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Sample records for aeroelastic trim analysis

  1. Aeroelastic tailoring for oblique wing lateral trim

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohlmann, Jonathan D.; Weisshaar, Terrence A.; Eckstrom, Clinton V.

    1988-01-01

    Composite material aeroelastic tailoring is presently explored as a means for the correction of the roll trim imbalance of oblique-wing aircraft configurations. The concept is demonstrated through the analysis of a realistic oblique wing by a static aeroelastic computational procedure encompassing the full potential transonic aerodynamic code FLO22 and a Ritz structural plate program that models the stiffness due to symmetrical-but-unbalanced composite wing skins. Results indicate that asymetric composite tailoring reduces the aileron deflection needed for roll equilibrium, and reduces control surface hinge moment and drag. Wing skin stresses are, however, very high.

  2. Static Aeroelastic and Longitudinal Trim Model of Flexible Wing Aircraft Using Finite-Element Vortex-Lattice Coupled Solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, Eric; Nguyen, Nhan; Trinh, Khanh

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a static aeroelastic model and longitudinal trim model for the analysis of a flexible wing transport aircraft. The static aeroelastic model is built using a structural model based on finite-element modeling and coupled to an aerodynamic model that uses vortex-lattice solution. An automatic geometry generation tool is used to close the loop between the structural and aerodynamic models. The aeroelastic model is extended for the development of a three degree-of-freedom longitudinal trim model for an aircraft with flexible wings. The resulting flexible aircraft longitudinal trim model is used to simultaneously compute the static aeroelastic shape for the aircraft model and the longitudinal state inputs to maintain an aircraft trim state. The framework is applied to an aircraft model based on the NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM) with wing structures allowed to flexibly deformed referred to as the Elastically Shaped Aircraft Concept (ESAC). The ESAC wing mass and stiffness properties are based on a baseline "stiff" values representative of current generation transport aircraft.

  3. Trim and Structural Optimization of Subsonic Transport Wings Using Nonconventional Aeroelastic Tailoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, Bret K.; Jutte, Christine V.

    2014-01-01

    Several minimum-mass aeroelastic optimization problems are solved to evaluate the effectiveness of a variety of novel tailoring schemes for subsonic transport wings. Aeroelastic strength and panel buckling constraints are imposed across a variety of trimmed maneuver loads. Tailoring with metallic thickness variations, functionally graded materials, composite laminates, tow steering, and distributed trailing edge control effectors are all found to provide reductions in structural wing mass with varying degrees of success. The question as to whether this wing mass reduction will offset the increased manufacturing cost is left unresolved for each case.

  4. Aeroelastic Analysis for Aeropropulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Bakhle, Milind A.

    2002-01-01

    Aeroelastic codes with advanced capabilities for modeling flow require substantial computational time. On the other hand, fast-running linear aeroelastic codes lack the capability to model three-dimensional, transonic, vortical, and viscous flows. The goal of this work was to develop an aeroelastic code with accurate modeling capabilities and small computational requirements.

  5. Transonic Aeroelasticity Analysis For Helicopter Rotor Blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, I-Chung; Gea, Lie-Mine; Chow, Chuen-Yen

    1991-01-01

    Numerical-simulation method for aeroelasticity analysis of helicopter rotor blade combines established techniques for analysis of aerodynamics and vibrations of blade. Application of method clearly shows elasticity of blade modifies flow and, consequently, aerodynamic loads on blade.

  6. Centrifugal Compressor Aeroelastic Analysis Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Srivastava, Rakesh

    2002-01-01

    Centrifugal compressors are very widely used in the turbomachine industry where low mass flow rates are required. Gas turbine engines for tanks, rotorcraft and small jets rely extensively on centrifugal compressors for rugged and compact design. These compressors experience problems related with unsteadiness of flowfields, such as stall flutter, separation at the trailing edge over diffuser guide vanes, tip vortex unsteadiness, etc., leading to rotating stall and surge. Considerable interest exists in small gas turbine engine manufacturers to understand and eventually eliminate the problems related to centrifugal compressors. The geometric complexity of centrifugal compressor blades and the twisting of the blade passages makes the linear methods inapplicable. Advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods are needed for accurate unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analysis of centrifugal compressors. Most of the current day industrial turbomachines and small aircraft engines are designed with a centrifugal compressor. With such a large customer base and NASA Glenn Research Center being, the lead center for turbomachines, it is important that adequate emphasis be placed on this area as well. Currently, this activity is not supported under any project at NASA Glenn.

  7. Probabilistic Aeroelastic Analysis Developed for Turbomachinery Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.; Mital, Subodh K.; Stefko, George L.; Pai, Shantaram S.

    2003-01-01

    Aeroelastic analyses for advanced turbomachines are being developed for use at the NASA Glenn Research Center and industry. However, these analyses at present are used for turbomachinery design with uncertainties accounted for by using safety factors. This approach may lead to overly conservative designs, thereby reducing the potential of designing higher efficiency engines. An integration of the deterministic aeroelastic analysis methods with probabilistic analysis methods offers the potential to design efficient engines with fewer aeroelastic problems and to make a quantum leap toward designing safe reliable engines. In this research, probabilistic analysis is integrated with aeroelastic analysis: (1) to determine the parameters that most affect the aeroelastic characteristics (forced response and stability) of a turbomachine component such as a fan, compressor, or turbine and (2) to give the acceptable standard deviation on the design parameters for an aeroelastically stable system. The approach taken is to combine the aeroelastic analysis of the MISER (MIStuned Engine Response) code with the FPI (fast probability integration) code. The role of MISER is to provide the functional relationships that tie the structural and aerodynamic parameters (the primitive variables) to the forced response amplitudes and stability eigenvalues (the response properties). The role of FPI is to perform probabilistic analyses by utilizing the response properties generated by MISER. The results are a probability density function for the response properties. The probabilistic sensitivities of the response variables to uncertainty in primitive variables are obtained as a byproduct of the FPI technique. The combined analysis of aeroelastic and probabilistic analysis is applied to a 12-bladed cascade vibrating in bending and torsion. Out of the total 11 design parameters, 6 are considered as having probabilistic variation. The six parameters are space-to-chord ratio (SBYC), stagger angle

  8. Computerized Analysis Of Helicopter-Rotor Aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.

    1988-01-01

    Analysis of aeroelastic stability of helicopter rotor automated. Symbolic-manipulation program, HESL, written in FORTRAN, used to aid in derivation of government equations of motion for elastic-bladed rotor. Operates both on expressions and matrices. By transferring some burden of algebraic manipulations from human analyst to computer, program reduces tedium analysis and conequent opportunity for errors.

  9. Aeroelastic Analysis of Counter Rotation Fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Murthy, Durbha V.

    1997-01-01

    Aeroelastic problems in turbomachinery and propfans can be static or dynamic in nature. The analysis of static aeroelastic problems is involved primarily with determination: (a) of the shape of the blades and the steady aerodynamic loads on the blades (which are inter-dependent), (b) of the resultant steady stresses and (c) of the static instability (divergence) margin, if applicable. In this project, we were concerned exclusively with dynamic aeroelastic behavior. The analysis of dynamic aeroelastic problems is involved with the determination: (a) of the unsteady aerodynamic loads on blades and the dynamic motion of the blades (which are again inter-dependent), (b) of the resultant dynamic stresses and their effect on fatigue life and (c) of the dynamic instability (flutter), if applicable. There are two primary dynamic aeroelastic phenomena of interest to designers of turbomachinery and propfans: flutter and forced response. Flutter generally refers to the occurrence of rapidly growing self-excited oscillations leading to catastrophic failure of the blade. When certain nonlinear phenomena are present, flutter response may lead to a potentially dangerous limit cycle oscillation rather than an immediate catastrophic failure. Forced response generally refers to the steady-state oscillations that occur as a consequence of excitations external to the rotor in question. These excitations typically result from the presence of upstream obstructions, inflow distortions, downstream obstructions, or mechanical sources such as tip-casing contact or shaft and gear meshing. Significant forced response leads to blade fatigue, and at design conditions, generally contributes to a degradation of blade life. At other operating conditions, forced response may lead to catastrophic failure due to severe blade fatigue in a short duration of time.

  10. Probabilistic Aeroelastic Analysis of Turbomachinery Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.; Mital, S. K.; Stefko, G. L.

    2004-01-01

    A probabilistic approach is described for aeroelastic analysis of turbomachinery blade rows. Blade rows with subsonic flow and blade rows with supersonic flow with subsonic leading edge are considered. To demonstrate the probabilistic approach, the flutter frequency, damping and forced response of a blade row representing a compressor geometry is considered. The analysis accounts for uncertainties in structural and aerodynamic design variables. The results are presented in the form of probabilistic density function (PDF) and sensitivity factors. For subsonic flow cascade, comparisons are also made with different probabilistic distributions, probabilistic methods, and Monte-Carlo simulation. The approach shows that the probabilistic approach provides a more realistic and systematic way to assess the effect of uncertainties in design variables on the aeroelastic instabilities and response.

  11. Rotorcraft Technology for HALE Aeroelastic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry; Johnson, Wayne

    2008-01-01

    Much of technology needed for analysis of HALE nonlinear aeroelastic problems is available from rotorcraft methodologies. Consequence of similarities in operating environment and aerodynamic surface configuration. Technology available - theory developed, validated by comparison with test data, incorporated into rotorcraft codes. High subsonic to transonic rotor speed, low to moderate Reynolds number. Structural and aerodynamic models for high aspect-ratio wings and propeller blades. Dynamic and aerodynamic interaction of wing/airframe and propellers. Large deflections, arbitrary planform. Steady state flight, maneuvers and response to turbulence. Linearized state space models. This technology has not been extensively applied to HALE configurations. Correlation with measured HALE performance and behavior required before can rely on tools.

  12. APPLE - An aeroelastic analysis system for turbomachines and propfans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.; Bakhle, Milind A.; Srivastava, R.; Mehmed, Oral

    1992-01-01

    This paper reviews aeroelastic analysis methods for propulsion elements (advanced propellers, compressors and turbines) being developed and used at NASA Lewis Research Center. These aeroelastic models include both structural and aerodynamic components. The structural models include the typical section model, the beam model with and without disk flexibility, and the finite element blade model with plate bending elements. The aerodynamic models are based on the solution of equations ranging from the two-dimensional linear potential equation for a cascade to the three-dimensional Euler equations for multi-blade configurations. Typical results are presented for each aeroelastic model. Suggestions for further research are indicated. All the available aeroelastic models and analysis methods are being incorporated into a unified computer program named APPLE (Aeroelasticity Program for Propulsion at LEwis).

  13. Sensitivity Analysis of the Static Aeroelastic Response of a Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldred, Lloyd B.

    1993-01-01

    A technique to obtain the sensitivity of the static aeroelastic response of a three dimensional wing model is designed and implemented. The formulation is quite general and accepts any aerodynamic and structural analysis capability. A program to combine the discipline level, or local, sensitivities into global sensitivity derivatives is developed. A variety of representations of the wing pressure field are developed and tested to determine the most accurate and efficient scheme for representing the field outside of the aerodynamic code. Chebyshev polynomials are used to globally fit the pressure field. This approach had some difficulties in representing local variations in the field, so a variety of local interpolation polynomial pressure representations are also implemented. These panel based representations use a constant pressure value, a bilinearly interpolated value. or a biquadraticallv interpolated value. The interpolation polynomial approaches do an excellent job of reducing the numerical problems of the global approach for comparable computational effort. Regardless of the pressure representation used. sensitivity and response results with excellent accuracy have been produced for large integrated quantities such as wing tip deflection and trim angle of attack. The sensitivities of such things as individual generalized displacements have been found with fair accuracy. In general, accuracy is found to be proportional to the relative size of the derivatives to the quantity itself.

  14. Computational Aeroelastic Analysis of the Ares Launch Vehicle During Ascent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert E.; Chwalowski, Pawel; Massey, Steven J.; Vatsa, Veer N.; Heeg, Jennifer; Wieseman, Carol D.; Mineck, Raymond E.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the static and dynamic computational aeroelastic (CAE) analyses of the Ares crew launch vehicle (CLV) during atmospheric ascent. The influence of launch vehicle flexibility on the static aerodynamic loading and integrated aerodynamic force and moment coefficients is discussed. The ultimate purpose of this analysis is to assess the aeroelastic stability of the launch vehicle along the ascent trajectory. A comparison of analysis results for several versions of the Ares CLV will be made. Flexible static and dynamic analyses based on rigid computational fluid dynamic (CFD) data are compared with a fully coupled aeroelastic time marching CFD analysis of the launch vehicle.

  15. Aeroelastic analysis of wind energy conversion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugundji, J.

    1978-01-01

    An aeroelastic investigation of horizontal axis wind turbines is described. The study is divided into two simpler areas; (1) the aeroelastic stability of a single blade on a rigid tower; and (2) the mechanical vibrations of the rotor system on a flexible tower. Some resulting instabilities and forced vibration behavior are described.

  16. Sensitivity Analysis of Wing Aeroelastic Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Issac, Jason Cherian

    1995-01-01

    Design for prevention of aeroelastic instability (that is, the critical speeds leading to aeroelastic instability lie outside the operating range) is an integral part of the wing design process. Availability of the sensitivity derivatives of the various critical speeds with respect to shape parameters of the wing could be very useful to a designer in the initial design phase, when several design changes are made and the shape of the final configuration is not yet frozen. These derivatives are also indispensable for a gradient-based optimization with aeroelastic constraints. In this study, flutter characteristic of a typical section in subsonic compressible flow is examined using a state-space unsteady aerodynamic representation. The sensitivity of the flutter speed of the typical section with respect to its mass and stiffness parameters, namely, mass ratio, static unbalance, radius of gyration, bending frequency, and torsional frequency is calculated analytically. A strip theory formulation is newly developed to represent the unsteady aerodynamic forces on a wing. This is coupled with an equivalent plate structural model and solved as an eigenvalue problem to determine the critical speed of the wing. Flutter analysis of the wing is also carried out using a lifting-surface subsonic kernel function aerodynamic theory (FAST) and an equivalent plate structural model. Finite element modeling of the wing is done using NASTRAN so that wing structures made of spars and ribs and top and bottom wing skins could be analyzed. The free vibration modes of the wing obtained from NASTRAN are input into FAST to compute the flutter speed. An equivalent plate model which incorporates first-order shear deformation theory is then examined so it can be used to model thick wings, where shear deformations are important. The sensitivity of natural frequencies to changes in shape parameters is obtained using ADIFOR. A simple optimization effort is made towards obtaining a minimum weight

  17. Reduced-Order Models for the Aeroelastic Analysis of Ares Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Vatsa, Veer N.; Biedron, Robert T.

    2010-01-01

    This document presents the development and application of unsteady aerodynamic, structural dynamic, and aeroelastic reduced-order models (ROMs) for the ascent aeroelastic analysis of the Ares I-X flight test and Ares I crew launch vehicles using the unstructured-grid, aeroelastic FUN3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. The purpose of this work is to perform computationally-efficient aeroelastic response calculations that would be prohibitively expensive via computation of multiple full-order aeroelastic FUN3D solutions. These efficient aeroelastic ROM solutions provide valuable insight regarding the aeroelastic sensitivity of the vehicles to various parameters over a range of dynamic pressures.

  18. Nonlinear Aeroelastic Analysis of Joined-Wing Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavallaro, Rauno

    Aeroelastic design of joined-wing configurations is yet a relatively unexplored topic which poses several difficulties. Due to the overconstrained nature of the system combined with structural geometric nonlinearities, the behavior of Joined Wings is often counterintuitive and presents challenges not seen in standard layouts. In particular, instability observed on detailed aircraft models but never thoroughly investigated, is here studied with the aid of a theoretical/computational framework. Snap-type of instabilities are shown for both pure structural and aeroelastic cases. The concept of snap-divergence is introduced to clearly identify the true aeroelastic instability, as opposed to the usual aeroelastic divergence evaluated through eigenvalue approach. Multi-stable regions and isola-type of bifurcations are possible characterizations of the nonlinear response of Joined Wings, and may lead to branch-jumping phenomena well below nominal critical load condition. Within this picture, sensitivity to (unavoidable) manufacturing defects could have potential catastrophic effects. The phenomena studied in this work suggest that the design process for Joined Wings needs to be revisited and should focus, when instability is concerned, on nonlinear post-critical analysis since linear methods may provide wrong trend indications and also hide potentially catastrophical situations. Dynamic aeroelastic analyses are also performed. Flutter occurrence is critically analyzed with frequency and time-domain capabilities. Sensitivity to different-fidelity aeroelastic modeling (fluid-structure interface algorithm, aerodynamic solvers) is assessed showing that, for some configurations, wake modeling (rigid versus free) has a strong impact on the results. Post-flutter regimes are also explored. Limit cycle oscillations are observed, followed, in some cases, by flip bifurcations (period doubling) and loss of periodicity of the solution. Aeroelastic analyses are then carried out on a

  19. Flutter and Divergence Analysis using the Generalized Aeroelastic Analysis Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, John W.; Wieseman, Carol D.

    2003-01-01

    The Generalized Aeroelastic Analysis Method (GAAM) is applied to the analysis of three well-studied checkcases: restrained and unrestrained airfoil models, and a wing model. An eigenvalue iteration procedure is used for converging upon roots of the complex stability matrix. For the airfoil models, exact root loci are given which clearly illustrate the nature of the flutter and divergence instabilities. The singularities involved are enumerated, including an additional pole at the origin for the unrestrained airfoil case and the emergence of an additional pole on the positive real axis at the divergence speed for the restrained airfoil case. Inconsistencies and differences among published aeroelastic root loci and the new, exact results are discussed and resolved. The generalization of a Doublet Lattice Method computer code is described and the code is applied to the calculation of root loci for the wing model for incompressible and for subsonic flow conditions. The error introduced in the reduction of the singular integral equation underlying the unsteady lifting surface theory to a linear algebraic equation is discussed. Acknowledging this inherent error, the solutions of the algebraic equation by GAAM are termed 'exact.' The singularities of the problem are discussed and exponential series approximations used in the evaluation of the kernel function shown to introduce a dense collection of poles and zeroes on the negative real axis. Again, inconsistencies and differences among published aeroelastic root loci and the new 'exact' results are discussed and resolved. In all cases, aeroelastic flutter and divergence speeds and frequencies are in good agreement with published results. The GAAM solution procedure allows complete control over Mach number, velocity, density, and complex frequency. Thus all points on the computed root loci can be matched-point, consistent solutions without recourse to complex mode tracking logic or dataset interpolation, as in the k and p

  20. Aeroelastic Flight Data Analysis with the Hilbert-Huang Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, Martin J.; Prazenica, Chad

    2006-01-01

    This report investigates the utility of the Hilbert Huang transform for the analysis of aeroelastic flight data. It is well known that the classical Hilbert transform can be used for time-frequency analysis of functions or signals. Unfortunately, the Hilbert transform can only be effectively applied to an extremely small class of signals, namely those that are characterized by a single frequency component at any instant in time. The recently-developed Hilbert Huang algorithm addresses the limitations of the classical Hilbert transform through a process known as empirical mode decomposition. Using this approach, the data is filtered into a series of intrinsic mode functions, each of which admits a well-behaved Hilbert transform. In this manner, the Hilbert Huang algorithm affords time-frequency analysis of a large class of signals. This powerful tool has been applied in the analysis of scientific data, structural system identification, mechanical system fault detection, and even image processing. The purpose of this report is to demonstrate the potential applications of the Hilbert Huang algorithm for the analysis of aeroelastic systems, with improvements such as localized online processing. Applications for correlations between system input and output, and amongst output sensors, are discussed to characterize the time-varying amplitude and frequency correlations present in the various components of multiple data channels. Online stability analyses and modal identification are also presented. Examples are given using aeroelastic test data from the F-18 Active Aeroelastic Wing airplane, an Aerostructures Test Wing, and pitch plunge simulation.

  1. An Aeroelastic Analysis of a Thin Flexible Membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Robert C.; Bartels, Robert E.; Kandil, Osama A.

    2007-01-01

    Studies have shown that significant vehicle mass and cost savings are possible with the use of ballutes for aero-capture. Through NASA's In-Space Propulsion program, a preliminary examination of ballute sensitivity to geometry and Reynolds number was conducted, and a single-pass coupling between an aero code and a finite element solver was used to assess the static aeroelastic effects. There remain, however, a variety of open questions regarding the dynamic aeroelastic stability of membrane structures for aero-capture, with the primary challenge being the prediction of the membrane flutter onset. The purpose of this paper is to describe and begin addressing these issues. The paper includes a review of the literature associated with the structural analysis of membranes and membrane utter. Flow/structure analysis coupling and hypersonic flow solver options are also discussed. An approach is proposed for tackling this problem that starts with a relatively simple geometry and develops and evaluates analysis methods and procedures. This preliminary study considers a computationally manageable 2-dimensional problem. The membrane structural models used in the paper include a nonlinear finite-difference model for static and dynamic analysis and a NASTRAN finite element membrane model for nonlinear static and linear normal modes analysis. Both structural models are coupled with a structured compressible flow solver for static aeroelastic analysis. For dynamic aeroelastic analyses, the NASTRAN normal modes are used in the structured compressible flow solver and 3rd order piston theories were used with the finite difference membrane model to simulate utter onset. Results from the various static and dynamic aeroelastic analyses are compared.

  2. Development of an Aeroelastic Analysis Including a Viscous Flow Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Bakhle, Milind A.

    2001-01-01

    Under this grant, Version 4 of the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes aeroelastic code (TURBO-AE) has been developed and verified. The TURBO-AE Version 4 aeroelastic code allows flutter calculations for a fan, compressor, or turbine blade row. This code models a vibrating three-dimensional bladed disk configuration and the associated unsteady flow (including shocks, and viscous effects) to calculate the aeroelastic instability using a work-per-cycle approach. Phase-lagged (time-shift) periodic boundary conditions are used to model the phase lag between adjacent vibrating blades. The direct-store approach is used for this purpose to reduce the computational domain to a single interblade passage. A disk storage option, implemented using direct access files, is available to reduce the large memory requirements of the direct-store approach. Other researchers have implemented 3D inlet/exit boundary conditions based on eigen-analysis. Appendix A: Aeroelastic calculations based on three-dimensional euler analysis. Appendix B: Unsteady aerodynamic modeling of blade vibration using the turbo-V3.1 code.

  3. A Coupled Aeroelastic Model for Launch Vehicle Stability Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, Jeb S.

    2010-01-01

    A technique for incorporating distributed aerodynamic normal forces and aeroelastic coupling effects into a stability analysis model of a launch vehicle is presented. The formulation augments the linear state-space launch vehicle plant dynamics that are compactly derived as a system of coupled linear differential equations representing small angular and translational perturbations of the rigid body, nozzle, and sloshing propellant coupled with normal vibration of a set of orthogonal modes. The interaction of generalized forces due to aeroelastic coupling and thrust can be expressed as a set of augmenting non-diagonal stiffness and damping matrices in modal coordinates with no penalty on system order. While the eigenvalues of the structural response in the presence of thrust and aeroelastic forcing can be predicted at a given flight condition independent of the remaining degrees of freedom, the coupled model provides confidence in closed-loop stability in the presence of rigid-body, slosh, and actuator dynamics. Simulation results are presented that characterize the coupled dynamic response of the Ares I launch vehicle and the impact of aeroelasticity on control system stability margins.

  4. Aeroelastic stability analysis of a Darrieus wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Popelka, D.

    1982-02-01

    An aeroelastic stability analysis has been developed for predicting flutter instabilities on vertical axis wind turbines. The analytical model and mathematical formulation of the problem are described as well as the physical mechanism that creates flutter in Darrieus turbines. Theoretical results are compared with measured experimental data from flutter tests of the Sandia 2 Meter turbine. Based on this comparison, the analysis appears to be an adequate design evaluation tool.

  5. Transonic aeroelasticity analysis for rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Chuen-Yen; Chang, I-Chung; Gea, Lie-Mine

    1989-01-01

    A numerical method is presented for calculating the unsteady transonic rotor flow with aeroelasticity effects. The blade structural dynamic equations based on beam theory were formulated by FEM and were solved in the time domain, instead of the frequency domain. For different combinations of precone, droop, and pitch, the correlations are very good in the first three flapping modes and the first twisting mode. However, the predicted frequencies are too high for the first lagging mode at high rotational speeds. This new structure code has been coupled into a transonic rotor flow code, TFAR2, to demonstrate the capability of treating elastic blades in transonic rotor flow calculations. The flow fields for a model-scale rotor in both hover and forward flight are calculated. Results show that the blade elasticity significantly affects the flow characteristics in forward flight.

  6. Aeroelastic analysis for propellers - mathematical formulations and program user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielawa, R. L.; Johnson, S. A.; Chi, R. M.; Gangwani, S. T.

    1983-01-01

    Mathematical development is presented for a specialized propeller dedicated version of the G400 rotor aeroelastic analysis. The G400PROP analysis simulates aeroelastic characteristics particular to propellers such as structural sweep, aerodynamic sweep and high subsonic unsteady airloads (both stalled and unstalled). Formulations are presented for these expanded propeller related methodologies. Results of limited application of the analysis to realistic blade configurations and operating conditions which include stable and unstable stall flutter test conditions are given. Sections included for enhanced program user efficiency and expanded utilization include descriptions of: (1) the structuring of the G400PROP FORTRAN coding; (2) the required input data; and (3) the output results. General information to facilitate operation and improve efficiency is also provided.

  7. Aeroelastic Flight Data Analysis with the Hilbert-Huang Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, Marty; Prazenica, Chad

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates the utility of the Hilbert-Huang transform for the analysis of aeroelastic flight data. It is well known that the classical Hilbert transform can be used for time-frequency analysis of functions or signals. Unfortunately, the Hilbert transform can only be effectively applied to an extremely small class of signals, namely those that are characterized by a single frequency component at any instant in time. The recently-developed Hilbert-Huang algorithm addresses the limitations of the classical Hilbert transform through a process known as empirical mode decomposition. Using this approach, the data is filtered into a series of intrinsic mode functions, each of which admits a well-behaved Hilbert transform. In this manner, the Hilbert-Huang algorithm affords time-frequency analysis of a large class of signals. This powerful tool has been applied in the analysis of scientific data, structural system identification, mechanical system fault detection, and even image processing. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the potential applications of the Hilbert-Huang algorithm for the analysis of aeroelastic systems, with improvements such as localized/online processing. Applications for correlations between system input and output, and amongst output sensors, are discussed to characterize the time-varying amplitude and frequency correlations present in the various components of multiple data channels. Online stability analyses and modal identification are also presented. Examples are given using aeroelastic test data from the F/A-18 Active Aeroelastic Wing aircraft, an Aerostructures Test Wing, and pitch-plunge simulation.

  8. Static Aeroelastic Analysis with an Inviscid Cartesian Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, David L.; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Nemec, Marian; Smith, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    An embedded-boundary, Cartesian-mesh flow solver is coupled with a three degree-of-freedom structural model to perform static, aeroelastic analysis of complex aircraft geometries. The approach solves a nonlinear, aerostructural system of equations using a loosely-coupled strategy. An open-source, 3-D discrete-geometry engine is utilized to deform a triangulated surface geometry according to the shape predicted by the structural model under the computed aerodynamic loads. The deformation scheme is capable of modeling large deflections and is applicable to the design of modern, very-flexible transport wings. The coupling interface is modular so that aerodynamic or structural analysis methods can be easily swapped or enhanced. After verifying the structural model with comparisons to Euler beam theory, two applications of the analysis method are presented as validation. The first is a relatively stiff, transport wing model which was a subject of a recent workshop on aeroelasticity. The second is a very flexible model recently tested in a low speed wind tunnel. Both cases show that the aeroelastic analysis method produces results in excellent agreement with experimental data.

  9. CFD and Aeroelastic Analysis of the MEXICO Wind Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrión, M.; Woodgate, M.; Steijl, R.; Barakos, G.; Gómez-Iradi, S.; Munduate, X.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents an aerodynamic and aeroelastic analysis of the MEXICO wind turbine, using the compressible HMB solver of Liverpool. The aeroelasticity of the blade, as well as the effect of a low-Mach scheme were studied for the zero-yaw 15m/s wind case and steady- state computations. The wake developed behind the rotor was also extracted and compared with the experimental data, using the compressible solver and a low-Mach scheme. It was found that the loads were not sensitive to the Mach number effects, although the low-Mach scheme improved the wake predictions. The sensitivity of the results to the blade structural properties was also highlighted.

  10. Aeroelastic stability analysis of flexible overexpanded rocket nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekka, N.; Sellam, M.; Chpoun, A.

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a new aeroelastic stability model taking into account the viscous effects for a supersonic nozzle flow in overexpanded regimes. This model is inspired by the Pekkari model which was developed initially for perfect fluid flow. The new model called the "Modified Pekkari Model" (MPM) considers a more realistic wall pressure profile for the case of a free shock separation inside the supersonic nozzle using the free interaction theory of Chapman. To reach this objective, a code for structure computation coupled with aerodynamic excitation effects is developed that allows the analysis of aeroelastic stability for the overexpanded nozzles. The main results are presented in a comparative manner using existing models (Pekkari model and its extended version) and the modified Pekkari model developed in this work.

  11. An analysis of the Space Shuttle hypersonic entry trim anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, J. C.; Findlay, J. T.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews a parameter identification methodology developed to investigate the hypersonic longitudinal trim misprediction apparent in the NASA Space Shuttle Orbiter entry flights. The method combines an analysis using a measured versus predicted technique in conjunction with a multilinear regression analysis to identify prediction deficiencies using quasi-static longitudinal data in the hypersonic flight regime (Mach 6 through 26). In general, the results of this extraction confirm results previously obtained by other Shuttle investigators with the exception of elevon effectiveness. Further analysis and/or flight data will be required to resolve the conflicting elevon results. A combination of this analytical tool and other flight data will enable flight data interpretation with the potential for identifying the sources of the Shuttle's hypersonic trim misprediction to an accuracy consistent with updating preflight prediction methodology for future spacecraft.

  12. NRT Rotor Structural / Aeroelastic Analysis for the Preliminary Design Review

    SciTech Connect

    Ennis, Brandon Lee; Paquette, Joshua A.

    2015-10-01

    This document describes the initial structural design for the National Rotor Testbed blade as presented during the preliminary design review at Sandia National Laboratories on October 28- 29, 2015. The document summarizes the structural and aeroelastic requirements placed on the NRT rotor for satisfactory deployment at the DOE/SNL SWiFT experimental facility to produce high-quality datasets for wind turbine model validation. The method and result of the NRT blade structural optimization is also presented within this report, along with analysis of its satisfaction of the design requirements.

  13. Aeroelastic Analysis of a Distributed Electric Propulsion Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massey, Steven J.; Stanford, Bret K.; Wieseman, Carol D.; Heeg, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    An aeroelastic analysis of a prototype distributed electric propulsion wing is presented. Results using MSC Nastran (Registered Trademark) doublet lattice aerodynamics are compared to those based on FUN3D Reynolds Averaged Navier- Stokes aerodynamics. Four levels of grid refinement were examined for the FUN3D solutions and solutions were seen to be well converged. It was found that no oscillatory instability existed, only that of divergence, which occurred in the first bending mode at a dynamic pressure of over three times the flutter clearance condition.

  14. Analytic simulation of higher harmonic control using a new aeroelastic model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, P. P.; Robinson, L. H.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes a higher harmonic control (HHC) study of a four bladed hingeless rotor using a coupled flap-lag-torsional aeroelastic stability and response analysis which incorporates finite-state, time-domain aerodynamics. The rotor trim condition is determined using a coupled trim-aeroelastic analysis. Deterministic and cautious controllers based on local and global HHC models are implemented with different combinations of input parameters identified using a Kalman filter. The effects of unsteady versus quasisteady aerodynamic modeling on HHC simulations are investigated, including the effectiveness of the local and global HHC models and the advantages of different identification schemes.

  15. Recent Applications of Higher-Order Spectral Analysis to Nonlinear Aeroelastic Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Hajj, Muhammad R.; Dunn, Shane; Strganac, Thomas W.; Powers, Edward J.; Stearman, Ronald

    2005-01-01

    Recent applications of higher-order spectral (HOS) methods to nonlinear aeroelastic phenomena are presented. Applications include the analysis of data from a simulated nonlinear pitch and plunge apparatus and from F-18 flight flutter tests. A MATLAB model of the Texas A&MUniversity s Nonlinear Aeroelastic Testbed Apparatus (NATA) is used to generate aeroelastic transients at various conditions including limit cycle oscillations (LCO). The Gaussian or non-Gaussian nature of the transients is investigated, related to HOS methods, and used to identify levels of increasing nonlinear aeroelastic response. Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) F/A-18 flight flutter test data is presented and analyzed. The data includes high-quality measurements of forced responses and LCO phenomena. Standard power spectral density (PSD) techniques and HOS methods are applied to the data and presented. The goal of this research is to develop methods that can identify the onset of nonlinear aeroelastic phenomena, such as LCO, during flutter testing.

  16. A Review of Recent Aeroelastic Analysis Methods for Propulsion at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.; Bakhle, Milind A.; Srivastava, R.; Mehmed, Oral; Stefko, George L.

    1993-01-01

    This report reviews aeroelastic analyses for propulsion components (propfans, compressors and turbines) being developed and used at NASA LeRC. These aeroelastic analyses include both structural and aerodynamic models. The structural models include a typical section, a beam (with and without disk flexibility), and a finite-element blade model (with plate bending elements). The aerodynamic models are based on the solution of equations ranging from the two-dimensional linear potential equation to the three-dimensional Euler equations for multibladed configurations. Typical calculated results are presented for each aeroelastic model. Suggestions for further research are made. Many of the currently available aeroelastic models and analysis methods are being incorporated in a unified computer program, APPLE (Aeroelasticity Program for Propulsion at LEwis).

  17. A review of recent aeroelastic analysis methods for propulsion at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.; Bakhle, Milind A.; Srivastava, R.; Mehmed, Oral; Stefko, George L.

    1993-09-01

    This report reviews aeroelastic analyses for propulsion components (propfans, compressors and turbines) being developed and used at NASA LeRC. These aeroelastic analyses include both structural and aerodynamic models. The structural models include a typical section, a beam (with and without disk flexibility), and a finite-element blade model (with plate bending elements). The aerodynamic models are based on the solution of equations ranging from the two-dimensional linear potential equation to the three-dimensional Euler equations for multibladed configurations. Typical calculated results are presented for each aeroelastic model. Suggestions for further research are made. Many of the currently available aeroelastic models and analysis methods are being incorporated in a unified computer program, APPLE (Aeroelasticity Program for Propulsion at LEwis).

  18. Comprehensive analysis of bearingless rotors - Model development and experimental correlation of modes, response, trim and stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jambunathan, V.; Murthy, V. R.

    1993-01-01

    A generic mathematical model that is capable of accurately modeling the multiple load path bearingless rotor blade is developed. A comprehensive, finite element based solution for the natural vibration of the rotor blade is developed. An iterative scheme based on harmonic balance is used to evaluate the nonlinear response of the rotor to control inputs and a Newton-Raphson procedure is employed to evaluate the trim of rotorcraft. Linearized perturbation model of the nonlinear system are presented. The model is validated by comparing with existing whirl tower, wind tunnel and flight test results of BMR/BO-105 helicopter. Frequencies of two bearingless rotor blades compare well with results from experiments. Nonlinear response and trim results are presented for the bearingless BMR/BO-105 rotor. Aeroelastic stability in forward flight, evaluated using floquet theory agrees with test data in general.

  19. Refined methods of aeroelastic analysis and optimization. [swept wings, propeller theory, and subsonic flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashley, H.

    1984-01-01

    Graduate research activity in the following areas is reported: the divergence of laminated composite lifting surfaces, subsonic propeller theory and aeroelastic analysis, and cross sectional resonances in wind tunnels.

  20. NASTRAN level 16 programmer's manual updates for aeroelastic analysis of bladed discs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallo, A. M.; Dale, B.

    1980-01-01

    The programming routines for the NASTRAN Level 16program are presented. Particular emphasis is placed on its application to aeroelastic analyses, mode development, and flutter analysis for turbomachine blades.

  1. ASTROP2 users manual: A program for aeroelastic stability analysis of propfans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, G. V.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1991-01-01

    A user's manual is presented for the aeroelastic stability and response of propulsion systems computer program called ASTROP2. The ASTROP2 code preforms aeroelastic stability analysis of rotating propfan blades. This analysis uses a two-dimensional, unsteady cascade aerodynamics model and a three-dimensional, normal-mode structural model. Analytical stability results from this code are compared with published experimental results of a rotating composite advanced turboprop model and of nonrotating metallic wing model.

  2. New Flutter Analysis Technique for CFD-based Unsteady Aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-gi; Jutte, Christine V.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a flutter analysis technique for the transonic flight regime. The technique uses an iterative approach to determine the critical dynamic pressure for a given mach number. Unlike other CFD-based flutter analysis methods, each iteration solves for the critical dynamic pressure and uses this value in subsequent iterations until the value converges. This process reduces the iterations required to determine the critical dynamic pressure. To improve the accuracy of the analysis, the technique employs a known structural model, leaving only the aerodynamic model as the unknown. The aerodynamic model is estimated using unsteady aeroelastic CFD analysis combined with a parameter estimation routine. The technique executes as follows. The known structural model is represented as a finite element model. Modal analysis determines the frequencies and mode shapes for the structural model. At a given mach number and dynamic pressure, the unsteady CFD analysis is performed. The output time history of the surface pressure is converted to a nodal aerodynamic force vector. The forces are then normalized by the given dynamic pressure. A multi-input multi-output parameter estimation software, ERA, estimates the aerodynamic model through the use of time histories of nodal aerodynamic forces and structural deformations. The critical dynamic pressure is then calculated using the known structural model and the estimated aerodynamic model. This output is used as the dynamic pressure in subsequent iterations until the critical dynamic pressure is determined. This technique is demonstrated on the Aerostructures Test Wing-2 model at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center.

  3. Studies in hypersonic aeroelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nydick, Ira Harvey

    2000-11-01

    This dissertation describes the aeroelastic analysis of a generic hypersonic vehicle, focusing on two specific problems: (1) hypersonic panel flutter, and (2) aeroelastic behavior of a complete unrestrained generic hypersonic vehicle operating at very high Mach numbers. The panels are modeled as shallow shells using Marguerre nonlinear shallow shell theory for orthotropic panels and the aerodynamic loads are obtained from third order piston theory. Two models of curvature, several applied temperature distributions, and the presence of a shock are also included in the model. Results indicate that the flutter speed of the panel is significantly reduced by temperature variations comparable to the buckling temperature and by the presence of a shock. A panel with initial curvature can be more stable than the flat panel but the increase in stability depends in a complex way on the material properties of the panel and the amount of curvature. At values of dynamic pressure above critical, aperiodic motion was observed. The value of dynamic pressure for which this occurs in both heated panels and curved panels is much closer to the critical dynamic pressure than for the flat, unheated panel. A comparison of piston theory aerodynamics and Euler and Navier-Stokes aerodynamics was performed for a two dimensional panel with prescribed motion and the results indicate that while 2nd or higher order piston theory agrees very well with the Euler solution for the frequencies seen in hypersonic panel flutter, it differs substantially from the Navier-Stokes solution. The aeroelastic behavior of the complete vehicle was simulated using the unrestrained equations of motion, utilizing the method of quasi-coordinates. The unrestrained mode shapes of the vehicle were obtained from an equivalent plate analysis using an available code (ELAPS). The effects of flexible trim and rigid body degrees of freedom are carefully incorporated in the mathematical model. This model was applied to a

  4. Sensitivity analysis for aeroacoustic and aeroelastic design of turbomachinery blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorence, Christopher B.; Hall, Kenneth C.

    1995-01-01

    A new method for computing the effect that small changes in the airfoil shape and cascade geometry have on the aeroacoustic and aeroelastic behavior of turbomachinery cascades is presented. The nonlinear unsteady flow is assumed to be composed of a nonlinear steady flow plus a small perturbation unsteady flow that is harmonic in time. First, the full potential equation is used to describe the behavior of the nonlinear mean (steady) flow through a two-dimensional cascade. The small disturbance unsteady flow through the cascade is described by the linearized Euler equations. Using rapid distortion theory, the unsteady velocity is split into a rotational part that contains the vorticity and an irrotational part described by a scalar potential. The unsteady vorticity transport is described analytically in terms of the drift and stream functions computed from the steady flow. Hence, the solution of the linearized Euler equations may be reduced to a single inhomogeneous equation for the unsteady potential. The steady flow and small disturbance unsteady flow equations are discretized using bilinear quadrilateral isoparametric finite elements. The nonlinear mean flow solution and streamline computational grid are computed simultaneously using Newton iteration. At each step of the Newton iteration, LU decomposition is used to solve the resulting set of linear equations. The unsteady flow problem is linear, and is also solved using LU decomposition. Next, a sensitivity analysis is performed to determine the effect small changes in cascade and airfoil geometry have on the mean and unsteady flow fields. The sensitivity analysis makes use of the nominal steady and unsteady flow LU decompositions so that no additional matrices need to be factored. Hence, the present method is computationally very efficient. To demonstrate how the sensitivity analysis may be used to redesign cascades, a compressor is redesigned for improved aeroelastic stability and two different fan exit guide

  5. Static Aeroelastic Analysis with an Inviscid Cartesian Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, David L.; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Nemec, Marian; Smith, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    An embedded-boundary Cartesian-mesh flow solver is coupled with a three degree-offreedom structural model to perform static, aeroelastic analysis of complex aircraft geometries. The approach solves the complete system of aero-structural equations using a modular, loosely-coupled strategy which allows the lower-fidelity structural model to deform the highfidelity CFD model. The approach uses an open-source, 3-D discrete-geometry engine to deform a triangulated surface geometry according to the shape predicted by the structural model under the computed aerodynamic loads. The deformation scheme is capable of modeling large deflections and is applicable to the design of modern, very-flexible transport wings. The interface is modular so that aerodynamic or structural analysis methods can be easily swapped or enhanced. This extended abstract includes a brief description of the architecture, along with some preliminary validation of underlying assumptions and early results on a generic 3D transport model. The final paper will present more concrete cases and validation of the approach. Preliminary results demonstrate convergence of the complete aero-structural system and investigate the accuracy of the approximations used in the formulation of the structural model.

  6. Rapid Aeroelastic Analysis of Blade Flutter in Turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trudell, J. J.; Mehmed, O.; Stefko, G. L.; Bakhle, M. A.; Reddy, T. S. R.; Montgomery, M.; Verdon, J.

    2006-01-01

    The LINFLUX-AE computer code predicts flutter and forced responses of blades and vanes in turbomachines under subsonic, transonic, and supersonic flow conditions. The code solves the Euler equations of unsteady flow in a blade passage under the assumption that the blades vibrate harmonically at small amplitudes. The steady-state nonlinear Euler equations are solved by a separate program, then equations for unsteady flow components are obtained through linearization around the steady-state solution. A structural-dynamics analysis (see figure) is performed to determine the frequencies and mode shapes of blade vibrations, a preprocessor interpolates mode shapes from the structural-dynamics mesh onto the LINFLUX computational-fluid-dynamics mesh, and an interface code is used to convert the steady-state flow solution to a form required by LINFLUX. Then LINFLUX solves the linearized equations in the frequency domain to calculate the unsteady aerodynamic pressure distribution for a given vibration mode, frequency, and interblade phase angle. A post-processor uses the unsteady pressures to calculate generalized aerodynamic forces, response amplitudes, and eigenvalues (which determine the flutter frequency and damping). In comparison with the TURBO-AE aeroelastic-analysis code, which solves the equations in the time domain, LINFLUX-AE is 6 to 7 times faster.

  7. Design and Analysis of AN Static Aeroelastic Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Ying-Yu; Yuan, Kai-Hua; Lv, Ji-Nan; Liu, Zi-Qiang

    2016-06-01

    Static aeroelastic experiments are very common in the United States and Russia. The objective of static aeroelastic experiments is to investigate deformation and loads of elastic structure in flow field. Generally speaking, prerequisite of this experiment is that the stiffness distribution of structure is known. This paper describes a method for designing experimental models, in the case where the stiffness distribution and boundary condition of a real aircraft are both uncertain. The stiffness distribution form of the structure can be calculated via finite element modeling and simulation calculation and F141 steels and rigid foam are used to make elastic model. In this paper, the design and manufacturing process of static aeroelastic models is presented and a set of experiment model was designed to simulate the stiffness of the designed wings, a set of experiments was designed to check the results. The test results show that the experimental method can effectively complete the design work of elastic model. This paper introduces the whole process of the static aeroelastic experiment, and the experimental results are analyzed. This paper developed a static aeroelasticity experiment technique and established an experiment model targeting at the swept wing of a certain kind of large aspect ratio aircraft.

  8. Wing Weight Optimization Under Aeroelastic Loads Subject to Stress Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapania, Rakesh K.; Issac, J.; Macmurdy, D.; Guruswamy, Guru P.

    1997-01-01

    A minimum weight optimization of the wing under aeroelastic loads subject to stress constraints is carried out. The loads for the optimization are based on aeroelastic trim. The design variables are the thickness of the wing skins and planform variables. The composite plate structural model incorporates first-order shear deformation theory, the wing deflections are expressed using Chebyshev polynomials and a Rayleigh-Ritz procedure is adopted for the structural formulation. The aerodynamic pressures provided by the aerodynamic code at a discrete number of grid points is represented as a bilinear distribution on the composite plate code to solve for the deflections and stresses in the wing. The lifting-surface aerodynamic code FAST is presently being used to generate the pressure distribution over the wing. The envisioned ENSAERO/Plate is an aeroelastic analysis code which combines ENSAERO version 3.0 (for analysis of wing-body configurations) with the composite plate code.

  9. Aeroelastic analysis of wings using the Euler equations with a deforming mesh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Brian A.; Batina, John T.; Yang, Henry T. Y.

    1990-01-01

    Modifications to the CFL3D three dimensional unsteady Euler/Navier-Stokes code for the aeroelastic analysis of wings are described. The modifications involve including a deforming mesh capability which can move the mesh to continuously conform to the instantaneous shape of the aeroelastically deforming wing, and including the structural equations of motion for their simultaneous time-integration with the governing flow equations. Calculations were performed using the Euler equations to verify the modifications to the code and as a first step toward aeroelastic analysis using the Navier-Stokes equations. Results are presented for the NACA 0012 airfoil and a 45 deg sweptback wing to demonstrate applications of CFL3D for generalized force computations and aeroelastic analysis. Comparisons are made with published Euler results for the NACA 0012 airfoil and with experimental flutter data for the 45 deg sweptback wing to assess the accuracy of the present capability. These comparisons show good agreement and, thus, the CFL3D code may be used with confidence for aeroelastic analysis of wings.

  10. Aeroelastic analysis of wings using the Euler equations with a deforming mesh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Brian A.; Batina, John T.; Yang, Henry T. Y.

    1990-01-01

    Modifications to the CFL3D three-dimensional unsteady Euler/Navier-Stokes code for the aeroelastic analysis of wings are described. The modifications involve including a deforming mesh capability which can move the mesh to continuously conform to the instantaneous shape of the aeroelastically deforming wing, and including the structural equations of motion for their simultaneous time-integration with the governing flow equations. Calculations were performed using the Euler equations to verify the modifications to the code and as a first-step toward aeroelastic analysis using the Navier-Stokes equations. Results are presented for the NACA 0012 airfoil and a 45 deg sweptback wing to demonstrate applications of CFL3D for generalized force computations and aeroelastic analysis. Comparisons are made with published Euler results for the NACA 0012 airfoil and with experimental flutter data for the 45 deg sweptback wing to assess the accuracy of the present capability. These comparisons show good agreement and, thus, the CFL3D code may be used with confidence for aeroelastic analysis of wings. The paper describes the modifications that were made to the code and presents results and comparisons which assess the capability.

  11. New Flutter Analysis Technique for Time-Domain Computational Aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-Gi; Lung, Shun-Fat

    2017-01-01

    A new time-domain approach for computing flutter speed is presented. Based on the time-history result of aeroelastic simulation, the unknown unsteady aerodynamics model is estimated using a system identification technique. The full aeroelastic model is generated via coupling the estimated unsteady aerodynamic model with the known linear structure model. The critical dynamic pressure is computed and used in the subsequent simulation until the convergence of the critical dynamic pressure is achieved. The proposed method is applied to a benchmark cantilevered rectangular wing.

  12. Dynamic response and aeroelastic analysis of a propeller blade of a prop-fan engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Gene; Lee, Hae-Kyung

    Blades are modeled as cantilevered sandwich plates with Gr/Ep composite faces and orthotropic cores and also as curved twisted beams for the aeroelastic analysis. A free vibration analysis for the cantilevered sandwich plate model is performed using Rayleigh-Ritz method. Calculated results are compared with FEM codes and free vibration test results. A free vibration equation for the aeroelastic analysis is obtained by small linear perturbation about the nonlinear static equilibrium position of the curved and twisted beam model. An aeroelastic stability is analyzed along with unsteady aerodynamic analysis results with 2-D cascade effects. For analyzing dynamic response of the real prop-fan blade mode, F.E.M. codes are used. In order to verify computed results, SR-3 composite prop-fan blades with various stacking sequencies are manufactured. Natural frequencies of prop-fan specimen are obtained by modal testing method using impact hammer and FFT analyzer.

  13. Dynamic Aeroelastic Analysis of Wing/Store Configurations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    for his assistance with Gridgen as well as Jacob Freeman, John Staples, and Dr. Charles Denegri for providing F-16 data. I would also like to thank my...ure 3.5) was created using Gridgen . A calculation of the flutter point was then made using the aeroelastic program. A dynamic pressure was chosen

  14. Proposed Wind Turbine Aeroelasticity Studies Using Helicopter Systems Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladkany, Samaan G.

    1998-01-01

    Advanced systems for the analysis of rotary wing aeroelastic structures (helicopters) are being developed at NASA Ames by the Rotorcraft Aeromechanics Branch, ARA. The research has recently been extended to the study of wind turbines, used for electric power generation Wind turbines play an important role in Europe, Japan & many other countries because they are non polluting & use a renewable source of energy. European countries such as Holland, Norway & France have been the world leaders in the design & manufacture of wind turbines due to their historical experience of several centuries, in building complex wind mill structures, which were used in water pumping, grain grinding & for lumbering. Fossil fuel cost in Japan & in Europe is two to three times higher than in the USA due to very high import taxes. High fuel cost combined with substantial governmental subsidies, allow wind generated power to be competitive with the more traditional sources of power generation. In the USA, the use of wind energy has been limited mainly because power production from wind is twice as expensive as from other traditional sources. Studies conducted at the National Renewable Energy Laboratories (NREL) indicate that the main cost in the production of wind turbines is due to the materials & the labor intensive processes used in the construction of turbine structures. Thus, for the US to assume world leadership in wind power generation, new lightweight & consequently very flexible wind turbines, that could be economically mass produced, would have to be developed [4,5]. This effort, if successful, would result in great benefit to the US & the developing nations that suffer from overpopulation & a very high cost of energy.

  15. Aeroelastic and Flight Dynamics Analysis of Folding Wing Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ivan

    This dissertation explores the aeroelastic stability of a folding wing using both theoretical and experimental methods. The theoretical model is based on the existing clamped-wing aeroelastic model that uses beam theory structural dynamics and strip theory aerodynamics. A higher-fidelity theoretical model was created by adding several improvements to the existing model, namely a structural model that uses ANSYS for individual wing segment modes and an unsteady vortex lattice aerodynamic model. The comparison with the lower-fidelity model shows that the higher-fidelity model typical provides better agreement between theory and experiment, but the predicted system behavior in general does not change, reinforcing the effectiveness of the low-fidelity model for preliminary design of folding wings. The present work also conducted more detailed aeroelastic analyses of three-segment folding wings, and in particular considers the Lockheed-type configurations to understand the existence of sudden changes in predicted aeroelastic behavior with varying fold angle for certain configurations. These phenomena were observed in carefully conducted experiments, and nonlinearities---structural and geometry---were shown to suppress the phenomena. Next, new experimental models with better manufacturing tolerances are designed to be tested in the Duke University Wind Tunnel. The testing focused on various configurations of three-segment folding wings in order to obtain higher quality data. Next, the theoretical model was further improved by adding aircraft longitudinal degrees of freedom such that the aeroelastic model may predict the instabilities for the entire aircraft and not just a clamped wing. The theoretical results show that the flutter instabilities typically occur at a higher air speed due to greater frequency separation between modes for the aircraft system than a clamped wing system, but the divergence instabilities occur at a lower air speed. Lastly, additional

  16. NASTRAN level 16 user's manual updates for aeroelastic analysis of bladed discs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elchuri, V.; Gallo, A. M.

    1980-01-01

    The NASTRAN aeroelastic and flutter capability was extended to solve a class of problems associated with axial flow turbomachines. The capabilities of the program are briefly discussed. The aerodynamic data pertaining to the bladed disc sector, the associated aerodynamic modeling, the steady aerothermoelastic 'design/analysis' formulations, and the modal, flutter, and subcritical roots analyses are described. Sample problems and their solutions are included.

  17. A methodology for aeroelastic constraint analysis in a conceptual design environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Baets, Peter Wilfried Gaston

    The objective of this study is the infusion of aeroelastic constraint knowledge into the design space. The mapping of such aeroelastic information in the conceptual design space has long been a desire of the design community. The conceptual design phase of an aircraft is a multidisciplinary environment and has the most influence on the future design of the vehicle. However, sufficient results cannot he obtained in a timely enough manner to materially contribute to early design decisions. Furthermore, the natural division of the engineering team into specialty groups is not well supported by the monolithic aerodynamic-structures codes typically used in modern aeroelastic analysis. The research examines how the Bi-Level Integrated System Synthesis decomposition technique can be adapted to perform as the conceptual aeroelastic design tool. The study describes a comprehensive solution of the aeroelastic coupled problem cast in this decomposition format and implemented in an integrated framework. The method is supported by application details of a proof of concept high speed vehicle. Physics-based codes such as finite element and an aerodynamic panel method are used to model the high-definition geometric characteristics of the vehicle. A synthesis and sizing code was added to referee the conflicts that arise between the two disciplines. This research's novelty lies in four points. First is the use of physics-based tools at the conceptual design phase to calculate the aeroelastic properties. Second is the projection of flutter and divergence velocity constraint lines in a power loading versus wing loading graph. Third is the aeroelastic assessment time reduction, which has moved from a matter of years to months. Lastly, this assessment allowed verification of the impact of changing velocity, altitude, and angle of attack on the aeroelastic properties. This then allowed identification of robust design space with respect to these three mission properties. The method

  18. Static Aeroelastic Scaling and Analysis of a Sub-Scale Flexible Wing Wind Tunnel Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, Eric; Lebofsky, Sonia; Nguyen, Nhan; Trinh, Khanh

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to the development of a scaled wind tunnel model for static aeroelastic similarity with a full-scale wing model. The full-scale aircraft model is based on the NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM) with flexible wing structures referred to as the Elastically Shaped Aircraft Concept (ESAC). The baseline stiffness of the ESAC wing represents a conventionally stiff wing model. Static aeroelastic scaling is conducted on the stiff wing configuration to develop the wind tunnel model, but additional tailoring is also conducted such that the wind tunnel model achieves a 10% wing tip deflection at the wind tunnel test condition. An aeroelastic scaling procedure and analysis is conducted, and a sub-scale flexible wind tunnel model based on the full-scale's undeformed jig-shape is developed. Optimization of the flexible wind tunnel model's undeflected twist along the span, or pre-twist or wash-out, is then conducted for the design test condition. The resulting wind tunnel model is an aeroelastic model designed for the wind tunnel test condition.

  19. Development of an Aeroelastic Modeling Capability for Transient Nozzle Side Load Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Zhao, Xiang; Zhang, Sijun; Chen, Yen-Sen

    2013-01-01

    Lateral nozzle forces are known to cause severe structural damage to any new rocket engine in development. Currently there is no fully coupled computational tool to analyze this fluid/structure interaction process. The objective of this study was to develop a fully coupled aeroelastic modeling capability to describe the fluid/structure interaction process during the transient nozzle operations. The aeroelastic model composes of three components: the computational fluid dynamics component based on an unstructured-grid, pressure-based computational fluid dynamics formulation, the computational structural dynamics component developed in the framework of modal analysis, and the fluid-structural interface component. The developed aeroelastic model was applied to the transient nozzle startup process of the Space Shuttle Main Engine at sea level. The computed nozzle side loads and the axial nozzle wall pressure profiles from the aeroelastic nozzle are compared with those of the published rigid nozzle results, and the impact of the fluid/structure interaction on nozzle side loads is interrogated and presented.

  20. Preliminary Computational Analysis of the (HIRENASD) Configuration in Preparation for the Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chwalowski, Pawel; Florance, Jennifer P.; Heeg, Jennifer; Wieseman, Carol D.; Perry, Boyd P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary computational aeroelastic analysis results generated in preparation for the first Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop (AePW). These results were produced using FUN3D software developed at NASA Langley and are compared against the experimental data generated during the HIgh REynolds Number Aero- Structural Dynamics (HIRENASD) Project. The HIRENASD wind-tunnel model was tested in the European Transonic Windtunnel in 2006 by Aachen University0s Department of Mechanics with funding from the German Research Foundation. The computational effort discussed here was performed (1) to obtain a preliminary assessment of the ability of the FUN3D code to accurately compute physical quantities experimentally measured on the HIRENASD model and (2) to translate the lessons learned from the FUN3D analysis of HIRENASD into a set of initial guidelines for the first AePW, which includes test cases for the HIRENASD model and its experimental data set. This paper compares the computational and experimental results obtained at Mach 0.8 for a Reynolds number of 7 million based on chord, corresponding to the HIRENASD test conditions No. 132 and No. 159. Aerodynamic loads and static aeroelastic displacements are compared at two levels of the grid resolution. Harmonic perturbation numerical results are compared with the experimental data using the magnitude and phase relationship between pressure coefficients and displacement. A dynamic aeroelastic numerical calculation is presented at one wind-tunnel condition in the form of the time history of the generalized displacements. Additional FUN3D validation results are also presented for the AGARD 445.6 wing data set. This wing was tested in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel and is commonly used in the preliminary benchmarking of computational aeroelastic software.

  1. Bayesian analysis of the flutter margin method in aeroelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Mohammad; Poirel, Dominique; Sarkar, Abhijit

    2016-12-01

    A Bayesian statistical framework is presented for Zimmerman and Weissenburger flutter margin method which considers the uncertainties in aeroelastic modal parameters. The proposed methodology overcomes the limitations of the previously developed least-square based estimation technique which relies on the Gaussian approximation of the flutter margin probability density function (pdf). Using the measured free-decay responses at subcritical (preflutter) airspeeds, the joint non-Gaussain posterior pdf of the modal parameters is sampled using the Metropolis-Hastings (MH) Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm. The posterior MCMC samples of the modal parameters are then used to obtain the flutter margin pdfs and finally the flutter speed pdf. The usefulness of the Bayesian flutter margin method is demonstrated using synthetic data generated from a two-degree-of-freedom pitch-plunge aeroelastic model. The robustness of the statistical framework is demonstrated using different sets of measurement data. It will be shown that the probabilistic (Bayesian) approach reduces the number of test points required in providing a flutter speed estimate for a given accuracy and precision.

  2. Bayesian analysis of the flutter margin method in aeroelasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, Mohammad; Poirel, Dominique; Sarkar, Abhijit

    2016-08-27

    A Bayesian statistical framework is presented for Zimmerman and Weissenburger flutter margin method which considers the uncertainties in aeroelastic modal parameters. The proposed methodology overcomes the limitations of the previously developed least-square based estimation technique which relies on the Gaussian approximation of the flutter margin probability density function (pdf). Using the measured free-decay responses at subcritical (preflutter) airspeeds, the joint non-Gaussain posterior pdf of the modal parameters is sampled using the Metropolis–Hastings (MH) Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm. The posterior MCMC samples of the modal parameters are then used to obtain the flutter margin pdfs and finally the flutter speed pdf. The usefulness of the Bayesian flutter margin method is demonstrated using synthetic data generated from a two-degree-of-freedom pitch-plunge aeroelastic model. The robustness of the statistical framework is demonstrated using different sets of measurement data. In conclusion, it will be shown that the probabilistic (Bayesian) approach reduces the number of test points required in providing a flutter speed estimate for a given accuracy and precision.

  3. Bayesian analysis of the flutter margin method in aeroelasticity

    DOE PAGES

    Khalil, Mohammad; Poirel, Dominique; Sarkar, Abhijit

    2016-08-27

    A Bayesian statistical framework is presented for Zimmerman and Weissenburger flutter margin method which considers the uncertainties in aeroelastic modal parameters. The proposed methodology overcomes the limitations of the previously developed least-square based estimation technique which relies on the Gaussian approximation of the flutter margin probability density function (pdf). Using the measured free-decay responses at subcritical (preflutter) airspeeds, the joint non-Gaussain posterior pdf of the modal parameters is sampled using the Metropolis–Hastings (MH) Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm. The posterior MCMC samples of the modal parameters are then used to obtain the flutter margin pdfs and finally the fluttermore » speed pdf. The usefulness of the Bayesian flutter margin method is demonstrated using synthetic data generated from a two-degree-of-freedom pitch-plunge aeroelastic model. The robustness of the statistical framework is demonstrated using different sets of measurement data. In conclusion, it will be shown that the probabilistic (Bayesian) approach reduces the number of test points required in providing a flutter speed estimate for a given accuracy and precision.« less

  4. Aeroelastic Analysis Of Versatile Thermal Insulation Panels For Launchers Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera, E.; Zappino, E.; Augello, G.; Ferrarese, A.; Montabone, M.

    2011-05-01

    The aeroelastic behavior of a Versatile Thermal Insulation (VTI) has been investigated. Among the various loadings acting on the panels in this work the attention is payed to fluid structure interaction. e.g. panel flutter phenomena. Known available results from open literature, related to similar problems, permit to analyze the effect of various Mach regimes, including boundary layers thickness effects, in-plane mechanical and thermal loadings, nonlinear effect and amplitude of so called limit cycle oscillations. Dedicated finite element model is developed for the supersonic regime. The model used for coupling orthotropic layered structural model with to Piston Theory aerodynamic models allows the calculations of flutter conditions in case of curved panels supported in a dis- crete number of points. Through this approach the flutter boundaries of the VTI-panel have been investigated.

  5. Nonlinear Aeroelastic Analysis of UAVs: Deterministic and Stochastic Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukut, Thomas Woodrow

    Aeroelastic aspects of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) is analyzed by treatment of a typical section containing geometrical nonlinearities. Equations of motion are derived and numerical integration of these equations subject to quasi-steady aerodynamic forcing is performed. Model properties are tailored to a high-altitude long-endurance unmanned aircraft. Harmonic balance approximation is employed based on the steady-state oscillatory response of the aerodynamic forcing. Comparisons are made between time integration results and harmonic balance approximation. Close agreement between forcing and displacement oscillatory frequencies is found. Amplitude agreement is off by a considerable margin. Additionally, stochastic forcing effects are examined. Turbulent flow velocities generated from the von Karman spectrum are applied to the same nonlinear structural model. Similar qualitative behavior is found between quasi-steady and stochastic forcing models illustrating the importance of considering the non-steady nature of atmospheric turbulence when operating near critical flutter velocity.

  6. Aeroelastic optimization of a helicopter rotor using an efficient sensitivity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Joon W.; Chopra, Inderjit

    1990-01-01

    To reduce oscillatory hub loads in forward flight, a structural optimization analysis of a hingeless helicopter rotor has been developed and applied. The aeroelastic analysis of the rotor is based on a finite element method in space and time, and linked with automated optimization algorithms. For the optimization analysis two types of structural representation are used: a generic stiffness-distribution and a single-cell thin-walled beam. For the first type, the design variables are nonstructural mass and its placement, chordwise center of gravity offset from the elastic axis, and stiffness. For the second type, width, height and thickness of spar are used as design variables. For the behavior constraints, frequency placement, autorotational inertia and aeroelastic stability of the blade are included. The required sensitivity derivatives are obtained using a direct analytical approach. An optimum oscillatory hub load shows a 25-77 percent reduction for the generic blade, and 30-50 percent reduction for the box-beam.

  7. ASTROP2-LE: A Mistuned Aeroelastic Analysis System Based on a Two Dimensional Linearized Euler Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.; Srivastava, R.; Mehmed, Oral

    2002-01-01

    An aeroelastic analysis system for flutter and forced response analysis of turbomachines based on a two-dimensional linearized unsteady Euler solver has been developed. The ASTROP2 code, an aeroelastic stability analysis program for turbomachinery, was used as a basis for this development. The ASTROP2 code uses strip theory to couple a two dimensional aerodynamic model with a three dimensional structural model. The code was modified to include forced response capability. The formulation was also modified to include aeroelastic analysis with mistuning. A linearized unsteady Euler solver, LINFLX2D is added to model the unsteady aerodynamics in ASTROP2. By calculating the unsteady aerodynamic loads using LINFLX2D, it is possible to include the effects of transonic flow on flutter and forced response in the analysis. The stability is inferred from an eigenvalue analysis. The revised code, ASTROP2-LE for ASTROP2 code using Linearized Euler aerodynamics, is validated by comparing the predictions with those obtained using linear unsteady aerodynamic solutions.

  8. Aeroelastic analysis and ground vibration survey of the NASA, Grumman American Yankee modified for spin testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroeger, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    A complete ground vibration and aeroelastic analysis was made of a modified version of the Grumman American Yankee. The aircraft had been modified for four empennage configurations, a wing boom was added, a spin chute installed and provisions included for large masses in the wing tip to vary the lateral and directional inertia. Other minor changes were made which have much less influence on the flutter and vibrations. Neither static divergence nor aileron reversal was considered since the wing structure was not sufficiently changed to affect its static aeroelastic qualities. The aircraft was found to be free from flutter in all of the normal modes explored in the ground shake test. The analysis demonstrated freedom from flutter up to 214 miles per hour.

  9. Modeling and Analysis of Composite Wing Sections for Improved Aeroelastic and Vibration Characteristics Using Smart Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Aditi

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop analysis procedures to investigate the coupling of composite and smart materials to improve aeroelastic and vibratory response of aerospace structures. The structural modeling must account for arbitrarily thick geometries, embedded and surface bonded sensors and actuators and imperfections, such as delamination. Changes in the dynamic response due to the presence of smart materials and delaminations is investigated. Experiments are to be performed to validate the proposed mathematical model.

  10. User's manual for the coupled mode version of the normal modes rotor aeroelastic analysis computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergquist, R. R.; Carlson, R. G.; Landgrebe, A. J.; Egolf, T. A.

    1974-01-01

    This User's Manual was prepared to provide the engineer with the information required to run the coupled mode version of the Normal Modes Rotor Aeroelastic Analysis Computer Program. The manual provides a full set of instructions for running the program, including calculation of blade modes, calculations of variable induced velocity distribution and the calculation of the time history of the response for either a single blade or a complete rotor with an airframe (the latter with constant inflow).

  11. Computational aspects of helicopter trim analysis and damping levels from Floquet theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaonkar, Gopal H.; Achar, N. S.

    1992-01-01

    Helicopter trim settings of periodic initial state and control inputs are investigated for convergence of Newton iteration in computing the settings sequentially and in parallel. The trim analysis uses a shooting method and a weak version of two temporal finite element methods with displacement formulation and with mixed formulation of displacements and momenta. These three methods broadly represent two main approaches of trim analysis: adaptation of initial-value and finite element boundary-value codes to periodic boundary conditions, particularly for unstable and marginally stable systems. In each method, both the sequential and in-parallel schemes are used and the resulting nonlinear algebraic equations are solved by damped Newton iteration with an optimally selected damping parameter. The impact of damped Newton iteration, including earlier-observed divergence problems in trim analysis, is demonstrated by the maximum condition number of the Jacobian matrices of the iterative scheme and by virtual elimination of divergence. The advantages of the in-parallel scheme over the conventional sequential scheme are also demonstrated.

  12. Helicopter trim analysis by shooting and finite element methods with optimally damped Newton iterations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Achar, N. S.; Gaonkar, G. H.

    1993-01-01

    Helicopter trim settings of periodic initial state and control inputs are investigated for convergence of Newton iteration in computing the settings sequentially and in parallel. The trim analysis uses a shooting method and a weak version of two temporal finite element methods with displacement formulation and with mixed formulation of displacements and momenta. These three methods broadly represent two main approaches of trim analysis: adaptation of initial-value and finite element boundary-value codes to periodic boundary conditions, particularly for unstable and marginally stable systems. In each method, both the sequential and in-parallel schemes are used, and the resulting nonlinear algebraic equations are solved by damped Newton iteration with an optimally selected damping parameter. The impact of damped Newton iteration, including earlier-observed divergence problems in trim analysis, is demonstrated by the maximum condition number of the Jacobian matrices of the iterative scheme and by virtual elimination of divergence. The advantages of the in-parallel scheme over the conventional sequential scheme are also demonstrated.

  13. NASTRAN/FLEXSTAB procedure for static aeroelastic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, L. S.

    1984-01-01

    Presented is a procedure for using the FLEXSTAB External Structural Influence Coefficients (ESIC) computer program to produce the structural data necessary for the FLEXSTAB Stability Derivatives and Static Stability (SD&SS) program. The SD&SS program computes trim state, stability derivatives, and pressure and deflection data for a flexible airplane having a plane of symmetry. The procedure used a NASTRAN finite-element structural model as the source of structural data in the form of flexibility matrices. Selection of a set of degrees of freedom, definition of structural nodes and panels, reordering and reformatting of the flexibility matrix, and redistribution of existing point mass data are among the topics discussed. Also discussed are boundary conditions and the NASTRAN substructuring technique.

  14. Aeroelastic Calculations Based on Three-Dimensional Euler Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakhle, Milind A.; Srivastava, Rakesh; Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Stefko, George L.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents representative results from an aeroelastic code (TURBO-AE) based on an Euler/Navier-Stokes unsteady aerodynamic code (TURBO). Unsteady pressure, lift, and moment distributions are presented for a helical fan test configuration which is used to verify the code by comparison to two-dimensional linear potential (flat plate) theory. The results are for pitching and plunging motions over a range of phase angles, Good agreement with linear theory is seen for all phase angles except those near acoustic resonances. The agreement is better for pitching motions than for plunging motions. The reason for this difference is not understood at present. Numerical checks have been performed to ensure that solutions are independent of time step, converged to periodicity, and linearly dependent on amplitude of blade motion. The paper concludes with an evaluation of the current state of development of the TURBO-AE code and presents some plans for further development and validation of the TURBO-AE code.

  15. Experimental and Computational Analysis of Shuttle Orbiter Hypersonic Trim Anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brauckmann, Gregory J.; Paulson, John W., Jr.; Weilmuenster, K. James

    1995-01-01

    During the high-Mach-number, high-altitude portion of the first entry of the Shuttle Orbiter, the vehicle exhibited a nose-up pitching moment relative to preflight prediction of approximately Delta Cm = 0.03. This trim anomaly has been postulated to be due to compressibility, viscous, and/or real-gas (lowered specific heat ratio gamma) effects on basic body pitching moment, body-flap effectiveness, or both. In order to assess the relative contribution of each of these effects, an experimental study was undertaken to examine the effects of Mach number, Reynolds number, and ratio of specific heats. Complementary computational solutions were obtained for wind-tunnel and flight conditions. The primary cause of the anomaly was determined to be lower pressures on the aft windward surface of the Orbiter than deduced from hypersonic wind-tunnel tests with ideal- or near-ideal-gas test flow. The lower pressure levels are a result of the lowering of the flowfield gamma due to high-temperature effects. This phenomenon was accurately simulated in a hypersonic wind tunnel using a heavy gas, which provided a lower, gamma, and was correctly predicted by Navier-Stokes computations using nonequilibrium chemistry.

  16. Total Risk Integrated Methodology (TRIM) - TRIM.Expo

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Exposure Event module of TRIM (TRIM.Expo), similar to most human exposure models, provides an analysis of the relationships between various chemical concentrations in the environment and exposure levels of humans.

  17. Development of an Aeroelastic Modeling Capability for Transient Nozzle Side Load Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Zhao, Xiang; Zhang, Sijun; Chen, Yen-Sen

    2013-01-01

    Lateral nozzle forces are known to cause severe structural damage to any new rocket engine in development during test. While three-dimensional, transient, turbulent, chemically reacting computational fluid dynamics methodology has been demonstrated to capture major side load physics with rigid nozzles, hot-fire tests often show nozzle structure deformation during major side load events, leading to structural damages if structural strengthening measures were not taken. The modeling picture is incomplete without the capability to address the two-way responses between the structure and fluid. The objective of this study is to develop a coupled aeroelastic modeling capability by implementing the necessary structural dynamics component into an anchored computational fluid dynamics methodology. The computational fluid dynamics component is based on an unstructured-grid, pressure-based computational fluid dynamics formulation, while the computational structural dynamics component is developed in the framework of modal analysis. Transient aeroelastic nozzle startup analyses of the Block I Space Shuttle Main Engine at sea level were performed. The computed results from the aeroelastic nozzle modeling are presented.

  18. Aeroelasticity and structural optimization of composite helicopter rotor blades with swept tips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, K. A.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the development of an aeroelastic analysis capability for composite helicopter rotor blades with straight and swept tips, and its application to the simulation of helicopter vibration reduction through structural optimization. A new aeroelastic model is developed in this study which is suitable for composite rotor blades with swept tips in hover and in forward flight. The hingeless blade is modeled by beam type finite elements. A single finite element is used to model the swept tip. Arbitrary cross-sectional shape, generally anisotropic material behavior, transverse shears and out-of-plane warping are included in the blade model. The nonlinear equations of motion, derived using Hamilton's principle, are based on a moderate deflection theory. Composite blade cross-sectbnal properties are calculated by a separate linear, two-dimensional cross section analysis. The aerodynamic loads are obtained from quasi-steady, incompressible aerodynamics, based on an implicit formulation. The trim and steady state blade aeroelastic response are solved in a fully coupled manner. In forward flight, where the blade equations of motion are periodic, the coupled trim-aeroelastic response solution is obtained from the harmonic balance method. Subsequently, the periodic system is linearized about the steady state response, and its stability is determined from Floquet theory.

  19. Aeroelastic stability analysis of the AD-1 manned oblique-wing aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutkowski, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    The AD-1 manned flight test program was conducted to evaluate the stability, control and handling characteristics of oblique wing aircraft. The results of the aeroelastic stability analysis are presented for both the wing alone and the wing with ailerons. A comparison was made between the results obtained using the traditional k-method of flutter analysis and the results using the PK or British method of flutter analysis. Studies were performed using the latest version of the NASTRAN computer code as well as the PASS/FLUT program.

  20. Synergistic Modification Induced Specific Recognition between Histone and TRIM24 via Fluctuation Correlation Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinmai; Luo, Huajie; Liu, Hao; Ye, Wei; Luo, Ray; Chen, Hai-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Histone modification plays a key role in gene regulation and gene expression. TRIM24 as a histone reader can recognize histone modification. However the specific recognition mechanism between TRIM24 and histone modification is unsolved. Here, systems biology method of dynamics correlation network based on molecular dynamics simulation was used to answer the question. Our network analysis shows that the dynamics correlation network of H3K23ac is distinctly different from that of wild type and other modifications. A hypothesis of “synergistic modification induced recognition” is then proposed to link histone modification and TRIM24 binding. These observations were further confirmed from community analysis of networks with mutation and network perturbation. Finally, a possible recognition pathway is also identified based on the shortest path search for H3K23ac. Significant difference of recognition pathway was found among different systems due to methylation and acetylation modifications. The analysis presented here and other studies show that the dynamic network-based analysis might be a useful general strategy to study the biology of protein post-translational modification and associated recognition. PMID:27079666

  1. Synergistic Modification Induced Specific Recognition between Histone and TRIM24 via Fluctuation Correlation Network Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jinmai; Luo, Huajie; Liu, Hao; Ye, Wei; Luo, Ray; Chen, Hai-Feng

    2016-04-01

    Histone modification plays a key role in gene regulation and gene expression. TRIM24 as a histone reader can recognize histone modification. However the specific recognition mechanism between TRIM24 and histone modification is unsolved. Here, systems biology method of dynamics correlation network based on molecular dynamics simulation was used to answer the question. Our network analysis shows that the dynamics correlation network of H3K23ac is distinctly different from that of wild type and other modifications. A hypothesis of “synergistic modification induced recognition” is then proposed to link histone modification and TRIM24 binding. These observations were further confirmed from community analysis of networks with mutation and network perturbation. Finally, a possible recognition pathway is also identified based on the shortest path search for H3K23ac. Significant difference of recognition pathway was found among different systems due to methylation and acetylation modifications. The analysis presented here and other studies show that the dynamic network-based analysis might be a useful general strategy to study the biology of protein post-translational modification and associated recognition.

  2. Nonlinear aeroelastic analysis, flight dynamics, and control of a complete aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Mayuresh Jayawant

    The focus of this research was to analyze a high-aspect-ratio wing aircraft flying at low subsonic speeds. Such aircraft are designed for high-altitude, long-endurance missions. Due to the high flexibility and associated wing deformation, accurate prediction of aircraft response requires use of nonlinear theories. Also strong interactions between flight dynamics and aeroelasticity are expected. To analyze such aircraft one needs to have an analysis tool which includes the various couplings and interactions. A theoretical basis has been established for a consistent analysis which takes into account, (i) material anisotropy, (ii) geometrical nonlinearities of the structure, (iii) rigid-body motions, (iv) unsteady flow behavior, and (v) dynamic stall. The airplane structure is modeled as a set of rigidly attached beams. Each of the beams is modeled using the geometrically exact mixed variational formulation, thus taking into account geometrical nonlinearities arising due to large displacements and rotations. The cross-sectional stiffnesses are obtained using an asymptotically exact analysis, which can model arbitrary cross sections and material properties. An aerodynamic model, consisting of a unified lift model, a consistent combination of finite-state inflow model and a modified ONERA dynamic stall model, is coupled to the structural system to determine the equations of motion. The results obtained indicate the necessity of including nonlinear effects in aeroelastic analysis. Structural geometric nonlinearities result in drastic changes in aeroelastic characteristics, especially in case of high-aspect-ratio wings. The nonlinear stall effect is the dominant factor in limiting the amplitude of oscillation for most wings. The limit cycle oscillation (LCO) phenomenon is also investigated. Post-flutter and pre-flutter LCOs are possible depending on the disturbance mode and amplitude. Finally, static output feedback (SOF) controllers are designed for flutter suppression

  3. Nonlinear Aeroelastic Analysis Using a Time-Accurate Navier-Stokes Equations Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuruvila, Geojoe; Bartels, Robert E.; Hong, Moeljo S.; Bhatia, G.

    2007-01-01

    A method to simulate limit cycle oscillation (LCO) due to control surface freeplay using a modified CFL3D, a time-accurate Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis code with structural modeling capability, is presented. This approach can be used to analyze aeroelastic response of aircraft with structural behavior characterized by nonlinearity in the force verses displacement curve. A limited validation of the method, using very low Mach number experimental data for a three-degrees-of-freedom (pitch/plunge/flap deflection) airfoil model with flap freeplay, is also presented.

  4. ASTROP2 Users Manual: A Program for Aeroelastic Stability Analysis of Propfans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.; Lucero, John M.

    1996-01-01

    This manual describes the input data required for using the second version of the ASTROP2 (Aeroelastic STability and Response Of Propulsion systems - 2 dimensional analysis) computer code. In ASTROP2, version 2.0, the program is divided into two modules: 2DSTRIP, which calculates the structural dynamic information; and 2DASTROP, which calculates the unsteady aerodynamic force coefficients from which the aeroelastic stability can be determined. In the original version of ASTROP2, these two aspects were performed in a single program. The improvements to version 2.0 include an option to account for counter rotation, improved numerical integration, accommodation for non-uniform inflow distribution, and an iterative scheme to flutter frequency convergence. ASTROP2 can be used for flutter analysis of multi-bladed structures such as those found in compressors, turbines, counter rotating propellers or propfans. The analysis combines a two-dimensional, unsteady cascade aerodynamics model and a three dimensional, normal mode structural model using strip theory. The flutter analysis is formulated in the frequency domain resulting in an eigenvalue determinant. The flutter frequency and damping can be inferred from the eigenvalues.

  5. NCSX Trim Coil Design

    SciTech Connect

    M. Kalish, A. Brooks, J. Rushinski, R. Upcavage

    2009-05-29

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) was being constructed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory in partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory before work was stopped in 2008. The objective of this experiment was to develop the stellarator concept and evaluate it's potential as a model for future fusion power plants. Stellarator design requires very precisely positioned Modular Coils of complex shape to form 3D plasmas. In the design of NCSX, Trim Coils were required to compensate for both the positioning of the coils during assembly and the fabrication tolerances of the Modular Coils. Use of the Trim Coils allowed for larger tolerances increasing ease of assembly and decreasing overall cost. A set of Trim coils was developed to suppress the toroidal flux in island regions due to misalignment, magnetic materials, and eddy currents. The requirement imposed upon the design forced the toroidal flux in island regions below 10% of the total toroidal flux in the plasma. An analysis was first performed to evaluate candidate Trim Coil configurations iterating both the size, number, and position of the coils. The design was optimized considering both performance and cost while staying within the tight restraints presented by the space limited geometry. The final design of the Trim Coils incorporated a 48 Coil top bottom symmetric set. Fabrication costs were minimized by having only two coil types and using a planar conventional design with off the shelf commercial conductor. The Trim Coil design incorporated supports made from simple structural shapes assembled together in a way which allowed for adjustment as well as accommodation for the tolerance build up on the mating surfaces. This paper will summarize the analysis that led to the optimization of the Trim Coils set, the trim coil mechanical design, thermal and stress analysis, and the design of the supporting Trim Coil structure.

  6. User's Manual for DuctE3D: A Program for 3D Euler Unsteady Aerodynamic and Aeroelastic Analysis of Ducted Fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, R.; Reddy, T. S. R.

    1997-01-01

    The program DuctE3D is used for steady or unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analysis of ducted fans. This guide describes the input data required and the output files generated, in using DuctE3D. The analysis solves three dimensional unsteady, compressible Euler equations to obtain the aerodynamic forces. A normal mode structural analysis is used to obtain the aeroelastic equations, which are solved using either the time domain or the frequency domain solution method. Sample input and output files are included in this guide for steady aerodynamic analysis and aeroelastic analysis of an isolated fan row.

  7. Aeroservoelastic Model Validation and Test Data Analysis of the F/A-18 Active Aeroelastic Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, Martin J.; Prazenica, Richard J.

    2003-01-01

    Model validation and flight test data analysis require careful consideration of the effects of uncertainty, noise, and nonlinearity. Uncertainty prevails in the data analysis techniques and results in a composite model uncertainty from unmodeled dynamics, assumptions and mechanics of the estimation procedures, noise, and nonlinearity. A fundamental requirement for reliable and robust model development is an attempt to account for each of these sources of error, in particular, for model validation, robust stability prediction, and flight control system development. This paper is concerned with data processing procedures for uncertainty reduction in model validation for stability estimation and nonlinear identification. F/A-18 Active Aeroelastic Wing (AAW) aircraft data is used to demonstrate signal representation effects on uncertain model development, stability estimation, and nonlinear identification. Data is decomposed using adaptive orthonormal best-basis and wavelet-basis signal decompositions for signal denoising into linear and nonlinear identification algorithms. Nonlinear identification from a wavelet-based Volterra kernel procedure is used to extract nonlinear dynamics from aeroelastic responses, and to assist model development and uncertainty reduction for model validation and stability prediction by removing a class of nonlinearity from the uncertainty.

  8. Aeroelastic analysis of versatile thermal insulation (VTI) panels with pinched boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera, Erasmo; Zappino, Enrico; Patočka, Karel; Komarek, Martin; Ferrarese, Adriano; Montabone, Mauro; Kotzias, Bernhard; Huermann, Brian; Schwane, Richard

    2014-03-01

    Launch vehicle design and analysis is a crucial problem in space engineering. The large range of external conditions and the complexity of space vehicles make the solution of the problem really challenging. The problem considered in the present work deals with the versatile thermal insulation (VTI) panel. This thermal protection system is designed to reduce heat fluxes on the LH2 tank during the long coasting phases. Because of the unconventional boundary conditions and the large-scale geometry of the panel, the aeroelastic behaviour of VTI is investigated in the present work. Known available results from literature related to similar problem, are reviewed by considering the effect of various Mach regimes, including boundary layer thickness effects, in-plane mechanical and thermal loads, non-linear effects and amplitude of limit cycle oscillations. A dedicated finite element model is developed for the supersonic regime. The models used for coupling the orthotropic layered structural model with Piston Theory aerodynamic models allow the calculations of flutter conditions in case of curved panels supported in a discrete number of points. An advanced computational aeroelasticity tool is developed using various dedicated commercial softwares (CFX, ZAERO, EDGE). A wind tunnel test campaign is carried out to assess the computational tool in the analysis of this type of problem.

  9. PROP3D: A Program for 3D Euler Unsteady Aerodynamic and Aeroelastic (Flutter and Forced Response) Analysis of Propellers. Version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, R.; Reddy, T. S. R.

    1996-01-01

    This guide describes the input data required, for steady or unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analysis of propellers and the output files generated, in using PROP3D. The aerodynamic forces are obtained by solving three dimensional unsteady, compressible Euler equations. A normal mode structural analysis is used to obtain the aeroelastic equations, which are solved using either time domain or frequency domain solution method. Sample input and output files are included in this guide for steady aerodynamic analysis of single and counter-rotation propellers, and aeroelastic analysis of single-rotation propeller.

  10. Aeroelastic simulation of higher harmonic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Lawson H.; Friedmann, Peretz P.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes the development of an aeroelastic analysis of a helicopter rotor and its application to the simulation of helicopter vibration reduction through higher harmonic control (HHC). An improved finite-state, time-domain model of unsteady aerodynamics is developed to capture high frequency aerodynamic effects. An improved trim procedure is implemented which accounts for flap, lead-lag, and torsional deformations of the blade. The effect of unsteady aerodynamics is studied and it is found that its impact on blade aeroelastic stability and low frequency response is small, but it has a significant influence on rotor hub vibrations. Several different HHC algorithms are implemented on a hingeless rotor and their effectiveness in reducing hub vibratory shears is compared. All the controllers are found to be quite effective, but very differing HHC inputs are required depending on the aerodynamic model used. Effects of HHC on rotor stability and power requirements are found to be quite small. Simulations of roughly equivalent articulated and hingeless rotors are carried out, and it is found that hingeless rotors can require considerably larger HHC inputs to reduce vibratory shears. This implies that the practical implementation of HHC on hingeless rotors might be considerably more difficult than on articulated rotors.

  11. Computational Aeroelastic Analysis of Ares Crew Launch Vehicle Bi-Modal Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massey, Steven J.; Chwalowski, Pawel

    2010-01-01

    A Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes analysis, with and without dynamic aeroelastic effects, is presented for the Ares I-X launch vehicle at transonic Mach numbers and flight Reynolds numbers for two grid resolutions and two angles of attack. The purpose of the study is to quantify the force and moment increment imparted by the sudden transition from fully separated flow around the crew module - service module junction to that of the bi-modal flow state in which only part of the flow reattaches. The bi-modal flow phenomenon is of interest to the guidance, navigation and control community because it causes a discontinuous jump in forces and moments. Computations with a rigid structure at zero zero angle of attack indicate significant increases in normal force and pitching moment. Dynamic aeroelastic computations indicate the bi-modal flow state is insensitive to vehicle flexibility due to the resulting deflections imparting only very small changes in local angle of attack. At an angle of attack of 2.5deg, the magnitude of the pitching moment increment resulting from the bi-modal state nearly triples, while occurring at a slightly lower Mach number. Significant grid induced variations between the solutions indicate that further grid refinement is warranted.

  12. Aeroelastic Analysis for Rotorcraft in Flight or in a Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical model is developed for the aeroelastic behavior of a rotorcraft in flight or in a wind tunnel. A unified development is presented for a wide class of rotors, helicopters, and operating conditions. The equations of motion for the rotor are derived using an integral Newtonian method, which gives considerable physical insight into the blade inertial and aerodynamic forces. The rotor model includes coupled flap-lag bending and blade torsion degrees of freedom, and is applicable to articulated, hingeless, gimballed, and teetering rotors with an arbitrary number of blades. The aerodynamic model is valid for both high and low inflow, and for axial and nonaxial flight. The rotor rotational speed dynamics, including engine inertia and damping, and the perturbation inflow dynamics are included. For a rotor on a wind-tunnel support, a normal mode representation of the test module, strut, and balance system is used. The aeroelastic analysis for the rotorcraft in flight is applicable to a general two-rotor aircraft, including single main-rotor and tandem helicopter configurations, and side-by-side or tilting proprotor aircraft configurations.

  13. FLUT - A program for aeroelastic stability analysis. [of aircraft structures in subsonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, E. H.

    1977-01-01

    A computer program (FLUT) that can be used to evaluate the aeroelastic stability of aircraft structures in subsonic flow is described. The algorithm synthesizes data from a structural vibration analysis with an unsteady aerodynamics analysis and then performs a complex eigenvalue analysis to assess the system stability. The theoretical basis of the program is discussed with special emphasis placed on some innovative techniques which improve the efficiency of the analysis. User information needed to efficiently and successfully utilize the program is provided. In addition to identifying the required input, the flow of the program execution and some possible sources of difficulty are included. The use of the program is demonstrated with a listing of the input and output for a simple example.

  14. Multidisciplinary aeroelastic analysis of a generic hypersonic vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, K. K.; Petersen, K. L.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents details of a flutter and stability analysis of aerospace structures such as hypersonic vehicles. Both structural and aerodynamic domains are discretized by the common finite element technique. A vibration analysis is first performed by the STARS code employing a block Lanczos solution scheme. This is followed by the generation of a linear aerodynamic grid for subsequent linear flutter analysis within subsonic and supersonic regimes of the flight envelope; the doublet lattice and constant pressure techniques are employed to generate the unsteady aerodynamic forces. Flutter analysis is then performed for several representative flight points. The nonlinear flutter solution is effected by first implementing a CFD solution of the entire vehicle. Thus, a 3-D unstructured grid for the entire flow domain is generated by a moving front technique. A finite element Euler solution is then implemented employing a quasi-implicit as well as an explicit solution scheme. A novel multidisciplinary analysis is next effected that employs modal and aerodynamic data to yield aerodynamic damping characteristics. Such analyses are performed for a number of flight points to yield a large set of pertinent data that define flight flutter characteristics of the vehicle. This paper outlines the finite-element-based integrated analysis procedures in detail, which is followed by the results of numerical analyses of flight flutter simulation.

  15. Multidisciplinary aeroelastic analysis of a generic hypersonic vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, K. K.; Petersen, K. L.

    1993-10-01

    This paper presents details of a flutter and stability analysis of aerospace structures such as hypersonic vehicles. Both structural and aerodynamic domains are discretized by the common finite element technique. A vibration analysis is first performed by the STARS code employing a block Lanczos solution scheme. This is followed by the generation of a linear aerodynamic grid for subsequent linear flutter analysis within subsonic and supersonic regimes of the flight envelope; the doublet lattice and constant pressure techniques are employed to generate the unsteady aerodynamic forces. Flutter analysis is then performed for several representative flight points. The nonlinear flutter solution is effected by first implementing a CFD solution of the entire vehicle. Thus, a 3-D unstructured grid for the entire flow domain is generated by a moving front technique. A finite element Euler solution is then implemented employing a quasi-implicit as well as an explicit solution scheme. A novel multidisciplinary analysis is next effected that employs modal and aerodynamic data to yield aerodynamic damping characteristics. Such analyses are performed for a number of flight points to yield a large set of pertinent data that define flight flutter characteristics of the vehicle. This paper outlines the finite-element-based integrated analysis procedures in detail, which is followed by the results of numerical analyses of flight flutter simulation.

  16. Primary analysis of DNA polymorphisms in the TRIM region (MHC subregion) of the Japanese quail, Coturnix japonica.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shingo; Hosomichi, Kazuyoshi; Yokoyama, Kana; Tsuda, Kaoru; Hara, Hiromi; Yoshida, Yutaka; Fujiwara, Akira; Mizutani, Makoto; Shiina, Takashi; Kono, Tomohiro; Hanzawa, Kei

    2013-01-01

    Based on sequences of two cosmid clones from Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica, Coja), we confirmed that the syntenic cluster, GNB2L1∼BTN1∼BTN2, is located in the quail TRIM subregion of the quail major histocompatibility complex (MHC Coja) region. These cosmids also included four CjBG loci and one CjLEC locus; therefore, the quail TRIM subregion was thought to be adjacent to the BG/LEC subregion. We then identified three polymorphic markers - CjHEP21, CjTRIM39.2 and CjBTN2 - in the TRIM subregion that may be useful for the functional analysis of the MHC-Coja region. We examined MHC-Coja sequences from 321 individual quails sampled from 11 inbred strains, and we found eight alleles for each of the three genes - CjHEP21, CjTRIM39.2 and CjBTN2. These polymorphisms represent the first avian DNA markers in the TRIM subregion. Additionally, we discovered a quail-specific VNTR (variable number of long tandem repeats, 133-137 bp) in intron 7 of CjBTN2. We identified 25 haplotypes in the sample of 321 quail; these haplotypes comprised combinations of all 24 alleles of the three polymorphic genes. We suggest that there are two recombination hotspots, one between each pair of adjacent loci. All strains, except AMRP, contained multiple haplotypes; the AMRP strain contained a single, apparently fixed haplotype.

  17. Static aeroelastic analysis of wings using Euler/Navier-Stokes equations coupled with improved wing-box finite element structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.; MacMurdy, Dale E.; Kapania, Rakesh K.

    1994-01-01

    Strong interactions between flow about an aircraft wing and the wing structure can result in aeroelastic phenomena which significantly impact aircraft performance. Time-accurate methods for solving the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations have matured to the point where reliable results can be obtained with reasonable computational costs for complex non-linear flows with shock waves, vortices and separations. The ability to combine such a flow solver with a general finite element structural model is key to an aeroelastic analysis in these flows. Earlier work involved time-accurate integration of modal structural models based on plate elements. A finite element model was developed to handle three-dimensional wing boxes, and incorporated into the flow solver without the need for modal analysis. Static condensation is performed on the structural model to reduce the structural degrees of freedom for the aeroelastic analysis. Direct incorporation of the finite element wing-box structural model with the flow solver requires finding adequate methods for transferring aerodynamic pressures to the structural grid and returning deflections to the aerodynamic grid. Several schemes were explored for handling the grid-to-grid transfer of information. The complex, built-up nature of the wing-box complicated this transfer. Aeroelastic calculations for a sample wing in transonic flow comparing various simple transfer schemes are presented and discussed.

  18. Extended aeroelastic analysis for helicopter rotors with prescribed hub motion and blade appended penduluum vibration absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielawa, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    The mathematical development for the expanded capabilities of the G400 rotor aeroelastic analysis was examined. The G400PA expanded analysis simulates the dynamics of all conventional rotors, blade pendulum vibration absorbers, and the higher harmonic excitations resulting from prescribed vibratory hub motions and higher harmonic blade pitch control. The methodology for modeling the unsteady stalled airloads of two dimensional airfoils is discussed. Formulations for calculating the rotor impedance matrix appropriate to the higher harmonic blade excitations are outlined. This impedance matrix, and the associated vibratory hub loads, are the rotor dynamic characteristic elements for use in the simplified coupled rotor/fuselage vibration analysis (SIMVIB). Updates to the development of the original G400 theory, program documentation, user instructions and information are presented.

  19. Aeroelastic Stability of Rotor Blades Using Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chopra, I.; Sivaneri, N.

    1982-01-01

    The flutter stability of flap bending, lead-lag bending, and torsion of helicopter rotor blades in hover is investigated using a finite element formulation based on Hamilton's principle. The blade is divided into a number of finite elements. Quasi-steady strip theory is used to evaluate the aerodynamic loads. The nonlinear equations of motion are solved for steady-state blade deflections through an iterative procedure. The equations of motion are linearized assuming blade motion to be a small perturbation about the steady deflected shape. The normal mode method based on the coupled rotating natural modes is used to reduce the number of equations in the flutter analysis. First the formulation is applied to single-load-path blades (articulated and hingeless blades). Numerical results show very good agreement with existing results obtained using the modal approach. The second part of the application concerns multiple-load-path blades, i.e. bearingless blades. Numerical results are presented for several analytical models of the bearingless blade. Results are also obtained using an equivalent beam approach wherein a bearingless blade is modelled as a single beam with equivalent properties. Results show the equivalent beam model.

  20. Unsteady aerodynamic flow field analysis of the space shuttle configuration. Part 4: 747/orbiter aeroelastic stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reding, J. P.; Ericsson, L. E.

    1976-01-01

    A quasi-steady analysis of the aeroelastic stability of the lateral (antisymmetric) modes of the 747/orbiter vehicle was accomplished. The interference effect of the orbiter wake on the 747 tail furnishes an aerodynamic undamping contribution to the elastic modes. Likewise, the upstream influence of the 747 tail and aft fuselage on the orbiter beaver-tail rail fairing also is undamping. Fortunately these undamping effects cannot overpower the large damping contribution of the 747 tail and the modes are damped for the configurations analyzed. However, significant interference effects of the orbiter on the 747 tail have been observed in the pitch plane. The high response of the 747 vertical tail in the orbiter wave was also considered. Wind tunnel data points to flapping of the OMS pod wakes as the source of the wake resonance phenomenon.

  1. Evaluation of linear, inviscid, viscous, and reduced-order modelling aeroelastic solutions of the AGARD 445.6 wing using root locus analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Chwalowski, Pawel; Perry, Boyd, III

    2014-03-01

    Reduced-order modelling (ROM) methods are applied to the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)-based aeroelastic analysis of the AGARD 445.6 wing in order to gain insight regarding well-known discrepancies between the aeroelastic analyses and the experimental results. The results presented include aeroelastic solutions using the inviscid Computational Aeroelasticity Programme-Transonic Small Disturbance (CAP-TSD) code and the FUN3D code (Euler and Navier-Stokes). Full CFD aeroelastic solutions and ROM aeroelastic solutions, computed at several Mach numbers, are presented in the form of root locus plots in order to better reveal the aeroelastic root migrations with increasing dynamic pressure. Important conclusions are drawn from these results including the ability of the linear CAP-TSD code to accurately predict the entire experimental flutter boundary (repeat of analyses performed in the 1980s), that the Euler solutions at supersonic conditions indicate that the third mode is always unstable, and that the FUN3D Navier-Stokes solutions stabilize the unstable third mode seen in the Euler solutions.

  2. Computational Aeroelastic Analysis of the Semi-Span Super-Sonic Transport (S4T) Wind-Tunnel Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanetrik, Mark D.; Silva, Walter A.; Hur, Jiyoung

    2012-01-01

    A summary of the computational aeroelastic analysis for the Semi-Span Super-Sonic Transport (S4T) wind-tunnel model is presented. A broad range of analysis techniques, including linear, nonlinear and Reduced Order Models (ROMs) were employed in support of a series of aeroelastic (AE) and aeroservoelastic (ASE) wind-tunnel tests conducted in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) at NASA Langley Research Center. This research was performed in support of the ASE element in the Supersonics Program, part of NASA's Fundamental Aeronautics Program. The analysis concentrated on open-loop flutter predictions, which were in good agreement with experimental results. This paper is one in a series that comprise a special S4T technical session, which summarizes the S4T project.

  3. Computational Aeroelasticity: Success, Progress, Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, David M.; Liu, Danny D.; Huttsell, Lawrence J.

    2003-01-01

    The formal term Computational Aeroelasticity (CAE) has only been recently adopted to describe aeroelastic analysis methods coupling high-level computational fluid dynamics codes with structural dynamics techniques. However, the general field of aeroelastic computations has enjoyed a rich history of development and application since the first hand-calculations performed in the mid 1930 s. This paper portrays a much broader definition of Computational Aeroelasticity; one that encompasses all levels of aeroelastic computation from the simplest linear aerodynamic modeling to the highest levels of viscous unsteady aerodynamics, from the most basic linear beam structural models to state-of-the-art Finite Element Model (FEM) structural analysis. This paper is not written as a comprehensive history of CAE, but rather serves to review the development and application of aeroelastic analysis methods. It describes techniques and example applications that are viewed as relatively mature and accepted, the "successes" of CAE. Cases where CAE has been successfully applied to unique or emerging problems, but the resulting techniques have proven to be one-of-a-kind analyses or areas where the techniques have yet to evolve into a routinely applied methodology are covered as "progress" in CAE. Finally the true value of this paper is rooted in the description of problems where CAE falls short in its ability to provide relevant tools for industry, the so-called "challenges" to CAE.

  4. Heteroscedastic Tests Statistics for One-Way Analysis of Variance: The Trimmed Means and Hall's Transformation Conjunction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luh, Wei-Ming; Guo, Jiin-Huarng

    2005-01-01

    To deal with nonnormal and heterogeneous data for the one-way fixed effect analysis of variance model, the authors adopted a trimmed means method in conjunction with Hall's invertible transformation into a heteroscedastic test statistic (Alexander-Govern test or Welch test). The results of simulation experiments showed that the proposed technique…

  5. STARS: An Integrated, Multidisciplinary, Finite-Element, Structural, Fluids, Aeroelastic, and Aeroservoelastic Analysis Computer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, K. K.

    1997-01-01

    A multidisciplinary, finite element-based, highly graphics-oriented, linear and nonlinear analysis capability that includes such disciplines as structures, heat transfer, linear aerodynamics, computational fluid dynamics, and controls engineering has been achieved by integrating several new modules in the original STARS (STructural Analysis RoutineS) computer program. Each individual analysis module is general-purpose in nature and is effectively integrated to yield aeroelastic and aeroservoelastic solutions of complex engineering problems. Examples of advanced NASA Dryden Flight Research Center projects analyzed by the code in recent years include the X-29A, F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle/Thrust Vectoring Control System, B-52/Pegasus Generic Hypersonics, National AeroSpace Plane (NASP), SR-71/Hypersonic Launch Vehicle, and High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) projects. Extensive graphics capabilities exist for convenient model development and postprocessing of analysis results. The program is written in modular form in standard FORTRAN language to run on a variety of computers, such as the IBM RISC/6000, SGI, DEC, Cray, and personal computer; associated graphics codes use OpenGL and IBM/graPHIGS language for color depiction. This program is available from COSMIC, the NASA agency for distribution of computer programs.

  6. Aeroelastic stability and response of rotating structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A summary of the work performed during the progress period is presented. Analysis methods for predicting loads and instabilities of wind turbines were developed. Three new areas of research to aid the Advanced Turboprop Project (ATP) were initiated and developed. These three areas of research are aeroelastic analysis methods for cascades including blade and disk flexibility; stall flutter analysis; and computational aeroelasticity.

  7. Aeroelastic Analysis of Helicopter Rotor Blades Incorporating Anisotropic Piezoelectric Twist Actuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkie, W. Keats; Belvin, W. Keith; Park, K. C.

    1996-01-01

    A simple aeroelastic analysis of a helicopter rotor blade incorporating embedded piezoelectric fiber composite, interdigitated electrode blade twist actuators is described. The analysis consists of a linear torsion and flapwise bending model coupled with a nonlinear ONERA based unsteady aerodynamics model. A modified Galerkin procedure is performed upon the rotor blade partial differential equations of motion to develop a system of ordinary differential equations suitable for dynamics simulation using numerical integration. The twist actuation responses for three conceptual fullscale blade designs with realistic constraints on blade mass are numerically evaluated using the analysis. Numerical results indicate that useful amplitudes of nonresonant elastic twist, on the order of one to two degrees, are achievable under one-g hovering flight conditions for interdigitated electrode poling configurations. Twist actuation for the interdigitated electrode blades is also compared with the twist actuation of a conventionally poled piezoelectric fiber composite blade. Elastic twist produced using the interdigitated electrode actuators was found to be four to five times larger than that obtained with the conventionally poled actuators.

  8. An aeroelastic analysis of helicopter rotor blades incorporating piezoelectric fiber composite twist actuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkie, W. Keats; Park, K. C.

    1996-01-01

    A simple aeroelastic analysis of a helicopter rotor blade incorporating embedded piezoelectric fiber composite, interdigitated electrode blade twist actuators is described. The analysis consist of a linear torsion and flapwise bending model coupled with a nonlinear ONERA based unsteady aerodynamics model. A modified Galerkin procedure is performed upon the rotor blade partial differential equations of motion to develop a system of ordinary differential equations suitable for numerical integration. The twist actuation responses for three conceptual full-scale blade designs with realistic constraints on blade mass are numerically evaluated using the analysis. Numerical results indicate that useful amplitudes of nonresonant elastic twist, on the order of one to two degrees, are achievable under one-g hovering flight conditions for interdigitated electrode poling configurations. Twist actuation for the interdigitated electrode blades is also compared with the twist actuation of a conventionally poled piezoelectric fiber composite blade. Elastic twist produced using the interdigitated electrode actuators was found to be four to five times larger than that obtained with the conventionally poled actuators.

  9. Evaluation of Linear, Inviscid, Viscous, and Reduced-Order Modeling Aeroelastic Solutions of the AGARD 445.6 Wing Using Root Locus Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Perry, Boyd III; Chwalowski, Pawel

    2014-01-01

    Reduced-order modeling (ROM) methods are applied to the CFD-based aeroelastic analysis of the AGARD 445.6 wing in order to gain insight regarding well-known discrepancies between the aeroelastic analyses and the experimental results. The results presented include aeroelastic solutions using the inviscid CAP-TSD code and the FUN3D code (Euler and Navier-Stokes). Full CFD aeroelastic solutions and ROM aeroelastic solutions, computed at several Mach numbers, are presented in the form of root locus plots in order to better reveal the aeroelastic root migrations with increasing dynamic pressure. Important conclusions are drawn from these results including the ability of the linear CAP-TSD code to accurately predict the entire experimental flutter boundary (repeat of analyses performed in the 1980's), that the Euler solutions at supersonic conditions indicate that the third mode is always unstable, and that the FUN3D Navier-Stokes solutions stabilize the unstable third mode seen in the Euler solutions.

  10. Analysis of Limit Cycle Oscillation Data from the Aeroelastic Test of the SUGAR Truss-Braced Wing Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert E.; Funk, Christie; Scott, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Research focus in recent years has been given to the design of aircraft that provide significant reductions in emissions, noise and fuel usage. Increases in fuel efficiency have also generally been attended by overall increased wing flexibility. The truss-braced wing (TBW) configuration has been forwarded as one that increases fuel efficiency. The Boeing company recently tested the Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research (SUGAR) Truss-Braced Wing (TBW) wind-tunnel model in the NASA Langley Research Center Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT). This test resulted in a wealth of accelerometer data. Other publications have presented details of the construction of that model, the test itself, and a few of the results of the test. This paper aims to provide a much more detailed look at what the accelerometer data says about the onset of aeroelastic instability, usually known as flutter onset. Every flight vehicle has a location in the flight envelope of flutter onset, and the TBW vehicle is not different. For the TBW model test, the flutter onset generally occurred at the conditions that the Boeing company analysis said it should. What was not known until the test is that, over a large area of the Mach number dynamic pressure map, the model displayed wing/engine nacelle aeroelastic limit cycle oscillation (LCO). This paper dissects that LCO data in order to provide additional insights into the aeroelastic behavior of the model.

  11. Reduced order modeling of aeroelasticity analysis for a wing under static deformation effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamayama, Masato

    2017-01-01

    The full order analysis of aeroelasticity system, which solves the Euler or Navier Stokes equations in a time domain, is usually expensive in a sense of time consumed. To improve this situation, the Reduced Order Modeling (ROM) method has been developed. If there is a pressure difference between upper and lower surfaces of a wing, the aerodynamic forces loaded on the wing cause static deformations. The ROM, therefore, should have a capability to simulate wing vibrations under the static deformation effect. To include this effect, sequential processing of ROMs for two times is proposed in this study. The 1st step ROM predicts the flutter condition for the rigid wing. The 2nd step ROM predicts the flutter condition for the statically deformed wing under the aerodynamic load caused by the 1st step ROM flutter dynamic pressure. The accuracy of this method is verified by comparing the results with those predicted only by the full order analysis. In this study, the identification of aerodynamic forces is conducted by the Eigensystem Realization Algorithm (ERA). In the ERA, reduction of singular value matrix influences the accuracy of identification. Two methods are introduced to reduce the singular value matrix, and the flutter conditions acquired by these two methods are compared each other.

  12. Loads and aeroelasticity division research and technology accomplishments for FY 1982 and plans for FY 1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    Accomplishments of the past year and plans for the coming year are highlighted as they relate to five year plans and the objectives of the following technical areas: aerothermal loads; multidisciplinary analysis and optimization; unsteady aerodynamics; and configuration aeroelasticity. Areas of interest include thermal protection system concepts, active control, nonlinear aeroelastic analysis, aircraft aeroelasticity, and rotorcraft aeroelasticity and vibrations.

  13. Analysis of Test Case Computations and Experiments for the First Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, David M.; Heeg, Jennifer; Wieseman, Carol D.; Chwalowski, Pawel

    2013-01-01

    This paper compares computational and experimental data from the Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop (AePW) held in April 2012. This workshop was designed as a series of technical interchange meetings to assess the state of the art of computational methods for predicting unsteady flowfields and static and dynamic aeroelastic response. The goals are to provide an impartial forum to evaluate the effectiveness of existing computer codes and modeling techniques to simulate aeroelastic problems and to identify computational and experimental areas needing additional research and development. Three subject configurations were chosen from existing wind-tunnel data sets where there is pertinent experimental data available for comparison. Participant researchers analyzed one or more of the subject configurations, and results from all of these computations were compared at the workshop.

  14. Static Aeroelastic Analysis of Transonic Wind Tunnel Models Using Finite Element Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, John R.; Burner, Alpheus W.; Valla, Robert

    1997-01-01

    A computational method for accurately predicting the static aeroelastic deformations of typical transonic transport wind tunnel models is described. The method utilizes a finite element method (FEM) for predicting the deformations. Extensive calibration/validation of this method was carried out using a novel wind-off wind tunnel model static loading experiment and wind-on optical wing twist measurements obtained during a recent wind tunnel test in the National Transonic Facility (NTF) at NASA LaRC. Further validations were carried out using a Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics (CFD) flow solver to calculate wing pressure distributions about several aeroelastically deformed wings and comparing these predictions with NTF experimental data. Results from this aeroelastic deformation method are in good overall agreement with experimentally measured values. Including the predicted deformations significantly improves the correlation between CFD predicted and experimentally measured wing & pressures.

  15. Rotorcraft aeroelastic stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormiston, Robert A.; Warmbrodt, William G.; Hodges, Dewey H.; Peters, David A.

    1988-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental developments in the aeroelastic and aeromechanical stability of helicopters and tilt-rotor aircraft are addressed. Included are the underlying nonlinear structural mechanics of slender rotating beams, necessary for accurate modeling of elastic cantilever rotor blades, and the development of dynamic inflow, an unsteady aerodynamic theory for low-frequency aeroelastic stability applications. Analytical treatment of isolated rotor stability in hover and forward flight, coupled rotor-fuselage stability in hover and forward flight, and analysis of tilt-rotor dynamic stability are considered. Results of parametric investigations of system behavior are presented, and correlation between theoretical results and experimental data from small and large scale wind tunnel and flight testing are discussed.

  16. A hybrid state vector approach to aeroelastic analysis with application to composite lifting surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehman, L. L.

    1981-01-01

    A computational technique has been developed for performing preliminary design aeroelastic analyses of large aspect ratio lifting surfaces. This technique, applicable to both fixed and rotating wing configurations, is based upon a formulation of the structural equilibrium equations in terms of a hybrid state vector containing generalized force and displacement variables. An integrating matrix is employed to solve these equations for divergence and flutter eigenvalues and steady aeroelastic deformation. Results are presented for simple examples which verify the technique and demonstrate how it can be applied to analyze lifting surfaces, including those constructed from composite materials.

  17. Aeroelastic analysis of circular cylindrical and truncated conical shells subjected to a supersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabri, Farhad

    Shells of revolution, particularly cylindrical and conical shells, are one of the basic structural elements in the aerospace structures. With the advent of high speed aircrafts, these shells can show dynamic instabilities when they are exposed to a supersonic flow. Therefore, aeroelastic analysis of these elements is one of the primary design criteria which aeronautical engineers are dealing with. This analysis can be done with the help of finite element method (FEM) coupled with the computational fluid dynamic (CFD) or by experimental methods but it is time consuming and very expensive. The purpose of this dissertation is to develop such a numerical tool to do aeroelastic analysis in a fast and precise way. Meanwhile during the design stage, where the different configurations, loading and boundary conditions may need to be analyzed, this numerical method can be used very easily with the high order of reliability. In this study structural modeling is a combination of linear Sanders thin shell theory and classical finite element method. Based on this hybrid finite element method, the shell displacements are found from the exact solutions of shell theory rather than approximating by polynomial function done in traditional finite element method. This leads to a precise and fast convergence. Supersonic aerodynamic modeling is done based on the piston theory and modified piston theory with the shell curvature term. The stress stiffening due to lateral pressure and axial compression are also taken into accounts. Fluid-structure interaction in the presence of inside quiescent fluid is modeled based on the potential theory. In this method, fluid is considered as a velocity potential variable at each node of the shell element where its motion is expressed in terms of nodal elastic displacements at the fluid-structure interface. This proposed hybrid finite element has capabilities to do following analysis: (i) Buckling and vibration of an empty or partially fluid filled

  18. NASTRAN level 16 demonstration manual updates for aeroelastic analysis of bladed discs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elchuri, V.; Gallo, A. M.

    1980-01-01

    A computer program based on state of the art compressor and structural technologies applied to bladed shrouded discs was developed and made operational in NASTRAN level 16. The problems encompassed include aeroelastic analyses, modes, and flutter. The demonstration manual updates are described.

  19. High fidelity CFD-CSD aeroelastic analysis of slender bladed horizontal-axis wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayed, M.; Lutz, Th.; Krämer, E.; Shayegan, Sh.; Ghantasala, A.; Wüchner, R.; Bletzinger, K.-U.

    2016-09-01

    The aeroelastic response of large multi-megawatt slender horizontal-axis wind turbine blades is investigated by means of a time-accurate CFD-CSD coupling approach. A loose coupling approach is implemented and used to perform the simulations. The block- structured CFD solver FLOWer is utilized to obtain the aerodynamic blade loads based on the time-accurate solution of the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The CSD solver Carat++ is applied to acquire the blade elastic deformations based on non-linear beam elements. In this contribution, the presented coupling approach is utilized to study the aeroelastic response of the generic DTU 10MW wind turbine. Moreover, the effect of the coupled results on the wind turbine performance is discussed. The results are compared to the aeroelastic response predicted by FLOWer coupled to the MBS tool SIMPACK as well as the response predicted by SIMPACK coupled to a Blade Element Momentum code for aerodynamic predictions. A comparative study among the different modelling approaches for this coupled problem is discussed to quantify the coupling effects of the structural models on the aeroelastic response.

  20. Development and Analysis of a Swept Blade Aeroelastic Model for a Small Wind Turbine (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Preus, R.; Damiani, R.; Lee, S.; Larwood, S.

    2014-06-01

    As part of the U.S. Department-of-Energy-funded Competitiveness Improvement Project, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed new capabilities for aeroelastic modeling of precurved and preswept blades for small wind turbines. This presentation covers the quest for optimized rotors, computer-aided engineering tools, a case study, and summary of the results.

  1. Performance Analysis of the Flapping Wing Propulsion Based on a New Experimentally Validated Aeroelastic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourtakdoust, Seid H.; Aliabadi, Saeed Karimain

    Flapping micro air vehicle (FMAV) is considered to exhibit much better performance at low speeds and small sizes compared to fixed-wing MAVs. To maximize the potential and capabilities of FMAVs also to produce adequate design implications, a new aeroelastic model of a typical flexible FMAV is being developed utilizing Euler-Bernoulli torsion beam and quasi steady aerodynamic model. The new model accounts for all natural existing complex interactions between the mass, inertia, elastic properties, aerodynamic loading, flapping amplitude and frequency of the FMAV as well as the effects of several geometric and design parameters. To validate the proposed theoretical model, a typical FMAV as well as instrumented test stand for the online measurement of forces, flapping angle and power consumption have been constructed. The experimental results are initially utilized to validate the flight dynamic model, and several appropriate conclusions are drawn. The model is subsequently used to demonstrate the flapping propulsion characteristics of the FMAV via simulation. Using dimensionless parameters, a set of new generalized curves have been deduced. The results indicate that by proper adjustment of the wing stiffness parameter as a function of the reduced frequency, the FMAV will attain its optimum propulsive efficiency. This fact raises additional new ideas for further research in this area by utilizing intelligent variable stiffness materials and/or or active morphing technology for the sustained, high-performance flight of FMAVs. The generalized model can also be used to conduct a performance and stability analysis of FMAVs and to design and optimize flapping-wing structures.

  2. Interactomic analysis of REST/NRSF and implications of its functional links with the transcription suppressor TRIM28 during neuronal differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Namgyu; Park, Sung Jin; Haddad, Ghazal; Kim, Dae-Kyum; Park, Seon-Min; Park, Sang Ki; Choi, Kwan Yong

    2016-01-01

    RE-1 silencing transcription factor (REST) is a transcriptional repressor that regulates gene expression by binding to repressor element 1. However, despite its critical function in physiology, little is known about its interaction proteins. Here we identified 204 REST-interacting proteins using affinity purification and mass spectrometry. The interactome included proteins associated with mRNA processing/splicing, chromatin organization, and transcription. The interactions of these REST-interacting proteins, which included TRIM28, were confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and immunocytochemistry, respectively. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis revealed that neuronal differentiation-related GO terms were enriched among target genes that were co-regulated by REST and TRIM28, while the level of CTNND2 was increased by the knockdown of REST and TRIM28. Consistently, the level of CTNND2 increased while those of REST and TRIM28 decreased during neuronal differentiation in the primary neurons, suggesting that CTNND2 expression may be co-regulated by both. Furthermore, neurite outgrowth was increased by depletion of REST or TRIM28, implying that reduction of both REST and TRIM28 could promote neuronal differentiation via induction of CTNND2 expression. In conclusion, our study of REST reveals novel interacting proteins which could be a valuable resource for investigating unidentified functions of REST and also suggested functional links between REST and TRIM28 during neuronal development. PMID:27976729

  3. Harmonic Balance Computations of Fan Aeroelastic Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakhle, Milind A.; Reddy, T. S. R.

    2010-01-01

    A harmonic balance (HB) aeroelastic analysis, which has been recently developed, was used to determine the aeroelastic stability (flutter) characteristics of an experimental fan. To assess the numerical accuracy of this HB aeroelastic analysis, a time-domain aeroelastic analysis was also used to determine the aeroelastic stability characteristics of the same fan. Both of these three-dimensional analysis codes model the unsteady flowfield due to blade vibrations using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. In the HB analysis, the unsteady flow equations are converted to a HB form and solved using a pseudo-time marching method. In the time-domain analysis, the unsteady flow equations are solved using an implicit time-marching approach. Steady and unsteady computations for two vibration modes were carried out at two rotational speeds: 100 percent (design) and 70 percent (part-speed). The steady and unsteady results obtained from the two analysis methods compare well, thus verifying the recently developed HB aeroelastic analysis. Based on the results, the experimental fan was found to have no aeroelastic instability (flutter) at the conditions examined in this study.

  4. Aeroelastic Stability Computations for Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, R.; Bakhle, M. A.; Keith, T. G., Jr.; Stefko, G. L.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes an aeroelastic analysis program for turbomachines. Unsteady Navier-Stokes equations are solved on dynamically deforming, body fitted, grid to obtain the aeroelastic characteristics. Blade structural response is modeled using a modal representation of the blade and the work-per-cycle method is used to evaluate the stability characteristics. Nonzero interblade phase angle is modeled using phase-lagged boundary conditions. Results obtained showed good correlation with existing experimental, analytical, and numerical results. Numerical analysis also showed that given the computational resources available today, engineering solutions with good accuracy are possible using higher fidelity analyses.

  5. Use of a Viscous Flow Simulation Code for Static Aeroelastic Analysis of a Wing at High-Lift Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akaydin, H. Dogus; Moini-Yekta, Shayan; Housman, Jeffrey A.; Nguyen, Nhan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a static aeroelastic analysis of a wind tunnel test model of a wing in high-lift configuration using a viscous flow simulation code. The model wing was tailored to deform during the tests by amounts similar to a composite airliner wing in highlift conditions. This required use of a viscous flow analysis to predict the lift coefficient of the deformed wing accurately. We thus utilized an existing static aeroelastic analysis framework that involves an inviscid flow code (Cart3d) to predict the deformed shape of the wing, then utilized a viscous flow code (Overflow) to compute the aerodynamic loads on the deformed wing. This way, we reduced the cost of flow simulations needed for this analysis while still being able to predict the aerodynamic forces with reasonable accuracy. Our results suggest that the lift of the deformed wing may be higher or lower than that of the non-deformed wing, and the washout deformation of the wing is the key factor that changes the lift of the deformed wing in two distinct ways: while it decreases the lift at low to moderate angles of attack simply by lowering local angles of attack along the span, it increases the lift at high angles of attack by alleviating separation.

  6. Aeroelastic Phenomena of Flight Vehicles in Transonic Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, In; Kim, Jong-Yun; Kim, Kyung-Seok; Lim, In-Gyu

    Flight vehicles experience aeroelastic problems due to the interaction between structures and aerodynamic forces. Aeroelastic instability is usually a critical problem in transonic and lower supersonic regions. In present study, the aeroelastic analyses of several flight vehicles have been performed using the coupled techniques of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and computational structural dynamics (CSD). The aeroelastic characteristics based on several aircraft models are investigated using the developed aeroelastic analysis system. On the other hand, structural nonlinearities always exist in flight vehicles. Structural nonlinearities such as freeplay and large deformation effects are considered in the present aeroelastic analysis system. Finally, aeroelastic characteristics of several flight vehicles will be explained considering both aerodynamic and structural nonlinearities.

  7. User's Guide for ECAP2D: an Euler Unsteady Aerodynamic and Aeroelastic Analysis Program for Two Dimensional Oscillating Cascades, Version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.

    1995-01-01

    This guide describes the input data required for using ECAP2D (Euler Cascade Aeroelastic Program-Two Dimensional). ECAP2D can be used for steady or unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analysis of two dimensional cascades. Euler equations are used to obtain aerodynamic forces. The structural dynamic equations are written for a rigid typical section undergoing pitching (torsion) and plunging (bending) motion. The solution methods include harmonic oscillation method, influence coefficient method, pulse response method, and time integration method. For harmonic oscillation method, example inputs and outputs are provided for pitching motion and plunging motion. For the rest of the methods, input and output for pitching motion only are given.

  8. Aero-elastic Parameter Estimation of a 2.5 MW Wind Turbine Through Dynamic Analysis of In-Operation Vibration Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozbek, Muammer; Rixen, Daniel J.

    Aero-elastic parameters of a 2.5 MW—80 m diameter—wind turbine were extracted by using the in-operation vibration data recorded for various wind speeds and operating conditions. The data acquired by 8 strain gauges (2 sensors on each blade and 2 sensors on the tower) installed on the turbine was analyzed by using OMA (Operational Modal Analysis) methods while several turbine parameters (eigenfrequencies and damping ratios) were extracted. The obtained system parameters were then qualitatively compared with the results presented in a study from literature, which includes both aeroelastic simulations and in-field measurements performed on a similar size and capacity wind turbine.

  9. An improved CAMRAD model for aeroelastic stability analysis of the XV-15 with advanced technology blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acree, C. W., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    In pursuit of higher performance, the XV-15 Tiltrotor Research Aircraft was modified by the installation of new composite rotor blades. Initial flights with the Advanced Technology Blades (ATB's) revealed excessive rotor control loads that were traced to a dynamic mismatch between the blades and the aircraft control system. The analytical models of both the blades and the mechanical controls were extensively revised for use by the CAMRAD computer program to better predict aeroelastic stability and loads. This report documents the most important revisions and discusses their effects on aeroelastic stability predictions for airplane-mode flight. The ATB's may be flown in several different configurations for research, including changes in blade sweep and tip twist. The effects on stability of 1 deg and 0 deg sweep are illustrated, as are those of twisted and zero-twist tips. This report also discusses the effects of stiffening the rotor control system, which was done by locking out lateral cyclic swashplate motion with shims.

  10. User's Guide for MSAP2D: A Program for Unsteady Aerodynamic and Aeroelastic (Flutter and Forced Response) Analysis of Multistage Compressors and Turbines. 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.; Srivastava, R.

    1996-01-01

    This guide describes the input data required for using MSAP2D (Multi Stage Aeroelastic analysis Program - Two Dimensional) computer code. MSAP2D can be used for steady, unsteady aerodynamic, and aeroelastic (flutter and forced response) analysis of bladed disks arranged in multiple blade rows such as those found in compressors, turbines, counter rotating propellers or propfans. The code can also be run for single blade row. MSAP2D code is an extension of the original NPHASE code for multiblade row aerodynamic and aeroelastic analysis. Euler equations are used to obtain aerodynamic forces. The structural dynamic equations are written for a rigid typical section undergoing pitching (torsion) and plunging (bending) motion. The aeroelastic equations are solved in time domain. For single blade row analysis, frequency domain analysis is also provided to obtain unsteady aerodynamic coefficients required in an eigen analysis for flutter. In this manual, sample input and output are provided for a single blade row example, two blade row example with equal and unequal number of blades in the blade rows.

  11. Transonic aeroelastic analysis of launch vehicle configurations. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filgueirasdeazevedo, Joao Luiz

    1988-01-01

    A numerical study of the aeroelastic stability of typical launch vehicle configurations in transonic flight is performed. Recent computational fluid dynamics techniques are used to simulate the transonic aerodynamic flow fields, as opposed to relying on experimental data for the unsteady aerodynamic pressures. The flow solver is coupled to an appropriate structural representation of the vehicle. The aerodynamic formulation is based on the thin layer approximation to the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations, where the account for turbulent mixing is done by the two-layer Baldwin and Lomax algebraic eddy viscosity model. The structural-dynamic equations are developed considering free-free flexural vibration of an elongated beam with variable properties and are cast in modal form. Aeroelastic analyses are performed by integrating simultaneously in the two sets of equations. By tracing the growth or decay of a perturbed oscillation, the aeroelastic stability of a given constant configuration can be ascertained. The method is described in detail, and results that indicate its application are presented. Applications include some validation cases for the algorithm developed, as well as the study of configurations known to have presented flutter programs in the past.

  12. Aeroelastic stability analysis of a high-energy turbine blade. [for SSME High Pressure Oxidizer TurboPump first stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Todd E.

    1990-01-01

    The dynamic analysis for the SSME HPOTP first stage turbine blade is presented wherein the rotor aeroelastic stability is assessed. The method employs normal modes analysis to simulate the coupled blade/fluid system. A three-dimensional finite element model of the blade is used in conjunction with a two-dimensional linearized unsteady aerodynamic theory which accounts for steady aerodynamic loading effects. This unsteady aerodynamic model is applied in stacked axisymmetric strips along the airfoil span. The blade dynamic and aerodynamic behaviors are coupled within modal space by expressing the unsteady aerodynamic forces in the frequency domain. A complex eigenvalue problem is solved to determine the stability of the rotor assuming tuned blades. The present analysis indicates that the HPOTP rotor experiences very low aerodynamic damping in the first four vibrational modes. The edgewise mode was found to be dynamically unstable. This mode of the blade became stable when the effect of mechanical damping was considered.

  13. Global Nonlinear Analysis of Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting from Ambient and Aeroelastic Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelkefi, Abdessattar

    Converting vibrations to a usable form of energy has been the topic of many recent investigations. The ultimate goal is to convert ambient or aeroelastic vibrations to operate low-power consumption devices, such as microelectromechanical systems, heath monitoring sensors, wireless sensors or replacing small batteries that have a finite life span or would require hard and expensive maintenance. The transduction mechanisms used for transforming vibrations to electric power include: electromagnetic, electrostatic, and piezoelectric mechanisms. Because it can be used to harvest energy over a wide range of frequencies and because of its ease of application, the piezoelectric option has attracted significant interest. In this work, we investigate the performance of different types of piezoelectric energy harvesters. The objective is to design and enhance the performance of these harvesters. To this end, distributed-parameter and phenomenological models of these harvesters are developed. Global analysis of these models is then performed using modern methods of nonlinear dynamics. In the first part of this Dissertation, global nonlinear distributed-parameter models for piezoelectric energy harvesters under direct and parametric excitations are developed. The method of multiple scales is then used to derive nonlinear forms of the governing equations and associated boundary conditions, which are used to evaluate their performance and determine the effects of the nonlinear piezoelectric coefficients on their behavior in terms of softening or hardening. In the second part, we assess the influence of the linear and nonlinear parameters on the dynamic behavior of a wing-based piezoaeroelastic energy harvester. The system is composed of a rigid airfoil that is constrained to pitch and plunge and supported by linear and nonlinear torsional and flexural springs with a piezoelectric coupling attached to the plunge degree of freedom. Linear analysis is performed to determine the

  14. MIMS for TRIM

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    MIMS supports complex computational studies that use multiple interrelated models / programs, such as the modules within TRIM. MIMS is used by TRIM to run various models in sequence, while sharing input and output files.

  15. Loads Model Development and Analysis for the F/A-18 Active Aeroelastic Wing Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Michael J.; Lizotte, Andrew M.; Dibley, Ryan P.; Clarke, Robert

    2005-01-01

    The Active Aeroelastic Wing airplane was successfully flight-tested in March 2005. During phase 1 of the two-phase program, an onboard excitation system provided independent control surface movements that were used to develop a loads model for the wing structure and wing control surfaces. The resulting loads model, which was used to develop the control laws for phase 2, is described. The loads model was developed from flight data through the use of a multiple linear regression technique. The loads model input consisted of aircraft states and control surface positions, in addition to nonlinear inputs that were calculated from flight-measured parameters. The loads model output for each wing consisted of wing-root bending moment and torque, wing-fold bending moment and torque, inboard and outboard leading-edge flap hinge moment, trailing-edge flap hinge moment, and aileron hinge moment. The development of the Active Aeroelastic Wing loads model is described, and the ability of the model to predict loads during phase 2 research maneuvers is demonstrated. Results show a good match to phase 2 flight data for all loads except inboard and outboard leading-edge flap hinge moments at certain flight conditions. The average load prediction errors for all loads at all flight conditions are 9.1 percent for maximum stick-deflection rolls, 4.4 percent for 5-g windup turns, and 7.7 percent for 4-g rolling pullouts.

  16. Computer program for definition of transonic axial-flow compressor blade rows. [computer program for fabrication and aeroelastic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouse, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    A method is presented for designing axial-flow compressor blading from blade elements defined on cones which pass through the blade-edge streamline locations. Each blade-element centerline is composed of two segments which are tangent to each other. The centerline and surfaces of each segment have constant change of angle with path distance. The stacking line for the blade elements can be leaned in both the axial and tangential directions. The output of the computer program gives coordinates for fabrication and properties for aeroelastic analysis for planar blade sections. These coordinates and properties are obtained by interpolation across conical blade elements. The program is structured to be coupled with an aerodynamic design program.

  17. Download TRIM.Risk

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    TRIM.Risk is used to integrate the information on exposure received from TRIM.FaTE or TRIM.Expo with that on dose-response or hazard assessment and to provide quantitative descriptions of risk or hazard and some of the attendant uncertainties.

  18. TRIM proteins in development.

    PubMed

    Petrera, Francesca; Meroni, Germana

    2012-01-01

    TRIM proteins play important roles in several patho-physiological processes. Their common activity within the ubiquitylation pathway makes them amenable to a number of diverse biological roles. Many of the TRIM genes are highly and sometimes specifically expressed during embryogenesis, it is therefore not surprising that several of them might be involved in developmental processes. Here, we primarily discuss the developmental implications of two subgroups of TRIM proteins that conserved domain composition and functions from their invertebrate ancestors. The two groups are: the TRIM-NHL proteins implicated in miRNA processing regulation and the TRIM-FN3 proteins involved in ventral midline development.

  19. Design sensitivity analysis for an aeroelastic optimization of a helicopter blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Joon; Chopra, Inderjit

    1987-01-01

    The sensitivity of vibratory hub loads of a four-bladed hingeless rotor with respect to blade design parameters is investigated using a finite element formulation in space and time. Design parameters include nonstructural mass distribution (spanwise and chordwise), chordwise offset of center of gravity from aerodynamic center, blade bending stiffnesses (flap, lag and torsion). Hub loads selected are 4/rev vertical hub shear and 3/rev hub moment in the rotating reference frame. The sensitivity derivatives of vertical hub loads with respect to blade design parameters are compared using two approaches, finite difference scheme and analytical approach using chain rule differentiation. The analytical derivative approach developed as an integral part of response solution (finite element in time) is a powerful method for an aeroelastic optimization of a helicopter rotor.

  20. Analysis of copy-number variation, insertional polymorphism, and methylation status of the tiniest class I (TRIM) and class II (MITE) transposable element families in various rice strains.

    PubMed

    Baruch, Omer; Kashkush, Khalil

    2012-05-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) dominate the genetic capacity of most eukaryotes, especially plants, where they may compose up to 90% of the genome. Many studies, both in plants and animals reported that in fact non-autonomous elements that have lost their protein-coding sequences and became miniature elements were highly associated with genes, and showed a high level of transpositional activity such as mPing family in rice. In this study, we have investigated in detail the copy number, insertional polymorphism and the methylation status of the tiniest LTR retrotransposon family, termed TRIM, in nine rice strains, in comparison with mPing. While TRIM showed similar copy numbers (average of 79 insertions) in all the nine rice strains, the copy number of mPing varied dramatically (ranging from 6 to 203 insertions) in the same strains. Site-specific PCR analysis revealed that ~58% of the TRIM elements have identical insertion sites among the nine rice strains, while none of the mPing elements (100% polymorphism) have identical insertion sites in the same strains. Finally, over 65% of the TRIM insertion sites were cytosine methylated in all nine rice strains, while the level of the methylated mPing insertion sites ranged between 43 and 81.5%. The findings of this study indicate that unlike mPing, TRIM is most probably a fossil TE family in rice. In addition, the data shows that there might be a strong correlation between TE methylation and copy number.

  1. A modal aeroelastic analysis scheme for turbomachinery blading. M.S. Thesis - Case Western Reserve Univ. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Todd E.

    1991-01-01

    An aeroelastic analysis is developed which has general application to all types of axial-flow turbomachinery blades. The approach is based on linear modal analysis, where the blade's dynamic response is represented as a linear combination of contributions from each of its in-vacuum free vibrational modes. A compressible linearized unsteady potential theory is used to model the flow over the oscillating blades. The two-dimensional unsteady flow is evaluated along several stacked axisymmetric strips along the span of the airfoil. The unsteady pressures at the blade surface are integrated to result in the generalized force acting on the blade due to simple harmonic motions. The unsteady aerodynamic forces are coupled to the blade normal modes in the frequency domain using modal analysis. An iterative eigenvalue problem is solved to determine the stability of the blade when the unsteady aerodynamic forces are included in the analysis. The approach is demonstrated by applying it to a high-energy subsonic turbine blade from a rocket engine turbopump power turbine. The results indicate that this turbine could undergo flutter in an edgewise mode of vibration.

  2. Thermal trim for luminaire

    DOEpatents

    Bazydola, Sarah; Ghiu, Camil-Daniel; Harrison, Robert; Jeswani, Anil

    2013-11-19

    A luminaire with a thermal pathway to reduce the junction temperature of the luminaire's light source, and methods for so doing, are disclosed. The luminaire includes a can, a light engine, and a trim, that define a substantially continuous thermal pathway from the light engine to a surrounding environment. The can defines a can cavity and includes a can end region. The light engine is within the can cavity and includes a light source and a heat sink, including a heat sink end region, coupled thereto. The trim is at least partially disposed within the can cavity and includes a first trim end region coupled to the heat sink end region and a second trim end region coupled to the can end region. Thermal interface material may be located between: the heat sink and the trim, the trim and the can, and/or the heat sink and the light source.

  3. NeoCASS: An integrated tool for structural sizing, aeroelastic analysis and MDO at conceptual design level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavagna, Luca; Ricci, Sergio; Travaglini, Lorenzo

    2011-11-01

    This paper presents a design framework called NeoCASS (Next generation Conceptual Aero-Structural Sizing Suite), developed at the Department of Aerospace Engineering of Politecnico di Milano in the frame of SimSAC (Simulating Aircraft Stability And Control Characteristics for Use in Conceptual Design) project, funded by EU in the context of 6th Framework Program. It enables the creation of efficient low-order, medium fidelity models particularly suitable for structural sizing, aeroelastic analysis and optimization at the conceptual design level. The whole methodology is based on the integration of geometry construction, aerodynamic and structural analysis codes that combine depictive, computational, analytical, and semi-empirical methods, validated in an aircraft design environment. The work here presented aims at including the airframe and its effect from the very beginning of the conceptual design. This aspect is usually not considered in this early phase. In most cases, very simplified formulas and datasheets are adopted, which implies a low level of detail and a poor accuracy. Through NeoCASS, a preliminar distribution of stiffness and inertias can be determined, given the initial layout. The adoption of empirical formulas is reduced to the minimum in favor of simple numerical methods. This allows to consider the aeroelastic behavior and performances, as well, improving the accuracy of the design tools during the iterative steps and lowering the development costs and reducing the time to market. The result achieved is a design tool based on computational methods for the aero-structural analysis and Multi-Disciplinary Optimization (MDO) of aircraft layouts at the conceptual design stage. A complete case study regarding the TransoniCRuiser aircraft, including validation of the results obtained using industrial standard tools like MSC/NASTRAN and a CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) code, is reported. As it will be shown, it is possible to improve the degree of

  4. Aeroelastic Analysis of Rotor Blades Using Cfd/csd Coupling in Hover Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Long; Wu, Yizhao; Xia, Jian

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is coupled with a computational structural dynamics (CSD) to simulate the unsteady rotor flow with aeroelasticity effects. An unstructured upwind Navier-Stokes solver was developed for this simulation, with 2nd order time-accurate dual-time stepping method for temporal discretization and low Mach number preconditioning method. For turbulent flows, both the Spalart-Allmaras and Menter's SST model are available. Mesh deformation is achieved through a fast dynamic grid method called Delaunay graph map method for unsteady flow simulation. The rotor blades are modeled as Hodges & Dowell's nonlinear beams coupled flap-lag-torsion. The rotorcraft computational structural dynamics code employs the 15-dof beam finite element formulation for modeling. The structure code was validated by comparing the natural frequencies of a rotor model with UMARC. The flow and structure codes are coupled tightly with information exchange several times at every time step. A rotor blade model's unsteady flow field in the hover mode is simulated using the coupling method. Effect of blade elasticity with aerodynamic loads was compared with rigid blade.

  5. Impact of TRIM5α in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Emi E.; Shioda, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    HIV type 1 (HIV-1) has a very narrow host range that is limited to humans and chimpanzees. HIV-1 cannot replicate well in Old World monkey cells such as rhesus and cynomolgus monkeys. Tripartite motif (TRIM)5α is a key molecule that confers potent resistance against HIV-1 infection and is composed of really interesting new gene, B-box2, coiled-coil and PRYSPRY domains. Interaction between TRIM5α PRYSPRY domains and HIV-1 capsid core triggers the anti-HIV-1 activity of TRIM5α. Analysis of natural HIV variants and extensive mutational experiments has revealed the presence of critical amino acid residues in both the PRYSPRY domain and HIV capsid for potent HIV suppression by TRIM5α. Genetic manipulation of the human TRIM5 gene could establish human cells totally resistant to HIV-1, which may lead to a cure for HIV-1 infection in the future. PMID:26372380

  6. Aeroelastic analysis for helicopter rotors with blade appended pendulum vibration absorbers. Mathematical derivations and program user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielawa, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    Mathematical development is presented for the expanded capabilities of the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) G400 Rotor Aeroelastic Analysis. This expanded analysis, G400PA, simulates the dynamics of teetered rotors, blade pendulum vibration absorbers and the higher harmonic excitations resulting from prescribed vibratory hub motions and higher harmonic blade pitch control. Formulations are also presented for calculating the rotor impedance matrix appropriate to these higher harmonic blade excitations. This impedance matrix and the associated vibratory hub loads are intended as the rotor blade characteristics elements for use in the Simplified Coupled Rotor/Fuselage Vibration Analysis (SIMVIB). Sections are included presenting updates to the development of the original G400 theory, and material appropriate to the user of the G400PA computer program. This material includes: (1) a general descriptionof the tructuring of the G400PA FORTRAN coding, (2) a detaild description of the required input data and other useful information for successfully running the program, and (3) a detailed description of the output results.

  7. Static Aeroelastic Effects of Formation Flight for Slender Unswept Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Curtis E.

    2009-01-01

    The static aeroelastic equilibrium equations for slender, straight wings are modified to incorporate the effects of aerodynamically-coupled formation flight. A system of equations is developed by applying trim constraints and is solved for component lift distribution, trim angle-of-attack, and trim aileron deflection. The trim values are then used to calculate the elastic twist distribution of the wing box. This system of equations is applied to a formation of two gliders in trimmed flight. Structural and aerodynamic properties are assumed for the gliders, and solutions are calculated for flexible and rigid wings in solo and formation flight. It is shown for a sample application of two gliders in formation flight, that formation disturbances produce greater twist in the wingtip immersed in the vortex than for either the opposing wingtip or the wings of a similar airplane in solo flight. Changes in the lift distribution, resulting from wing twist, increase the performance benefits of formation flight. A flexible wing in formation flight will require greater aileron deflection to achieve roll trim than a rigid wing.

  8. Transonic and Low-Supersonic Aeroelastic Analysis of a Two-Degree Airfoil with a Freeplay Non-Linearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KIM, DONG-HYUN; LEE, IN

    2000-07-01

    A two-degree-of-freedom airfoil with a freeplay non-linearity in the pitch and plunge directions has been analyzed in the transonic and low-supersonic flow region, where aerodynamic non-linearities also exist. The primary purpose of this study is to show aeroelastic characteristics due to freeplay structural non-linearity in the transonic and low-supersonic regions. The unsteady aerodynamic forces on the airfoil were evaluated using two-dimensional unsteady Euler code, and the resulting aeroelastic equations are numerically integrated to obtain the aeroelastic time responses of the airfoil motions and to investigate the dynamic instability. The present model has been considered as a simple aeroelastic model, which is equivalent to the folding fin of an advanced generic missile. From the results of the present study, characteristics of important vibration responses and aeroelastic instabilities can be observed in the transonic and supersonic regions, especially considering the effect of structural non-linearity in the pitch and plunge directions. The regions of limit-cycle oscillation are shown at much lower velocities, especially in the supersonic flow region, than the divergent flutter velocities of the linear structure model. It is also shown that even small freeplay angles can lead to severe dynamic instabilities and dangerous fatigue conditions for the flight vehicle wings and control fins.

  9. An expanded clade of rodent Trim5 genes.

    PubMed

    Tareen, Semih U; Sawyer, Sara L; Malik, Harmit S; Emerman, Michael

    2009-03-15

    Trim5alpha from primates (including humans), cows, and rabbits has been shown to be an active antiviral host gene that acts against a range of retroviruses. Although this suggests that Trim5alpha may be a common antiviral restriction factor among mammals, the status of Trim5 genes in rodents has been unclear. Using genomic and phylogenetic analyses, we describe an expanded paralogous cluster of at least eight Trim5-like genes in mice (including the previously described Trim12 and Trim30 genes), and three Trim5-like genes in rats. Our characterization of the rodent Trim5 locus, and comparison to the Trim5 locus in humans, cows, and rabbits, indicates that Trim5 has undergone independent evolutionary expansions within species. Evolutionary analysis shows that rodent Trim5 genes have evolved under positive selection, suggesting evolutionary conflicts consistent with important antiviral function. Sampling six rodent Trim5 genes failed to reveal antiviral activities against a set of eight retroviral challenges, although we predict that such activities exist.

  10. Airloads, wakes, and aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wayne

    1990-01-01

    Fundamental considerations regarding the theory of modeling of rotary wing airloads, wakes, and aeroelasticity are presented. The topics covered are: airloads and wakes, including lifting-line theory, wake models and nonuniform inflow, free wake geometry, and blade-vortex interaction; aerodynamic and wake models for aeroelasticity, including two-dimensional unsteady aerodynamics and dynamic inflow; and airloads and structural dynamics, including comprehensive airload prediction programs. Results of calculations and correlations are presented.

  11. Uncertainty Quantification in Aeroelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beran, Philip; Stanford, Bret; Schrock, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Physical interactions between a fluid and structure, potentially manifested as self-sustained or divergent oscillations, can be sensitive to many parameters whose values are uncertain. Of interest here are aircraft aeroelastic interactions, which must be accounted for in aircraft certification and design. Deterministic prediction of these aeroelastic behaviors can be difficult owing to physical and computational complexity. New challenges are introduced when physical parameters and elements of the modeling process are uncertain. By viewing aeroelasticity through a nondeterministic prism, where key quantities are assumed stochastic, one may gain insights into how to reduce system uncertainty, increase system robustness, and maintain aeroelastic safety. This article reviews uncertainty quantification in aeroelasticity using traditional analytical techniques not reliant on computational fluid dynamics; compares and contrasts this work with emerging methods based on computational fluid dynamics, which target richer physics; and reviews the state of the art in aeroelastic optimization under uncertainty. Barriers to continued progress, for example, the so-called curse of dimensionality, are discussed.

  12. Nonlinear Aeroelastic Analysis of the HIAD TPS Coupon in the NASA 8' High Temperature Tunnel: Theory and Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, Benjamin D.; Scott, Robert C,; Dowell, Earl H.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a set of theoretical and experimental techniques to characterize the aeroelasticity of the thermal protection system (TPS) on the NASA Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD). A square TPS coupon experiences trailing edge oscillatory behavior during experimental testing in the 8' High Temperature Tunnel (HTT), which may indicate the presence of aeroelastic flutter. Several theoretical aeroelastic models have been developed, each corresponding to a different experimental test configuration. Von Karman large deflection theory is used for the plate-like components of the TPS, along with piston theory for the aerodynamics. The constraints between the individual TPS layers and the presence of a unidirectional foundation at the back of the coupon are included by developing the necessary energy expressions and using the Rayleigh Ritz method to derive the nonlinear equations of motion. Free vibrations and limit cycle oscillations are computed and the frequencies and amplitudes are compared with accelerometer and photogrammetry data from the experiments.

  13. Predictions of Control Inputs, Periodic Responses and Damping Levels of an Isolated Experimental Rotor in Trimmed Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaonkar, G. H.; Subramanian, S.

    1996-01-01

    Since the early 1990s the Aeroflightdynamics Directorate at the Ames Research Center has been conducting tests on isolated hingeless rotors in hover and forward flight. The primary objective is to generate a database on aeroelastic stability in trimmed flight for torsionally soft rotors at realistic tip speeds. The rotor test model has four soft inplane blades of NACA 0012 airfoil section with low torsional stiffness. The collective pitch and shaft tilt are set prior to each test run, and then the rotor is trimmed in the following sense: the longitudinal and lateral cyclic pitch controls are adjusted through a swashplate to minimize the 1/rev flapping moment at the 12 percent radial station. In hover, the database comprises lag regressive-mode damping with pitch variations. In forward flight the database comprises cyclic pitch controls, root flap moment and lag regressive-mode damping with advance ratio, shaft angle and pitch variations. This report presents the predictions and their correlation with the database. A modal analysis is used, in which nonrotating modes in flap bending, lag bending and torsion are computed from the measured blade mass and stiffness distributions. The airfoil aerodynamics is represented by the ONERA dynamic stall models of lift, drag and pitching moment, and the wake dynamics is represented by a state-space wake model. The trim analysis of finding, the cyclic controls and the corresponding, periodic responses is based on periodic shooting with damped Newton iteration; the Floquet transition matrix (FTM) comes out as a byproduct. The stabillty analysis of finding the frequencies and damping levels is based on the eigenvalue-eigenvector analysis of the FTM. All the structural and aerodynamic states are included from modeling to trim analysis. A major finding is that dynamic wake dramatically improves the correlation for the lateral cyclic pitch control. Overall, the correlation is fairly good.

  14. Aeroelastic Stability and Response of Rotating Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Reddy, Tondapu

    2004-01-01

    A summary of the work performed under NASA grant is presented. More details can be found in the cited references. This grant led to the development of relatively faster aeroelastic analysis methods for predicting flutter and forced response in fans, compressors, and turbines using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) methods. These methods are based on linearized two- and three-dimensional, unsteady, nonlinear aerodynamic equations. During the period of the grant, aeroelastic analysis that includes the effects of uncertainties in the design variables has also been developed.

  15. Aeroelastic Analysis of a Flexible Wing Wind Tunnel Model with Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Ting, Eric; Lebofsky, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents data analysis of a flexible wing wind tunnel model with a variable camber continuous trailing edge flap (VCCTEF) design for drag minimization tested at the University of Washington Aeronautical Laboratory (UWAL). The wind tunnel test was designed to explore the relative merit of the VCCTEF concept for improved cruise efficiency through the use of low-cost aeroelastic model test techniques. The flexible wing model is a 10%-scale model of a typical transport wing and is constructed of woven fabric composites and foam core. The wing structural stiffness in bending is tailored to be half of the stiffness of a Boeing 757-era transport wing while the torsional stiffness is about the same. This stiffness reduction results in a wing tip deflection of about 10% of the wing semi-span. The VCCTEF is a multi-segment flap design having three chordwise camber segments and five spanwise flap sections for a total of 15 individual flap elements. The three chordwise camber segments can be positioned appropriately to create a desired trailing edge camber. Elastomeric material is used to cover the gaps in between the spanwise flap sections, thereby creating a continuous trailing edge. Wind tunnel data analysis conducted previously shows that the VCCTEF can achieve a drag reduction of up to 6.31% and an improvement in the lift-to-drag ratio (L=D) of up to 4.85%. A method for estimating the bending and torsional stiffnesses of the flexible wingUWAL wind tunnel model from static load test data is presented. The resulting estimation indicates that the stiffness of the flexible wing is significantly stiffer in torsion than in bending by as much as 9 to 1. The lift prediction for the flexible wing is computed by a coupled aerodynamic-structural model. The coupled model is developed by coupling a conceptual aerodynamic tool Vorlax with a finite-element model of the flexible wing via an automated geometry deformation tool. Based on the comparison of the lift curve slope

  16. Download Trim.Fate

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    TRIM.FaTE is a spatially explicit, compartmental mass balance model that describes the movement and transformation of pollutants over time, through a user-defined, bounded system that includes both biotic and abiotic compartments.

  17. TRIM proteins in cancer.

    PubMed

    Cambiaghi, Valeria; Giuliani, Virginia; Lombardi, Sara; Marinelli, Cristiano; Toffalorio, Francesca; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Some members of the tripartite motif (TRIM/RBCC) protein family are thought to be important regulators of carcinogenesis. This is not surprising as the TRIM proteins are involved in several biological processes, such as cell growth, development and cellular differentiation and alteration of these proteins can affect transcriptional regulation, cell proliferation and apoptosis. In particular, four TRIM family genes are frequently translocated to other genes, generating fusion proteins implicated in cancer initiation and progression. Among these the most famous is the promyelocytic leukaemia gene PML, which encodes the protein TRIM19. PML is involved in the t(15;17) translocation that specifically occurs in Acute Promyelocytic Leukaemia (APL), resulting in a PML-retinoic acid receptor-alpha (PML-RARalpha) fusion protein. Other members of the TRIM family are linked to cancer development without being involved in chromosomal re-arrangements, possibly through ubiquitination or loss of tumour suppression functions. This chapter discusses the biological functions of TRIM proteins in cancer.

  18. Level-Set Topology Optimization with Aeroelastic Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunning, Peter D.; Stanford, Bret K.; Kim, H. Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Level-set topology optimization is used to design a wing considering skin buckling under static aeroelastic trim loading, as well as dynamic aeroelastic stability (flutter). The level-set function is defined over the entire 3D volume of a transport aircraft wing box. Therefore, the approach is not limited by any predefined structure and can explore novel configurations. The Sequential Linear Programming (SLP) level-set method is used to solve the constrained optimization problems. The proposed method is demonstrated using three problems with mass, linear buckling and flutter objective and/or constraints. A constraint aggregation method is used to handle multiple buckling constraints in the wing skins. A continuous flutter constraint formulation is used to handle difficulties arising from discontinuities in the design space caused by a switching of the critical flutter mode.

  19. Optimal Topology of Aircraft Rib and Spar Structures under Aeroelastic Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, Bret K.; Dunning, Peter D.

    2014-01-01

    Several topology optimization problems are conducted within the ribs and spars of a wing box. It is desired to locate the best position of lightening holes, truss/cross-bracing, etc. A variety of aeroelastic metrics are isolated for each of these problems: elastic wing compliance under trim loads and taxi loads, stress distribution, and crushing loads. Aileron effectiveness under a constant roll rate is considered, as are dynamic metrics: natural vibration frequency and flutter. This approach helps uncover the relationship between topology and aeroelasticity in subsonic transport wings, and can therefore aid in understanding the complex aircraft design process which must eventually consider all these metrics and load cases simultaneously.

  20. Helicopter aeroelastic stability and response - Current topics and future trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, Peretz P.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents several current topics in rotary wing aeroelasticity and concludes by attempting to anticipate future trends and developments. These topics are: (1) the role of geometric nonlinearities; (2) structural modeling, and aeroelastic analysis of composite rotor blades; (3) aeroelastic stability and response in forward flight; (4) modeling of coupled rotor/fuselage aeromechanical problems and their active control; and (5) the coupled rotor-fuselage vibration problem and its alleviation by higher harmonic control. Selected results illustrating the fundamental aspects of these topics are presented. Future developments are briefly discussed.

  1. Experimental aeroelasticity history, status and future in brief

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricketts, Rodney H.

    1990-01-01

    NASA conducts wind tunnel experiments to determine and understand the aeroelastic characteristics of new and advanced flight vehicles, including fixed-wing, rotary-wing and space-launch configurations. Review and assessments are made of the state-of-the-art in experimental aeroelasticity regarding available facilities, measurement techniques, and other means and devices useful in testing. In addition, some past experimental programs are described which assisted in the development of new technology, validated new analysis codes, or provided needed information for clearing flight envelopes of unwanted aeroelastic response. Finally, needs and requirements for advances and improvements in testing capabilities for future experimental research and development programs are described.

  2. Aeroelastic Tailoring of Transport Wings Including Transonic Flutter Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, Bret K.; Wieseman, Carol D.; Jutte, Christine V.

    2015-01-01

    Several minimum-mass optimization problems are solved to evaluate the effectiveness of a variety of novel tailoring schemes for subsonic transport wings. Aeroelastic stress and panel buckling constraints are imposed across several trimmed static maneuver loads, in addition to a transonic flutter margin constraint, captured with aerodynamic influence coefficient-based tools. Tailoring with metallic thickness variations, functionally graded materials, balanced or unbalanced composite laminates, curvilinear tow steering, and distributed trailing edge control effectors are all found to provide reductions in structural wing mass with varying degrees of success. The question as to whether this wing mass reduction will offset the increased manufacturing cost is left unresolved for each case.

  3. Transonic Unsteady Aerodynamics and Aeroelasticity 1987, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bland, Samuel R. (Compiler)

    1989-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics methods have been widely accepted for transonic aeroelastic analysis. Previously, calculations with the TSD methods were used for 2-D airfoils, but now the TSD methods are applied to the aeroelastic analysis of the complete aircraft. The Symposium papers are grouped into five subject areas, two of which are covered in this part: (1) Transonic Small Disturbance (TSD) theory for complete aircraft configurations; and (2) Full potential and Euler equation methods.

  4. TRIM proteins and diseases.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masashi; Hatakeyama, Shigetsugu

    2017-01-07

    Ubiquitination is one of the posttranslational modifications that regulates a number of intracellular events including signal transduction, protein quality control, transcription, cell cycle, apoptosis and development. The ubiquitin system functions as a garbage machine to degrade target proteins and as a regulator for several signalling pathways. Biochemical reaction of ubiquitination requires several enzymes including E1, E2 and E3, and E3 ubiquitin ligases play roles as receptors for recognizing target proteins. Most of the tripartite motif (TRIM) proteins are E3 ubiquitin ligases. Recent studies have shown that some TRIM proteins function as important regulators for a variety of diseases including cancer, inflammatory diseases, infectious diseases, neuropsychiatric disorders, chromosomal abnormalities and developmental diseases. In this review, we summarize the involvement of TRIM proteins in the aetiology of various diseases.

  5. Ship trim optimization: assessment of influence of trim on resistance of MOERI container ship.

    PubMed

    Sherbaz, Salma; Duan, Wenyang

    2014-01-01

    Environmental issues and rising fuel prices necessitate better energy efficiency in all sectors. Shipping industry is a stakeholder in environmental issues. Shipping industry is responsible for approximately 3% of global CO₂ emissions, 14-15% of global NO(X) emissions, and 16% of global SO(X) emissions. Ship trim optimization has gained enormous momentum in recent years being an effective operational measure for better energy efficiency to reduce emissions. Ship trim optimization analysis has traditionally been done through tow-tank testing for a specific hullform. Computational techniques are increasingly popular in ship hydrodynamics applications. The purpose of this study is to present MOERI container ship (KCS) hull trim optimization by employing computational methods. KCS hull total resistances and trim and sinkage computed values, in even keel condition, are compared with experimental values and found in reasonable agreement. The agreement validates that mesh, boundary conditions, and solution techniques are correct. The same mesh, boundary conditions, and solution techniques are used to obtain resistance values in different trim conditions at Fn = 0.2274. Based on attained results, optimum trim is suggested. This research serves as foundation for employing computational techniques for ship trim optimization.

  6. STARS: An integrated general-purpose finite element structural, aeroelastic, and aeroservoelastic analysis computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Kajal K.

    1991-01-01

    The details of an integrated general-purpose finite element structural analysis computer program which is also capable of solving complex multidisciplinary problems is presented. Thus, the SOLIDS module of the program possesses an extensive finite element library suitable for modeling most practical problems and is capable of solving statics, vibration, buckling, and dynamic response problems of complex structures, including spinning ones. The aerodynamic module, AERO, enables computation of unsteady aerodynamic forces for both subsonic and supersonic flow for subsequent flutter and divergence analysis of the structure. The associated aeroservoelastic analysis module, ASE, effects aero-structural-control stability analysis yielding frequency responses as well as damping characteristics of the structure. The program is written in standard FORTRAN to run on a wide variety of computers. Extensive graphics, preprocessing, and postprocessing routines are also available pertaining to a number of terminals.

  7. Total Risk Integrated Methodology (TRIM) - TRIM.Risk

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    TRIM.Riskis used to integrate the information on exposure received from TRIM.FaTE or TRIM.Expo with that on dose-response or hazard assessment and to provide quantitative descriptions of risk or hazard and some of the attendant uncertainties.

  8. Predicting Unsteady Aeroelastic Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strganac, Thomas W.; Mook, Dean T.

    1990-01-01

    New method for predicting subsonic flutter, static deflections, and aeroelastic divergence developed. Unsteady aerodynamic loads determined by unsteady-vortex-lattice method. Accounts for aspect ratio and angle of attack. Equations for motion of wing and flow field solved iteratively and simultaneously. Used to predict transient responses to initial disturbances, and to predict steady-state static and oscillatory responses. Potential application for research in such unsteady structural/flow interactions as those in windmills, turbines, and compressors.

  9. Dynamics and Aeroelasticity of Composite Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-22

    UNCLASSIFIED/UNLIMITEO SAME AS aPT Z OTIC USERS C3UNCLASSIFIED 22a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE INDIVIDUAL 22b. TELEPHONE NUMBER 22c. OFFICE SYMBOL flncliads A’Wa...support related dynamic instability which could be eliminated by 3roper adjustment of the sutnport stiffness. Good agreement with linear thoery was found...Aeroelastic analysis 38 2.3 Wind Tunnel Support Stability Analysis 40 Chapter 3 Experiment 50 3.1 Wind Tunnel Model, Support System, and 50

  10. Aeroelastic analysis for helicopter rotor blades with time-variable, non-linear structural twist and multiple structural redundancy: Mathematical derivation and program user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielawa, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    The differential equations of motion for the lateral and torsional deformations of a nonlinearly twisted rotor blade in steady flight conditions together with those additional aeroelastic features germane to composite bearingless rotors are derived. The differential equations are formulated in terms of uncoupled (zero pitch and twist) vibratory modes with exact coupling effects due to finite, time variable blade pitch and, to second order, twist. Also presented are derivations of the fully coupled inertia and aerodynamic load distributions, automatic pitch change coupling effects, structural redundancy characteristics of the composite bearingless rotor flexbeam - torque tube system in bending and torsion, and a description of the linearized equations appropriate for eigensolution analyses. Three appendixes are included presenting material appropriate to the digital computer program implementation of the analysis, program G400.

  11. Analysis of the relationship between lung cancer drug response level and atom connectivity dynamics based on trimmed Delaunay triangulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Bin; Wang, Debby D.; Ma, Lichun; Chen, Lijiang; Yan, Hong

    2016-05-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation is a pathogenic factor of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), such as gefitinib, are widely used in NSCLC treatment. In this work, we investigated the relationship between the number of EGFR residues connected with gefitinib and the response level for each EGFR mutation type. Three-dimensional trimmed Delaunay triangulation was applied to construct connections between EGFR residues and gefitinib atoms. Through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we discovered that when the number of EGFR residues connected with gefitinib increases, the response level of the corresponding EGFR mutation tends to descend.

  12. Fluorescent image analysis of HIV-1 and HIV-2 uncoating kinetics in the presence of old world monkey TRIM5α.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Eri; Kono, Ken; Hulme, Amy E; Hope, Thomas J; Nakayama, Emi E; Shioda, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    Uncoating of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) and type 2 (HIV-2) conical cores is an important early step for establishment of infection. In Old World Monkey (OWM) cells, the TRIM5α cellular factor potently suppresses an early step of infection by HIV-1. Previously, biochemical studies using whole cell lysates of infected cells revealed that OWM TRIM5α accelerates the uncoating of HIV-1, leading to premature reverse transcription. In the present study, we re-evaluated uncoating kinetics of HIV-1 in the presence of OWM TRIM5α by using an in situ uncoating assay, which allowed us to differentiate productive HIV-1 entry from simple (non-productive) endocytosis. Results showed that the uncoating kinetics of HIV-1 was indeed accelerated in the presence of OWM TRIM5α. Furthermore, we adapted an in situ uncoating assay to HIV-2, which showed wide variations in TRIM5α sensitivity among different isolates. HIV-2 isolate GH123, whose infectivity was suppressed by cynomolgus monkey (CM) TRIM5α, showed accelerated uncoating in the presence of CM TRIM5α. In contrast, mutant HIV-2 ASA, whose infectivity was unaltered by CM TRIM5α, showed no change in uncoating kinetics in the presence of CM TRIM5α. These results confirmed and further extended the previous notion that accelerated uncoating is associated with restriction activity of TRIM5α against lentiviruses.

  13. An evolutionary screen highlights canonical and noncanonical candidate antiviral genes within the primate TRIM gene family.

    PubMed

    Malfavon-Borja, Ray; Sawyer, Sara L; Wu, Lily I; Emerman, Michael; Malik, Harmit S

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent viral pressure has acted on host-encoded antiviral genes during primate and mammalian evolution. This selective pressure has resulted in dramatic episodes of adaptation in host antiviral genes, often detected via positive selection. These evolutionary signatures of adaptation have the potential to highlight previously unrecognized antiviral genes (also called restriction factors). Although the TRIM multigene family is recognized for encoding several bona fide restriction factors (e.g., TRIM5alpha), most members of this expansive gene family remain uncharacterized. Here, we investigated the TRIM multigene family for signatures of positive selection to identify novel candidate antiviral genes. Our analysis reveals previously undocumented signatures of positive selection in 17 TRIM genes, 10 of which represent novel candidate restriction factors. These include the unusual TRIM52 gene, which has evolved under strong positive selection despite its encoded protein lacking a putative viral recognition (B30.2) domain. We show that TRIM52 arose via gene duplication from the TRIM41 gene. Both TRIM52 and TRIM41 have dramatically expanded RING domains compared with the rest of the TRIM multigene family, yet this domain has evolved under positive selection only in primate TRIM52, suggesting that it represents a novel host-virus interaction interface. Our evolutionary-based screen not only documents positive selection in known TRIM restriction factors but also highlights candidate novel restriction factors, providing insight into the interfaces of host-pathogen interactions mediated by the TRIM multigene family.

  14. TRIM proteins as trim tabs for the homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Horie-Inoue, Kuniko

    2013-10-01

    The tripartite motif (TRIM) or RBCC proteins are characterized by the TRIM composed of a RING finger, B-box and coiled-coil domains. TRIM proteins often play roles in the post-translational protein modification, including ubiquitylation and other ubiquitin-like modifications. Evidence has accumulated in regard to the contribution of TRIM proteins to diverse cellular processes, including such as cell cycle progression, apoptosis, immunity and transcriptional regulation. In particular, some of the TRIM proteins have been characterized to exert oncogenic or tumour suppressor-like functions depending on the context. A recent report by Inoue and his colleagues has revealed that Terf/TRIM17 stimulates the degradation of a kinetochore protein ZWINT and regulates the proliferation of breast cancer cells. Terf has also been paid attention as a factor promoting neuronal apoptosis, by degrading a Bcl2-like anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1. Like aircraft trim tabs, TRIM proteins trim the balance of homoeostasis by modulating various biological pathways through protein-protein interactions.

  15. Nonlinear dynamical analysis of an aeroelastic system with multi-segmented moment in the pitch degree-of-freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasconcellos, Rui; Abdelkefi, Abdessattar

    2015-01-01

    The effects of a multi-segmented nonlinearity in the pitch degree of freedom on the behavior of a two-degree of freedom aeroelastic system are investigated. The aeroelastic system is free to plunge and pitch and is supported by linear translational and nonlinear torsional springs and is subjected to an incoming flow. The unsteady representation based on the Duhamel formulation is used to model the aerodynamic loads. Using modern method of nonlinear dynamics, a nonlinear characterization is performed to identify the system's response when increasing the wind speed. It is demonstrated that four sudden transitions take place with a change in the system's response. It is shown that, in the first transition, the system's response changes from simply periodic (only main oscillating frequency) to two periods (having the main oscillating frequency and its superharmonic of order 2). In the second transition, the response of the system changes from two periods (having the main oscillating frequency and its superharmonic of order 2) to a period-1. The results also show that the third transition is accompanied by a change in the system's response from simply periodic to two periods (having the main oscillating frequency and its superharmonic of order 3). After this transition, chaotic responses take place and then the fourth transition is accompanied by a sudden change in the system's response from chaotic to two periods (having the main oscillating frequency and its superharmonic of order 3). The results show that these transitions are caused by the tangential contact between the trajectory and the multi-segmented nonlinearity boundaries and with a zero-pitch speed incidence. This observation is associated with the definition of grazing bifurcation.

  16. Thermal trim for a luminaire

    DOEpatents

    Bazydola, Sarah; Ghiu, Camil-Daniel; Harrison, Robert; Jeswani, Anil

    2013-02-19

    A luminaire with a thermal pathway to reduce the junction temperature of the luminaire's light source, and methods for so doing, are disclosed. The luminaire includes a can, a light engine, and a trim, that define a substantially continuous thermal pathway from the light engine to a surrounding environment. The can defines a can cavity and includes a can end region. The light engine is within the can cavity and includes a light source and a heat sink, including a heat sink end region, coupled thereto. The trim is at least partially disposed within the can cavity and includes a first trim end region coupled to the heat sink end region and a second trim end region coupled to the can end region. Thermal interface material may be located between: the heat sink and the trim, the trim and the can, and/or the heat sink and the light source.

  17. The cell biology of TRIM5α.

    PubMed

    Lukic, Zana; Campbell, Edward M

    2012-03-01

    The tripartite motif (TRIM)-containing proteins are involved in many cellular functions such as cell signaling, apoptosis, cell differentiation, and immune modulation. TRIM5 proteins, including TRIM5α and TRIM-Cyp, are known to possess antiretroviral activity against many different retroviruses. Besides being retroviral restriction factors, TRIM5 proteins participate in other cellular functions that have recently emerged in the study of TRIM5α. In this review, we discuss properties of TRIM5α such as cytoplasmic body formation, protein turnover, and trafficking. Also, we discuss recent insights into innate immune modulation mediated by TRIM5α, highlighting the various functions TRIM5α has in cellular processes.

  18. Gust response of aeroelastically tailored wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, S.; Capuzzi, M.; Langston, D.; Bossanyi, E.; McCann, G.; Weaver, PM; Pirrera, A.

    2016-09-01

    Some interesting challenges arise from the drive to build larger, more durable rotors that produce cheaper energy. The rationale is that, with current wind turbine designs, the power generated is theoretically proportional to the square of blade length. One enabling technology is aeroelastic tailoring that offers enhanced combined energy capture and system durability. The design of two adaptive, aeroelastically tailored blade configurations is considered here. One uses material bend-twist coupling; the other combines both material and geometric coupling. Each structural design meets a predefined coupling distribution, whilst approximately matching the stiffness of an uncoupled baseline blade. A gust analysis shows beneficial flapwise load alleviation for both adaptive blades, with the additional benefits of smoothing variations in electrical power and rotational speed.

  19. 14 CFR 25.161 - Trim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Trim. 25.161 Section 25.161 Aeronautics and...: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Trim § 25.161 Trim. (a) General. Each airplane must meet the trim requirements of this section after being trimmed, and without further pressure upon, or movement of, either...

  20. 14 CFR 25.161 - Trim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Trim. 25.161 Section 25.161 Aeronautics and...: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Trim § 25.161 Trim. (a) General. Each airplane must meet the trim requirements of this section after being trimmed, and without further pressure upon, or movement of, either...

  1. In-flight total forces, moments and static aeroelastic characteristics of an oblique-wing research airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, R. E.; Sim, A. G.

    1984-01-01

    A low-speed flight investigation has provided total force and moment coefficients and aeroelastic effects for the AD-1 oblique-wing research airplane. The results were interpreted and compared with predictions that were based on wind tunnel data. An assessment has been made of the aeroelastic wing bending design criteria. Lateral-directional trim requirements caused by asymmetry were determined. At angles of attack near stall, flow visualization indicated viscous flow separation and spanwise vortex flow. These effects were also apparent in the force and moment data.

  2. TRIM71 suppresses tumorigenesis via modulation of Lin28B-let-7-HMGA2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jinlong; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Park, Nayun; Shin, Daye; Choi, Hae In; Cho, Sungchan; Park, Jong Bae; Kim, Jong Heon

    2016-01-01

    TRIM71 (tripartite motif-containing 71) belongs to the TRIM-NHL protein family, which plays a conserved role in regulating early development and differentiation. However, the molecular functions of TRIM71 have remained largely unknown. Here, we explored the role of TRIM71 together with modulation of Lin28B-let-7-HMGA2 (high-mobility group AT-hook 2) signaling in tumorigenesis. TRIM71 overexpression opposed Lin28B-induced transformation in primary cells and inhibited tumor formation in a mouse model. Specific knockdown of TRIM71 expression increased cancer cell proliferation and invasion. Conversely, overexpression of wild-type TRIM71 in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cells in which Lin28B-let-7-HMGA2 signaling was conserved decreased both cancer cell phenotypes. More importantly, overexpression of an ubiquitin transfer activity-deficient TRIM71 mutant in NSCLC cells had no effect on proliferation or invasion, regardless of the conservation status of Lin28B-let-7-HMGA2 signaling. The tumorigenic inhibitory action of TRIM71 was antagonized by overexpression of the TRIM71 downstream targets, Lin28B and HMGA2. Furthermore, a bioinformatics analysis revealed that TRIM71 expression was downregulated in various types of cancer tissue from patients. Taken together, these data indicate that TRIM71 acts through post-transcriptional repression of Lin28B and subsequent modulation of let-7-HMGA2 signaling during tumorigenesis to potentially function as a tumor suppressor. PMID:27821801

  3. TRIM71 suppresses tumorigenesis via modulation of Lin28B-let-7-HMGA2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jinlong; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Park, Nayun; Shin, Daye; Choi, Hae In; Cho, Sungchan; Park, Jong Bae; Kim, Jong Heon

    2016-11-29

    TRIM71 (tripartite motif-containing 71) belongs to the TRIM-NHL protein family, which plays a conserved role in regulating early development and differentiation. However, the molecular functions of TRIM71 have remained largely unknown. Here, we explored the role of TRIM71 together with modulation of Lin28B-let-7-HMGA2 (high-mobility group AT-hook 2) signaling in tumorigenesis. TRIM71 overexpression opposed Lin28B-induced transformation in primary cells and inhibited tumor formation in a mouse model. Specific knockdown of TRIM71 expression increased cancer cell proliferation and invasion. Conversely, overexpression of wild-type TRIM71 in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cells in which Lin28B-let-7-HMGA2 signaling was conserved decreased both cancer cell phenotypes. More importantly, overexpression of an ubiquitin transfer activity-deficient TRIM71 mutant in NSCLC cells had no effect on proliferation or invasion, regardless of the conservation status of Lin28B-let-7-HMGA2 signaling. The tumorigenic inhibitory action of TRIM71 was antagonized by overexpression of the TRIM71 downstream targets, Lin28B and HMGA2. Furthermore, a bioinformatics analysis revealed that TRIM71 expression was downregulated in various types of cancer tissue from patients. Taken together, these data indicate that TRIM71 acts through post-transcriptional repression of Lin28B and subsequent modulation of let-7-HMGA2 signaling during tumorigenesis to potentially function as a tumor suppressor.

  4. Three-Dimensional Aeroelastic and Aerothermoelastic Behavior in Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNamara, Jack J.; Friedmann, Peretz P.; Powell, Kenneth G.; Thuruthimattam, Biju J.; Bartels, Robert E.

    2005-01-01

    The aeroelastic and aerothermoelastic behavior of three-dimensional configurations in hypersonic flow regime are studied. The aeroelastic behavior of a low aspect ratio wing, representative of a fin or control surface on a generic hypersonic vehicle, is examined using third order piston theory, Euler and Navier-Stokes aerodynamics. The sensitivity of the aeroelastic behavior generated using Euler and Navier-Stokes aerodynamics to parameters governing temporal accuracy is also examined. Also, a refined aerothermoelastic model, which incorporates the heat transfer between the fluid and structure using CFD generated aerodynamic heating, is used to examine the aerothermoelastic behavior of the low aspect ratio wing in the hypersonic regime. Finally, the hypersonic aeroelastic behavior of a generic hypersonic vehicle with a lifting-body type fuselage and canted fins is studied using piston theory and Euler aerodynamics for the range of 2.5 less than or equal to M less than or equal to 28, at altitudes ranging from 10,000 feet to 80,000 feet. This analysis includes a study on optimal mesh selection for use with Euler aerodynamics. In addition to the aeroelastic and aerothermoelastic results presented, three time domain flutter identification techniques are compared, namely the moving block approach, the least squares curve fitting method, and a system identification technique using an Auto-Regressive model of the aeroelastic system. In general, the three methods agree well. The system identification technique, however, provided quick damping and frequency estimations with minimal response record length, and therefore o ers significant reductions in computational cost. In the present case, the computational cost was reduced by 75%. The aeroelastic and aerothermoelastic results presented illustrate the applicability of the CFL3D code for the hypersonic flight regime.

  5. Whole-annulus aeroelasticity analysis of a 17-bladerow WRF compressor using an unstructured Navier Stokes solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X.; Vahdati, M.; Sayma, A.; Imregun, M.

    2005-03-01

    This paper describes a large-scale aeroelasticity computation for an aero-engine core compressor. The computational domain includes all 17 bladerows, resulting in a mesh with over 68 million points. The Favre-averaged Navier Stokes equations are used to represent the flow in a non-linear time-accurate fashion on unstructured meshes of mixed elements. The structural model of the first two rotor bladerows is based on a standard finite element representation. The fluid mesh is moved at each time step according to the structural motion so that changes in blade aerodynamic damping and flow unsteadiness can be accommodated automatically. An efficient domain decomposition technique, where special care was taken to balance the memory requirement across processors, was developed as part of the work. The calculation was conducted in parallel mode on 128 CPUs of an SGI Origin 3000. Ten vibration cycles were obtained using over 2.2 CPU years, though the elapsed time was a week only. Steady-state flow measurements and predictions were found to be in good agreement. A comparison of the averaged unsteady flow and the steady-state flow revealed some discrepancies. It was concluded that, in due course, the methodology would be adopted by industry to perform routine numerical simulations of the unsteady flow through entire compressor assemblies with vibrating blades not only to minimise engine and rig tests but also to improve performance predictions.

  6. Aeroelastic structural acoustic control.

    PubMed

    Clark, R L; Frampton, K D

    1999-02-01

    Static, constant-gain, output-feedback control compensators were designed to increase the transmission loss across a panel subjected to mean flow on one surface and a stationary, acoustic half-space on the opposite surface. The multi-input, multi-output control system was based upon the use of an array of colocated transducer pairs. The performance of the static-gain, output-feedback controller was compared to that of the full state-feedback controller using the same control actuator arrays, and was found to yield comparable levels of performance for practical limitations on control effort. Additionally, the resulting static compensators proved to be dissipative in nature, and thus the design varied little as a function of the aeroelastic coupling induced by the fluid-structure interaction under subsonic flow conditions. Several parametric studies were performed, comparing the effects of control-effort penalty as well as the number of transducer pairs used in the control system.

  7. Jefferson Lab's Trim Card II

    SciTech Connect

    Trent Allison; Sarin Philip; C. Higgins; Edward Martin; William Merz

    2005-05-01

    Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) uses Trim Card I power supplies to drive approximately 1900 correction magnets. These trim cards have had a long and illustrious service record. However, some of the employed technology is now obsolete, making it difficult to maintain the system and retain adequate spares. The Trim Card II is being developed to act as a transparent replacement for its aging predecessor. A modular approach has been taken in its development to facilitate the substitution of sections for future improvements and maintenance. The resulting design has been divided into a motherboard and 7 daughter cards which has also allowed for parallel development. The Trim Card II utilizes modern technologies such as a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) and a microprocessor to embed trim card controls and diagnostics. These reprogrammable devices also provide the versatility to incorporate future requirements.

  8. Multi-fractality in aeroelastic response as a precursor to flutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatramani, J.; Nair, Vineeth; Sujith, R. I.; Gupta, Sayan; Sarkar, Sunetra

    2017-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests on a NACA 0012 airfoil have been carried out to study the transition in aeroelastic response from an initial state characterised by low-amplitude aperiodic fluctuations to aeroelastic flutter when the system exhibits limit cycle oscillations. An analysis of the aeroelastic measurements reveals multi-fractal characteristics in the pre-flutter regime. This has not been studied in the literature. As the flow velocity approaches the flutter velocity from below, a gradual loss in multi-fractality is observed. Measures based on the generalised Hurst exponents are developed and are shown to have the potential to warn against impending aeroelastic flutter. The results of this study could be useful for health monitoring of aeroelastic structures.

  9. Unique features of TRIM5alpha among closely related human TRIM family members.

    PubMed

    Li, Xing; Gold, Bert; O'hUigin, Colm; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Song, Byeongwoon; Si, Zhihai; Li, Yuan; Yuan, Wen; Stremlau, Matthew; Mische, Claudia; Javanbakht, Hassan; Scally, Mark; Winkler, Cheryl; Dean, Michael; Sodroski, Joseph

    2007-04-10

    The tripartite motif (TRIM) protein, TRIM5alpha, restricts some retroviruses, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1), from infecting the cells of particular species. TRIM proteins contain RING, B-box, coiled-coil and, in some cases, B30.2(SPRY) domains. We investigated the properties of human TRIM family members closely related to TRIM5. These TRIM proteins, like TRIM5alpha, assembled into homotrimers and co-localized in the cytoplasm with TRIM5alpha. TRIM5alpha turned over more rapidly than related TRIM proteins. TRIM5alpha, TRIM34 and TRIM6 associated with HIV-1 capsid-nucleocapsid complexes assembled in vitro; the TRIM5alpha and TRIM34 interactions with these complexes were dependent on their B30.2(SPRY) domains. Only TRIM5alpha potently restricted infection by the retroviruses studied; overexpression of TRIM34 resulted in modest inhibition of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV(mac)) infection. In contrast to the other TRIM genes examined, TRIM5 exhibited evidence of positive selection. The unique features of TRIM5alpha among its TRIM relatives underscore its special status as an antiviral factor.

  10. Total Risk Integrated Methodology (TRIM) - TRIM.FaTE

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    TRIM.FaTE is a spatially explicit, compartmental mass balance model that describes the movement and transformation of pollutants over time, through a user-defined, bounded system that includes both biotic and abiotic compartments.

  11. Aeroelasticity of Nonlinear Tail / Rudder Systems with Freeplay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rishel, Evan

    This thesis details the development of a linear/nonlinear three degree of freedom aeroelastic system designed and manufactured at the University of Washington (UW). Describing function analysis was carried out in the frequency domain. Time domain simulations were carried out to account for all types of motion. Nonlinear aeroelastic behavior may lead to limit cycles which can be captured in the frequency domain using describing function approximation and numerically using Runga-Kutta integration. Linear and nonlinear aeroelastic tests were conducted in the UW 3x3 low-speed wind tunnel to determine the linear flutter speed and frequency of the system as well as its nonlinear behavior when freeplay is introduced. The test data is presented along with the results of the MATLAB-based simulations. The correlation between test and numerical results is very high.

  12. Impact of Parallel Computing on Large Scale Aeroelastic Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Aeroelasticity is computationally one of the most intensive fields in aerospace engineering. Though over the last three decades the computational speed of supercomputers have substantially increased, they are still inadequate for large scale aeroelastic computations using high fidelity flow and structural equations. In addition to reaching a saturation in computational speed because of changes in economics, computer manufactures are stopping the manufacturing of mainframe type supercomputers. This has led computational aeroelasticians to face the gigantic task of finding alternate approaches for fulfilling their needs. The alternate path to over come speed and availability limitations of mainframe type supercomputers is to use parallel computers. During this decade several different architectures have evolved. In FY92 the US Government started the High Performance Computing and Communication (HPCC) program. As a participant in this program NASA developed several parallel computational tools for aeroelastic applications. This talk describes the impact of those application tools on high fidelity based multidisciplinary analysis.

  13. 14 CFR 27.161 - Trim control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Trim control. 27.161 Section 27.161... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Flight Characteristics § 27.161 Trim control. The trim control— (a) Must trim any steady longitudinal, lateral, and collective control forces to zero in level...

  14. 14 CFR 29.161 - Trim control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Trim control. 29.161 Section 29.161... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Flight Characteristics § 29.161 Trim control. The trim control— (a) Must trim any steady longitudinal, lateral, and collective control forces to zero in...

  15. 14 CFR 23.677 - Trim systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Trim systems. 23.677 Section 23.677... Systems § 23.677 Trim systems. (a) Proper precautions must be taken to prevent inadvertent, improper, or abrupt trim tab operation. There must be means near the trim control to indicate to the pilot...

  16. 14 CFR 27.161 - Trim control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Trim control. 27.161 Section 27.161... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Flight Characteristics § 27.161 Trim control. The trim control— (a) Must trim any steady longitudinal, lateral, and collective control forces to zero in level...

  17. 14 CFR 29.161 - Trim control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Trim control. 29.161 Section 29.161... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Flight Characteristics § 29.161 Trim control. The trim control— (a) Must trim any steady longitudinal, lateral, and collective control forces to zero in...

  18. 14 CFR 23.677 - Trim systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Trim systems. 23.677 Section 23.677... Systems § 23.677 Trim systems. (a) Proper precautions must be taken to prevent inadvertent, improper, or abrupt trim tab operation. There must be means near the trim control to indicate to the pilot...

  19. 7 CFR 51.607 - Well trimmed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Well trimmed. 51.607 Section 51.607 Agriculture... trimmed. Well trimmed means that the outside coarse and damaged branches have been removed and that the root or roots have been neatly trimmed to a reasonable length for the size of the stalk....

  20. 14 CFR 29.161 - Trim control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Trim control. 29.161 Section 29.161... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Flight Characteristics § 29.161 Trim control. The trim control— (a) Must trim any steady longitudinal, lateral, and collective control forces to zero in...

  1. 7 CFR 51.607 - Well trimmed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Well trimmed. 51.607 Section 51.607 Agriculture... trimmed. Well trimmed means that the outside coarse and damaged branches have been removed and that the root or roots have been neatly trimmed to a reasonable length for the size of the stalk....

  2. 14 CFR 23.677 - Trim systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Trim systems. 23.677 Section 23.677... Systems § 23.677 Trim systems. (a) Proper precautions must be taken to prevent inadvertent, improper, or abrupt trim tab operation. There must be means near the trim control to indicate to the pilot...

  3. 7 CFR 51.607 - Well trimmed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Well trimmed. 51.607 Section 51.607 Agriculture... Consumer Standards for Celery Stalks Definitions § 51.607 Well trimmed. Well trimmed means that the outside coarse and damaged branches have been removed and that the root or roots have been neatly trimmed to...

  4. 7 CFR 51.607 - Well trimmed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Well trimmed. 51.607 Section 51.607 Agriculture... Consumer Standards for Celery Stalks Definitions § 51.607 Well trimmed. Well trimmed means that the outside coarse and damaged branches have been removed and that the root or roots have been neatly trimmed to...

  5. 14 CFR 23.677 - Trim systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Trim systems. 23.677 Section 23.677... Systems § 23.677 Trim systems. (a) Proper precautions must be taken to prevent inadvertent, improper, or abrupt trim tab operation. There must be means near the trim control to indicate to the pilot...

  6. 14 CFR 27.161 - Trim control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Trim control. 27.161 Section 27.161... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Flight Characteristics § 27.161 Trim control. The trim control— (a) Must trim any steady longitudinal, lateral, and collective control forces to zero in level...

  7. 14 CFR 29.161 - Trim control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Trim control. 29.161 Section 29.161... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Flight Characteristics § 29.161 Trim control. The trim control— (a) Must trim any steady longitudinal, lateral, and collective control forces to zero in...

  8. 7 CFR 51.607 - Well trimmed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Well trimmed. 51.607 Section 51.607 Agriculture... Consumer Standards for Celery Stalks Definitions § 51.607 Well trimmed. Well trimmed means that the outside coarse and damaged branches have been removed and that the root or roots have been neatly trimmed to...

  9. 14 CFR 27.161 - Trim control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Trim control. 27.161 Section 27.161... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Flight Characteristics § 27.161 Trim control. The trim control— (a) Must trim any steady longitudinal, lateral, and collective control forces to zero in level...

  10. 14 CFR 27.161 - Trim control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Trim control. 27.161 Section 27.161... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Flight Characteristics § 27.161 Trim control. The trim control— (a) Must trim any steady longitudinal, lateral, and collective control forces to zero in level...

  11. 14 CFR 23.677 - Trim systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Trim systems. 23.677 Section 23.677... Systems § 23.677 Trim systems. (a) Proper precautions must be taken to prevent inadvertent, improper, or abrupt trim tab operation. There must be means near the trim control to indicate to the pilot...

  12. 14 CFR 29.161 - Trim control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Trim control. 29.161 Section 29.161... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Flight Characteristics § 29.161 Trim control. The trim control— (a) Must trim any steady longitudinal, lateral, and collective control forces to zero in...

  13. Overexpression of TRIM24 is correlated with the progression of human cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Li; Zhao, Weihua; Sun, Bo; Wang, Xinyu; Liu, Qiao

    2017-01-01

    TRIM24, originally known as intermediary factor 1-alpha, is involved in the development of several cancers. This study aimed to evaluate the expression level and prognostic value of TRIM24 in cervical cancer. In the present study, we showed that the expression of TRIM24 was markedly upregulated in cervical cancer cell lines and cancerous specimens at both transcriptional and translational levels. TRIM24 expression was analyzed in 147 archived cervical cancer specimens using immunohistochemistry, and the correlation between TRIM24 expression and clinicopathological parameters was evaluated. Statistical analysis suggested that TRIM24 expression was significantly correlated with clinical stage and (P=0.007) and lymphatic metastasis (P=0.001). Patients with higher TRIM24 expression had shorter overall (P=0.005) and recurrence-free (P=0.011) survival time. Moreover, we found that silencing TRIM24 by short hairpin RNAi caused an inhibition of cell migration and invasion. Further study indicated that TRIM24 induced cervical cancer cell migration and invasion was through the NF-κB and AKT signaling pathways. In conclusion, TRIM24 is overexpressed in cervical cancer and regulates malignant cell metastasis, which makes TRIM24 a candidate therapeutic target for cervical cancer. PMID:28337289

  14. Frequency-Domain Identification Of Aeroelastic Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acree, C. W., Jr.; Tischler, Mark B.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes flight measurements and frequency-domain analyses of aeroelastic vibrational modes of wings of XV-15 tilt-rotor aircraft. Begins with description of flight-test methods. Followed by brief discussion of methods of analysis, which include Fourier-transform computations using chirp z transformers, use of coherence and other spectral functions, and methods and computer programs to obtain frequencies and damping coefficients from measurements. Includes brief description of results of flight tests and comparisions among various experimental and theoretical results. Ends with section on conclusions and recommended improvements in techniques.

  15. Plans for Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heeg, Jennifer; Ballmann, Josef; Bhatia, Kumar; Blades, Eric; Boucke, Alexander; Chwalowski, Pawel; Dietz, Guido; Dowell, Earl; Florance, Jennifer P.; Hansen, Thorsten; Mani, Mori; Marvriplis, Dimitri; Perry, Boyd, III; Ritter, Markus; Schuster, David M.; Smith, Marilyn; Taylor, Paul; Whiting, Brent; Wieseman, Carol C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes the plans for the first Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop. The workshop is designed to assess the state of the art of computational methods for predicting unsteady flow fields and aeroelastic response. The goals are to provide an impartial forum to evaluate the effectiveness of existing computer codes and modeling techniques, and to identify computational and experimental areas needing additional research and development. Three subject configurations have been chosen from existing wind tunnel data sets where there is pertinent experimental data available for comparison. For each case chosen, the wind tunnel testing was conducted using forced oscillation of the model at specified frequencies

  16. Inertial Force Coupling to Nonlinear Aeroelasticity of Flexible Wing Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Ting, Eric

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the inertial force effect on nonlinear aeroelasticity of flexible wing aircraft. The geometric are nonlinearity due to rotational and tension stiffening. The effect of large bending deflection will also be investigated. Flutter analysis will be conducted for a truss-braced wing aircraft concept with tension stiffening and inertial force coupling.

  17. Evolutionary and Functional Analysis of Old World Primate TRIM5 Reveals the Ancient Emergence of Primate Lentiviruses and Convergent Evolution Targeting a Conserved Capsid Interface

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Kevin R.; Kirmaier, Andrea; Autissier, Patrick; Johnson, Welkin E.

    2015-01-01

    The widespread distribution of lentiviruses among African primates, and the lack of severe pathogenesis in many of these natural reservoirs, are taken as evidence for long-term co-evolution between the simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) and their primate hosts. Evidence for positive selection acting on antiviral restriction factors is consistent with virus-host interactions spanning millions of years of primate evolution. However, many restriction mechanisms are not virus-specific, and selection cannot be unambiguously attributed to any one type of virus. We hypothesized that the restriction factor TRIM5, because of its unique specificity for retrovirus capsids, should accumulate adaptive changes in a virus-specific fashion, and therefore, that phylogenetic reconstruction of TRIM5 evolution in African primates should reveal selection by lentiviruses closely related to modern SIVs. We analyzed complete TRIM5 coding sequences of 22 Old World primates and identified a tightly-spaced cluster of branch-specific adaptions appearing in the Cercopithecinae lineage after divergence from the Colobinae around 16 million years ago. Functional assays of both extant TRIM5 orthologs and reconstructed ancestral TRIM5 proteins revealed that this cluster of adaptations in TRIM5 specifically resulted in the ability to restrict Cercopithecine lentiviruses, but had no effect (positive or negative) on restriction of other retroviruses, including lentiviruses of non-Cercopithecine primates. The correlation between lineage-specific adaptations and ability to restrict viruses endemic to the same hosts supports the hypothesis that lentiviruses closely related to modern SIVs were present in Africa and infecting the ancestors of Cercopithecine primates as far back as 16 million years ago, and provides insight into the evolution of TRIM5 specificity. PMID:26291613

  18. AEROELASTIC SIMULATION TOOL FOR INFLATABLE BALLUTE AEROCAPTURE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liever, P. A.; Sheta, E. F.; Habchi, S. D.

    2006-01-01

    A multidisciplinary analysis tool is under development for predicting the impact of aeroelastic effects on the functionality of inflatable ballute aeroassist vehicles in both the continuum and rarefied flow regimes. High-fidelity modules for continuum and rarefied aerodynamics, structural dynamics, heat transfer, and computational grid deformation are coupled in an integrated multi-physics, multi-disciplinary computing environment. This flexible and extensible approach allows the integration of state-of-the-art, stand-alone NASA and industry leading continuum and rarefied flow solvers and structural analysis codes into a computing environment in which the modules can run concurrently with synchronized data transfer. Coupled fluid-structure continuum flow demonstrations were conducted on a clamped ballute configuration. The feasibility of implementing a DSMC flow solver in the simulation framework was demonstrated, and loosely coupled rarefied flow aeroelastic demonstrations were performed. A NASA and industry technology survey identified CFD, DSMC and structural analysis codes capable of modeling non-linear shape and material response of thin-film inflated aeroshells. The simulation technology will find direct and immediate applications with NASA and industry in ongoing aerocapture technology development programs.

  19. Aeroelastic and dynamic finite element analyses of a bladder shrouded disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. C. C.; Elchuri, V.

    1980-01-01

    The delivery and demonstration of a computer program for the analysis of aeroelastic and dynamic properties is reported. Approaches to flutter and forced vibration of mistuned discs, and transient aerothermoelasticity are described.

  20. CFD for applications to aircraft aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.

    1989-01-01

    Strong interactions of structures and fluids are common in many engineering environments. Such interactions can give rise to physically important phenomena such as those occurring for aircraft due to aeroelasticity. Aeroelasticity can significantly influence the safe performance of aircraft. At present exact methods are available for making aeroelastic computations when flows are in either the linear subsonic or supersonic range. However, for complex flows containing shock waves, vortices and flow separations, computational methods are still under development. Several phenomena that can be dangerous and limit the performance of an aircraft occur due to the interaction of these complex flows with flexible aircraft components such as wings. For example, aircraft with highly swept wings experience vortex induced aeroelastic oscillations. Correct understanding of these complex aeroelastic phenomena requires direct coupling of fluids and structural equations. Here, a summary is presented of the development of such coupled methods and applications to aeroelasticity since about 1978 to present. The successful use of the transonic small perturbation theory (TSP) coupled with structures is discussed. This served as a major stepping stone for the current stage of aeroelasticity using computational fluid dynamics. The need for the use of more exact Euler/Navier-Stokes (ENS) equations for aeroelastic problems is explained. The current development of unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic procedures based on the ENS equations are discussed. Aeroelastic results computed using both TSP and ENS equations are discussed.

  1. Empirical Likelihood-Based ANOVA for Trimmed Means

    PubMed Central

    Velina, Mara; Valeinis, Janis; Greco, Luca; Luta, George

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce an alternative to Yuen’s test for the comparison of several population trimmed means. This nonparametric ANOVA type test is based on the empirical likelihood (EL) approach and extends the results for one population trimmed mean from Qin and Tsao (2002). The results of our simulation study indicate that for skewed distributions, with and without variance heterogeneity, Yuen’s test performs better than the new EL ANOVA test for trimmed means with respect to control over the probability of a type I error. This finding is in contrast with our simulation results for the comparison of means, where the EL ANOVA test for means performs better than Welch’s heteroscedastic F test. The analysis of a real data example illustrates the use of Yuen’s test and the new EL ANOVA test for trimmed means for different trimming levels. Based on the results of our study, we recommend the use of Yuen’s test for situations involving the comparison of population trimmed means between groups of interest. PMID:27690063

  2. TRIM5α associates with proteasomal subunits in cells while in complex with HIV-1 virions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The TRIM5 proteins are cellular restriction factors that prevent retroviral infection in a species-specific manner. Multiple experiments indicate that restriction activity requires accessory host factors, including E2-enzymes. To better understand the mechanism of restriction, we conducted yeast-two hybrid screens to identify proteins that bind to two TRIM5 orthologues. Results The only cDNAs that scored on repeat testing with both TRIM5 orthologues were the proteasome subunit PSMC2 and ubiquitin. Using co-immunoprecipitation assays, we demonstrated an interaction between TRIM5α and PSMC2, as well as numerous other proteasome subunits. Fluorescence microscopy revealed co-localization of proteasomes and TRIM5α cytoplasmic bodies. Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) analysis indicated that the interaction between TRIM5 and PSMC2 was direct. Previous imaging experiments demonstrated that, when cells are challenged with fluorescently-labeled HIV-1 virions, restrictive TRIM5α orthologues assemble cytoplasmic bodies around incoming virion particles. Following virus challenge, we observed localization of proteasome subunits to rhTRIM5α cytoplasmic bodies that contained fluorescently labeled HIV-1 virions. Conclusions Taken together, the results presented here suggest that localization of the proteasome to TRIM5α cytoplasmic bodies makes an important contribution to TRIM5α-mediated restriction. PMID:22078707

  3. TRIM37 defective in mulibrey nanism is a novel RING finger ubiquitin E3 ligase

    SciTech Connect

    Kallijaervi, Jukka; Lahtinen, Ulla; Haemaelaeinen, Riikka; Lipsanen-Nyman, Marita; Palvimo, Jorma J.; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina . E-mail: anna-elina.lehesjoki@helsinki.fi

    2005-08-01

    Mulibrey nanism is an autosomal recessive prenatal-onset growth disorder characterized by dysmorphic features, cardiomyopathy, and hepatomegaly. Mutations in TRIM37 encoding a tripartite motif (TRIM, RING-B-box-coiled-coil)-family protein underlie mulibrey nanism. We investigated the ubiquitin ligase activity predicted for the RING domain of TRIM37 by analyzing its autoubiquitination. Full-length TRIM37 and its TRIM domain were highly polyubiquitinated when co-expressed with ubiquitin. Polyubiquitination was decreased in a mutant protein with disrupted RING domain (Cys35Ser;Cys36Ser) and in the Leu76Pro mutant protein, a disease-associated missense mutation affecting the TRIM domain of TRIM37. Bacterially produced GST-TRIM domain fusion protein, but not its Cys35Ser;Cys36Ser or Leu76Pro mutants, were polyubiquitinated in cell-free conditions, implying RING-dependent modification. Ubiquitin was also identified as an interaction partner for TRIM37 in a yeast two-hybrid screen. Ectopically expressed TRIM37 rapidly formed aggregates that were ubiquitin-, proteasome subunit-, and chaperone-positive in immunofluorescence analysis, defining them as aggresomes. The Cys35Ser;Cys36Ser mutant and the Leu76Pro and Gly322Val patient mutant proteins were markedly less prone to aggregation, implying that aggresomal targeting reflects a physiological function of TRIM37. These findings suggest that TRIM37 acts as a TRIM domain-dependent E3 ubiquitin ligase and imply defective ubiquitin-dependent degradation of an as-yet-unidentified target protein in the pathogenesis of mulibrey nanism.

  4. Non-linear aeroelastic prediction for aircraft applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de C. Henshaw, M. J.; Badcock, K. J.; Vio, G. A.; Allen, C. B.; Chamberlain, J.; Kaynes, I.; Dimitriadis, G.; Cooper, J. E.; Woodgate, M. A.; Rampurawala, A. M.; Jones, D.; Fenwick, C.; Gaitonde, A. L.; Taylor, N. V.; Amor, D. S.; Eccles, T. A.; Denley, C. J.

    2007-05-01

    Current industrial practice for the prediction and analysis of flutter relies heavily on linear methods and this has led to overly conservative design and envelope restrictions for aircraft. Although the methods have served the industry well, it is clear that for a number of reasons the inclusion of non-linearity in the mathematical and computational aeroelastic prediction tools is highly desirable. The increase in available and affordable computational resources, together with major advances in algorithms, mean that non-linear aeroelastic tools are now viable within the aircraft design and qualification environment. The Partnership for Unsteady Methods in Aerodynamics (PUMA) Defence and Aerospace Research Partnership (DARP) was sponsored in 2002 to conduct research into non-linear aeroelastic prediction methods and an academic, industry, and government consortium collaborated to address the following objectives: To develop useable methodologies to model and predict non-linear aeroelastic behaviour of complete aircraft. To evaluate the methodologies on real aircraft problems. To investigate the effect of non-linearities on aeroelastic behaviour and to determine which have the greatest effect on the flutter qualification process. These aims have been very effectively met during the course of the programme and the research outputs include: New methods available to industry for use in the flutter prediction process, together with the appropriate coaching of industry engineers. Interesting results in both linear and non-linear aeroelastics, with comprehensive comparison of methods and approaches for challenging problems. Additional embryonic techniques that, with further research, will further improve aeroelastics capability. This paper describes the methods that have been developed and how they are deployable within the industrial environment. We present a thorough review of the PUMA aeroelastics programme together with a comprehensive review of the relevant research

  5. Some experiences in aircraft aeroelastic design using Preliminary Aeroelastic Design of Structures (PAD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radovcich, N. A.

    1984-01-01

    The design experience associated with a benchmark aeroelastic design of an out of production transport aircraft is discussed. Current work being performed on a high aspect ratio wing design is reported. The Preliminary Aeroelastic Design of Structures (PADS) system is briefly summarized and some operational aspects of generating the design in an automated aeroelastic design environment are discussed.

  6. Tinning/Trimming Robot System

    SciTech Connect

    Fureigh, M.L.

    1993-02-01

    In a new surface mount assembly area at AlliedSignal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD), a tinning/trimming robot system tins and trims the gold-plated leads of surface mount technology (SMT) transistors. The KCD-designed system uses a Unimation PUMA 260 robot, a General Production Devices SP-2000 solder pot; water-soluble Blackstone No. 2508 flux; and a Virtual Industries high-temperature, ESD-conductive, miniature suction cup. After the manual cleaning operation, the processed SMT transistors go to the QUADSTAR Automated Component Placement System for a Radar Logic Assembly. The benefits are reductions in the cost of nonconformance, worker fatigue, and standard hours.

  7. Aeroelastic Modeling of a Nozzle Startup Transient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Zhao, Xiang; Zhang, Sijun; Chen, Yen-Sen

    2014-01-01

    Lateral nozzle forces are known to cause severe structural damage to any new rocket engine in development during test. While three-dimensional, transient, turbulent, chemically reacting computational fluid dynamics methodology has been demonstrated to capture major side load physics with rigid nozzles, hot-fire tests often show nozzle structure deformation during major side load events, leading to structural damages if structural strengthening measures were not taken. The modeling picture is incomplete without the capability to address the two-way responses between the structure and fluid. The objective of this study is to develop a tightly coupled aeroelastic modeling algorithm by implementing the necessary structural dynamics component into an anchored computational fluid dynamics methodology. The computational fluid dynamics component is based on an unstructured-grid, pressure-based computational fluid dynamics formulation, while the computational structural dynamics component is developed under the framework of modal analysis. Transient aeroelastic nozzle startup analyses at sea level were performed, and the computed transient nozzle fluid-structure interaction physics presented,

  8. Estimation of the Hopf Bifurcation Point for Aeroelastic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SEDAGHAT, A.; COOPER, J. E.; LEUNG, A. Y. T.; WRIGHT, J. R.

    2001-11-01

    The estimation of the Hopf bifurcation point is an important prerequisite for the non-linear analysis of non-linear instabilities in aircraft using the classical normal form theory. For unsteady transonic aerodynamics, the aeroelastic response is frequency-dependent and therefore a very costly trial-and-error and iterative scheme, frequency-matching, is used to determine flutter conditions. Furthermore, the standard algebraic methods have usually been used for systems not bigger than two degrees of freedom and do not appear to have been applied for frequency-dependent aerodynamics. In this study, a procedure is developed to produce and solve algebraic equations for any order aeroelastic systems, with and without frequency-dependent aerodynamics, to predict the Hopf bifurcation point. The approach performs the computation in a single step using symbolic programming and does not require trial and error and repeated calculations at various speeds required when using classical iterative methods. To investigate the validity of the approach, a Hancock two-degrees-of-freedom aeroelastic wing model and a multi-degree-of-freedom cantilever wind model were studied in depth. Hancock experimental data was used for curve fitting the unsteady aerodynamic damping term as a function of frequency. Fairly close agreement was obtained between the analytical and simulated aeroelastic solutions with and without frequency-dependent aerodynamics.

  9. Aeroelastic System Development Using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition and Volterra Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucia, David J.; Beran, Philip S.; Silva, Walter A.

    2003-01-01

    This research combines Volterra theory and proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) into a hybrid methodology for reduced-order modeling of aeroelastic systems. The out-come of the method is a set of linear ordinary differential equations (ODEs) describing the modal amplitudes associated with both the structural modes and the POD basis functions for the uid. For this research, the structural modes are sine waves of varying frequency, and the Volterra-POD approach is applied to the fluid dynamics equations. The structural modes are treated as forcing terms which are impulsed as part of the uid model realization. Using this approach, structural and uid operators are coupled into a single aeroelastic operator. This coupling converts a free boundary uid problem into an initial value problem, while preserving the parameter (or parameters) of interest for sensitivity analysis. The approach is applied to an elastic panel in supersonic cross ow. The hybrid Volterra-POD approach provides a low-order uid model in state-space form. The linear uid model is tightly coupled with a nonlinear panel model using an implicit integration scheme. The resulting aeroelastic model provides correct limit-cycle oscillation prediction over a wide range of panel dynamic pressure values. Time integration of the reduced-order aeroelastic model is four orders of magnitude faster than the high-order solution procedure developed for this research using traditional uid and structural solvers.

  10. Application of Aeroelastic Solvers Based on Navier Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Srivastava, Rakesh

    2001-01-01

    The propulsion element of the NASA Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) initiative is directed towards increasing the overall efficiency of current aircraft engines. This effort requires an increase in the efficiency of various components, such as fans, compressors, turbines etc. Improvement in engine efficiency can be accomplished through the use of lighter materials, larger diameter fans and/or higher-pressure ratio compressors. However, each of these has the potential to result in aeroelastic problems such as flutter or forced response. To address the aeroelastic problems, the Structural Dynamics Branch of NASA Glenn has been involved in the development of numerical capabilities for analyzing the aeroelastic stability characteristics and forced response of wide chord fans, multi-stage compressors and turbines. In order to design an engine to safely perform a set of desired tasks, accurate information of the stresses on the blade during the entire cycle of blade motion is required. This requirement in turn demands that accurate knowledge of steady and unsteady blade loading is available. To obtain the steady and unsteady aerodynamic forces for the complex flows around the engine components, for the flow regimes encountered by the rotor, an advanced compressible Navier-Stokes solver is required. A finite volume based Navier-Stokes solver has been developed at Mississippi State University (MSU) for solving the flow field around multistage rotors. The focus of the current research effort, under NASA Cooperative Agreement NCC3- 596 was on developing an aeroelastic analysis code (entitled TURBO-AE) based on the Navier-Stokes solver developed by MSU. The TURBO-AE code has been developed for flutter analysis of turbomachine components and delivered to NASA and its industry partners. The code has been verified. validated and is being applied by NASA Glenn and by aircraft engine manufacturers to analyze the aeroelastic stability characteristics of modem fans, compressors

  11. 7 CFR 51.571 - Well trimmed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Well trimmed. 51.571 Section 51.571 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Celery Definitions § 51.571 Well trimmed. Well trimmed means that not more than 2...

  12. 7 CFR 51.3063 - Well trimmed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Well trimmed. 51.3063 Section 51.3063 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Florida Avocados Definitions § 51.3063 Well trimmed. Well trimmed means that the stem,...

  13. 7 CFR 51.3063 - Well trimmed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Well trimmed. 51.3063 Section 51.3063 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Florida Avocados Definitions § 51.3063 Well trimmed. Well trimmed means that the stem,...

  14. 7 CFR 51.3063 - Well trimmed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Well trimmed. 51.3063 Section 51.3063 Agriculture..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Florida Avocados Definitions § 51.3063 Well trimmed. Well trimmed means that the stem, when present, is cut off fairly smoothly at a point not more than...

  15. 7 CFR 51.571 - Well trimmed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Well trimmed. 51.571 Section 51.571 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Celery Definitions § 51.571 Well trimmed. Well trimmed means that not more than 2...

  16. 14 CFR 25.677 - Trim systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Trim systems. 25.677 Section 25.677... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 25.677 Trim systems. (a) Trim controls must be designed to prevent inadvertent or abrupt operation and to operate in the...

  17. 14 CFR 25.677 - Trim systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Trim systems. 25.677 Section 25.677... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 25.677 Trim systems. (a) Trim controls must be designed to prevent inadvertent or abrupt operation and to operate in the...

  18. 7 CFR 51.3063 - Well trimmed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Well trimmed. 51.3063 Section 51.3063 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Florida Avocados Definitions § 51.3063 Well trimmed. Well trimmed means that the stem,...

  19. 14 CFR 25.677 - Trim systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Trim systems. 25.677 Section 25.677... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 25.677 Trim systems. (a) Trim controls must be designed to prevent inadvertent or abrupt operation and to operate in the...

  20. 7 CFR 51.571 - Well trimmed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Well trimmed. 51.571 Section 51.571 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Celery Definitions § 51.571 Well trimmed. Well trimmed means that not more than 2...

  1. 14 CFR 25.677 - Trim systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Trim systems. 25.677 Section 25.677... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 25.677 Trim systems. (a) Trim controls must be designed to prevent inadvertent or abrupt operation and to operate in the...

  2. 7 CFR 51.3063 - Well trimmed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Well trimmed. 51.3063 Section 51.3063 Agriculture..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Florida Avocados Definitions § 51.3063 Well trimmed. Well trimmed means that the stem, when present, is cut off fairly smoothly at a point not more than...

  3. 14 CFR 25.677 - Trim systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Trim systems. 25.677 Section 25.677... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 25.677 Trim systems. (a) Trim controls must be designed to prevent inadvertent or abrupt operation and to operate in the...

  4. Static Aeroelasticity in Combat Aircraft.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    aircraft design. Fuselage flexibility is, in general , a secondary consideration. The relatively high density of this structural component, designed to...representation of the structure. An effective beam representation of the total panel stiffness is generally applicable and appropriate for these needs and...loading effect Is to produce zero wing lift, but a large leading-edge-up wing torque. Aeroelastically, a significant wing lift is generated as the

  5. Response studies of rotors and rotor blades with application to aeroelastic tailoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, P. P.

    1982-01-01

    Various tools for the aeroelastic stability and response analysis of rotor blades in hover and forward flight were developed and incorporated in a comprehensive package capable of performing aeroelastic tailoring of rotor blades in forward flight. The results indicate that substantial vibration reductions, of order 15-40%, in the vibratory hub shears can be achieved by relatively small modifications of the initial design. Furthermore the optimized blade can be up to 20% lighter than the original design. Accomplishments are reported for the following tasks: (1) finite element modeling of rotary-wing aeroelastic problems in hover and forward flight; (2) development of numerical methods for calculating the aeroelastic response and stability of rotor blades in forward fight; (3) formulation of the helicopter air resonance problem in hover with active controls; and (4) optimum design of rotor blades for vibration reduction in forward flight.

  6. Including Aeroelastic Effects in the Calculation of X-33 Loads and Control Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeiler, Thomas A.

    1998-01-01

    Up until now, loads analyses of the X-33 RLV have been done at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) using aerodynamic loads derived from CFD and wind tunnel models of a rigid vehicle. Control forces and moments are determined using a rigid vehicle trajectory analysis and the detailed control load distributions for achieving the desired control forces and moments, again on the rigid vehicle, are determined by Lockheed Martin Skunk Works. However, static aeroelastic effects upon the load distributions are not known. The static aeroelastic effects will generally redistribute external loads thereby affecting both the internal structural loads as well as the forces and moments generated by aerodynamic control surfaces. Therefore, predicted structural sizes as well as maneuvering requirements can be altered by consideration of static aeroelastic effects. The objective of the present work is the development of models and solutions for including static aeroelasticity in the calculation of X-33 loads and in the determination of stability and control derivatives.

  7. TRIM24 Links Glucose Metabolism with Transformation of Human Mammary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pathiraja, Thushangi N.; Thakkar, Kaushik N.; Jiang, Shiming; Stratton, Sabrina; Liu, Zhaoliang; Gagea, Mihai; Xi, Shi; Shah, Parantu K.; Phan, Liem; Lee, Mong-Hong; Andersen, Jannik; Stampfer, Martha; Barton, Michelle C.

    2015-01-01

    Tripartite motif 24 protein (TRIM24) is a plant homeodomain (PHD)/bromodomain histone reader, recently associated with poor overall survival of breast cancer patients. At a molecular level, TRIM24 is a negative regulator of p53 levels and a co-activator of estrogen receptor. However, the role of TRIM24 in breast tumorigenesis remains largely unknown. We used an isogenic human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) culture model, derived from reduction mammoplasty tissue, and found that ectopic expression of TRIM24 in immortalized HMECs (TRIM24-iHMECs) greatly increased cellular proliferation and induced malignant transformation. Subcutaneous injection of TRIM24-iHMECs in nude mice led to growth of intermediate to high-grade tumors in 60-70% of mice. Molecular analysis of TRIM24-iHMECs revealed a glycolytic and tricarboxylic acid cycle gene signature, alongside increased glucose uptake and activated aerobic glycolysis. Collectively, these results identify a role for TRIM24 in breast tumorigenesis through reprogramming of glucose metabolism in HMECs, further supporting TRIM24 as a viable therapeutic target in breast cancers. PMID:25065590

  8. Aeroelastic stability of wind turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaza, K. R. V.

    1928-01-01

    The second degree nonlinear aeroelastic equations for a flexible, twisted, nonuniform wind turbine blade were developed using Hamilton's principle. The derivation of these equations has its basis in the geometric nonlinear theory of elasticity. These equations with periodic coefficients are suitable for determining the aeroelastic stability and response of large wind turbine blades. Methods for solving these equations are discussed.

  9. Trim angle measurements in free-flight facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, Leslie A.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    1991-01-01

    The aerodynamic cofficients and trim angle for an aerobrake at Mach 9.2 and 11.8 were found using a combination of experiment and computation. Free-flight tests were performed at NASA Ames Research Center's Hypervelocity Free-Flight Aerodynamic Facility, and the forebody pressure distribution was calculated using a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code with an effective specific heat ratio. Using the computed drag, lift, and moments to prescribe the number of terms in the aerodynamic coefficient expansions and to specify the values of the higher order terms, the experimental aerodynamic coefficients and trim angle were found using a six-degree-of-freedom, weighted, least-squares analysis. The experimental and computed aerodynamic coefficients and trim angles are in good agreement. The trim angle obtained from the free-flight tests, 14.7 deg, differs from the design trim angle, 17 deg, and from the Langley wind tunnel results, 12 deg in air and 17 deg in CF4. These differences are attributable to real-gas effects.

  10. Structural basis for the recognition and degradation of host TRIM proteins by Salmonella effector SopA

    PubMed Central

    Fiskin, Evgenij; Bhogaraju, Sagar; Herhaus, Lina; Kalayil, Sissy; Hahn, Marcel; Dikic, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    The hallmark of Salmonella Typhimurium infection is an acute intestinal inflammatory response, which is mediated through the action of secreted bacterial effector proteins. The pro-inflammatory Salmonella effector SopA is a HECT-like E3 ligase, which was previously proposed to activate host RING ligases TRIM56 and TRIM65. Here we elucidate an inhibitory mechanism of TRIM56 and TRIM65 targeting by SopA. We present the crystal structure of SopA in complex with the RING domain of human TRIM56, revealing the atomic details of their interaction and the basis for SopA selectivity towards TRIM56 and TRIM65. Structure-guided biochemical analysis shows that SopA inhibits TRIM56 E3 ligase activity by occluding the E2-interacting surface of TRIM56. We further demonstrate that SopA ubiquitinates TRIM56 and TRIM65, resulting in their proteasomal degradation during infection. Our results provide the basis for how a bacterial HECT ligase blocks host RING ligases and exemplifies the multivalent power of bacterial effectors during infection. PMID:28084320

  11. Aeroelasticity Benchmark Assessment: Subsonic Fixed Wing Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florance, Jennifer P.; Chwalowski, Pawel; Wieseman, Carol D.

    2010-01-01

    The fundamental technical challenge in computational aeroelasticity is the accurate prediction of unsteady aerodynamic phenomena and the effect on the aeroelastic response of a vehicle. Currently, a benchmarking standard for use in validating the accuracy of computational aeroelasticity codes does not exist. Many aeroelastic data sets have been obtained in wind-tunnel and flight testing throughout the world; however, none have been globally presented or accepted as an ideal data set. There are numerous reasons for this. One reason is that often, such aeroelastic data sets focus on the aeroelastic phenomena alone (flutter, for example) and do not contain associated information such as unsteady pressures and time-correlated structural dynamic deflections. Other available data sets focus solely on the unsteady pressures and do not address the aeroelastic phenomena. Other discrepancies can include omission of relevant data, such as flutter frequency and / or the acquisition of only qualitative deflection data. In addition to these content deficiencies, all of the available data sets present both experimental and computational technical challenges. Experimental issues include facility influences, nonlinearities beyond those being modeled, and data processing. From the computational perspective, technical challenges include modeling geometric complexities, coupling between the flow and the structure, grid issues, and boundary conditions. The Aeroelasticity Benchmark Assessment task seeks to examine the existing potential experimental data sets and ultimately choose the one that is viewed as the most suitable for computational benchmarking. An initial computational evaluation of that configuration will then be performed using the Langley-developed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software FUN3D1 as part of its code validation process. In addition to the benchmarking activity, this task also includes an examination of future research directions. Researchers within the

  12. Amplification of TRIM44: Pairing a Prognostic Target With Potential Therapeutic Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Chin-Ann Johnny; Shannon, Nicholas B.; Ross-Innes, Caryn S.; O’Donovan, Maria; Rueda, Oscar M.; Hu, De-en; Kettunen, Mikko I.; Walker, Christina Elaine; Noorani, Ayesha; Hardwick, Richard H.; Caldas, Carlos; Brindle, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Background Many prognostic biomarkers have been proposed recently. However, there is a lack of therapeutic strategies exploiting novel prognostic biomarkers. We aimed to propose therapeutic options in patients with overexpression of TRIM44, a recently identified prognostic gene. Methods Genomic and transcriptomic data of epithelial cancers (n = 1932), breast cancers (BCs; n = 1980) and esophago-gastric cancers (EGCs; n = 163) were used to identify genomic aberrations driving TRIM44 overexpression. The driver gene status of TRIM44 was determined using a small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen of the 11p13 amplicon. Integrative analysis was applied across multiple datasets to identify pathway activation and potential therapeutic strategies. Validation of the in silico findings were performed using in vitro assays, xenografts, and patient samples (n = 160). Results TRIM44 overexpression results from genomic amplification in 16.1% of epithelial cancers, including 8.1% of EGCs and 6.1% of BCs. This was confirmed using fluorescent in situ hybridization. The siRNA screen confirmed TRIM44 to be a driver of the amplicon. In silico analysis revealed an association between TRIM44 and mTOR signalling, supported by a decrease in mTOR signalling after siRNA knockdown of TRIM44 in cell lines and colocalization of TRIM44 and p-mTOR in patient samples. In vitro inhibition studies using an mTOR inhibitor (everolimus) decreased cell viability in two TRIM44-amplified cells lines by 88% and 70% compared with 35% in the control cell line. These findings were recapitulated in xenograft models. Conclusions Genomic amplification drives TRIM44 overexpression in EGCs and BCs. Targeting the mTOR pathway provides a potential therapeutic option for TRIM44-amplified tumors. PMID:24777112

  13. Advanced tree-trimming equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, P.A.; Gillon, J.P. )

    1990-07-01

    A project funded by the Electric Power research Institute has produced a working prototype of a pantograph linkage supported, telescopic pole type tool with interchangeable cutting heads for trimming trees around electrical conductors. The tool is designed for mounting on the bucket of an aerial lift of the type commonly used for tree trimming. The three-section telescopic pole is constructed of non-conductive, filament wound, fiber-glass reinforced epoxy and is adjustable from an overall length of 7 feet to a fully extended length of 17 feet. The project goal was to obtain a 20% improvement in productivity of tree crews. Productivity gains are expected to result from fewer truck set-ups, faster tool positioning, and reduced user fatigue. The next phase of the project will involve test and evaluation of the prototype and will quantify actual productivity gains.

  14. Role of the Cephalic Trim in Modern Rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Nagarkar, Purushottam; Stark, Ran Y; Pezeshk, Ronnie A; Amirlak, Bardia; Rohrich, Rod J

    2016-01-01

    There have been a variety of techniques describing nasal tip refinement. The cephalic trim has long been accepted as a means for shaping the nasal tip, but it has been misinterpreted by many surgeons. The improper use of a cephalic trim poses potential long-term sequelae. During analysis of the nasal tip, several anatomic findings must be noted to ensure appropriate correction as well as to avoid pitfalls. These findings include the type of boxy tip or bulbous tip, cartilage strength, and the skin quality. The goal of this article is to describe five types of cephalic trim techniques to assist in refining the nasal tip and an algorithm for selection of the appropriate technique based on these anatomic findings.

  15. Aeroelastic Response Analysis of Two Dimensional, Single and Two Degree of Freedom Airfoils in Low-Frequency, Small-Disturbance Unsteady Transonic Flow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-01

    performed an aeroelastic response study of a NACA 64A010 airfoil by simultaneously integrating the LTRAN2 aerodynamics program and the structural...of LTRAN2. Examples of an NACA 64A006 airfoil at Mach numbers of 0.88 and 0.85 are also analyzed. Response results obtained for a single pitching...4.4.1 NACA 64A006 Airfoil Pitching at M - 0.88 .... 22 4.4.2 Flat Plate Pitching at M - 0.70 ........ 26 4.4.3 Flat Plate Plunging at M - 0.70

  16. TRIM16 suppresses the progression of prostate tumors by inhibiting the Snail signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Li; Lu, Zhong; Sun, Yong-Hong; Song, Hai-Tao; Xu, Wei-Kang

    2016-01-01

    Prostate carcinoma is a devastating disease which is characterized by insidious early symptoms, rapid progression and a poor prognosis. Tripartite motif-containing protein 16 (TRIM16) was identified as an estrogen- and antiestrogen-regulated gene in epithelial cells stably expressing estrogen receptors. The protein encoded by this gene contains two B-box domains and a coiled-coiled region that are characteristic of the B-box zinc finger protein family. Proteins belonging to this family have been reported to be involved in a variety of biological processes including cell growth, differentiation and pathogenesis. TRIM16 expression has been detected in most tissues. However, the funtions of this gene remain to be elucidated. In the present study, immunohistochemical staining revealed that the expression of TRIM16 was decreased in prostate adenocarcinoma compared with that in normal prostate tissues. The patients with high TRIM16-expressing tumors had a significantly greater survival than those with low TRIM16-expressing tumors. Western blot analysis showed that TRIM16 was downregulated in distant metastatic cancer tissues compared with that in non-distant metastatic cancer tissues. The overexpression of TRIM16 inhibited the migration and invasion of prostate cancer cells as well as inhibiting the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition process, whereas TRIM16 depletion enhanced these processes. Moreover, TRIM16 inhibited the Snail signaling pathway. The silencing of Snail by small interfering RNA was performed in order to determine the role of Snail in the TRIM16-mediated tumor phenotype. Taken together, these findings suggest that TRIM16 may be an important molecular target which may aid in the design of novel therapeutic agents for prostate cancer. PMID:27748839

  17. SUMO-Interacting Motifs of Human TRIM5α are Important for Antiviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Goff, Stephen P.

    2011-01-01

    Human TRIM5α potently restricts particular strains of murine leukemia viruses (the so-called N-tropic strains) but not others (the B- or NB-tropic strains) during early stages of infection. We show that overexpression of SUMO-1 in human 293T cells, but not in mouse MDTF cells, profoundly blocks N-MLV infection. This block is dependent on the tropism of the incoming virus, as neither B-, NB-, nor the mutant R110E of N-MLV CA (a B-tropic switch) are affected by SUMO-1 overexpression. The block occurred prior to reverse transcription and could be abrogated by large amounts of restricted virus. Knockdown of TRIM5α in 293T SUMO-1-overexpressing cells resulted in ablation of the SUMO-1 antiviral effects, and this loss of restriction could be restored by expression of a human TRIM5α shRNA-resistant plasmid. Amino acid sequence analysis of human TRIM5α revealed a consensus SUMO conjugation site at the N-terminus and three putative SUMO interacting motifs (SIMs) in the B30.2 domain. Mutations of the TRIM5α consensus SUMO conjugation site did not affect the antiviral activity of TRIM5α in any of the cell types tested. Mutation of the SIM consensus sequences, however, abolished TRIM5α antiviral activity against N-MLV. Mutation of lysines at a potential site of SUMOylation in the CA region of the Gag gene reduced the SUMO-1 block and the TRIM5α restriction of N-MLV. Our data suggest a novel aspect of TRIM5α-mediated restriction, in which the presence of intact SIMs in TRIM5α, and also the SUMO conjugation of CA, are required for restriction. We propose that at least a portion of the antiviral activity of TRIM5α is mediated through the binding of its SIMs to SUMO-conjugated CA. PMID:21490953

  18. Terminal repeat retrotransposon in miniature (TRIM) as DNA markers in Brassica relatives.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soo-Jin; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Lim, Myung-Ho; Long, Yan; Meng, Jin-Ling; Lim, Ki-Byung; Kim, Jin-A; Kim, Jung Sun; Jin, Mina; Kim, Ho-Il; Ahn, Sang-Nag; Wessler, Susan R; Yang, Tae-Jin; Park, Beom-Seok

    2007-10-01

    We have developed a display system using a unique sequence of terminal repeat retrotransposon in miniature (TRIM) elements, which were recently identified from gene-rich regions of Brassica rapa. The technique, named TRIM display, is based on modification of the AFLP technique using an adapter primer for the restriction fragments of BfaI and a primer derived from conserved terminal repeat sequences of TRIM elements, Br1 and Br2. TRIM display using genomic DNA produced 50-70 bands ranging from 100 to 700 bp in all the species of the family Brassicaceae. TRIM display using B. rapa cDNA produced about 20 bands. Sequences of 11 randomly selected bands, 7 from genomic DNA and 4 from cDNA, begin with about 104 bp of the terminal repeat sequences of TRIM elements Br1 or Br2 and end with unique sequences indicating that all bands are derived from unique insertion sites of TRIM elements. Furthermore, 7 of the 11 unique sequences showed significant similarity with expressed gene. Most of the TRIM display bands were polymorphic between genera and about 55% (132 of 239 bands) are polymorphic among 19 commercial F1 hybrid cultivars. Analysis of phylogenetic relationships shows clear-cut lineage among the 19 cultivars. Furthermore, a combination of 11 polymorphic bands derived from only one primer combination can clearly distinguish one cultivar from the others. TRIM display bands were reproducible and inheritable through successive generations that is revealed by genetic mapping of 6 out of 27 polymorphic TRIM markers on the genetic map of Brassica napus. Collective data provide evidence that TRIM display can provide useful DNA markers in Brassica relatives because these markers are distributed in gene-rich regions, and are sometimes involved in the restructuring of genes.

  19. Aeroelastic Airworthiness Assesment of the Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge Flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrera, Claudia Y.; Spivey, Natalie D.; Lung, Shun-fat; Ervin, Gregory; Flick, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge (ACTE) demonstrator is a joint task under the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project in partnership with the Air Force Research Laboratory and FlexSys, Inc. (Ann Arbor, Michigan). The project goal is to develop advanced technologies that enable environmentally friendly aircraft, such as adaptive compliant technologies. The ACTE demonstrator flight-test program encompassed replacing the Fowler flaps on the SubsoniC Aircraft Testbed, a modified Gulfstream III (Gulfstream Aerospace, Savannah, Georgia) aircraft, with control surfaces developed by FlexSys. The control surfaces developed by FlexSys are a pair of uniquely-designed unconventional flaps to be used as lifting surfaces during flight-testing to validate their structural effectiveness. The unconventional flaps required a multidisciplinary airworthiness assessment to prove they could withstand the prescribed flight envelope. Several challenges were posed due to the large deflections experienced by the structure, requiring non-linear analysis methods. The aeroelastic assessment necessitated both conventional and extensive testing and analysis methods. A series of ground vibration tests (GVTs) were conducted to provide modal characteristics to validate and update finite element models (FEMs) used for the flutter analyses for a subset of the various flight configurations. Numerous FEMs were developed using data from FlexSys and the ground tests. The flap FEMs were then attached to the aircraft model to generate a combined FEM that could be analyzed for aeroelastic instabilities. The aeroelastic analysis results showed the combined system of aircraft and flaps were predicted to have the required flutter margin to successfully demonstrate the adaptive compliant technology. This paper documents the details of the aeroelastic airworthiness assessment described, including the ground testing and analyses, and subsequent flight

  20. Development of a Rotor-Body Coupled Analysis for an Active Mount Aeroelastic Rotor Testbed. Degree awarded by George Washington Univ., May 1996

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, Matthew L.

    1998-01-01

    At the Langley Research Center an active mount rotorcraft testbed is being developed for use in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. This testbed, the second generation version of the Aeroelastic Rotor Experimental System (ARES-II), can impose rotor hub motions and measure the response so that rotor-body coupling phenomena may be investigated. An analytical method for coupling an aeroelastically scaled model rotor system to the ARES-II is developed in the current study. Models of the testbed and the rotor system are developed in independent analyses, and an impedance-matching approach is used to couple the rotor system to the testbed. The development of the analytical models and the coupling method is examined, and individual and coupled results are presented for the testbed and rotor system. Coupled results are presented with and without applied hub motion, and system loads and displacements are examined. The results show that a closed-loop control system is necessary to achieve desired hub motions, that proper modeling requires including the loads at the rotor hub and rotor control system, and that the strain-gauge balance placed in the rotating system of the ARES-II provided the best loads results.

  1. Structural determinants of TRIM protein function.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Diego; Koliopoulos, Marios G; Rittinger, Katrin

    2017-02-08

    Tripartite motif (TRIM) proteins constitute one of the largest subfamilies of Really Interesting New Gene (RING) E3 ubiquitin ligases and contribute to the regulation of numerous cellular activities, including innate immune responses. The conserved TRIM harbours a RING domain that imparts E3 ligase activity to TRIM family proteins, whilst a variable C-terminal region can mediate recognition of substrate proteins. The knowledge of the structure of these multidomain proteins and the functional interplay between their constituent domains is paramount to understanding their cellular roles. To date, available structural information on TRIM proteins is still largely restricted to subdomains of many TRIMs in isolation. Nevertheless, applying a combination of structural, biophysical and biochemical approaches has recently allowed important progress to be made towards providing a better understanding of the molecular features that underlie the function of TRIM family proteins and has uncovered an unexpected diversity in the link between self-association and catalytic activity.

  2. Aeroelastic Optimization Study Based on X-56A Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wesley; Pak, Chan-Gi

    2014-01-01

    A design process which incorporates the object-oriented multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization (MDAO) tool and the aeroelastic effects of high fidelity finite element models to characterize the design space was successfully developed and established. Two multidisciplinary design optimization studies using an object-oriented MDAO tool developed at NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center were presented. The first study demonstrates the use of aeroelastic tailoring concepts to minimize the structural weight while meeting the design requirements including strength, buckling, and flutter. A hybrid and discretization optimization approach was implemented to improve accuracy and computational efficiency of a global optimization algorithm. The second study presents a flutter mass balancing optimization study. The results provide guidance to modify the fabricated flexible wing design and move the design flutter speeds back into the flight envelope so that the original objective of X-56A flight test can be accomplished.

  3. Multi-fidelity construction of explicit boundaries: Application to aeroelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dribusch, Christoph

    Wings, control surfaces and rotor blades subject to aerodynamic forces may exhibit aeroelastic instabilities such as flutter, divergence and limit cycle oscillations which generally reduce their life and functionality. This possibility of instability must be taken into account during the design process and numerical simulation models may be used to predict aeroelastic stability. Aeroelastic stability is a design requirement that encompasses several difficulties also found in other areas of design. For instance, the large computational time associated with stability analysis is also found in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models. It is a major hurdle in numerical optimization and reliability analysis, which generally require large numbers of call to the simulation code. Similarly, the presence of bifurcations and discontinuities is also encountered in structural impact analysis based on nonlinear dynamic simulations and renders traditional approximation techniques such as Kriging ineffective. Finally, for a given component or system, aeroelastic instability is only one of multiple failure modes which must be accounted for during design and reliability studies. To address the above challenges, this dissertation proposes a novel algorithm to predict, over a range of parameters, the qualitative outcomes (pass/fail) of simulations based on relatively few, classified (pass/fail) simulation results. This is different from traditional approximation techniques that seek to predict simulation outcomes quantitatively, for example by fitting a response surface. The predictions of the proposed algorithm are based on the theory of support vector machines (SVM), a machine learning method originated in the field of pattern recognition. This process yields an analytical function that explicitly defines the boundary between feasible and infeasible regions of the parameter space and has the ability to reproduce nonlinear, disjoint boundaries in n dimensions. Since training the

  4. An Overview of Recent Developments in Computational Aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Robert M.; Edwards, John W.

    2004-01-01

    The motivation for Computational Aeroelasticity (CA) and the elements of one type of the analysis or simulation process are briefly reviewed. The need for streamlining and improving the overall process to reduce elapsed time and improve overall accuracy is discussed. Further effort is needed to establish the credibility of the methodology, obtain experience, and to incorporate the experience base to simplify the method for future use. Experience with the application of a variety of Computational Aeroelasticity programs is summarized for the transonic flutter of two wings, the AGARD 445.6 wing and a typical business jet wing. There is a compelling need for a broad range of additional flutter test cases for further comparisons. Some existing data sets that may offer CA challenges are presented.

  5. Trimming Simulation of Forming Metal Sheets Isogeometric Models by Using NURBS Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero-Adan, D.; Cardoso, Rui P. R.; Adetoro, O. B.

    2016-08-01

    Some metal sheets forming processes need trimming in a final stage for achieving the net- shape specification and for removing micro-cracks and irregularities. In numerical simulation, since the exact final edge location is a priori unknown in the original metal blanket, the trimming needs to be done once the forming is finished. During the forming internal stresses are generated inside the sheet. When trimming those stresses configuration is changed to achieve equilibrium as a consequence of the material removal. In this paper a novel method for simulating the trimming is presented. The part to trim is modelled using isogeometric analysis (IGA). The new surface generated is modelled with non-uniform rational B-splines (NURBS). Due to the IGA characteristics a total geometrical accuracy and an efficient residual stresses recalculation are accomplished.

  6. Linear and nonlinear dynamic analysis of redundant load path bearingless rotor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, V. R.; Shultz, Louis A.

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this research is to develop the transfer matrix method to treat nonlinear autonomous boundary value problems with multiple branches. The application is the complete nonlinear aeroelastic analysis of multiple-branched rotor blades. Once the development is complete, it can be incorporated into the existing transfer matrix analyses. There are several difficulties to be overcome in reaching this objective. The conventional transfer matrix method is limited in that it is applicable only to linear branch chain-like structures, but consideration of multiple branch modeling is important for bearingless rotors. Also, hingeless and bearingless rotor blade dynamic characteristics (particularly their aeroelasticity problems) are inherently nonlinear. The nonlinear equations of motion and the multiple-branched boundary value problem are treated together using a direct transfer matrix method. First, the formulation is applied to a nonlinear single-branch blade to validate the nonlinear portion of the formulation. The nonlinear system of equations is iteratively solved using a form of Newton-Raphson iteration scheme developed for differential equations of continuous systems. The formulation is then applied to determine the nonlinear steady state trim and aeroelastic stability of a rotor blade in hover with two branches at the root. A comprehensive computer program is developed and is used to obtain numerical results for the (1) free vibration, (2) nonlinearly deformed steady state, (3) free vibration about the nonlinearly deformed steady state, and (4) aeroelastic stability tasks. The numerical results obtained by the present method agree with results from other methods.

  7. Aeroelastic Stability of Idling Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kai; Riziotis, Vasilis A.; Voutsinas, Spyros G.

    2016-09-01

    Wind turbine rotors in idling operation mode can experience high angles of attack, within the post stall region that are capable of triggering stall-induced vibrations. In the present paper rotor stability in slow idling operation is assessed on the basis of non-linear time domain and linear eigenvalue analysis. Analysis is performed for a 10 MW conceptual wind turbine designed by DTU. First the flow conditions that are likely to favour stall induced instabilities are identified through non-linear time domain aeroelastic analysis. Next, for the above specified conditions, eigenvalue stability simulations are performed aiming at identifying the low damped modes of the turbine. Finally the results of the eigenvalue analysis are evaluated through computations of the work of the aerodynamic forces by imposing harmonic vibrations following the shape and frequency of the various modes. Eigenvalue analysis indicates that the asymmetric and symmetric out-of-plane modes have the lowest damping. The results of the eigenvalue analysis agree well with those of the time domain analysis.

  8. Aeroelastic stability analyses of two counter rotating propfan designs for a cruise missile model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahajan, Aparajit J.; Lucero, John M.; Mehmed, Oral; Stefko, George L.

    1992-01-01

    Aeroelastic stability analyses were performed to insure structural integrity of two counterrotating propfan blade designs for a NAVY/Air Force/NASA cruise missile model wind tunnel test. This analysis predicted if the propfan designs would be flutter free at the operating conditions of the wind tunnel test. Calculated stability results are presented for the two blade designs with rotational speed and Mach number as the parameters. A aeroelastic analysis code ASTROP2 (Aeroelastic Stability and Response of Propulsion Systems - 2 Dimensional Analysis), developed at LeRC, was used in this project. The aeroelastic analysis is a modal method and uses the combination of a finite element structural model and two dimensional steady and unsteady cascade aerodynamic models. This code was developed to analyze single rotation propfans but was modified and applied to counterrotating propfans for the present work. Modifications were made to transform the geometry and rotation of the aft rotor to the same reference frame as the forward rotor, to input a non-uniform inflow into the rotor being analyzed, and to automatically converge to the least stable aeroelastic mode.

  9. Ongoing Fixed Wing Research within the NASA Langley Aeroelasticity Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert; Chwalowski, Pawel; Funk, Christie; Heeg, Jennifer; Hur, Jiyoung; Sanetrik, Mark; Scott, Robert; Silva, Walter; Stanford, Bret; Wiseman, Carol

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Langley Aeroelasticity Branch is involved in a number of research programs related to fixed wing aeroelasticity and aeroservoelasticity. These ongoing efforts are summarized here, and include aeroelastic tailoring of subsonic transport wing structures, experimental and numerical assessment of truss-braced wing flutter and limit cycle oscillations, and numerical modeling of high speed civil transport configurations. Efforts devoted to verification, validation, and uncertainty quantification of aeroelastic physics in a workshop setting are also discussed. The feasibility of certain future civil transport configurations will depend on the ability to understand and control complex aeroelastic phenomena, a goal that the Aeroelasticity Branch is well-positioned to contribute through these programs.

  10. Wing-Body Aeroelasticity on Parallel Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.; Byun, Chansup

    1996-01-01

    This article presents a procedure for computing the aeroelasticity of wing-body configurations on multiple-instruction, multiple-data parallel computers. In this procedure, fluids are modeled using Euler equations discretized by a finite difference method, and structures are modeled using finite element equations. The procedure is designed in such a way that each discipline can be developed and maintained independently by using a domain decomposition approach. A parallel integration scheme is used to compute aeroelastic responses by solving the coupled fluid and structural equations concurrently while keeping modularity of each discipline. The present procedure is validated by computing the aeroelastic response of a wing and comparing with experiment. Aeroelastic computations are illustrated for a high speed civil transport type wing-body configuration.

  11. Specification for a Program for an Interative Aeroelastic Solution (PIAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manro, M. E.; Donahue, M. J.; Dreisbach, R. L.; Bussoletti, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    An engineering and software specification which was written for a computer program to calculate aeroelastic structural loads including the effects of nonlinear aerodynamics is presented. The procedure used in the program for an iterative aeroelastic solution (PIAS) is to alternately execute two computer codes: one to calculate aerodynamic loads for a specific wing shape, and another to calculate the deflected shape caused by this loading. A significant advantage to the design of PIAS is that the initial aerodynamic module can be replaced with others. The leading edge vortex (LEV) program is used as the aerodynamic module in PIAS. This provides the capability to calculate aeroelastic loads, including the effects of a separation induced leading edge vortex. The finite element method available in ATLAS Integrated structural analysis and design system is used to determine the deflected wing shape for the applied aerodynamics and inertia loads. The data management capabilities in ATLAS are used by the execution control monitor (ECM) of PIAS to control the solution process.

  12. Aeroelastic Optimization Study Based on the X-56A Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wesley W.; Pak, Chan-Gi

    2014-01-01

    One way to increase the aircraft fuel efficiency is to reduce structural weight while maintaining adequate structural airworthiness, both statically and aeroelastically. A design process which incorporates the object-oriented multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization (MDAO) tool and the aeroelastic effects of high fidelity finite element models to characterize the design space was successfully developed and established. This paper presents two multidisciplinary design optimization studies using an object-oriented MDAO tool developed at NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center. The first study demonstrates the use of aeroelastic tailoring concepts to minimize the structural weight while meeting the design requirements including strength, buckling, and flutter. Such an approach exploits the anisotropic capabilities of the fiber composite materials chosen for this analytical exercise with ply stacking sequence. A hybrid and discretization optimization approach improves accuracy and computational efficiency of a global optimization algorithm. The second study presents a flutter mass balancing optimization study for the fabricated flexible wing of the X-56A model since a desired flutter speed band is required for the active flutter suppression demonstration during flight testing. The results of the second study provide guidance to modify the wing design and move the design flutter speeds back into the flight envelope so that the original objective of X-56A flight test can be accomplished successfully. The second case also demonstrates that the object-oriented MDAO tool can handle multiple analytical configurations in a single optimization run.

  13. Aeroelastic Uncertainty Quantification Studies Using the S4T Wind Tunnel Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikbay, Melike; Heeg, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    This paper originates from the joint efforts of an aeroelastic study team in the Applied Vehicle Technology Panel from NATO Science and Technology Organization, with the Task Group number AVT-191, titled "Application of Sensitivity Analysis and Uncertainty Quantification to Military Vehicle Design." We present aeroelastic uncertainty quantification studies using the SemiSpan Supersonic Transport wind tunnel model at the NASA Langley Research Center. The aeroelastic study team decided treat both structural and aerodynamic input parameters as uncertain and represent them as samples drawn from statistical distributions, propagating them through aeroelastic analysis frameworks. Uncertainty quantification processes require many function evaluations to asses the impact of variations in numerous parameters on the vehicle characteristics, rapidly increasing the computational time requirement relative to that required to assess a system deterministically. The increased computational time is particularly prohibitive if high-fidelity analyses are employed. As a remedy, the Istanbul Technical University team employed an Euler solver in an aeroelastic analysis framework, and implemented reduced order modeling with Polynomial Chaos Expansion and Proper Orthogonal Decomposition to perform the uncertainty propagation. The NASA team chose to reduce the prohibitive computational time by employing linear solution processes. The NASA team also focused on determining input sample distributions.

  14. Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) Area of Interest (AOI) 6: Develop and Validate Aeroelastic Codes for Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Kevin D.; Liu, Jong-Shang; Murthy, Durbha V.; Kruse, Marlin J.; James, Darrell

    1999-01-01

    AlliedSignal Engines, in cooperation with NASA GRC (National Aeronautics and Space Administration Glenn Research Center), completed an evaluation of recently-developed aeroelastic computer codes using test cases from the AlliedSignal Engines fan blisk and turbine databases. Test data included strain gage, performance, and steady-state pressure information obtained for conditions where synchronous or flutter vibratory conditions were found to occur. Aeroelastic codes evaluated included quasi 3-D UNSFLO (MIT Developed/AE Modified, Quasi 3-D Aeroelastic Computer Code), 2-D FREPS (NASA-Developed Forced Response Prediction System Aeroelastic Computer Code), and 3-D TURBO-AE (NASA/Mississippi State University Developed 3-D Aeroelastic Computer Code). Unsteady pressure predictions for the turbine test case were used to evaluate the forced response prediction capabilities of each of the three aeroelastic codes. Additionally, one of the fan flutter cases was evaluated using TURBO-AE. The UNSFLO and FREPS evaluation predictions showed good agreement with the experimental test data trends, but quantitative improvements are needed. UNSFLO over-predicted turbine blade response reductions, while FREPS under-predicted them. The inviscid TURBO-AE turbine analysis predicted no discernible blade response reduction, indicating the necessity of including viscous effects for this test case. For the TURBO-AE fan blisk test case, significant effort was expended getting the viscous version of the code to give converged steady flow solutions for the transonic flow conditions. Once converged, the steady solutions provided an excellent match with test data and the calibrated DAWES (AlliedSignal 3-D Viscous Steady Flow CFD Solver). However, efforts expended establishing quality steady-state solutions prevented exercising the unsteady portion of the TURBO-AE code during the present program. AlliedSignal recommends that unsteady pressure measurement data be obtained for both test cases examined

  15. Normal T-cell development and immune functions in TRIM-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Kölsch, Uwe; Arndt, Börge; Reinhold, Dirk; Lindquist, Jonathan A; Jüling, Nicole; Kliche, Stefanie; Pfeffer, Klaus; Bruyns, Eddy; Schraven, Burkhart; Simeoni, Luca

    2006-05-01

    The transmembrane adaptor molecule TRIM is strongly expressed within thymus and in peripheral CD4(+) T cells. Previous studies suggested that TRIM is an integral component of the T-cell receptor (TCR)/CD3 complex and might be involved in regulating TCR cycling. To elucidate the in vivo function of TRIM, we generated TRIM-deficient mice by homologous recombination. TRIM(-/-) mice develop normally and are healthy and fertile. However, the animals show a mild reduction in body weight that appears to be due to a decrease in the size and/or cellularity of many organs. The morphology and anatomy of nonlymphoid as well as primary and secondary lymphoid organs is normal. The frequency of thymocyte and peripheral T-cell subsets does not differ from control littermates. In addition, a detailed analysis of lymphocyte development revealed that TRIM is not required for either positive or negative selection. Although TRIM(-/-) CD4(+) T cells showed an augmented phosphorylation of the serine/threonine kinase Akt, the in vitro characterization of peripheral T cells indicated that proliferation, survival, activation-induced cell death, migration, adhesion, TCR internalization and recycling, TCR-mediated calcium fluxes, tyrosine phosphorylation, and mitogen-activated protein family kinase activation are not affected in the absence of TRIM. Similarly, the in vivo immune response to T-dependent and T-independent antigens as well as the clinical course of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a complex Th1-mediated autoimmune model, is comparable to that of wild-type animals. Collectively, these results demonstrate that TRIM is dispensable for T-cell development and peripheral immune functions. The lack of an evident phenotype could indicate that TRIM shares redundant functions with other transmembrane adaptors involved in regulating the immune response.

  16. Overview of the Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heeg, Jennifer; Chwalowski, Pawel; Schuster, David M.; Dalenbring, Mats

    2013-01-01

    The AIAA Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop (AePW) was held in April, 2012, bringing together communities of aeroelasticians and computational fluid dynamicists. The objective in conducting this workshop on aeroelastic prediction was to assess state-of-the-art computational aeroelasticity methods as practical tools for the prediction of static and dynamic aeroelastic phenomena. No comprehensive aeroelastic benchmarking validation standard currently exists, greatly hindering validation and state-of-the-art assessment objectives. The workshop was a step towards assessing the state of the art in computational aeroelasticity. This was an opportunity to discuss and evaluate the effectiveness of existing computer codes and modeling techniques for unsteady flow, and to identify computational and experimental areas needing additional research and development. Three configurations served as the basis for the workshop, providing different levels of geometric and flow field complexity. All cases considered involved supercritical airfoils at transonic conditions. The flow fields contained oscillating shocks and in some cases, regions of separation. The computational tools principally employed Reynolds-Averaged Navier Stokes solutions. The successes and failures of the computations and the experiments are examined in this paper.

  17. Aeroelastic airfoil smart spar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhalgh, Skott; Pastore, Christopher M.; Garfinkle, Moishe

    1993-01-01

    Aircraft wings and rotor-blades are subject to undesirable bending and twisting excursions that arise from unsteady aerodynamic forces during high speed flight, abrupt maneuvers, or hard landings. These bending excursions can range in amplitude from wing-tip flutter to failure. A continuous-filament construction 'smart' laminated composite box-beam spar is described which corrects itself when subject to undesirable bending excursions or flutter. The load-bearing spar is constructed so that any tendency for the wing or rotor-blade to bend from its normal position is met by opposite twisting of the spar to restore the wing to its normal position. Experimental and theoretical characterization of these spars was made to evaluate the torsion-flexure coupling associated with symmetric lay-ups. The materials used were uniweave AS-4 graphite and a matrix comprised of Shell 8132 resin and U-40 hardener. Experimental tests were conducted on five spars to determine spar twist and bend as a function of load for 0, 17, 30, 45 and 60 deg fiber angle lay-ups. Symmetric fiber lay-ups do exhibit torsion-flexure couplings. Predictions of the twist and bend versus load were made for different fiber orientations in laminated spars using a spline function structural analysis. The analytical results were compared with experimental results for validation. Excellent correlation between experimental and analytical values was found.

  18. An Interview with John Trim at 80

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saville, Nick

    2005-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Dr. John Trim, which was recorded at his home in Cambridge on January 21, 2005, not long after his 80th birthday in October 2004. Although he would not consider himself a language tester, Dr. Trim has followed the trends in language assessment since the 1960s and his own work, particularly as a coauthor of…

  19. Transfusion-related immunomodulation (TRIM): an update.

    PubMed

    Vamvakas, Eleftherios C; Blajchman, Morris A

    2007-11-01

    Allogeneic blood transfusion (ABT)-related immunomodulation (TRIM) encompasses the laboratory immune aberrations that occur after ABT and their established or purported clinical effects. TRIM is a real biologic phenomenon resulting in at least one established beneficial clinical effect in humans, but the existence of deleterious clinical TRIM effects has not yet been confirmed. Initially, TRIM encompassed effects attributable to ABT by immunomodulatory mechanisms (e.g., cancer recurrence, postoperative infection, or virus activation). More recently, TRIM has also included effects attributable to ABT by pro-inflammatory mechanisms (e.g., multiple-organ failure or mortality). TRIM effects may be mediated by: (1) allogeneic mononuclear cells; (2) white-blood-cell (WBC)-derived soluble mediators; and/or (3) soluble HLA peptides circulating in allogeneic plasma. This review categorizes the available randomized controlled trials based on the inference(s) that they permit about possible mediator(s) of TRIM, and examines the strength of the evidence available for relying on WBC reduction or autologous transfusion to prevent TRIM effects.

  20. 7 CFR 51.571 - Well trimmed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Well trimmed. 51.571 Section 51.571 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Celery Definitions § 51.571 Well trimmed. Well...

  1. 7 CFR 51.571 - Well trimmed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Well trimmed. 51.571 Section 51.571 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Celery Definitions § 51.571 Well trimmed. Well...

  2. Effects Of Molecular Processes On Trim Angles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Chul; Yoon, Seokkwan

    1991-01-01

    Report discusses preliminary calculations of effects of vibrational excitation and dissociation of air molecules on trim angle of attack on blunt body flying at suborbital speed. Intended as study of feasibility and utility of such calculations, motivated by fact that trim angle of attack at suborbital and higher speeds important aerodynamic parameter for spacecraft reentering atmosphere and for future hypersonic aerospace vehicles.

  3. Aeroelastic Modeling of X-56A Stiff-Wing Configuration Flight Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grauer, Jared A.; Boucher, Matthew J.

    2017-01-01

    Aeroelastic stability and control derivatives for the X-56A Multi-Utility Technology Testbed (MUTT), in the stiff-wing configuration, were estimated from flight test data using the output-error method. Practical aspects of the analysis are discussed. The orthogonal phase-optimized multisine inputs provided excellent data information for aeroelastic modeling. Consistent parameter estimates were determined using output error in both the frequency and time domains. The frequency domain analysis converged faster and was less sensitive to starting values for the model parameters, which was useful for determining the aeroelastic model structure and obtaining starting values for the time domain analysis. Including a modal description of the structure from a finite element model reduced the complexity of the estimation problem and improved the modeling results. Effects of reducing the model order on the short period stability and control derivatives were investigated.

  4. General Description and Conceptual Plan for TRIM.Risk, from TRIM Total Risk Integrated Methodology Status Report, 1999

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the status of TRIM and all of its major components, with particular focus on the progress in TRIM development since the 1998 TRIM Status Report (US EPA, 1998).

  5. Origin and diversification of TRIM ubiquitin ligases.

    PubMed

    Marín, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    Most proteins of the TRIM family (also known as RBCC family) are ubiquitin ligases that share a peculiar protein structure, characterized by including an N-terminal RING finger domain closely followed by one or two B-boxes. Additional protein domains found at their C termini have been used to classify TRIM proteins into classes. TRIMs are involved in multiple cellular processes and many of them are essential components of the innate immunity system of animal species. In humans, it has been shown that mutations in several TRIM-encoding genes lead to diverse genetic diseases and contribute to several types of cancer. They had been hitherto detected only in animals. In this work, by comprehensively analyzing the available diversity of TRIM and TRIM-like protein sequences and evaluating their evolutionary patterns, an improved classification of the TRIM family is obtained. Members of one of the TRIM subfamilies defined, called Subfamily A, turn to be present not only in animals, but also in many other eukaryotes, such as fungi, apusozoans, alveolates, excavates and plants. The rest of subfamilies are animal-specific and several of them originated only recently. Subfamily A proteins are characterized by containing a MATH domain, suggesting a potential evolutionary connection between TRIM proteins and a different type of ubiquitin ligases, known as TRAFs, which contain quite similar MATH domains. These results indicate that the TRIM family emerged much earlier than so far thought and contribute to our understanding of its origin and diversification. The structural and evolutionary links with the TRAF family of ubiquitin ligases can be experimentally explored to determine whether functional connections also exist.

  6. Trimming Problems and Remedies in COADS.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolter, Klaus

    1997-08-01

    The Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (COADS) offers the most complete marine surface data collection (1854-1992) currently available for global climate research. In the context of the long-term monitoring of global climate, COADS constitutes an important in situ baseline dataset, considerably extending the presently available decade-long satellite-based datasets.Marine observations of a given ocean location originate from a variable mixture of vessels with different instrumentations, resulting in nontrivial sampling errors. Therefore, careful quality control (QC) is paramount. The final portion of COADS QC-flagging statistical outliers and removing them from the computation of areal averages-is referred to as `trimming' and is of particular concern here.This paper reviews evidence showing that the trimming of COADS in Release 1 and interim releases was unnecessarily restrictive. Trimming not only eliminated obvious outliers but also a relatively large fraction of realistic observations, where climate anomalies were large and available observations were few, especially common for tropical Pacific sea surface temperatures (SST). In poorly sampled regions, trimming may thus have removed the most prominent signal, the `bull's-eye,' of climate anomalies. For instance, during the strong El Niño events of 1877-78 and 1982-83, up to two-thirds (one-third) of central Pacific SST observations were erroneously excluded from the trimmed record, reducing the peak trimmed SST anomaly by up to 1°C.Excessive trimming occurred often enough for all observed variables to prompt a review of trimming procedures for COADS Release 1a (1980-92). In its enhanced version, trimming limits were moderately widened (by nearly 30%). This appears to have reduced erroneous trimming losses by over 50%, without noticeably increasing the number of unwanted statistical outliers.Given the present state of knowledge about COADS QC problems, the paper includes recommendations for the optimal use

  7. Aeroelastic Stability Investigations for Large-scale Vertical Axis Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, B. C.; Griffith, D. T.

    2014-06-01

    The availability of offshore wind resources in coastal regions, along with a high concentration of load centers in these areas, makes offshore wind energy an attractive opportunity for clean renewable electricity production. High infrastructure costs such as the offshore support structure and operation and maintenance costs for offshore wind technology, however, are significant obstacles that need to be overcome to make offshore wind a more cost-effective option. A vertical-axis wind turbine (VAWT) rotor configuration offers a potential transformative technology solution that significantly lowers cost of energy for offshore wind due to its inherent advantages for the offshore market. However, several potential challenges exist for VAWTs and this paper addresses one of them with an initial investigation of dynamic aeroelastic stability for large-scale, multi-megawatt VAWTs. The aeroelastic formulation and solution method from the BLade Aeroelastic STability Tool (BLAST) for HAWT blades was employed to extend the analysis capability of a newly developed structural dynamics design tool for VAWTs. This investigation considers the effect of configuration geometry, material system choice, and number of blades on the aeroelastic stability of a VAWT, and provides an initial scoping for potential aeroelastic instabilities in large-scale VAWT designs.

  8. Computational Aeroelastic Modeling of Airframes and TurboMachinery: Progress and Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, R. E.; Sayma, A. I.

    2006-01-01

    Computational analyses such as computational fluid dynamics and computational structural dynamics have made major advances toward maturity as engineering tools. Computational aeroelasticity is the integration of these disciplines. As computational aeroelasticity matures it too finds an increasing role in the design and analysis of aerospace vehicles. This paper presents a survey of the current state of computational aeroelasticity with a discussion of recent research, success and continuing challenges in its progressive integration into multidisciplinary aerospace design. This paper approaches computational aeroelasticity from the perspective of the two main areas of application: airframe and turbomachinery design. An overview will be presented of the different prediction methods used for each field of application. Differing levels of nonlinear modeling will be discussed with insight into accuracy versus complexity and computational requirements. Subjects will include current advanced methods (linear and nonlinear), nonlinear flow models, use of order reduction techniques and future trends in incorporating structural nonlinearity. Examples in which computational aeroelasticity is currently being integrated into the design of airframes and turbomachinery will be presented.

  9. Flight Dynamics of Flexible Aircraft with Aeroelastic and Inertial Force Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Tuzcu, Ilhan

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated flight dynamic modeling method for flexible aircraft that captures coupled physics effects due to inertial forces, aeroelasticity, and propulsive forces that are normally present in flight. The present approach formulates the coupled flight dynamics using a structural dynamic modeling method that describes the elasticity of a flexible, twisted, swept wing using an equivalent beam-rod model. The structural dynamic model allows for three types of wing elastic motion: flapwise bending, chordwise bending, and torsion. Inertial force coupling with the wing elasticity is formulated to account for aircraft acceleration. The structural deflections create an effective aeroelastic angle of attack that affects the rigid-body motion of flexible aircraft. The aeroelastic effect contributes to aerodynamic damping forces that can influence aerodynamic stability. For wing-mounted engines, wing flexibility can cause the propulsive forces and moments to couple with the wing elastic motion. The integrated flight dynamics for a flexible aircraft are formulated by including generalized coordinate variables associated with the aeroelastic-propulsive forces and moments in the standard state-space form for six degree-of-freedom flight dynamics. A computational structural model for a generic transport aircraft has been created. The eigenvalue analysis is performed to compute aeroelastic frequencies and aerodynamic damping. The results will be used to construct an integrated flight dynamic model of a flexible generic transport aircraft.

  10. Recent Applications of the Volterra Theory to Aeroelastic Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Haji, Muhammad R; Prazenica, Richard J.

    2005-01-01

    The identification of nonlinear aeroelastic systems based on the Volterra theory of nonlinear systems is presented. Recent applications of the theory to problems in experimental aeroelasticity are reviewed. These results include the identification of aerodynamic impulse responses, the application of higher-order spectra (HOS) to wind-tunnel flutter data, and the identification of nonlinear aeroelastic phenomena from flight flutter test data of the Active Aeroelastic Wing (AAW) aircraft.

  11. Trimming and procrastination as inversion techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backus, George E.

    1996-12-01

    By examining the processes of truncating and approximating the model space (trimming it), and by committing to neither the objectivist nor the subjectivist interpretation of probability (procrastinating), we construct a formal scheme for solving linear and non-linear geophysical inverse problems. The necessary prior information about the correct model xE can be either a collection of inequalities or a probability measure describing where xE was likely to be in the model space X before the data vector y0 was measured. The results of the inversion are (1) a vector z0 that estimates some numerical properties zE of xE; (2) an estimate of the error δz = z0 - zE. As y0 is finite dimensional, so is z0, and hence in principle inversion cannot describe all of xE. The error δz is studied under successively more specialized assumptions about the inverse problem, culminating in a complete analysis of the linear inverse problem with a prior quadratic bound on xE. Our formalism appears to encompass and provide error estimates for many of the inversion schemes current in geomagnetism, and would be equally applicable in geodesy and seismology if adequate prior information were available there. As an idealized example we study the magnetic field at the core-mantle boundary, using satellite measurements of field elements at sites assumed to be almost uniformly distributed on a single spherical surface. Magnetospheric currents are neglected and the crustal field is idealized as a random process with rotationally invariant statistics. We find that an appropriate data compression diagonalizes the variance matrix of the crustal signal and permits an analytic trimming of the idealized problem.

  12. Trim angle of attack of flexible wings using non-linear aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, David Erik

    Multidisciplinary interactions are expected to play a significant role in the design of future high-performance aircraft (Blended-Wing Body, Truss-Braced wing; High Speed Civil transport, High-Altitude Long Endurance aircraft and future military aircraft). Also, the availability of supercomputers has made it now possible to employ high-fidelity models (Computational Fluid Dynamics for fluids and detailed finite element models for structures) at the preliminary design stage. A necessary step at that stage is to calculate the wing angle-of-attack at which the wing will generate the desired lift for the specific flight maneuver. Determination of this angle, a simple affair when the wing is rigid and the flow regime linear, becomes difficult when the wing is flexible and the flow regime non-linear. To solve this inherently nonlinear problem, a Newton's method type algorithm is developed to simultaneously calculate the deflection and the angle of attack. The developed algorithm is tested for a wing, used for in-house aeroelasticity research at Boeing (previously McDonnell Douglas) Long Beach. The trim angle of attack is calculated for a range of desired lift values. In addition to the Newton's method algorithm, a non derivative method (NDM) based on fixed point iteration, typical of fixed angle of attack calculations in aeroelasticity, is employed. The NDM, which has been extended to be able to calculate trim angle of attack, is used for one of the cases. The Newton's method calculation converges in fewer iterations, but requires more CPU time than the NDM method. The NDM, however, results in a slightly different value of the trim angle of attack. It should be noted that NDM will converge in a larger number of iterations as the dynamic pressure increases. For one value of the desired lift, both viscous and inviscid results were generated. The use of the inviscid flow model while not resulting in a markedly different value for the trim angle of attack, does result in a

  13. Periodic trim solutions with hp-version finite elements in time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, David A.; Hou, Lin-Jun

    1990-01-01

    Finite elements in time as an alternative strategy for rotorcraft trim problems are studied. The research treats linear flap and linearized flap-lag response both for quasi-trim and trim cases. The connection between Fourier series analysis and hp-finite elements for periodic a problem is also examined. It is proved that Fourier series is a special case of space-time finite elements in which one element is used with a strong displacement formulation. Comparisons are made with respect to accuracy among Fourier analysis, displacement methods, and mixed methods over a variety parameters. The hp trade-off is studied for the periodic trim problem to provide an optimum step size and order of polynomial for a given error criteria. It is found that finite elements in time can outperform Fourier analysis for periodic problems, and for some given error criteria. The mixed method provides better results than does the displacement method.

  14. Periodic trim solutions with hp-version finite elements in time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Lin-Jun; Peters, David A.

    1991-01-01

    Finite elements in time as an alternative strategy for rotorcraft trim problems are studied. The research treats linear flap and linearized flap-lag response both for quasi-trim and trim cases. The connection between Fourier series analysis and hp-finite elements for periodic a problem is also examined. It is proved that Fourier series is a special case of space-time finite elements in which one element is used with a strong displacement formulation. Comparisons are made with respect to accuracy among Fourier analysis, displacement methods, and mixed methods over a variety parameters. The hp trade-off is studied for the periodic trim problem to provide an optimum step size and order of polynomial for a given error criteria. It is found that finite elements in time can outperform Fourier analysis for periodic problems, and for some given error criteria. The mixed method provides better results than does the displacement method.

  15. Molecular characterization of a CpTRIM35-like protein and its splice variants from whitespotted bamboo shark (Chiloscyllium plagiosum)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xinshang Zhao, Heng Chen, Yeyu Luo, Huiying Yao, Bin

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • A TRIM gene and three splice variants were firstly cloned from elasmobranch fish. • The genes were constitutively expressed with high levels in spleen and kidney. • The gene products were distributed in cytoplasm alone or cytoplasm and nucleus. • As E3 ubiquitin ligases, the proteins differed in immune responses to challenges. - Abstract: The tripartite motif (TRIM) proteins play important roles in a broad range of biological processes, including apoptosis, cell proliferation and innate immunity response. In this study, a TRIM gene and its three splice variants were cloned from an elasmobranch fish—whitespotted bamboo shark (Chiloscyllium plagiosum Bennett). Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the gene was closely related to TRIM35 homologs, thus termed CpTRIM35-like. Deduced CpTRIM35 has a RBCC-PRY/SPRY structure typical of TRIM proteins, and its splice variants (CpTRIM35-1–3) have different truncations at the C-terminus. The gene products were constitutively expressed in adult sharks with the highest levels in spleen and kidney. The different subcellular locations, upregulation upon LPS and poly I:C stimulation, and significant E3 ubiquitin ligase activities suggested their different roles in immune responses as an E3 ubiquitin ligase. This is the first TRIM protein ever characterized in elasmobranch fish.

  16. TRIM52: A nuclear TRIM protein that positively regulates the nuclear factor-kappa B signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wenchun; Liu, Tingting; Li, Xiangmin; Zhou, Yun; Wu, Mengge; Cui, Xiaofang; Chen, Huanchun; Qian, Ping

    2017-02-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that TRIM family proteins play a crucial role in regulating the NF-κB signaling pathway. TRIM52 is a novel noncanonical antiviral TRIM gene with a unique expanded RING domain. Information on the biological function of TRIM52 is limited. Herein, we demonstrated TRIM52 involvement in NF-κB activation. We found that TRIM52 overexpression specifically activated the NF-κB signal. TRIM52 overexpression can significantly induce TNFα and IL-6 expression. We also found that the RING domain of TRIM52 was essential for its activation of the NF-κB signal. Further study showed that TRIM52 overexpression did not affect the protein level of IκBα and phosphorylated p65 protein. We found that the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNFα and IL-6 could induce TRIM52 expression. Overall, these data suggested that TRIM52 was a positive regulator of the NF-κB pathway.

  17. FUN3D Analyses in Support of the Second Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chwalowski, Pawel; Heeg, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the computational aeroelastic results generated in support of the second Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop for the Benchmark Supercritical Wing (BSCW) configurations and compares them to the experimental data. The computational results are obtained using FUN3D, an unstructured grid Reynolds- Averaged Navier-Stokes solver developed at NASA Langley Research Center. The analysis results include aerodynamic coefficients and surface pressures obtained for steady-state, static aeroelastic equilibrium, and unsteady flow due to a pitching wing or flutter prediction. Frequency response functions of the pressure coefficients with respect to the angular displacement are computed and compared with the experimental data. The effects of spatial and temporal convergence on the computational results are examined.

  18. Simulation of Non-Linear Transonic Aeroelastic Behavior on the B-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreim, D. R.; Jacobson, S. B.; Britt, R. T.

    1999-01-01

    At high subsonic flight speeds, large flexible aircraft begin to encounter unsteady airloads which are not predicted by most currently available aerodynamic analysis and design methods. With increasing speed and the development of transonic flow and shocks, viscous effects quickly become very important, and flow separation can occur. The Northrop Grumman USAF B-2 Bomber encountered a nonlinear aeroelastic Residual Pitch Oscillation (RPO) under these conditions. Simulation studies were performed with the Computational Aeroelasticity Program-Transonic Small Disturbance, Viscous (CAPTSDv) computer program to evaluate its ability to predict these nonlinear aeroelastic responses. Open and closed loop simulations were performed to assess the participation of the flight control system. Control, system actuator hysteresis characteristics were modeled and found to be a significant participant in the RPO phenomenon. Simulations were also performed for varying Mach numbers and altitudes to establish the stability boundaries and compare with flight test data. These CAPTSDv simulations compared well with flight data and revealed many potential further modeling enhancements.

  19. Lentiviral Effector Pathways of TRIM Proteins.

    PubMed

    Turrini, Filippo; Di Pietro, Andrea; Vicenzi, Elisa

    2014-04-01

    The human tripartite motif (TRIM) family, composed of more than 77 members, encompasses an emerging group of innate antiviral factors. Most TRIM proteins are characterized by being E3 ubiquitin ligases, but also engage in specific interactions with a variety of cellular and viral partners. They are involved in many cellular processes, including cell differentiation, transcriptional regulation, cytoskeleton remodeling, intracellular trafficking, membrane repair, and oncogenesis. In regard to antiviral immunity, they restrict both retroviruses and lentiviruses as well as other DNA and RNA viruses. This review will focus on the TRIM members endowed with anti-retroviral and anti-lentiviral activities and, in particular, human immunodeficiency virus.

  20. Evaluation of an aeroelastic model technique for predicting airplane buffet loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, P. W.

    1973-01-01

    A wind-tunnel technique which makes use of a dynamically scaled aeroelastic model to predict full-scale airplane buffet loads during buffet boundary penetration is evaluated. A 1/8-scale flutter model of a fighter airplane with remotely controllable variable-sweep wings and trimming surfaces was used for the evaluation. The model was flown on a cable-mount system which permitted high lift forces comparable to those in maneuvering flight. Bending moments and accelerations due to buffet were measured on the flutter model and compared with those measured on the full-scale airplane in an independent flight buffet research study. It is concluded that the technique can provide valuable information on airplane buffet load characteristics not available from any other source except flight test.

  1. Aeroelastic stability of wind turbines: the problem, the methods and the issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riziotis, V. A.; Voutsinas, S. G.; Politis, E. S.; Chaviaropoulos, P. K.

    2004-10-01

    Aeroelastic stability is a key issue in the design process of wind turbines towards both enchanced stability and increased fatigue life. The theory and models behind the state-of-the-art aeroelastic stability tools developed for the analysis of the complete wind turbine at the Centre for Renewable Energy Sources and the National Technical University of Athens are presented in this article. Application examples of stability calculations for a pitch, variable speed and a stall-regulated wind turbine are also presented. Copyright

  2. The benchmark aeroelastic models program: Description and highlights of initial results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Robert M.; Eckstrom, Clinton V.; Rivera, Jose A., Jr.; Dansberry, Bryan E.; Farmer, Moses G.; Durham, Michael H.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental effort was implemented in aeroelasticity called the Benchmark Models Program. The primary purpose of this program is to provide the necessary data to evaluate computational fluid dynamic codes for aeroelastic analysis. It also focuses on increasing the understanding of the physics of unsteady flows and providing data for empirical design. An overview is given of this program and some results obtained in the initial tests are highlighted. The tests that were completed include measurement of unsteady pressures during flutter of a rigid wing with an NACA 0012 airfoil section and dynamic response measurements of a flexible rectangular wing with a thick circular arc airfoil undergoing shock boundary layer oscillations.

  3. The benchmark aeroelastic models program: Description and highlights of initial results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Robert M.; Eckstrom, Clinton V.; Rivera, Jose A., Jr.; Dansberry, Bryan E.; Farmer, Moses G.; Durham, Michael H.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental effort was implemented in aeroelasticity called the Benchmark Models Program. The primary purpose of this program is to provide the necessary data to evaluate computational fluid dynamic codes for aeroelastic analysis. It also focuses on increasing the understanding of the physics of unsteady flows and providing data for empirical design. An overview is given of this program and some results obtained in the initial tests are highlighted. The tests that were completed include measurement of unsteady pressures during flutter of rigid wing with a NACA 0012 airfoil section and dynamic response measurements of a flexible rectangular wing with a thick circular arc airfoil undergoing shock boundary layer oscillations.

  4. Anti-HIV-1 activity of Trim 37.

    PubMed

    Tabah, Azah A; Tardif, Keith; Mansky, Louis M

    2014-04-01

    Trim 5α was the first member of the tripartite motif (TRIM) family of proteins that was identified to potently restrict human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication. The breadth of antiretroviral activity of TRIM family members is an active area of investigation. In this study, we demonstrate that human Trim 37 possesses anti-HIV-1 activity. This antiretroviral activity and the manner in which it was displayed were implicated by (1) decreased viral replication upon Trim 37 transient overexpression in virus-producing cells, (2) correlation of the reduction of viral infectivity with Trim 37 virion incorporation, (3) increased HIV-1 replication during siRNA depletion of Trim 37 expression, and (4) reduction in viral DNA synthesis upon Trim 37 transient overexpression. Our findings provide the first demonstration, to our knowledge, of the potent antiviral activity of human Trim 37, and implicate an antiviral mechanism whereby Trim 37 interferes with viral DNA synthesis.

  5. Aeroelastic Tailoring via Tow Steered Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, Bret K.; Jutte, Christine V.

    2014-01-01

    The use of tow steered composites, where fibers follow prescribed curvilinear paths within a laminate, can improve upon existing capabilities related to aeroelastic tailoring of wing structures, though this tailoring method has received relatively little attention in the literature. This paper demonstrates the technique for both a simple cantilevered plate in low-speed flow, as well as the wing box of a full-scale high aspect ratio transport configuration. Static aeroelastic stresses and dynamic flutter boundaries are obtained for both cases. The impact of various tailoring choices upon the aeroelastic performance is quantified: curvilinear fiber steering versus straight fiber steering, certifiable versus noncertifiable stacking sequences, a single uniform laminate per wing skin versus multiple laminates, and identical upper and lower wing skins structures versus individual tailoring.

  6. TRIM.FaTE Evaluation Report

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The TRIM.FaTE Evaluation Report is composed of three volumes. Volume I presents conceptual, mechanistic, and structural complexity evaluations of various aspects of the model. Volumes II and III present performance evaluation.

  7. Noble gas sputtering calculations using TRIM

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, J.P.; Nemanich, J.; Thomas, G.E.; Schiel, S.L.

    1996-12-31

    In conjunction with our experimental work on saddle field ion sputtering, we have attempted to apply the Monte Carlo program TRIM (Transport of Ions in Matter) to calculate the sputter yields for a variety of noble gas sputtering applications. Comparison with experiments are shown. Information extracted from these analyses have proved useful in optimizing the experimental sputtering parameters. Calculated sputter yields obtained utilizing TRIM are presented for noble gas sputtering of a variety of materials common to nuclear target production.

  8. Blade mistuning coupled with shaft flexibility effects in rotor aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khader, Naim; Loewy, Robert G.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of bladed-disk polar dissymmetry, resulting from variations in mass from one blade to another, on aeroelastic stability boundaries for a fan stage is presented. In addition to both in-plane and out-of-plane deformations of the bladed-disk, bending of the supporting shaft in two planes is considered, and the resulting Coriolis forces and gyroscopic moments are included in the analysis. A quasi-steady aerodynamics approach is combined with the Lagrangian method to develop the governing equations of motion for the flexible bladed-disk-shaft assembly. Calculations are performed for an actual fan stage.

  9. Convergence acceleration of an aeroelastic Navier-Stokes solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obayashi, S.; Guruswamy, G.

    1994-01-01

    New capabilities have been added to a Navier-Stokes solver to perform steady-state simulations more efficiently. The flow solver for solving the Navier-Stokes equations is completely rewritten with a combination of the LU-SGS (Lower-Upper factored Symmetric Gauss-Seidel) implicit method and the modified HLLE (Harten-Lax-van Leer-Einfeldt) upwind scheme. A pseudo-time marching method is used for the directly coupled structural equations to improve overall convergence rates for static aeroelastic analysis. Results are demonstrated for transonic flows over rigid and flexible wings.

  10. Role of HPC in Advancing Computational Aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.

    2004-01-01

    On behalf of the High Performance Computing and Modernization Program (HPCMP) and NASA Advanced Supercomputing Division (NAS) a study is conducted to assess the role of supercomputers on computational aeroelasticity of aerospace vehicles. The study is mostly based on the responses to a web based questionnaire that was designed to capture the nuances of high performance computational aeroelasticity, particularly on parallel computers. A procedure is presented to assign a fidelity-complexity index to each application. Case studies based on major applications using HPCMP resources are presented.

  11. Method of performing computational aeroelastic analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Computational aeroelastic analyses typically use a mathematical model for the structural modes of a flexible structure and a nonlinear aerodynamic model that can generate a plurality of unsteady aerodynamic responses based on the structural modes for conditions defining an aerodynamic condition of the flexible structure. In the present invention, a linear state-space model is generated using a single execution of the nonlinear aerodynamic model for all of the structural modes where a family of orthogonal functions is used as the inputs. Then, static and dynamic aeroelastic solutions are generated using computational interaction between the mathematical model and the linear state-space model for a plurality of periodic points in time.

  12. Renaissance of Aeroelasticity and Its Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, Peretz P.

    1999-01-01

    The primary objective of this paper is to demonstrate that the field of aeroelasticity continues to play a critical role in the design of modern aerospace vehicles, and several important problems are still far from being well understood. Furthermore, the emergence of new technologies, such as the use of adaptive materials (sometimes denoted as smart structures technology), providing new actuator and sensor capabilities, has invigorated aeroelasticity, and generated a host of new and challenging research topics that can have a major impact on the design of a new generation of aerospace vehicles.

  13. Wet trimming process for critical dimension reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Sam X.; Smith, Brian A.; Qin, Anwei

    2008-03-01

    Plasma trimming is a method widely used to achieve small feature sizes beyond the capability of photolithography. Plasma processes reduce the dimensions of photoresist, anti-reflective coating, hardmask, or device substrate patterns with varying degrees of anisotropy. The vertical trim rate is higher than or equal to the lateral trim rate. As a result, much of the line-edge roughness from the resist pattern remains. High aspect-ratio resist patterns are subject to necking and collapse during this process. However, by using a developer-soluble hardmask in place of traditional anti-reflective layers, it is possible to achieve controllable, anisotropic trim rates, as well as reduced roughness. Moreover, the process benefits from a very thin resist, or imaging layer, instead of relying on a thicker mask with a high aspect-ratio. The hardmask is patterned during a standard resist develop step, and the resist may be stripped prior to substrate etching due to the high etch resistance of the hardmask. Many other advantages have been discovered from this wet trimming process, including high resolution, extended depth of focus, controllable trim rate, and lower cost than traditional methods.

  14. Feasibility of Supersonic Aircraft Concepts for Low-Boom and Flight Trim Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wu

    2015-01-01

    This paper documents a process for analyzing whether a particular supersonic aircraft configuration layout and a given cruise condition are feasible to achieve a trimmed low-boom design. This process was motivated by the need to know whether a particular configuration at a given cruise condition could be reshaped to satisfy both low-boom and flight trim constraints. Without such a process, much effort could be wasted on shaping a configuration layout at a cruise condition that could never satisfy both low-boom and flight trim constraints simultaneously. The process helps to exclude infeasible configuration layouts with minimum effort and allows a designer to develop trimmed low-boom concepts more effectively. A notional low-boom supersonic demonstrator concept is used to illustrate the analysis/design process.

  15. Aeroelastic Analysis of SUGAR Truss-Braced Wing Wind-Tunnel Model Using FUN3D and a Nonlinear Structural Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert E.; Scott, Robert C.; Allen, Timothy J.; Sexton, Bradley W.

    2015-01-01

    Considerable attention has been given in recent years to the design of highly flexible aircraft. The results of numerous studies demonstrate the significant performance benefits of strut-braced wing (SBW) and trussbraced wing (TBW) configurations. Critical aspects of the TBW configuration are its larger aspect ratio, wing span and thinner wings. These aspects increase the importance of considering fluid/structure and control system coupling. This paper presents high-fidelity Navier-Stokes simulations of the dynamic response of the flexible Boeing Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research (SUGAR) truss-braced wing wind-tunnel model. The latest version of the SUGAR TBW finite element model (FEM), v.20, is used in the present simulations. Limit cycle oscillations (LCOs) of the TBW wing/strut/nacelle are simulated at angle-of-attack (AoA) values of -1, 0 and +1 degree. The modal data derived from nonlinear static aeroelastic MSC.Nastran solutions are used at AoAs of -1 and +1 degrees. The LCO amplitude is observed to be dependent on AoA. LCO amplitudes at -1 degree are larger than those at +1 degree. The LCO amplitude at zero degrees is larger than either -1 or +1 degrees. These results correlate well with both wind-tunnel data and the behavior observed in previous studies using linear aerodynamics. The LCO onset at zero degrees AoA has also been computed using unloaded v.20 FEM modes. While the v.20 model increases the dynamic pressure at which LCO onset is observed, it is found that the LCO onset at and above Mach 0.82 is much different than that produced by an earlier version of the FEM, v. 19.

  16. Trimming the UCERF2 hazard logic tree

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Porter, Keith A.; Field, Edward H.; Milner, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    The Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast 2 (UCERF2) is a fully time‐dependent earthquake rupture forecast developed with sponsorship of the California Earthquake Authority (Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities [WGCEP], 2007; Field et al., 2009). UCERF2 contains 480 logic‐tree branches reflecting choices among nine modeling uncertainties in the earthquake rate model shown in Figure 1. For seismic hazard analysis, it is also necessary to choose a ground‐motion‐prediction equation (GMPE) and set its parameters. Choosing among four next‐generation attenuation (NGA) relationships results in a total of 1920 hazard calculations per site. The present work is motivated by a desire to reduce the computational effort involved in a hazard analysis without understating uncertainty. We set out to assess which branching points of the UCERF2 logic tree contribute most to overall uncertainty, and which might be safely ignored (set to only one branch) without significantly biasing results or affecting some useful measure of uncertainty. The trimmed logic tree will have all of the original choices from the branching points that contribute significantly to uncertainty, but only one arbitrarily selected choice from the branching points that do not.

  17. StreamingTrim 1.0: a Java software for dynamic trimming of 16S rRNA sequence data from metagenetic studies.

    PubMed

    Bacci, G; Bazzicalupo, M; Benedetti, A; Mengoni, A

    2014-03-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies are extensively used in the field of molecular microbial ecology to describe taxonomic composition and to infer functionality of microbial communities. In particular, the so-called barcode or metagenetic applications that are based on PCR amplicon library sequencing are very popular at present. One of the problems, related to the utilization of the data of these libraries, is the analysis of reads quality and removal (trimming) of low-quality segments, while retaining sufficient information for subsequent analyses (e.g. taxonomic assignment). Here, we present StreamingTrim, a DNA reads trimming software, written in Java, with which researchers are able to analyse the quality of DNA sequences in fastq files and to search for low-quality zones in a very conservative way. This software has been developed with the aim to provide a tool capable of trimming amplicon library data, retaining as much as taxonomic information as possible. This software is equipped with a graphical user interface for a user-friendly usage. Moreover, from a computational point of view, StreamingTrim reads and analyses sequences one by one from an input fastq file, without keeping anything in memory, permitting to run the computation on a normal desktop PC or even a laptop. Trimmed sequences are saved in an output file, and a statistics summary is displayed that contains the mean and standard deviation of the length and quality of the whole sequence file. Compiled software, a manual and example data sets are available under the BSD-2-Clause License at the GitHub repository at https://github.com/GiBacci/StreamingTrim/.

  18. A numerical investigation of nonlinear aeroelastic effects on flexible high aspect ratio wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Joseph Avila

    2002-01-01

    A nonlinear aeroelastic analysis that couples a nonlinear structural model with an Euler/Navier-Stokes flow solver is developed for flexible high aspect ratio wings. To model the nonlinear structural characteristics of flexible high aspect ratio wings, a two-dimensional geometric nonlinear methodology, based on a 6 degree-of-freedom (DOF) beam finite element, is extended to three dimensions based on a 12 DOF beam finite element. The three-dimensional analysis is developed in order to capture the nonlinear torsion-bending coupling, which is not accounted for by the two-dimensional nonlinear methodology. Validation of the three-dimensional nonlinear structural approach against experimental data shows that the approach accurately predicts the geometric nonlinear bending and torsion due to bending for configurations of general interest. Torsion is slightly overpredicted in extreme cases and higher order modeling is then required. The three-dimensional nonlinear beam model is then coupled with an Euler/Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. Solving the equations numerically for the two nonlinear systems results in an increase in computational time and cost needed to perform the aeroelastic analysis. To improve the computational efficiency of the nonlinear aeroelastic analysis, the nonlinear structural approach uses a second-order accurate predictor-corrector methodology to solve for the displacements. Static aeroelastic results are presented for an unswept and swept high aspect ratio wing in the transonic flow regime, using the developed nonlinear aeroelastic methodology. Unswept wing results show a reversal in twist due to the nonlinear torsion-bending coupling effects. Specifically, the torsional moments due to drag become large enough to cause the wing twist rotations to washin the wing tips, while the linear results show a washout twist rotation. The nonlinear twist results are attributed to the large bending displacements coupled with the large

  19. Aeroelastic Stability and Response of Rotating Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Reddy, T. S. R.

    1998-01-01

    A summary of the work performed from 1996 to 1997 is presented. More details can be found in the cited references. This grant led to the development of aeroelastic analyses methods for predicting flutter and forced response in fans, compressors, and turbines using computational

  20. Aeroelastic Stability & Response of Rotating Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Reddy, T. S. R.

    2001-01-01

    A summary of the work performed under NASA grant NCC3-605 is presented. More details can be found in the cited references. This grant led to the development of relatively faster aeroelastic analyses methods for predicting flutter and forced response in fans, compressors, and turbines using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) methods.

  1. A homozygous mutation in TRIM36 causes autosomal recessive anencephaly in an Indian family.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nivedita; Kumble Bhat, Vishwanath; Tiwari, Ankana; Kodaganur, Srinivas G; Tontanahal, Sagar J; Sarda, Astha; Malini, K V; Kumar, Arun

    2017-01-13

    Anencephaly is characterized by the absence of brain tissues and cranium. During primary neurulation stage of the embryo, the rostral part of the neural pore fails to close, leading to anencephaly. Anencephaly shows a heterogeneous etiology, ranging from environmental to genetic causes. The autosomal recessive inheritance of anencephaly has been reported in several populations. In this study, we employed whole-exome sequencing and identified a homozygous missense mutation c.1522C>A (p.Pro508Thr) in the TRIM36 gene as the cause of autosomal recessive anencephaly (APH) in an Indian family. The TRIM36 gene is expressed in the developing brain, suggesting a role in neurogenesis. In silco analysis showed that proline at codon position 508 is highly conserved in 26 vertebrate species, and the mutation is predicted to affect the conformation of the B30.2/SPRY domain of TRIM36. Both in vitro and in vivo results showed that the mutation renders the TRIM36 protein less stable. TRIM36 is known to associate with microtubules. Transient expression of the mutant TRIM36 in HeLa and LN229 cells resulted in microtubule disruption, disorganized spindles, loosely arranged chromosomes, multiple spindles, abnormal cytokinesis, reduced cell proliferation and increased apoptosis as compared to cells transfected with its wild-type counterpart. The siRNA knock down of TRIM36 in HeLa and LN229 cells also led to reduced cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. We suggest that microtubule disruption and disorganized spindles mediated by mutant TRIM36 affect neural cell proliferation during neural tube formation, leading to anencephaly.

  2. Analyzing Aeroelastic Stability of a Tilt-Rotor Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvaternil, Raymond G.

    2006-01-01

    Proprotor Aeroelastic Stability Analysis, now at version 4.5 (PASTA 4.5), is a FORTRAN computer program for analyzing the aeroelastic stability of a tiltrotor aircraft in the airplane mode of flight. The program employs a 10-degree- of-freedom (DOF), discrete-coordinate, linear mathematical model of a rotor with three or more blades and its drive system coupled to a 10-DOF modal model of an airframe. The user can select which DOFs are included in the analysis. Quasi-steady strip-theory aerodynamics is employed for the aerodynamic loads on the blades, a quasi-steady representation is employed for the aerodynamic loads acting on the vibrational modes of the airframe, and a stability-derivative approach is used for the aerodynamics associated with the rigid-body DOFs of the airframe. Blade parameters that vary with the blade collective pitch can be obtained by interpolation from a user-defined table. Stability is determined by examining the eigenvalues that are obtained by solving the coupled equations of motions as a matrix eigenvalue problem. Notwithstanding the relative simplicity of its mathematical foundation, PASTA 4.5 and its predecessors have played key roles in a number of engineering investigations over the years.

  3. Development of Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap for Performance Adaptive Aeroelastic Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Kaul, Upender; Lebofsky, Sonia; Ting, Eric; Chaparro, Daniel; Urnes, James

    2015-01-01

    This paper summarizes the recent development of an adaptive aeroelastic wing shaping control technology called variable camber continuous trailing edge flap (VCCTEF). As wing flexibility increases, aeroelastic interactions with aerodynamic forces and moments become an increasingly important consideration in aircraft design and aerodynamic performance. Furthermore, aeroelastic interactions with flight dynamics can result in issues with vehicle stability and control. The initial VCCTEF concept was developed in 2010 by NASA under a NASA Innovation Fund study entitled "Elastically Shaped Future Air Vehicle Concept," which showed that highly flexible wing aerodynamic surfaces can be elastically shaped in-flight by active control of wing twist and bending deflection in order to optimize the spanwise lift distribution for drag reduction. A collaboration between NASA and Boeing Research & Technology was subsequently funded by NASA from 2012 to 2014 to further develop the VCCTEF concept. This paper summarizes some of the key research areas conducted by NASA during the collaboration with Boeing Research and Technology. These research areas include VCCTEF design concepts, aerodynamic analysis of VCCTEF camber shapes, aerodynamic optimization of lift distribution for drag minimization, wind tunnel test results for cruise and high-lift configurations, flutter analysis and suppression control of flexible wing aircraft, and multi-objective flight control for adaptive aeroelastic wing shaping control.

  4. A numerical investigation into the aerodynamic characteristics and aeroelastic stability of a footbridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, I. J.; Vezza, M.

    2009-01-01

    The results of a numerical investigation into the aerodynamic characteristics and aeroelastic stability of a proposed footbridge across a highway in the north of England are presented. The longer than usual span, along with the unusual nature of the pedestrian barriers, indicated that the deck configuration was likely to be beyond the reliable limits of the British design code BD 49/01. The calculations were performed using the discrete vortex method, DIVEX, developed at the Universities of Glasgow and Strathclyde. DIVEX has been successfully validated on a wide range of problems, including the aeroelastic response of bridge deck sections. In particular, the investigation focussed on the effects of non-standard pedestrian barriers on the structural integrity of the bridge. The proposed deck configuration incorporated a barrier comprised of angled flat plates, and the bridge was found to be unstable at low wind speeds, with the plates having a strong turning effect on the flow at the leading edge of the deck. These effects are highlighted in both a static and dynamic analysis of the bridge deck, along with modifications to the design that aim to improve the aeroelastic stability of the deck. Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) was also used to investigate the unsteady pressure field on the upper surface of the static bridge deck. The results of the flutter investigation and the POD analysis highlight the strong influence of the pedestrian barriers on the overall aerodynamic characteristics and aeroelastic stability of the bridge.

  5. Moving mass trim control system design

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, R.H.; Robinett, R.D.; Sturgis, B.R.

    1996-03-01

    This paper describes the design of a moving mass trim control system for maneuvering axisymmetric reentry vehicles. The moving mass trim controller is composed of three equal masses that are independently positioned in order to deliver a desired center of mass position. For a slowly spinning reentry vehicle, the mass offset creates a trim angle-of-attack to generate modest flight path corrections. The control system must maintain the desired position of each mass in the face of large disturbances. A novel algorithm for determining the desired mass positions is developed in conjunction with a preliminary controller design. The controller design is based on classical frequency domain techniques where a bound on the disturbance magnitude is used to formulate the disturbance rejection problem. Simulation results for the controller are presented for a typical reentry vehicle.

  6. trimAl: a tool for automated alignment trimming in large-scale phylogenetic analyses

    PubMed Central

    Capella-Gutiérrez, Salvador; Silla-Martínez, José M.; Gabaldón, Toni

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Multiple sequence alignments are central to many areas of bioinformatics. It has been shown that the removal of poorly aligned regions from an alignment increases the quality of subsequent analyses. Such an alignment trimming phase is complicated in large-scale phylogenetic analyses that deal with thousands of alignments. Here, we present trimAl, a tool for automated alignment trimming, which is especially suited for large-scale phylogenetic analyses. trimAl can consider several parameters, alone or in multiple combinations, for selecting the most reliable positions in the alignment. These include the proportion of sequences with a gap, the level of amino acid similarity and, if several alignments for the same set of sequences are provided, the level of consistency across different alignments. Moreover, trimAl can automatically select the parameters to be used in each specific alignment so that the signal-to-noise ratio is optimized. Availability: trimAl has been written in C++, it is portable to all platforms. trimAl is freely available for download (http://trimal.cgenomics.org) and can be used online through the Phylemon web server (http://phylemon2.bioinfo.cipf.es/). Supplementary Material is available at http://trimal.cgenomics.org/publications. Contact: tgabaldon@crg.es PMID:19505945

  7. Some observations on four current subjects related to aeroelastic stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashley, H.

    1978-01-01

    After introductory comments on the literature and the purposes of this paper, a table is presented summarizing the author's views on some currently solved vs partially unsolved problems related to aeroelastic stability. The term 'solved' is used in the practical sense that engineers are able to cope confidently with that problem during the process of structural design. Selected entries in the table are reviewed, partially to motivate the topics in the rest of the paper. The 'four current subjects' are chosen both for timeliness and because they are among the ongoing interests of the Stanford group. The first involves the prediction of linearized unsteady aerodynamic loads due to arbitrary motions of streamlined shapes. Some contributions by Edwards are refined, which were motivated by the requirements of active control system design. The second subject is nonlinear unsteady aerodynamics for the transonic regime. After describing a few useful developments from locally-linear theory and computational fluid dynamics, there is suggested an empirical procedure for interim-analysis purposes. The third and fourth subjects concern recent discoveries regarding the aeroelastic stability of large-aspect-ratio wings and wind turbines. The former work is mainly that of Petre and Boyd. The latter includes some of the author's own preliminary discoveries about the performance and dynamics of vertical-axis machines.

  8. Analytic investigation of helicopter rotor blade appended aeroelastic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielawa, Richard L.

    1984-01-01

    Analytic evaluations of four different passive aeroelastic devices appended to helicopter rotor blades are presented. The devices consist of a passive tuned tab, a control coupled tab, an all-flying tip and a harmonic dilational airfoil tip. Each device was conceived for improving either aerodynamic performance or reducing vibratory control loads or hub shears. The evaluation was performed using a comprehensive rotor aeroelastic analysis (the G400PA code with appropriate modifications), together with data for a realistic helicopter rotor blade (the UH-60A Blackhawk), in high speed flight (90 m/s, 175 kts). The results of this study show that significant performance (L/(D sub e)) gains can be achieved with the all-flying free tip. Results from the harmonic dilational airfoil tip show the potential for moderate improvements in L/(D sub e). Finally, the results for the passive tuned tab and the control coupled tab, as configured for this study, show these devices to be impractical. Sections are included which describe the operation of each device, the required G400PA modifications, and the detailed results obtained for each device.

  9. Recent Enhancements to the Development of CFD-Based Aeroelastic Reduced-Order Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.

    2007-01-01

    Recent enhancements to the development of CFD-based unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic reduced-order models (ROMs) are presented. These enhancements include the simultaneous application of structural modes as CFD input, static aeroelastic analysis using a ROM, and matched-point solutions using a ROM. The simultaneous application of structural modes as CFD input enables the computation of the unsteady aerodynamic state-space matrices with a single CFD execution, independent of the number of structural modes. The responses obtained from a simultaneous excitation of the CFD-based unsteady aerodynamic system are processed using system identification techniques in order to generate an unsteady aerodynamic state-space ROM. Once the unsteady aerodynamic state-space ROM is generated, a method for computing the static aeroelastic response using this unsteady aerodynamic ROM and a state-space model of the structure, is presented. Finally, a method is presented that enables the computation of matchedpoint solutions using a single ROM that is applicable over a range of dynamic pressures and velocities for a given Mach number. These enhancements represent a significant advancement of unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic ROM technology.

  10. Trim or Replace Impellers on Oversized Pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-09-01

    One in a series of tip sheets to help manufacturers optimize their industrial pumping systems. As a result of conservative engineering practices, pumps are often substantially larger than they need to be for an industrial plant's process requirements. Centrifugal pumps can often be oversized because of ''rounding up'', trying to accommodate gradual increases in pipe surface roughness and flow resistance over time, or anticipating future plant capacity expansions. In addition, the plant's pumping requirements might not have been clearly defined during the design phase. Because of this conservative approach, pumps can have operating points completely different from their design points. The pump head is often less than expected, while the flow rate is greater. This can cause cavitation and waste energy as the flow rate typically must be regulated with bypass or throttle control. Oversized and throttled pumps that produce excess pressure are excellent candidates for impeller replacement or ''trimming'', to save energy and reduce costs. Trimming involves machining the impeller to reduce its diameter. Trimming should be limited to about 75% of a pump's maximum impeller diameter, because excessive trimming can result in a mismatched impeller and casing. As the impeller diameter decreases, added clearance between the impeller and the fixed pump casing increases internal flow recirculation, causes head loss, and lowers pumping efficiency. For manufacturing standardization purposes, pump casings and shafts are designed to accommodate impellers in a range of sizes. Many pump manufacturers provide pump performance curves that indicate how various models will perform with different impeller diameters or trims. The impeller should not be trimmed any smaller than the minimum diameter shown on the curve. Net positive suction head requirements (NPSHR) usually decrease at lower flow rates and can increase at the higher end of the pump head curve. The NPSHR at a given flow rate will

  11. TRIM32 — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    From NCBI Gene: The protein encoded by this gene is a member of the tripartite motif (TRIM) family. The TRIM motif includes three zinc-binding domains, a RING, a B-box type 1 and a B-box type 2, and a coiled-coil region. The protein localizes to cytoplasmic bodies. The protein has also been localized to the nucleus, where it interacts with the activation domain of the HIV-1 Tat protein. The Tat protein activates transcription of HIV-1 genes. [provided by RefSeq, Jul 2008

  12. TRIM22 — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    From NCBI Gene: The protein encoded by this gene is a member of the tripartite motif (TRIM) family. The TRIM motif includes three zinc-binding domains, a RING, a B-box type 1 and a B-box type 2, and a coiled-coil region. This protein localizes to the cytoplasm and its expression is induced by interferon. The protein down-regulates transcription from the HIV-1 LTR promoter region, suggesting that function of this protein may be to mediate interferon's antiviral effects. Alternative splicing results in multiple transcript variants. [provided by RefSeq, Dec 2010

  13. A Taguchi study of the aeroelastic tailoring design process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohlmann, Jonathan D.; Scott, Robert C.

    1991-01-01

    A Taguchi study was performed to determine the important players in the aeroelastic tailoring design process and to find the best composition of the optimization's objective function. The Wing Aeroelastic Synthesis Procedure (TSO) was used to ascertain the effects that factors such as composite laminate constraints, roll effectiveness constraints, and built-in wing twist and camber have on the optimum, aeroelastically tailored wing skin design. The results show the Taguchi method to be a viable engineering tool for computational inquiries, and provide some valuable lessons about the practice of aeroelastic tailoring.

  14. An analytical study of effects of aeroelasticity on control effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehrotra, S. C.

    1975-01-01

    Structural influence coefficients were calculated for various wing planforms using the KU Aeroelastic and NASTRAN programs. The resulting matrices are compared with experimental results. Conclusions are given.

  15. TRIM37 promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Cheng-En; Gan, Jun

    2017-01-01

    There is substantial research on the oncogenic role of tripartite motif containing 37 (TRIM37); however, its importance in colorectal cancer (CRC) remains to be elucidated. The present study used reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry and western blotting to detect the expression level of TRIM37 in CRC. The importance of TRIM37 in cell proliferation, invasion and metastasis of CRC were investigated through overexpressing or knocking-down of TRIM37 in CRC cell lines, to observe its function. The present study revealed that TRIM37 was overexpressed in human CRC tissues. High TRIM37 expression resulted in increased CRC proliferation, migration and invasion. Mechanistically, it was confirmed that TRIM37 enhanced invasion and metastasis of CRC via the epithelial-mesenchymal transition pathway. In conclusion, the present study suggested that TRIM3 may contribute to CRC and act as a potential therapeutic target for CRC treatment. PMID:28098873

  16. TRIM16 acts as an E3 ubiquitin ligase and can heterodimerize with other TRIM family members.

    PubMed

    Bell, Jessica L; Malyukova, Alena; Holien, Jessica K; Koach, Jessica; Parker, Michael W; Kavallaris, Maria; Marshall, Glenn M; Cheung, Belamy B

    2012-01-01

    The TRIM family of proteins is distinguished by its tripartite motif (TRIM). Typically, TRIM proteins contain a RING finger domain, one or two B-box domains, a coiled-coil domain and the more variable C-terminal domains. TRIM16 does not have a RING domain but does harbour two B-box domains. Here we showed that TRIM16 homodimerized through its coiled-coil domain and heterodimerized with other TRIM family members; TRIM24, Promyelocytic leukaemia (PML) protein and Midline-1 (MID1). Although, TRIM16 has no classic RING domain, three-dimensional modelling of TRIM16 suggested that its B-box domains adopts RING-like folds leading to the hypothesis that TRIM16 acts as an ubiquitin ligase. Consistent with this hypothesis, we demonstrated that TRIM16, devoid of a classical RING domain had auto-polyubiquitination activity and acted as an E3 ubiquitin ligase in vivo and in vitro assays. Thus via its unique structure, TRIM16 possesses both heterodimerization function with other TRIM proteins and also has E3 ubiquitin ligase activity.

  17. Aeroelastic flutter produces hummingbird feather songs.

    PubMed

    Clark, Christopher J; Elias, Damian O; Prum, Richard O

    2011-09-09

    During courtship flights, males of some hummingbird species produce diverse sounds with tail feathers of varying shapes. We show that these sounds are produced by air flowing past a feather, causing it to aeroelastically flutter and generate flutter-induced sound. Scanning laser doppler vibrometery and high-speed video of individual feathers of different sizes and shapes in a wind tunnel revealed multiple vibratory modes that produce a range of acoustic frequencies and harmonic structures. Neighboring feathers can be aerodynamically coupled and flutter either at the same frequency, resulting in sympathetic vibrations that increase loudness, or at different frequencies, resulting in audible interaction frequencies. Aeroelastic flutter is intrinsic to stiff airfoils such as feathers and thus explains tonal sounds that are common in bird flight.

  18. 16 CFR 303.12 - Trimmings of household textile articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Trimmings of household textile articles. 303... household textile articles. (a) Trimmings incorporated in articles of wearing apparel and other household textile articles may, among other forms of trim, include: (1) Rick-rack, tape, belting, binding,...

  19. 16 CFR 303.12 - Trimmings of household textile articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Trimmings of household textile articles. 303... household textile articles. (a) Trimmings incorporated in articles of wearing apparel and other household textile articles may, among other forms of trim, include: (1) Rick-rack, tape, belting, binding,...

  20. 16 CFR 303.12 - Trimmings of household textile articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Trimmings of household textile articles. 303... household textile articles. (a) Trimmings incorporated in articles of wearing apparel and other household textile articles may, among other forms of trim, include: (1) Rick-rack, tape, belting, binding,...

  1. 16 CFR 303.12 - Trimmings of household textile articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Trimmings of household textile articles. 303... household textile articles. (a) Trimmings incorporated in articles of wearing apparel and other household textile articles may, among other forms of trim, include: (1) Rick-rack, tape, belting, binding,...

  2. 16 CFR 303.12 - Trimmings of household textile articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Trimmings of household textile articles. 303... CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER THE TEXTILE FIBER PRODUCTS IDENTIFICATION ACT § 303.12 Trimmings of household textile articles. (a) Trimmings incorporated in articles of wearing apparel and other...

  3. 7 CFR 51.585 - Fairly well trimmed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fairly well trimmed. 51.585 Section 51.585 Agriculture..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Celery Definitions § 51.585 Fairly well trimmed. Fairly well trimmed means that the main root has been cut off so that it does not extend more than...

  4. 14 CFR 23.255 - Out of trim characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Out of trim characteristics. 23.255 Section... Requirements § 23.255 Out of trim characteristics. For airplanes with an MD greater than M 0.6 and that incorporate a trimmable horizontal stabilizer, the following requirements for out-of-trim...

  5. 7 CFR 51.585 - Fairly well trimmed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fairly well trimmed. 51.585 Section 51.585 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Celery Definitions § 51.585 Fairly well trimmed. Fairly well trimmed means that the main...

  6. 30 CFR 56.9314 - Trimming stockpile and muckpile faces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Trimming stockpile and muckpile faces. 56.9314... Dumping Sites § 56.9314 Trimming stockpile and muckpile faces. Stockpile and muckpile faces shall be trimmed to prevent hazards to persons....

  7. 30 CFR 57.9314 - Trimming stockpile and muckpile faces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Trimming stockpile and muckpile faces. 57.9314... Dumping Sites § 57.9314 Trimming stockpile and muckpile faces. Stockpile and muckpile faces shall be trimmed to prevent hazards to persons....

  8. 7 CFR 51.585 - Fairly well trimmed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fairly well trimmed. 51.585 Section 51.585 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Celery Definitions § 51.585 Fairly well trimmed. Fairly well trimmed means that the main...

  9. 14 CFR 23.255 - Out of trim characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Out of trim characteristics. 23.255 Section... Requirements § 23.255 Out of trim characteristics. For airplanes with an MD greater than M 0.6 and that incorporate a trimmable horizontal stabilizer, the following requirements for out-of-trim...

  10. 14 CFR 23.407 - Trim tab effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Trim tab effects. 23.407 Section 23.407... Loads § 23.407 Trim tab effects. The effects of trim tabs on the control surface design conditions must... deflections must correspond to the maximum degree of “out of trim” expected at the speed for the...

  11. 30 CFR 56.9314 - Trimming stockpile and muckpile faces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Trimming stockpile and muckpile faces. 56.9314... Dumping Sites § 56.9314 Trimming stockpile and muckpile faces. Stockpile and muckpile faces shall be trimmed to prevent hazards to persons....

  12. 14 CFR 23.407 - Trim tab effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Trim tab effects. 23.407 Section 23.407... Loads § 23.407 Trim tab effects. The effects of trim tabs on the control surface design conditions must... deflections must correspond to the maximum degree of “out of trim” expected at the speed for the...

  13. 14 CFR 23.255 - Out of trim characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Out of trim characteristics. 23.255 Section... Out of trim characteristics. For airplanes with an MD greater than M 0.6 and that incorporate a trimmable horizontal stabilizer, the following requirements for out-of-trim characteristics apply: (a)...

  14. 14 CFR 25.407 - Trim tab effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Trim tab effects. 25.407 Section 25.407... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.407 Trim tab effects. The effects of trim tabs on the control surface design conditions must be accounted for only where...

  15. 30 CFR 57.9314 - Trimming stockpile and muckpile faces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Trimming stockpile and muckpile faces. 57.9314... Dumping Sites § 57.9314 Trimming stockpile and muckpile faces. Stockpile and muckpile faces shall be trimmed to prevent hazards to persons....

  16. 30 CFR 56.9314 - Trimming stockpile and muckpile faces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Trimming stockpile and muckpile faces. 56.9314... Dumping Sites § 56.9314 Trimming stockpile and muckpile faces. Stockpile and muckpile faces shall be trimmed to prevent hazards to persons....

  17. 30 CFR 56.9314 - Trimming stockpile and muckpile faces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Trimming stockpile and muckpile faces. 56.9314... Dumping Sites § 56.9314 Trimming stockpile and muckpile faces. Stockpile and muckpile faces shall be trimmed to prevent hazards to persons....

  18. 14 CFR 23.407 - Trim tab effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Trim tab effects. 23.407 Section 23.407... Loads § 23.407 Trim tab effects. The effects of trim tabs on the control surface design conditions must... deflections must correspond to the maximum degree of “out of trim” expected at the speed for the...

  19. Tri-M: Try it; You'll Like it!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beelendorf, Pierre

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Tri-M Music Honor Society that is for middle/junior high and senior high school students. Discusses what having a Tri-M Society can do for a music department and the benefits of having a Tri-M Society. Includes information on starting the society, a history, and Web sites. (CMK)

  20. 30 CFR 57.9314 - Trimming stockpile and muckpile faces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Trimming stockpile and muckpile faces. 57.9314... Dumping Sites § 57.9314 Trimming stockpile and muckpile faces. Stockpile and muckpile faces shall be trimmed to prevent hazards to persons....

  1. 14 CFR 23.407 - Trim tab effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Trim tab effects. 23.407 Section 23.407... Loads § 23.407 Trim tab effects. The effects of trim tabs on the control surface design conditions must... deflections must correspond to the maximum degree of “out of trim” expected at the speed for the...

  2. 14 CFR 23.407 - Trim tab effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Trim tab effects. 23.407 Section 23.407... Loads § 23.407 Trim tab effects. The effects of trim tabs on the control surface design conditions must... deflections must correspond to the maximum degree of “out of trim” expected at the speed for the...

  3. 14 CFR 25.407 - Trim tab effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Trim tab effects. 25.407 Section 25.407... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.407 Trim tab effects. The effects of trim tabs on the control surface design conditions must be accounted for only where...

  4. 14 CFR 25.407 - Trim tab effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Trim tab effects. 25.407 Section 25.407... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.407 Trim tab effects. The effects of trim tabs on the control surface design conditions must be accounted for only where...

  5. 30 CFR 57.9314 - Trimming stockpile and muckpile faces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Trimming stockpile and muckpile faces. 57.9314... Dumping Sites § 57.9314 Trimming stockpile and muckpile faces. Stockpile and muckpile faces shall be trimmed to prevent hazards to persons....

  6. 14 CFR 25.407 - Trim tab effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Trim tab effects. 25.407 Section 25.407... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.407 Trim tab effects. The effects of trim tabs on the control surface design conditions must be accounted for only where...

  7. 30 CFR 56.9314 - Trimming stockpile and muckpile faces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Trimming stockpile and muckpile faces. 56.9314... Dumping Sites § 56.9314 Trimming stockpile and muckpile faces. Stockpile and muckpile faces shall be trimmed to prevent hazards to persons....

  8. 14 CFR 25.407 - Trim tab effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Trim tab effects. 25.407 Section 25.407... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.407 Trim tab effects. The effects of trim tabs on the control surface design conditions must be accounted for only where...

  9. 7 CFR 51.585 - Fairly well trimmed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fairly well trimmed. 51.585 Section 51.585 Agriculture..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Celery Definitions § 51.585 Fairly well trimmed. Fairly well trimmed means that the main root has been cut off so that it does not extend more than...

  10. 7 CFR 51.585 - Fairly well trimmed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fairly well trimmed. 51.585 Section 51.585 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Celery Definitions § 51.585 Fairly well trimmed. Fairly well trimmed means that the main...

  11. 30 CFR 57.9314 - Trimming stockpile and muckpile faces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Trimming stockpile and muckpile faces. 57.9314... Dumping Sites § 57.9314 Trimming stockpile and muckpile faces. Stockpile and muckpile faces shall be trimmed to prevent hazards to persons....

  12. Identification of TRIM22 as a progesterone-responsive gene in Ishikawa endometrial cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Saito-Kanatani, Mayuko; Urano, Tomohiko; Hiroi, Hisahiko; Momoeda, Mikio; Ito, Masanori; Fujii, Tomoyuki; Inoue, Satoshi

    2015-11-01

    Progesterone plays important roles in implantation and maintains pregnancy. It antagonizes estrogen-mediated cell proliferation and promotes differentiation in the uterus. The action of progesterone is mediated by specific receptors, namely, the progesterone receptors (PRs). We generated two Ishikawa cell clones stably expressing PR isoform A (PR-A) and identified progesterone-responsive genes using cDNA microarray analysis. Fifteen genes were identified as progesterone-responsive gene candidates by microarray analysis and their progesterone-responsiveness was shown by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis. Out of these 15 genes, we focused on TRIM22. A database search revealed a progesterone response element (PRE) located from the -25 to -11 bp region upstream of TRIM22 exon 1. This PRE had a 1-bp mismatch in the consensus PRE sequence. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed that the interaction of PR with the TRIM22 PRE region increased in a hormone-dependent manner. The progesterone-dependent enhancer activity of TRIM22 PRE was demonstrated using a luciferase assay. Based on these results, we propose that TRIM22 is a direct target gene of PR and that it can mediate progesterone actions in uterine cells.

  13. Advanced Aeroelastic Technologies for Turbomachinery Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, Kenneth; Srivastava, Rakesh; Reddy, T. S. R.

    2004-01-01

    A summary of the work performed under the grant NCC-1068 is presented. More details can be found in the cited references. The summary is presented in two parts to represent two areas of research. In the first part, methods to analyze a high temperature ceramic guide vane subjected to cooling jets are presented, and in the second part, the effect of unsteady aerodynamic forces on aeroelastic stability as implemented into the turbo-REDUCE code are presented

  14. Effects of Beak Trimming on Pecking Force

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beak trimming in the production laying hen has come under great scrutiny by welfare and consumer advocacy groups as a potential source of acute and chronic pain as well as having the potential to inhibit the freedom to express normal behaviors such as feeding behaviors. Although several studies have...

  15. 14 CFR 23.161 - Trim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... maintain lateral and directional trim in level flight with the landing gear and wing flaps retracted as... following conditions: (1) A climb with— (i) Takeoff power, landing gear retracted, wing flaps in the takeoff... continuous power; (3) The landing gear retracted; (4) Wing flaps retracted; and (5) An angle of bank of...

  16. 14 CFR 23.161 - Trim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... maintain lateral and directional trim in level flight with the landing gear and wing flaps retracted as... following conditions: (1) A climb with— (i) Takeoff power, landing gear retracted, wing flaps in the takeoff... continuous power; (3) The landing gear retracted; (4) Wing flaps retracted; and (5) An angle of bank of...

  17. 14 CFR 23.161 - Trim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... maintain lateral and directional trim in level flight with the landing gear and wing flaps retracted as... following conditions: (1) A climb with— (i) Takeoff power, landing gear retracted, wing flaps in the takeoff... continuous power; (3) The landing gear retracted; (4) Wing flaps retracted; and (5) An angle of bank of...

  18. 14 CFR 23.161 - Trim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... maintain lateral and directional trim in level flight with the landing gear and wing flaps retracted as... following conditions: (1) A climb with— (i) Takeoff power, landing gear retracted, wing flaps in the takeoff... continuous power; (3) The landing gear retracted; (4) Wing flaps retracted; and (5) An angle of bank of...

  19. 14 CFR 23.161 - Trim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... maintain lateral and directional trim in level flight with the landing gear and wing flaps retracted as... following conditions: (1) A climb with— (i) Takeoff power, landing gear retracted, wing flaps in the takeoff... continuous power; (3) The landing gear retracted; (4) Wing flaps retracted; and (5) An angle of bank of...

  20. Building Trades. Block VIII. Interior Trim.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Vocational Instructional Services.

    This curriculum for interior trim provides instructional materials for 18 informational and manipulative lessons. A list of 11 references precedes the course materials. The instructor's plan for each informational lesson begins by providing this information: subject, aim, required teaching aids, required materials, references, and prerequisite…

  1. Development of Reduced-Order Models for Aeroelastic and Flutter Prediction Using the CFL3Dv6.0 Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Bartels, Robert E.

    2002-01-01

    A reduced-order model (ROM) is developed for aeroelastic analysis using the CFL3D version 6.0 computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, recently developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. This latest version of the flow solver includes a deforming mesh capability, a modal structural definition for nonlinear aeroelastic analyses, and a parallelization capability that provides a significant increase in computational efficiency. Flutter results for the AGARD 445.6 Wing computed using CFL3D v6.0 are presented, including discussion of associated computational costs. Modal impulse responses of the unsteady aerodynamic system are then computed using the CFL3Dv6 code and transformed into state-space form. Important numerical issues associated with the computation of the impulse responses are presented. The unsteady aerodynamic state-space ROM is then combined with a state-space model of the structure to create an aeroelastic simulation using the MATLAB/SIMULINK environment. The MATLAB/SIMULINK ROM is used to rapidly compute aeroelastic transients including flutter. The ROM shows excellent agreement with the aeroelastic analyses computed using the CFL3Dv6.0 code directly.

  2. Overview of the Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heeg, Jennifer; Chwalowski, Pawel; Florance, Jennifer P.; Wieseman, Carol D.; Schuster, David M.; Perry, Raleigh B.

    2013-01-01

    The Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop brought together an international community of computational fluid dynamicists as a step in defining the state of the art in computational aeroelasticity. This workshop's technical focus was prediction of unsteady pressure distributions resulting from forced motion, benchmarking the results first using unforced system data. The most challenging aspects of the physics were identified as capturing oscillatory shock behavior, dynamic shock-induced separated flow and tunnel wall boundary layer influences. The majority of the participants used unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes codes. These codes were exercised at transonic Mach numbers for three configurations and comparisons were made with existing experimental data. Substantial variations were observed among the computational solutions as well as differences relative to the experimental data. Contributing issues to these differences include wall effects and wall modeling, non-standardized convergence criteria, inclusion of static aeroelastic deflection, methodology for oscillatory solutions, post-processing methods. Contributing issues pertaining principally to the experimental data sets include the position of the model relative to the tunnel wall, splitter plate size, wind tunnel expansion slot configuration, spacing and location of pressure instrumentation, and data processing methods.

  3. Technical activities of the configuration aeroelasticity branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Stanley R. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    A number of recent technical activities of the Configuration Aeroelasticity Branch of the NASA Langley Research Center are discussed in detail. The information on the research branch is compiled in twelve separate papers. The first of these topics is a summary of the purpose of the branch, including a full description of the branch and its associated projects and program efforts. The next ten papers cover specific projects and are as follows: Experimental transonic flutter characteristics of supersonic cruise configurations; Aeroelastic effects of spoiler surfaces mounted on a low aspect ratio rectangular wing; Planform curvature effects on flutter of 56 degree swept wing determined in Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT); An introduction to rotorcraft testing in TDT; Rotorcraft vibration reduction research at the TDT; A preliminary study to determine the effects of tip geometry on the flutter of aft swept wings; Aeroelastic models program; NACA 0012 pressure model and test plan; Investigation of the use of extension twist coupling in composite rotor blades; and Improved finite element methods for rotorcraft structures. The final paper describes the primary facility operation by the branch, the Langley TDT.

  4. Adaptive neural control of aeroelastic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenwalner, Peter F.; Little, Gerald R.; Scott, Robert C.

    1996-05-01

    The Adaptive Neural Control of Aeroelastic Response (ANCAR) program is a joint research and development effort conducted by McDonnell Douglas Aerospace (MDA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC) under a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA). The purpose of the MOA is to cooperatively develop the smart structure technologies necessary for alleviating undesirable vibration and aeroelastic response associated with highly flexible structures. Adaptive control can reduce aeroelastic response associated with buffet and atmospheric turbulence, it can increase flutter margins, and it may be able to reduce response associated with nonlinear phenomenon like limit cycle oscillations. By reducing vibration levels and loads, aircraft structures can have lower acquisition cost, reduced maintenance, and extended lifetimes. Phase I of the ANCAR program involved development and demonstration of a neural network-based semi-adaptive flutter suppression system which used a neural network for scheduling control laws as a function of Mach number and dynamic pressure. This controller was tested along with a robust fixed-gain control law in NASA's Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) utilizing the Benchmark Active Controls Testing (BACT) wing. During Phase II, a fully adaptive on-line learning neural network control system has been developed for flutter suppression which will be tested in 1996. This paper presents the results of Phase I testing as well as the development progress of Phase II.

  5. 76 FR 72978 - Premier Trim, LLC, Spectrum Trim, LLC and Grant Products International, Inc. D/B/A Spectrum Grant...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... Employment and Training Administration Premier Trim, LLC, Spectrum Trim, LLC and Grant Products International, Inc. D/B/A Spectrum Grant De Mexico Including Workers Whose Unemployment Insurance (UI) Wages Are Paid..., LLC and Spectrum Trim, LLC, d/b/a Spectrum Grant De Mexico, Manufacturing Division, including...

  6. Fracture Profile and Crack Propagation of Ultra-High Strength Hot-Stamped Boron Steel During Mechanical Trimming Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xianhong; Yang, Kun; Chen, Sisi; Chen, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Mechanical trimming process for ultra-high strength boron steel after hot stamping was carried out in this study. Shear and tensile tests were designed to analyze the influences of stress state on the fracture mode; trimmed fracture surface and profile were observed and compared to other commonly used steels such as DP980 and Q235 etc.; the crack propagation during trimming process was studied through step-by-step tests. The observation and analysis reveal that the fracture mode of hot-stamped boron steel is highly related to the stress state, it belongs to cleavage fracture on low stress triaxiality but dimple fracture on high stress triaxiality. Such phenomenon is reflected in the trimming process, during which the stress state changes from shear-dominated state to tensile-dominated state. In addition, the burnish zone of trimmed boron steel is much smaller than other high strength steels, and the profile of cutting surface shows an `S'-like shape which is destructive to the trimming tool. Moreover, during the trimming process, most martensite laths near the cutting edge are stretched and rotated markedly to the direction of the shear band, and the main crack expands along those grain boundaries, which may penetrate through a few martensite laths and form small crack branches.

  7. TRIM4; a novel mitochondrial interacting RING E3 ligase, sensitizes the cells to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Dhanendra; Prajapati, Paresh; Lavie, Julie; Singh, Kritarth; Lakshmi, Sripada; Bhatelia, Khyati; Roy, Milton; Singh, Rochika; Bénard, Giovanni; Singh, Rajesh

    2015-12-01

    The emerging evidences suggest that posttranslational modification of target protein by ubiquitin (Ub) not only regulate its turnover through ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) but is a critical regulator of various signaling pathways. During ubiquitination, E3 ligase recognizes the target protein and determines the topology of ubiquitin chains. In current study, we studied the role of TRIM4, a member of the TRIM/RBCC protein family of RING E3 ligase, in regulation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced cell death. TRIM4 is expressed differentially in human tissues and expressed in most of the analyzed human cancer cell lines. The subcellular localization studies showed that TRIM4 forms distinct cytoplasmic speckle like structures which transiently interacts with mitochondria. The expression of TRIM4 induces mitochondrial aggregation and increased level of mitochondrial ROS in the presence of H2O2. It sensitizes the cells to H2O2 induced death whereas knockdown reversed the effect. TRIM4 potentiates the loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential and cytochrome c release in the presence of H2O2. The analysis of TRIM4 interacting proteins showed its interaction with peroxiredoxin 1 (PRX1), including other proteins involved in regulation of mitochondrial and redox homeostasis. TRIM4 interaction with PRX1 is critical for the regulation of H2O2 induced cell death. Collectively, the evidences in the current study suggest the role of TRIM4 in regulation of oxidative stress induced cell death.

  8. Performance of the trim and fill method in the presence of publication bias and between-study heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Peters, Jaime L; Sutton, Alex J; Jones, David R; Abrams, Keith R; Rushton, Lesley

    2007-11-10

    The trim and fill method allows estimation of an adjusted meta-analysis estimate in the presence of publication bias. To date, the performance of the trim and fill method has had little assessment. In this paper, we provide a more comprehensive examination of different versions of the trim and fill method in a number of simulated meta-analysis scenarios, comparing results with those from usual unadjusted meta-analysis models and two simple alternatives, namely use of the estimate from: (i) the largest; or (ii) the most precise study in the meta-analysis. Findings suggest a great deal of variability in the performance of the different approaches. When there is large between-study heterogeneity the trim and fill method can underestimate the true positive effect when there is no publication bias. However, when publication bias is present the trim and fill method can give estimates that are less biased than the usual meta-analysis models. Although results suggest that the use of the estimate from the largest or most precise study seems a reasonable approach in the presence of publication bias, when between-study heterogeneity exists our simulations show that these estimates are quite biased. We conclude that in the presence of publication bias use of the trim and fill method can help to reduce the bias in pooled estimates, even though the performance of this method is not ideal. However, because we do not know whether funnel plot asymmetry is truly caused by publication bias, and because there is great variability in the performance of different trim and fill estimators and models in various meta-analysis scenarios, we recommend use of the trim and fill method as a form of sensitivity analysis as intended by the authors of the method.

  9. Aeroelastic modeling of rotor blades with spanwise variable elastic axis offset: Classic issues revisited and new formulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielawa, Richard L.

    1988-01-01

    In response to a systematic methodology assessment program directed to the aeroelastic stability of hingeless helicopter rotor blades, improved basic aeroelastic reformulations and new formulations relating to structural sweep were achieved. Correlational results are presented showing the substantially improved performance of the G400 aeroelastic analysis incorporating these new formulations. The formulations pertain partly to sundry solutions to classic problem areas, relating to dynamic inflow with vortex-ring state operation and basic blade kinematics, but mostly to improved physical modeling of elastic axis offset (structural sweep) in the presence of nonlinear structural twist. Specific issues addressed are an alternate modeling of the delta EI torsional excitation due to compound bending using a force integration approach, and the detailed kinematic representation of an elastically deflected point mass of a beam with both structural sweep and nonlinear twist.

  10. Aeroelastic Tailoring with Composites Applied to Forward Swept Wings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-01

    wings a viable configo.-tion option for high perfotmance aircraft. Forward swept wings have an inherent -.endency to encounter a static aeroelastic...configuration option for high performance aircraft. Forward swept wings have an inherent tendency to encounter a static aeroelastic instability ialled divergence...conventional and super- critical airfoils. ....... ..................... 19 12 Static methods for subcritical divergence dynamic pressure projection. (a

  11. Trim69 regulates zebrafish brain development by ap-1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ruiqin; Wang, Renxian; Zhao, Qing; Han, Yongqing; Zong, Shudong; Miao, Shiying; Song, Wei; Wang, Linfang

    2016-01-01

    Proteins belonging to the TRIM family have been implicated in a variety of cellular processes such as apoptosis, differentiation, neurogenesis, muscular physiology and innate immune responses. Trim69, previously identified as a novel gene cloned from a human testis cDNA library, has a homologous gene in zebrafish and this study focused on investigating the function of trim69 in zebrafish neurogenesis. Trim69 was found to be expressed in zebrafish embryo brain at the early stages. Knockdown of trim69 led to deformed brain development, obvious signs of apoptosis present in the head, and decreased expression of neuronal differentiation and stem cell markers. This phenotype was rescued upon co-injection of human mRNA together along with the trim69 knockdown. Results of this study also showed an interaction between TRIM69 and c-Jun in human cells, and upon TRIM69 knock down c-Jun expression subsequently increased, whereas the over-expression of TRIM69 led to the down-regulation of c-Jun. Additionally, knockdown both c-Jun and trim69 can rescue the deformed brain, evident cellular apoptosis in the head and decreased expression of neuronal differentiation and stem cell markers. Overall, our results support a role for trim69 in the development of the zebrafish brain through ap-1 pathway. PMID:27050765

  12. Unsteady Aerodynamic Validation Experiences From the Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heeg, Jennifer; Chawlowski, Pawel

    2014-01-01

    The AIAA Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop (AePW) was held in April 2012, bringing together communities of aeroelasticians, computational fluid dynamicists and experimentalists. The extended objective was to assess the state of the art in computational aeroelastic methods as practical tools for the prediction of static and dynamic aeroelastic phenomena. As a step in this process, workshop participants analyzed unsteady aerodynamic and weakly-coupled aeroelastic cases. Forced oscillation and unforced system experiments and computations have been compared for three configurations. This paper emphasizes interpretation of the experimental data, computational results and their comparisons from the perspective of validation of unsteady system predictions. The issues examined in detail are variability introduced by input choices for the computations, post-processing, and static aeroelastic modeling. The final issue addressed is interpreting unsteady information that is present in experimental data that is assumed to be steady, and the resulting consequences on the comparison data sets.

  13. Optimal design application on the advanced aeroelastic rotor blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, F. S.; Jones, R.

    1985-01-01

    The vibration and performance optimization procedure using regression analysis was successfully applied to an advanced aeroelastic blade design study. The major advantage of this regression technique is that multiple optimizations can be performed to evaluate the effects of various objective functions and constraint functions. The data bases obtained from the rotorcraft flight simulation program C81 and Myklestad mode shape program are analytically determined as a function of each design variable. This approach has been verified for various blade radial ballast weight locations and blade planforms. This method can also be utilized to ascertain the effect of a particular cost function which is composed of several objective functions with different weighting factors for various mission requirements without any additional effort.

  14. Coupled nonlinear aeroelasticity and flight dynamics of fully flexible aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Weihua

    of the framework. Gust responses of the Flying-Wing configuration subject to stall effects are investigated. A bilinear torsional stiffness model is introduced to study the skin wrinkling due to large bending curvature of the Flying-Wing. The numerical studies illustrate the improvements of the existing reduced-order formulation with new capabilities of both structural modeling and coupled aeroelastic and flight dynamic analysis of fully flexible aircraft.

  15. Boiler Control Systems Oxygen Trim Systems Manual.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    measurement , and how these measurements can be used to improve the boiler efficiency. Section 4.0 identifies the various combustion air trim systems that can...with the oxygen in air to form various gases, the formation of which results in the release of large amounts of heat referred to as the heat of...method of combustion optimization is just as effective. Carbon monoxide concentration is independent of excess air and is a direct measure of

  16. TRIMS: Validating T2 Molecular Effects for Neutrino Mass Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ying-Ting; Bodine, Laura; Enomoto, Sanshiro; Kallander, Matthew; Machado, Eric; Parno, Diana; Robertson, Hamish; Trims Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The upcoming KATRIN and Project 8 experiments will measure the model-independent effective neutrino mass through the kinematics near the endpoint of tritium beta-decay. A critical systematic, however, is the understanding of the molecular final-state distribution populated by tritium decay. In fact, the current theory incorporated in the KATRIN analysis framework predicts an observable that disagrees with an experimental result from the 1950s. The Tritium Recoil-Ion Mass Spectrometer (TRIMS) experiment will reexamine branching ratio of the molecular tritium (T2) beta decay to the bound state (3HeT+). TRIMS consists of a magnet-guided time-of-flight mass spectrometer with a detector located on each end. By measuring the kinetic energy and time-of-flight difference of the ions and beta particles reaching the detectors, we will be able to distinguish molecular ions from atomic ones and hence derive the ratio in question.We will give an update on simulation software, analysis tools, and the apparatus, including early commissioning results. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, Award Number DE-FG02-97ER41020.

  17. Teaching Real Data Interpretation with Models (TRIM): Analysis of Student Dialogue in a Large-Enrollment Cell and Developmental Biology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zagallo, Patricia; Meddleton, Shanice; Bolger, Molly S.

    2016-01-01

    We present our design for a cell biology course to integrate content with scientific practices, specifically data interpretation and model-based reasoning. A 2-year research project within this course allowed us to understand how students interpret authentic biological data in this setting. Through analysis of written work, we measured the extent…

  18. Aircraft interior noise models - Sidewall trim, stiffened structures, and cabin acoustics with floor partition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, L. D.; Wilby, E. G.; Willis, C. M.; Mayes, W. H.

    1983-01-01

    As part of the continuing development of an aircraft interior noise prediction model, in which a discrete modal representation and power flow analysis are used, theoretical results are considered for inclusion of sidewall trim, stiffened structures, and cabin acoustics with floor partition. For validation purposes, predictions of the noise reductions for three test articles (a bare ring-stringer stiffened cylinder, an unstiffened cylinder with floor and insulation, and a ring-stringer stiffened cylinder with floor and sidewall trim) are compared with measurements.

  19. Solution found to chronic trim damage

    SciTech Connect

    Smirl, P.A.; Edwards, T.W.

    1997-09-01

    For some time, 2-inch single-stage gas-pressure letdown valve trim at a large Mideast oil and gas production facility suffered severe erosion damage, and experienced noise/vibration problems both within the valves themselves and the downstream piping. It was determined that the trim erosion which caused the problem was due to high oxide corrosion products from the upstream piping passing at high velocity (1,020 ft/sec) through the single-stage, drilled-hole-cage valve trim. This was also the source of the noise/vibration problems. Since it takes into account fluid density, it has been established that velocity head (V2/2) is a better criterion than just pure fluid velocity in judging design adequacy in pressure-reducing valves. It is very useful in eliminating the destructive effects of high fluid velocity and noise/vibration problems. In this case, the actual velocity head equaled 360 psi. For these reasons, it was decided to replace these single-stage pressure-reduction valves with multi-stage pressure-reduction valves capable of limiting this high velocity. These valves are described.

  20. Functional interactions between ubiquitin E2 enzymes and TRIM proteins.

    PubMed

    Napolitano, Luisa M; Jaffray, Ellis G; Hay, Ronald T; Meroni, Germana

    2011-03-01

    The TRIM (tripartite motif) family of proteins is characterized by the presence of the tripartite motif module, composed of a RING domain, one or two B-box domains and a coiled-coil region. TRIM proteins are involved in many cellular processes and represent the largest subfamily of RING-containing putative ubiquitin E3 ligases. Whereas their role as E3 ubiquitin ligases has been presumed, and in several cases established, little is known about their specific interactions with the ubiquitin-conjugating E2 enzymes or UBE2s. In the present paper, we report a thorough screening of interactions between the TRIM and UBE2 families. We found a general preference of the TRIM proteins for the D and E classes of UBE2 enzymes, but we also revealed very specific interactions between TRIM9 and UBE2G2, and TRIM32 and UBE2V1/2. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the TRIM E3 activity is only manifest with the UBE2 with which they interact. For most specific interactions, we could also observe subcellular co-localization of the TRIM involved and its cognate UBE2 enzyme, suggesting that the specific selection of TRIM-UBE2 pairs has physiological relevance. Our findings represent the basis for future studies on the specific reactions catalysed by the TRIM E3 ligases to determine the fate of their targets.

  1. X-HALE: The Development of a Research Platform for the Validation of Nonlinear Aeroelastic Codes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    flight structure that changes the aircraft’s modes in all three axes [38]. Patil, Hodges and Cesnik studied the aeroelastic dynamics of HALE...wing’s natural mode that may cause the wing’s flutter velocity to fall to aircraft’s cruise velocity. Continuing the research, Patil, Hodges , and...analysis and lifting line aerodynamics coupled with a one-lag term for unsteadiness corrections. Patil and Hodges also developed NATASHA [18]. This

  2. Loads and aeroelasticity division research and technology accomplishments for FY 1983 and plans for FY 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, J. E.; Dixon, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    Research was done in the following areas: development and validation of solution algorithms, modeling techniques, integrated finite elements for flow-thermal-structural analysis and design, optimization of aircraft and spacecraft for the best performance, reduction of loads and increase in the dynamic structural stability of flexible airframes by the use of active control, methods for predicting steady and unsteady aerodynamic loads and aeroelastic characteristics of flight vehicles with emphasis on the transonic range, and methods for predicting and reducing helicoper vibrations.

  3. Aerodynamics and Aeroelasticity Calculations of Flapping Motion for Micro Air Vehicle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-24

    Nastran program which uses Doublet Lattice Method for aerodynamic analysis and couples with its structural model . The program could handle also gust...numerical calculations a. 3D flat plate methods could be calculated with MSC. Nastran aeroelastic module. Conventional MSC.Nastran Structural Model performs...platforms will modelled by Direct Numerical Simulation technique (DNS) using a computer programme, based on an available commercial code Star-CD (or

  4. Development of Advanced Computational Aeroelasticity Tools at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, R. E.

    2008-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has continued to develop its long standing computational tools to address new challenges in aircraft and launch vehicle design. This paper discusses the application and development of those computational aeroelastic tools. Four topic areas will be discussed: 1) Modeling structural and flow field nonlinearities; 2) Integrated and modular approaches to nonlinear multidisciplinary analysis; 3) Simulating flight dynamics of flexible vehicles; and 4) Applications that support both aeronautics and space exploration.

  5. Static Aeroelastic Response of an Aircraft With Asymmetric Wing Planforms Representative of Combat Damage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    combat damage. The analysis was performed using the MSCANASTRAN Aeroelastic Code. Structural and aerodynamic models are based on the finite element...rudders) are considered as lifing and control surfaces in the aerodynamic model . Five different wing structural models , one undamaged and four damaged, are...of wing-body Interference, on the aircraft’s flight dynamics are discussed. 14. SUBJECT TERMS IS. NUMBER OF PAGES T-38 aircraft; auerodynamic model

  6. Visualizing Trimming Dependence of Biodistribution and Kinetics with Homo- and Heterogeneous N-Glycoclusters on Fluorescent Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, Akihiro; Tahara, Tsuyoshi; Nozaki, Satoshi; Morimoto, Koji; Kizuka, Yasuhiko; Kitazume, Shinobu; Hara, Mitsuko; Kojima, Soichi; Onoe, Hirotaka; Kurbangalieva, Almira; Taniguchi, Naoyuki; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Tanaka, Katsunori

    2016-01-01

    A series of N-glycans, each sequentially trimmed from biantennary sialoglycans, were homo- or heterogeneously clustered efficiently on fluorescent albumin using a method that combined strain-promoted alkyne-azide cyclization and 6π-azaelectrocyclization. Noninvasive in vivo kinetics and dissection analysis revealed, for the first time, a glycan-dependent shift from urinary to gall bladder excretion mediated by sequential trimming of non-reducing end sialic acids. N-glycoalbumins that were trimmed further, in particular, GlcNAc- and hybrid biantennary-terminated congeners, were selectively taken up by sinusoidal endothelial and stellate cells in the liver, which are critical for diagnosis and treatment of liver fibrillation. Our glycocluster strategy can not only reveal the previously unexplored extracellular functions of N-glycan trimming, but will be classified as the newly emerging glycoprobes for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. PMID:26902314

  7. Aeroelastic Response of the Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge Transtition Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrera, Claudia Y.; Spivey, Natalie D.; Lung, Shun-fat

    2016-01-01

    The Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge demonstrator was a joint task under the Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project in partnership with the Air Force Research Laboratory and FlexSys, Inc. (Ann Arbor, Michigan), chartered by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to develop advanced technologies that enable environmentally friendly aircraft, such as continuous mold-line technologies. The Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge demonstrator encompassed replacing the Fowler flaps on the SubsoniC Aircraft Testbed, a Gulfstream III (Gulfstream Aerospace, Savannah, Georgia) aircraft, with control surfaces developed by FlexSys, Inc., a pair of uniquely-designed, unconventional flaps to be used as lifting surfaces during flight-testing to substantiate their structural effectiveness. The unconventional flaps consisted of a main flap section and two transition sections, inboard and outboard, which demonstrated the continuous mold-line technology. Unique characteristics of the transition sections provided a challenge to the airworthiness assessment for this part of the structure. A series of build-up tests and analyses were conducted to ensure the data required to support the airworthiness assessment were acquired and applied accurately. The transition sections were analyzed both as individual components and as part of the flight-test article assembly. Instrumentation was installed in the transition sections based on the analysis to best capture the in-flight aeroelastic response. Flight-testing was conducted and flight data were acquired to validate the analyses. This paper documents the details of the aeroelastic assessment and in-flight response of the transition sections of the unconventional Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge flaps.

  8. A wind turbine hybrid simulation framework considering aeroelastic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wei; Su, Weihua

    2015-04-01

    In performing an effective structural analysis for wind turbine, the simulation of turbine aerodynamic loads is of great importance. The interaction between the wake flow and the blades may impact turbine blades loading condition, energy yield and operational behavior. Direct experimental measurement of wind flow field and wind profiles around wind turbines is very helpful to support the wind turbine design. However, with the growth of the size of wind turbines for higher energy output, it is not convenient to obtain all the desired data in wind-tunnel and field tests. In this paper, firstly the modeling of dynamic responses of large-span wind turbine blades will consider nonlinear aeroelastic effects. A strain-based geometrically nonlinear beam formulation will be used for the basic structural dynamic modeling, which will be coupled with unsteady aerodynamic equations and rigid-body rotations of the rotor. Full wind turbines can be modeled by using the multi-connected beams. Then, a hybrid simulation experimental framework is proposed to potentially address this issue. The aerodynamic-dominant components, such as the turbine blades and rotor, are simulated as numerical components using the nonlinear aeroelastic model; while the turbine tower, where the collapse of failure may occur under high level of wind load, is simulated separately as the physical component. With the proposed framework, dynamic behavior of NREL's 5MW wind turbine blades will be studied and correlated with available numerical data. The current work will be the basis of the authors' further studies on flow control and hazard mitigation on wind turbine blades and towers.

  9. Enhanced Modeling of First-Order Plant Equations of Motion for Aeroelastic and Aeroservoelastic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pototzky, Anthony S.

    2010-01-01

    A methodology is described for generating first-order plant equations of motion for aeroelastic and aeroservoelastic applications. The description begins with the process of generating data files representing specialized mode-shapes, such as rigid-body and control surface modes, using both PATRAN and NASTRAN analysis. NASTRAN executes the 146 solution sequence using numerous Direct Matrix Abstraction Program (DMAP) calls to import the mode-shape files and to perform the aeroelastic response analysis. The aeroelastic response analysis calculates and extracts structural frequencies, generalized masses, frequency-dependent generalized aerodynamic force (GAF) coefficients, sensor deflections and load coefficients data as text-formatted data files. The data files are then re-sequenced and re-formatted using a custom written FORTRAN program. The text-formatted data files are stored and coefficients for s-plane equations are fitted to the frequency-dependent GAF coefficients using two Interactions of Structures, Aerodynamics and Controls (ISAC) programs. With tabular files from stored data created by ISAC, MATLAB generates the first-order aeroservoelastic plant equations of motion. These equations include control-surface actuator, turbulence, sensor and load modeling. Altitude varying root-locus plot and PSD plot results for a model of the F-18 aircraft are presented to demonstrate the capability.

  10. Teaching Real Data Interpretation with Models (TRIM): Analysis of Student Dialogue in a Large-Enrollment Cell and Developmental Biology Course

    PubMed Central

    Zagallo, Patricia; Meddleton, Shanice; Bolger, Molly S.

    2016-01-01

    We present our design for a cell biology course to integrate content with scientific practices, specifically data interpretation and model-based reasoning. A 2-yr research project within this course allowed us to understand how students interpret authentic biological data in this setting. Through analysis of written work, we measured the extent to which students’ data interpretations were valid and/or generative. By analyzing small-group audio recordings during in-class activities, we demonstrated how students used instructor-provided models to build and refine data interpretations. Often, students used models to broaden the scope of data interpretations, tying conclusions to a biological significance. Coding analysis revealed several strategies and challenges that were common among students in this collaborative setting. Spontaneous argumentation was present in 82% of transcripts, suggesting that data interpretation using models may be a way to elicit this important disciplinary practice. Argumentation dialogue included frequent co-construction of claims backed by evidence from data. Other common strategies included collaborative decoding of data representations and noticing data patterns before making interpretive claims. Focusing on irrelevant data patterns was the most common challenge. Our findings provide evidence to support the feasibility of supporting students’ data-interpretation skills within a large lecture course. PMID:27193288

  11. Teaching Real Data Interpretation with Models (TRIM): Analysis of Student Dialogue in a Large-Enrollment Cell and Developmental Biology Course.

    PubMed

    Zagallo, Patricia; Meddleton, Shanice; Bolger, Molly S

    2016-01-01

    We present our design for a cell biology course to integrate content with scientific practices, specifically data interpretation and model-based reasoning. A 2-yr research project within this course allowed us to understand how students interpret authentic biological data in this setting. Through analysis of written work, we measured the extent to which students' data interpretations were valid and/or generative. By analyzing small-group audio recordings during in-class activities, we demonstrated how students used instructor-provided models to build and refine data interpretations. Often, students used models to broaden the scope of data interpretations, tying conclusions to a biological significance. Coding analysis revealed several strategies and challenges that were common among students in this collaborative setting. Spontaneous argumentation was present in 82% of transcripts, suggesting that data interpretation using models may be a way to elicit this important disciplinary practice. Argumentation dialogue included frequent co-construction of claims backed by evidence from data. Other common strategies included collaborative decoding of data representations and noticing data patterns before making interpretive claims. Focusing on irrelevant data patterns was the most common challenge. Our findings provide evidence to support the feasibility of supporting students' data-interpretation skills within a large lecture course.

  12. The mammalian TRIM-NHL protein TRIM71/LIN-41 is a repressor of mRNA function.

    PubMed

    Loedige, Inga; Gaidatzis, Dimos; Sack, Ragna; Meister, Gunter; Filipowicz, Witold

    2013-01-07

    TRIM-NHL proteins are conserved regulators of development and differentiation but their molecular function has remained largely elusive. Here, we report an as yet unrecognized activity for the mammalian TRIM-NHL protein TRIM71 as a repressor of mRNAs. We show that TRIM71 is associated with mRNAs and that it promotes translational repression and mRNA decay. We have identified Rbl1 and Rbl2, two transcription factors whose down-regulation is important for stem cell function, as TRIM71 targets in mouse embryonic stem cells. Furthermore, one of the defining features of TRIM-NHL proteins, the NHL domain, is necessary and sufficient to target TRIM71 to RNA, while the RING domain that confers ubiquitin ligase activity is dispensable for repression. Our results reveal strong similarities between TRIM71 and Drosophila BRAT, the best-studied TRIM-NHL protein and a well-documented translational repressor, suggesting that BRAT and TRIM71 are part of a family of mRNA repressors regulating proliferation and differentiation.

  13. Simplified Aeroelastic Model for Fluid Structure Interaction between Microcantilever Sensors and Fluid Surroundings.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Zhao, Liang; Zhang, Yanling; Qiao, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Fluid-structural coupling occurs when microcantilever sensors vibrate in a fluid. Due to the complexity of the mechanical characteristics of microcantilevers and lack of high-precision microscopic mechanical testing instruments, effective methods for studying the fluid-structural coupling of microcantilevers are lacking, especially for non-rectangular microcantilevers. Here, we report fluid-structure interactions (FSI) of the cable-membrane structure via a macroscopic study. The simplified aeroelastic model was introduced into the microscopic field to establish a fluid-structure coupling vibration model for microcantilever sensors. We used the finite element method to solve the coupled FSI system. Based on the simplified aeroelastic model, simulation analysis of the effects of the air environment on the vibration of the commonly used rectangular microcantilever was also performed. The obtained results are consistent with the literature. The proposed model can also be applied to the auxiliary design of rectangular and non-rectangular sensors used in fluid environments.

  14. Determining XV-15 aeroelastic modes from flight data with frequency-domain methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acree, C. W., Jr.; Tischler, Mark B.

    1993-01-01

    The XV-15 tilt-rotor wing has six major aeroelastic modes that are close in frequency. To precisely excite individual modes during flight test, dual flaperon exciters with automatic frequency-sweep controls were installed. The resulting structural data were analyzed in the frequency domain (Fourier transformed). All spectral data were computed using chirp z-transforms. Modal frequencies and damping were determined by fitting curves to frequency-response magnitude and phase data. The results given in this report are for the XV-15 with its original metal rotor blades. Also, frequency and damping values are compared with theoretical predictions made using two different programs, CAMRAD and ASAP. The frequency-domain data-analysis method proved to be very reliable and adequate for tracking aeroelastic modes during flight-envelope expansion. This approach required less flight-test time and yielded mode estimations that were more repeatable, compared with the exponential-decay method previously used.

  15. Aeroelastic response of metallic and composite propfan models in yawed flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaza, Krishna Rao V.; Williams, Marc H.; Mehmed, Oral; Nerayanan, G. V.

    1988-01-01

    An analytical investigation of aeroelastic response of metallic and composite propfan models in yawed flow was performed. The analytical model is based on the normal modes of a rotating blade and the three dimensional unsteady lifting surface aerodynamic theory including blade mistuning. The calculated blade stresses or strains are compared with published wind tunnel data on two metallic and three composite propfan wind tunnel models. The comparison shows a good agreement between theory and experiment. Additional parametric results indicate that blade response is very sensitive to the blade stiffness and also to blade frequency and mode shape mistuning. From these findings, it is concluded that both frequency and mode shape mistuning should be included in aeroelastic response analysis. Furthermore, both calculated and measured strains show that combined blade frequency and mode shape mistuning has beneficial effects on response due to yawed flow.

  16. Impact of structural optimization with aeroelastic/multidisciplinary constraints on helicopter rotor design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, Peretz P.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the state-of-the-art in the field of structural optimization when applied to vibration reduction of helicopters in forward flight with aeroelastic and multidisciplinary constraints. It emphasizes the application of the modern approach where the optimization is formulated as a mathematical programming problem and the objective function consists of the vibration levels at the hub and behavior constraints are imposed on the blade frequencies, aeroelastic stability margins as well as on a number of additional ingredients which can have a significant effect on the overall performance and flight mechanics of the helicopter. It is shown that the integrated multidisciplinary optimization of rotorcraft offers the potential for substantial improvements which can be achieved by careful preliminary design and analysis without requiring additional hardware such as rotor vibration absorbers or isolation systems.

  17. Helicopter vibration reduction using structural optimization with aeroelastic/multidisciplinary constraints - A survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, Peretz P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a survey of the state-of-the-art in the field of structural optimization when applied to vibration reduction of helicopters in forward flight with aeroelastic and multidisciplinary constraints. It emphasizes the application of the modern approach where the optimization is formulated as a mathematical programming problem, the objective function consists of the vibration levels at the hub, and behavior constraints are imposed on the blade frequencies and aeroelastic stability margins, as well as on a number of additional ingredients that can have a significant effect on the overall performance and flight mechanics of the helicopter. It is shown that the integrated multidisciplinary optimization of rotorcraft offers the potential for substantial improvements, which can be achieved by careful preliminary design and analysis without requiring additional hardware such as rotor vibration absorbers of isolation systems.

  18. Preliminary report on candidates for AGARD standard aeroelastic configurations for dynamic response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, E. Carson, Jr.

    1987-01-01

    At the request of the Aeroelasticity Subcommittee of the AGARD Structures and Materials Panel, a survey of member countries has been conducted to seek candidates for a prospective set of standard configurations to be used for comparison of calculated and measured dynamic aeroelastic behavior with emphasis on the transonic speed range. This set is a sequel to that established several years ago for comparisons of calculated and measured aerodynamic pressures and forces. Approximately two dozen people in the United States, and more than three dozen people in the other member countries, were contacted. This preliminary report presents the results of the survey and an analysis of those results along with recommendations for the initial set of standard configurations and for additional experimental work needed to fill significant gaps in the available information.

  19. Application of Computational Stability and Control Techniques Including Unsteady Aerodynamics and Aeroelastic Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, David M.; Edwards, John W.

    2004-01-01

    The motivation behind the inclusion of unsteady aerodynamics and aeroelastic effects in the computation of stability and control (S&C) derivatives will be discussed as they pertain to aeroelastic and aeroservoelastic analysis. This topic will be addressed in the context of two applications, the first being the estimation of S&C derivatives for a cable-mounted aeroservoelastic wind tunnel model tested in the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT). The second application will be the prediction of the nonlinear aeroservoelastic phenomenon known as Residual Pitch Oscillation (RPO) on the B-2 Bomber. Techniques and strategies used in these applications to compute S&C derivatives and perform flight simulations will be reviewed, and computational results will be presented.

  20. Computational Aeroelastic Analyses of a Low-Boom Supersonic Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Sanetrik, Mark D.; Chwalowski, Pawel; Connolly, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    An overview of NASA's Commercial Supersonic Technology (CST) Aeroservoelasticity (ASE) element is provided with a focus on recent computational aeroelastic analyses of a low-boom supersonic configuration developed by Lockheed-Martin and referred to as the N+2 configuration. The overview includes details of the computational models developed to date including a linear finite element model (FEM), linear unsteady aerodynamic models, unstructured CFD grids, and CFD-based aeroelastic analyses. In addition, a summary of the work involving the development of aeroelastic reduced-order models (ROMs) and the development of an aero-propulso-servo-elastic (APSE) model is provided.

  1. Aeroelastic Model Structure Computation for Envelope Expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kukreja, Sunil L.

    2007-01-01

    Structure detection is a procedure for selecting a subset of candidate terms, from a full model description, that best describes the observed output. This is a necessary procedure to compute an efficient system description which may afford greater insight into the functionality of the system or a simpler controller design. Structure computation as a tool for black-box modeling may be of critical importance in the development of robust, parsimonious models for the flight-test community. Moreover, this approach may lead to efficient strategies for rapid envelope expansion that may save significant development time and costs. In this study, a least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) technique is investigated for computing efficient model descriptions of non-linear aeroelastic systems. The LASSO minimises the residual sum of squares with the addition of an l(Sub 1) penalty term on the parameter vector of the traditional l(sub 2) minimisation problem. Its use for structure detection is a natural extension of this constrained minimisation approach to pseudo-linear regression problems which produces some model parameters that are exactly zero and, therefore, yields a parsimonious system description. Applicability of this technique for model structure computation for the F/A-18 (McDonnell Douglas, now The Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois) Active Aeroelastic Wing project using flight test data is shown for several flight conditions (Mach numbers) by identifying a parsimonious system description with a high percent fit for cross-validated data.

  2. Aeroelasticity of Axially Loaded Aerodynamic Structures for Truss-Braced Wing Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Ting, Eric; Lebofsky, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an aeroelastic finite-element formulation for axially loaded aerodynamic structures. The presence of axial loading causes the bending and torsional sitffnesses to change. For aircraft with axially loaded structures such as the truss-braced wing aircraft, the aeroelastic behaviors of such structures are nonlinear and depend on the aerodynamic loading exerted on these structures. Under axial strain, a tensile force is created which can influence the stiffness of the overall aircraft structure. This tension stiffening is a geometric nonlinear effect that needs to be captured in aeroelastic analyses to better understand the behaviors of these types of aircraft structures. A frequency analysis of a rotating blade structure is performed to demonstrate the analytical method. A flutter analysis of a truss-braced wing aircraft is performed to analyze the effect of geometric nonlinear effect of tension stiffening on the flutter speed. The results show that the geometric nonlinear tension stiffening effect can have a significant impact on the flutter speed prediction. In general, increased wing loading results in an increase in the flutter speed. The study illustrates the importance of accounting for the geometric nonlinear tension stiffening effect in analyzing the truss-braced wing aircraft.

  3. An Aeroelastic Perspective of Floating Offshore Wind Turbine Wake Formation and Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Steven N.; Jaworski, Justin W.

    2015-11-01

    The wake formation and wake stability of floating offshore wind turbines are investigated from an aeroelastic perspective. The aeroelastic model is composed of the Sebastian-Lackner free-vortex wake aerodynamic model coupled to the nonlinear Hodges-Dowell beam equations, which are extended to include the effects of blade profile asymmetry, higher-order torsional effects, and kinetic energy components associated with periodic rigid-body motions of floating platforms. Rigid-body platform motions are also assigned to the aerodynamic model as varying inflow conditions to emulate operational rotor-wake interactions. Careful attention is given to the wake formation within operational states where the ratio of inflow velocity to induced velocity is over 50%. These states are most susceptible to aerodynamic instabilities, and provide a range of states about which a wake stability analysis can be performed. In addition, the stability analysis used for the numerical framework is implemented into a standalone free-vortex wake aerodynamic model. Both aeroelastic and standalone aerodynamic results are compared to evaluate the level of impact that flexible blades have on the wake formation and wake stability.

  4. LINFLUX-AE: A Turbomachinery Aeroelastic Code Based on a 3-D Linearized Euler Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.; Bakhle, M. A.; Trudell, J. J.; Mehmed, O.; Stefko, G. L.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the development and validation of LINFLUX-AE, a turbomachinery aeroelastic code based on the linearized unsteady 3-D Euler solver, LINFLUX. A helical fan with flat plate geometry is selected as the test case for numerical validation. The steady solution required by LINFLUX is obtained from the nonlinear Euler/Navier Stokes solver TURBO-AE. The report briefly describes the salient features of LINFLUX and the details of the aeroelastic extension. The aeroelastic formulation is based on a modal approach. An eigenvalue formulation is used for flutter analysis. The unsteady aerodynamic forces required for flutter are obtained by running LINFLUX for each mode, interblade phase angle and frequency of interest. The unsteady aerodynamic forces for forced response analysis are obtained from LINFLUX for the prescribed excitation, interblade phase angle, and frequency. The forced response amplitude is calculated from the modal summation of the generalized displacements. The unsteady pressures, work done per cycle, eigenvalues and forced response amplitudes obtained from LINFLUX are compared with those obtained from LINSUB, TURBO-AE, ASTROP2, and ANSYS.

  5. Influence of thickness and camber on the aeroelastic stability of supersonic throughflow fans: An engineering approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, John K.

    1989-01-01

    An engineering approach was used to include the nonlinear effects of thickness and camber in an analytical aeroelastic analysis of cascades in supersonic acial flow (supersonic leading-edge locus). A hybrid code using Lighthill's nonlinear piston theory and Lanes's linear potential theory was developed to include these nonlinear effects. Lighthill's theory was used to calculate the unsteady pressures on the noninterference surface regions of the airfoils in cascade. Lane's theory was used to calculate the unsteady pressures on the remaining interference surface regions. Two airfoil profiles was investigated (a supersonic throughflow fan design and a NACA 66-206 airfoil with a sharp leading edge). Results show that compared with predictions of Lane's potential theory for flat plates, the inclusion of thickness (with or without camber) may increase or decrease the aeroelastic stability, depending on the airfoil geometry and operating conditions. When thickness effects are included in the aeroelastic analysis, inclusion of camber will influence the predicted stability in proportion to the magnitude of the added camber. The critical interblade phase angle, depending on the airfoil profile and operating conditions, may also be influenced by thickness and camber. Compared with predictions of Lane's linear potential theory, the inclusion of thickness and camber decreased the aerodynamic stifness and increased the aerodynamic damping at Mach 2 and 2.95 for a cascade of supersonic throughflow fan airfoils oscillating 180 degrees out of phase at a reduced frequency of 0.1.

  6. 5. GENERAL VIEW, SECOND FLOOR, SHOWING TYPICAL WINDOW TRIM AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. GENERAL VIEW, SECOND FLOOR, SHOWING TYPICAL WINDOW TRIM AND THE PRESSED METAL CEILING, VIEW FROM SOUTHWEST. - 443 Seventh Street, Northwest (Commercial Building), Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  7. TRIM family proteins and their emerging roles in innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Ozato, Keiko; Shin, Dong-Mi; Chang, Tsung-Hsien; Morse, Herbert C

    2008-11-01

    The superfamily of tripartite motif-containing (TRIM) proteins is conserved throughout the metazoan kingdom and has expanded rapidly during vertebrate evolution; there are now more than 60 TRIM proteins known in humans and mice. Many TRIM proteins are induced by type I and type II interferons, which are crucial for many aspects of resistance to pathogens, and several are known to be required for the restriction of infection by lentiviruses. In this Review, we describe recent data that reveal broader antiviral and antimicrobial activities of TRIM proteins and discuss their involvement in the regulation of pathogen-recognition and transcriptional pathways in host defence.

  8. Generalization of trim and fill for application in meta-regression.

    PubMed

    Weinhandl, Eric D; Duval, Sue

    2012-03-01

    Trim and fill is a popular method of accounting for publication bias in meta-analysis. However, the use of trim and fill is limited to the setting in which all meta-analyzed studies represent a true common effect. In many practical settings, within-study effect estimates are a function of some covariate. Because methods of accounting for publication bias in meta-regression have received little attention, we propose here a generalization of trim and fill for application in meta-regression. The proposed algorithm preserves the computational features of trim and fill and adds only an assumption of symmetry in the hypothesized distribution of the measured covariate. By simulation, we evaluate properties (mean bias, root mean squared error, and coverage probability) of meta-regression parameter estimates and corresponding confidence intervals with application of the proposed algorithm in a range of scenarios, including violation of the aforementioned assumption of symmetry. We also evaluate the performance of common estimators of the number of suppressed studies. In general, we show that the proposed algorithm is successful in identifying suppression of studies and reducing the bias in regression parameters derived from the analysis of the augmented set of studies. We apply the proposed algorithm to an analysis of the effect of cognitive-behavioral therapy on the risk of recidivism. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Reliability-based aeroelastic optimization of a composite aircraft wing via fluid-structure interaction of high fidelity solvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikbay, M.; Fakkusoglu, N.; Kuru, M. N.

    2010-06-01

    We consider reliability based aeroelastic optimization of a AGARD 445.6 composite aircraft wing with stochastic parameters. Both commercial engineering software and an in-house reliability analysis code are employed in this high-fidelity computational framework. Finite volume based flow solver Fluent is used to solve 3D Euler equations, while Gambit is the fluid domain mesh generator and Catia-V5-R16 is used as a parametric 3D solid modeler. Abaqus, a structural finite element solver, is used to compute the structural response of the aeroelastic system. Mesh based parallel code coupling interface MPCCI-3.0.6 is used to exchange the pressure and displacement information between Fluent and Abaqus to perform a loosely coupled fluid-structure interaction by employing a staggered algorithm. To compute the probability of failure for the probabilistic constraints, one of the well known MPP (Most Probable Point) based reliability analysis methods, FORM (First Order Reliability Method) is implemented in Matlab. This in-house developed Matlab code is embedded in the multidisciplinary optimization workflow which is driven by Modefrontier. Modefrontier 4.1, is used for its gradient based optimization algorithm called NBI-NLPQLP which is based on sequential quadratic programming method. A pareto optimal solution for the stochastic aeroelastic optimization is obtained for a specified reliability index and results are compared with the results of deterministic aeroelastic optimization.

  10. Origin and evolution of TRIM proteins: new insights from the complete TRIM repertoire of zebrafish and pufferfish.

    PubMed

    Boudinot, Pierre; van der Aa, Lieke M; Jouneau, Luc; Du Pasquier, Louis; Pontarotti, Pierre; Briolat, Valérie; Benmansour, Abdenour; Levraud, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Tripartite motif proteins (TRIM) constitute a large family of proteins containing a RING-Bbox-Coiled Coil motif followed by different C-terminal domains. Involved in ubiquitination, TRIM proteins participate in many cellular processes including antiviral immunity. The TRIM family is ancient and has been greatly diversified in vertebrates and especially in fish. We analyzed the complete sets of trim genes of the large zebrafish genome and of the compact pufferfish genome. Both contain three large multigene subsets--adding the hsl5/trim35-like genes (hltr) to the ftr and the btr that we previously described--all containing a B30.2 domain that evolved under positive selection. These subsets are conserved among teleosts. By contrast, most human trim genes of the other classes have only one or two orthologues in fish. Loss or gain of C-terminal exons generated proteins with different domain organizations; either by the deletion of the ancestral domain or, remarkably, by the acquisition of a new C-terminal domain. Our survey of fish trim genes in fish identifies subsets with different evolutionary dynamics. trims encoding RBCC-B30.2 proteins show the same evolutionary trends in fish and tetrapods: they evolve fast, often under positive selection, and they duplicate to create multigenic families. We could identify new combinations of domains, which epitomize how new trim classes appear by domain insertion or exon shuffling. Notably, we found that a cyclophilin-A domain replaces the B30.2 domain of a zebrafish fintrim gene, as reported in the macaque and owl monkey antiretroviral TRIM5α. Finally, trim genes encoding RBCC-B30.2 proteins are preferentially located in the vicinity of MHC or MHC gene paralogues, which suggests that such trim genes may have been part of the ancestral MHC.

  11. A Note About HARP's State Trimming Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Ricky W.; Hayhurst, Kelly J.; Johnson, Sally C.

    1998-01-01

    This short note provides some additional insight into how the HARP program works. In some cases, it is possible for HARP to tdm away too many states and obtain an optimistic result. The HARP Version 7.0 manual warns the user that 'Unlike the ALL model, the SAME model can automatically drop failure modes for certain system models. The user is cautioned to insure that no important failure modes are dropped; otherwise, a non-conservative result can be given.' This note provides an example of where this occurs and a pointer to further documentation that gives a means of bounding the error associated with trimming these states.

  12. Unified Formulation of the Aeroelasticity of Swept Lifting Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter; Marzocca, Piergiovanni; Librescu, Liviu

    2001-01-01

    An unified approach for dealing with stability and aeroelastic response to time-dependent pressure pulses of swept wings in an incompressible flow is developed. To this end the indicial function concept in time and frequency domains, enabling one to derive the proper unsteady aerodynamic loads is used. Results regarding stability in the frequency and time domains, and subcritical aeroelastic response to arbitrary time-dependent external excitation obtained via the direct use of the unsteady aerodynamic derivatives for 3-D wings are supplied. Closed form expressions for unsteady aerodynamic derivatives using this unified approach have been derived and used to illustrate their application to flutter and aeroelastic response to blast and sonic-boom signatures. In this context, an original representation of the aeroelastic response in the phase space was presented and pertinent conclusions on the implications of some basic parameters have been outlined.

  13. Static aeroelastic behavior of an adaptive laminated piezoelectric composite wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisshaar, T. A.; Ehlers, S. M.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of using an adaptive material to modify the static aeroelastic behavior of a uniform wing is examined. The wing structure is idealized as a laminated sandwich structure with piezoelectric layers in the upper and lower skins. A feedback system that senses the wing root loads applies a constant electric field to the piezoelectric actuator. Modification of pure torsional deformaton behavior and pure bending deformation are investigated, as is the case of an anisotropic composite swept wing. The use of piezoelectric actuators to create an adaptive structure is found to alter static aeroelastic behavior in that the proper choice of the feedback gain can increase or decrease the aeroelastic divergence speed. This concept also may be used to actively change the lift effectiveness of a wing. The ability to modify static aeroelastic behavior is limited by physical limitations of the piezoelectric material and the manner in which it is integrated into the parent structure.

  14. Aeroelastic Response of Nonlinear Wing Section by Functional Series Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Marzocca, Piergiovanni

    2001-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of the determination of the subcritical aeroelastic response and flutter instability of nonlinear two-dimensional lifting surfaces in an incompressible flow-field via indicial functions and Volterra series approach. The related aeroelastic governing equations are based upon the inclusion of structural and damping nonlinearities in plunging and pitching, of the linear unsteady aerodynamics and consideration of an arbitrary time-dependent external pressure pulse. Unsteady aeroelastic nonlinear kernels are determined, and based on these, frequency and time histories of the subcritical aeroelastic response are obtained, and in this context the influence of the considered nonlinearities is emphasized. Conclusions and results displaying the implications of the considered effects are supplied.

  15. Aeroelastic Response of Nonlinear Wing Section By Functional Series Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzocca, Piergiovanni; Librescu, Liviu; Silva, Walter A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of the determination of the subcritical aeroelastic response and flutter instability of nonlinear two-dimensional lifting surfaces in an incompressible flow-field via indicial functions and Volterra series approach. The related aeroelastic governing equations are based upon the inclusion of structural and damping nonlinearities in plunging and pitching, of the linear unsteady aerodynamics and consideration of an arbitrary time-dependent external pressure pulse. Unsteady aeroelastic nonlinear kernels are determined, and based on these, frequency and time histories of the subcritical aeroelastic response are obtained, and in this context the influence of the considered nonlinearities is emphasized. Conclusions and results displaying the implications of the considered effects are supplied.

  16. Development and Testing of Control Laws for the Active Aeroelastic Wing Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dibley, Ryan P.; Allen, Michael J.; Clarke, Robert; Gera, Joseph; Hodgkinson, John

    2005-01-01

    The Active Aeroelastic Wing research program was a joint program between the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory and NASA established to investigate the characteristics of an aeroelastic wing and the technique of using wing twist for roll control. The flight test program employed the use of an F/A-18 aircraft modified by reducing the wing torsional stiffness and adding a custom research flight control system. The research flight control system was optimized to maximize roll rate using only wing surfaces to twist the wing while simultaneously maintaining design load limits, stability margins, and handling qualities. NASA Dryden Flight Research Center developed control laws using the software design tool called CONDUIT, which employs a multi-objective function optimization to tune selected control system design parameters. Modifications were made to the Active Aeroelastic Wing implementation in this new software design tool to incorporate the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center nonlinear F/A-18 simulation for time history analysis. This paper describes the design process, including how the control law requirements were incorporated into constraints for the optimization of this specific software design tool. Predicted performance is also compared to results from flight.

  17. Results of including geometric nonlinearities in an aeroelastic model of an F/A-18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buttrill, Carey S.

    1989-01-01

    An integrated, nonlinear simulation model suitable for aeroelastic modeling of fixed-wing aircraft has been developed. While the author realizes that the subject of modeling rotating, elastic structures is not closed, it is believed that the equations of motion developed and applied herein are correct to second order and are suitable for use with typical aircraft structures. The equations are not suitable for large elastic deformation. In addition, the modeling framework generalizes both the methods and terminology of non-linear rigid-body airplane simulation and traditional linear aeroelastic modeling. Concerning the importance of angular/elastic inertial coupling in the dynamic analysis of fixed-wing aircraft, the following may be said. The rigorous inclusion of said coupling is not without peril and must be approached with care. In keeping with the same engineering judgment that guided the development of the traditional aeroelastic equations, the effect of non-linear inertial effects for most airplane applications is expected to be small. A parameter does not tell the whole story, however, and modes flagged by the parameter as significant also need to be checked to see if the coupling is not a one-way path, i.e., the inertially affected modes can influence other modes.

  18. Preliminary Assessment of Optimal Longitudinal-Mode Control for Drag Reduction through Distributed Aeroelastic Shaping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ippolito, Corey; Nguyen, Nhan; Lohn, Jason; Dolan, John

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of advanced lightweight materials is resulting in a new generation of lighter, flexible, more-efficient airframes that are enabling concepts for active aeroelastic wing-shape control to achieve greater flight efficiency and increased safety margins. These elastically shaped aircraft concepts require non-traditional methods for large-scale multi-objective flight control that simultaneously seek to gain aerodynamic efficiency in terms of drag reduction while performing traditional command-tracking tasks as part of a complete guidance and navigation solution. This paper presents results from a preliminary study of a notional multi-objective control law for an aeroelastic flexible-wing aircraft controlled through distributed continuous leading and trailing edge control surface actuators. This preliminary study develops and analyzes a multi-objective control law derived from optimal linear quadratic methods on a longitudinal vehicle dynamics model with coupled aeroelastic dynamics. The controller tracks commanded attack-angle while minimizing drag and controlling wing twist and bend. This paper presents an overview of the elastic aircraft concept, outlines the coupled vehicle model, presents the preliminary control law formulation and implementation, presents results from simulation, provides analysis, and concludes by identifying possible future areas for research

  19. Subspace Iteration Method for Complex Eigenvalue Problems with Nonsymmetric Matrices in Aeroelastic System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-gi; Lung, Shun-fat

    2009-01-01

    Modern airplane design is a multidisciplinary task which combines several disciplines such as structures, aerodynamics, flight controls, and sometimes heat transfer. Historically, analytical and experimental investigations concerning the interaction of the elastic airframe with aerodynamic and in retia loads have been conducted during the design phase to determine the existence of aeroelastic instabilities, so called flutter .With the advent and increased usage of flight control systems, there is also a likelihood of instabilities caused by the interaction of the flight control system and the aeroelastic response of the airplane, known as aeroservoelastic instabilities. An in -house code MPASES (Ref. 1), modified from PASES (Ref. 2), is a general purpose digital computer program for the analysis of the closed-loop stability problem. This program used subroutines given in the International Mathematical and Statistical Library (IMSL) (Ref. 3) to compute all of the real and/or complex conjugate pairs of eigenvalues of the Hessenberg matrix. For high fidelity configuration, these aeroelastic system matrices are large and compute all eigenvalues will be time consuming. A subspace iteration method (Ref. 4) for complex eigenvalues problems with nonsymmetric matrices has been formulated and incorporated into the modified program for aeroservoelastic stability (MPASES code). Subspace iteration method only solve for the lowest p eigenvalues and corresponding eigenvectors for aeroelastic and aeroservoelastic analysis. In general, the selection of p is ranging from 10 for wing flutter analysis to 50 for an entire aircraft flutter analysis. The application of this newly incorporated code is an experiment known as the Aerostructures Test Wing (ATW) which was designed by the National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA) Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California to research aeroelastic instabilities. Specifically, this experiment was used to study an instability

  20. TRIM65 regulates microRNA activity by ubiquitination of TNRC6

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shitao; Wang, Lingyan; Fu, Bishi; Berman, Michael A.; Diallo, Alos; Dorf, Martin E.

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small evolutionarily conserved regulatory RNAs that modulate mRNA stability and translation in a wide range of cell types. MiRNAs are involved in a broad array of biological processes, including cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. To identify previously unidentified regulators of miRNA, we initiated a systematic discovery-type proteomic analysis of the miRNA pathway interactome in human cells. Six of 66 genes identified in our proteomic screen were capable of regulating lethal-7a (let-7a) miRNA reporter activity. Tripartite motif 65 (TRIM65) was identified as a repressor of miRNA activity. Detailed analysis indicates that TRIM65 interacts and colocalizes with trinucleotide repeat containing six (TNRC6) proteins in processing body-like structures. Ubiquitination assays demonstrate that TRIM65 is an ubiquitin E3 ligase for TNRC6 proteins. The combination of overexpression and knockdown studies establishes that TRIM65 relieves miRNA-driven suppression of mRNA expression through ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of TNRC6. PMID:24778252

  1. Simulation and Flight Control of an Aeroelastic Fixed Wing Micro Aerial Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin; Davidson, John B.; Ifju, Peter G.

    2002-01-01

    Micro aerial vehicles have been the subject of continued interest and development over the last several years. The majority of current vehicle concepts rely on rigid fixed wings or rotors. An alternate design based on an aeroelastic membrane wing has also been developed that exhibits desired characteristics in flight test demonstrations, competition, and in prior aerodynamics studies. This paper presents a simulation model and an assessment of flight control characteristics of the vehicle. Linear state space models of the vehicle associated with typical trimmed level flight conditions and which are suitable for control system design are presented as well. The simulation is used as the basis for the design of a measurement based nonlinear dynamic inversion control system and outer loop guidance system. The vehicle/controller system is the subject of ongoing investigations of autonomous and collaborative control schemes. The results indicate that the design represents a good basis for further development of the micro aerial vehicle for autonomous and collaborative controls research.

  2. Phenomena and characterization of grazing-sliding bifurcations in aeroelastic systems with discontinuous impact effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasconcellos, R.; Abdelkefi, A.

    2015-12-01

    Impacts are present in real aircraft movable surfaces, such as ailerons, flaps, rudder, elevators, trim tabs among other secondary control surfaces leading to complex, dangerous, and abrupt transitions. In this research study, we investigate the effects of discontinuous nonlinear stiffness simulating regions of freeplay, linear stiffness, and stoppers in the pitch degree of freedom on the response of a two-degree of freedom aeroelastic system. This system consists of a plunging and pitching rigid airfoil supported by a linear spring in the plunge degree of freedom and a nonlinear spring which includes the simulated stoppers at high angles in the pitch degree of freedom. The unsteady representation based on the Duhamel formulation is used to model the aerodynamic lift and moment. To characterize the system's response when subjected to impacts, we use modern methods of nonlinear dynamics including phase portraits, power spectra, and Poincaré sections. The results show that five main complex transitions are observed as the freestream velocity is increased. It is demonstrated that the observed transitions can be associated with grazing and/or grazing-sliding bifurcations.

  3. TRIM72 modulates caveolar endocytosis in repair of lung cells.

    PubMed

    Nagre, Nagaraja; Wang, Shaohua; Kellett, Thomas; Kanagasabai, Ragu; Deng, Jing; Nishi, Miyuki; Shilo, Konstantin; Oeckler, Richard A; Yalowich, Jack C; Takeshima, Hiroshi; Christman, John; Hubmayr, Rolf D; Zhao, Xiaoli

    2016-03-01

    Alveolar epithelial and endothelial cell injury is a major feature of the acute respiratory distress syndrome, in particular when in conjunction with ventilation therapies. Previously we showed [Kim SC, Kellett T, Wang S, Nishi M, Nagre N, Zhou B, Flodby P, Shilo K, Ghadiali SN, Takeshima H, Hubmayr RD, Zhao X. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 307: L449-L459, 2014.] that tripartite motif protein 72 (TRIM72) is essential for amending alveolar epithelial cell injury. Here, we posit that TRIM72 improves cellular integrity through its interaction with caveolin 1 (Cav1). Our data show that, in primary type I alveolar epithelial cells, lack of TRIM72 led to significant reduction of Cav1 at the plasma membrane, accompanied by marked attenuation of caveolar endocytosis. Meanwhile, lentivirus-mediated overexpression of TRIM72 selectively increases caveolar endocytosis in rat lung epithelial cells, suggesting a functional association between these two. Further coimmunoprecipitation assays show that deletion of either functional domain of TRIM72, i.e., RING, B-box, coiled-coil, or PRY-SPRY, abolishes the physical interaction between TRIM72 and Cav1, suggesting that all theoretical domains of TRIM72 are required to forge a strong interaction between these two molecules. Moreover, in vivo studies showed that injurious ventilation-induced lung cell death was significantly increased in knockout (KO) TRIM72(KO) and Cav1(KO) lungs compared with wild-type controls and was particularly pronounced in double KO mutants. Apoptosis was accompanied by accentuation of gross lung injury manifestations in the TRIM72(KO) and Cav1(KO) mice. Our data show that TRIM72 directly and indirectly modulates caveolar endocytosis, an essential process involved in repair of lung epithelial cells through removal of plasma membrane wounds. Given TRIM72's role in endomembrane trafficking and cell repair, we consider this molecule an attractive therapeutic target for patients with injured lungs.

  4. Activities in Aeroelasticity at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Boyd, III; Noll, Thomas E.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the results of recently-completed research and presents status reports of current research being performed within the Aeroelasticity Branch of the NASA Langley Research Center. Within the paper this research is classified as experimental, analytical, and theoretical aeroelastic research. The paper also describes the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel, its features, capabilities, a new open-architecture data acquisition system, ongoing facility modifications, and the subsequent calibration of the facility.

  5. 2005 PathfinderPlus Aero-Elastic Research Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro, Robert

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the 2005 Pathfinder along with an investigation of its aeroelastic responses. The contents include: 1) HALE Class of Vehicles; 2) Aero-elastic Research Flights Overall Objective; 3) General Arrangement; 4) Sensor Locations; 5) NASA Ramp Operations; 6) Lakebed Operations; 7) 1st Flight Data Set; 8) Tool development / data usage; 9) HALE Tool Development & Validation; 10) Building a HALE Foundation; 11) Compelling Needs Drive HALE Efforts; and 12) Team Photo

  6. Non-contact test set-up for aeroelasticity in a rotating turbomachine combining a novel acoustic excitation system with tip-timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, O.; Montgomery, M.; Mittelbach, M.; Seume, J. R.

    2014-03-01

    Due to trends in aero-design, aeroelasticity becomes increasingly important in modern turbomachines. Design requirements of turbomachines lead to the development of high aspect ratio blades and blade integral disc designs (blisks), which are especially prone to complex modes of vibration. Therefore, experimental investigations yielding high quality data are required for improving the understanding of aeroelastic effects in turbomachines. One possibility to achieve high quality data is to excite and measure blade vibrations in turbomachines. The major requirement for blade excitation and blade vibration measurements is to minimize interference with the aeroelastic effects to be investigated. Thus in this paper, a non-contact—and thus low interference—experimental set-up for exciting and measuring blade vibrations is proposed and shown to work. A novel acoustic system excites rotor blade vibrations, which are measured with an optical tip-timing system. By performing measurements in an axial compressor, the potential of the acoustic excitation method for investigating aeroelastic effects is explored. The basic principle of this method is described and proven through the analysis of blade responses at different acoustic excitation frequencies and at different rotational speeds. To verify the accuracy of the tip-timing system, amplitudes measured by tip-timing are compared with strain gage measurements. They are found to agree well. Two approaches to vary the nodal diameter (ND) of the excited vibration mode by controlling the acoustic excitation are presented. By combining the different excitable acoustic modes with a phase-lag control, each ND of the investigated 30 blade rotor can be excited individually. This feature of the present acoustic excitation system is of great benefit to aeroelastic investigations and represents one of the main advantages over other excitation methods proposed in the past. In future studies, the acoustic excitation method will be used

  7. Dynamic Deformation Measurements of an Aeroelastic Semispan Model. [conducted in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Sharon S.; Burner, Alpheus W.; Edwards, John W.; Schuster, David M.

    2001-01-01

    The techniques used to acquire, reduce, and analyze dynamic deformation measurements of an aeroelastic semispan wind tunnel model are presented. Single-camera, single-view video photogrammetry (also referred to as videogrammetric model deformation, or VMD) was used to determine dynamic aeroelastic deformation of the semispan 'Models for Aeroelastic Validation Research Involving Computation' (MAVRIC) model in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center. Dynamic deformation was determined from optical retroreflective tape targets at five semispan locations located on the wing from the root to the tip. Digitized video images from a charge coupled device (CCD) camera were recorded and processed to automatically determine target image plane locations that were then corrected for sensor, lens, and frame grabber spatial errors. Videogrammetric dynamic data were acquired at a 60-Hz rate for time records of up to 6 seconds during portions of this flutter/Limit Cycle Oscillation (LCO) test at Mach numbers from 0.3 to 0.96. Spectral analysis of the deformation data is used to identify dominant frequencies in the wing motion. The dynamic data will be used to separate aerodynamic and structural effects and to provide time history deflection data for Computational Aeroelasticity code evaluation and validation.

  8. In-flight aeroelastic measurement technique development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burner, Alpheus W.; Lokos, William A.; Barrows, Danny A.

    2003-11-01

    The initial concept and development of a low-cost, adaptable method for the measurement of static and dynamic aeroelastic deformation of aircraft during flight testing is presented. The method is adapted from a proven technique used in wind tunnel testing to measure model deformation, often referred to as the videogrammetric model deformation (or VMD) technique. The requirements for in-flight measurements are compared and contrasted with those for wind tunnel testing. The methodology for the proposed measurements and differences compared with that used for wind tunnel testing is given. Several error sources and their effects are identified. Measurement examples using the new technique, including change in wing twist and deflection as a function of time, from an F/A-18 research aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center are presented.

  9. Triboelectret-based aeroelastic flutter energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Matthias; Boisseau, Sebastien; Geisler, Matthias; Despesse, Ghislain; Reboud, Jean Luc

    2016-11-01

    This paper highlights some experimental results on several electrostatic membranes tested in a wind tunnel between 0 and 20m.s-1 for airflow energy harvesting. The main idea is to use the aeroelastic behavior of thin flexible films to induce simultaneously the capacitance variations and the polarization required by the triboelectric/electrostatic conversion. This technology provides thin and flexible devices and avoids the issue of electrets discharge. Our prototypes (<16cm2) allowed a quick startup (from 3ms-1), an electrical power-flux density from 0.1μW.cm-2 to 60μW.cm-2. In order to complete the energy harvesting chain, we have used a wireless sensor with temperature and acceleration measures coupled to a low power transmission (Bluetooth Low Energy) with reception on a smartphone.

  10. Pain in Chickens and Effects of Beak Trimming

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beak trimming may cause pain (acute, chronic or both) in trimmed chickens due to tissue damage and nerve injury. The complexity and plasticity of the nervous system and the animal’s inability to communicate verbally make pain difficult to measure directly. However, pain in animals can be recognized...

  11. 7 CFR 58.725 - Trimming and cleaning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Trimming and cleaning. 58.725 Section 58.725 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Procedures § 58.725 Trimming and cleaning. The natural cheese shall be cleaned free of all...

  12. 7 CFR 58.725 - Trimming and cleaning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Trimming and cleaning. 58.725 Section 58.725 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Procedures § 58.725 Trimming and cleaning. The natural cheese shall be cleaned free of all...

  13. 7 CFR 58.725 - Trimming and cleaning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Trimming and cleaning. 58.725 Section 58.725 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Procedures § 58.725 Trimming and cleaning. The natural cheese shall be cleaned free of all...

  14. 7 CFR 58.725 - Trimming and cleaning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Trimming and cleaning. 58.725 Section 58.725 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Procedures § 58.725 Trimming and cleaning. The natural cheese shall be cleaned free of all...

  15. 7 CFR 58.725 - Trimming and cleaning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Trimming and cleaning. 58.725 Section 58.725 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Procedures § 58.725 Trimming and cleaning. The natural cheese shall be cleaned free of all...

  16. Building for the Future through Tri-M.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thoms, Paul E.

    1984-01-01

    Few teaching techniques encourage excellence in music education more effectively than recognition through membership in the Tri-M International Music Honor Society. Examined are how Tri-M promotes excellence, rewards achievement, and benefits both school and student. Membership requirements are also discussed. (RM)

  17. Trimming algorithm of frequency modulation for CIAE-230 MeV proton superconducting synchrocyclotron model cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengzhan; Zhang, Tianjue; Ji, Bin; Hou, Shigang; Guo, Juanjuan; Yin, Meng; Xing, Jiansheng; Lv, Yinlong; Guan, Fengping; Lin, Jun

    2017-01-01

    A new project, the 230 MeV proton superconducting synchrocyclotron for cancer therapy, was proposed at CIAE in 2013. A model cavity is designed to verify the frequency modulation trimming algorithm featuring a half-wave structure and eight sets of rotating blades for 1 kHz frequency modulation. Based on the electromagnetic (EM) field distribution analysis of the model cavity, the variable capacitor works as a function of time and the frequency can be written in Maclaurin series. Curve fitting is applied for theoretical frequency and original simulation frequency. The second-order fitting excels at the approximation given its minimum variance. Constant equivalent inductance is considered as an important condition in the calculation. The equivalent parameters of theoretical frequency can be achieved through this conversion. Then the trimming formula for rotor blade outer radius is found by discretization in time domain. Simulation verification has been performed and the results show that the calculation radius with minus 0.012 m yields an acceptable result. The trimming amendment in the time range of 0.328-0.4 ms helps to reduce the frequency error to 0.69% in Simulation C with an increment of 0.075 mm/0.001 ms, which is half of the error in Simulation A (constant radius in 0.328-0.4 ms). The verification confirms the feasibility of the trimming algorithm for synchrocyclotron frequency modulation.

  18. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon photonic device trimming by UV-irradiation.

    PubMed

    Lipka, Timo; Kiepsch, Melanie; Trieu, Hoc Khiem; Müller, Jörg

    2014-05-19

    A method to compensate for fabrication tolerances and to fine-tune individual photonic circuit components is inevitable for wafer-scale photonic systems even with most-advanced CMOS-fabrication tools. We report a cost-effective and highly accurate method for the permanent trimming of hydrogenated amorphous silicon photonic devices by UV-irradiation. Microring resonators and Mach-Zehnder-interferometers were utilized as photonic test devices. The MZIs were tuned forth and back over their complete free spectral range of 5.5 nm by locally trimming the two MZI-arms. The trimming range exceeds 8 nm for compact ring resonators with trimming accuracies of 20 pm. Trimming speeds of ≥ 10 GHz/s were achieved. The components did not show any substantial device degradation.

  19. TRIM family: Pleiotropy and diversification through homomultimer and heteromultimer formation.

    PubMed

    Napolitano, Luisa M; Meroni, Germana

    2012-01-01

    The TRIM family is composed of multidomain ubiquitin E3 ligases characterized by the presence of the N-terminal tripartite motif (RING, B-boxes, and coiled coil). TRIM proteins transfer the ubiquitin moiety to specific substrates but are also involved in ubiquitin-like modifications, in particular SUMOylation and ISGylation. The TRIM family members are involved in a plethora of biological and physiological processes and, when altered, are implicated in many pathological conditions. Growing evidence indicates the pleiotropic effect of several TRIM genes, each of which might be connected to very diverse cellular processes. As a way to reconcile a single family member with several functions, we propose that structural features, that is, their ability to homo- and hetero-di(multi)merize, can increase and diversify TRIM ubiquitin E3 ligase capability.

  20. Unsteady Aerodynamic Models for Turbomachinery Aeroelastic and Aeroacoustic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verdon, Joseph M.; Barnett, Mark; Ayer, Timothy C.

    1995-01-01

    Theoretical analyses and computer codes are being developed for predicting compressible unsteady inviscid and viscous flows through blade rows of axial-flow turbomachines. Such analyses are needed to determine the impact of unsteady flow phenomena on the structural durability and noise generation characteristics of the blading. The emphasis has been placed on developing analyses based on asymptotic representations of unsteady flow phenomena. Thus, high Reynolds number flows driven by small amplitude unsteady excitations have been considered. The resulting analyses should apply in many practical situations and lead to a better understanding of the relevant flow physics. In addition, they will be efficient computationally, and therefore, appropriate for use in aeroelastic and aeroacoustic design studies. Under the present effort, inviscid interaction and linearized inviscid unsteady flow models have been formulated, and inviscid and viscid prediction capabilities for subsonic steady and unsteady cascade flows have been developed. In this report, we describe the linearized inviscid unsteady analysis, LINFLO, the steady inviscid/viscid interaction analysis, SFLOW-IVI, and the unsteady viscous layer analysis, UNSVIS. These analyses are demonstrated via application to unsteady flows through compressor and turbine cascades that are excited by prescribed vortical and acoustic excitations and by prescribed blade vibrations. Recommendations are also given for the future research needed for extending and improving the foregoing asymptotic analyses, and to meet the goal of providing efficient inviscid/viscid interaction capabilities for subsonic and transonic unsteady cascade flows.

  1. MiRNA need a TRIM regulation of miRNA activity by Trim-NHL proteins.

    PubMed

    Wulczyn, F Gregory; Cuevas, Elisa; Franzoni, Eleonora; Rybak, Agnieszka

    2010-01-01

    Trim-NHL proteins are defined by RING, B-Box and Coiled-coil protein motifs (referred to collectively as the Trim domain) coupled to an NHL domain. The C. elegans, D. melanogaster, mouse and human Trim-NHL proteins are potential and in several cases confirmed, E3 ubiquitin ligases. Current research is focused on identifying targets and pathways for Trim-NHL-mediated ubiquitination and in assessing the contribution of the NHL protein-protein interactiondomain for function and specificity. Several Trim-NHL proteins were discovered in screens for developmental genes in model organisms; mutations in one of the family members, Trim32, cause developmental disturbances in humans. In most instances, mutations that alter protein function map to the NHL domain. The NHL domain is a scaffold for the assembly of a translational repressor complex by the Brat proto-oncogene, a well-studied family member in Drosophila. The link to translational control is common to at least four Trim-NHLs that associate with miRNA pathway proteins. So far, two have been shown to repress (Mei-P26 and Lin41) and two to promote (NHL-2, Trim32) miRNA-mediated gene silencing. In this chapter we will describe structure-function relations for each of the proteins and then focus on the lessons being learned from these proteins about miRNA functions in development and in stem cell biology.

  2. miRNAs Need a Trim : Regulation of miRNA Activity by Trim-NHL Proteins.

    PubMed

    Wulczyn, F Gregory; Cuevas, Elisa; Franzoni, Eleonora; Rybak, Agnieszka

    2011-01-01

    Trim-NHL proteins are defined by RING, B-Box and Coiled-coil protein motifs (referred to collectively as the Trim domain) coupled to an NHL domain. The C. elegans, D. melanogaster, mouse and human Trim-NHL proteins are potential and in several cases confirmed, E3 ubiquitin ligases. Current research is focused on identifying targets and pathways for Trim-NHL-mediated ubiquitination and in assessing the contribution of the NHL protein-protein interaction domain for function and specificity. Several Trim-NHL proteins were discovered in screens for developmental genes in model organisms; mutations in one of the family members, Trim32, cause developmental disturbances in humans. In most instances, mutations that alter protein function map to the NHL domain. The NHL domain is a scaffold for the assembly of a translational repressor complex by the Brat proto-oncogene, a well-studied family member in Drosophila. The link to translational control is common to at least four Trim-NHLs that associate with miRNA pathway proteins. So far, two have been shown to repress (Mei-P26 and Lin41) and two to promote (NHL-2, Trim32) miRNA-mediated gene silencing. In this chapter we will describe structure-function relations for each of the proteins and then focus on the lessons being learned from these proteins about miRNA functions in development and in stem cell biology.

  3. Structural Model Tuning Capability in an Object-Oriented Multidisciplinary Design, Analysis, and Optimization Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lung, Shun-fat; Pak, Chan-gi

    2008-01-01

    Updating the finite element model using measured data is a challenging problem in the area of structural dynamics. The model updating process requires not only satisfactory correlations between analytical and experimental results, but also the retention of dynamic properties of structures. Accurate rigid body dynamics are important for flight control system design and aeroelastic trim analysis. Minimizing the difference between analytical and experimental results is a type of optimization problem. In this research, a multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization [MDAO] tool is introduced to optimize the objective function and constraints such that the mass properties, the natural frequencies, and the mode shapes are matched to the target data as well as the mass matrix being orthogonalized.

  4. Structural Model Tuning Capability in an Object-Oriented Multidisciplinary Design, Analysis, and Optimization Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lung, Shun-fat; Pak, Chan-gi

    2008-01-01

    Updating the finite element model using measured data is a challenging problem in the area of structural dynamics. The model updating process requires not only satisfactory correlations between analytical and experimental results, but also the retention of dynamic properties of structures. Accurate rigid body dynamics are important for flight control system design and aeroelastic trim analysis. Minimizing the difference between analytical and experimental results is a type of optimization problem. In this research, a multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization (MDAO) tool is introduced to optimize the objective function and constraints such that the mass properties, the natural frequencies, and the mode shapes are matched to the target data as well as the mass matrix being orthogonalized.

  5. Active and passive techniques for tiltrotor aeroelastic stability augmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hathaway, Eric L.

    Tiltrotors are susceptible to whirl flutter, an aeroelastic instability characterized by a coupling of rotor-generated aerodynamic forces and elastic wing modes in high speed airplane-mode flight. The conventional approach to ensuring adequate whirl flutter stability will not scale easily to larger tiltrotor designs. This study constitutes an investigation of several alternatives for improving tiltrotor aerolastic stability. A whirl flutter stability analysis is developed that does not rely on more complex models to determine the variations in crucial input parameters with flight condition. Variation of blade flap and lag frequency, and pitch-flap, pitch-lag, and flap-lag couplings, are calculated from physical parameters, such as blade structural flap and lag stiffness distribution (inboard or outboard of pitch bearing), collective pitch, and precone. The analysis is used to perform a study of the influence of various design parameters on whirl flutter stability. While previous studies have investigated the individual influence of various design parameters, the present investigation uses formal optimization techniques to determine a unique combination of parameters that maximizes whirl flutter stability. The optimal designs require only modest changes in the key rotor and wing design parameters to significantly increase flutter speed. When constraints on design parameters are relaxed, optimized configurations are obtained that allow large values of kinematic pitch-flap (delta3) coupling without degrading aeroelastic stability. Larger values of delta3 may be desirable for advanced tiltrotor configurations. An investigation of active control of wing flaperons for stability augmentation is also conducted. Both stiff- and soft-inplane tiltrotor configurations are examined. Control systems that increase flutter speed and wing mode sub-critical damping are designed while observing realistic limits on flaperon deflection. The flaperon is shown to be particularly

  6. A closed-form trim solution yielding minimum trim drag for airplanes with multiple longitudinal-control effectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, Kenneth H.; Sliwa, Steven M.; Lallman, Frederick J.

    1989-01-01

    Airplane designs are currently being proposed with a multitude of lifting and control devices. Because of the redundancy in ways to generate moments and forces, there are a variety of strategies for trimming each airplane. A linear optimum trim solution (LOTS) is derived using a Lagrange formulation. LOTS enables the rapid calculation of the longitudinal load distribution resulting in the minimum trim drag in level, steady-state flight for airplanes with a mixture of three or more aerodynamic surfaces and propulsive control effectors. Comparisons of the trim drags obtained using LOTS, a direct constrained optimization method, and several ad hoc methods are presented for vortex-lattice representations of a three-surface airplane and two-surface airplane with thrust vectoring. These comparisons show that LOTS accurately predicts the results obtained from the nonlinear optimization and that the optimum methods result in trim drag reductions of up to 80 percent compared to the ad hoc methods.

  7. Trimming an aircraft model for flight simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfarland, Richard E.

    1987-01-01

    Real-time piloted aircraft simulations with digital computers have been performed at Ames Research Center (ARC) for over two decades. For the simulation of conventional aircraft models, the establishment of initial vehicle and control orientations at various operational flight regimes has been adequately handled by either analog techniques or simple inversion processes. However, exotic helicopter configurations have been introduced recently that require more sophisticated techniques because of their expanded degrees of freedom and environmental vibration levels. At ARC, these techniques are used for the backward solutions to real-time simulation models as required for the generation of trim points. These techniques are presented in this paper with examples from a blade-element helicopter simulation model.

  8. TRIM13 (RFP2) downregulation decreases tumour cell growth in multiple myeloma through inhibition of NF Kappa B pathway and proteasome activity

    PubMed Central

    Gatt, Moshe E; Takada, Kohichi; Mani, Mala; Lerner, Mikael; Pick, Marjorie; Hideshima, Teru; Carrasco, Daniel E.; Protopopov, Alexei; Ivanova, Elena; Sangfelt, Olle; Grandér, Dan; Barlogie, Bart; Shaughnessy, John D.; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Carrasco, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable neoplasm caused by proliferation of malignant plasma cells in the bone marrow (BM). MM is characterized frequently by a complete or partial deletion of chromosome 13q14, seen in more than 50% of patients at diagnosis. Within this deleted region the tripartite motif containing 13 (TRIM13, also termed RFP2) gene product has been proposed to be a tumour suppressor gene (TSG). Here, we show that low expression levels of TRIM13 in MM are associated with chromosome 13q deletion and poor clinical outcome. We present a functional analysis of TRIM13 using a loss-of-function approach, and demonstrate that TRIM13 downregulation decreases tumour cell survival as well as cell cycle progression and proliferation of MM cells. In addition, we provide evidence for the involvement of TRIM13 downregulation in inhibiting the NF kappa B pathway and the activity of the 20S proteasome. Although this data does not support a role of TRIM13 as a TSG, it substantiates important roles of TRIM13 in MM tumour survival and proliferation, underscoring its potential role as a novel target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:23647456

  9. SUMO E3 ligase activity of TRIM proteins.

    PubMed

    Chu, Y; Yang, X

    2011-03-03

    SUMOylation governs numerous cellular processes and is essential to most eukaryotic life. Despite increasing recognition of the importance of this process, an extremely limited number of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) protein ligases (E3s) have been identified. Here we show that at least some members of the functionally diverse tripartite motif (TRIM) superfamily are SUMO E3s. These TRIM proteins bind both the SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9 and substrates and strongly enhance transfer of SUMOs from Ubc9 to these substrates. Among the substrates of TRIM SUMO E3s are the tumor suppressor p53 and its principal antagonist Mdm2. The E3 activity depends on the TRIM motif, suggesting it to be the first widespread SUMO E3 motif. Given the large number of TRIM proteins, our results may greatly expand the identified SUMO E3s. Furthermore, TRIM E3 activity may be an important contributor to SUMOylation specificity and the versatile functions of TRIM proteins.

  10. Simplified aeroelastic modeling of horizontal axis wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wendell, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    Certain aspects of the aeroelastic modeling and behavior of the horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) are examined. Two simple three degree of freedom models are described in this report, and tools are developed which allow other simple models to be derived. The first simple model developed is an equivalent hinge model to study the flap-lag-torsion aeroelastic stability of an isolated rotor blade. The model includes nonlinear effects, preconing, and noncoincident elastic axis, center of gravity, and aerodynamic center. A stability study is presented which examines the influence of key parameters on aeroelastic stability. Next, two general tools are developed to study the aeroelastic stability and response of a teetering rotor coupled to a flexible tower. The first of these tools is an aeroelastic model of a two-bladed rotor on a general flexible support. The second general tool is a harmonic balance solution method for the resulting second order system with periodic coefficients. The second simple model developed is a rotor-tower model which serves to demonstrate the general tools. This model includes nacelle yawing, nacelle pitching, and rotor teetering. Transient response time histories are calculated and compared to a similar model in the literature. Agreement between the two is very good, especially considering how few harmonics are used. Finally, a stability study is presented which examines the effects of support stiffness and damping, inflow angle, and preconing.

  11. NASA Aeroelasticity Handbook Volume 2: Design Guides Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, John K. (Editor)

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Aeroelasticity Handbook comprises a database (in three formats) of NACA and NASA aeroelasticity flutter data through 1998 and a collection of aeroelasticity design guides. The Microsoft Access format provides the capability to search for specific data, retrieve it, and present it in a tabular or graphical form unique to the application. The full-text NACA and NASA documents from which the data originated are provided in portable document format (PDF), and these are hyperlinked to their respective data records. This provides full access to all available information from the data source. Two other electronic formats, one delimited by commas and the other by spaces, are provided for use with other software capable of reading text files. To the best of the author s knowledge, this database represents the most extensive collection of NACA and NASA flutter data in electronic form compiled to date by NASA. Volume 2 of the handbook contains a convenient collection of aeroelastic design guides covering fixed wings, turbomachinery, propellers and rotors, panels, and model scaling. This handbook provides an interactive database and design guides for use in the preliminary aeroelastic design of aerospace systems and can also be used in validating or calibrating flutter-prediction software.

  12. Aeroelastic flutter in axial flow-The continuum theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, A. V.; Tuffaha, A. M.

    2012-11-01

    We present a mathematical continuum model for aeroelastic flutter of a Goland type structure subject to axial airflow. The model consists of a linearized Euler full potential equation for the airflow and a second order linear structure equation in two degrees of freedom plunge and pitch (bending and torsion). These are coupled through velocity matching type conditions and Kutta type condition describing the pressure jump. The approach mimics the approach used to study aeroelastic flutter in the normal flow case [?], which deals with aircraft applications. We layout the theoretical framework for determining the aeroelastic modes and the flutter point of the structure at any given mode. We will focus on the torsion aeroelastic modes and consider bending modes in future work. The importance of studying aeroelastic flutter in the axial flow case has come to attention in the recent years in light of non aircraft applications of which we mention two: the problem of snoring or apnea, which can be characterized as palattal flutter and secondly power generation from structures placed in axial flow.

  13. Control Law Design in a Computational Aeroelasticity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, Jerry R.; Robertshaw, Harry H.; Kapania, Rakesh K.

    2003-01-01

    A methodology for designing active control laws in a computational aeroelasticity environment is given. The methodology involves employing a systems identification technique to develop an explicit state-space model for control law design from the output of a computational aeroelasticity code. The particular computational aeroelasticity code employed in this paper solves the transonic small disturbance aerodynamic equation using a time-accurate, finite-difference scheme. Linear structural dynamics equations are integrated simultaneously with the computational fluid dynamics equations to determine the time responses of the structure. These structural responses are employed as the input to a modern systems identification technique that determines the Markov parameters of an "equivalent linear system". The Eigensystem Realization Algorithm is then employed to develop an explicit state-space model of the equivalent linear system. The Linear Quadratic Guassian control law design technique is employed to design a control law. The computational aeroelasticity code is modified to accept control laws and perform closed-loop simulations. Flutter control of a rectangular wing model is chosen to demonstrate the methodology. Various cases are used to illustrate the usefulness of the methodology as the nonlinearity of the aeroelastic system is increased through increased angle-of-attack changes.

  14. Computational aeroelastic modelling of airframes and turbomachinery: progress and challenges.

    PubMed

    Bartels, R E; Sayma, A I

    2007-10-15

    Computational analyses such as computational fluid dynamics and computational structural dynamics have made major advances towards maturity as engineering tools. Computational aeroelasticity (CAE) is the integration of these disciplines. As CAE matures, it also finds an increasing role in the design and analysis of aerospace vehicles. This paper presents a survey of the current state of CAE with a discussion of recent research, success and continuing challenges in its progressive integration into multidisciplinary aerospace design. It approaches CAE from the perspective of the two main areas of application: airframe and turbomachinery design. An overview will be presented of the different prediction methods used for each field of application. Differing levels of nonlinear modelling will be discussed with insight into accuracy versus complexity and computational requirements. Subjects will include current advanced methods (linear and nonlinear), nonlinear flow models, use of order reduction techniques and future trends in incorporating structural nonlinearity. Examples in which CAE is currently being integrated into the design of airframes and turbomachinery will be presented.

  15. Aeroelastic stability and response of horizontal axis wind turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kottapalli, S. B. R.; Friedmann, P. P.; Rosen, A.

    1978-01-01

    The coupled flap-lag-torsion equations of motion of an isolated horizontal axis wind turbine blade are formulated. Quasi-steady blade-element strip theory was applied to derive the aerodynamic operator which includes boundary layer type gradient winds. The final equations which have periodic coefficients were solved in order to obtain the aeroelastic response and stability of large horizontal axis wind turbine blade. A new method of generating an appropriate time-dependent equilibrium position (required for the stability analysis) has been implemented. Representative steady-state responses and stability boundaries, applicable mainly to an existing blade design (NASA/-ERDA MOD-0), are presented. The results indicate that the MOD-0 configuration is a basically stable design and that blade stability is not sensitive to offsets between blade elastic axis and aerodynamic center. Blade stability appears to be sensitive to precone. The tower shadow (or wake) has a considerable effect on the flap response but leaves blade stability unchanged. Finally, it was found that non linear terms in the equations of motion can significantly affect the linearized stability boundaries, however, these terms have a negligible effect on blade response at operating conditions.

  16. TRIM21, a negative modulator of LFG in breast carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    MÜLLER, JUDITH; MAURER, VIKTOR; REIMERS, KERSTIN; VOGT, PETER M.; BUCAN, VESNA

    2015-01-01

    Lifeguard (LFG) is a transmembrane protein which is highly expressed in tissues of the hippocampus and the cerebellum, especially during postnatal development. This protein is responsible for the protection of neurons against Fas-induced apoptosis, and the same effect can be seen in tumor cells derived from mastocarcinoma. However, the molecular function of LFG and its regulation in the carcinogenesis of human breast cells remains to be elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the connection of the interaction of LFG within an array analysis of over 9,000 different proteins. Results showed an interaction between the proteins tripartite motif-containing 21 (TRIM21) and LFG and a negative regulatory effect of TRIM21 towards LFG on the protein level. Furthermore, Fas-induced apoptosis decreased upon the addition of TRIM21 to the cultured cells. These results revealed TRIM21 to be a negative modulator of LFG in cells of mastocarcinoma in vitro. For all analyses, MDA-MB-231 cells were used. The interaction of TRIM21 and LFG was analyzed by co-immunoprecipitation. To examine changes in regulatory processes, western blot analyses, real-time PCR, activity of apoptotic process and flow cytometric analyses were carried out. PMID:26398169

  17. Nicotine Induced Murine Spermatozoa Apoptosis via Up-Regulation of Deubiquitinated RIP1 by Trim27 Promoter Hypomethylation.

    PubMed

    Nie, Dongsheng; Zhang, Dong; Dai, Jingbo; Zhang, Meixing; Zhao, Xianglong; Xu, Wangjie; Chen, Zhong; Wang, Lianyun; Wang, Zhaoxia; Qiao, Zhongdong

    2016-02-01

    Nicotine significantly promoted apoptosis in stages I, VII, VIII, and XI spermatogonia, stages I, VII, VIII, X, and XI spermatocytes, and stages I-V, VII, and VIII elongating spermatids. To explore the underlying molecular mechanisms, sperm mRNA next-generation sequencing of nicotine-treated mice was conducted. Out of the 86 genes related to apoptosis, Tnf (tumor necrosis factor alpha) was screened to be the most significant varied transcript, and the Onto-pathway analysis indicated that the TNF apoptotic pathway was especially activated by nicotine exposure. The TNF pathway was further studied at the gene and protein levels. The results showed that RIP1, the key component in the TNF apoptotic pathway, was up-expressed in its deubiquitinated form in nicotine-treated mice testis. TRIM27, an E3 ubiquitin ligase that activated TNF apoptotic pathway through up-regulating deubiquitinated RIP1, was also overexpressed in nicotine-treated spermatocytes; moreover, four consecutive CpG sites near the Trim27 transcription start site were less frequently methylated. Finally, in vitro experiments of Trim27 overexpression and RNA interference in GC-1 spermatogonial cells confirmed that the RIP1 deubiquitination and TRIM27 hyopmethylation were both positively correlated with spermatocyte apoptosis. In summary, our study suggests that nicotine may induce murine spermatozoal apoptosis via the TNF apoptotic pathway through up-regulation of deubiquitinated RIP1 by Trim27 promoter hypomethylation.

  18. TRIM-9 functions in the UNC-6/UNC-40 pathway to regulate ventral guidance.

    PubMed

    Song, Song; Ge, Qinglan; Wang, Jinbo; Chen, Haiyang; Tang, Sanyuan; Bi, Junfeng; Li, Xia; Xie, Qi; Huang, Xun

    2011-01-01

    TRIpartite Motif (TRIM) family proteins are ring finger domain-containing, multi-domain proteins implicated in many biological processes. Members of the TRIM-9/C-I subfamily of TRIM proteins, including TRIM-9, MID1 and MID2, have neuronal functions and are associated with neurological diseases. To explore whether the functions of C-I TRIM proteins are conserved in invertebrates, we analyzed Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila trim-9 mutants. C. elegans trim-9 mutants exhibit defects in the ventral guidance of hermaphrodite specific neuron (HSN) and the touch neuron AVM. Further genetic analyses indicate that TRIM-9 participates in the UNC-6-UNC-40 attraction pathway. Asymmetric distribution of UNC-40 during HSN development is normal in trim-9 mutants. However, the asymmetric localization of MIG-10, a downstream effector of UNC-40, is abolished in trim-9 mutants. These results suggest that TRIM-9 functions upstream of MIG-10 in the UNC-40 pathway. Moreover, we showed that TRIM-9 exhibits E3 ubiquitin ligase activity in vitro and this activity is important for TRIM-9 function in vivo. Additionally, we found that Drosophila trim-9 is required for the midline attraction of a group of sensory neuron axons. Over-expression of the Netrin/UNC-6 receptor Frazzled suppresses the guidance defects in trim-9 mutants. Our study reveals an evolutionarily conserved function of TRIM-9 in the UNC-40/Frazzled-mediated UNC-6/Netrin attraction pathway.

  19. Determinants of the higher order association of the restriction factor TRIM5alpha and other tripartite motif (TRIM) proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Xing; Yeung, Darwin F; Fiegen, Ann M; Sodroski, Joseph

    2011-08-12

    Many tripartite motif (TRIM) proteins self-associate, forming dimers and higher order complexes. For example, dimers of TRIM5α, a host factor that restricts retrovirus infection, assemble into higher order arrays on the surface of the viral capsid, resulting in an increase in avidity. Here we show that the higher order association of different TRIM proteins exhibits a wide range of efficiencies. Homologous association (self-association) was more efficient than the heterologous association of different TRIM proteins, indicating that specificity determinants of higher order self-association exist. To investigate the structural determinants of higher order self-association, we studied TRIM mutants and chimeras. These studies revealed the following: 1) the RING domain contributes to the efficiency of higher order self-association, which enhances the binding of TRIM5α to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) capsid; 2) the RING and B-box 2 domains work together as a homologous unit to promote higher order association of dimers; 3) dimerization is probably required for efficient higher order self-association; 4) the Linker 2 region contributes to higher order self-association, independently of effects of Linker 2 changes on TRIM dimerization; and 5) for efficiently self-associating TRIM proteins, the B30.2(SPRY) domain is not required for higher order self-association. These results support a model in which both ends of the core TRIM dimer (RING-B-box 2 at one end and Linker 2 at the other) contribute to the formation of higher order arrays.

  20. An inverse method for computation of structural stiffness distributions of aeroelastically optimized wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, David M.

    1993-04-01

    An inverse method has been developed to compute the structural stiffness properties of wings given a specified wing loading and aeroelastic twist distribution. The method directly solves for the bending and torsional stiffness distribution of the wing using a modal representation of these properties. An aeroelastic design problem involving the use of a computational aerodynamics method to optimize the aeroelastic twist distribution of a tighter wing operating at maneuver flight conditions is used to demonstrate the application of the method. This exercise verifies the ability of the inverse scheme to accurately compute the structural stiffness distribution required to generate a specific aeroelastic twist under a specified aeroelastic load.

  1. Aeroelastic Tailoring of a Plate Wing with Functionally Graded Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunning, Peter D.; Stanford, Bret K.; Kim, H. Alicia; Jutte, Christine V.

    2014-01-01

    This work explores the use of functionally graded materials for the aeroelastic tailoring of a metallic cantilevered plate-like wing. Pareto trade-off curves between dynamic stability (flutter) and static aeroelastic stresses are obtained for a variety of grading strategies. A key comparison is between the effectiveness of material grading, geometric grading (i.e., plate thickness variations), and using both simultaneously. The introduction of material grading does, in some cases, improve the aeroelastic performance. This improvement, and the physical mechanism upon which it is based, depends on numerous factors: the two sets of metallic material parameters used for grading, the sweep of the plate, the aspect ratio of the plate, and whether the material is graded continuously or discretely.

  2. Application of the Finite Element Method to Rotary Wing Aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straub, F. K.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1982-01-01

    A finite element method for the spatial discretization of the dynamic equations of equilibrium governing rotary-wing aeroelastic problems is presented. Formulation of the finite element equations is based on weighted Galerkin residuals. This Galerkin finite element method reduces algebraic manipulative labor significantly, when compared to the application of the global Galerkin method in similar problems. The coupled flap-lag aeroelastic stability boundaries of hingeless helicopter rotor blades in hover are calculated. The linearized dynamic equations are reduced to the standard eigenvalue problem from which the aeroelastic stability boundaries are obtained. The convergence properties of the Galerkin finite element method are studied numerically by refining the discretization process. Results indicate that four or five elements suffice to capture the dynamics of the blade with the same accuracy as the global Galerkin method.

  3. Automatic channel trimming for control systems: A concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandervoort, R. J.; Sykes, H. A.

    1977-01-01

    Set of bias signals added to channel inputs automatically normalize differences between channels. Algorithm and second feedback loop compute trim biases. Concept could be applied to regulators and multichannel servosystems for remote manipulators in undersea mining.

  4. 1. GENERAL VIEW. TRIM, ROOF AND STABLE DOORS ALL ARE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL VIEW. TRIM, ROOF AND STABLE DOORS ALL ARE PAINTED RED. HEX SIGNS ARE PAINTED OCHRE, BLACK, RED, WHITE AND BLUE. NOTE PAINTED FLAGS ON SHED - Decorated White Barn, (Maiden Creek Township), Maiden Creek, Berks County, PA

  5. TRIM.FaTE Public Reference Library Documentation

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    TRIM.FaTE is a spatially explicit, compartmental mass balance model that describes the movement and transformation of pollutants over time, through a user-defined, bounded system that includes both biotic and abiotic compartments.

  6. 21. First floor, west wall, detail of molding trim ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. First floor, west wall, detail of molding trim - Veterans Administration Center, Officers Duplex Quarters, 5302 East Kellogg (Legal Address); 5500 East Kellogg (Common Address), Wichita, Sedgwick County, KS

  7. TRIM proteins as RING finger E3 ubiquitin ligases.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    The tripartite motif(TRIM) proteins harboring the RING finger, B-box and coiled-coil (RBCC) domain motifs form a large protein family. The members of this family are involved in various biological processes, including growth, differentiation, apoptosis and transcription and also in diseases and oncogenesis. Recent studies have revealed that TRIM proteins play key roles in innate antiviral immunity. An accumulating body of evidence has demonstrated that some TRIM proteins function as E3 ubiquitin ligases in specific ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation pathways; however, the precise mechanisms underlying this function have not been fully elucidated. In this chapter, we focus on the TRIM family of proteins specially with regard to E3 ligase.

  8. Remapping algorithms: application to trimming operations in sheet metal forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neto, D. M.; Diogo, C. M. A.; Neves, T. F.; Oliveira, M. C.; Alves, J. L.; Menezes, L. F.

    2016-08-01

    Most of sheet metal forming processes comprise intermediate trimming operations to remove superfluous material. These operations are required for subsequent forming operations. On the other hand, the springback is strongly influenced by the trimming operations that change the part stiffness and the stress field. From the numerical point of view, this involves the geometrical trimming of the finite element mesh and subsequent remapping of the state variables. This study presents a remapping method based on Dual Kriging interpolation, specifically developed for hexahedral finite elements, which has been implemented in DD3TRIM in-house code. Its performance is compared with the one of the Incremental Volumetric Remapping method, using the split-ring test to highlight their advantages and limitations. The numerical simulation of the forming processes is performed with DD3IMP finite element solver.

  9. 32. TRIM SAWS IN BACKGROUND, VIEW FROM SOUTH WEST. NOTE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. TRIM SAWS IN BACKGROUND, VIEW FROM SOUTH WEST. NOTE WASTE CONVEYOR IN FOREGROUND, CANT ROLL CASE TO BEAM SAW, THEN ROLL CASE FROM EDGER IN MIDDLE GROUND. - Hull-Oakes Lumber Company, 23837 Dawson Road, Monroe, Benton County, OR

  10. 155. Credit ER. Hand cleaning and trimming of Coleman canal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    155. Credit ER. Hand cleaning and trimming of Coleman canal after excavation by steam shovel. (ER, v. 64 1911 p. 701). - Battle Creek Hydroelectric System, Battle Creek & Tributaries, Red Bluff, Tehama County, CA

  11. Total Risk Integrated Methodology (TRIM) - Peer Review and Publications

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Peer review: Consistent with Agency peer review policy, and the 1994 Agency Task Force on Environmental Regulatory Modeling, internal and external peer review has been an integral part of the TRIM development plan.

  12. Optimization of rotor blades for combined structural, performance, and aeroelastic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, David A.; Cheng, Y. P.

    1989-01-01

    The strategies whereby helicopter rotor blades can be optimized for combined structural, inertial, dynamic, aeroelastic, and aerodynamic performance characteristics are outlined. There are three key ingredients in the successful execution of such an interdisciplinary optimization. The first is the definition of a satisfactory performance index that combines all aspects of the problem without too many constraints. The second element is the judicious choice of computationally efficient analysis tools for the various quantitative components in both the cost functional and constraints. The third element is an effective strategy for combining the various disciplines either in parallel or sequential optimizations.

  13. Some experiences using wind-tunnel models in active control studies. [minimization of aeroelastic response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doggett, R. V., Jr.; Abel, I.; Ruhlin, C. L.

    1976-01-01

    A status report and review of wind tunnel model experimental techniques that have been developed to study and validate the use of active control technology for the minimization of aeroelastic response are presented. Modeling techniques, test procedures, and data analysis methods used in three model studies are described. The studies include flutter mode suppression on a delta-wing model, flutter mode suppression and ride quality control on a 1/30-size model of the B-52 CCV airplane, and an active lift distribution control system on a 1/22 size C-5A model.

  14. Investigation of an automatic trim algorithm for restructurable aircraft control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, J.; Eterno, J.; Grunberg, D.; Looze, D.; Ostroff, A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper develops and solves an automatic trim problem for restructurable aircraft control. The trim solution is applied as a feed-forward control to reject measurable disturbances following control element failures. Disturbance rejection and command following performances are recovered through the automatic feedback control redesign procedure described by Looze et al. (1985). For this project the existence of a failure detection mechanism is assumed, and methods to cope with potential detection and identification inaccuracies are addressed.

  15. The effect of asymmetric attack on trim angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruse, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Ballistic range tests were conducted to determine the effect of an asymmetrically ablated heat shield on the trim angle of attack of an entry vehicle. The tests, which were in support of Project Galileo, were conducted in atmospheric air at Mach numbers from 0.7 to 2.0. For the results for the configuration that was tested, the deduced trim angle varied between 13 deg and 21 deg.

  16. Data Comparisons and Summary of the Second Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heeg, Jennifer; Wieseman, Carol D.; Chwalowski, Pawel

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the computational results generated by participating teams of the second Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop and compare them with experimental data. Aeroelastic and rigid configurations of the Benchmark Supercritical Wing (BSCW) wind tunnel model served as the focus for the workshop. The comparison data sets include unforced ("steady") system responses, forced pitch oscillations and coupled fluid-structure responses. Integrated coefficients, frequency response functions, and flutter onset conditions are compared. The flow conditions studied were in the transonic range, including both attached and separated flow conditions. Some of the technical discussions that took place at the workshop are summarized.

  17. Survey of Army/NASA rotorcraft aeroelastic stability research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormiston, Robert A.; Warmbrodt, William G.; Hodges, Dewey H.; Peters, David A.

    1988-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental developments in the aeroelastic and aeromechanical stability of helicopters and tilt-rotor aircraft are addressed. Included are the underlying nonlinear structural mechanics of slender rotating beams, necessary for accurate modeling of elastic cantilever rotor blades, and the development of dynamic inflow, an unsteady aerodynamic theory for low frequency aeroelastic stability applications. Analytical treatment of isolated rotor stability in hover and forward flight, coupled rotor-fuselage stability are considered. Results of parametric investigations of system behavior are presented, and correlations between theoretical results and experimental data from small- and large-scale wind tunnel and flight testing are discussed.

  18. Problems and progress in aeroelasticity for interdisciplinary design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, E. Carson, Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Some problems and progress in the development of aerodynamic and aeroelastic computational capabilities are reviewed with emphasis on needs for use in current interdisciplinary design procedures as well as for stand-alone analyses. The primary focus is on integral-equation methods which are well suited for general, accurate, efficient, and unified treatment of flow around vehicles having arbitrary shapes, motions, and deformations at subsonic, transonic, and supersonic speeds up to high angles of attack. Computational methods for potential flows and viscous flows are discussed, and some applications are shown. Calculation of steady and unsteady aeroelastic characteristics of aircraft with nonlinear aerodynamic behavior is also addressed briefly.

  19. A Parallel Multiblock Mesh Movement Scheme For Complex Aeroelastic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potsdam, Mark A.; Guruswamy, Guru P.

    2000-01-01

    A scheme has been developed for the movement of multiblock, structured grids due to surface deformation arising from aeroelastics, control surface movement, or design optimization. Elements of the method include a blending of a surface spline approximation and nearest surface point movement for block boundaries. Transfinite interpolation is employed for volume grid deformation. The scheme is demonstrated on a range of simple and complex aeroelastic aircraft applications using Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics and modal structural analyses on parallel processors. Results are robust and accurate, requiring only minimal user input specification.

  20. Aerodynamic optimization, comparison, and trim design of canard and conventional high performance general aviation configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, M. W.; Selberg, B. P.

    1983-01-01

    A design study has been conducted to optimize trim cruise flight of high performance general aviation canard aircraft which achieve minimum drag. In order to investigate the advantages and disadvantages of canard configured aircraft, corresponding conventional tail-aft 'baseline' aircraft were designed and used for comparison. Two-dimensional predictions were obtained by coupling inviscid results from a vortex panel multi-element program to a momentum integral boundary layer analysis. Using the results of the two-dimensional vortex panel analysis, a vortex lattice method was employed to predict the finite wing results. The analysis utilized a turbulent airfoil and a natural laminar airfoil which are two NASA state-of-the-art airfoil sections. The canard aircraft designs give quantitative results of wing and canard loadings, wing-to-canard moment arm ratios, and aspect ratio effects for trim cruise flight for a wide range of wing-to-canard area ratios. Both canard and baseline aircraft achieved a 25 to 30 percent improvement in performance over typical current technology aircraft, but high canard loading necessary for trim resulted in slightly poorer performance of the canard aircraft as compared to the baseline designs.