effect of Reynolds number on the stability characteristics of a body with cruciform wings at large angles of attack. Pressure distributions and force and moment data (axial force not measured) are presented for Mach 1.60 and 2.70, Reynolds numbers based on body diameter from approximately 130,000 to 2,800,000, and angles of attack from 0 deg to 50 deg. In general, the data show only small effects of Reynolds number throughout the range of test condition. Also discussed are force balance and pressure data that suggest a direct relationship between wind choking and the onset of a nonlinear stability variaton with angle of attack.

  10. Antiparallel triple helices. Structural characteristics and stabilization by 8-amino derivatives.

    PubMed

    Aviñó, Anna; Cubero, Elena; González, Carlos; Eritja, Ramon; Orozco, Modesto

    2003-12-24

    The structural, dynamical, and recognition properties of antiparallel DNA triplexes formed by the antiparallel d(G#G.C), d(A#A.T), and d(T#A.T) motifs (the pound sign and dot mean reverse-Hoogsteen and Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds, respectively) are studied by means of "state of the art" molecular dynamics simulations. Once the characteristics of the helix are defined, molecular dynamics and thermodynamic integration calculations are used to determine the expected stabilization of the antiparallel triplex caused by the introduction of 8-aminopurines. Finally, oligonucleotides containing 8-aminopurine derivatives are synthesized and tested experimentally using several approaches in a variety of systems. A very large stabilization of the triplex is found experimentally, as predicted by simulations. These results open the possibility for the use of oligonucleotides carrying 8-aminopurines to bind single-stranded nucleic acids by formation of antiparallel triplexes.

  11. Subsonic static and dynamic stability characteristics of the test technique demonstrator NASP configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyden, Richmond P.; Dress, David A.; Fox, Charles H., Jr.; Huffman, Jarrett K.; Cruz, Christopher I.

    1993-01-01

    The paper describes the procedure used for and the results obtained of wind-tunnel tests of the National Aerospace Plane (NASP) configuration, which were conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center High Speed Tunnel using a blended body NASP configuration designed by the research center. Static and dynamic stability characteristics were measured at Mach numbers 0.3, 0.6, and 0.8. In addition to tests of the baseline configuration, component buildup tests with a canard surface and with a body flap were carried out. Results demonstrated a positive static stability of the baseline configuration, except at the higher angles of attack at Mach 0.8. A good agreement was found between the inphase dynamic parameters and the corresponding static data.

  12. Correlation and evaluation of inplane stability characteristics for an advanced bearingless main rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weller, W. H.

    1983-01-01

    A program of experimental and analytical research was performed to demonstrate the degree of correlation achieved between measured and computed rotor inplane stability characteristics. The experimental data were obtained from hover and wind tunnel tests of a scaled bearingless main rotor model. Both isolated rotor and free-hub conditions were tested. Test parameters included blade built-in cone and sweep angles; rotor inplane structural stiffness and damping; pitch link stiffness and location; and fuselage damping, inertia, and natural frequency. Analytical results for many test conditions were obtained. In addition, the analytical and experimental results were examined to ascertain the effects of the test parameters on rotor ground and air resonance stability. The results from this program are presented herein in tabular and graphical form.

  13. Take-off Stability Characteristics of a 1/13-scale Model of the Consolidated Vultee Skate 7 Seaplane (TED No. NACA DE 338)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKann, Robert; Coffee, Claude W.; Abrabian, Donald D.

    1949-01-01

    The take-off stability characteristics of a Consolidated Vultee Aircraft Corporation Skate 7 seaplane were determined in the Langley tank no. 2. Trim limits of stability, trim tracks, and elevator limits of stability are presented.

  14. Lateral-directional stability and control characteristics of the Quiet Short-Haul Research Aircraft (QSRA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephenson, Jack D.; Jeske, James A.; Hardy, Gordon H.

    1990-01-01

    The results are presented of flight experiments to determine the lateral-directional stability and control characteristics of the Quiet Short-Haul Research Aircraft (QSRA), an experimental aircraft designed to furnish information on various aerodynamic characteristics of a transport type of airplane that makes use of the upper-surface blown (USB) flap technology to achieve short takeoff and landing (STOL) performance. The flight program designed to acquire the data consisted of maneuvers produced by rudder and control-wheel inputs with the airplane in several configurations that had been proposed for landing approach and takeoff operation. The normal stability augmentation system was not engaged during these maneuvers. Time-history records from the maneuvers were analyzed with a parameter estimation procedure to extract lateral-directional stability and control derivatives. For one aircraft configuration in which the USB flaps were deflected 50 deg, several maneuvers were performed to determine the effects of varying the average angle of attack, varying the thrust coefficient, and setting the airplane's upper surface spoilers at a 13 deg symmetrical bias angle . The effects on the lateral characteristics of deflecting the spoilers were rather small and generally favorable. The data indicate that for one test, conducted at low thrust (a thrust coefficient of 0.38), compared with results from tests at thrust coefficients of 0.77 and larger, there was a significant decrease in the lateral control effectiveness, in the yaw damping and in the directional derivative. The directional derivative was also decreased (by about 30 percent) when the average angle of attack of the test was increased from 3 to 16 deg.

  15. Dynamic Characteristics and Stability Analysis of Space Shuttle Main Engine Oxygen Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunter, Edgar J.; Branagan, Lyle

    1991-01-01

    The dynamic characteristics of the Space Shuttle high pressure oxygen pump are presented. Experimental data is presented to show the vibration spectrum and response under actual engine operation and also in spin pit testing for balancing. The oxygen pump appears to be operating near a second critical speed and is sensitive to self excited aerodynamic cross coupling forces in the turbine and pump. An analysis is presented to show the improvement in pump stability by the application of turbulent flow seals, preburner seals, and pump shaft cross sectional modifications.

  16. Highly flexible flight vehicle aeroelastic and aero-viscoelastic flutter issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrett, Craig G.; Hilton, Harry H.

    2012-11-01

    Aeroelastic and aero-viscoelastic phenomena arising from the high flexibility of modern flight vehicles are examined, and governing relations are formulated and solved. In particular, the time dependent flight velocities associated with maneuvers and with in-plane bending are considered, which necessitate new derivations of the Theodorsen function, unsteady aerodynamic relations and equations of motion. Under these conditions, simple harmonic motion (SHM) is no longer achievable and different flutter criteria based directly on motion stability are presented. The viscoelastic problem is formulated in terms of integral partial differential equations with variable nonlinear coefficients. Their solutions and evaluations are discussed in detail. One interesting departure from linear responses emerged, which indicates flutter in one bending while the other bending mode and the torsional are both stable. A detailed and extended treatment of these subjects may be found in [1].

  17. On longitudinal control of high speed aircraft in the presence of aeroelastic modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Suresh M.; Kelkar, Atul G.

    1996-01-01

    Longitudinal control system design is considered for a linearized dynamic model of a supersonic transport aircraft concept characterized by relaxed static stability and significant aeroelastic interactions. Two LQG-type controllers are designed using the frequency-domain additive uncertainty formulation to ensure robustness to unmodeled flexible modes. The first controller is based on a 4th-order model containing only the rigid-body modes, while the second controller is based on an 8th-order model that additionally includes the two most prominent flexible modes. The performance obtainable from the 4th-order controller is not adequate, while the 8th-order controller is found to provide better performance. Frequency-domain and time-domain (Lyapunov) methods are subsequently used to assess the robustness of the 8th-order controller to parametric uncertainties in the design model.

  18. Aeroelastic modeling for the FIT team F/A-18 simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeiler, Thomas A.; Wieseman, Carol D.

    1989-01-01

    Some details of the aeroelastic modeling of the F/A-18 aircraft done for the Functional Integration Technology (FIT) team's research in integrated dynamics modeling and how these are combined with the FIT team's integrated dynamics model are described. Also described are mean axis corrections to elastic modes, the addition of nonlinear inertial coupling terms into the equations of motion, and the calculation of internal loads time histories using the integrated dynamics model in a batch simulation program. A video tape made of a loads time history animation was included as a part of the oral presentation. Also discussed is work done in one of the areas of unsteady aerodynamic modeling identified as needing improvement, specifically, in correction factor methodologies for improving the accuracy of stability derivatives calculated with a doublet lattice code.

  19. Aeroelastic Response of Swept Aircraft Wings in a Compressible Flow Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzocca, Piergiovanni; Librescu, Liviu; Silva, Walter A.

    2000-01-01

    The present study addresses the subcritical aeroelastic response of swept wings, in various flight speed regimes, to arbitrary time-dependent external excitations. The methodology based on the concept of indicial functions is carried out in time and frequency domains. As a result of this approach, the proper unsteady aerodynamic loads necessary to study the subcritical aeroelastic response of the open/closed loop aeroelastic systems, and of flutter instability, respectively are obtained. Validation of the aeroelastic model is provided, and applications to subcritical aeroelastic response to blast pressure signatures are illustrated. In this context, an original representation of the aeroelastic response in the phase-space is displayed, and pertinent conclusions on the implications of a number of selected parameters of the system are outlined.

  20. Time-accurate unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic calculations for wings using Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.

    1988-01-01

    A time-accurate approach to simultaneously solve the Euler flow equations and modal structural equations of motion is presented for computing aeroelastic responses of wings. The Euler flow eauations are solved by a time-accurate finite difference scheme with dynamic grids. The coupled aeroelastic equations of motion are solved using the linear acceleration method. The aeroelastic configuration adaptive dynamic grids are time accurately generated using the aeroelastically deformed shape of the wing. The unsteady flow calculations are validated wih experiment, both for a semi-infinite wing and a wall-mounted cantilever rectangular wings. Aeroelastic responses are computed for a rectangular wing using the modal data generated by the finite-element method. The robustness of the present approach in computing unsteady flows and aeroelastic responses that are beyond the capability of earlier approaches using the potential equations are demonstrated.

  1. Aeroelasticity matters: Some reflections on two decades of testing in the NASA Langley transonic dynamics tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, W. H., III

    1981-01-01

    Testing of wind-tunnel aeroelastic models is a well established, widely used means of studying flutter trends, validating theory and investigating flutter margins of safety of new vehicle designs. The Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel was designed specifically for work on dynamics and aeroelastic problems of aircraft and space vehicles. A cross section of aeroelastic research and testing in the facility since it became operational more than two decades ago is presented. Examples selected from a large store of experience illustrate the nature and purpose of some major areas of work performed in the tunnel. These areas include: specialized experimental techniques; development testing of new aircraft and launch vehicle designs; evaluation of proposed "fixes" to solve aeroelastic problems uncovered during development testing; study of unexpected aeroelastic phenomena (i.e., "surprises"); control of aeroelastic effects by active and passive means; and, finally, fundamental research involving measurement of unsteady pressures on oscillating wings and control surface.

  2. Low-Speed Static Stability and Control Characteristics of a Model of a Right Triangular Pyramid Reentry Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulson, John W.

    1959-01-01

    An investigation of the low-speed static stability and control characteristics of a model of a right triangular pyramid reentry configuration has been made in the Langley free-flight tunnel. The investigation showed that the model had generally satisfactory longitudinal and lateral static stability characteristics. The maximum lift-drag ratio was increased from about 3 to 5 by boattailing the base of the model.

  3. Experimental data to demonstrate the density influenced transport characteristics of stabilized iron nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, T. P.; Kanel, S. R.; Goswami, R. R.; Barnett, M. O.

    2008-12-01

    Zero valent iron nanoparticles (INP) are often used to treat various types of environmental contaminants. In this study, we synthesized a new class of iron nanoparticles and stabilized it using poly-acrylic acid (PAA). A two dimensional groundwater aquifer model was used to study the fate and transport of pristine INP and SINP (stabilized iron nano particles) under steady-state flow conditions. Transport data for a non-reactive tracer, INP, and SINP were collected under similar experimental conditions. The results clearly demonstrate the ability of PAA to stabilize INP. Furthermore, the transport data indicated that the S-INP plume will sink in a groundwater aquifer, indicating that small density gradients have significant influence on two-dimensional transport. This observation has enormous implication for designing field scale remediation systems that use iron nano particles. We used the variable-density groundwater model SEAWAT to model INP as a density driven tracer. The model results along with the experimental data show that the density influence transport controlled the migration patterns of SINP. Since the influence of density effects cannot be fully discerned using column experiments, two dimensional experiments are essential for fully understanding the transport characteristics of INP.

  4. Norm stability in Jirisan National Park: effects of time, existing conditions, and background characteristics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Oh; Shelby, Bo

    2008-04-01

    Norm stability is an important issue to consider in using the normative approach as a component of resource management decision making. This study examines three major questions related to norm stability: (1) Do norms change over time? (2) Do existing conditions affect norms? (3) Do background characteristics and visitation patterns affect norms? Data used in this study were collected at a campground in the Jirisan National Park (JNP) of Korea in 1993, 1994, and 2003. A total of 396 subjects were used for the study (120 for 1993, 106 for 1994, and 170 for 2003). Changes in the standards for "quiet time" and "seeing others littering" were statistically significant, but there was no change in the standard for "number of other tents." There was little change in norm agreement or norm prevalence. Existing conditions were strongly correlated with standards for number of other tents but results were mixed for the other two indicators. Users' demographic characteristics and visitation patterns were not generally related to norms. Findings of the study are discussed.

  5. Chemical composition, rheological, quality characteristics and storage stability of buns enriched with coriander and curry leaves.

    PubMed

    Sudha, M L; Rajeswari, G; Venkateswara Rao, G

    2014-12-01

    Effect of addition of normal (NL) and dehydrated (DL) curry leaves (Murraya koeniggi) and coriander leaves (Corinadrum sativum) in the ratio of 1:1 to refined wheat flour (WF) or a blend of refined wheat flour-whole wheat flour (WF-WWF, 1:1) on the rheological, nutritional, storage and quality characteristics of the buns were studied. Water absorption increased on addition of increasing levels of DL from 0 to 7.5 % to WF-WWF when compared to WF. Dough weakening was greater when DL was added to WF-WWF as seen in decrease in dough stability and abscissa at rupture values. Addition of gluten and emulsifiers improved the quality characteristics of buns prepared using either 25 % NL or 5 % DL. Storage stability of buns with DL was better. The protein, dietary fiber, iron and carotenoids in buns prepared from WF-WWF were higher. The results indicate the utilization of leaves in dehydrated form in the preparation of nutritionally improved buns. PMID:25477645

  6. Optimal rheological characteristics in dynamic stability of polymer flow through porous media: Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, H.W.; French, T.R.

    1988-04-01

    To identify the optimal rheological characteristics for maintaining the dynamic stability of polymer solutions flowing through porous media, displacement tests with a Newtonian fluid and a non-Newtonian fluid were performed in a 4-ft Berea sandstone core. A solution of 63 wt pct gylcerin in 53 meg/1 NaCL and a solution of 1500 ppM Pusher 500 in 53 meq/1 NaCl were used as the Newtonian fluid and non-Newtonian fluid, respectively. Two flow rates one in the purely viscous regime and one in the viscoelastic flow regime of Pusher 500 in Berea sandstone, were used in the displacement tests. The effluents collected were analyzed to determine polymer and tracer concentrations. The viscosities of the effluents were also measured with a Contraves viscometer. By comparing the concentration profiles obtained in tests with Pusher 500 and in those with gylcerin, the effects of flow rate, mobility ratio, and rheological characteristics on the dynamic stability of polymer flow in porous media were determined. At both leading and trailing edges of the polymer slug, stability increases with decreasing mobility ratio. At both high and low flow rates, a Newtonian fluid gives a more stable displacement at the fluid front than does a non-Newtonian fluid. Measurements on the mixing lengths at the back edge show that the size of the mobility buffer bank required for a flow rate at reservior conditions (viscous flow regime) would be less for a Newtonian fluid than for a non-Newtonian fluid. At a flow rate in the viscoelastic flow regime, the required size of the mobility buffer bank is less for a non-Newtonian fluid than for a Newtonian fluid. 39 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Volterra Series Approach for Nonlinear Aeroelastic Response of 2-D Lifting Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Marzocca, Piergiovanni; Librescu, Liviu

    2001-01-01

    The problem of the determination of the subcritical aeroelastic response and flutter instability of nonlinear two-dimensional lifting surfaces in an incompressible flow-field via Volterra series approach is addressed. The related aeroelastic governing equations are based upon the inclusion of structural nonlinearities, of the linear unsteady aerodynamics and consideration of an arbitrary time-dependent external pressure pulse. Unsteady aeroelastic nonlinear kernels are determined, and based on these, frequency and time histories of the subcritical aeroelastic response are obtained, and in this context the influence of geometric nonlinearities is emphasized. Conclusions and results displaying the implications of the considered effects are supplied.

  8. Techniques to improve maneuver stability characteristics of a nonlinear wide-body transport airplane in cruise flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grantham, William D.; Person, Lee H., Jr.; Bailey, Melvin L.; Tingas, Stephen A.

    1994-01-01

    The maneuver control stability characteristics of an aircraft are a flying qualities parameter of critical importance, to ensure structural protection as well as adequate predictability to the pilot. Currently, however, maneuver stability characteristics are not uniquely addressed in the Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR) Part 25, for transport aircraft. In past transport category certification programs, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has used a combination of requirements (longitudinal control, vibration and buffeting, high-speed characteristics, and out-of-trim characteristics) to ensure safe and controllable maneuver stability characteristics over a range of flight conditions and airplane configurations. Controversies exist regarding each of these regulations, however, and considerable expenditures in terms of design studies and testing time have resulted from the requirements. It is also recognized that additional engineering guidance is needed for identifying acceptable nonlinear maneuver stability characteristics, particularly as they relate to relaxed stability, highly augmented transport configurations. The current trend in large aircraft design is toward relaxed, or even negative, static margins for improved fuel efficiency. The advanced flight control systems developed for these aircraft, in many instances, have rendered current aforementioned maneuver stability criteria either too stringent or of little practical use. Current design requirements do not account for these advanced designs. The objective was to evaluate a broad spectrum of linear and nonlinear longitudinal stability characteristics to generate data for defining satisfactory and unacceptable maneuver characteristics, as defined by pilot opinion. Primary emphasis was placed on two techniques of varying column force per normal acceleration. This study was a joint venture with four pilots participating; one from NASA, one from the FAA, and two from industry.

  9. Flexible Launch Vehicle Stability Analysis Using Steady and Unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    Launch vehicles frequently experience a reduced stability margin through the transonic Mach number range. This reduced stability margin can be caused by the aerodynamic undamping one of the lower-frequency flexible or rigid body modes. Analysis of the behavior of a flexible vehicle is routinely performed with quasi-steady aerodynamic line loads derived from steady rigid aerodynamics. However, a quasi-steady aeroelastic stability analysis can be unconservative at the critical Mach numbers, where experiment or unsteady computational aeroelastic analysis show a reduced or even negative aerodynamic damping.Amethod of enhancing the quasi-steady aeroelastic stability analysis of a launch vehicle with unsteady aerodynamics is developed that uses unsteady computational fluid dynamics to compute the response of selected lower-frequency modes. The response is contained in a time history of the vehicle line loads. A proper orthogonal decomposition of the unsteady aerodynamic line-load response is used to reduce the scale of data volume and system identification is used to derive the aerodynamic stiffness, damping, and mass matrices. The results are compared with the damping and frequency computed from unsteady computational aeroelasticity and from a quasi-steady analysis. The results show that incorporating unsteady aerodynamics in this way brings the enhanced quasi-steady aeroelastic stability analysis into close agreement with the unsteady computational aeroelastic results.

  10. CFD and Aeroelastic Analysis of the MEXICO Wind Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrión, M.; Woodgate, M.; Steijl, R.; Barakos, G.; Gómez-Iradi, S.; Munduate, X.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents an aerodynamic and aeroelastic analysis of the MEXICO wind turbine, using the compressible HMB solver of Liverpool. The aeroelasticity of the blade, as well as the effect of a low-Mach scheme were studied for the zero-yaw 15m/s wind case and steady- state computations. The wake developed behind the rotor was also extracted and compared with the experimental data, using the compressible solver and a low-Mach scheme. It was found that the loads were not sensitive to the Mach number effects, although the low-Mach scheme improved the wake predictions. The sensitivity of the results to the blade structural properties was also highlighted.

  11. An aeroelastic analysis with a generalized dynamic wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Cheng J.; Peters, David A.

    1991-01-01

    An aeroelastic model with generalized dynamic wake is developed for application in the integration of aerodynamic, dynamic, and structural optimization of a rotor blade. The investigation is carried out with special attention to efficiency and accuracy of aeroelastic modeling. Each blade is assumed to be an elastic beam undergoing flap bending, lead-lag bending, elastic twist and axial deflections. The nonuniform blade is discretized into finite beam elements, each of which consists of twelve degrees of freedom. Such important blade design variables as pretwist, and chordwise offsets of the blade center of gravity and of the aerodynamic center from the elastic axis have been included in the analysis. Aerodynamic loads are computed from unsteady blade element theory where the rotor three-dimensional unsteady wake is modeled using a generalized dynamic wake theory. The noncirculatory loads based on unsteady thin airfoil theory are also included.

  12. Unsteady transonic aerodynamic and aeroelastic calculations about airfoils and wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goorjian, P. M.; Guruswamy, G. P.

    1985-01-01

    The development and application of transonic small disturbance codes for computing two dimensional flows, using the code ATRAN2, and for computing three dimensional flows, using the code ATRAN3S, are described. Calculated and experimental results are compared for unsteady flows about airfoils and wings, including several of the cases from the AGARD Standard Aeroelastic Configurations. In two dimensions, the results include AGARD priority cases for the NACA 54A006, NACA 64A010, NACA 0012, and MBB-A3 airfoils. In three dimensions, the results include flow about the F-5 wing, a typical wing, and the AGARD rectangular wings. Viscous corrections are included in some calculations, including those for the AGARD rectangular wing. For several cases, the aerodynamic and aeroelastic calculations are compared with experimental results.

  13. A Nonlinear Modal Aeroelastic Solver for FUN3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, Benjamin D.; Bartels, Robert E.; Biedron, Robert T.; Scott, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    A nonlinear structural solver has been implemented internally within the NASA FUN3D computational fluid dynamics code, allowing for some new aeroelastic capabilities. Using a modal representation of the structure, a set of differential or differential-algebraic equations are derived for general thin structures with geometric nonlinearities. ODEPACK and LAPACK routines are linked with FUN3D, and the nonlinear equations are solved at each CFD time step. The existing predictor-corrector method is retained, whereby the structural solution is updated after mesh deformation. The nonlinear solver is validated using a test case for a flexible aeroshell at transonic, supersonic, and hypersonic flow conditions. Agreement with linear theory is seen for the static aeroelastic solutions at relatively low dynamic pressures, but structural nonlinearities limit deformation amplitudes at high dynamic pressures. No flutter was found at any of the tested trajectory points, though LCO may be possible in the transonic regime.

  14. An Overview of Recent Developments in Computational Aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Robert M.; Edwards, John W.

    2004-01-01

    The motivation for Computational Aeroelasticity (CA) and the elements of one type of the analysis or simulation process are briefly reviewed. The need for streamlining and improving the overall process to reduce elapsed time and improve overall accuracy is discussed. Further effort is needed to establish the credibility of the methodology, obtain experience, and to incorporate the experience base to simplify the method for future use. Experience with the application of a variety of Computational Aeroelasticity programs is summarized for the transonic flutter of two wings, the AGARD 445.6 wing and a typical business jet wing. There is a compelling need for a broad range of additional flutter test cases for further comparisons. Some existing data sets that may offer CA challenges are presented.

  15. Aeroelastic Optimization Study Based on X-56A Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wesley; Pak, Chan-Gi

    2014-01-01

    A design process which incorporates the object-oriented multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization (MDAO) tool and the aeroelastic effects of high fidelity finite element models to characterize the design space was successfully developed and established. Two multidisciplinary design optimization studies using an object-oriented MDAO tool developed at NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center were presented. The first study demonstrates the use of aeroelastic tailoring concepts to minimize the structural weight while meeting the design requirements including strength, buckling, and flutter. A hybrid and discretization optimization approach was implemented to improve accuracy and computational efficiency of a global optimization algorithm. The second study presents a flutter mass balancing optimization study. The results provide guidance to modify the fabricated flexible wing design and move the design flutter speeds back into the flight envelope so that the original objective of X-56A flight test can be accomplished.

  16. Analytical formulation of 2-D aeroelastic model in weak ground effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessi, Daniele; Mastroddi, Franco; Mancini, Simone

    2013-10-01

    This paper deals with the aeroelastic modeling and analysis of a 2-D oscillating airfoil in ground effect, elastically constrained by linear and torsional springs and immersed in an incompressible potential flow (typical section) at a finite distance from the ground. This work aims to extend Theodorsen theory, valid in an unbounded flow domain, to the case of weak ground effect, i.e., for clearances above half the airfoil chord. The key point is the determination of the aerodynamic loads, first in the frequency domain and then in the time domain, accounting for their dependence on the ground distance. The method of images is exploited in order to comply with the impermeability condition on the ground. The new integral equation in the unknown vortex distribution along the chord and the wake is solved using asymptotic expansions in the perturbation parameter defined as the inverse of the non-dimensional ground clearance of the airfoil. The mathematical model describing the aeroelastic system is transformed from the frequency domain into the time domain and then in a pure differential form using a finite-state aerodynamic approximation (augmented states). The typical section, which the developed theory is applied to, is obtained as a reduced model of a wing box finite element representation, thus allowing comparison with the corresponding aeroelastic analysis carried out by a commercial solver based on a 3-D lifting surface aerodynamic model. Stability (flutter margins) and response of the airfoil both in frequency and time domains are then investigated. In particular, within the developed theory, the solution of the Wagner problem can be directly achieved confirming an asymptotic trend of the aerodynamic coefficients toward the steady-state conditions different from that relative to the unbounded domain case. The dependence of flutter speed and the frequency response functions on ground clearance is highlighted, showing the usefulness of this approach in efficiently

  17. Change and Stability in the Characteristics of Homicide Victims, Offenders and Incidents During Rapid Social Change

    PubMed Central

    Pridemore, William Alex

    2008-01-01

    The Russian homicide rate doubled during the 1990s and is now among the highest in the world. During this same period, Russian citizens experienced swift, widespread, and meaningful political, economic, and social change. It is likely that this profound transition altered structural conditions, cultural norms, and interpersonal relations in a way that led to changes in the nature of interpersonal violence. Taking advantage of a unique set of homicide narratives drawn from court and police records in the Udmurt Republic, this study examined stability and change in the distribution of Russian homicide victim, offender, and incident characteristics before and after the fall of the Soviet Union. Odds ratios obtained from logistic regression showed no change in victim characteristics, but substantial changes in several offender and incident characteristics. We discuss the potential mechanisms through which the structural and cultural shifts are resulting in these changes and conclude that the ongoing transition is largely responsible for the changing nature of homicide in Russia. In doing so, we introduce the new term “criminological transition” and suggest that Russia (and perhaps other nations) may have experienced a change in its crime profile in much the same way as we discuss a “demographic transition” in terms of fertility and mortality profiles. PMID:19122789

  18. Research of aerohydrodynamic and aeroelastic processes on PNRPU HPC system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modorskii, V. Ya.; Shevelev, N. A.

    2016-10-01

    Research of aerohydrodynamic and aeroelastic processes with the High Performance Computing Complex in PNIPU is actively conducted within the university priority development direction "Aviation engine and gas turbine technology". Work is carried out in two areas: development and use of domestic software and use of well-known foreign licensed applied software packets. In addition, the third direction associated with the verification of computational experiments - physical modeling, with unique proprietary experimental installations is being developed.

  19. Evaluation of an aeroelastic model technique for predicting airplane buffet loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, P. W.

    1973-01-01

    A wind-tunnel technique which makes use of a dynamically scaled aeroelastic model to predict full-scale airplane buffet loads during buffet boundary penetration is evaluated. A 1/8-scale flutter model of a fighter airplane with remotely controllable variable-sweep wings and trimming surfaces was used for the evaluation. The model was flown on a cable-mount system which permitted high lift forces comparable to those in maneuvering flight. Bending moments and accelerations due to buffet were measured on the flutter model and compared with those measured on the full-scale airplane in an independent flight buffet research study. It is concluded that the technique can provide valuable information on airplane buffet load characteristics not available from any other source except flight test.

  20. An integrated analytical aeropropulsive/aeroelastic model for the dynamic analysis of hypersonic vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chavez, Frank R.; Schmidt, David K.

    1992-01-01

    The development of an approach to the determination of the dynamic characteristics of hypersonic vehicles which is intentionally generic and basic is given. The approach involves a 2D hypersonic aerodynamic analysis utilizing Newtonian theory, coupled with a 1D aero/thermoanalysis of the flow in a scramjet-type propulsion system. In addition, the airframe is considered to be elastic, and the structural dynamics are characterized in terms of a simple lumped-mass model of the invacuo vibration modes. The vibration modes are coupled to the rigid-body modes through the aero/propulsive forces acting on the structure. The control effectors considered on a generic study configuration include aerodynamic pitch-control surfaces, as well as engine fuel flow and diffuser area ratio. The study configuration is shown to be highly statically unstable in pitch, and to exhibit strong airframe/engine/elastic coupling in the aeroelastic and attitude dynamics, as well as the engine responses.

  1. New conceptual design of aeroelastic wing structures by multi-objective optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleesongsom, S.; Bureerat, S.

    2013-01-01

    Internal structural layouts and component sizes of aircraft wing structures have a significant impact on aircraft performance such as aeroelastic characteristics and mass. This work presents an approach to achieve simultaneous partial topology and sizing optimization of a three-dimensional wing-box structure. A multi-objective optimization problem is assigned to optimize lift effectiveness, buckling factor and mass of a structure. Design constraints include divergence and flutter speeds, buckling factor and stresses. The topology and sizing design variables for wing internal components are based on a ground element approach. The design problem is solved by multi-objective population-based incremental learning (MOPBIL). The Pareto optimum results lead to unconventional wing structures that are superior to their conventional counterparts.

  2. Development of unsteady aerodynamic analyses for turbomachinery aeroelastic and aeroacoustic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verdon, Joseph M.; Barnett, Mark; Hall, Kenneth C.; Ayer, Timothy C.

    1991-01-01

    Theoretical analyses and computer codes are being developed for predicting compressible unsteady inviscid and viscous flows through blade rows. Such analyses are needed to determine the impact of unsteady flow phenomena on the structural durability and noise generation characteristics of turbomachinery blading. Emphasis is being placed on developing analyses based on asymptotic representations of unsteady flow phenomena. Thus, flow driven by small-amplitude unsteady excitations in which viscous effects are concentrated in thin layers are being considered. The resulting analyses should apply in many practical situations, lead to a better understanding of the relevent physics, and they will be efficient computationally, and therefore, appropriate for aeroelastic and aeroacoustic design applications. Under the present phase (Task 3), the effort was focused on providing inviscid and viscid prediction capabilities for subsonic unsteady cascade flows.

  3. Extended aeroelastic analysis for helicopter rotors with prescribed hub motion and blade appended penduluum vibration absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielawa, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    The mathematical development for the expanded capabilities of the G400 rotor aeroelastic analysis was examined. The G400PA expanded analysis simulates the dynamics of all conventional rotors, blade pendulum vibration absorbers, and the higher harmonic excitations resulting from prescribed vibratory hub motions and higher harmonic blade pitch control. The methodology for modeling the unsteady stalled airloads of two dimensional airfoils is discussed. Formulations for calculating the rotor impedance matrix appropriate to the higher harmonic blade excitations are outlined. This impedance matrix, and the associated vibratory hub loads, are the rotor dynamic characteristic elements for use in the simplified coupled rotor/fuselage vibration analysis (SIMVIB). Updates to the development of the original G400 theory, program documentation, user instructions and information are presented.

  4. Low-speed stability and control characteristics of a transport model with aft-fuselage-mounted advanced turboprops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Applin, Z. T.; Coe, P. L., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A limited experimental investigation was conducted in the Langley 4- by 7-Meter Tunnel to explore the effects of aft-fuselage-mounted advanced turboprop installations on the low-speed stability and control characteristics of a representative transport aircraft in a landing configuration. In general, the experimental results indicate that the longitudinal and lateral-directional stability characteristics for the aft-fuselage-mounted single-rotation tractor and counter-rotation pusher propeller configurations tested during this investigation are acceptable aerodynamically. For the single-rotation tractor configuration, the propeller-induced aerodynamics are significantly influenced by the interaction of the propeller slipstream with the pylon and nacelle. The stability characteristics for the counter-rotation pusher configuration are strongly influenced by propeller normal forces. The longitudinal and directional control effectiveness, engine-out characteristics, and ground effects are also presented. In addition, a tabulated presentation of all aerodynamic data presented in this report is included as an appendix.

  5. Optical design and aeroelastic investigation of segmented windmill rotor blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, C. C.; Wanh, L.

    An aeroelastic model is developed for optimizing the aerodynamic design and aeroelastic structural analysis of segmented wind turbine rotor blades. The treatment is limited to the aerodynamics of the segmented blade as a whole using the Box method, with attention given to rotor response with an appropriate aeroelastic feedback for optimizing the pitch response to aerodynamic moments which occur. Vibration and flutter are also accounted for, including the natural frequencies and the mode shapes. The rotor blades are segmented, each segment being a foam-filled core shell with two end bearings for rotating around the spar. Compensation springs restrict the rotation. An energy balance and the equations of motion are formulated in the aerodynamic analysis, and calculations are presented for a 60 ft blade on a machine with an 8 m/sec design speed. A large diameter rotor is found to be preferable to many smaller machines for large power generation. A large rotor will not encounter structural resonance, and the segmented blade will be suitably damped in flapping, inplane lagging, and segment twist.

  6. Aeroelastic Optimization Study Based on the X-56A Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wesley W.; Pak, Chan-Gi

    2014-01-01

    One way to increase the aircraft fuel efficiency is to reduce structural weight while maintaining adequate structural airworthiness, both statically and aeroelastically. A design process which incorporates the object-oriented multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization (MDAO) tool and the aeroelastic effects of high fidelity finite element models to characterize the design space was successfully developed and established. This paper presents two multidisciplinary design optimization studies using an object-oriented MDAO tool developed at NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center. The first study demonstrates the use of aeroelastic tailoring concepts to minimize the structural weight while meeting the design requirements including strength, buckling, and flutter. Such an approach exploits the anisotropic capabilities of the fiber composite materials chosen for this analytical exercise with ply stacking sequence. A hybrid and discretization optimization approach improves accuracy and computational efficiency of a global optimization algorithm. The second study presents a flutter mass balancing optimization study for the fabricated flexible wing of the X-56A model since a desired flutter speed band is required for the active flutter suppression demonstration during flight testing. The results of the second study provide guidance to modify the wing design and move the design flutter speeds back into the flight envelope so that the original objective of X-56A flight test can be accomplished successfully. The second case also demonstrates that the object-oriented MDAO tool can handle multiple analytical configurations in a single optimization run.

  7. Transonic aeroelastic analysis of the B-1 wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, G. P.; Goorjian, P. M.; Ide, H.; Miller, G. D.

    1986-01-01

    The flow over the B-1 wing is studied computationally, including the aeroelastic response of the wing. Computed results are compared with results from wind tunnel and flight tests for both low- and high-sweep cases, at 25.0 and 67.5 deg, respectively, for selected transonic Mach numbers. The aerodynamic and aeroelastic computations are made by using the transonic unsteady code ATRAN3S. Steady aerodynamic computations compare well with wind tunnel results for the 25.0 deg sweep case and also for small angles of attack at 67.5 deg sweep case. The aeroelastic response results show that the wing is stable at the low-sweep angle for the calculation at the Mach number at which there is a shock wave. In the higher-sweep case, for the higher angle of attack at which oscillations were observed in the flight and wind tunnel tests, the calculations do not show any shock waves. Their absence lends support to the hypothesis that the observed oscillations are due to the presence of leading-edge separation vortices and not to shock wave motion, as was previously proposed.

  8. Static Aeroelastic Analysis with an Inviscid Cartesian Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, David L.; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Nemec, Marian; Smith, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    An embedded-boundary, Cartesian-mesh flow solver is coupled with a three degree-of-freedom structural model to perform static, aeroelastic analysis of complex aircraft geometries. The approach solves a nonlinear, aerostructural system of equations using a loosely-coupled strategy. An open-source, 3-D discrete-geometry engine is utilized to deform a triangulated surface geometry according to the shape predicted by the structural model under the computed aerodynamic loads. The deformation scheme is capable of modeling large deflections and is applicable to the design of modern, very-flexible transport wings. The coupling interface is modular so that aerodynamic or structural analysis methods can be easily swapped or enhanced. After verifying the structural model with comparisons to Euler beam theory, two applications of the analysis method are presented as validation. The first is a relatively stiff, transport wing model which was a subject of a recent workshop on aeroelasticity. The second is a very flexible model recently tested in a low speed wind tunnel. Both cases show that the aeroelastic analysis method produces results in excellent agreement with experimental data.

  9. Non-linear aeroelastic prediction for aircraft applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de C. Henshaw, M. J.; Badcock, K. J.; Vio, G. A.; Allen, C. B.; Chamberlain, J.; Kaynes, I.; Dimitriadis, G.; Cooper, J. E.; Woodgate, M. A.; Rampurawala, A. M.; Jones, D.; Fenwick, C.; Gaitonde, A. L.; Taylor, N. V.; Amor, D. S.; Eccles, T. A.; Denley, C. J.

    2007-05-01

    Current industrial practice for the prediction and analysis of flutter relies heavily on linear methods and this has led to overly conservative design and envelope restrictions for aircraft. Although the methods have served the industry well, it is clear that for a number of reasons the inclusion of non-linearity in the mathematical and computational aeroelastic prediction tools is highly desirable. The increase in available and affordable computational resources, together with major advances in algorithms, mean that non-linear aeroelastic tools are now viable within the aircraft design and qualification environment. The Partnership for Unsteady Methods in Aerodynamics (PUMA) Defence and Aerospace Research Partnership (DARP) was sponsored in 2002 to conduct research into non-linear aeroelastic prediction methods and an academic, industry, and government consortium collaborated to address the following objectives: To develop useable methodologies to model and predict non-linear aeroelastic behaviour of complete aircraft. To evaluate the methodologies on real aircraft problems. To investigate the effect of non-linearities on aeroelastic behaviour and to determine which have the greatest effect on the flutter qualification process. These aims have been very effectively met during the course of the programme and the research outputs include: New methods available to industry for use in the flutter prediction process, together with the appropriate coaching of industry engineers. Interesting results in both linear and non-linear aeroelastics, with comprehensive comparison of methods and approaches for challenging problems. Additional embryonic techniques that, with further research, will further improve aeroelastics capability. This paper describes the methods that have been developed and how they are deployable within the industrial environment. We present a thorough review of the PUMA aeroelastics programme together with a comprehensive review of the relevant research

  10. Efficient Cfd/csd Coupling Methods for Aeroelastic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Long; Xu, Tianhao; Xie, Jing

    2016-06-01

    A fast aeroelastic numerical simulation method using CFD/CSD coupling are developed. Generally, aeroelastic numerical simulation costs much time and significant hardware resources with CFD/CSD coupling. In this paper, dynamic grid method, full implicit scheme, parallel technology and improved coupling method are researched for efficiency simulation. An improved Delaunay graph mapping method is proposed for efficient dynamic grid deform. Hybrid grid finite volume method is used to solve unsteady flow fields. The dual time stepping method based on parallel implicit scheme is used in temporal discretization for efficiency simulation. An approximate system of linear equations is solved by the GMRES algorithm with a LU-SGS preconditioner. This method leads to a significant increase in performance over the explicit and LU-SGS implicit methods. A modification of LU-SGS is proposed to improve the parallel performance. Parallel computing overs a very effective way to improve our productivity in doing CFD/CFD coupling analysis. Improved loose coupling method is an efficiency way over the loose coupling method and tight coupling method. 3D wing's aeroelastic phenomenon is simulated by solving Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations using improved loose coupling method. The flutter boundary is calculated and agrees well with experimental data. The transonic hole is very clear in numerical simulation results.

  11. Using FUN3D for Aeroelastic, Sonic Boom, and AeroPropulsoServoElastic (APSE) Analyses of a Supersonic Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Sanetrik, Mark D.; Chwalowski, Pawel; Connolly, Joseph; Kopasakis, George

    2016-01-01

    An overview of recent applications of the FUN3D CFD code to computational aeroelastic, sonic boom, and aeropropulsoservoelasticity (APSE) analyses of a low-boom supersonic configuration is presented. The overview includes details of the computational models developed including multiple unstructured CFD grids suitable for aeroelastic and sonic boom analyses. In addition, aeroelastic Reduced-Order Models (ROMs) are generated and used to rapidly compute the aeroelastic response and utter boundaries at multiple flight conditions.

  12. Effect of thrust on the aeroelastic instability of a composite swept wing with two engines in subsonic compressible flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firouz-Abadi, R. D.; Askarian, A. R.; Zarifian, P.

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate aeroelastic stability boundary of subsonic wings under the effect of thrust of two engines. The wing structure is modeled as a tapered composite box-beam. Moreover, an indicial function based model is used to calculate the unsteady lift and moment distribution along the wing span in subsonic compressible flow. The two jet engines mounted on the wing are modeled as concentrated masses and the effect of thrust of each engine is applied as a follower force. Using Hamilton's principle along with Galerkin's method, the governing equations of motion are derived, then the obtained equations are solved in frequency domain using the K-method and the aeroelastic instability conditions are determined. The flutter analysis results of four example wings are compared with the experimental and analytical results in the literature and good agreements are achieved which validate the present model. Furthermore, based on several case studies on a reference wing, some attempts are performed to analyze the effect of thrust on the stability margin of the wing and some conclusions are outlined.

  13. Aerodynamic stability and control characteristics of TBC shuttle booster AR-11981-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phelps, E. R.; Watts, L. L.; Ainsworth, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    A scale model of the Boeing Company space shuttle booster configuration 3 was tested in the MSFC 14-inch trisonic wind tunnel. This test was proposed to fill-in the original test run schedule as well as to investigate the aerodynamic stability and control characteristics of the booster with three wing configurations not previously tested. The configurations tested included: (1) a cylindrical booster body with an axisymmetric nose, (2) clipped delta canards that had variable incidence from 0 deg to -60 deg, (3) different aft body mounted wing configurations, (4) two vertical fin configurations, and (5) a Grumman G-3 orbiter configuration. Tests were conducted over a Mach range from 0.6 to 5.0.

  14. Summary and analysis of performance and stability characteristics of the refan JT8D-109 engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanberg, K. G.; Mogielnicki, R. M.; Davis, J. C.; Scaramella, V. M.

    1975-01-01

    The refan JT8D-109 performance and stability characteristics are reported as determined from sea level testing, altitude testing, and DC-9 flight testing. The test results are summarized as follows: (1) TSFC at SLS achieved design goal of 12.66 percent reduction. (2) TSFC at altitude average cruise power 0.5 percent higher than design goal, (3) TSFC at altitude maximum cruise power 1.7-3.7 percent higher than design goal, (4) ground starting consistent with JT8D-9 base engine, (5) successful flight starts without starter assist, (6) transient surge margin equivalent to JT8D-9, (7) stable engine operation with inlet distortion, and (8) stable engine operation during snap acceleration and deceleration. A flight idle setting is required for acceptable aborted-landing go-around acceleration time due to increase in low-rotor moment of inertia, and a performance improvement program should be conducted as part of any future certification program.

  15. Applications of the unsteady vortex-lattice method in aircraft aeroelasticity and flight dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murua, Joseba; Palacios, Rafael; Graham, J. Michael R.

    2012-11-01

    The unsteady vortex-lattice method provides a medium-fidelity tool for the prediction of non-stationary aerodynamic loads in low-speed, but high-Reynolds-number, attached flow conditions. Despite a proven track record in applications where free-wake modelling is critical, other less-computationally expensive potential-flow models, such as the doublet-lattice method and strip theory, have long been favoured in fixed-wing aircraft aeroelasticity and flight dynamics. This paper presents how the unsteady vortex-lattice method can be implemented as an enhanced alternative to those techniques for diverse situations that arise in flexible-aircraft dynamics. A historical review of the methodology is included, with latest developments and practical applications. Different formulations of the aerodynamic equations are outlined, and they are integrated with a nonlinear beam model for the full description of the dynamics of a free-flying flexible vehicle. Nonlinear time-marching solutions capture large wing excursions and wake roll-up, and the linearisation of the equations lends itself to a seamless, monolithic state-space assembly, particularly convenient for stability analysis and flight control system design. The numerical studies emphasise scenarios where the unsteady vortex-lattice method can provide an advantage over other state-of-the-art approaches. Examples of this include unsteady aerodynamics in vehicles with coupled aeroelasticity and flight dynamics, and in lifting surfaces undergoing complex kinematics, large deformations, or in-plane motions. Geometric nonlinearities are shown to play an instrumental, and often counter-intuitive, role in the aircraft dynamics. The unsteady vortex-lattice method is unveiled as a remarkable tool that can successfully incorporate all those effects in the unsteady aerodynamics modelling.

  16. AC over-current characteristics of YBCO coated conductor with copper stabilizer layer considering insulation layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, H.-I.; Kim, M.-J.; Kim, Y.-J.; Lee, D.-H.; Han, B.-S.; Song, S.-S.

    2010-11-01

    Compared with the first-generation BSCCO wire, the YBCO thin-film wire boasts low material costs and high Jc and superior magnetic-field properties, among other strengths. Meanwhile, the previous BSCCO wire material for superconducting cables has been researched on considerably with regard to its post-wire quenching characteristics during the application of an alternating over-current. In this regard, the promising YBCO thin-film wire has yet to be further researched on. Moreover, still lacking is research on the YBCO thin-film wire with insulating layers, which is essential in the manufacture of superconducting cables, along with the testing of the application of an alternating over-current to the wire. In this study, YBCO thin-film wires with copper-stabilizing layers were used in testing alternating over-current application according to the presence or absence of insulating layers and to the thickness of such layers, to examine the post-quenching wire resistance increase and quenching trends. The YBCO thin-film wire with copper-stabilizing layers has a critical temperature of 90 K and a critical current of 85 A rms. Moreover, its current application cycle is 5.5 cycles, and its applied currents are 354, 517, 712, and 915 A peak. These figures enabled the YBCO thin-film wires with copper-stabilizing layers to reach 90, 180, 250, and 300 K, respectively, in this study. These temperatures serve as a relative reference to examine the post-quenching wire properties following the application of an alternating over-current.

  17. Characteristics and stability of mercury vapor adsorption over two kinds of modified semicoke.

    PubMed

    Huawei, Zhang; Xiuli, Liu; Li, Wang; Peng, Liang

    2014-01-01

    In an attempt to produce effective and lower price gaseous Hg(0) adsorbents, two methods of HCl and KMnO4/heat treatment were used respectively for the surface modification of liginite semicoke from inner Mongolia. The different effects of modification process on the surface physical and chemical properties were analyzed. The characteristics and stability of mercury vapor adsorption over two kinds of modified semicoke were investigated. The results indicated that modification process caused lower micropore quantity and volume capacity of semicoke; the C-Cl functional groups, C=O bond and delocalized electron π on the surface of Cl-SC, the amorphous higher valency Mn (x+) , and O=C-OH functional groups on the surface of Mn-H-SC were the active sites for oxidation and adsorption of gaseous Hg(0). Modification process led to higher mercury removal efficiency of semicoke at 140°C and reduced the stability of adsorbed mercury of semicoke in simulated water circumstance simultaneously. PMID:25309948

  18. Characteristics and stability of mercury vapor adsorption over two kinds of modified semicoke.

    PubMed

    Huawei, Zhang; Xiuli, Liu; Li, Wang; Peng, Liang

    2014-01-01

    In an attempt to produce effective and lower price gaseous Hg(0) adsorbents, two methods of HCl and KMnO4/heat treatment were used respectively for the surface modification of liginite semicoke from inner Mongolia. The different effects of modification process on the surface physical and chemical properties were analyzed. The characteristics and stability of mercury vapor adsorption over two kinds of modified semicoke were investigated. The results indicated that modification process caused lower micropore quantity and volume capacity of semicoke; the C-Cl functional groups, C=O bond and delocalized electron π on the surface of Cl-SC, the amorphous higher valency Mn (x+) , and O=C-OH functional groups on the surface of Mn-H-SC were the active sites for oxidation and adsorption of gaseous Hg(0). Modification process led to higher mercury removal efficiency of semicoke at 140°C and reduced the stability of adsorbed mercury of semicoke in simulated water circumstance simultaneously.

  19. Characteristics and Stability of Mercury Vapor Adsorption over Two Kinds of Modified Semicoke

    PubMed Central

    Huawei, Zhang; Xiuli, Liu; Li, Wang; Peng, Liang

    2014-01-01

    In an attempt to produce effective and lower price gaseous Hg0 adsorbents, two methods of HCl and KMnO4/heat treatment were used respectively for the surface modification of liginite semicoke from inner Mongolia. The different effects of modification process on the surface physical and chemical properties were analyzed. The characteristics and stability of mercury vapor adsorption over two kinds of modified semicoke were investigated. The results indicated that modification process caused lower micropore quantity and volume capacity of semicoke; the C-Cl functional groups, C=O bond and delocalized electron π on the surface of Cl-SC, the amorphous higher valency Mnx+, and O=C–OH functional groups on the surface of Mn-H-SC were the active sites for oxidation and adsorption of gaseous Hg0. Modification process led to higher mercury removal efficiency of semicoke at 140°C and reduced the stability of adsorbed mercury of semicoke in simulated water circumstance simultaneously. PMID:25309948

  20. Transient characteristics and stability analysis of standing wave thermoacoustic-piezoelectric harvesters.

    PubMed

    Nouh, Mostafa; Aldraihem, Osama; Baz, Amr

    2014-02-01

    Standing wave thermoacoustic-piezoelectric (TAP) energy harvesters convert thermal energy, such as solar or waste heat energy, directly into electrical energy without the need for any moving components. The input thermal energy generates a steep temperature gradient along a porous medium called "stack." At a critical threshold of the temperature gradient, self-sustained acoustic waves are developed inside an acoustic resonator. The associated pressure fluctuations impinge on a piezoelectric diaphragm, placed at the end of the resonator, to generate electricity. The behavior of this multi-field system is modeled using the electrical analogy approach. The developed model combines the descriptions of the acoustic resonator and the stack with the characteristics of the piezoelectric diaphragm. The equivalent electric network is analyzed to determine the system's stability and predict the temperature gradient necessary to developing self-sustained oscillations inside the harvester. The developed network is utilized also to investigate the transient performance of the harvester by employing the network theory and Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis software package. The established stability boundaries are validated against the predictions of the root locus technique. Furthermore, the obtained results are compared with experimental results extracted from testing a prototype of the harvester. The developed approach presents an innovative tool for the design of TAP energy harvesters. PMID:25234876

  1. Effects of freeze-thaw on characteristics of new KMP binder stabilized Zn- and Pb-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ming-Li; Du, Yan-Jun; Reddy, Krishna R; Wu, Hao-Liang

    2015-12-01

    For viable and sustainable reuse of solidified/stabilized heavy metal-contaminated soils as roadway subgrade materials, long-term durability of these soils should be ensured. A new binder, KMP, has been developed for solidifying/stabilizing soils contaminated with high concentrations of heavy metals. However, the effects of long-term extreme weather conditions including freeze and thaw on the leachability and strength of the KMP stabilized contaminated soils have not been investigated. This study presents a systematic investigation on the impacts of freeze-thaw cycle on leachability, strength, and microstructural characteristics of the KMP stabilized soils spiked with Zn and Pb individually and together. For comparison purpose, Portland cement is also tested as a conventional binder. Several series of tests are conducted including the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP), modified European Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) sequential extraction procedure, unconfined compression test (UCT), and mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP). The results demonstrate that the freeze-thaw cycles have much less impact on the leachability and strength of the KMP stabilized soils as compared to the PC stabilized soils. After the freeze-thaw cycle tests, the KMP stabilized soils display much lower leachability, mass loss, and strength loss. These results are assessed based on the chemical speciation of Zn and Pb, and pore size distribution of the soils. Overall, this study demonstrates that the KMP stabilized heavy metal-contaminated soils perform well under the freeze-thaw conditions. PMID:26257120

  2. Effects of freeze-thaw on characteristics of new KMP binder stabilized Zn- and Pb-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ming-Li; Du, Yan-Jun; Reddy, Krishna R; Wu, Hao-Liang

    2015-12-01

    For viable and sustainable reuse of solidified/stabilized heavy metal-contaminated soils as roadway subgrade materials, long-term durability of these soils should be ensured. A new binder, KMP, has been developed for solidifying/stabilizing soils contaminated with high concentrations of heavy metals. However, the effects of long-term extreme weather conditions including freeze and thaw on the leachability and strength of the KMP stabilized contaminated soils have not been investigated. This study presents a systematic investigation on the impacts of freeze-thaw cycle on leachability, strength, and microstructural characteristics of the KMP stabilized soils spiked with Zn and Pb individually and together. For comparison purpose, Portland cement is also tested as a conventional binder. Several series of tests are conducted including the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP), modified European Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) sequential extraction procedure, unconfined compression test (UCT), and mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP). The results demonstrate that the freeze-thaw cycles have much less impact on the leachability and strength of the KMP stabilized soils as compared to the PC stabilized soils. After the freeze-thaw cycle tests, the KMP stabilized soils display much lower leachability, mass loss, and strength loss. These results are assessed based on the chemical speciation of Zn and Pb, and pore size distribution of the soils. Overall, this study demonstrates that the KMP stabilized heavy metal-contaminated soils perform well under the freeze-thaw conditions.

  3. Experimental aeroelasticity in wind tunnels - History, status, and future in brief

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricketts, Rodney H.

    1993-01-01

    The state of the art of experimental aeroelasticity in the United States is assessed. A brief history of the development of ground test facilities, apparatus, and testing methods is presented. Several experimental programs are described that were previously conducted and helped to improve the state of the art. Some specific future directions for improving and enhancing experimental aeroelasticity are suggested.

  4. Characteristics, stability and outcomes of the 2011 GOLD COPD groups in the ECLIPSE cohort.

    PubMed

    Agusti, Alvar; Edwards, Lisa D; Celli, Bartolomé; Macnee, William; Calverley, Peter M A; Müllerova, Hana; Lomas, David A; Wouters, Emiel; Bakke, Per; Rennard, Steve; Crim, Courtney; Miller, Bruce E; Coxson, Harvey O; Yates, Julie C; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Vestbo, Jørgen

    2013-09-01

    The 2011 Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) classifies patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) into four groups (A to D). We explored the characteristics, stability and relationship to outcomes of these groups within the ECLIPSE study (Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate End-points) (n = 2101). Main results showed that: 1) these groups differed in several clinical, functional, imaging and biological characteristics in addition to those used for their own definition; 2) A and D groups were relatively stable over time, whereas groups B and C showed more temporal variability; 3) the risk of exacerbation over 3 years increased progressively from A to D, whereas that of hospitalisation and mortality were lowest in A, highest in D and intermediate and similar in B and C, despite the former having milder airflow limitation. The prevalence of comorbidities and persistent systemic inflammation were highest in group B. The different longitudinal behaviour of group A versus B and C versus D (each pair with similar forced expiratory volume in1 s (FEV1) values supports the 2011 GOLD proposal of assessing COPD patients by more than FEV1 only. However the assumption that symptoms do not equate to risk appears to be naïve, as groups B and C carry equally poor clinical outcomes, though for different reasons. PMID:23766334

  5. Quality Characteristics, Nutraceutical Profile, and Storage Stability of Aloe Gel-Papaya Functional Beverage Blend.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Pushkala; Nagarajan, Srividya

    2014-01-01

    Aloe vera gel, well known for its nutraceutical potential, is being explored as a functional ingredient in a wide array of health foods and drinks. Processing of exotic fruits and herbal botanicals into functional beverage is an emerging sector in food industry. The present study was undertaken to develop a spiced functional RTS beverage blend using Aloe gel (AG) and papaya. Aloe gel (30%), papaya pulp (15%), spice extract (5%), and citric acid (0.1%) were mixed in given proportion to prepare the blend with TSS of 15 °Brix. The product was bottled, pasteurized, and stored at room temperature. The quality characteristics and storage stability of the spiced beverage blend (SAGPB) were compared with spiced papaya RTS beverage (SPB). Periodic analysis was carried out up to five months for various physicochemical parameters, sugar profile, bioactive compounds, microbial quality, instrumental color, and sensory acceptability. The SAGPB exhibited superior quality characteristics compared to SPB both in fresh and in stored samples. The SPB was acceptable up to four months and SAGPB for five months. The results indicate that nutraceutical rich AG could be successfully utilized to develop functional fruit beverages with improved quality and shelf life. PMID:26904652

  6. Quality Characteristics, Nutraceutical Profile, and Storage Stability of Aloe Gel-Papaya Functional Beverage Blend

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Pushkala; Nagarajan, Srividya

    2014-01-01

    Aloe vera gel, well known for its nutraceutical potential, is being explored as a functional ingredient in a wide array of health foods and drinks. Processing of exotic fruits and herbal botanicals into functional beverage is an emerging sector in food industry. The present study was undertaken to develop a spiced functional RTS beverage blend using Aloe gel (AG) and papaya. Aloe gel (30%), papaya pulp (15%), spice extract (5%), and citric acid (0.1%) were mixed in given proportion to prepare the blend with TSS of 15 °Brix. The product was bottled, pasteurized, and stored at room temperature. The quality characteristics and storage stability of the spiced beverage blend (SAGPB) were compared with spiced papaya RTS beverage (SPB). Periodic analysis was carried out up to five months for various physicochemical parameters, sugar profile, bioactive compounds, microbial quality, instrumental color, and sensory acceptability. The SAGPB exhibited superior quality characteristics compared to SPB both in fresh and in stored samples. The SPB was acceptable up to four months and SAGPB for five months. The results indicate that nutraceutical rich AG could be successfully utilized to develop functional fruit beverages with improved quality and shelf life. PMID:26904652

  7. Electrical characteristics and stability of gold and palladium Schottky contacts on ZnO nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klason, P.; Nur, O.; Willander, M.

    2008-11-01

    The electrical characteristics and stability of Pd and Au Schottky contacts on ZnO nanorods grown on glass substrate have been investigated. The nanorods were grown using the aqueous chemical growth method. The nanorods were characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD) and photoluminescence (PL). Prior to the metal contact deposition, an insulating PMMA layer was deposited between the nanorods. The best-produced Schottky contact was an as-deposited Pd/ZnO contact with an ideality factor of 1.74 ± 0.43 and a barrier height of 0.67 ± 0.09 eV. The relatively high ideality factor indicates that the current transport cannot be described by pure thermionic transport. The presence of surface states due to the high evaporation pressure is probably the reason for the high ideality factor. Post metal deposition annealing at 150 °C for 30 min in air lowered the barrier height and decreased the Au/ZnO ideality factor but increased it for Pd/ZnO. The current follows ohmic behavior when the applied forward bias, Vforward, is lower than 0.1 V, whereas for Vforward between 0.1 and 0.45 V the current follows I~exp(cV), and at higher forward biases the current-voltage characteristics follow the relation I~V2, indicating that the space-charge current-limiting mechanism is dominating the current transport.

  8. Combustion Stability Characteristics of the Project Morpheus Liquid Oxygen/Liquid Methane Main Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, J. C.; Morehead, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    The Project Morpheus liquid oxygen (LOX) / liquid methane rocket engines demonstrated acousticcoupled combustion instabilities during sea-level ground-based testing at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) and Stennis Space Center (SSC). High-amplitude, 1T, 1R, 1T1R (and higher order) modes appear to be triggered by injector conditions. The instability occurred during the Morpheus-specific engine ignition/start sequence, and did demonstrate the capability to propagate into mainstage. However, the instability was never observed to initiate during mainstage, even at low power levels. The Morpheus main engine is a JSC-designed 5,000 lbf-thrust, 4:1 throttling, pressure-fed cryogenic engine using an impinging element injector design. Two different engine designs, named HD4 and HD5, and two different builds of the HD4 engine all demonstrated similar instability characteristics. Through the analysis of more than 200 hot fire tests on the Morpheus vehicle and SSC test stand, a relationship between ignition stability and injector/chamber pressure was developed. The instability has the distinct characteristic of initiating at high relative injection pressure drop (dP) at low chamber pressure (Pc); i.e., instabilities initiated at high dP/Pc at low Pc during the start sequence. The high dP/Pc during start results during the injector /chamber chill-in, and is enhanced by hydraulic flip in the injector orifice elements. Because of the fixed mixture ratio of the existing engine design (the main valves share a common actuator), it is not currently possible to determine if LOX or methane injector dP/Pc were individual contributors (i.e., LOX and methane dP/Pc typically trend in the same direction within a given test). The instability demonstrated initiation characteristic of starting at or shortly after methane injector chillin. Colder methane (e.g., sub-cooled) at the injector inlet prior to engine start was much more likely to result in an instability. A secondary effect of LOX

  9. Navier-Stokes Simulation of the Canard-Wing-Body Longitudinal Dynamic Stability Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tu, Eugene L.; VanDalsem, William R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Many modern aircraft are canard-configured for aircraft control and improved aerodynamic performance. Canards can often enhance aircraft cruise performance, maneuverability and agility. For close-coupled canard configurations, the aerodynamic interaction between the canard and wing significantly changes the flow characteristics of the wing. In unsteady flow, such changes in the flow structure and performance of wings can be quite pronounced. Accurate modeling of the unsteady aerodynamics is essential for potential CFD design and analysis of such configurations. A time-accurate numerical simulation is performed to study the unsteady aerodynamic interaction between a canard and wing with emphasis on the effects of the canard on the configuration's dynamic response characteristics. The thin-layer Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes Equations with various turbulence models are used in this study. Computations are made on a generic, analytically-defined, close-coupled canard-wing-body configuration which has been the subject of numerous previously published experimental studies during the 1970's to mid-80's. More recently, a series of steady-flow simulations has been performed and published by the author. In the current study, the configuration is given prescribed ramp and oscillatory motions in order to predict characteristics such as the damping-in-pitch and oscillatory longitudinal stability parameters. The current computations are made at high-subsonic and transonic Mach numbers, moderate angles-of- attack from -4 to 20 degrees, and at various pitch rates and reduced frequencies. Comparisons of pressures and integrated force quantities (e.g. lift, drag, pitching moment and selected dynamic parameters) are made with other published computational results and available experimental data. Results showing the unsteady effects of the canard on surface pressures, integrated forces, canard-wing vortex interaction and vortex breakdown will be presented.

  10. Soil Pore Characteristics, an Underappreciated Regulatory Factor in GHGs Emission and C Stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toosi, E. R.; Yu, J.; Doane, T. A.; Guber, A.; Rivers, M. L.; Marsh, T. L.; Ali, K.; Kravchenko, A. N.

    2015-12-01

    Enduring challenges in understanding soil organic matter (SOM) stability and emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs) from soil stem from complexities of soil processes, many of which occur at micro-scales. The goal of this study is to evaluate the interactive effects soil pore characteristics, soil moisture levels, inherent SOM levels and properties, and substrate quality, on GHGs emission, and accelerated decomposition of native SOM following addition of fresh substrate i.e. priming. Our core hypothesis is that soil pore characteristics play a major role as a mediator in (i) the decomposition of organic matter regardless of its source (i.e. litter vs. native SOM) or substrate quality, as well as in (ii) GHGs emissions. Samples with prevalence of small (<10 μm) vs. large (>30 μm) pores were prepared from soils with similar properties but under long-term contrasting management. The samples were incubated (110 d) at low and optimum soil moisture conditions after addition of high quality (13C-soybean) and low quality (13C-corn) substrate. Headspace gas was analyzed for 13C-CO2 and GHGs on a regularly basis (day 1, 3, 7, 14, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72, 90, and 110). Selected samples were scanned at the early stage of decomposition (7, 14, 24 d) at 2-6 μm resolutions using X-ray computed μ tomography in order to: (1) quantify soil pore characteristics; (2) visualize and quantify distribution of soil moisture within samples of different pore characteristics; and (3) to visualize and measure losses of decomposing plant residue. Initial findings indicate that, consistent with our hypotheses, pore characteristics influenced GHGs emission, and intensity and pattern of plant residue decomposition. The importance of pores was highly pronounced in presence of added plant residue where greater N2O emission occurred in samples with dominant large pores, in contrast to CO2. Further findings will be discussed upon completion of the study and analysis of the results.

  11. Recent Applications of Higher-Order Spectral Analysis to Nonlinear Aeroelastic Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Hajj, Muhammad R.; Dunn, Shane; Strganac, Thomas W.; Powers, Edward J.; Stearman, Ronald

    2005-01-01

    Recent applications of higher-order spectral (HOS) methods to nonlinear aeroelastic phenomena are presented. Applications include the analysis of data from a simulated nonlinear pitch and plunge apparatus and from F-18 flight flutter tests. A MATLAB model of the Texas A&MUniversity s Nonlinear Aeroelastic Testbed Apparatus (NATA) is used to generate aeroelastic transients at various conditions including limit cycle oscillations (LCO). The Gaussian or non-Gaussian nature of the transients is investigated, related to HOS methods, and used to identify levels of increasing nonlinear aeroelastic response. Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) F/A-18 flight flutter test data is presented and analyzed. The data includes high-quality measurements of forced responses and LCO phenomena. Standard power spectral density (PSD) techniques and HOS methods are applied to the data and presented. The goal of this research is to develop methods that can identify the onset of nonlinear aeroelastic phenomena, such as LCO, during flutter testing.

  12. Past, Present, and Future Capabilities of the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel from an Aeroelasticity Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Stanley R.; Garcia, Jerry L.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) has provided a unique capability for aeroelastic testing for forty years. The facility has a rich history of significant contributions to the design of many United States commercial transports, military aircraft, launch vehicles, and spacecraft. The facility has many features that contribute to its uniqueness for aeroelasticity testing, perhaps the most important feature being the use of a heavy gas test medium to achieve higher test densities. Higher test medium densities substantially improve model-building requirements and therefore simplify the fabrication process for building aeroelastically scaled wind tunnel models. Aeroelastic scaling for the heavy gas results in lower model structural frequencies. Lower model frequencies tend to a make aeroelastic testing safer. This paper will describe major developments in the testing capabilities at the TDT throughout its history, the current status of the facility, and planned additions and improvements to its capabilities in the near future.

  13. A Review of Recent Aeroelastic Analysis Methods for Propulsion at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.; Bakhle, Milind A.; Srivastava, R.; Mehmed, Oral; Stefko, George L.

    1993-01-01

    This report reviews aeroelastic analyses for propulsion components (propfans, compressors and turbines) being developed and used at NASA LeRC. These aeroelastic analyses include both structural and aerodynamic models. The structural models include a typical section, a beam (with and without disk flexibility), and a finite-element blade model (with plate bending elements). The aerodynamic models are based on the solution of equations ranging from the two-dimensional linear potential equation to the three-dimensional Euler equations for multibladed configurations. Typical calculated results are presented for each aeroelastic model. Suggestions for further research are made. Many of the currently available aeroelastic models and analysis methods are being incorporated in a unified computer program, APPLE (Aeroelasticity Program for Propulsion at LEwis).

  14. Aeroelastic Tailoring of Transport Aircraft Wings: State-of-the-Art and Potential Enabling Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jutte, Christine; Stanford, Bret K.

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides a brief overview of the state-of-the-art for aeroelastic tailoring of subsonic transport aircraft and offers additional resources on related research efforts. Emphasis is placed on aircraft having straight or aft swept wings. The literature covers computational synthesis tools developed for aeroelastic tailoring and numerous design studies focused on discovering new methods for passive aeroelastic control. Several new structural and material technologies are presented as potential enablers of aeroelastic tailoring, including selectively reinforced materials, functionally graded materials, fiber tow steered composite laminates, and various nonconventional structural designs. In addition, smart materials and structures whose properties or configurations change in response to external stimuli are presented as potential active approaches to aeroelastic tailoring.

  15. Aeroelasticity at the NASA Langley Research Center Recent progress, new challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    Recent progress in aeroelasticity, particularly at the NASA Langley Research Center is reviewed to look at the questions answered and questions raised, and to attempt to define appropriate research emphasis needed in the near future and beyond. The paper is focused primarily on the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) Program because Langley is the lead NASA center for aerospace structures research, and essentially is the only one working in depth in the area of aeroelasticity. Historical trends in aeroelasticity are reviewed broadly in terms of technology and staffing particularly at the LaRC. Then, selected studies of the Loads and Aeroelasticity Division at LaRC and others over the past three years are presented with attention paid to unresolved questions. Finally, based on the results of these studies and on perceptions of design trends and aircraft operational requirements, future research needs in aeroelasticity are discussed.

  16. A review of recent aeroelastic analysis methods for propulsion at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.; Bakhle, Milind A.; Srivastava, R.; Mehmed, Oral; Stefko, George L.

    1993-09-01

    This report reviews aeroelastic analyses for propulsion components (propfans, compressors and turbines) being developed and used at NASA LeRC. These aeroelastic analyses include both structural and aerodynamic models. The structural models include a typical section, a beam (with and without disk flexibility), and a finite-element blade model (with plate bending elements). The aerodynamic models are based on the solution of equations ranging from the two-dimensional linear potential equation to the three-dimensional Euler equations for multibladed configurations. Typical calculated results are presented for each aeroelastic model. Suggestions for further research are made. Many of the currently available aeroelastic models and analysis methods are being incorporated in a unified computer program, APPLE (Aeroelasticity Program for Propulsion at LEwis).

  17. Rotorcraft aeromechanical stability-methodology assessment. Phase 2: Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bousman, William G.

    1990-01-01

    Helicopter rotor aeroelastic and aeromechanical stability predictions for four data sets were made using industry and government stability analyses and compared with data at a workshop held at Ames Research Center, August 2-3, 1988. The present report contains the workshop comparisons.

  18. Comparative thermal stability characteristics and isothermal oxidation behavior of an aluminized and a Pt-aluminized Ni-base superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Tawancy, H.M.; Sridhar, N.; Abbas, N.M.; Rickerby, D.

    1995-11-01

    It is the objective of this paper to compare the thermal stability characteristics and isothermal oxidation behavior of an aluminide coating and a Pt-aluminide coating of the same Al content on a Ni-base superalloy. Addition of Pt to an aluminide coating was found to improve its thermal stability as well as its capability for selective oxidation of Al resulting in a purer scale of slower growth rate. This was correlated with the greater diffusional stability of the Pt-aluminide coating restricting the transport of substrate elements into the outer coating layers.

  19. Methods Used in the NACA Tank for the Investigation of the Longitudinal-Stability Characteristics of Models of Flying Boats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Roland E; Land, Norman S

    1943-01-01

    Report presents the results of tests of longitudinal stability characteristics of models of several flying boats conducted in the NACA Tank No. 1. These investigations were made for the purpose of (1) determining suitable methods for evaluating the stability characteristics of models of flying boats, and (2) determining the design parameters which have an important effect on the porpoising. This report is mainly concerned with the construction of suitable models, the apparatus, and methods used in the tests. The effect of changes in some design parameters is discussed.

  20. Combustion Stability Characteristics of the Project Morpheus Liquid Oxygen / Liquid Methane Main Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, John C.; Morehead, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    The project Morpheus liquid oxygen (LOX) / liquid methane (LCH4) main engine is a Johnson Space Center (JSC) designed 5,000 lbf-thrust, 4:1 throttling, pressure-fed cryogenic engine using an impinging element injector design. The engine met or exceeded all performance requirements without experiencing any in- ight failures, but the engine exhibited acoustic-coupled combustion instabilities during sea-level ground-based testing. First tangential (1T), rst radial (1R), 1T1R, and higher order modes were triggered by conditions during the Morpheus vehicle derived low chamber pressure startup sequence. The instability was never observed to initiate during mainstage, even at low power levels. Ground-interaction acoustics aggravated the instability in vehicle tests. Analysis of more than 200 hot re tests on the Morpheus vehicle and Stennis Space Center (SSC) test stand showed a relationship between ignition stability and injector/chamber pressure. The instability had the distinct characteristic of initiating at high relative injection pressure drop at low chamber pressure during the start sequence. Data analysis suggests that the two-phase density during engine start results in a high injection velocity, possibly triggering the instabilities predicted by the Hewitt stability curves. Engine ignition instability was successfully mitigated via a higher-chamber pressure start sequence (e.g., 50% power level vs 30%) and operational propellant start temperature limits that maintained \\cold LOX" and \\warm methane" at the engine inlet. The main engine successfully demonstrated 4:1 throttling without chugging during mainstage, but chug instabilities were observed during some engine shutdown sequences at low injector pressure drop, especially during vehicle landing.

  1. Electrical characteristics and stability of gold and palladium Schottky contacts on ZnO nanorods.

    PubMed

    Klason, P; Nur, O; Willander, M

    2008-11-26

    The electrical characteristics and stability of Pd and Au Schottky contacts on ZnO nanorods grown on glass substrate have been investigated. The nanorods were grown using the aqueous chemical growth method. The nanorods were characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD) and photoluminescence (PL). Prior to the metal contact deposition, an insulating PMMA layer was deposited between the nanorods. The best-produced Schottky contact was an as-deposited Pd/ZnO contact with an ideality factor of 1.74 ± 0.43 and a barrier height of 0.67 ± 0.09 eV. The relatively high ideality factor indicates that the current transport cannot be described by pure thermionic transport. The presence of surface states due to the high evaporation pressure is probably the reason for the high ideality factor. Post metal deposition annealing at 150 °C for 30 min in air lowered the barrier height and decreased the Au/ZnO ideality factor but increased it for Pd/ZnO. The current follows ohmic behavior when the applied forward bias, V(forward), is lower than 0.1 V, whereas for V(forward) between 0.1 and 0.45 V the current follows I∼exp(cV), and at higher forward biases the current-voltage characteristics follow the relation I∼V(2), indicating that the space-charge current-limiting mechanism is dominating the current transport. PMID:21836267

  2. Aeroelastically deflecting flaps for shock/boundary-layer interaction control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gefroh, D.; Loth, E.; Dutton, C.; Hafenrichter, E.

    2003-06-01

    An aeroelastic mesoflap system has been developed to improve the downstream flow properties of an oblique shock/boundary-layer interaction. The mesoflap system employs a set of small flaps over a cavity, whereby the flaps downstream of the interaction bend downward aeroelastically to bleed the flow and the upstream flaps bend upward to re-inject this same mass flow upstream. This recirculating system requires no net mass bleed and therefore has advantages for boundary layer control in external or mixed-compression supersonic aircraft inlets. In addition, the system may be applicable in other aerospace applications where boundary-layer control can help remedy the adverse effects of shock interactions. Several mesoflap systems have been fabricated and examined experimentally to investigate their aerodynamic and structural performance. Each mesoflap is rigidly attached to a spar on its upstream end while the remainder of the flap is free to deflect aeroelastically. The flap length is nominally a few boundary-layer thicknesses in dimension, while the flap thickness is small enough to allow tip deflections that are of the order of the boundary-layer momentum thickness. Experiments were conducted for a Mach 2.41 impinging oblique shock wave interaction with a turbulent boundary layer. Spanwise-centered laser Doppler velocimeter measurements indicate that certain mesoflap designs can show significant flow improvement as compared to the solid-wall case, including increased stagnation pressure recovery and a 7% reduction in boundary layer thickness and sonic thickness. However, one drawback of the mesoflap system is the potential for fatigue, which in some cases led to microcracking followed by flap failure. Structural design improvements to alleviate and avoid this problem included a lower profile spar design, substitution of Nitinol for aluminum as the flap material, and use of stress-relieving holes at the ends of the flap cut-outs.

  3. Effect of phase stability degradation of bismuth on sensor characteristics of nano-bismuth fixed electrode.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gyoung-Ja; Kim, Chang Kyu; Lee, Min Ku; Rhee, Chang Kyu

    2010-12-15

    Effect of phase stability degradation of bismuth on sensor characteristics of nano-bismuth fixed electrode has been investigated using square-wave anodic stripping voltammetry technique, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy. From the analyses of square-wave anodic stripping voltammograms (SWASV) repetitively measured on the nano-bismuth fixed electrode, it was found that the oxidation peak currents dropped by 81%, 68% and 59% for zinc, cadmium and lead, respectively, after the 100th measurement (about 400 min of operation time). The sphere bismuth nanoparticles gradually changed to the agglomerates with petal shape as the operation time increased. From the analyses of SEM images and XRD patterns, it is confirmed that the oxidation of Bi into BiOCl/Bi(2)O(2)CO(3) and the agglomeration of bismuth nanoparticles caused by the phase change decrease a reproducibility of the stripping voltammetric response. Moreover, most of the bismuth becomes BiOCl at pH 3.0 and bismuth hydroxide, Bi(OH)(3) at pH 7.0, which results in a significant decrease in sensitivity of the nano-bismuth fixed electrode.

  4. Subsonic, transonic, and supersonic stability and control characteristics of the -147B space shuttle orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennell, R. C.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations were conducted on 0.015 scale representations of two Space Shuttle Orbiter configurations in a trisonic wind tunnel from June 20, 1973 to June 30, 1973. The primary test objective was to define subsonic, transonic, and supersonic stability and control characteristics of the -147B Orbiter. Six-component aerodynamic force and moment data for the -147B Orbiter were recorded over an angle of attack range of -2 deg to 30 deg at Mach numbers of 0.6, 0.9, 1.2, 2.0, and 3.0. Reynolds numbers of 5.0, 7.0, 8.0, and 9.0 x 100000 6/ft were tested at Mach numbers less than 2.0 while testing at Mach 2.0 and 3.0 was conducted at a Reynolds number of 11.0 x 100000/ft. Eleven deflections of 0 deg, +15 deg, -20, deg and -40 deg; body flap deflections of 0 deg, +13.75 deg and -14.25 deg; and rudder flare angles of 24.92 deg and 54.92 deg were tested on the -147B Orbiter over the entire Mach number range. Testing of the -139B Orbiter was for data verification and configuration comparison purposes only.

  5. Stability of active mantle upwelling revealed by net characteristics of plate tectonics.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Clinton P; Steinberger, Bernhard; Torsvik, Trond H

    2013-06-27

    Viscous convection within the mantle is linked to tectonic plate motions and deforms Earth's surface across wide areas. Such close links between surface geology and deep mantle dynamics presumably operated throughout Earth's history, but are difficult to investigate for past times because the history of mantle flow is poorly known. Here we show that the time dependence of global-scale mantle flow can be deduced from the net behaviour of surface plate motions. In particular, we tracked the geographic locations of net convergence and divergence for harmonic degrees 1 and 2 by computing the dipole and quadrupole moments of plate motions from tectonic reconstructions extended back to the early Mesozoic era. For present-day plate motions, we find dipole convergence in eastern Asia and quadrupole divergence in both central Africa and the central Pacific. These orientations are nearly identical to the dipole and quadrupole orientations of underlying mantle flow, which indicates that these 'net characteristics' of plate motions reveal deeper flow patterns. The positions of quadrupole divergence have not moved significantly during the past 250 million years, which suggests long-term stability of mantle upwelling beneath Africa and the Pacific Ocean. These upwelling locations are positioned above two compositionally and seismologically distinct regions of the lowermost mantle, which may organize global mantle flow as they remain stationary over geologic time. PMID:23803848

  6. Stability of active mantle upwelling revealed by net characteristics of plate tectonics.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Clinton P; Steinberger, Bernhard; Torsvik, Trond H

    2013-06-27

    Viscous convection within the mantle is linked to tectonic plate motions and deforms Earth's surface across wide areas. Such close links between surface geology and deep mantle dynamics presumably operated throughout Earth's history, but are difficult to investigate for past times because the history of mantle flow is poorly known. Here we show that the time dependence of global-scale mantle flow can be deduced from the net behaviour of surface plate motions. In particular, we tracked the geographic locations of net convergence and divergence for harmonic degrees 1 and 2 by computing the dipole and quadrupole moments of plate motions from tectonic reconstructions extended back to the early Mesozoic era. For present-day plate motions, we find dipole convergence in eastern Asia and quadrupole divergence in both central Africa and the central Pacific. These orientations are nearly identical to the dipole and quadrupole orientations of underlying mantle flow, which indicates that these 'net characteristics' of plate motions reveal deeper flow patterns. The positions of quadrupole divergence have not moved significantly during the past 250 million years, which suggests long-term stability of mantle upwelling beneath Africa and the Pacific Ocean. These upwelling locations are positioned above two compositionally and seismologically distinct regions of the lowermost mantle, which may organize global mantle flow as they remain stationary over geologic time.

  7. NRT Rotor Structural / Aeroelastic Analysis for the Preliminary Design Review

    SciTech Connect

    Ennis, Brandon Lee; Paquette, Joshua A.

    2015-10-01

    This document describes the initial structural design for the National Rotor Testbed blade as presented during the preliminary design review at Sandia National Laboratories on October 28- 29, 2015. The document summarizes the structural and aeroelastic requirements placed on the NRT rotor for satisfactory deployment at the DOE/SNL SWiFT experimental facility to produce high-quality datasets for wind turbine model validation. The method and result of the NRT blade structural optimization is also presented within this report, along with analysis of its satisfaction of the design requirements.

  8. Aeroelastic Analysis of Aircraft: Wing and Wing/Fuselage Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, H. H.; Chang, K. C.; Tzong, T.; Cebeci, T.

    1997-01-01

    A previously developed interface method for coupling aerodynamics and structures is used to evaluate the aeroelastic effects for an advanced transport wing at cruise and under-cruise conditions. The calculated results are compared with wind tunnel test data. The capability of the interface method is also investigated for an MD-90 wing/fuselage configuration. In addition, an aircraft trim analysis is described and applied to wing configurations. The accuracy of turbulence models based on the algebraic eddy viscosity formulation of Cebeci and Smith is studied for airfoil flows at low Mach numbers by using methods based on the solutions of the boundary-layer and Navier-Stokes equations.

  9. Aeroelastic Tailoring of Transport Wings Including Transonic Flutter Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, Bret K.; Wieseman, Carol D.; Jutte, Christine V.

    2015-01-01

    Several minimum-mass optimization problems are solved to evaluate the effectiveness of a variety of novel tailoring schemes for subsonic transport wings. Aeroelastic stress and panel buckling constraints are imposed across several trimmed static maneuver loads, in addition to a transonic flutter margin constraint, captured with aerodynamic influence coefficient-based tools. Tailoring with metallic thickness variations, functionally graded materials, balanced or unbalanced composite laminates, curvilinear tow steering, and distributed trailing edge control effectors are all found to provide reductions in structural wing mass with varying degrees of success. The question as to whether this wing mass reduction will offset the increased manufacturing cost is left unresolved for each case.

  10. Some experiences with active control of aeroelastic response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, J. R.; Abel, I.

    1981-01-01

    Flight and wind tunnel tests were conducted and multidiscipline computer programs were developed as part of investigations of active control technology conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center. Unsteady aerodynamics approximation, optimal control theory, optimal controller design, and the Delta wing and DC-10 models are described. The drones for aerodynamics and structural testing (DAST program) for evaluating procedures for aerodynamic loads prediction and the design of active control systems on wings with significant aeroelastic effects is described as well as the DAST model used in the wind tunnel tests.

  11. Aeroelastic Wing Shaping Control Subject to Actuation Constraints.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swei, Sean Shan-Min; Nguyen, Nhan

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers the control of coupled aeroelastic aircraft model which is configured with Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap (VCCTEF) system. The relative deflection between two adjacent flaps is constrained and this actuation constraint is accounted for when designing an effective control law for suppressing the wing vibration. A simple tuned-mass damper mechanism with two attached masses is used as an example to demonstrate the effectiveness of vibration suppression with confined motion of tuned masses. In this paper, a dynamic inversion based pseudo-control hedging (PCH) and bounded control approach is investigated, and for illustration, it is applied to the NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM) configured with VCCTEF system.

  12. Effect of carbonation on leachability, strength and microstructural characteristics of KMP binder stabilized Zn and Pb contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Du, Yan-Jun; Wei, Ming-Li; Reddy, Krishna R; Wu, Hao-liang

    2016-02-01

    This study presents a systematic investigation of effects of carbonation on the contaminant leachability and unconfined compressive strength of KMP stabilized contaminated soils. A field soil spiked with Zn and Pb individually and together is stabilized using a new KMP additive under standard curing conditions and also with carbonation. The KMP additive is composed of oxalic acid-activated phosphate rock, monopotassium phosphate and reactive magnesia. The stabilized soils are tested for acid neutralization capacity, toxic characteristics leaching characteristics, contaminant speciation and unconfined compression strength. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive spectroscopy analyses are performed to assess reaction products. The results demonstrate that carbonation increases both acid buffer capacity index and unconfined compressive strength, but decreases leachability of KMP stabilized soils. These results are interpreted based on the changes in chemical speciation of Zn and Pb and also stability and solubility of the reaction products (metal phosphates and carbonates) formed in the soils. Overall, this study demonstrates that carbonation has positive effects on leachability and strength of the KMP stabilized soils.

  13. Effect of carbonation on leachability, strength and microstructural characteristics of KMP binder stabilized Zn and Pb contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Du, Yan-Jun; Wei, Ming-Li; Reddy, Krishna R; Wu, Hao-liang

    2016-02-01

    This study presents a systematic investigation of effects of carbonation on the contaminant leachability and unconfined compressive strength of KMP stabilized contaminated soils. A field soil spiked with Zn and Pb individually and together is stabilized using a new KMP additive under standard curing conditions and also with carbonation. The KMP additive is composed of oxalic acid-activated phosphate rock, monopotassium phosphate and reactive magnesia. The stabilized soils are tested for acid neutralization capacity, toxic characteristics leaching characteristics, contaminant speciation and unconfined compression strength. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive spectroscopy analyses are performed to assess reaction products. The results demonstrate that carbonation increases both acid buffer capacity index and unconfined compressive strength, but decreases leachability of KMP stabilized soils. These results are interpreted based on the changes in chemical speciation of Zn and Pb and also stability and solubility of the reaction products (metal phosphates and carbonates) formed in the soils. Overall, this study demonstrates that carbonation has positive effects on leachability and strength of the KMP stabilized soils. PMID:26451653

  14. A Quasi-Steady Flexible Launch Vehicle Stability Analysis Using Steady CFD with Unsteady Aerodynamic Enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    Launch vehicles frequently experience a reduced stability margin through the transonic Mach number range. This reduced stability margin is caused by an undamping of the aerodynamics in one of the lower frequency flexible or rigid body modes. Analysis of the behavior of a flexible vehicle is routinely performed with quasi-steady aerodynamic lineloads derived from steady rigid computational fluid dynamics (CFD). However, a quasi-steady aeroelastic stability analysis can be unconservative at the critical Mach numbers where experiment or unsteady computational aeroelastic (CAE) analysis show a reduced or even negative aerodynamic damping. This paper will present a method of enhancing the quasi-steady aeroelastic stability analysis of a launch vehicle with unsteady aerodynamics. The enhanced formulation uses unsteady CFD to compute the response of selected lower frequency modes. The response is contained in a time history of the vehicle lineloads. A proper orthogonal decomposition of the unsteady aerodynamic lineload response is used to reduce the scale of data volume and system identification is used to derive the aerodynamic stiffness, damping and mass matrices. The results of the enhanced quasi-static aeroelastic stability analysis are compared with the damping and frequency computed from unsteady CAE analysis and from a quasi-steady analysis. The results show that incorporating unsteady aerodynamics in this way brings the enhanced quasi-steady aeroelastic stability analysis into close agreement with the unsteady CAE analysis.

  15. Free-flight investigation of the stability and control characteristics of a STOL model with an externally blown jet flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parlett, L. P.; Emerling, S. J.; Phelps, A. E., III

    1974-01-01

    The stability and control characteristics of a four-engine turbofan STOL transport model having an externally blown jet flap have been investigated by means of the flying-model technique in the Langley full-scale tunnel. The flight characteristics of the model were investigated under conditions of symmetric and asymmetric (one engine inoperative) thrust at lift coefficients up to 9.5 and 5.5, respectively. Static characteristics were studied by conventional power-on force tests over the flight-test angle-of-attack range including the stall. In addition to these tests, dynamic longitudinal and lateral stability calculations were performed for comparison with the flight-test results and for use in correlating the model results with STOL handling-qualities criteria.

  16. Application of constrained optimization to active control of aeroelastic response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, J. R.; Mukhopadhyay, V.

    1981-01-01

    Active control of aeroelastic response is a complex in which the designer usually tries to satisfy many criteria which are often conflicting. To further complicate the design problem, the state space equations describing this type of control problem are usually of high order, involving a large number of states to represent the flexible structure and unsteady aerodynamics. Control laws based on the standard Linear-Quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) method are of the same high order as the aeroelastic plant. To overcome this disadvantage of the LQG mode, an approach developed for designing low order optimal control laws which uses a nonlinear programming algorithm to search for the values of the control law variables that minimize a composite performance index, was extended to the constrained optimization problem. The method involves searching for the values of the control law variables that minimize a basic performance index while satisfying several inequality constraints that describe the design criteria. The method is applied to gust load alleviation of a drone aircraft.

  17. Bayesian analysis of the flutter margin method in aeroelasticity

    DOE PAGES

    Khalil, Mohammad; Poirel, Dominique; Sarkar, Abhijit

    2016-08-27

    A Bayesian statistical framework is presented for Zimmerman and Weissenburger flutter margin method which considers the uncertainties in aeroelastic modal parameters. The proposed methodology overcomes the limitations of the previously developed least-square based estimation technique which relies on the Gaussian approximation of the flutter margin probability density function (pdf). Using the measured free-decay responses at subcritical (preflutter) airspeeds, the joint non-Gaussain posterior pdf of the modal parameters is sampled using the Metropolis–Hastings (MH) Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm. The posterior MCMC samples of the modal parameters are then used to obtain the flutter margin pdfs and finally the fluttermore » speed pdf. The usefulness of the Bayesian flutter margin method is demonstrated using synthetic data generated from a two-degree-of-freedom pitch-plunge aeroelastic model. The robustness of the statistical framework is demonstrated using different sets of measurement data. In conclusion, it will be shown that the probabilistic (Bayesian) approach reduces the number of test points required in providing a flutter speed estimate for a given accuracy and precision.« less

  18. Aeroelastic behavior of twist-coupled HAWT blades

    SciTech Connect

    Lobitz, D.W.; Veers, P.S.

    1998-12-31

    As the technology for horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWT) development matures, more novel techniques are required for the capture of additional amounts of energy, alleviation of loads and control of the rotor. One such technique employs the use of an adaptive blade that could sense the wind velocity or rotational speed in some fashion and accordingly modify its aerodynamic configuration to meet a desired objective. This could be achieved in either an active or passive manner, although the passive approach is much more attractive due to its simplicity and economy. As an example, a blade design might employ coupling between bending and/or extension, and twisting so that, as it bends and extends due to the action of the aerodynamic and inertial loads, it also twists modifying the aerodynamic performance in some way. These performance modifications also have associated aeroelastic effects, including effects on aeroelastic instability. To address the scope and magnitude of these effects a tool has been developed for investigating classical flutter and divergence of HAWT blades. As a starting point, an adaptive version of the uniform Combined Experiment Blade will be investigated. Flutter and divergence airspeeds will be reported as a function of the strength of the coupling and also be compared to those of generic blade counterparts.

  19. Sensitivity analysis of aeroelastic response of a wing using piecewise pressure representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldred, Lloyd B.; Kapania, Rakesh K.; Barthelemy, Jean-Francois M.

    1993-04-01

    A sensitivity analysis scheme of the static aeroelastic response of a wing is developed, by incorporating a piecewise panel-based pressure representation into an existing wing aeroelastic model to improve the model's fidelity, including the sensitivity of the wing static aeroelastic response with respect to various shape parameters. The new formulation is quite general and accepts any aerodynamics and structural analysis capability. A program is developed which combines the local sensitivities, such as the sensitivity of the stiffness matrix or the aerodynamic kernel matrix, into global sensitivity derivatives.

  20. Spring water level stabilization and relationships between hydrologic, biologic, and fishery characteristics of TVA reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Yeager, B.L.; McDonough, T.A.; Taylor, J.

    1992-01-01

    Reservoir operations and annual variation in hydrology result in substantial fluctuations of water level within impoundments. Since the 1950s, TVA has attempted to stabilize tributary reservoir pool levels for a two-week period when water temperatures reach 65[degree]F at a depth of five feet. These conditions approximate the peak spawning season for largemouth bass, an important sport fish of the Tennessee River Valley. The current water level stabilization program was established to benefit largemouth bass. However, the benefits of the current spring stabilization procedures accrue, not to bass, but to another important sportfish, the white crappie. An earlier stabilization period would likely be of even greater benefit to white crappie. Phase-two of this project will provide a more detailed evaluation of the effects of timing and duration of spring water level stabilization and allow us to recommend specific optimizing modifications. Pending these recommendations, the water level stabilization program should continue as implemented.

  1. Experimental Investigation of Aeroelastic Deformation of Slender Wings at Supersonic Speeds Using a Video Model Deformation Measurement Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary E.

    2013-01-01

    A video-based photogrammetric model deformation system was established as a dedicated optical measurement technique at supersonic speeds in the NASA Langley Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. This system was used to measure the wing twist due to aerodynamic loads of two supersonic commercial transport airplane models with identical outer mold lines but different aeroelastic properties. One model featured wings with deflectable leading- and trailing-edge flaps and internal channels to accommodate static pressure tube instrumentation. The wings of the second model were of single-piece construction without flaps or internal channels. The testing was performed at Mach numbers from 1.6 to 2.7, unit Reynolds numbers of 1.0 million to 5.0 million, and angles of attack from -4 degrees to +10 degrees. The video model deformation system quantified the wing aeroelastic response to changes in the Mach number, Reynolds number concurrent with dynamic pressure, and angle of attack and effectively captured the differences in the wing twist characteristics between the two test articles.

  2. Aeroelastic considerations for torsionally soft rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantay, W. R.; Yeager, W. T., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A research study was initiated to systematically determine the impact of selected blade tip geometric parameters on conformable rotor performance and loads characteristics. The model articulated rotors included baseline and torsionally soft blades with interchangeable tips. Seven blade tip designs were evaluated on the baseline rotor and six tip designs were tested on the torsionally soft blades. The designs incorporated a systemmatic variation in geometric parameters including sweep, taper, and anhedral. The rotors were evaluated in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel at several advance ratios, lift and propulsive force values, and tip Mach numbers. A track sensitivity study was also conducted at several advance ratios for both rotors. Based on the test results, tip parameter variations generated significant rotor performance and loads differences for both baseline and torsionally soft blades. Azimuthal variation of elastic twist generated by variations in the tip parameters strongly correlated with rotor performance and loads, but the magnitude of advancing blade elastic twist did not. In addition, fixed system vibratory loads and rotor track for potential conformable rotor candidates appears very sensitive to parametric rotor changes.

  3. A Summary of Data and Findings from the First Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, David M.; Chwalowski, Pawel.; Heeg, Jennifer; Wieseman, Carol D.

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes data and findings from the first Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop (AePW) held in April, 2012. The workshop has been designed as a series of technical interchange meetings to assess the state of the art of computational methods for predicting unsteady flowfields and static and dynamic aeroelastic response. The goals are to provide an impartial forum to evaluate the effectiveness of existing computer codes and modeling techniques to simulate aeroelastic problems, and to identify computational and experimental areas needing additional research and development. For this initial workshop, three subject configurations have been chosen from existing wind tunnel data sets where there is pertinent experimental data available for comparison. Participant researchers analyzed one or more of the subject configurations and results from all of these computations were compared at the workshop. Keywords: Unsteady Aerodynamics, Aeroelasticity, Computational Fluid Dynamics, Transonic Flow, Separated Flow.

  4. Nastran level 16 theoretical manual updates for aeroelastic analysis of bladed discs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elchuri, V.; Smith, G. C. C.

    1980-01-01

    A computer program based on state of the art compressor and structural technologies applied to bladed shrouded disc was developed and made operational in NASTRAN Level 16. Aeroelastic analyses, modes and flutter. Theoretical manual updates are included.

  5. Refined methods of aeroelastic analysis and optimization. [swept wings, propeller theory, and subsonic flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashley, H.

    1984-01-01

    Graduate research activity in the following areas is reported: the divergence of laminated composite lifting surfaces, subsonic propeller theory and aeroelastic analysis, and cross sectional resonances in wind tunnels.

  6. Aeroelastic and dynamic finite element analyses of a bladder shrouded disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. C. C.; Elchuri, V.

    1980-01-01

    The delivery and demonstration of a computer program for the analysis of aeroelastic and dynamic properties is reported. Approaches to flutter and forced vibration of mistuned discs, and transient aerothermoelasticity are described.

  7. Studies in tilt-rotor VTOL aircraft aeroelasticity, volume 1. Ph.D. Thesis - Case Western Reserve Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvaternik, R. G.

    1973-01-01

    Aeroelastic and dynamic studies which complement and extend various aspects of technology applicable to tilt-rotor VTOL aircraft are discussed. Particular attention is given to proprotor/pylon whirl instability, a precession-type instability akin to propeller/nacelle whirl flutter. The blade flapping and pitch-change freedoms of a proprotor are shown to lead to a fundamentally different situation as regards the manner in which the precession-generated aerodynamic forces and moments act on the pylon and induce whirl flutter relative to that of a propeller. The implication of these forces and moments with regard to their capacity for instigating a whirl instability is examined, demonstrating why a proprotor can exhibit whirl flutter in either the backward or forward directions in contrast to a propeller which is found to always whirl in the backward direction. Analytical trend studies delineating the effect of several system design parameters on proprotor/pylon stability and response are shown.

  8. Thermal stability and separation characteristics of anti-sticking layers of Pt/Cr films for the hot slumping technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shuang; Wen, Ming-Wu; Wang, Zhan-Shan

    2016-07-01

    The thermal stability and separation characteristics of anti-sticking layers of Pt/Cr films are studied in this paper. Several types of adhesion layers were investigated: 10.0 nm Pt, 1.5 nm Cr + 50.0 nm Pt, 2.5 nm Cr + 50.0 nm Pt and 3.5 nm Cr + 50.0 nm Pt fabricated using direct current magnetron sputtering. The variation of layer thickness, roughness, crystallization and surface topography of Pt/Cr films were analyzed by grazing incidence X-ray reflectometry, large angle X-ray diffraction and optical profiler before and after heating. 2.5 nm Cr + 50.0 nm Pt film exhibits the best thermal stability and separation characteristics according to the heating and hot slumping experiments. The film was also applied as an anti-sticking layer to optimize the maximum temperature of the hot slumping technique. Supported by CAS XTP project XDA04060605

  9. Trapped Field Characteristics of Stacked YBCO Thin Plates for Compact NMR Magnets: Spatial Field Distribution and Temporal Stability

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Seungyong; Kim, Seok Beom; Ahn, Min Cheol; Voccio, John; Bascuñán, Juan; Iwasa, Yukikazu

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents experimental and analytical results of trapped field characteristics of a stack of square YBCO thin film plates for compact NMR magnets. Each YBCO plate, 40 mm × 40 mm × 0.08 mm, has a 25-mm diameter hole at its center. A total of 500 stacked plates were used to build a 40-mm long magnet. Its trapped field, in a bath of liquid nitrogen, was measured for spatial field distribution and temporal stability. Comparison of measured and analytical results is presented: the effects on trapped field characteristics of the unsaturated nickel substrate and the non-uniform current distribution in the YBCO plate are discussed. PMID:20585463

  10. Trapped Field Characteristics of Stacked YBCO Thin Plates for Compact NMR Magnets: Spatial Field Distribution and Temporal Stability.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Seungyong; Kim, Seok Beom; Ahn, Min Cheol; Voccio, John; Bascuñán, Juan; Iwasa, Yukikazu

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents experimental and analytical results of trapped field characteristics of a stack of square YBCO thin film plates for compact NMR magnets. Each YBCO plate, 40 mm × 40 mm × 0.08 mm, has a 25-mm diameter hole at its center. A total of 500 stacked plates were used to build a 40-mm long magnet. Its trapped field, in a bath of liquid nitrogen, was measured for spatial field distribution and temporal stability. Comparison of measured and analytical results is presented: the effects on trapped field characteristics of the unsaturated nickel substrate and the non-uniform current distribution in the YBCO plate are discussed.

  11. CEAS/AIAA/ICASE/NASA Langley International Forum on Aeroelasticity and Structural Dynamics 1999. Pt. 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodrow Whitlow, Jr. (Editor); Todd, Emily N. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    These proceedings represent a collection of the latest advances in aeroelasticity and structural dynamics from the world community. Research in the areas of unsteady aerodynamics and aeroelasticity, structural modeling and optimization, active control and adaptive structures, landing dynamics, certification and qualification, and validation testing are highlighted in the collection of papers. The wide range of results will lead to advances in the prediction and control of the structural response of aircraft and spacecraft.

  12. Active Aeroelastic Wing Aerodynamic Model Development and Validation for a Modified F/A-18A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cumming, Stephen B.; Diebler, Corey G.

    2005-01-01

    A new aerodynamic model has been developed and validated for a modified F/A-18A used for the Active Aeroelastic Wing (AAW) research program. The goal of the program was to demonstrate the advantages of using the inherent flexibility of an aircraft to enhance its performance. The research aircraft was an F/A-18A with wings modified to reduce stiffness and a new control system to increase control authority. There have been two flight phases. Data gathered from the first flight phase were used to create the new aerodynamic model. A maximum-likelihood output-error parameter estimation technique was used to obtain stability and control derivatives. The derivatives were incorporated into the National Aeronautics and Space Administration F-18 simulation, validated, and used to develop new AAW control laws. The second phase of flights was used to evaluate the handling qualities of the AAW aircraft and the control law design process, and to further test the accuracy of the new model. The flight test envelope covered Mach numbers between 0.85 and 1.30 and dynamic pressures from 600 to 1250 pound-force per square foot. The results presented in this report demonstrate that a thorough parameter identification analysis can be used to improve upon models that were developed using other means. This report describes the parameter estimation technique used, details the validation techniques, discusses differences between previously existing F/A-18 models, and presents results from the second phase of research flights.

  13. Influences of NOM composition and bacteriological characteristics on biological stability in a full-scale drinking water treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Won; Kim, Hyun-Chul; Meyer, Anne S; Kim, Sungpyo; Maeng, Sung Kyu

    2016-10-01

    The influences of natural organic matter (NOM) and bacteriological characteristics on the biological stability of water were investigated in a full-scale drinking water treatment plant. We found that prechlorination decreased the hydrophobicity of the organic matter and significantly increased the high-molecular-weight (MW) dissolved organic matter, such as biopolymers and humic substances. High-MW organic matter and structurally complex compounds are known to be relatively slowly biodegradable; however, because of the prechlorination step, the indigenous bacteria could readily utilise these fractions as assimilable organic carbon. Sequential coagulation and sedimentation resulted in the substantial removal of biopolymer (74%), humic substance (33%), bacterial cells (79%), and assimilable organic carbon (67%). Rapid sand and granular activated carbon filtration induced an increase in the low-nucleic-acid content bacteria; however, these bacteria were biologically less active in relation to enzymatic activity and ATP. The granular activated carbon step was essential to securing biological stability (the ability to prevent bacterial growth) by removing the residual assimilable organic carbon that had formed during the ozone treatment. The growth potential of Escherichia coli and indigenous bacteria were found to differ in respect to NOM characteristics. In comparison with E. coli, the indigenous bacteria utilised a broader range of NOM as a carbon source. Principal component analysis demonstrated that the measured biological stability of water could differ, depending on the NOM characteristics, as well as on the bacterial inoculum selected for the analysis.

  14. Influences of NOM composition and bacteriological characteristics on biological stability in a full-scale drinking water treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Won; Kim, Hyun-Chul; Meyer, Anne S; Kim, Sungpyo; Maeng, Sung Kyu

    2016-10-01

    The influences of natural organic matter (NOM) and bacteriological characteristics on the biological stability of water were investigated in a full-scale drinking water treatment plant. We found that prechlorination decreased the hydrophobicity of the organic matter and significantly increased the high-molecular-weight (MW) dissolved organic matter, such as biopolymers and humic substances. High-MW organic matter and structurally complex compounds are known to be relatively slowly biodegradable; however, because of the prechlorination step, the indigenous bacteria could readily utilise these fractions as assimilable organic carbon. Sequential coagulation and sedimentation resulted in the substantial removal of biopolymer (74%), humic substance (33%), bacterial cells (79%), and assimilable organic carbon (67%). Rapid sand and granular activated carbon filtration induced an increase in the low-nucleic-acid content bacteria; however, these bacteria were biologically less active in relation to enzymatic activity and ATP. The granular activated carbon step was essential to securing biological stability (the ability to prevent bacterial growth) by removing the residual assimilable organic carbon that had formed during the ozone treatment. The growth potential of Escherichia coli and indigenous bacteria were found to differ in respect to NOM characteristics. In comparison with E. coli, the indigenous bacteria utilised a broader range of NOM as a carbon source. Principal component analysis demonstrated that the measured biological stability of water could differ, depending on the NOM characteristics, as well as on the bacterial inoculum selected for the analysis. PMID:27376858

  15. Finite state aeroelastic model for use in rotor design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Chengjian; Peters, David A.

    1993-01-01

    In this article, a rotor aeroelastic model based on a newly developed finite state dynamic wake, coupled with blade finite element analysis, is described. The analysis is intended for application in rotor blade design optimization. A coupled simultaneous system of differential equations combining blade structural dynamics and aerodynamics is established in a formulation well-suited for design sensitivity computation. Each blade is assumed to be an elastic beam undergoing flap bending, lead-lag bending, elastic twist, and axial deflections. Aerodynamic loads are computed from unsteady blade element theory where the rotor three-dimensional unsteady wake is described by a generalized dynamic wake model. Correlation of results obtained from the analysis with flight test data is provided to assess model accuracy.

  16. Aeroelasticity-based fluid agitation for lab-on-chips.

    PubMed

    Xia, H M; Wang, Z P; Wang, W; Fan, W; Wijaya, A; Wang, Z F

    2013-04-21

    In this study, we report a robust agitation method for small-volume liquids. It utilizes an elastic diaphragm as the bottom of a liquid chamber, upon which an initial tension is also applied to enhance the aeroelasticity effects at small/micro scales. As a result, spontaneous vibration of the diaphragm can be induced by an external air flow, which further provides fluid agitations. The device structure is simple and can be easily fabricated at low cost. More importantly, the vibration amplitude is controllable and varies widely from several tens to several hundred micrometers depending on the applied air pressure. The resulting agitation is effective and applicable at high viscosities of up to 900 cSt. The influences of air pressure and liquid viscosity on the vibration frequency are discussed. Potential applications of this technique for solid particle agitation, focusing and fluid mixing are also demonstrated.

  17. Optimal design application on the advanced aeroelastic rotor blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, F. S.; Jones, R.

    1985-01-01

    The vibration and performance optimization procedure using regression analysis was successfully applied to an advanced aeroelastic blade design study. The major advantage of this regression technique is that multiple optimizations can be performed to evaluate the effects of various objective functions and constraint functions. The data bases obtained from the rotorcraft flight simulation program C81 and Myklestad mode shape program are analytically determined as a function of each design variable. This approach has been verified for various blade radial ballast weight locations and blade planforms. This method can also be utilized to ascertain the effect of a particular cost function which is composed of several objective functions with different weighting factors for various mission requirements without any additional effort.

  18. Advance finite element modeling of rotor blade aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straub, F. K.; Sangha, K. B.; Panda, B.

    1994-01-01

    An advanced beam finite element has been developed for modeling rotor blade dynamics and aeroelasticity. This element is part of the Element Library of the Second Generation Comprehensive Helicopter Analysis System (2GCHAS). The element allows modeling of arbitrary rotor systems, including bearingless rotors. It accounts for moderately large elastic deflections, anisotropic properties, large frame motion for maneuver simulation, and allows for variable order shape functions. The effects of gravity, mechanically applied and aerodynamic loads are included. All kinematic quantities required to compute airloads are provided. In this paper, the fundamental assumptions and derivation of the element matrices are presented. Numerical results are shown to verify the formulation and illustrate several features of the element.

  19. Nonlinear Aeroelastic Analysis of UAVs: Deterministic and Stochastic Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukut, Thomas Woodrow

    Aeroelastic aspects of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) is analyzed by treatment of a typical section containing geometrical nonlinearities. Equations of motion are derived and numerical integration of these equations subject to quasi-steady aerodynamic forcing is performed. Model properties are tailored to a high-altitude long-endurance unmanned aircraft. Harmonic balance approximation is employed based on the steady-state oscillatory response of the aerodynamic forcing. Comparisons are made between time integration results and harmonic balance approximation. Close agreement between forcing and displacement oscillatory frequencies is found. Amplitude agreement is off by a considerable margin. Additionally, stochastic forcing effects are examined. Turbulent flow velocities generated from the von Karman spectrum are applied to the same nonlinear structural model. Similar qualitative behavior is found between quasi-steady and stochastic forcing models illustrating the importance of considering the non-steady nature of atmospheric turbulence when operating near critical flutter velocity.

  20. Aeroelasticity-based fluid agitation for lab-on-chips.

    PubMed

    Xia, H M; Wang, Z P; Wang, W; Fan, W; Wijaya, A; Wang, Z F

    2013-04-21

    In this study, we report a robust agitation method for small-volume liquids. It utilizes an elastic diaphragm as the bottom of a liquid chamber, upon which an initial tension is also applied to enhance the aeroelasticity effects at small/micro scales. As a result, spontaneous vibration of the diaphragm can be induced by an external air flow, which further provides fluid agitations. The device structure is simple and can be easily fabricated at low cost. More importantly, the vibration amplitude is controllable and varies widely from several tens to several hundred micrometers depending on the applied air pressure. The resulting agitation is effective and applicable at high viscosities of up to 900 cSt. The influences of air pressure and liquid viscosity on the vibration frequency are discussed. Potential applications of this technique for solid particle agitation, focusing and fluid mixing are also demonstrated. PMID:23455690

  1. Design of an Aeroelastically Tailored 10 MW Wind Turbine Rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahle, Frederik; Tibaldi, Carlo; Pavese, Christian; McWilliam, Michael K.; Blasques, Jose P. A. A.; Hansen, Morten H.

    2016-09-01

    This work presents an integrated multidisciplinary wind turbine optimization framework utilizing state-of-the-art aeroelastic and strutural tools, capable of simultaneous design of the outer geometry and internal structure of the blade. The framework is utilized to design a 10 MW rotor constrained not to exceed the design loads of an existing reference wind turbine. The results show that through combined geometric tailoring of the internal structure and aerodynamic shape of the blade it is possible to achieve significant passive load alleviation that allows for a 9% longer blade with an increase in AEP of 8.7%, without increasing blade mass and without significant increases in ultimate and fatigue loads on the hub and tower.

  2. Recent progress in flapping wing aerodynamics and aeroelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyy, W.; Aono, H.; Chimakurthi, S. K.; Trizila, P.; Kang, C.-K.; Cesnik, C. E. S.; Liu, H.

    2010-10-01

    Micro air vehicles (MAVs) have the potential to revolutionize our sensing and information gathering capabilities in areas such as environmental monitoring and homeland security. Flapping wings with suitable wing kinematics, wing shapes, and flexible structures can enhance lift as well as thrust by exploiting large-scale vortical flow structures under various conditions. However, the scaling invariance of both fluid dynamics and structural dynamics as the size changes is fundamentally difficult. The focus of this review is to assess the recent progress in flapping wing aerodynamics and aeroelasticity. It is realized that a variation of the Reynolds number (wing sizing, flapping frequency, etc.) leads to a change in the leading edge vortex (LEV) and spanwise flow structures, which impacts the aerodynamic force generation. While in classical stationary wing theory, the tip vortices (TiVs) are seen as wasted energy, in flapping flight, they can interact with the LEV to enhance lift without increasing the power requirements. Surrogate modeling techniques can assess the aerodynamic outcomes between two- and three-dimensional wing. The combined effect of the TiVs, the LEV, and jet can improve the aerodynamics of a flapping wing. Regarding aeroelasticity, chordwise flexibility in the forward flight can substantially adjust the projected area normal to the flight trajectory via shape deformation, hence redistributing thrust and lift. Spanwise flexibility in the forward flight creates shape deformation from the wing root to the wing tip resulting in varied phase shift and effective angle of attack distribution along the wing span. Numerous open issues in flapping wing aerodynamics are highlighted.

  3. A wind turbine hybrid simulation framework considering aeroelastic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wei; Su, Weihua

    2015-04-01

    In performing an effective structural analysis for wind turbine, the simulation of turbine aerodynamic loads is of great importance. The interaction between the wake flow and the blades may impact turbine blades loading condition, energy yield and operational behavior. Direct experimental measurement of wind flow field and wind profiles around wind turbines is very helpful to support the wind turbine design. However, with the growth of the size of wind turbines for higher energy output, it is not convenient to obtain all the desired data in wind-tunnel and field tests. In this paper, firstly the modeling of dynamic responses of large-span wind turbine blades will consider nonlinear aeroelastic effects. A strain-based geometrically nonlinear beam formulation will be used for the basic structural dynamic modeling, which will be coupled with unsteady aerodynamic equations and rigid-body rotations of the rotor. Full wind turbines can be modeled by using the multi-connected beams. Then, a hybrid simulation experimental framework is proposed to potentially address this issue. The aerodynamic-dominant components, such as the turbine blades and rotor, are simulated as numerical components using the nonlinear aeroelastic model; while the turbine tower, where the collapse of failure may occur under high level of wind load, is simulated separately as the physical component. With the proposed framework, dynamic behavior of NREL's 5MW wind turbine blades will be studied and correlated with available numerical data. The current work will be the basis of the authors' further studies on flow control and hazard mitigation on wind turbine blades and towers.

  4. Small Engine Technology (Set) Task 8 Aeroelastic Prediction Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eick, Chris D.; Liu, Jong-Shang

    1998-01-01

    AlliedSignal Engines, in cooperation with NASA LeRC, completed an evaluation of recently developed aeroelastic computer codes using test cases from the AlliedSignal Engines fan blisk database. Test data for this task includes strain gage, light probe, performance, and steady-state pressure information obtained for conditions where synchronous or flutter vibratory conditions were found to occur. Aeroelastic codes evaluated include the quasi 3-D UNSFLO (developed at MIT and modified to include blade motion by AlliedSignal), the 2-D FREPS (developed by NASA LeRC), and the 3-D TURBO-AE (under development at NASA LeRC). Six test cases each where flutter and synchronous vibrations were found to occur were used for evaluation of UNSFLO and FREPS. In addition, one of the flutter cases was evaluated using TURBO-AE. The UNSFLO flutter evaluations were completed for 75 percent radial span and provided good agreement with the experimental test data. Synchronous evaluations were completed for UNSFLO but further enhancement needs to be added to the code before the unsteady pressures can be used to predict forced response vibratory stresses. The FREPS evaluations were hindered as the steady flow solver (SFLOW) was unable to converge to a solution for the transonic flow conditions in the fan blisk. This situation resulted in all FREPS test cases being attempted but no results were obtained during the present program. Currently, AlliedSignal is evaluating integrating FREPS with our existing steady flow solvers to bypass the SFLOW difficulties. ne TURBO-AE steady flow solution provided an excellent match with the AlliedSignal Engines calibrated DAWES 3-D viscous solver. Finally, the TURBO-AE unsteady analyses also matched experimental observations by predicting flutter for the single test case evaluated.

  5. Structural Characteristics of the Alpha-Synuclein Oligomers Stabilized By the Flavonoid Baicalein

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, D.-P.; Fink, A.L.; Uversky, V.N.

    2009-05-18

    The flavonoid baicalein inhibits fibrillation of alpha-synuclein, which is a major component of Lewy bodies in Parkinson's disease. It has been known that baicalein induces the formation of alpha-synuclein oligomers and consequently prevents their fibrillation. In order to evaluate the structural properties of baicalein-stabilized oligomers, we purified oligomer species by HPLC and examined their stability and structure by CD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, size exclusion chromatography HPLC, small-angle X-ray scattering, and atomic force microscopy. Baicalein-stabilized oligomers are beta-sheet-enriched according to CD and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses. They did not form fibrils even after very prolonged incubation. From small-angle X-ray scattering data and atomic force microscopy images, the oligomers were characterized as quite compact globular species. Oligomers were extremely stable, with a GdmCl C(m)=3.3 M. This high stability explains the previously observed inhibition properties of baicalein against alpha-synuclein fibrillation. These baicalein-stabilized oligomers, added to the solution of aggregating alpha-synuclein, were able to noticeably inhibit its fibrillation. After prolonged coincubation, short fibrils were formed, suggesting an effective interaction of oligomers with monomeric alpha-synuclein. Membrane permeability tests suggested that the baicalein-stabilized oligomers had a mild effect on the integrity of the membrane surface. This effect was rather similar to that of the monomeric protein, suggesting that targeted stabilization of certain alpha-synuclein oligomers might offer a potential strategy for the development of novel Parkinson's disease therapies.

  6. Characteristics of two types of stabilized nano zero-valent iron and transport in porous media.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Hao; Tseng, Hui-Hsin; Wey, Ming-Yen; Lin, Min-Der

    2010-04-15

    Nano-scale zero-valent iron (NZVI) has been shown to be suitable for remediating contaminated aquifers. However, they usually aggregate rapidly and result in a very limited migration distance that inhibits their usefulness. This study employed poly acrylic acid (PAA) and carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) to synthesize two types of stabilized styles of NZVI with finer sizes (namely PNZVI and CNZVI). The mobility of stabilized NZVI was also demonstrated on the basis of transport in porous media. The results show that the PNZVI has a uniform particle size of 12 nm. However, tens of CNZVI particles with diameters of 1-3 nm were packed into secondary particles. Both the PNZVI and the CNZVI exhibited amorphous structures, and the stabilizer was bound to particle surfaces in the form of bidentate bridging via the carboxylic group, which could provide both electrostatic and steric repulsion to prevent particle aggregation. This study also proposes presumed stabilized configurations of PNZVI and CNZVI to reasonably illustrate their different dispersed suspension types. On the basis of the breakthrough curves and mass recovery, this study observed that the mobility of PNZVI in classic Ca(2+) concentration of groundwater was superior to CNZVI. Nonetheless, the mobility of CNZVI would be decreased less significantly than PNZVI when encountering high Ca(2+) concentrations (40 mM). Presumably, increasing the pore flow velocity would enhance the mobility of stabilized NZVI. Overall, the results of this study indicate that PNZVI has the potential to become an effective reactive material for in situ groundwater remediation.

  7. Impact of physicochemical characteristics on the oxidative stability of fish oil microencapsulated by spray-drying.

    PubMed

    Drusch, Stephan; Serfert, Yvonne; Scampicchio, Matteo; Schmidt-Hansberg, Benjamin; Schwarz, Karin

    2007-12-26

    The aim of the present research was to identify principal parameters determining the oxidative stability of microencapsulated fish oil. Microcapsules were prepared by spray-drying using different types of n-octenylsuccinate-derivatized starch, gum Arabic, sugar beet pectin, sodium caseinate, and/or glucose syrup. Two principal components to classify the different microcapsules accounting for up to 79% of the variance were identified. The principal components were determined by physicochemical parameters reflecting the emulsifying ability of the encapsulant and the drying behavior of the parent emulsion. Microcapsules, which were identified by principal component analysis to be significantly different, exhibited a low stability upon storage, showing that the principal components and, thus, the underlying physicochemical parameters analyzed in the present study are correlated with core material stability.

  8. Guidelines for Computing Longitudinal Dynamic Stability Characteristics of a Subsonic Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Joseph R.; Frank, Neal T.; Murphy, Patrick C.

    2010-01-01

    A systematic study is presented to guide the selection of a numerical solution strategy for URANS computation of a subsonic transport configuration undergoing simulated forced oscillation about its pitch axis. Forced oscillation is central to the prevalent wind tunnel methodology for quantifying aircraft dynamic stability derivatives from force and moment coefficients, which is the ultimate goal for the computational simulations. Extensive computations are performed that lead in key insights of the critical numerical parameters affecting solution convergence. A preliminary linear harmonic analysis is included to demonstrate the potential of extracting dynamic stability derivatives from computational solutions.

  9. Numerical validation of a stability model for a flexible over-expanded rocket nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefrançois, E.

    2005-10-01

    A numerical approach for the aeroelastical stability of an over-expanded rocket engine is proposed in this paper. The main idea is to offer a better understanding of the repercussions likely to appear from the aeroelastic coupling in terms of side loads that may be responsible for damage effects on the engine. After a brief description of the stability model issued from previous works (Pekkari's team) and details upon a numerical fluid-structure coupling code, comparative calculations are conducted. The stability model is then called into question and a finer analysis is proposed to explain its major tendency to over-predict the aeroelastic frequency shift in comparison with numerical coupling results.

  10. Contributions of the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel to the Testing of Active Control of Aeroelastic Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Boyd, III; Noll, Thomas E.; Scott, Robert C.

    2000-01-01

    By the 1960s, researchers began to investigate the feasibility of using active controls technology (ACT) for increasing the capabilities of military and commercial aircraft. Since then many researchers, too numerous to mention, have investigated and demonstrated the usefulness of ACT for favorably modifying the aeroelastic response characteristics of flight vehicles. As a result, ACT entered the limelight as a viable tool for answering some very difficult design questions and had the potential for obtaining structural weight reductions optimizing maneuvering performance, and satisfying the multimission requirements being imposed on future military and commercial aircraft designs. Over the past 40 years, the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has played a major role in developing ACT in part by its participation in many wind-tunnel programs conducted in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT). These programs were conducted for the purposes of: (1) establishing concept feasibility; (2) demonstrating proof of concept; and (3) providing data for validating new modeling, analysis, and design methods. This paper provides an overview of the ACT investigations conducted in the TDT. For each program discussed herein, the objectives of the effort, the testing techniques, the test results, any, signIficant findings, and the lessons learned with respect to ACT testing are presented.

  11. Structure, electrical characteristics, and high-temperature stability of aerosol jet printed silver nanoparticle films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Md Taibur; McCloy, John; Ramana, C. V.; Panat, Rahul

    2016-08-01

    Printed electronics has emerged as a versatile eco-friendly fabrication technique to create sintered nanoparticle (NP) films on arbitrary surfaces with an excellent control over the film microstructure. While applicability of such films for high-temperature applications is not explored previously, herein we report the high-temperature electrical stability of silver (Ag) metal NP films fabricated using an Aerosol Jet based printing technique and demonstrate that this behavior is dictated by changes in the film microstructure. In-situ high temperature (24-500 °C) impedance spectroscopy measurements show that the real part of the impedance increases with increasing temperature up to 150 °C, at which point a decreasing trend prevails until 300 °C, followed again by an increase in impedance. The electrical behavior is correlated with the in-situ grain growth of the Ag NP films, as observed afterwards by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD), and could be tailored by controlling the initial microstructure through sintering conditions. Using combined diffraction and spectroscopic analytical methods, it is demonstrated the Aerosol Jet printed Ag NP films exhibit enhanced thermal stability and oxidation resistance. In addition to establishing the conditions for stability of Ag NP films, the results provide a fundamental understanding of the effect of grain growth and reduction in grain boundary area on the electrical stability of sintered NP films.

  12. Characteristics of sugar surfactants in stabilizing proteins during freeze-thawing and freeze-drying.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Koreyoshi; Murai, Katsuyuki; Korehisa, Tamayo; Shimizu, Noriyuki; Yamahira, Ryo; Matsuura, Tsutashi; Tada, Hiroko; Imanaka, Hiroyuki; Ishida, Naoyuki; Nakanishi, Kazuhiro

    2014-06-01

    Sugar surfactants with different alkyl chain lengths and sugar head groups were compared for their protein-stabilizing effect during freeze-thawing and freeze-drying. Six enzymes, different in terms of tolerance against inactivation because of freeze-thawing and freeze-drying, were used as model proteins. The enzyme activities that remained after freeze-thawing and freeze-drying in the presence of a sugar surfactant were measured for different types and concentrations of sugar surfactants. Sugar surfactants stabilized all of the tested enzymes both during freeze-thawing and freeze-drying, and a one or two order higher amount of added sugar surfactant was required for achieving protein stabilization during freeze-drying than for the cryoprotection. The comprehensive comparison showed that the C10-C12 esters of sucrose or trehalose were the most effective through the freeze-drying process: the remaining enzyme activities after freeze-thawing and freeze-drying increased at the sugar ester concentrations of 1-10 and 10-100 μM, respectively, and increased to a greater extent than for the other surfactants at higher concentrations. Results also indicate that, when a decent amount of sugar was also added, the protein-stabilizing effect of a small amount of sugar ester through the freeze-drying process could be enhanced.

  13. Thermal stability and energy harvesting characteristics of Au nanorods: harsh environment chemical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karker, Nicholas; Dharmalingam, Gnanaprakash; Carpenter, Michael A.

    2015-05-01

    Monitoring the levels of polluting gases such as CO and NOx from high temperature (500°C and higher) combustion environments requires materials with high thermal stability and resilience that can withstand harsh oxidizing and reducing environments. Au nanorods (AuNRs) have shown potential in plasmonic gas sensing due to their catalytic activity, high oxidation stability, and absorbance sensitivity to changes in the surrounding environment. By using electron beam lithography, AuNR geometries can be patterned with tight control of the rod dimensions and spacings, allowing tunability of their optical properties. Methods such as NR encapsulation within an yttria-stabilized zirconia overcoat layer with subsequent annealing procedures will be shown to improve temperature stability within a simulated harsh environment. Since light sources and spectrometers are typically required to obtain optical measurements, integration is a major barrier for harsh environment sensing. Plasmonic sensing results will be presented where thermal energy is harvested by the AuNRs, which replaces the need for an external incident light source. Results from gas sensing experiments that utilize thermal energy harvesting are in good agreement with experiments which use an external incident light source. Principal component analysis results demonstrate that by selecting the most "active" wavelengths in a plasmonic band, the wavelength space can be reduced from hundreds of monitored wavelengths to just four, without loss of information about selectivity of the AuNRs. By combining thermal stability, the thermal energy harvesting capability, and the selectivity in gas detection (achieved through multivariate analysis), integration of plasmonic sensors into combustion environments can be greatly simplified.

  14. Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Feathered Dinosaur Measured Using Physical Models. Effects of Form on Static Stability and Control Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Evangelista, Dennis; Cardona, Griselda; Guenther-Gleason, Eric; Huynh, Tony; Kwong, Austin; Marks, Dylan; Ray, Neil; Tisbe, Adrian; Tse, Kyle; Koehl, Mimi

    2014-01-01

    We report the effects of posture and morphology on the static aerodynamic stability and control effectiveness of physical models based on the feathered dinosaur, Microraptor gui, from the Cretaceous of China. Postures had similar lift and drag coefficients and were broadly similar when simplified metrics of gliding were considered, but they exhibited different stability characteristics depending on the position of the legs and the presence of feathers on the legs and the tail. Both stability and the function of appendages in generating maneuvering forces and torques changed as the glide angle or angle of attack were changed. These are significant because they represent an aerial environment that may have shifted during the evolution of directed aerial descent and other aerial behaviors. Certain movements were particularly effective (symmetric movements of the wings and tail in pitch, asymmetric wing movements, some tail movements). Other appendages altered their function from creating yaws at high angle of attack to rolls at low angle of attack, or reversed their function entirely. While M. gui lived after Archaeopteryx and likely represents a side experiment with feathered morphology, the general patterns of stability and control effectiveness suggested from the manipulations of forelimb, hindlimb and tail morphology here may help understand the evolution of flight control aerodynamics in vertebrates. Though these results rest on a single specimen, as further fossils with different morphologies are tested, the findings here could be applied in a phylogenetic context to reveal biomechanical constraints on extinct flyers arising from the need to maneuver. PMID:24454820

  15. Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) Area of Interest (AOI) 6: Develop and Validate Aeroelastic Codes for Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Kevin D.; Liu, Jong-Shang; Murthy, Durbha V.; Kruse, Marlin J.; James, Darrell

    1999-01-01

    AlliedSignal Engines, in cooperation with NASA GRC (National Aeronautics and Space Administration Glenn Research Center), completed an evaluation of recently-developed aeroelastic computer codes using test cases from the AlliedSignal Engines fan blisk and turbine databases. Test data included strain gage, performance, and steady-state pressure information obtained for conditions where synchronous or flutter vibratory conditions were found to occur. Aeroelastic codes evaluated included quasi 3-D UNSFLO (MIT Developed/AE Modified, Quasi 3-D Aeroelastic Computer Code), 2-D FREPS (NASA-Developed Forced Response Prediction System Aeroelastic Computer Code), and 3-D TURBO-AE (NASA/Mississippi State University Developed 3-D Aeroelastic Computer Code). Unsteady pressure predictions for the turbine test case were used to evaluate the forced response prediction capabilities of each of the three aeroelastic codes. Additionally, one of the fan flutter cases was evaluated using TURBO-AE. The UNSFLO and FREPS evaluation predictions showed good agreement with the experimental test data trends, but quantitative improvements are needed. UNSFLO over-predicted turbine blade response reductions, while FREPS under-predicted them. The inviscid TURBO-AE turbine analysis predicted no discernible blade response reduction, indicating the necessity of including viscous effects for this test case. For the TURBO-AE fan blisk test case, significant effort was expended getting the viscous version of the code to give converged steady flow solutions for the transonic flow conditions. Once converged, the steady solutions provided an excellent match with test data and the calibrated DAWES (AlliedSignal 3-D Viscous Steady Flow CFD Solver). However, efforts expended establishing quality steady-state solutions prevented exercising the unsteady portion of the TURBO-AE code during the present program. AlliedSignal recommends that unsteady pressure measurement data be obtained for both test cases examined

  16. Electrodynamic stabilization conditions for high-temperature superconducting composites with different types of current-voltage characteristic nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkharov, A. M.; Lavrov, N. A.; Romanovskii, V. R.

    2014-06-01

    The current instability is studied in high-temperature superconducting current-carrying elements with I- V characteristics described by power or exponential equations. Stability analysis of the macroscopic states is carried out in terms of a stationary zero-dimensional model. In linear temperature approximation criteria are derived that allow one to find the maximum allowable values of the induced current, induced electric field intensity, and overheating of the superconductor. A condition is formulated for the complete thermal stabilization of the superconducting composite with regard to the nonlinearity of its I- V characteristic. It is shown that both subcritical and supercritical stable states may arise. In the latter case, the current and electric field intensity are higher than the preset critical parameters of the superconductor. Conditions for these states depending on the properties of the matrix, superconductor's critical current, fill factor, and nonlinearity of the I- V characteristic are discussed. The obtained results considerably augment the class of allowable states for high-temperature superconductors: it is demonstrated that there exist stable resistive conditions from which superconductors cannot pass to the normal state even if the parameters of these conditions are supercritical.

  17. Effects of perfluorocarbon gases on the size and stability characteristics of phospholipid-coated microbubbles: osmotic effect versus interfacial film stabilization.

    PubMed

    Szíjjártó, Csongor; Rossi, Simona; Waton, Gilles; Krafft, Marie Pierre

    2012-01-17

    Micrometer-sized bubbles coated with phospholipids are used as contrast agents for ultrasound imaging and have potential for oxygen, drug, and gene delivery and as therapeutic devices. An internal perfluorocarbon (FC) gas is generally used to stabilize them osmotically. We report here on the effects of three relatively heavy FCs, perfluorohexane (F-hexane), perfluorodiglyme (F-diglyme ), and perfluorotriglyme (F-triglyme), on the size and stability characteristics of microbubbles coated with a soft shell of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and on the surface tension and compressibility of DMPC monolayers. Monomodal populations of small bubbles (~1.3 ± 0.2 μm in radius, polydispersivity index ~8%) were prepared by sonication, followed by centrifugal fractionation. The mean microbubble size, size distribution, and stability were determined by acoustical attenuation measurements, static light scattering, and optical microscopy. The half-lives of F-hexane- and F-diglyme-stabilized bubbles (149 ± 8 and 134 ± 3 min, respectively) were about 2 times longer than with the heavier F-triglyme (76 ± 7 min) and 4-5 times longer than with air (34 ± 3 min). Remarkably, the bubbles are smaller than the minimal size values calculated assuming that the bubbles are stabilized osmotically by the insoluble FC gases. Particularly striking is that bubbles 2 orders of magnitude smaller than the calculated collapse radius can be prepared with F-triglyme, while its very low vapor pressure prohibits any osmotic effect. The interface between an aqueous DMPC dispersion and air, or air (or N(2)) saturated with the FCs, was investigated by tensiometry and by Langmuir monolayer compressions. Remarkably, after 3 h, the tensions at the interface between an aqueous DMPC dispersion (0.5 mmol L(-1)) and air were lowered from ~50 ± 1 to ~37 ± 1 mN m(-1) when F-hexane and F-diglyme were present and to ~40 ± 1 mN m(-1) for F-triglyme. Also noteworthy, the adsorption kinetics of DMPC at the

  18. Theoretical stability and control characteristics of wings with various amounts of taper and twist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, H. A.; Jones, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    Stability derivatives have been computed for twisted wings of different planforms that include variations in both the wing taper and the aspect ratio. Taper ratios of 1.0, 0.50, and 0.25 are considered for each of three aspect ratios: 6, 10, and 16. The specific derivatives for which results are given are the rolling moment and the yawing moment derivatives with respect to rolling velocity, yawing velocity, and angle of sideslip. In addition to the stability derivatives, results are included for determining the theoretical rolling moment due to aileron deflection and a series of influence lines is given by which the loading across the span may be determined for any angle-of-attack distribution that may occur on the wing planforms considered.

  19. Subsonic dynamic stability characteristics of two close-coupled canard-wing configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyden, R. P.

    1978-01-01

    The pitch, yaw, and roll damping, as well as the oscillatory stability in pitch and in yaw, were measured for two canard wing configurations with wing sweeps of 44 deg and 60 deg. Tests were made at free stream Mach numbers of 0.3, 0.4, and 0.7 and for angles of attack from about -4 deg to 20 deg. The effects of various components such as the canard, nose strakes, wings, vertical tail, and horizontal tail were determined. The basic canard wing, vertical tail configurations generally had positive damping in pitch, yaw, and roll. The effect of the canard was generally beneficial except for its tendency to decrease the oscillatory directional stability.

  20. Lateral and Directional Stability and Control Characteristics of a C-54D Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talmage, Donald B; Reeder, John P

    1949-01-01

    Data are presented showing compliance of C-54D with Army and Navy lateral and directional stability and control specifications. The airplane met requirements except for the rolling effectiveness pb/2V, the aileron forces in rolling, and the rudder forces in the asymmetric power conditions which were marginal. Also, the results of special tests concerning asymmetric power, asymmetric loading, and pitch due to yaw requested by the Airplane Handling Qualities Subcommittee of the Air Transport Association are presented.

  1. Lateral-directional stability characteristics of a wing-fuselage configuration at angles of attack up to 44 deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, W. P.; Huffman, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted to determine the effects of configuration variables on the lateral-directional stability characteristics of a wing-fuselage configuration. The variables under study included variations in the location of a single center-line vertical tail and twin vertical tails, wing height, fuselage strakes, and horizontal tails. The study was conducted in the Langley high-speed 7-by 10-foot tunnel at a Mach number of 0.30, at angles of attack up to 44 deg and at sideslip angles of 0 deg and plus or minus 5 deg.

  2. Improved Aerodynamic Influence Coefficients for Dynamic Aeroelastic Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratton, Patrice

    2011-12-01

    Currently at Bombardier Aerospace, aeroelastic analyses are performed using the Doublet Lattice Method (DLM) incorporated in the NASTRAN solver. This method proves to be very reliable and fast in preliminary design stages where wind tunnel experimental results are often not available. Unfortunately, the geometric simplifications and limitations of the DLM, based on the lifting surfaces theory, reduce the ability of this method to give reliable results for all flow conditions, particularly in transonic flow. Therefore, a new method has been developed involving aerodynamic data from high-fidelity CFD codes which solve the Euler or Navier-Stokes equations. These new aerodynamic loads are transmitted to the NASTRAN aeroelastic module through improved aerodynamic influence coefficients (AIC). A cantilevered wing model is created from the Global Express structural model and a set of natural modes is calculated for a baseline configuration of the structure. The baseline mode shapes are then combined with an interpolation scheme to deform the 3-D CFD mesh necessary for Euler and Navier-Stokes analyses. An uncoupled approach is preferred to allow aerodynamic information from different CFD codes. Following the steady state CFD analyses, pressure differences ( DeltaCp), calculated between the deformed models and the original geometry, lead to aerodynamic loads which are transferred to the DLM model. A modal-based AIC method is applied to the aerodynamic matrices of NASTRAN based on a least-square approximation to evaluate aerodynamic loads of a different wing configuration which displays similar types of mode shapes. The methodology developed in this research creates weighting factors based on steady CFD analyses which have an equivalent reduced frequency of zero. These factors are applied to both the real and imaginary part of the aerodynamic matrices as well as all reduced frequencies used in the PK-Method which solves flutter problems. The modal-based AIC method

  3. Longitudinal Stability and Stalling Characteristics of a 1/8.33-Scale Model of the Republic XF-12 Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, Edward; Foster, Gerald V.

    1946-01-01

    The XF-12 airplane is a high performance, photo-reconnaissance aircraft designed by the Republic Aviation Corporation for Army Air Forces. A series of tests of a 1/8.33-scale powered model was conducted in the Langley 9-foot pressure tunnel to obtain information relative to the aerodynamic design of the airplane. This report presents the results of tests to determine the static longitudinal stability and stalling characteristics of the model. From this investigation it was indicated that the airplane will possess a positive static margin for all probable flight conditions. The stalling characteristics are considered satisfactory in that the stall initiates near the root section and progresses toward the tips. Early root section stalling occurs, with the flaps retracted and may cause undesirable tail buffeting and erratic elevator control in the normal flight range. From considerations of sinking speed landing flap deflections of 40 degrees may be preferable to 55 degrees of 65 degrees.

  4. On the nonlinear aerodynamic and stability characteristics of a generic chine-forebody slender-wing fighter configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary E.; Brandon, Jay M.

    1987-01-01

    An exploratory investigation was conducted of the nonlinear aerodynamic and stability characteristics of a tailless generic fighter configuration featuring a chine-shaped forebody coupled to a slender cropped delta wing in the NASA Langley Research Center's 12-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel. Forebody and wing vortex flow mechanisms were identified through off-body flow visualizations to explain the trends in the longitudinal and lateral-directional characteristics at extreme attitudes (angles of attack and sideslip). The interactions of the vortical motions with centerline and wing-mounted vertical tail surfaces were studied and the flow phenomena were correlated with the configuration forces and moments. Single degree of freedom, free-to-roll tests were used to study the wing rock susceptibility of the generic fighter model. Modifications to the nose region of the chine forebody were examined and fluid mechanisms were established to account for their ineffectiveness in modulating the highly interactive forebody and wing vortex systems.

  5. Computational Aeroelastic Modeling of Airframes and TurboMachinery: Progress and Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, R. E.; Sayma, A. I.

    2006-01-01

    Computational analyses such as computational fluid dynamics and computational structural dynamics have made major advances toward maturity as engineering tools. Computational aeroelasticity is the integration of these disciplines. As computational aeroelasticity matures it too finds an increasing role in the design and analysis of aerospace vehicles. This paper presents a survey of the current state of computational aeroelasticity with a discussion of recent research, success and continuing challenges in its progressive integration into multidisciplinary aerospace design. This paper approaches computational aeroelasticity from the perspective of the two main areas of application: airframe and turbomachinery design. An overview will be presented of the different prediction methods used for each field of application. Differing levels of nonlinear modeling will be discussed with insight into accuracy versus complexity and computational requirements. Subjects will include current advanced methods (linear and nonlinear), nonlinear flow models, use of order reduction techniques and future trends in incorporating structural nonlinearity. Examples in which computational aeroelasticity is currently being integrated into the design of airframes and turbomachinery will be presented.

  6. Stability Characteristics of "Aerobic" Acetyl-CoA Synthetase of Yeast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satyanarayana, T.; Klein, Harold P.

    1976-01-01

    During the purification of the "aerobic" acetyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, strain LK2Gl2, it was noted that stronge at 4 C resulted in the loss of enzyme activity within 24 hr. Similar losses were observed during column chromatography. Addition of boiled extracts from either aerobic or anerobic cells completely prevents this. The stabilizing factor (SF) in these extracts is non-dialyzable and organic in nature. SF is excluded on G-25 and G-50 Sephadex columns and is slightly retarded on G-75 columns. On G-100 columns, SF elutes as a peak exactly coincident with that of cytochrome c, indicating a molecular weight of 13,000. SF activity was not destroyed by Pronase treatment, was adsorbed onto Norite, and absorbed in the UV with a single maximum at 260 nm. The action of SF could be replaced by a number of nucleotides. At 0.01 M, the order of effectiveness was: ATP>ADP>AMP>GTP>CTP>/=UTP>XTP. Even at 2 x 10(exp -4) M, ATP and ADP, but not AMP, cyclic AMP, adenosine or adenine, were effective in stabilizing this ACS. The mechanism of stabilization by ATP and AMP appears to be the same, since AMP competitively inhibited the ACS with respect to ATP in in vitro assays, while ADP gave a mixed type of inhibition, thus indicating a different mechanism. ACS from nonaerobic cells is also unstable in the absence of SF but, unlike aerobic ACS, is not affected by ATP or other nucleotides.

  7. Effect of anaerobic pretreatment on environmental and physicochemical characteristics of duckweed based stabilization ponds.

    PubMed

    Caicedo, J R; Espinosa, C; Andrade, M; Gijzen, H

    2002-01-01

    Duckweed based stabilization ponds, an alternative for wastewater treatment, are attracting a growing interest from researchers because they are basically a low cost technology, easy to built and operate, and produce tertiary quality effluents. Besides, this technology offers the possibility of resource recovery by producing high quality duckweed protein, which can be of further use. Since the technology is rather new, there are many aspects to be studied before its full-scale implementation. It is necessary to gain sound knowledge of the basic principles of the complex processes occurring in the system, as well as of the practical aspects of design and operation. The presence of a layer of duckweed on the surface is expected to produce different environmental and physicochemical conditions in the water from those found in conventional stabilization ponds. These environmental and physicochemical conditions affect both plant growth and biological treatment processes in the system, therefore it is important to determine their behavior in a duckweed system and how they can be affected by an anaerobic pretreatment. Continuous flow pilot plants composed of seven ponds in series were operated with artificial substrate under two different conditions: with anaerobic pretreatment and without anaerobic pretreatment. The flow was kept constant during the operation. Conditions such as pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen, alkalinity, conductivity, chemical oxygen demand, biochemical oxygen demand, total and ammonium nitrogen, nitrites and nitrates, and phosphorus were evaluated in the system under steady state conditions. The main conclusions from the study include the following: pH, temperature and oxygen profiles are more stable in duckweed ponds than in conventional stabilization ponds; anaerobic pretreatment has a significant effect on the oxygen concentration in the system and on the organic matter removal but not on the nutrient removal.

  8. Motivations and Characteristics of Adult Students: Factor Stability and Construct Validity of the Educational Participation Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fujita-Starck, Pamela J.

    1996-01-01

    Data from 1,142 adult students confirmed the seven-factor typology of the Educational Participation Scale. Reliability of scales was acceptable. Construct validity was tested by predicting membership in three curricular groups: arts/leisure, personal development, and professional development. Results revealed distinctive characteristics and…

  9. Body-Rocking in College Students and Persons with Mental Retardation: Characteristics, Stability, and Collateral Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkson, Gershon; Andriacchi, Tami

    2000-01-01

    Four studies analyzing body-rocking in individuals with mental retardation found: (1) rocking chairs are not necessarily preferred and produce higher amplitude rocking; (2) body-rocking characteristics were stable over a 21-month period; (3) when compared with body-rocking college students, persons with mental retardation engage in more…

  10. Theoretical stability and control characteristics of wings with various amounts of taper and twist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, Henry A; Jones, Robert T

    1938-01-01

    Stability derivatives have been computed for twisted wings of different plan forms that include variations in both the wing taper and the aspect ratio. Taper ratios of 1.0, 0,50, and 0.25 are considered for each of three aspect ratios: 6, 10, and 16. The specific derivatives for which results are given are the rolling-moment and the yawing-moment derivatives with respect to (a) rolling velocity, (b) yawing velocity, and (c) angle of sideslip. These results are given in such a form that the effect of any initial symmetrical wing twist (such as may be produced by flaps) on the derivatives may easily be taken into account. In addition to the stability derivatives, results are included for determining the theoretical rolling moment due to aileron deflection and a series of influence lines is given by which the loading across the span may be determined for any angle-of-attack distribution that may occur on the wing plan forms considered. The report also includes incidental references to the application of the results.

  11. Development of cetyl dimethicone based water-in-oil emulsion containing botanicals: Physical characteristics and stability.

    PubMed

    Waqas, Muhammad Khurram; Akhtar, Naveed; Shah, Pervaiz Akhtar; Danish, Muhammad Zeeshan; Shah, Arshad Ali; Braga, Valdir de Andrade; Khan, Barkat Ali

    2016-01-01

    The aim of current research was to develop a water-in-oil emulsion containing grape seed extract for application in cosmeceuticals. Finally grinded dried grape seeds powder was extracted with hydro alcoholic mixture. Emulsions consisting of different concentrations of cetyl dimethicone (Abile EM90), the nonionic emulsifier, liquid paraffin as oily phase and water as aqueous phase were developed. Color, odor, pH, viscosity, liquefaction, phase separation, centrifugation and thermal stability of the formulated emulsions were observed at various storage temperatures i.e. 8±0.5°C, 25±0.5°C, 40±0.5°C and 40°C±0.5°C with 70% RH. The stable formulation consist of 16% mineral oil, 4% of ABIL EM 90(®), 4% grape seeds extract, 1% rose oil and 75% distilled water. All the results derived from this study showed good stability over the three months study period which indicates w/o emulsion can be used as carrier of 4% grape seeds extract to enhance desired effects when applied topically. PMID:26826810

  12. Aeroelastic Calculations Based on Three-Dimensional Euler Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakhle, Milind A.; Srivastava, Rakesh; Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Stefko, George L.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents representative results from an aeroelastic code (TURBO-AE) based on an Euler/Navier-Stokes unsteady aerodynamic code (TURBO). Unsteady pressure, lift, and moment distributions are presented for a helical fan test configuration which is used to verify the code by comparison to two-dimensional linear potential (flat plate) theory. The results are for pitching and plunging motions over a range of phase angles, Good agreement with linear theory is seen for all phase angles except those near acoustic resonances. The agreement is better for pitching motions than for plunging motions. The reason for this difference is not understood at present. Numerical checks have been performed to ensure that solutions are independent of time step, converged to periodicity, and linearly dependent on amplitude of blade motion. The paper concludes with an evaluation of the current state of development of the TURBO-AE code and presents some plans for further development and validation of the TURBO-AE code.

  13. Bridge aerodynamics and aeroelasticity: A comparison of modeling schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Teng; Kareem, Ahsan

    2013-11-01

    Accurate modeling of wind-induced loads on bridge decks is critical to ensure the functionality and survivability of long-span bridges. Over the last few decades, several schemes have emerged to model bridge behavior under winds from an aerodynamic/aeroelastic perspective. A majority of these schemes rely on the quasi-steady (QS) theory. This paper systematically compares and assesses the efficacy of five analytical models available in the literature with a new model presented herein. These models include: QS theory-based model, corrected QS theory-based model, linearized QS theory-based model, semi-empirical linear model, hybrid model, and the proposed modified hybrid model. The ability of these models to capture fluid memory and nonlinear effects either individually or collectively is examined. In addition, their ability to include the effects of turbulence in the approach flow on the bridge behavior is assessed. All models are compared in a consistent manner by utilizing the time domain approach. The underlying role of each model in capturing the physics of bridge behavior under winds is highlighted and the influence of incoming turbulence and its interaction with the bridge deck is examined. A discussion is included that focuses on a number of critical parameters pivotal to the effectiveness of corresponding models.

  14. Static Aeroelastic Effects of Formation Flight for Slender Unswept Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Curtis E.

    2009-01-01

    The static aeroelastic equilibrium equations for slender, straight wings are modified to incorporate the effects of aerodynamically-coupled formation flight. A system of equations is developed by applying trim constraints and is solved for component lift distribution, trim angle-of-attack, and trim aileron deflection. The trim values are then used to calculate the elastic twist distribution of the wing box. This system of equations is applied to a formation of two gliders in trimmed flight. Structural and aerodynamic properties are assumed for the gliders, and solutions are calculated for flexible and rigid wings in solo and formation flight. It is shown for a sample application of two gliders in formation flight, that formation disturbances produce greater twist in the wingtip immersed in the vortex than for either the opposing wingtip or the wings of a similar airplane in solo flight. Changes in the lift distribution, resulting from wing twist, increase the performance benefits of formation flight. A flexible wing in formation flight will require greater aileron deflection to achieve roll trim than a rigid wing.

  15. Static Aeroelastic Analysis with an Inviscid Cartesian Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, David L.; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Nemec, Marian; Smith, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    An embedded-boundary Cartesian-mesh flow solver is coupled with a three degree-offreedom structural model to perform static, aeroelastic analysis of complex aircraft geometries. The approach solves the complete system of aero-structural equations using a modular, loosely-coupled strategy which allows the lower-fidelity structural model to deform the highfidelity CFD model. The approach uses an open-source, 3-D discrete-geometry engine to deform a triangulated surface geometry according to the shape predicted by the structural model under the computed aerodynamic loads. The deformation scheme is capable of modeling large deflections and is applicable to the design of modern, very-flexible transport wings. The interface is modular so that aerodynamic or structural analysis methods can be easily swapped or enhanced. This extended abstract includes a brief description of the architecture, along with some preliminary validation of underlying assumptions and early results on a generic 3D transport model. The final paper will present more concrete cases and validation of the approach. Preliminary results demonstrate convergence of the complete aero-structural system and investigate the accuracy of the approximations used in the formulation of the structural model.

  16. Sensitivity Analysis of the Static Aeroelastic Response of a Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldred, Lloyd B.

    1993-01-01

    A technique to obtain the sensitivity of the static aeroelastic response of a three dimensional wing model is designed and implemented. The formulation is quite general and accepts any aerodynamic and structural analysis capability. A program to combine the discipline level, or local, sensitivities into global sensitivity derivatives is developed. A variety of representations of the wing pressure field are developed and tested to determine the most accurate and efficient scheme for representing the field outside of the aerodynamic code. Chebyshev polynomials are used to globally fit the pressure field. This approach had some difficulties in representing local variations in the field, so a variety of local interpolation polynomial pressure representations are also implemented. These panel based representations use a constant pressure value, a bilinearly interpolated value. or a biquadraticallv interpolated value. The interpolation polynomial approaches do an excellent job of reducing the numerical problems of the global approach for comparable computational effort. Regardless of the pressure representation used. sensitivity and response results with excellent accuracy have been produced for large integrated quantities such as wing tip deflection and trim angle of attack. The sensitivities of such things as individual generalized displacements have been found with fair accuracy. In general, accuracy is found to be proportional to the relative size of the derivatives to the quantity itself.

  17. Investigation at High Subsonic Speeds of the Static Longitudinal and Lateral Stability Characteristics of Two Canard Airplane Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleeman, William C., Jr.

    1957-01-01

    The present investigation was conducted in the Langley high-speed 7-by 10-foot tunnel to determine the static longitudinal and lateral stability characteristics at high subsonic speeds of two canard airplane configurations previously tested at supersonic speeds. The Mach number range of this investigation extended from 0.60 to 0.94 and a maximum angle-of-attack range of -2dewg to 24deg was obtained at the lowest test Mach number. Two wing plan forms of equal area were studied in the present tests; one was a 60deg delta wing and the other was a trapezoid wing having an aspect ratio of 3, taper ratio of 0.143, and an unswept 80-percent-chord line. The canard control had a trapezoidal plan form and its area was approximately 11.5 percent of the wing area. The model also had a low-aspect-ratio highly swept vertical tail and twin ventral fins. The longitudinal control characteristics of the models were consistent with past experience at low speed on canard configurations in that stalling of the canard surface occurred at moderate and high control deflections for moderate values of angle of attack. This stalling could impose appreciable limitations on the maximum trim-lift coefficient attainable. The control effectiveness and maximum value of trim-lift was significantly increased by addition of a body flap having a conical shape and located slightly behind the canard surface on the bottom of the body. Addition of the canard surface at 0deg deflection had relatively little effect on overall directional stability of the delta-wing configuration; however, deflection of the canard surface from 0deg to 10deg had a large favorable effect on directional stability at high angles of attack for both the trapezoid- and delta-wing configurations.

  18. A Study of the Short-Term Stability of Energy Characteristics of the Ionospheric Radio Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barabashov, B. G.; Ogar, A. S.; Pelevin, O. Yu.; Radio, L. P.

    2015-04-01

    On the basis of the results of long-term measurements on the calibrated mid-latitude highfrequency paths, it is concluded that the processes responsible for the energy characteristics of the high-frequency wave field have inertial properties. Slow (one-hour) absolute variations in the average signal and effective-noise levels in the daytime and the night-time hours do not exceed 2 .0 dB. Similar variations in the average signal levels in the twilight hours after removal of the trend, which is caused by the diurnal variation in the ionospheric characteristics, are also below 2 .0 dB. Analysis of the time behavior of the relative error-appearance frequency during transmission of the binary sequences with the amplitude manipulation indicates that the above frequency varies in the range 20 -75 % for an hour if the reception results are averaged for 20 min.

  19. Frequency-response method for determination of dynamic stability characteristics of airplanes with automatic controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Harry

    1947-01-01

    A frequency-response method for determining the critical control-gearing and hunting oscillations of airplanes with automatic pilots is presented. The method is graphical and has several advantages over the standard numerical procedure based on Routh's discriminant. The chief advantage of the method is that direct use can be made of the measured response characteristics of the automatic pilot. This feature is especially useful in determining the existence, amplitude, and frequency of the hunting oscillations that may be present when the automatic pilot has nonlinear dynamic characteristics. Several examples are worked out to illustrate the application of the frequency-response method in determining the effect of automatic-pilot lag or lead on critical control gearing and in determining the amplitude and frequency hunting. It is shown that the method may be applied to the case of a control geared to airplane motions about two axes.

  20. Comparison of meat quality characteristics and oxidative stability between conventional and free-range chickens.

    PubMed

    Funaro, A; Cardenia, V; Petracci, M; Rimini, S; Rodriguez-Estrada, M T; Cavani, C

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate quality traits and oxidative stability of meat products from free-range (FR) and conventionally (C) raised chickens as they actually reach consumers in the Italian retail market. Free-range female and male chickens (n = 1,500 + 1,500), medium growing ISA strain, were raised under commercial conditions for 56 (1.8 kg of live weight) and 70 d (3.1 kg of live weight), respectively; C female and male birds (n = 5,000 + 5,000) were a fast growing hybrid (Ross 708) and were separately raised for 39 (1.9 kg of live weight) and 50 d (3.1 kg of live weight), respectively. A total of 96 chickens (equally divided by production system and sex) were slaughtered in 2 separate sessions to obtain the main 2 commercial categories (rotisserie and cut-up, respectively). After slaughtering, 12 carcasses of each treatment group were randomly selected and used to assess quality properties, chemical composition, and oxidation stability of breast and leg meat. The C birds had dramatic higher carcass and breast meat yield, whereas FR had higher wing and leg yields. The FR birds exhibited higher water holding capacity in both breast and leg meat. Although shear force did not differ in breast meat, legs from FR birds were tougher. Fatty acid composition of FR breast and thigh meat of both categories were characterized by a higher polyunsaturated fatty acid n-6-/n-3 ratio. In general, a low lipid oxidation level (peroxide value < 1.3 mEq O2/kg of lipid and TBA reactive substances < 0.2 mg malondialdehyde/kg of sample) was found in breast and legs, regardless of the commercial category. However, the C system significantly increased peroxide value in rotisserie thigh meat, whereas FR led to a significantly higher TBA reactive substances in breast meat. Our results demonstrated that free range can modify the properties of chicken meat and also highlighted the importance of the bird genetic background to select nutritional strategies to improve meat

  1. Flame stabilization and mixing characteristics in a Stagnation Point Reverse Flow combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobba, Mohan K.

    A novel combustor design, referred to as the Stagnation Point Reverse-Flow (SPRF) combustor, was recently developed that is able to operate stably at very lean fuel-air mixtures and with low NOx emissions even when the fuel and air are not premixed before entering the combustor. The primary objective of this work is to elucidate the underlying physics behind the excellent stability and emissions performance of the SPRF combustor. The approach is to experimentally characterize velocities, species mixing, heat release and flame structure in an atmospheric pressure SPRF combustor with the help of various optical diagnostic techniques: OH PLIF, chemiluminescence imaging, PIV and Spontaneous Raman Scattering. Results indicate that the combustor is primarily stabilized in a region downstream of the injector that is characterized by low average velocities and high turbulence levels; this is also the region where most of the heat release occurs. High turbulence levels in the shear layer lead to increased product entrainment levels, elevating the reaction rates and thereby enhancing the combustor stability. The effect of product entrainment on chemical timescales and the flame structure is illustrated with simple reactor models. Although reactants are found to burn in a highly preheated (1300 K) and turbulent environment due to mixing with hot product gases, the residence times are sufficiently long compared to the ignition timescales such that the reactants do not autoignite. Turbulent flame structure analysis indicates that the flame is primarily in the thin reaction zones regime throughout the combustor, and it tends to become more flamelet like with increasing distance from the injector. Fuel-air mixing measurements in case of non-premixed operation indicate that the fuel is shielded from hot products until it is fully mixed with air, providing nearly premixed performance without the safety issues associated with premixing. The reduction in NOx emissions in the SPRF

  2. Comparison of meat quality characteristics and oxidative stability between conventional and free-range chickens.

    PubMed

    Funaro, A; Cardenia, V; Petracci, M; Rimini, S; Rodriguez-Estrada, M T; Cavani, C

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate quality traits and oxidative stability of meat products from free-range (FR) and conventionally (C) raised chickens as they actually reach consumers in the Italian retail market. Free-range female and male chickens (n = 1,500 + 1,500), medium growing ISA strain, were raised under commercial conditions for 56 (1.8 kg of live weight) and 70 d (3.1 kg of live weight), respectively; C female and male birds (n = 5,000 + 5,000) were a fast growing hybrid (Ross 708) and were separately raised for 39 (1.9 kg of live weight) and 50 d (3.1 kg of live weight), respectively. A total of 96 chickens (equally divided by production system and sex) were slaughtered in 2 separate sessions to obtain the main 2 commercial categories (rotisserie and cut-up, respectively). After slaughtering, 12 carcasses of each treatment group were randomly selected and used to assess quality properties, chemical composition, and oxidation stability of breast and leg meat. The C birds had dramatic higher carcass and breast meat yield, whereas FR had higher wing and leg yields. The FR birds exhibited higher water holding capacity in both breast and leg meat. Although shear force did not differ in breast meat, legs from FR birds were tougher. Fatty acid composition of FR breast and thigh meat of both categories were characterized by a higher polyunsaturated fatty acid n-6-/n-3 ratio. In general, a low lipid oxidation level (peroxide value < 1.3 mEq O2/kg of lipid and TBA reactive substances < 0.2 mg malondialdehyde/kg of sample) was found in breast and legs, regardless of the commercial category. However, the C system significantly increased peroxide value in rotisserie thigh meat, whereas FR led to a significantly higher TBA reactive substances in breast meat. Our results demonstrated that free range can modify the properties of chicken meat and also highlighted the importance of the bird genetic background to select nutritional strategies to improve meat

  3. Geotechnical characteristics and slope stability on the Ebro margin, western Mediterranean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baraza, J.; Lee, H.J.; Kayen, R.E.; Hampton, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    Sedimentological and geotechnical analyses of core samples from the Ebro continental slope define two distinct areas on the basis of sediment type, physical properties and geotechnical behavior. The first area is the upper slope area (water depths of 200-500 m), which consists of upper Pleistocene prodeltaic silty clay with a low water content (34% dry weight average), low plasticity, and high overconsolidation near the seafloor. The second area, the middle and lower slope (water depths greater than 500 m), contains clay- and silt-size hemipelagic deposits with a high water content (90% average), high plasticity, and a low to moderate degree of overconsolidation near the sediment surface. Results from geotechnical tests show that the upper slope has a relatively high degree of stability under relatively rapid (undrained) static loading conditions, compared with the middle and lower slopes, which have a higher degree of stability under long-term (drained) static loading conditions. Under cyclic loading, which occurs during earthquakes, the upper slope has a higher degree of stability than the middle and lower slopes. For the surface of the seafloor, calculated critical earthquake accelerations that can trigger slope failures range from 0.73 g on the upper slope to 0.23 g on the lower slope. Sediment buried well below the seafloor may have a critical acceleration as low as 0.09 g on the upper slope and 0.17 g on the lower slope. Seismically induced instability of most of the Ebro slope seems unlikely given that an earthquake shaking of at least intensity VI would be needed, and such strong intensities have never been recorded in the last 70 years. Other cyclic loading events, such as storms or internal waves, do not appear to be direct causes of instability at present. Infrequent, particularly strong earthquakes could cause landslides on the Ebro margin slope. The Columbretes slide on the southwestern Ebro margin may have been caused by intense earthquake shaking

  4. Aerodynamic characteristics of a feathered dinosaur measured using physical models. Effects of form on static stability and control effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, Dennis; Cardona, Griselda; Guenther-Gleason, Eric; Huynh, Tony; Kwong, Austin; Marks, Dylan; Ray, Neil; Tisbe, Adrian; Tse, Kyle; Koehl, Mimi

    2014-01-01

    We report the effects of posture and morphology on the static aerodynamic stability and control effectiveness of physical models based on the feathered dinosaur, [Formula: see text]Microraptor gui, from the Cretaceous of China. Postures had similar lift and drag coefficients and were broadly similar when simplified metrics of gliding were considered, but they exhibited different stability characteristics depending on the position of the legs and the presence of feathers on the legs and the tail. Both stability and the function of appendages in generating maneuvering forces and torques changed as the glide angle or angle of attack were changed. These are significant because they represent an aerial environment that may have shifted during the evolution of directed aerial descent and other aerial behaviors. Certain movements were particularly effective (symmetric movements of the wings and tail in pitch, asymmetric wing movements, some tail movements). Other appendages altered their function from creating yaws at high angle of attack to rolls at low angle of attack, or reversed their function entirely. While [Formula: see text]M. gui lived after [Formula: see text]Archaeopteryx and likely represents a side experiment with feathered morphology, the general patterns of stability and control effectiveness suggested from the manipulations of forelimb, hindlimb and tail morphology here may help understand the evolution of flight control aerodynamics in vertebrates. Though these results rest on a single specimen, as further fossils with different morphologies are tested, the findings here could be applied in a phylogenetic context to reveal biomechanical constraints on extinct flyers arising from the need to maneuver. PMID:24454820

  5. Effect of fibrolytic enzymes on the fermentation characteristics, aerobic stability, and digestibility of bermudagrass silage.

    PubMed

    Dean, D B; Adesogan, A T; Krueger, N; Littell, R C

    2005-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if the nutritive value and aerobic stability of bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon) silage could be improved by addition of proprietary, exogenous cellulase/hemicellulase enzyme preparations at ensiling. A 5-wk regrowth of Tifton 85 bermudagrass was conserved without treatment (control) or after treatment with exogenous fibrolytic enzymes including Promote NET (Pr), Biocellulase X-20 (X20), Biocellulase A-20 (A20), and Enzyme CT. The respective enzymes were applied at half the recommended rate, the recommended rate, or twice the recommended rate corresponding to 0.65, 1.3, and 2.6 g/kg of DM, 7.3, 14.5, and 29 mg/kg of DM, at 7.3, 14.4, and 29 mg/kg of DM, and 89, 178, and 356 mg/kg of DM, for Pr, X20, A20, and CT, respectively. The enzymes were sprayed on the bermudagrass at ensiling (not added at feeding as suggested by the manufacturers) to test the objectives of the study. Six 1-kg replicates of chopped (5 cm) forage were ensiled for 145 d in 2.8-L mini silos. Three silos per treatment were used for chemical analysis and 3 for aerobic stability monitoring. The silage juice was analyzed for organic acids, pH, water-soluble carbohydrates (WSC), ammonia-N, and soluble N. Freeze-dried samples were analyzed for crude protein (CP), neutral detergent fiber (NDF), and acid detergent fiber (ADF). In vitro digestibility of DM (IVDMD), NDF (IVNDFD), and ADF (IVADFD) were determined after digesting the silages in buffered rumen fluid for 6 or 48 h in 2 ANKOM(II) Daisy Incubators. Compared with the other silages, those treated with Pr had lower DM losses, and lower pH and ammonia-N concentration than control silages. Residual WSC concentration was greater in Pr- and CT-treated silages than in control silages and greater in Pr-treated silages than CT-treated silages. Compared with control silages, NDF concentration was lower in silages treated with Pr, X20, and CT, and ADF concentration was lower in silages treated with Pr, X20, and A20

  6. A neural network-based power system stabilizer using power flow characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y.M.; Choi, M.S.; Lee, K.Y.

    1996-06-01

    A neural network-based Power System Stabilizer (Neuro-PSS) is designed for a generator connected to a multi-machine power system utilizing the nonlinear power flow dynamics. The uses of power flow dynamics provide a PSS for a wide range operation with reduced size neutral networks. The Neuro-PSS consists of two neutral networks: Neuro-Identifier and Neuro-Controller. The low-frequency oscillation is modeled by the Neuro-Identifier using the power flow dynamics, then a Generalized Backpropagation-Thorough-Time (GBTT) algorithm is developed to train the Neuro-Controller. The simulation results show that the Neuro-PSS designed in this paper performs well with good damping in a wide operation range compared with the conventional PSS.

  7. The effect of stochastic modulations on the stability characteristics of hydrodynamic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wulbrand, W.

    The present study is concerned with the development of a model which can be employed to study the effect of temporal stochastic modulations of the boundary values on the stability of flows. The linearized equations of motion for the development of the disturbance of the basic flow have the form of stochastic differential equations with multiplicative 'external' noise. Equations for the first moment of the perturbation of the basic flow are derived for the formulation of an instability criterion. The Galerkin procedure is used for a calculation of the critical parameters. The considered method can be employed for all problems in which the basic flow can be calculated on the basis of the Navier-Stokes equations. An employment of the method to the Couette-Poiseuille flow is found to lead to equations which have to be evaluated numerically. On the other hand, in the case of convective instability, an approximate result can be obtained by means of an analytical calculation.

  8. Stability of Electrical and Photovoltaic Characteristics of HBr Solution-Doped Polyacetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M. S.; Tzeng, J. S.; Chen, Y. C.; Shiramatsu, T.

    1989-06-01

    Polyacetylene was doped with hydrogen bromide (HBr) solution. The electrical conductivity of the solution-doped polyacetylene increased by an order of six from 5× 10-9 S/cm to 4× 10-3 S/cm. Here the stability of HBr-doped polyacetylene is discussed with respect to the changes in conductivity due to heat treatment and exposure to air, in comparison with I2-doped polyacetylene. The HBr-doped polyacetylene is slightly more stable than the I2-doped polyacetylene. The Al/cis-[CH(HBr)y]x/Au M-S Schottky barrier solar cell was fabricated, and its properties were investigated. The maximum energy conversion efficiency of the cell was 0.9% under the illumination of an incident light intensity of 10 mW/cm2.

  9. Thermal barrier characteristics of partially stabilized zirconia coatings on INCOLOY alloy 909; A controlled expansion alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.D. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on INCOLOY{sup 1} alloy 909 which is a low-expansion alloy used in critical seal and shaft applications within the gas turbine engine. However, because of its poor oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures, the maximum service temperature is limited. Since its coefficient of expansion is similar to that of partially stabilized zirconia for temperatures to 1200{degrees}F (649{degrees}C), it has been proposed to use this metal-ceramic combination for dimensionally critical, air-cooled jet engine components. This coating system should extend temperature limitations by reducing metal temperatures and providing oxidation resistance. The performance advantage offered by a thermal barrier coating has been investigated at temperatures up to 2000{degrees}F (1093{degrees}C) and the results are presented in this paper. Metal temperatures and heat flow rates of coated and bare specimens are compared for two air-cooling flow rates.

  10. Static Aeroelastic Analysis of Transonic Wind Tunnel Models Using Finite Element Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, John R.; Burner, Alpheus W.; Valla, Robert

    1997-01-01

    A computational method for accurately predicting the static aeroelastic deformations of typical transonic transport wind tunnel models is described. The method utilizes a finite element method (FEM) for predicting the deformations. Extensive calibration/validation of this method was carried out using a novel wind-off wind tunnel model static loading experiment and wind-on optical wing twist measurements obtained during a recent wind tunnel test in the National Transonic Facility (NTF) at NASA LaRC. Further validations were carried out using a Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics (CFD) flow solver to calculate wing pressure distributions about several aeroelastically deformed wings and comparing these predictions with NTF experimental data. Results from this aeroelastic deformation method are in good overall agreement with experimentally measured values. Including the predicted deformations significantly improves the correlation between CFD predicted and experimentally measured wing & pressures.

  11. Aeroelastic Deformation Measurements of Flap, Gap, and Overhang on a Semispan Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Liu, Tianshu; Garg, Sanjay; Ghee, Terence A.; Taylor, Nigel J.

    2000-01-01

    Single-camera, single-view videogrammetry has been used to determine static aeroelastic deformation of a slotted flap configuration on a semispan model at the National Transonic Facility (NTF). Deformation was determined by comparing wind-off to wind-on spatial data from targets placed on the main element, shroud, and flap of the model. Digitized video images from a camera were recorded and processed to automatically determine target image plane locations that were then corrected for sensor, lens, and frame grabber spatial errors. The videogrammetric technique has been established at NASA facilities as the technique of choice when high-volume static aeroelastic data with minimum impact on data taking is required. The primary measurement at the NTF with this technique in the past has been the measurement of static aeroelastic wing twist on full span models. The first results using the videogrammetric technique for the measurement of component deformation during semispan testing at the NTF are presented.

  12. Non-Linear System Identification for Aeroelastic Systems with Application to Experimental Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kukreja, Sunil L.

    2008-01-01

    Representation and identification of a non-linear aeroelastic pitch-plunge system as a model of the NARMAX class is considered. A non-linear difference equation describing this aircraft model is derived theoretically and shown to be of the NARMAX form. Identification methods for NARMAX models are applied to aeroelastic dynamics and its properties demonstrated via continuous-time simulations of experimental conditions. Simulation results show that (i) the outputs of the NARMAX model match closely those generated using continuous-time methods and (ii) NARMAX identification methods applied to aeroelastic dynamics provide accurate discrete-time parameter estimates. Application of NARMAX identification to experimental pitch-plunge dynamics data gives a high percent fit for cross-validated data.

  13. Plans and Example Results for the 2nd AIAA Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heeg, Jennifer; Chwalowski, Pawel; Schuster, David M.; Raveh, Daniella; Jirasek, Adam; Dalenbring, Mats

    2015-01-01

    This paper summarizes the plans for the second AIAA Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop. The workshop is designed to assess the state-of-the-art of computational methods for predicting unsteady flow fields and aeroelastic response. The goals are to provide an impartial forum to evaluate the effectiveness of existing computer codes and modeling techniques, and to identify computational and experimental areas needing additional research and development. This paper provides guidelines and instructions for participants including the computational aerodynamic model, the structural dynamic properties, the experimental comparison data and the expected output data from simulations. The Benchmark Supercritical Wing (BSCW) has been chosen as the configuration for this workshop. The analyses to be performed will include aeroelastic flutter solutions of the wing mounted on a pitch-and-plunge apparatus.

  14. Structural Dynamics Modeling of HIRENASD in Support of the Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieseman, Carol; Chwalowski, Pawel; Heeg, Jennifer; Boucke, Alexander; Castro, Jack

    2013-01-01

    An Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop (AePW) was held in April 2012 using three aeroelasticity case study wind tunnel tests for assessing the capabilities of various codes in making aeroelasticity predictions. One of these case studies was known as the HIRENASD model that was tested in the European Transonic Wind Tunnel (ETW). This paper summarizes the development of a standardized enhanced analytical HIRENASD structural model for use in the AePW effort. The modifications to the HIRENASD finite element model were validated by comparing modal frequencies, evaluating modal assurance criteria, comparing leading edge, trailing edge and twist of the wing with experiment and by performing steady and unsteady CFD analyses for one of the test conditions on the same grid, and identical processing of results.

  15. Nonlinear System Identification for Aeroelastic Systems with Application to Experimental Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kukreja, Sunil L.

    2008-01-01

    Representation and identification of a nonlinear aeroelastic pitch-plunge system as a model of the Nonlinear AutoRegressive, Moving Average eXogenous (NARMAX) class is considered. A nonlinear difference equation describing this aircraft model is derived theoretically and shown to be of the NARMAX form. Identification methods for NARMAX models are applied to aeroelastic dynamics and its properties demonstrated via continuous-time simulations of experimental conditions. Simulation results show that (1) the outputs of the NARMAX model closely match those generated using continuous-time methods, and (2) NARMAX identification methods applied to aeroelastic dynamics provide accurate discrete-time parameter estimates. Application of NARMAX identification to experimental pitch-plunge dynamics data gives a high percent fit for cross-validated data.

  16. FUN3D Analyses in Support of the Second Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chwalowski, Pawel; Heeg, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the computational aeroelastic results generated in support of the second Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop for the Benchmark Supercritical Wing (BSCW) configurations and compares them to the experimental data. The computational results are obtained using FUN3D, an unstructured grid Reynolds- Averaged Navier-Stokes solver developed at NASA Langley Research Center. The analysis results include aerodynamic coefficients and surface pressures obtained for steady-state, static aeroelastic equilibrium, and unsteady flow due to a pitching wing or flutter prediction. Frequency response functions of the pressure coefficients with respect to the angular displacement are computed and compared with the experimental data. The effects of spatial and temporal convergence on the computational results are examined.

  17. Analysis of Test Case Computations and Experiments for the First Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, David M.; Heeg, Jennifer; Wieseman, Carol D.; Chwalowski, Pawel

    2013-01-01

    This paper compares computational and experimental data from the Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop (AePW) held in April 2012. This workshop was designed as a series of technical interchange meetings to assess the state of the art of computational methods for predicting unsteady flowfields and static and dynamic aeroelastic response. The goals are to provide an impartial forum to evaluate the effectiveness of existing computer codes and modeling techniques to simulate aeroelastic problems and to identify computational and experimental areas needing additional research and development. Three subject configurations were chosen from existing wind-tunnel data sets where there is pertinent experimental data available for comparison. Participant researchers analyzed one or more of the subject configurations, and results from all of these computations were compared at the workshop.

  18. Aeroelastic measurements and simulations of a small wind turbine operating in the built environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, S. P.; Bradney, D. R.; Clausen, P. D.

    2016-09-01

    Small wind turbines, when compared to large commercial scale wind turbines, often lag behind with respect to research investment, technological development, and experimental verification of design standards. In this study we assess the simplified load equations outlined in IEC 61400.2-2013 for use in determining fatigue loading of small wind turbine blades. We compare these calculated loads to fatigue damage cycles from both measured in-service operation, and aeroelastic modelling of a small 5 kW Aerogenesis wind turbine. Damage cycle ranges and corresponding stress ratios show good agreement when comparing both aeroelastic simulations and operational measurements. Loads calculated from simplified load equations were shown to significantly overpredict load ranges while underpredicting the occurrence of damage cycles per minute of operation by 89%. Due to the difficulty in measuring and acquiring operational loading, we recommend the use of aeroelastic modelling as a method of mitigating the over-conservative simplified load equation for fatigue loading.

  19. A comparative study of serial and parallel aeroelastic computations of wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byun, Chansup; Guruswamy, Guru P.

    1994-01-01

    A procedure for computing the aeroelasticity of wings on parallel multiple-instruction, multiple-data (MIMD) computers is presented. In this procedure, fluids are modeled using Euler equations, and structures are modeled using modal or finite element equations. The procedure is designed in such a way that each discipline can be developed and maintained independently by using a domain decomposition approach. In the present parallel procedure, each computational domain is scalable. A parallel integration scheme is used to compute aeroelastic responses by solving fluid and structural equations concurrently. The computational efficiency issues of parallel integration of both fluid and structural equations are investigated in detail. This approach, which reduces the total computational time by a factor of almost 2, is demonstrated for a typical aeroelastic wing by using various numbers of processors on the Intel iPSC/860.

  20. Dew formation characteristics in a revegetation-stabilized desert ecosystem in Shapotou area, Northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yan-xia; Wang, Xin-ping; Zhang, Ya-feng

    2010-06-01

    SummarySoil moisture in the upper layer plays an important role in arid desert ecosystems. Dew as an additional source of fresh water, may have a positive impact upon the ecosystems in arid and semi-arid zones. Measurements on dew formation amount and duration were carried out in the whole October of 2008 at different condensing surface types (bare dune sands, physical soil crusts and biological soil crusts) associated with different inter-space positions between plants, and at the area under plant canopy in a revegetation-stabilized arid desert ecosystem in Shapotou area, China. The results indicated that there was a positive linear correlation between dew amounts and relative humidity, while mean temperature was negatively linearly related to dew amounts and no significant relationship was found between dew amounts and wind speed. Clear and foggy mornings were characterized by higher dew amounts and longer dew duration, whereas less dew was recorded during cloudy and especially windy mornings. Crusts, especially the biological soil crusts, obtained significantly higher amounts of dew than that of bare moving sand dunes. It was more difficult for dew to condense under the canopy of the plants than on the bare sand dunes. At the first stage of ecological engineering projects, dew can renew the moisture losing through the evaporation of soil and transpiration of leaves, and thus can supply important source of water for xerophytic shrubs. The higher dew amount at the inter-space of re-vegetated plants is an important driving factor for the growth of microorganisms and spore plants, which further accelerate the formation of biological soil crusts and stabilization of moving sand dunes. The presence of biological soil crusts, in turn, helps to facilitate the formation of dew. Therefore, a mutual enhanced effect exists between dew and artificially revegetation ecosystems.

  1. Characteristics, composition and oxidative stability of Lannea microcarpa seed and seed oil.

    PubMed

    Bazongo, Patrice; Bassolé, Imaël Henri Nestor; Nielsen, Søren; Hilou, Adama; Dicko, Mamoudou Hama; Shukla, Vijai K S

    2014-01-01

    The proximate composition of seeds and main physicochemical properties and thermal stability of oil extracted from Lannea microcarpa seeds were evaluated. The percentage composition of the seeds was: ash (3.11%), crude oil (64.90%), protein (21.14%), total carbohydrate (10.85%) and moisture (3.24%). Physicochemical properties of the oil were: refractive index, 1.473; melting point, 22.60°C; saponification value, 194.23 mg of KOH/g of oil; iodine value, 61.33 g of I2/100 g of oil; acid value, 1.21 mg of KOH/g of oil; peroxide value, 1.48 meq of O2/kg of oil and oxidative stability index, 43.20 h. Oleic (43.45%), palmitic (34.45%), linoleic (11.20%) and stearic (8.35%) acids were the most dominant fatty acids. Triacylglycerols with equivalent carbon number (ECN) 48 and ECN 46 were dominant (46.96% and 37.31%, respectively). The major triacylglycerol constituents were palmitoyl diolein (POO) (21.23%), followed by dipalmitoyl olein (POP) (16.47%), palmitoyl linoleyl olein (PLO) (12.03%), dipalmitoyl linolein (PLP) (10.85%) and dioleoyl linolein (LOO) (9.30%). The total polyphenol and tocopherol contents were 1.39 mg GAE g-1 DW and 578.56 ppm, respectively. γ-Tocopherol was the major tocopherol (437.23 ppm). These analytical results indicated that the L. microcarpa seed oil could be used as a frying oil and in the cosmetic industry. PMID:24566330

  2. [Stability and organic carbon characteristics of soil aggregates under different ecosystems in karst canyon region].

    PubMed

    Tan, Qiu-Jin; Song, Tong-Qing; Peng, Wan-Xi; Zeng, Fu-Ping; Du, Hu; Yang, Gai-Ren; Fan, Fu-Jing

    2014-03-01

    Soil aggregates and their organic carbon distributions were studied under six ecosystems, i. e., farmland (short for ST), dry land (HD), grassland (CD), shrubbery (GC), plantation (RGL) and secondary forest (CSL), in a karst canyon region of China by a combination of field investigation and laboratory analysis. The result showed that, soil aggregates were dominated by particles with sizes>8 mm in the ecosystems except HD under dry sieving, and basically presented a trend of decreasing firstly, then increasing and finally decreasing along with particle sizes decreasing; while soil aggregates were dominated by particles with sizes > 5 mm in the ecosystems except HD under wet sieving and decreased with decreasing of particle sizes. The mean mass diameter (MMD) was in the order of ST>CD>RGL>CSL>GC>HD and the geometric mean diameter (GMD) was ST>CD>RGL>CSL>HD>GC by dry sieving, and MMD was RGL>CSL>GC>CD>ST>HD and GMD was CSL>RGL>GC>CD>ST>HD by wet sieving. Therefore, MMD and especially GMD of wet sieving were more accurate than that of dry sieving to evaluate soil aggregates quality in the karst cannon region. The fractal dimension (D) of mechanical stability in soil aggregates followed the order of CD>HD>ST>RGL>CSL>GC and the water stability was in the order of GC>CSL>RGL>HD> CD>ST. The higher the SOC content was, the larger values of D, MMD, GMD became, and the more sense the soil structure made. Soil organic carbon content was highest in the aggregate particles with sizes ranging from 0.25 to 0.053 mm, and the content in some particles with sizes > 5 mm was lowest. However, the contribution rate of particles with sizes > 5 mm was largest to soil organic carbon, which gradually decreased with the decrease of particle size.

  3. Aeroelastic analysis of circular cylindrical and truncated conical shells subjected to a supersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabri, Farhad

    circular cylindrical shell or truncated conical shell subjected to internal/external pressure and axial compression loading. This is a typical example of external liquid propellant tanks of space shuttles and re-entry vehicles where they may experience this kind of loading during the flight. In the current work, different end boundary conditions of a circular cylindrical shell with different filling ratios were analyzed. To the best author' knowledge this is the first study where this kind of complex loading and boundary conditions are treated together during such an analysis. Only static instability, divergence, was observed where it showed that the fluid filling ratio does not have any effect on the critical buckling pressure and axial compression. It only reduces the vibration frequencies. It also revealed that the pressurized shell loses its stability at a higher critical axial load. (ii) Aeroelastic analysis of empty or partially liquid filled circular cylindrical and conical shells. Different boundary conditions with different geometries of shells subjected to supersonic air flow are studied here. In all of cases shell loses its stability though the coupled mode flutter. The results showed that internal pressure has a stabilizing effect and increases the critical flutter speed. It is seen that the value of critical dynamic pressure changes rapidly and widely as the filling ratio increases from a low value. In addition, by increasing the length ratio the decrement of flutter speed is decreased and vanishes. This rapid change in critical dynamic pressure at low filling ratios and its almost steady behaviour at large filling ratios indicate that the fluid near the bottom of the shell is largely influenced by elastic deformation when a shell is subjected to external subsonic flow. Based on comparison with the existing numerical, analytical and experimental data and the power of capabilities of this hybrid finite element method to model different boundary conditions and

  4. STABCAR: A program for finding characteristic root systems having transcendental stability matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, W. M., Jr.; Tiffany, S. H.; Newsom, J. R.; Peele, E. L.

    1984-01-01

    STABCAR can be used to determine the characteristic roots of flexible, actively controlled aircraft, including the effects of unsteady aerodynamics. A modal formulation and a transfer-matrix representation of the control system are employed. Operable in either a batch or an interactive mode, STABCAR can provide graphical or tabular output of the variation of the roots with velocity, density, altitude, dynamic pressure or feedback gains. Herein the mathematical model, program structure, input requirements, output capabilities, and a series of sample cases are detailed. STABCAR was written for use on CDC CYBER 175 equipment; modification would be required for operation on other machines.

  5. The Longitudinal Stability, Control Effectiveness, and Control Hinge Moment Characteristics Obtained from a Flight Investigation of a Canard Missile Configuration at Transonic and Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niewald, Roy J; Moul, Martin T

    1950-01-01

    A 60 degree delta wing canard missile configuration was flight-tested at the Langley pilotless aircraft research station at Wallops Island, Va. The results include the longitudinal stability derivatives, control effectiveness, drag characteristics, and control-surface hinge-moment characteristics for a Mach number range of 0.7 to 1.45.

  6. Trim and Structural Optimization of Subsonic Transport Wings Using Nonconventional Aeroelastic Tailoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, Bret K.; Jutte, Christine V.

    2014-01-01

    Several minimum-mass aeroelastic optimization problems are solved to evaluate the effectiveness of a variety of novel tailoring schemes for subsonic transport wings. Aeroelastic strength and panel buckling constraints are imposed across a variety of trimmed maneuver loads. Tailoring with metallic thickness variations, functionally graded materials, composite laminates, tow steering, and distributed trailing edge control effectors are all found to provide reductions in structural wing mass with varying degrees of success. The question as to whether this wing mass reduction will offset the increased manufacturing cost is left unresolved for each case.

  7. Optimal Topology of Aircraft Rib and Spar Structures under Aeroelastic Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, Bret K.; Dunning, Peter D.

    2014-01-01

    Several topology optimization problems are conducted within the ribs and spars of a wing box. It is desired to locate the best position of lightening holes, truss/cross-bracing, etc. A variety of aeroelastic metrics are isolated for each of these problems: elastic wing compliance under trim loads and taxi loads, stress distribution, and crushing loads. Aileron effectiveness under a constant roll rate is considered, as are dynamic metrics: natural vibration frequency and flutter. This approach helps uncover the relationship between topology and aeroelasticity in subsonic transport wings, and can therefore aid in understanding the complex aircraft design process which must eventually consider all these metrics and load cases simultaneously.

  8. A historical overview of tiltrotor aeroelastic research at Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvaternik, Raymond G.

    1992-01-01

    The Bell/Boeing V-22 Osprey which is being developed for the U.S. Military is a tiltrotor aircraft combining the versatility of a helicopter with the range and speed of a turboprop airplane. The V-22 represents a tiltrotor lineage which goes back over forty years, during which time contributions to the technology base needed for its development were made by both government and industry. NASA Langley Research Center has made substantial contributions to tiltrotor technology in several areas, in particular in the area of aeroelasticity. The purpose of this talk is to present a summary of the tiltrotor aeroelastic research conducted at Langley which has contributed to that technology.

  9. Comparison of Curvilinear Stiffeners and Tow Steered Composites for Aeroelastic Tailoring of Transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, Bret K.; Jutte, Christine V.

    2016-01-01

    A series of aeroelastic optimization problems are solved on a high aspect ratio wingbox of the Common Research Model, in an effort to minimize structural mass under coupled stress, buckling, and flutter constraints. Two technologies are of particular interest: tow steered composite laminate skins and curvilinear stiffeners. Both methods are found to afford feasible reductions in mass over their non-curvilinear structural counterparts, through both distinct and shared mechanisms for passively controlling aeroelastic performance. Some degree of diminishing returns are seen when curvilinear stiffeners and curvilinear fiber tow paths are used simultaneously.

  10. Efficient computation of aerodynamic influence coefficients for aeroelastic analysis on a transputer network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janetzke, David C.; Murthy, Durbha V.

    1991-01-01

    Aeroelastic analysis is multi-disciplinary and computationally expensive. Hence, it can greatly benefit from parallel processing. As part of an effort to develop an aeroelastic capability on a distributed memory transputer network, a parallel algorithm for the computation of aerodynamic influence coefficients is implemented on a network of 32 transputers. The aerodynamic influence coefficients are calculated using a 3-D unsteady aerodynamic model and a parallel discretization. Efficiencies up to 85 percent were demonstrated using 32 processors. The effect of subtask ordering, problem size, and network topology are presented. A comparison to results on a shared memory computer indicates that higher speedup is achieved on the distributed memory system.

  11. Development of Unsteady Aerodynamic and Aeroelastic Reduced-Order Models Using the FUN3D Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Vatsa, Veer N.; Biedron, Robert T.

    2009-01-01

    Recent significant improvements to the development of CFD-based unsteady aerodynamic reduced-order models (ROMs) are implemented into the FUN3D unstructured flow solver. These improvements include the simultaneous excitation of the structural modes of the CFD-based unsteady aerodynamic system via a single CFD solution, minimization of the error between the full CFD and the ROM unsteady aero- dynamic solution, and computation of a root locus plot of the aeroelastic ROM. Results are presented for a viscous version of the two-dimensional Benchmark Active Controls Technology (BACT) model and an inviscid version of the AGARD 445.6 aeroelastic wing using the FUN3D code.

  12. Effects of rainfall characteristics on infiltration and redistribution patterns in revegetation-stabilized desert ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin-Ping; Cui, Yan; Pan, Yan-Xia; Li, Xin-Rong; Yu, Z.; Young, M. H.

    2008-08-01

    SummaryRainfall, the dominant source of water replenishment in the semi-arid sand dune area of north-western China, plays an important role in sustaining the desert ecosystem. An experiment to measure water balance associated with infiltration events was conducted on the re-vegetated sand dunes in the Tengger Desert, north-western China. The redistribution of infiltrated moisture in the course of percolation, root extraction, and evapotranspiration pathways was investigated for a period of 45 days during the growing season. Time domain reflectometry probes were inserted horizontally at 12 different depths below the ground surface in the Caragana korshinskii dwarf-shrub community to record volumetric soil moisture at hourly intervals. Rainfall events were sporadic with widely different intensities during the period of the experiment. The presence of vegetation markedly influenced the infiltration and redistribution patterns on the stabilized sand dunes. Infiltration rates varied greatly with individual rainfall quantity and antecedent soil moisture, with drier soil profile facilitating infiltration. The relationship between infiltration rate and rainfall intensity was linear, with infiltration rate at 80% the magnitude of rainfall intensity. Contrasts between the infiltration rate and cumulative infiltration varied with the feature of rainfall events of the vegetation-stabilized desert soil and the un-vegetated bare desert soil indicate that the measured precipitation alone is insufficient to explain the effective rainfall of the studied regions. At rainfall amount <8.2 mm, with rainfall intensity <0.5 mm h -1, no soil moisture was gained for the re-vegetated soil, while for the bare soil the comparable values were <6.4 mm, and <0.7 mm h -1, respectively. Root withdrawal of soil water and evapotranspiration (reaching 69-90% of precipitation) restricted the wetting front penetration for the vegetated soil. In contrast, the bare soil was prone to infiltration zone

  13. Characteristics of Four Plant Species Used for Soil Bioengineering Techniques in River Bank Stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Gao, J. R.; Lou, H. P.; Zhang, J. R.; Rauch, H. P.

    2010-05-01

    Use the potential values of soil bioengineering techniques are important for the wide attention river ecological restoration works in Beijing. At first, demand for basic knowledge of the technical and biological properties of plants is essential for development of such techniques. Species for each chosen plant material type should be selected with an emphasis on the following: suitability for anticipated environment conditions, reasonable availability in desired quantity and probability of successful establishment. Account on these criteria, four species which used as live staking and rooted cutting techniques were selected, namely, Salix X aureo-pendula, Salix cheilophila, Vitex negundo var. heterophylla and Amorpha fruticosa L.. And monitoring work was performed on three construction sites of Beijing. Various survival rates and morphological parameters data were collected. Concerning plants hydraulic and hydrological behavior, bending tests were used to analysis the flexibility of each plant species. The results from rate and morphological parameters monitoring show that: Salix cheilophila performed the best. Other three plants behaved satisfactorily in shoots or roots development respectively. In the bending test mornitoring, Salix cheilophila branch had the least broken number. Then were Salix X aureo-pendula and Amorpha fruticosa L.. Vitex negundo var. branch had the highest broken number, but it tolerated the highest amount of stress. All plant species should be considered in the future scientific research and construction works in Beijing. Keywords: River bank stabilization, live staking, rooted cutting

  14. Equilibrium and Stability Characteristics of DIII-D Discharges with Low Edge Safety Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayakumar, R. J.; Garofalo, A. M.; Navratil, G. A.; Reimerdes, H.; Jensen, T. H.; La Haye, R. J.; Scoville, J. T.; Strait, E. J.; Turnbull, A. D.; Okabayashi, M.

    2002-11-01

    A low safety factor plasma has a good potential for reactor applications, since the fusion power and gain increase with reduction in safety factor. Experiments are being carried out in the DIII-D to investigate the equilibrium profiles and stability limits of such plasmas. Plasmas with flat q profiles q_min>1 and q_95<2.5 have been obtained with βN (>2.0) above no wall limits during current ramp and using resistive wall mode feedback. The discharge followed a current profile evolution predicted by the code CORSICA. The ideal wall and no wall beta limits for such discharges are being investigated using the codes GATO and DCON, for different current and pressure profiles. Simultaneously, the current profile and its evolution are being modeled for a variety of plasma cross sectional shapes and discharge formation scenarios to select an optimal scenario for the 2003 experimental run. The experimental results to date and modeling results will be presented.

  15. Influence of grain boundary characteristics on thermal stability in nanotwinned copper.

    PubMed

    Niu, Rongmei; Han, Ke; Su, Yi-Feng; Besara, Tiglet; Siegrist, Theo M; Zuo, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    High density grain boundaries provide high strength, but may introduce undesirable features, such as high Fermi levels and instability. We investigated the kinetics of recovery and recrystallization of Cu that was manufactured to include both nanotwins (NT) and high-angle columnar boundaries. We used the isothermal Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) model to estimate activation energy values for recovery and recrystallization and compared those to values derived using the non-isothermal Kissinger equation. The JMAK model hinges on an exponent that expresses the growth mechanism of a material. The exponent for this Cu was close to 0.5, indicating low-dimensional microstructure evolution, which is associated with anisotropic twin coarsening, heterogeneous recrystallization, and high stability. Since this Cu was of high purity, there was a negligible impurity-drag-effect on boundaries. The twin coarsening and heterogeneous recrystallization resulted from migration of high-angle columnar boundaries with their triple junctions in one direction, assisted by the presence of high concentration vacancies at boundaries. Analyses performed by electron energy loss spectroscopy of atomic columns at twin boundaries (TBs) and in the interior showed similar plasma peak shapes and L3 edge positions. This implies that values for conductivity and Fermi level are equal for atoms at TBs and in the interior. PMID:27514474

  16. Influence of grain boundary characteristics on thermal stability in nanotwinned copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Rongmei; Han, Ke; Su, Yi-Feng; Besara, Tiglet; Siegrist, Theo M.; Zuo, Xiaowei

    2016-08-01

    High density grain boundaries provide high strength, but may introduce undesirable features, such as high Fermi levels and instability. We investigated the kinetics of recovery and recrystallization of Cu that was manufactured to include both nanotwins (NT) and high-angle columnar boundaries. We used the isothermal Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) model to estimate activation energy values for recovery and recrystallization and compared those to values derived using the non-isothermal Kissinger equation. The JMAK model hinges on an exponent that expresses the growth mechanism of a material. The exponent for this Cu was close to 0.5, indicating low-dimensional microstructure evolution, which is associated with anisotropic twin coarsening, heterogeneous recrystallization, and high stability. Since this Cu was of high purity, there was a negligible impurity-drag-effect on boundaries. The twin coarsening and heterogeneous recrystallization resulted from migration of high-angle columnar boundaries with their triple junctions in one direction, assisted by the presence of high concentration vacancies at boundaries. Analyses performed by electron energy loss spectroscopy of atomic columns at twin boundaries (TBs) and in the interior showed similar plasma peak shapes and L3 edge positions. This implies that values for conductivity and Fermi level are equal for atoms at TBs and in the interior.

  17. Influence of grain boundary characteristics on thermal stability in nanotwinned copper

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Rongmei; Han, Ke; Su, Yi-feng; Besara, Tiglet; Siegrist, Theo M.; Zuo, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    High density grain boundaries provide high strength, but may introduce undesirable features, such as high Fermi levels and instability. We investigated the kinetics of recovery and recrystallization of Cu that was manufactured to include both nanotwins (NT) and high-angle columnar boundaries. We used the isothermal Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) model to estimate activation energy values for recovery and recrystallization and compared those to values derived using the non-isothermal Kissinger equation. The JMAK model hinges on an exponent that expresses the growth mechanism of a material. The exponent for this Cu was close to 0.5, indicating low-dimensional microstructure evolution, which is associated with anisotropic twin coarsening, heterogeneous recrystallization, and high stability. Since this Cu was of high purity, there was a negligible impurity-drag-effect on boundaries. The twin coarsening and heterogeneous recrystallization resulted from migration of high-angle columnar boundaries with their triple junctions in one direction, assisted by the presence of high concentration vacancies at boundaries. Analyses performed by electron energy loss spectroscopy of atomic columns at twin boundaries (TBs) and in the interior showed similar plasma peak shapes and L3 edge positions. This implies that values for conductivity and Fermi level are equal for atoms at TBs and in the interior. PMID:27514474

  18. Experimental study of the stability and flow characteristics of floating liquid columns confined between rotating disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowle, A. A.; Soto, L.; Strong, P. F.; Wang, C. A.

    1980-01-01

    A low Bond number simulation technique was used to establish the stability limits of cylindrical and conical floating liquid columns under conditions of isorotation, equal counter rotation, rotation of one end only, and parallel axis offset. The conditions for resonance in cylindrical liquid columns perturbed by axial, sinusoidal vibration of one end face are also reported. All tests were carried out under isothermal conditions with water and silicone fluids of various viscosities. A technique for the quantitative measurement of stream velocity within a floating, isothermal, liquid column confined between rotatable disks was developed. In the measurement, small, light scattering particles were used as streamline markers in common arrangement, but the capability of the measurement was extended by use of stereopair photography system to provide quantitative data. Results of velocity measurements made under a few selected conditions, which established the precision and accuracy of the technique, are given. The general qualitative features of the isothermal flow patterns under various conditions of end face rotation resulting from both still photography and motion pictures are presented.

  19. Influence of grain boundary characteristics on thermal stability in nanotwinned copper

    DOE PAGES

    Niu, Rongmei; Han, Ke; Su, Yi-feng; Besara, Tiglet; Siegrist, Theo M.; Zuo, Xiaowei

    2016-08-12

    High density grain boundaries provide high strength, but may introduce undesirable features, such as high Fermi levels and instability. We investigated the kinetics of recovery and recrystallization of Cu that was manufactured to include both nanotwins (NT) and high-angle columnar boundaries. We used the isothermal Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) model to estimate activation energy values for recovery and recrystallization and compared those to values derived using the non-isothermal Kissinger equation. The JMAK model hinges on an exponent that expresses the growth mechanism of a material. The exponent for this Cu was close to 0.5, indicating low-dimensional microstructure evolution, which is associated withmore » anisotropic twin coarsening, heterogeneous recrystallization, and high stability. Since this Cu was of high purity, there was a negligible impurity-drag-effect on boundaries. The twin coarsening and heterogeneous recrystallization resulted from migration of high-angle columnar boundaries with their triple junctions in one direction, assisted by the presence of high concentration vacancies at boundaries. Analyses performed by electron energy loss spectroscopy of atomic columns at twin boundaries (TBs) and in the interior showed similar plasma peak shapes and L3 edge positions. As a result, this implies that values for conductivity and Fermi level are equal for atoms at TBs and in the interior.« less

  20. Comparison of Biomechanical Characteristics and Pelvic Ring Stability Using Different Fixation Methods to Treat Pubic Symphysis Diastasis

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Feng; He, Yu; Qian, Hebu; Zhou, Dongsheng; Li, Qinghu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The intention of this study was to compare the biomechanical characteristics using 5 internal fixation methods used clinically to stabilize a pubic symphysis diastasis (PSD, Tile type B1). A 3-dimensional finite element model of PSD was simulated using 5 implants, including single superior plate (Single-Plate), superior and anterior plate (Dual-Plate), single cannulated screw (Single-Screw), crossed dual cannulated screws (Cross-Screw), and parallel dual cannulated screws (Para-Screw). Three loads were distributed in all models, including dual-leg standing, single-leg stance, and rotation. To evaluate the biomechanical properties, the construct stiffness, the stress distribution, and the von Misses stress were recorded and analyzed. To evaluate pelvic ring stability, the micromotion of the pubic symphysis and iliosacral joint was analyzed. Disruption of pubic symphysis dramatically decreased the pelvic ring stability. Cross-screw and Para-Screw showed higher stiffness than other methods. All implants endured the maximum von Misses stress under single-leg stance. For Plate-Screw system, the maximum stress occurred at a place where it strides over pubic symphysis and adjacent Plate-Screw interface. The single implant and Para-Screw had a tendency to fail. Para-Screw showed the best fixation effect under dual-leg conditions. Cross-screw showed superior antishearing force capacity under single-leg stance. Dual-Plate provided maximum antihorizontal rotation. Para-Screw provided the maximum stabilization for the posterior pelvic ring. This study showed the biomechanical advantages of dual-implant for PSD only from the finite element view. The Para-Screw provided high construct stiffness under 3 load conditions. The single implant and Para-Screw had a tendency to fail. The better anterior and posterior pelvic stabilization were obtained by the dual-implant fixation than other methods. Therefore, the Cross-Screw and Dual-Plate fixation methods should be preferred

  1. Water properties in fern spores: sorption characteristics relating to water affinity, glassy states, and storage stability.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, Daniel; Walters, Christina

    2007-01-01

    Ex situ conservation of ferns may be accomplished by maintaining the viability of stored spores for many years. Storage conditions that maximize spore longevity can be inferred from an understanding of the behaviour of water within fern spores. Water sorption properties were measured in spores of five homosporeous species of ferns and compared with properties of pollen, seeds, and fern leaf tissue. Isotherms were constructed at 5, 25, and 45 degrees C and analysed using different physicochemical models in order to quantify chemical affinity and heat (enthalpy) of sorption of water in fern spores. Fern spores hydrate slowly but dry rapidly at ambient relative humidity. Low Brunauer-Emmet-Teller monolayer values, few water-binding sites according to the D'Arcy-Watt model, and limited solute-solvent compatibility according to the Flory-Huggins model suggest that fern spores have low affinity for water. Despite the low water affinity, fern spores demonstrate relatively high values of sorption enthalpy (DeltaH(sorp)). Parameters associated with binding sites and DeltaH(sorp) decrease with increasing temperature, suggesting temperature- and hydration-dependent changes in volume of spore macromolecules. Collectively, these data may relate to the degree to which cellular structures within fern spores are stabilized during drying and cooling. Water sorption properties within fern spores suggest that storage at subfreezing temperatures will give longevities comparable with those achieved with seeds. However, the window of optimum water contents for fern spores is very narrow and much lower than that measured in seeds, making precise manipulation of water content imperative for achieving maximum longevity.

  2. Perceptions of variability in facial emotion influence beliefs about the stability of psychological characteristics.

    PubMed

    Weisbuch, Max; Grunberg, Rebecca L; Slepian, Michael L; Ambady, Nalini

    2016-10-01

    Beliefs about the malleability versus stability of traits (incremental vs. entity lay theories) have a profound impact on social cognition and self-regulation, shaping phenomena that range from the fundamental attribution error and group-based stereotyping to academic motivation and achievement. Less is known about the causes than the effects of these lay theories, and in the current work the authors examine the perception of facial emotion as a causal influence on lay theories. Specifically, they hypothesized that (a) within-person variability in facial emotion signals within-person variability in traits and (b) social environments replete with within-person variability in facial emotion encourage perceivers to endorse incremental lay theories. Consistent with Hypothesis 1, Study 1 participants were more likely to attribute dynamic (vs. stable) traits to a person who exhibited several different facial emotions than to a person who exhibited a single facial emotion across multiple images. Hypothesis 2 suggests that social environments support incremental lay theories to the extent that they include many people who exhibit within-person variability in facial emotion. Consistent with Hypothesis 2, participants in Studies 2-4 were more likely to endorse incremental theories of personality, intelligence, and morality after exposure to multiple individuals exhibiting within-person variability in facial emotion than after exposure to multiple individuals exhibiting a single emotion several times. Perceptions of within-person variability in facial emotion-rather than perceptions of simple diversity in facial emotion-were responsible for these effects. Discussion focuses on how social ecologies shape lay theories. (PsycINFO Database Record

  3. Simulator study of stall/post-stall characteristics of a fighter airplane with relaxed longitudinal static stability. [F-16

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, L. T.; Ogburn, M. E.; Gilbert, W. P.; Kibler, K. S.; Brown, P. W.; Deal, P. L.

    1979-01-01

    A real-time piloted simulation was conducted to evaluate the high-angle-of-attack characteristics of a fighter configuration based on wind-tunnel testing of the F-16, with particular emphasis on the effects of various levels of relaxed longitudinal static stability. The aerodynamic data used in the simulation was conducted on the Langley differential maneuvering simulator, and the evaluation involved representative low-speed combat maneuvering. Results of the investigation show that the airplane with the basic control system was resistant to the classical yaw departure; however, it was susceptible to pitch departures induced by inertia coupling during rapid, large-amplitude rolls at low airspeed. The airplane also exhibited a deep-stall trim which could be flown into and from which it was difficult to recover. Control-system modifications were developed which greatly decreased the airplane susceptibility to the inertia-coupling departure and which provided a reliable means for recovering from the deep stall.

  4. Stability characteristics of a non-Newtonian strongly coupled dusty plasma in the presence of shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garai, S.; Jana, S.; Janaki, M. S.; Chakrabarti, N.

    2016-06-01

    A visco-elastic medium, such as a strongly coupled dusty plasma (SCDP), permits both the propagation of longitudinal dust acoustic mode due to compressibility and transverse shear mode due to elasticity. In the presence of finite velocity shear, these two modes get coupled with each other and eventually the coupled mode becomes unstable. In a non-Newtonian dust fluid, it has been found that the viscosity gradient has a modulating effect on this shear-driven instability under various parametric regimes. A detailed investigation has been carried out on the effect of viscosity gradient on the stability characteristics of a strongly coupled dusty plasma by using the conventional dust fluid equations; both analytically and numerically. These results can be helpful in understanding the phenomena associated with mechanical instabilities in highly viscous fluids; such as metallic glasses, Earth's mantle etc.

  5. Proposed Wind Turbine Aeroelasticity Studies Using Helicopter Systems Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladkany, Samaan G.

    1998-01-01

    Advanced systems for the analysis of rotary wing aeroelastic structures (helicopters) are being developed at NASA Ames by the Rotorcraft Aeromechanics Branch, ARA. The research has recently been extended to the study of wind turbines, used for electric power generation Wind turbines play an important role in Europe, Japan & many other countries because they are non polluting & use a renewable source of energy. European countries such as Holland, Norway & France have been the world leaders in the design & manufacture of wind turbines due to their historical experience of several centuries, in building complex wind mill structures, which were used in water pumping, grain grinding & for lumbering. Fossil fuel cost in Japan & in Europe is two to three times higher than in the USA due to very high import taxes. High fuel cost combined with substantial governmental subsidies, allow wind generated power to be competitive with the more traditional sources of power generation. In the USA, the use of wind energy has been limited mainly because power production from wind is twice as expensive as from other traditional sources. Studies conducted at the National Renewable Energy Laboratories (NREL) indicate that the main cost in the production of wind turbines is due to the materials & the labor intensive processes used in the construction of turbine structures. Thus, for the US to assume world leadership in wind power generation, new lightweight & consequently very flexible wind turbines, that could be economically mass produced, would have to be developed [4,5]. This effort, if successful, would result in great benefit to the US & the developing nations that suffer from overpopulation & a very high cost of energy.

  6. Physicochemical and sensory characteristics of fat-free goat milk yogurt with added stabilizers and skim milk powder fortification.

    PubMed

    Bruzantin, F P; Daniel, J L P; da Silva, P P M; Spoto, M H F

    2016-05-01

    Goat milk yogurt has a less consistent coagulum compared with cow milk yogurt; furthermore, the presence of goat milk in foodstuffs imparts a characteristic flavor that can restrict its acceptance by consumers. This study aimed to assess and compare the physicochemical and sensory characteristics of fat-free goat milk yogurts with added stabilizers or bovine skim milk powder to improve the final product. Four treatment additions were evaluated: (1) a mixture of 0.1% (wt/vol) carrageenan and 0.1% (wt/vol) pectin (treatment CR); (2) 0.5% (wt/vol) pectin (treatment PE); (3) 4.65% (wt/vol) bovine skim milk powder (treatment BM); and (4) control (no stabilizer; treatment CT). The physicochemical parameters were investigated at on d 1 and 5 of storage. The BM treatment presented higher pH and titratable acidity values, resulting in a buffering capacity effect. The total crude protein (CP) and solids-not-fat (SNF) contents were also higher in BM compared with the other evaluated treatments because of the addition of bovine skim milk powder. We detected a reduction in pH values for all treatments. Lower SNF contents were present in the CR and CT treatments, which might be related to a syneresis process during storage; moreover, an increase in total CP was observed for all treatments due to the proteolytic action of the starter culture. Sensory attributes, including appearance (color, consistency, and presence of lumps), texture (consistency, viscosity, and presence of lumps), flavor (bitter, sweet, and characteristic of commercial plain nonfat yogurt), and overall impression were evaluated by quantitative descriptive analysis. The addition of 0.5% (wt/vol) of pectin (PE treatment) strengthened the curd; however, the visual and oral presence of lumps and a higher bitterness score were noted by trained panelists, which resulted in the lowest overall impression score for the PE treatment. In several sensory attributes, the CR treatment was considered similar to the control

  7. Stability and Control Characteristics at Subsonic Speeds of a Flat-Top Arrowhead Wing-Body Combination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buell, Donald A.; Johnson, Norman S.

    1959-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation was made to determine the longitudinal- and lateral-stability derivatives of a flat-top wing-body configuration at Mach numbers from 0.22 to 0.90 and Reynolds numbers of 3.5 and 17 million. The wing had a leading-edge sweepback of 78.9 deg and a cathedral of 45 deg on the outer panels. The tests included the determination of the effectiveness of elevon and rudder controls and also an investigation of ground effects. The model was tested at angles of attack up to 28 deg and angles of sideslip up to 18 deg. The dynamic response of this configuration has been determined from the wind-tunnel data for a simulated airplane having a wing loading of 17.7 pounds per square foot. The longitudinal data show a forward shift in aerodynamic center of 10 percent of the mean aerodynamic chord as the lift coefficient is increased above 0.1. Although flown in the lift range of decreasing stability, the simulated airplane did not encounter pitch-up in maneuvers initiated from steady level flight with zero static margin unless a load factor of 2.2 was exceeded. This maneuver margin was provided by a large value of pitching moment due to pitching velocity. The number of cycles to damp the Dutch roll mode to half amplitude, the time constants of the roll subsidence and spiral divergence modes, and control effectiveness in roll are computed. The lateral stability is shown to be positive but is marginal in meeting the military specifications for today's aircraft. An analog computer study has been made in five degrees of freedom (constant velocity) which illustrates that the handling characteristics are satisfactory. Several programed rolling maneuvers and coordinated turns also illustrate the handling qualities of the airplane.

  8. [Soil aggregate stability and soil organic carbon characteristics in Quercus variabilis and Pinus tabulaeformis plantations in Beijing area].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Zha, Tong-Gang; Wang, Yi-Kun; Wang, Gao-min

    2013-03-01

    Based on the field survey and laboratory analysis, this paper studied the soil aggregate stability and soil organic carbon characteristics in Quercus variabilis and Pinus tabulaeformis plantations in Beijing area. In the two plantations, the contents of soil macro-aggregates decreased with soil depth. In P. tabulaeformis plantation, soil macro-aggregates (>0.25 mm) occupied the majority, accounting for 71% -77% of the total; whereas in Q. variabilis plantation, no significant difference was observed in the contents of soil macro-aggregates and micro-aggregates (< or =0.25 mm), which accounted for 51% -58% and 42% -49%, respectively. Both the mean mass diameter and the geometrical mean mass diameter of the soil aggregates in P. tabulaeformis plantation were significantly higher than those in Q. variabilis plantation, and the fractal dimension (D) of the soil water-stable aggregates in P. tabulaeformis plantation was lower than that in Q. variabilis plantation, suggesting that P. tabulaeformis plantation was more favorable for the soil aggregate stability than Q. variabilis plantation. Also in the two plantations, the organic carbon content in soil water-stable aggregates decreased with soil depth. The organic carbon content in soil macro-aggregates was significantly higher in P. tabulaeformis plantation (58% -83%) than in Q. variabilis plantation (49% -66% ). It was suggested that in Beijing area, P. tabulaeformis plantation was more beneficial to the soil organic carbon protection, as compared with Q. variabilis plantation.

  9. Aeroelastic Tests of an Eight Percent Scale Saturn C-1 Block II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Aeroelastic Tests of an Eight Percent Scale Saturn C-1 Block II. Buffet and flutter characteristics of Saturn Apollo mission were studied using a dynamically scaled model. The model was built around a central aluminum tube for scaled stiffness distribution and strength to resist loads imposed during testing. Styrofoam sections attached to the core provided the correct external contours. Lead weights were added for correct mass distribution. An electromagnetic shaker was used to excite the model in its flexible modes of vibration during portions of the test. The model was supported on a sting, mounted by leaf springs, cables and torsion bars. The support system provided for simulating the full scale rigid body pitch frequency with minimum restraint imposed on elastic deflections. Bending moments recorded by sensors on the aluminum tube. Several modified nose configurations were tested: The basic configuration was tested with and without a flow separator disk on the escape rocket motor, tests also were made with the escape tower and rocket motor removed completely. For the final test, the Apollo capsule was replaced with a Jupiter nose cone. The test program consisted of determining model response throughout the transonic speed range at angles of attack up to 6 degrees and measuring the aerodynamic damping over the same range for the basic model and the modified configurations. Signals from the model pickup were recorded on tape for later analysis. The data obtained were used to estimate bending moments that would be produced on the full-scale vehicle by aerodynamic forces due to buffeting. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070030987. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  10. Measurements of droplets characteristics in a swirl-stabilized spray flame

    SciTech Connect

    Hadef, R.; Lenze, B.

    2005-11-01

    Experiments have been performed in a kerosene airblast atomized spray flame where the fuel supply is sandwiched between two coswirling air streams. A phase-Doppler particle sizing system was used to measure fuel droplet size, velocity and turbulent kinetic energy of droplets and gas as well as the fuel volume flux within the combustor for two values of air preheat temperature, 200{sup o}C and 400{sup o}C. The results reveal that a small liquid fuel exists in the centre of the combustor and due to larger droplets with the swirl effect; the droplets characteristics (velocity and turbulent kinetic energy) did not follow the gas ones. Based upon these measurements, an optimum swirl number will exist with every atomization and burner arrangement of a liquid-fuelled flame associated and will be different from that associated with the corresponding gas-fuelled flame. The investigated atomizer shows a marked influence of the inlet air temperature on the measured droplet size which may be attributed to the design of the internal airflow, promoting prompt atomization at the dominant atomization mode.

  11. Structural characteristics that stabilize or destabilize different assembly levels of phycocyanin by urea.

    PubMed

    Marx, Ailie; Adir, Noam

    2014-07-01

    Phycocyanin is one of the two phycobiliproteins always found in the Phycobilisome antenna complex. It is always situated at the ends of the peripheral rods, adjacent to the core cylinders composed of allophycocyanin. The basic phycocyanin monomer is an (αβ) dimer of globin-like subunits with three covalently linked phycocyanobilin cofactors. Monomers assemble further into trimers, hexamers, and rods which include non-pigmented linker proteins. Upon isolation in low ionic strength solution, rods quickly disintegrate into phycocyanin trimers, which lose contacts with other phycobiliproteins and with the linker proteins. The trimers, however, are quite stable and only the presence of high concentrations of chaotropic agents (such as urea), very acidic solutions, or elevated temperatures induces monomerization, followed by separation between the subunits. We have recently determined the crystal structures of phycocyanin from the thremophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus vulcanus in the presence of 2 or 4 M urea, and shown that 4 M urea monomerizes the phycocyanin trimers. In this paper, we will describe the phycocyanin structures in 2 and 4 M urea more completely. By mapping out the urea positions, we describe the structural elements within the trimeric interaction interface that may be interrupted by the presence of 4 M urea. In addition, we also identify what are the structural characteristics that prevent 4 M urea from inducing subunit dissociation. PMID:24687534

  12. Structural characteristics that stabilize or destabilize different assembly levels of phycocyanin by urea.

    PubMed

    Marx, Ailie; Adir, Noam

    2014-07-01

    Phycocyanin is one of the two phycobiliproteins always found in the Phycobilisome antenna complex. It is always situated at the ends of the peripheral rods, adjacent to the core cylinders composed of allophycocyanin. The basic phycocyanin monomer is an (αβ) dimer of globin-like subunits with three covalently linked phycocyanobilin cofactors. Monomers assemble further into trimers, hexamers, and rods which include non-pigmented linker proteins. Upon isolation in low ionic strength solution, rods quickly disintegrate into phycocyanin trimers, which lose contacts with other phycobiliproteins and with the linker proteins. The trimers, however, are quite stable and only the presence of high concentrations of chaotropic agents (such as urea), very acidic solutions, or elevated temperatures induces monomerization, followed by separation between the subunits. We have recently determined the crystal structures of phycocyanin from the thremophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus vulcanus in the presence of 2 or 4 M urea, and shown that 4 M urea monomerizes the phycocyanin trimers. In this paper, we will describe the phycocyanin structures in 2 and 4 M urea more completely. By mapping out the urea positions, we describe the structural elements within the trimeric interaction interface that may be interrupted by the presence of 4 M urea. In addition, we also identify what are the structural characteristics that prevent 4 M urea from inducing subunit dissociation.

  13. A biosensor based on Bay leaf (Laurus nobilis L.) tissue homogenate: improvement of the stability characteristics by a simple bio-imprinted technique.

    PubMed

    Teke, Mustafa; Sezgintürk, Mustafa Kemal; Dinçkaya, Erhan

    2008-01-01

    Although enzymes are effective biocatalysts that are widely used in biosensors, a major drawback that hampers many of these biotechnological applications of enzymes is their limited stability. Applications that use very pure, high value proteins need to employ effective stabilization technology, primarily due to cost considerations and availability of the proteins used. For this purpose, interest in bio-imprinting techniques increases because it allows stability characteristics of enzymes to be improved. In this study, a bio-imprinted Bay leaf (Laurus nobilis L.) tissue homogenate biosensor was devised by a very simple way. For this purpose, the enzymes, polyphenol oxidases in the bay leaf tissue, were first complexed by using their competitive inhibitor, thiourea, in aqueous medium and then this enzyme was immobilized on gelatin by crosslinking with glutaraldehyde on a Clark-type oxygen electrode surface. Similarly, noncomplexed polyphenol oxidase with thiourea was also immobilized on a Clark-type oxygen electrode in the same conditions. The aim of the study was to prepare a new biosensor-based Bay leaf tissue homogenate and to improve the stability characteristics such as thermal stability, pH stability, and storage stability, of the biosensor by bio-imprinting method. The results showed that this simple technique should be effectively used to improve the stabilities of a biosensor.

  14. Effect of drying treatments and storage stability on quality characteristics of bael powder.

    PubMed

    Sagar, V R; Kumar, Rajesh

    2014-09-01

    Dehydration of bael pulp in to powder form is a challenging operation, mainly due to the sticky issue of bael pulp and caking of powder during handling and storage. To overcome on this problem maltodextrin MD (drying aid) and tricalcium phosphate, TCP (anti caking agent) were added to the bael pulp at four levels along with control and dried in a mechanical drier into thin layer at 58 ± 2 °C for 12 h, to obtain a moisture content of 4-5 % in dehydrated pulp. The dehydrated bael pulp was grounded in a laboratory powder mill and sieve with 30 mesh sieve. The powder was packed in 150gauge PP, 400gauge LDPE and 200gauge HDPE pouches and was stored at low temperature (7 °C) and ambient condition (18-35 °C) up to 6 months for storage study. The powder was evaluated for its quality characteristics in respect of acidity, sugars, antioxidant, phenol, ascorbic acid, non- enzymatic browning (NEB) before packaging and during storage. The amount of MD and TCP required to reduce powder stickiness and caking were optimized on the powder properties. The amount of MD (0.25 kg per kg dry bael solids) and TCP (0.15 kg per kg dry bael solids) with the values of degree of caking (19.24 %) and stickiness point temperature (45.4 °C) were found to be optimum for reducing the powder stickiness, caking and nutritional parameters. The adsorption isotherm of bael powder was found to be type-II sigmoid and 200 g HDPE as packaging material followed by storage at low temperature were selected as best process. PMID:25190878

  15. Characteristics of Cu stabilized Nb3Al strands with low Cu ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, A.; Yamada, R.; Barzi, E.; Kobayashi, M.; Lamm, M.; Nakagawa, K.; Sasaki, K.; Takeuchi, T.; Turrioni, D.; Zlobin, A.V.; /NIMC, Tsukuba /Fermilab /Hitachi, Tsuchiura Works /KEK, Tsukuba

    2008-12-01

    Characteristics of recently developed F4-Nb{sub 3}Al strand with low Cu ratio are described. The overall J{sub c} of the Nb{sub 3}Al strand could be easily increased by decreasing of the Cu ratio. Although the quench of a pulse-like voltage generation is usually observed in superconducting unstable conductor, the F4 strand with a low Cu ratio of 0.61 exhibited an ordinary critical transition of gradual voltage generation. The F4 strand does not have magnetic instabilities at 4.2 K because of the tantalum interfilament matrix. The overall J{sub c} of the F4 strand achieved was 80-85% of the RRP strand. In the large mechanical stress above 100 MPa, the overall J{sub c} of the F4 strand might be comparable to that of high J{sub c} RRP-Nb{sub 3}Sn strands. The Rutherford cable with a high packing factor of 86.5% has been fabricated using F4 strands. The small racetrack magnet, SR07, was also fabricated by a 14 m F4 cable. The quench current, I{sub q}, of SR07 were obtained 22.4 kA at 4.5 K and 25.2 kA at 2.2 K. The tantalum matrix Nb{sub 3}Al strands are promising for the application of super-cooled high-field magnets as well as 4.2 K operation magnets.

  16. Characteristics and stabilities of residues from the Wheal Jane constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Swash, P M; Monhemius, A J

    2005-02-01

    The characteristics and solubilities of residues formed during effluent treatment at the Wheal Jane constructed wetland facility in Cornwall, UK are described. The constructed wetland treats an acidic (pH 3 to 4) mine discharge enriched in iron (<100 mg/l), zinc (<80 mg/l), manganese (<20 mg/l) and arsenic (<2 mg/l). The processing strategy adopted at the site is to remove elements selectively from the mine water in distinct unit process operations and concentrate the iron and base metals into residues within the circuits. Solubility tests conducted on the materials from the aerobic and anaerobic cells attempt to simulate future possible leaching processes within landfill sites used for ultimate disposal. The tests used in the evaluation included TCLP, MARG, washing and column leaching. The aerobic solids overall have very low solubilities which are well below the TCLP thresholds for As, Cd and Pb. The TCLP results for these toxic elements are supported by the washing and column test work. The anaerobic substrates are carbonaceous in nature, composed of straw, wood pulp and manure. They contain minimal amounts of toxic compounds and are considered to be less of a disposal problem. Ochre precipitated at a pH of 3-4 in the aerobic cells contains significant concentrations of arsenic (>0.1%). This element is carcinogenic, and such residues are classified as hazardous waste under current UK landfill regulations. This classification does not take into consideration the solubility of the material but is based solely on the bulk chemical composition. PMID:15680630

  17. Effect of drying treatments and storage stability on quality characteristics of bael powder.

    PubMed

    Sagar, V R; Kumar, Rajesh

    2014-09-01

    Dehydration of bael pulp in to powder form is a challenging operation, mainly due to the sticky issue of bael pulp and caking of powder during handling and storage. To overcome on this problem maltodextrin MD (drying aid) and tricalcium phosphate, TCP (anti caking agent) were added to the bael pulp at four levels along with control and dried in a mechanical drier into thin layer at 58 ± 2 °C for 12 h, to obtain a moisture content of 4-5 % in dehydrated pulp. The dehydrated bael pulp was grounded in a laboratory powder mill and sieve with 30 mesh sieve. The powder was packed in 150gauge PP, 400gauge LDPE and 200gauge HDPE pouches and was stored at low temperature (7 °C) and ambient condition (18-35 °C) up to 6 months for storage study. The powder was evaluated for its quality characteristics in respect of acidity, sugars, antioxidant, phenol, ascorbic acid, non- enzymatic browning (NEB) before packaging and during storage. The amount of MD and TCP required to reduce powder stickiness and caking were optimized on the powder properties. The amount of MD (0.25 kg per kg dry bael solids) and TCP (0.15 kg per kg dry bael solids) with the values of degree of caking (19.24 %) and stickiness point temperature (45.4 °C) were found to be optimum for reducing the powder stickiness, caking and nutritional parameters. The adsorption isotherm of bael powder was found to be type-II sigmoid and 200 g HDPE as packaging material followed by storage at low temperature were selected as best process.

  18. Thermal stability of hydrocarbons in nature: Limits, evidence, characteristics, and possible controls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Price, L.C.

    1993-01-01

    Numerous petroleum-geochemical analyses of deeply buried, high-rank, fine-grained rocks from ultra-deep wellbores by different investigators demonstrate that C15+ hydrocarbons (HCs) persist in moderate to high concentrations at vitrinite reflectance (R0) values of 2.0-5.0% and persist in measurable concentrations up to R0 = 7.0-8.0%, at which point the thermal deadline for C15+ HC's is finally approached. Qualitative analyses have been carried out on 1. (1) high-rank gas condensates which have been exposed to the HC-thermal-destructive phase, 2. (2) bitumens from high-temperature aqueous-pyrolysis experiments in the HC-thermal-destructive phase, and 3. (3) bitumens from high-rank, fine-grained rocks near the HC-thermal-destructive phase. These analyses clearly demonstrate that well-defined compositional suites are established in the saturated, aromatic, and sulfur-bearing aromatic HCs in and near the HC-thermal-destructive phase. On the other hand, accepted petroleum-geochemical paradigms place rigid limits on HC thermal stability: C15+ HCs begin thermal cracking at R0 values of 0.9% and are completely thermally destroyed by R0 = 1.35%; C2-C4 HC gases are thermally destroyed by R0 = 2.0% and methane is thermally destroyed by R0 = 4.0%. Furthermore, published data and observations in many HC basins worldwide support these models; for example, 1. (1) sharp basinal zonations of gas and oil deposits vs. maturation rank in HC basins and 2. (2) decreasing C15+ HC concentrations in some fine-grained rocks at ranks of R0 ??? 0.9%. The fact that observed data (C15+ HCs thermally stable to R0 = 7.0-8.0%) is so far removed from predicted behavior (C15+) HCs expected to be thermally destroyed by R0 = 1.35%) may be due to 1. (1) a lack of recognition of some important possible controlling parameters of organic matter (OM) metamorphism and too much importance given to other assumed controlling parameters; and 2. (2) assigning HC distribution patterns in petroleum basins to HC

  19. Maximized Gust Loads of a Closed-Loop, Nonlinear Aeroelastic System Using Nonlinear Systems Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.

    1999-01-01

    The problem of computing the maximized gust load for a nonlinear, closed-loop aeroelastic aircraft is discusses. The Volterra theory of nonlinear systems is applied in order to define a linearized system that provides a bounds on the response of the nonlinear system of interest. The method is applied to a simplified model of an Airbus A310.

  20. Finite element model for aero-elastically tailored residential wind turbine blade design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Eric Alan

    Advances in passive wind turbine control systems have allowed wind turbines to achieve higher efficiencies and operate in wider inflow conditions than ever before. Within recent years, the adoption of aero-elastically tailored (bend-twist coupled) composite blades have been a pursued strategy. Unfortunately, for this strategy to be applied, traditional means of modeling, designing and manufacturing are no longer adequate. New parameters regarding non-linearities in deflections, stiffness, and aerodynamic loadings must now be implemented. To aid in the development of passive wind turbine system design, a finite element based aero-elastic program capable of computationally predicting blade deflection and twist under loading was constructed. The program was built around the idea of iteratively solving a blade composite structure to reach a maximum aero-elastic twist configuration under elevated wind speeds. Adopting a pre-existing blade geometry, from a pitch controlled small scale (3.5kW) turbine design, the program was tested to discover the geometry bend-twist coupling potential. This research would be a contributing factor in designing a passive pitch control replacement system for the turbine. A study of various model loading configurations was first performed to insure model validity. Then, a final model was used to analyze composite layups for selected spar configurations. Results characterize the aero-elastic twist properties for the selected configurations.