Science.gov

Sample records for aerogel capture cells

  1. Silica Aerogel Captures Cosmic Dust Intact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.

    1994-01-01

    The mesostructure of silica aerogel resembles stings of grapes, ranging in size from 10 to 100 angstrom. This fine mesostructure transmits nearly 90 percent of incident light in the visible, while providing sufficiently gentle dissipation of the kinetric energy of hypervelocity cosmic dust particles to permit their intact capture. We introduced silica aerogel in 1987 as capture medium to take advantage of its low density, fine mesostruicture and most importantly, its transparency, allowing optical location of captured micron sized particles.

  2. Eureka! Aerogel capture of meteoroids in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brownlee, D. E.; Horz, F.; Hrubsch, L.; Mcdonnell, J. A. M.; Tsou, P.; Williams, J.

    1994-01-01

    Light gas gun studies have shown that 6 km/s solid mineral and glass test particles can be successively captured in 0.05 g cm(exp -3) aerogel without severe heating or fragmentation. In spite of this work, there has been uncertainty in the performance of aerogel for hypervelocity capture of real meteoroids. Natural impacts differ from simulations in that the particles are likely to be structurally weak and they typically impact at higher velocity that can be simulated in the laboratory. We are fortunate now to have had two successful capture experiments using aerogel exposed in space. These experiments provide fundamental data for the assessment of the value of silica aerogel for capture of hypervelocity meteoroids from spacecraft. The first experiment used 0.02 g cm(exp -3) aerogel flown on the lid of a Shuttle Get Away Special canister. During its 9 day exposure, the 0.165 m(exp 2) of aerogel in this Sample Return Experiment (SRE) captured two long 'carrot-shaped' tracks and one highly fractured bowl shaped 'crater'. The second collection was with 0.04 m(exp 2) of 0.05 g cm(exp -3) aerogel exposed on ESA's Eureca freeflying spacecraft that was exposed for 11 months before recovery by the Shuttle. The Eureca aerogel exposure consisted of four 10x10 cm module trays that were part of the TiCCE meteoroid collector built by the University of Kent at Canterbury. To date we have found ten 'carrot-shaped' tracks and two 'craters' on this experiment. The longest tracks in both exposures are over 2 mm long. Two of the TiCCE modules had a 0.1 micron Al film suspended a millimeter above the aerogel. On these modules several of the projectiles fragmented during passage through the film producing fields of carrot shaped tracks from the resulting miniature 'meteor' shower. Most of the tracks in these showers have observable particles at their ends. We have extracted one of the carrot track meteoroids and mounted it in epoxy for sectioning. So far the examination of these 14

  3. Hypervelocity Capture of Meteoritic Particles in Nonsilica Aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    S Jones; G Flynn

    2011-12-31

    The Stardust mission captured particles from the comet 81P/Wild 2 in gradient density silica aerogel and returned the collected samples to earth in 2006. The analyses of these particles have revealed several new insights into the formation of our solar system. However, since the aerogel used as the capture material was silica, the elemental analyses of the silica-rich particles were made more complicated in certain ways due to the mixing of the silicon of the particles and that of the aerogel. By using a nonsilica aerogel, future elemental analyses of silica-rich particles captured in aerogel could be made more straightforward. Resorcinol/formaldehyde (RF), alumina, and zirconia aerogels were impact tested with meteoritic fragments and the captured fragments were mapped with synchrotron-based X-ray microprobe (XRM) and the particles were analyzed with X-ray fluorescence (XRF). The resorcinol/formaldehyde aerogel proved to be the best capture material, in that it could be keystoned and XRF could be used to locate and analyze particles that were less than 10 {micro}m.

  4. Bulbous tracks arising from hypervelocity capture in aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigo-Rodríguez, J. M.; Domínguez, G.; Burchell, M. J.; Hörz, F.; Llorca, J.

    2008-02-01

    The capture of 81P/Wild 2 cometary particles in aerogel with a well-defined impact velocity (6.1 km s-1) has provided a wealth of data concerning the composition of Jupiter-family comets. To interpret this data we must understand the capture processes in the aerogel. A major category of tracks are those with bulbous cavities lined with particle fragments. We present a new model to account for the production of these “turnip”-shaped impact cavities. The model uses a thermodynamic approach in order to account for the likely expansion of vapors from particles rich in volatile species. Volume measurements of some of the largest Stardust tracks analysed so far, together with theoretical considerations, indicate that for the majority of Stardust cometary aggregate particle impacts, fragmentation of relatively weak impactors (combined with radial expansion of the resulting subgrains) is the leading cause of bulbous track production, while volatile release of vapors played a secondary role.

  5. The microbe capture experiment in space: Fluorescence microscopic detection of microbes captured by aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugino, Tomohiro; Yokobori, Shin-Ichi; Yang, Yinjie; Kawaguchi, Yuko; Okudaira, Kyoko; Tabata, Makoto; Kawai, Hideyuki; Hasegawa, Sunao; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    particles such as clay). The surface of micro-particles captured by aerogel is often vitrified. The non-specific fluorescent light is often observed from vitrified materials. Therefore, we need to distinguish fluorescent light of stained microbes from that of vitrified ma-terials. We are going to use two types of differences (wavelength dependence and attenuation rate of fluorescent) between stained microbes with DNA-specific fluorescent dye and other ma-terials such as clay and aerogel. Fluorescent light of stained microbes shows attenuation faster than that of vitrified materials. Fluorescent light of vitrified materials shows broader range of emission spectra than that of stained microbes. In addition, we simulated the high-speed collision experiment of micro-particles to the aerogel with the two stage light gas gun (ca. 4 km/s). The micro-particles containing pre-stained and dried cells of Deinococcus radiodurans mixed with clay material were used for the collision experiment, and the captured particles were observed with fluorescence microscope. This experiment suggests that the captured microbes can be detected and be distinguished from clay materials. Reference [1] Yang, Y. et al. (2009) Biol. Sci. Space, 23, 151-163. [2] Yang, Y., et al. (2008) Biol. Sci. Space 22:18-25. [3] Yang, Y., et al. (2008) JAXA-RR-08-001: 34-42. [4] Yang, Y., et al. (2009) Internatl. J. Syst. Evol. Bacteriol., 59: 1862-1866. [5] Yang, Y. et al. (2010) Internatl. J. Syst. Evol. Bacteriol. (in press). [6] Arrhenius, S. (1908) Worlds in the Making-the Evolution of the Universe (translation to English by H. Borns) Harper and Brothers Publishers, New York. [7]Crick, F. (1981) Life Itself. Simon Schuster, New York. [8] W.L. Nicholson et al., Microbiol. Mol. Biol. Rev. 64 (2000) 548. [9] G. Horneck et al., Orig. Life Evol. Biosph. 31 (2001) 527. [10] Chyba, C. and C. Sagan (1992) Nature 355: 125-132. [11] Sandford, S. A., et al. (2006) Science 314: 1720-1724. [12] Yamagishi, A., et al. (2008

  6. Electron Beam Analysis of Micrometeoroids Captured in Aerogel as Stardust Analogues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, G. A.; Sheffield-Parker, J.; Bradley, P.; Kearsley, A. T.; Dai, Z. R.; Mayo, S. C.; Teslich, N.; Snead, C.; Westphal, A. J.; Ishii, H.

    2005-01-01

    In January 2004, NASA s Stardust spacecraft passed through the tail of Comet 81P/Wild-2. The on-board dust flux monitor instrument indicated that numerous micro- and nano-meter sized cometary dust particles were captured by the dedicated silica aerogel capture cell. The collected cometary particles will be returned to Earth in January 2006. Current Stardust analogues are: (i) Light-gas-gun accelerated individual mineral grains and carbonaceous meteoritic material in aerogels at the Stardust encounter velocity ca.approximately 6 kilometers per second. (ii) Aerogels exposed in low-Earth orbit (LEO) containing preserved cosmic dust grains. Studies of these impacts offer insight into the potential state of the captured cometary dust by Stardust and the suitability of various analytical techniques. A number of papers have discussed the application of sophisticated synchrotron analytical techniques to analyze Stardust particles. Yet much of the understanding gained on the composition and mineralogy of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) has come from electron microscopy studies. Here we discuss the application of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for Stardust during the preliminary phase of post-return investigations.

  7. Purity and cleanness of aerogel as a cosmic dust capture medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.; Fleming, R. H.; Lindley, P. M.; Craig, A. Y.; Blake, D.

    1994-01-01

    The capability for capturing micrometeoroids intact through laboratory simulations and in space in passive underdense silica aerogel offers a valuable tool for cosmic dust research. The integrity of the sample handling medium can substantially modify the integrity of the sample. Intact capture is a violent hypervelocity event: the integrity of the capturing medium can cause even greater modification of the sample. Doubts of the suitability of silica aerogel as a capture medium were raised at the 20th LPSC, and questions were raised again at the recent workshop on Particle Capture, Recovery, and Velocity Trajectory Measurement Technologies. Assessment of aerogel's volatile components and carbon contents have been made. We report the results of laboratory measurements of the purity and cleanliness of silica aerogel used for several Sample Return Experiments flown on the Get Away Special program.

  8. A Fluorescent Aerogel for Capture and Identification of Interplanetary and Interstellar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominguez, Gerardo; Westphal, Andrew J.; Phillips, Mark L. F.; Jones, Steven M.

    2003-01-01

    Aerogels are extremely low-density solids whose superiority as capturing media for hypervelocity (v > 0.5 km/s) grains has been well established. A prominent example is the use of silica aerogel as the collecting medium for cometary and interstellar grains on NASA s Stardust mission. Aerogel collectors have been deployed in low-earth orbit, but severe background from anthropogenic orbital debris has so far prevented the identification of more than a handful of interplanetary particles. No interstellar particles have been identified so far. Since they are on hyperbolic orbits, extraterrestrial particles are faster than orbital debris, so could in principle be identified on that basis, but existing aerogels give little information on impact velocity. With this in mind, we have developed a novel calorimetric aerogel which passively records the kinetic energy of captured hypervelocity particles.

  9. Silica Aerogel for Capturing Intact Interplanetary Dust Particles for the Tanpopo Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabata, Makoto; Yano, Hajime; Kawai, Hideyuki; Imai, Eiichi; Kawaguchi, Yuko; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we report the progress in developing a silica-aerogel-based cosmic dust capture panel for use in the Tanpopo experiment on the International Space Station (ISS). Previous studies revealed that ultralow-density silica aerogel tiles, comprising two layers with densities of 0.01 and 0.03 g/cm3 developed using our production technique, were suitable for achieving the scientific objectives of the astrobiological mission. A special density configuration (i.e., box framing) aerogel with a holder was designed to construct the capture panels. Qualification tests for an engineering model of the capture panel as an instrument aboard the ISS were successful. Sixty box-framing aerogel tiles were manufactured in a contamination-controlled environment.

  10. Silica aerogel for capturing intact interplanetary dust particles for the Tanpopo experiment.

    PubMed

    Tabata, Makoto; Yano, Hajime; Kawai, Hideyuki; Imai, Eiichi; Kawaguchi, Yuko; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we report the progress in developing a silica-aerogel-based cosmic dust capture panel for use in the Tanpopo experiment on the International Space Station (ISS). Previous studies revealed that ultralow-density silica aerogel tiles, comprising two layers with densities of 0.01 and 0.03 g/cm(3) developed using our production technique, were suitable for achieving the scientific objectives of the astrobiological mission. A special density configuration (i.e., box framing) aerogel with a holder was designed to construct the capture panels. Qualification tests for an engineering model of the capture panel as an instrument aboard the ISS were successful. Sixty box-framing aerogel tiles were manufactured in a contamination-controlled environment.

  11. Identification of minerals and meteoritic materials via Raman techniques after capture in hypervelocity impacts on aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, M J; Mann, J; Creighton, J A; Kearsley, A; Graham, G A; Esposito, A P; Franchi, I A; Westphal, A J; Snead, C

    2004-10-04

    For this study, an extensive suite of mineral particles analogous to components of cosmic dust were tested to determine if their Raman signatures can be recognized after hypervelocity capture in aerogel. The mineral particles were mainly of greater than 20 micrometers in size and were accelerated onto the silica aerogel by light gas gun shots. It was found that all the individual minerals captured in aerogel could be subsequently identified using Raman (or fluorescent) spectra. The beam spot size used for the laser illumination was of the order of 5 micrometers, and in some cases the captured particles were of a similar small size. In some samples fired into aerogel there was observed a shift in the wavenumbers of some of the Raman bands, a result of the trapped particles being at quite high temperatures due to heating by the laser. Temperatures of samples under laser illumination were estimated from the relative intensities of Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman bands, or, in the case of ruby particles, from the wavenumber of fluorescence bands excited by the laser. It was found that the temperature of particles in aerogel varied greatly, dependent upon laser power and the nature of the particle. In the worst case, some particles were shown to have temperatures in the 500-700 C range at a laser power of about 3 mW at the sample. However most of the mineral particles examined at this laser power had temperatures below 200 C. This is sufficiently low a temperature not to damage most materials expected to be found captured in aerogel in space. In addition, selected meteorite samples were examined to obtain Raman signatures of their constituent minerals and were then shot into aerogel. It was possible to find several Raman signatures after capture in aerogel and obtain a Raman map of a whole grain in situ in the aerogel. Finally, a Raman analysis was carried out of a particle captured in aerogel in space and carbonaceous material identified. In general therefore it is

  12. Capture of Hypervelocity Particles with Low-Density Aerogel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoerz, Friedrich; Cintala, Mark J.; Zolensky, Michael E.; Bernhard, Ronald B.; Haynes, Gerald; See, Thomas H.; Tsou, Peter; Brownlee, Donald E.

    1998-01-01

    Recent impact experiments conducted at Johnson Space Center supported a space-exposed flight instrument called the orbital debris collector (ODC) to see whether SiO2 acrogel performed adequately as a collector to capture cosmic dust particles and/or manmade debris, or whether additional development is needed. The first ODC was flown aboard the Mir for 18 months, while the second will be flown aboard a spacecraft (Stardust, to be launched in 1999) that will encounter the comet Wild 2 and return to Earth. Aerogels are highly porous materials that decelerate high-velocity particles without substantial melting or modifications to the particles' components; in other denser materials, these particles would melt or vaporize upon impact. The experimental data in this report must be considered somewhat qualitative because they are characterized by substantial, if not intolerable, scatter, possibly due to experimental difficulties in duplicating given sets of initial impact conditions. Therefore, this report is a chronological guide of the experimenters' attempts, difficulties, progress, and evaluations for future tests.

  13. Flexible, Mechanically Durable Aerogel Composites for Oil Capture and Recovery.

    PubMed

    Karatum, Osman; Steiner, Stephen A; Griffin, Justin S; Shi, Wenbo; Plata, Desiree L

    2016-01-13

    More than 30 years separate the two largest oil spills in North American history (the Ixtoc I and Macondo well blowouts), yet the responses to both disasters were nearly identical in spite of advanced material innovation during the same time period. Novel, mechanically durable sorbents could enable (a) sorbent use in the open ocean, (b) automated deployment to minimize workforce exposure to toxic chemicals, and (c) mechanical recovery of spilled oils. Here, we explore the use of two mechanically durable, low-density (0.1-0.2 g cm(-3)), highly porous (85-99% porosity), hydrophobic (water contact angles >120°), flexible aerogel composite blankets as sorbent materials for automated oil capture and recovery: Cabot Thermal Wrap (TW) and Aspen Aerogels Spaceloft (SL). Uptake of crude oils (Iraq and Sweet Bryan Mound oils) was 8.0 ± 0.1 and 6.5 ± 0.3 g g(-1) for SL and 14.0 ± 0.1 and 12.2 ± 0.1 g g(-1) for TW, respectively, nearly twice as high as similar polyurethane- and polypropylene-based devices. Compound-specific uptake experiments and discrimination against water uptake suggested an adsorption-influenced sorption mechanism. Consistent with that mechanism, chemical extraction oil recoveries were 95 ± 2 (SL) and 90 ± 2% (TW), but this is an undesirable extraction route in decentralized oil cleanup efforts. In contrast, mechanical extraction routes are favorable, and a modest compression force (38 N) yielded 44.7 ± 0.5% initially to 42.0 ± 0.4% over 10 reuse cycles for SL and initially 55.0 ± 0.1% for TW, degrading to 30.0 ± 0.2% by the end of 10 cycles. The mechanical integrity of SL deteriorated substantially (800 ± 200 to 80 ± 30 kPa), whereas TW was more robust (380 ± 80 to 700 ± 100 kPa) over 10 uptake-and-compression extraction cycles.

  14. Flexible, Mechanically Durable Aerogel Composites for Oil Capture and Recovery.

    PubMed

    Karatum, Osman; Steiner, Stephen A; Griffin, Justin S; Shi, Wenbo; Plata, Desiree L

    2016-01-13

    More than 30 years separate the two largest oil spills in North American history (the Ixtoc I and Macondo well blowouts), yet the responses to both disasters were nearly identical in spite of advanced material innovation during the same time period. Novel, mechanically durable sorbents could enable (a) sorbent use in the open ocean, (b) automated deployment to minimize workforce exposure to toxic chemicals, and (c) mechanical recovery of spilled oils. Here, we explore the use of two mechanically durable, low-density (0.1-0.2 g cm(-3)), highly porous (85-99% porosity), hydrophobic (water contact angles >120°), flexible aerogel composite blankets as sorbent materials for automated oil capture and recovery: Cabot Thermal Wrap (TW) and Aspen Aerogels Spaceloft (SL). Uptake of crude oils (Iraq and Sweet Bryan Mound oils) was 8.0 ± 0.1 and 6.5 ± 0.3 g g(-1) for SL and 14.0 ± 0.1 and 12.2 ± 0.1 g g(-1) for TW, respectively, nearly twice as high as similar polyurethane- and polypropylene-based devices. Compound-specific uptake experiments and discrimination against water uptake suggested an adsorption-influenced sorption mechanism. Consistent with that mechanism, chemical extraction oil recoveries were 95 ± 2 (SL) and 90 ± 2% (TW), but this is an undesirable extraction route in decentralized oil cleanup efforts. In contrast, mechanical extraction routes are favorable, and a modest compression force (38 N) yielded 44.7 ± 0.5% initially to 42.0 ± 0.4% over 10 reuse cycles for SL and initially 55.0 ± 0.1% for TW, degrading to 30.0 ± 0.2% by the end of 10 cycles. The mechanical integrity of SL deteriorated substantially (800 ± 200 to 80 ± 30 kPa), whereas TW was more robust (380 ± 80 to 700 ± 100 kPa) over 10 uptake-and-compression extraction cycles. PMID:26701744

  15. Analytical Methods for Discriminating Stardust in Aerogel Capture Media

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, S; Ishii, H A; Bradley, J P; Luening, K; Ignatyev, K; Pianetta, P

    2007-09-04

    Comet 81P/Wild 2's serendipitous orbit change to the inner solar system in 1974 offered researchers a rare opportunity to sample cometary material from the Kuiper belt, a repository of material left over from solar system formation {approx}4.6 Gyr ago. NASA's Stardust mission intercepted the comet in January 2004 and returned with material collected from its tail in January 2006. The cometary material, consisting of particles ranging from 10 microns down to <2 nm, was collected in aerogel, a very low density ({approx}3 mg/cm cm3) silica foam, to minimize the effects of deceleration from 6.1 km/s. The entire deceleration track is extracted from the aerogel block as a pyramidal shape known as a keystone which can be mapped using x-ray fluorescence prior to extraction of terminal or intermediate particles for other analyses. One goal of the track mapping is to determine the bulk composition of the cometary material returned. Unfortunately, although the aerogel is predominantly SiO{sub 2}, there are sufficient quantities of trace elements similar to those expected in the cometary material to require sophisticated discrimination techniques in order to decide whether a fluorescence map pixel contains only aerogel or both aerogel and cometary material. We have developed a dual threshold analysis approach for better distinguishing cometary material from aerogel contaminants and have applied it to five Stardust impact tracks and terminal particles. Here, we present aspects of the dual threshold approach and demonstrate its impact on track composition for one track.

  16. An Extraction and Curation Technique for Particles Captured in Aerogel Collectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphal, A. J.; Snead, C.; Dominquez, G.; Bradley, J. P.; Zolensky, M. E.; Flynn, G.; Brownlee, D.

    2003-01-01

    In 2006, the STARDUST mission will return samples of cometary, interplanetary and interstellar dust captured in aerogel collectors. The curation strategy (or strategies) for STARDUST remain to be defined. Here we present a technique for curation of particles captured in aerogel which will simultaneously preserve the entire particle track, and could allow for the elemental in situ analysis of both the particle residue at the terminus of the track and any particle residues located along the track. This builds on work that we have previously reported elsewhere.

  17. Aerogel tempelated ZnO dye-sensitized solar cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Hamann, T. W.; Martinson , A. B. E.; Elam, J. W.; Pellin, M. J.; Hupp, J. T.; Materials Science Division; Northwestern Univ.

    2008-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition is employed to conformally coat low density, high surface area aerogel films with ZnO. The ZnO/aerogel membranes are incorporated as photoanodes in dye-sensitized solar cells, which exhibit excellent power efficiencies of up to 2.4% under 100 mW cm{sup -2} light intensity.

  18. Particle Tracks in Aerogel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    In an experiment using a special air gun, particles are shot into aerogel at high velocities. Closeup of particles that have been captured in aerogel are shown here. The particles leave a carrot-shaped trail in the aerogel. Aerogel was used on the Stardust spacecraft to capture comet particles from Comet Wild 2.

  19. FUNCTIONALIZED SILICA AEROGELS: ADVANCED MATERIALS TO CAPTURE AND IMMOBILIZE RADIOACTIVE IODINE

    SciTech Connect

    Matyas, Josef; Fryxell, Glen E.; Busche, Brad J.; Wallace, Krys; Fifield, Leonard S.

    2011-11-16

    To support the future expansion of nuclear energy, an effective method is needed to capture and safely store radiological iodine-129 released during reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. Various materials have been investigated to capture and immobilize iodine. In most cases, however, the materials that are effective for capturing iodine cannot subsequently be sintered/densified to create a stable composite that could be a viable waste form. We have developed chemically modified, highly porous, silica aerogels that show sorption capacities higher than 440 mg of I2 per gram at 150 C. An iodine uptake test in dry air containing 4.2 ppm of iodine demonstrated no breakthrough after 3.5 h and indicated a decontamination factor in excess of 310. Preliminary densification tests showed that the I2-loaded aerogels retained more than 92 wt% of I2 after thermal sintering with pressure assistance at 1200 C for 30 min. These high capture and retention efficiencies for I2 can be further improved by optimizing the functionalization process and the chemistry as well as the sintering conditions.

  20. Interplanetary and Interstellar Dust Particles: Reentry Heating and Capture in Aerogel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szydlik, Paul P.

    1996-01-01

    Studies of interplanetary and interstellar dust can provide significant information on the evolution of the solar system or stars, respectively. However, for reliable analysis it is crucial to know how the particles have been modified during reentry (in the case of interplanetary dust particles, or [DP's) and impact into the capture medium. In the case of stratospheric capture, particles will be heated by atmospheric drag. Subsequent capture of the particles will result in heating, ablation, accretion of the capture medium and possible fragmentation. Modeling of these processes is a useful way of assessing their effects on the interpretation of the compositional data for these particles. Previous work on reentry heating has shown that heat diffusion alone cannot adequately account for temperature gradients observed in IDP's. In fact, for any reasonable thermal parameters, calculations show the particles to be nearly isothermal. Here we extend those studies to include phase transitions. These preliminary results are promising and show a significant temperature gradient for a 100 micron (diameter) particle. The actual capture of the particles in silica aerogel is being modeled using a comprehensive shock hydrodynamic code (called CTH). Various options of this code were investigated to attempt to make the most appropriate choice of methods of impact, equations of state, and processes of energy transfer from capture material to particle. The initial calculations with the code used only 'reasonable' estimates for the physical parameters of silica aerogel. Through the literature searches and personal contacts with the knowledgeable scientists, the best possible mechanical and thermal data have been made available for these computations.

  1. A Synchrotron-Based Facility for the in-situ Location, Chemical and Mineralogical Characterization of ~10 um Particles Captured in Aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, G.; Sutton, S; Lanzirotti, A

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Stardust mission collected dust from the coma of Comet Wild-2 on January 2nd, 2004, by direct capture into aerogel cells that flew through the dust coma at 6 km/s. Stardust collected several hundred comet particles >10 {mu}m in size. These comet samples were delivered to Earth on January 15th, 2006. We developed a facility at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory (Upton, NY, USA) for the in-situ characterization of 10 {mu}m particles collected in aerogel. These analytical instruments allow us to perform extensive chemical, mineralogical, and size-frequency characterization of particles captured in aerogel. These analyses are conducted without any invasive extraction, minimizing the possibility of contamination or particle loss during preparation. This facility was used to determine the chemical composition, the oxidation state, the mineralogy and to provide an indication of the grain size of the Wild-2 particles before they were removed from the aerogel. This information provides a catalog of particle types, allowing a more reasoned allocation of the particles to subsequent investigators based on a relatively detailed knowledge of the chemical composition and mineralogy of each particle. These measurements allowed a comparison of the chemical and mineralogical properties of the Wild-2 particles with other types of extraterrestrial materials, including interplanetary dust particles and meteorites. The success of in-situ analysis for Wild 2 particles demonstrates that synchrotron-based facilities will be important for the analysis of particles collected in aerogel on future earth-orbiting satellites and spacecraft.

  2. A Synchrotron Based Facility for the In-situ Location, Chemical and Mineralogical Characterization of ~10 micron Particles Captured in Aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, G.; Lanzirotti, A.

    NASA's Stardust spacecraft is expected to return ~1000 dust particles >10 μm in size from Comet Wild -2. The particles will be captured in aerogel at ~6 km/sec, thus they will be embedded at depths ~millimeters. During capture some particles may fragment or vaporize, leaving particle fragments and/or vapor along the entry trail. It is critical to characterize this material before the particle is extracted, because these small fragments and vapor may be lost during particle extraction. In addition, it is important to develop techniques for in-situ chemical and mineralogical characterization of particles, because the extraction method and the allocation of individual particles may depend on particle type. We are developing a synchrotron-based facility to locate and characterize particles >10 μm as-collected in the aerogel cells. The facility will perform 6 tasks: 3-D Mapping of the Locations of Individual Particles - We plan to use computed microtomography (CMT) to detect and locate individual ~10 μm particles. This will be important if the aerogel is not transparent because of damage to its surface by impact of submicron particles or by collection of submicron particles. X-Ray Fluorescence Analysis - Since fluorescence xrays from heavy elements- have a range in low-density aerogel that is long compared to the depth of the captured ~10 μm particles, we will perform quantitative chemical analysis for the major and minor elements with z > Ca. X-Ray Diffraction Analysis - We plan to obtain x ray diffraction patterns allowing- us to determine the major mineralogy of particles >10 μm in size. Oxidization States ­ We plan to perform Xray Absorption Near-Edge Structure- (XANES) spectroscopy to determine Fe &Cr oxidization states in particles >10 μm. Mapping the Distribution of Particles Along an Entry Trail - We expect to perform high resolution CMT to determine in 3D the distribution of fragments along the trail. Chemical Characterization of Fragments or Vapor Along

  3. Aerogel in Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Though ghostly in appearance like an hologram, aerogel is very solid. It feels like hard styrofoam to the touch. Aerogel was used on the Stardust spacecraft to capture comet particles from Comet Wild 2.

  4. Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination IX: High-Speed Interstellar Dust Analog Capture in Stardust Flight-Spare Aerogel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postberg, F.; Sterken, V.; Achilles, C.; Allen, C.; Bastien, R. K.; Frank, D.; Sandford, S. A.; Zolensky, M. E.; Butterworth, A.; Gainesforth, Z.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Stardust mission used silica aerogel slabs to slowly decelerate and capture impinging cosmic dust particles for return to Earth. During this process, impact tracks are generated along the trajectory of the particle into the aerogel. It is believed that the morphology and dimensions of these tracks, together with the state of captured grains at track termini, may be linked to the size, velocity, and density of the impacting cosmic dust grain. Here, we present the results of laboratory hypervelocity impact experiments, during which cosmic dust analog particles (diameters of between 0.2 and 0.4 lm), composed of olivine, orthopyroxene, or an organic polymer, were accelerated onto Stardust flight spare low-density (approximately 0.01 g/cu cm) silica aerogel. The impact velocities (3-21 km/s) were chosen to simulate the range of velocities expected during Stardust's interstellar dust (ISD) collection phases. Track lengths and widths, together with the success of particle capture, are analyzed as functions of impact velocity and particle composition, density, and size. Captured terminal particles from low-density organic projectiles become undetectable at lower velocities than those from similarly sized, denser mineral particles, which are still detectable (although substantially altered by the impact process) at 15 km/s. The survival of these terminal particles, together with the track dimensions obtained during low impact speed capture of small grains in the laboratory, indicates that two of the three best Stardust candidate extraterrestrial grains were actually captured at speeds much lower than predicted. Track length and diameters are, in general, more sensitive to impact velocities than previously expected, which makes tracks of particles with diameters of 0.4 lm and below hard to identify at low capture speeds (<10 km/s). Therefore, although captured intact, the majority of the interstellar dust grains returned to Earth by Stardust remain to be found.

  5. Aerogel microspheres from natural cellulose nanofibrils and their application as cell culture scaffold.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hongli; Sharma, Sudhir; Liu, Wenying; Mu, Wei; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Xiaodan; Deng, Yulin

    2014-07-14

    We demonstrated that ultralight pure natural aerogel microspheres can be fabricated using cellulose nanofibrials (CNF) directly. Experimentally, the CNF aqueous gel droplets, produced by spraying and atomizing through a steel nozzle, were collected into liquid nitrogen for instant freezing followed by freeze-drying. The aerogel microspheres are highly porous with bulk density as low as 0.0018 g cm(-3). The pore size of the cellulose aeogel microspheres ranges from nano- to macrometers. The unique ultralight and high porous structure ensured high moisture (~90 g g(-1)) and water uptake capacity (~100 g g(-1)) of the aerogel microspheres. Covalent cross-linking between the native nanofibrils and cross-linkers made the aerogel microspheres very stable even in a harsh environment. The present study also confirmed this kind of aerogel microspheres from native cellulose fibers can be used as cell culture scaffold.

  6. Aerogel sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Begag, Redouane; Rhine, Wendell E; Dong, Wenting

    2016-04-05

    The current invention describes methods and compositions of various sorbents based on aerogels of various silanes and their use as sorbent for carbon dioxide. Methods further provide for optimizing the compositions to increase the stability of the sorbents for prolonged use as carbon dioxide capture matrices.

  7. Study on Unit Cell Models and the Effective Thermal Conductivities of Silica Aerogel.

    PubMed

    Liu, He; Li, Zeng-Yao; Zhao, Xin-Peng; Tao, Wen-Quan

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, two modified unit cell models, truncated octahedron and cubic array of intersecting square rods with 45-degree rotation, are developed in consideration of the tortuous path of heat conduction in solid skeleton of silica aerogel. The heat conduction is analyzed for each model and the expressions of effective thermal conductivity of the modified unit cell models are derived. Considering the random microstructure of silica aerogel, the probability model is presented. We also discuss the effect of the thermal conductivity of aerogel backbone. The effective thermal conductivities calculated by the proposed probability model are in good agreement with available experimental data when the density of the aerogel is 110 kg/m3.

  8. Melamine-formaldehyde aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Pekala, R.W.

    1992-02-04

    This patent describes a composition of matter. It comprises: a low density, melamineformaldehyde (MF) aerogel which is transparent and essentially colorless, wherein the cell/pore sizes of the aerogel are less than or equal to 500 angstroms (A) and the density of the aerogel is from about 0.1 to 0.8 g/cc.

  9. Comet Ejecta in Aerogel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for annotated image

    This image shows a particle impact on the aluminum frame that holds the aerogel tiles. The debris from the impact shot into the adjacent aerogel tile producing the explosion pattern of ejecta framents captured in the material. A nice cratering experiment.

  10. Penetration of multiple thin films in micrometeorite capture cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Charles G.

    1994-01-01

    As part of a continuing effort to develop cosmic dust detectors/collectors for use in space, we performed a series of hypervelocity impact experiments on combined sensor/capture-cell assemblies using 10-200-micron-diameter glass projectiles and olivine crystals at velocities of 0.9-14.4 km/s. The design objective of the space-flight instrument is to measure the trajectories of individual particles with sufficient accuracy to permit identification of their parent bodies and to capture enough impactor material to allow chemical and isotopic analyses of samples returned to Earth. Three different multiple-film small-particle capture cell designs (0.1-100-micron-thick Al foils with approx. 10, 100, and 1800 micron spacing) were evaluated for their ability to capture impactor fragments and residue. Their performances were compared to two other types of capture cells, foil covered Ge crystals, and 0.50 and 0.120 g/cu cm aerogels. All capture cells were tested behind multifilm (1.4-6.0-micron-thick) polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) velocity/trajectory sensor devices. Several tests were also done without the PVDF sensors for comparison. The results of this study were reported by Simon in a comprehensive report in which the morphology of impacts and impactor residues in various types of capture cells after passage through two PVDF sensor films is discussed. Impactor fragments in selected capture cells from impacts at velocities up to 6.4 km/s were identified using scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS).

  11. Small Particles Intact Capture Experiment (SPICE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishioka, Ken-Ji; Carle, G. C.; Bunch, T. E.; Mendez, David J.; Ryder, J. T.

    1994-01-01

    The Small Particles Intact Capture Experiment (SPICE) will develop technologies and engineering techniques necessary to capture nearly intact, uncontaminated cosmic and interplanetary dust particles (IDP's). Successful capture of such particles will benefit the exobiology and planetary science communities by providing particulate samples that may have survived unaltered since the formation of the solar system. Characterization of these particles may contribute fundamental data to our knowledge of how these particles could have formed into our planet Earth and, perhaps, contributed to the beginnings of life. The term 'uncontaminated' means that captured cosmic and IDP particles are free of organic contamination from the capture process and the term 'nearly intact capture' means that their chemical and elemental components are not materially altered during capture. The key to capturing cosmic and IDP particles that are organic-contamination free and nearly intact is the capture medium. Initial screening of capture media included organic foams, multiple thin foil layers, and aerogel (a silica gel); but, with the exception of aerogel, the requirements of no contamination or nearly intact capture were not met. To ensure no contamination of particles in the capture process, high-purity aerogel was chosen. High-purity aerogel results in high clarity (visual clearness), a useful quality in detection and recovery of embedded captured particles from the aerogel. P. Tsou at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) originally described the use of aerogel for this purpose and reported laboratory test results. He has flown aerogel as a 'GAS-can Lid' payload on STS-47 and is evaluating the results. The Timeband Capture Cell Experiment (TICCE), a Eureca 1 experiment, is also flying aerogel and is scheduled for recovery in late April.

  12. Aerogel-supported filament

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, C.R.; Tillotson, T.M.; Johnson, C.V. III

    1995-05-16

    The present invention is a thin filament embedded in a low density aerogel for use in radiation detection instruments and incandescent lamps. The aerogel provides a supportive matrix that is thermally and electrically nonconductive, mechanically strong, highly porous, gas-permeable, and transparent to ionizing radiation over short distances. A low density, open-cell aerogel is cast around a fine filament or wire, which allows the wire to be positioned with little or no tension and keeps the wire in place in the event of breakage. The aerogel support reduces the stresses on the wire caused by vibrational, gravitational, electrical, and mechanical forces. 6 Figs.

  13. Aerogel-supported filament

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, Craig R.; Tillotson, Thomas M.; Johnson, III, Coleman V.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention is a thin filament embedded in a low density aerogel for use in radiation detection instruments and incandescent lamps. The aerogel provides a supportive matrix that is thermally and electrically nonconductive, mechanically strong, highly porous, gas-permeable, and transparent to ionizing radiation over short distances. A low density, open-cell aerogel is cast around a fine filament or wire, which allows the wire to be positioned with little or no tension and keeps the wire in place in the event of breakage. The aerogel support reduces the stresses on the wire caused by vibrational, gravitational, electrical, and mechanical forces.

  14. Melamine-formaldehyde aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, Richard W.

    1992-01-01

    Organic aerogels that are transparent and essentially colorless are prepa from the aqueous, sol-gel polymerization of melamine with formaldehyde. The melamine-formaldehyde (MF) aerogels have low densities, high surface areas, continuous porsity, ultrafine cell/pore sizes, and optical clarity.

  15. Melamine-formaldehyde aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Pekala, R.W.

    1992-01-14

    Organic aerogels that are transparent and essentially colorless are prepared from the aqueous, sol-gel polymerization of melamine with formaldehyde. The melamine-formaldehyde (MF) aerogels have low densities, high surface areas, continuous porosity, ultrafine cell/pore sizes, and optical clarity. 3 figs.

  16. Flame Retardant Effect of Aerogel and Nanosilica on Engineered Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha K.; Smith, Trent M.; Roberson, Luke B.; Yang, Feng; Nelson, Gordon L.

    2010-01-01

    Aerogels are typically manufactured vIa high temperature and pressure-critical-point drying of a colloidal metal oxide gel filled with solvents. Aerogel materials derived from silica materials represent a structural morphology (amorphous, open-celled nanofoams) rather than a particular chemical constituency. Aerogel is not like conventional foams in that it is a porous material with extreme microporosity and composed of individual features only a few nanometers in length with a highly porous dendriticlike structure. This unique substance has unusual properties such as low thermal conductivity, refractive index and sound suppression; in addition to its exceptional ability to capture fast moving dust. The highly porous nature of the aerogel's structure provides large amounts of surface area per unit weight. For instance, a silica aerogel material with a density of 100 kilograms per cubic meters can have surface areas of around 800 to 1500 square meters per gram depending on the precursors and process utilized to produce it. To take advantage of the unique properties of silica aerogels, especially the ultra light weight and low thermal conductivity, their composites with various engineering polymers were prepared and their flammability was investigated by Cone Calorimetry. The flammability of various polystyrene/silica aerogel nanocomposites were measured. The combination of these nanocomposites with a NASA patented flame retardant SINK were also studied. The results were compared with the base polymer to show the differences between composites with different forms of silica.

  17. Production of hollow aerogel microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Upadhye, Ravindra S.; Henning, Sten A.

    1993-01-01

    A method is described for making hollow aerogel microspheres of 800-1200 .mu. diameter and 100-300 .mu. wall thickness by forming hollow alcogel microspheres during the sol/gel process in a catalytic atmosphere and capturing them on a foam surface containing catalyst. Supercritical drying of the formed hollow alcogel microspheres yields hollow aerogel microspheres which are suitable for ICF targets.

  18. Production of hollow aerogel microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhye, R.S.; Henning, S.A.

    1990-12-31

    A method is described for making hollow aerogel microspheres of 800--1200{mu} diameter and 100--300{mu} wall thickness by forming hollow alcogel microspheres during the sol/gel process in a catalytic atmosphere and capturing them on a foam surface containing catalyst. Supercritical drying of the formed hollow alcogel microspheres yields hollow aerogel microspheres which are suitable for ICF targets.

  19. Advanced Aerogel Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Steven

    2013-01-01

    The JPL Aerogel Laboratory has made aerogels for NASA flight missions, e.g., Stardust, 2003 Mars Exploration Rovers and the 2011 Mars Science Laboratory, as well as NASA research projects for the past 14 years. During that time it has produced aerogels of a range of shapes, sizes, densities and compositions. Research is ongoing in the development of aerogels for future sample capture and return missions and for thermal insulation for both spacecraft and scientific instruments. For the past several years, the JPL Aerogel Laboratory has been developing, producing and testing a new composite material for use as the high temperature thermal insulation in the Advanced Sterling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) being developed by Lockheed Martin and NASA. The composite is made up of a glass fiber felt, silica aerogel, Titania powder, and silica powder. The oxide powders are included to reduce irradiative heat transport at elevated temperatures. These materials have thermal conductivity values that are the same as the best commercially produced high temperature insulation materials, and yet are 40% lighter. By greatly reducing the amount of oxide powder in the composite, the density, and therefore for the value of the thermal conductivity, would be reduced. The JPL Aerogel Laboratory has experimented with using glass fiber felt, expanded glass fiber felt and loose fibers to add structural integrity to silica aerogels. However, this work has been directed toward high temperature applications. By conducting a brief investigation of the optimal combination of fiber reinforcement and aerogel density, a durable, extremely efficient thermal insulation material for ambient temperature applications would be produced. If a transparent thermal insulation is desired, then aerogel is an excellent candidate material. At typical ambient temperatures, silica aerogel prevents the transport of heat via convection and conduction due to its highly porous nature. To prevent irradiative thermal

  20. Graphene aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Pauzauskie, Peter J; Worsley, Marcus A; Baumann, Theodore F; Satcher, Jr., Joe H; Biener, Juergen

    2015-03-31

    Graphene aerogels with high conductivity and surface areas including a method for making a graphene aerogel, including the following steps: (1) preparing a reaction mixture comprising a graphene oxide suspension and at least one catalyst; (2) curing the reaction mixture to produce a wet gel; (3) drying the wet gel to produce a dry gel; and (4) pyrolyzing the dry gel to produce a graphene aerogel. Applications include electrical energy storage including batteries and supercapacitors.

  1. Micro-mechanical modelling of cellulose aerogels from molten salt hydrates.

    PubMed

    Rege, Ameya; Schestakow, Maria; Karadagli, Ilknur; Ratke, Lorenz; Itskov, Mikhail

    2016-09-14

    In this paper, a generalised micro-mechanical model capable of capturing the mechanical behaviour of polysaccharidic aerogels, in particular cellulose aerogels, is proposed. To this end, first the mechanical structure and properties of these highly nanoporous cellulose aerogels prepared from aqueous salt hydrate melts (calcium thiocyanate, Ca(SCN)2·6H2O and zinc chloride, ZnCl2·4H2O) are studied. The cellulose content within these aerogels is found to have a direct relation to the microstructural quantities such as the fibril length and diameter. This, along with porosity, appears to influence the resulting mechanical properties. Furthermore, experimental characterisation of cellulose aerogels was done using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), pore-size data analysis, and compression tests. Cellulose aerogels are of a characteristic cellular microstructures and accordingly a network formed by square shaped cells is considered in the micro-mechanical model proposed in this paper. This model is based on the non-linear bending and collapse of such cells of varying pore sizes. The extended Euler-Bernoulli beam theory for large deflections is used to describe the bending in the cell walls. The proposed model is physically motivated and demonstrates a good agreement with our experimental data of both ZnCl2 and Ca(SCN)2 based cellulose aerogels with different cellulose contents.

  2. Micro-mechanical modelling of cellulose aerogels from molten salt hydrates.

    PubMed

    Rege, Ameya; Schestakow, Maria; Karadagli, Ilknur; Ratke, Lorenz; Itskov, Mikhail

    2016-09-14

    In this paper, a generalised micro-mechanical model capable of capturing the mechanical behaviour of polysaccharidic aerogels, in particular cellulose aerogels, is proposed. To this end, first the mechanical structure and properties of these highly nanoporous cellulose aerogels prepared from aqueous salt hydrate melts (calcium thiocyanate, Ca(SCN)2·6H2O and zinc chloride, ZnCl2·4H2O) are studied. The cellulose content within these aerogels is found to have a direct relation to the microstructural quantities such as the fibril length and diameter. This, along with porosity, appears to influence the resulting mechanical properties. Furthermore, experimental characterisation of cellulose aerogels was done using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), pore-size data analysis, and compression tests. Cellulose aerogels are of a characteristic cellular microstructures and accordingly a network formed by square shaped cells is considered in the micro-mechanical model proposed in this paper. This model is based on the non-linear bending and collapse of such cells of varying pore sizes. The extended Euler-Bernoulli beam theory for large deflections is used to describe the bending in the cell walls. The proposed model is physically motivated and demonstrates a good agreement with our experimental data of both ZnCl2 and Ca(SCN)2 based cellulose aerogels with different cellulose contents. PMID:27487115

  3. Aerogel Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahai, Rashmi K.

    2005-01-01

    Aerogel is one of the most promising materials of the future. It's unique properties, including high porosity, transparency, very high thermal tolerance, and environmental friendliness give it the potential of replacing many different products used in society today. However, the market for aerogel is still very limited because of the cost of producing the material and its fragility. The principle objective of my project has been to find new ways to apply aerogel in order to increase its practicality and appeal to different aspects of society. More specifically, I have focused on finding different chemicals that will coat aerogel and increase its durability. Because aerogel is so fragile and will crumble under the pressure of most coatings this has been no easy task. However, by experimenting with many different coatings and combinations of aerogel properties, I have made several significant discoveries. Aerogel (ideally, high density and hydrophobic) can be coated with several acrylic polymers, including artist's gel and nail polish. These materials provide a protective layering around the aerogel and keep it from breaking as easily. Because fragility is one of the main reasons applications of aerogel are limited, these discoveries will hopefully aid in finding future applications for this extraordinary material.

  4. Rare Cell Capture in Microfluidic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, Erica D.; Huang, Chao; Hawkins, Benjamin G.; Gleghorn, Jason P.; Kirby, Brian J.

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews existing methods for the isolation, fractionation, or capture of rare cells in microfluidic devices. Rare cell capture devices face the challenge of maintaining the efficiency standard of traditional bulk separation methods such as flow cytometers and immunomagnetic separators while requiring very high purity of the target cell population, which is typically already at very low starting concentrations. Two major classifications of rare cell capture approaches are covered: (1) non-electrokinetic methods (e.g., immobilization via antibody or aptamer chemistry, size-based sorting, and sheath flow and streamline sorting) are discussed for applications using blood cells, cancer cells, and other mammalian cells, and (2) electrokinetic (primarily dielectrophoretic) methods using both electrode-based and insulative geometries are presented with a view towards pathogen detection, blood fractionation, and cancer cell isolation. The included methods were evaluated based on performance criteria including cell type modeled and used, number of steps/stages, cell viability, and enrichment, efficiency, and/or purity. Major areas for improvement are increasing viability and capture efficiency/purity of directly processed biological samples, as a majority of current studies only process spiked cell lines or pre-diluted/lysed samples. Despite these current challenges, multiple advances have been made in the development of devices for rare cell capture and the subsequent elucidation of new biological phenomena; this article serves to highlight this progress as well as the electrokinetic and non-electrokinetic methods that can potentially be combined to improve performance in future studies. PMID:21532971

  5. Thermal properties of organic and modified inorganic aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Pekala, R.W.; Hrubesh, L.W.

    1992-08-01

    Aerogels are open-cell foams that have already been shown to be among the best thermal insulating solid materials known. Improvements in the thermal insulating properties of aerogels are possible by synthesizing new organic varieties, by using additives within existing aerogel matrix, and by optimizing their nanostructures. We discuss these approaches and give some examples of aerogels which demonstrate the improvements.

  6. Mechanically Strong, Polymer Cross-linked Aerogels (X-Aerogels)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventis, Nicholas

    2006-01-01

    have been demonstrated with several polymers such as polyurethanes/polyureas, epoxies and polyolefins, while crosslinking of approximately 35 different oxide aerogels yields a range of dimensionally stable, porous lightweight materials with unique combinations of structural, magnetic and optical properties. The main theme in materials development for space exploration is multifunction. For example, use of one material for thermal insulation/structural component will free weight for useful payload. In that regard, X-aerogels are evaluated at NASA for cryogenic fuel storage tanks and for spacesuits. Along the same lines, major impact fro X-Aerogels is also expected in commercial applications for thermal/acoustic insulation, in catalytic reformers and converters, in filtration membranes and membranes for fuel cells, as platforms for optical, electrical and magnetic sensors, and as lightweight structural component for aircraft and satellites.

  7. Influence of compressible aerogel electrodes on the properties of an electrochemical cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sponheimer, Christopher

    In the biomedical field the need for intra organ pressure measurement can only be facilitated by adapting existing pressure sensing technology to the specific tissues under test. The customization of these sensors has only driven up cost and the need to explore new technologies has become increasingly more important. For this dissertation, we explore the use of a new technology, particularly electrochemical pressure sensing to provide a low-cost pressure sensor to fill this need. Preliminary testing showed that electrically conductive polymers exhibited a change in voltage when pressurized if bubbles were first electrolyzed in the gel creating an aerogel, and that this effect was virtually undetectable without the bubbles present. Using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and model fitting, it was shown that this effect occurs at the electrode interface. Theoretical derivation supported by potentiostatic voltage measurements indicated that a change in the electrode surface area in contact with the fluid was responsible for the effect. Optical micrographs were taken as a bubble along the electrode was pressurized. Using image analysis, the relationship of the change in surface area of the bubble correlated to the relationship of the change in impedance of the electrochemical cell (ECC). The results further demonstrated that the electrochemical response to pressure of a gelatin aerogel electrode was linear for the pressure range of 0 to1034 mmHg. This finding lends itself well for use in medical devices. A new device was invented along with a manufacturing process for an electrochemical pressure transducer (EPT). The EPT was subject to in vitro testing using simulated gastric fluid to create a baseline efficacy of the device for use in the gastrointestinal tract. Multiple design specific techniques were developed to improve sensor performance during physiological conditions.

  8. A universal nanoparticle cell secretion capture assay.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Wendy; Grivel, Jean-Charles

    2013-02-01

    Secreted proteins play an important role in intercellular interactions, especially between cells of the immune system. Currently, there is no universal assay that allows a simple noninvasive identification and isolation of cells based on their secretion of various products. We have developed such a method. Our method is based on the targeting, to the cell surface, of heterofunctional nanoparticles coupled to a cell surface-specific antibody and to a secreted protein-specific antibody, which captures the secreted protein on the surface of the producing cell. Importantly, this method does not compromise cellviability and is compatible with further culture and expansion of the secreting cells.

  9. Bonding aerogels with polyurethanes

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, F.M.; Hoffman, D.M.

    1989-11-01

    Aerogels, porous silica glasses with ultra-fine cell size (30nm), are made by a solution gelation (sol-gel) process. The resulting gel is critical point dried to densities from 0.15--0.60 g/cc. This material is machinable, homogeneous, transparent, coatable and bondable. To bond aerogel an adhesive should have long cure time, no attack on the aerogel structure, and high strength. Several epoxies and urethanes were examined to determine if they satisfied these conditions. Bond strengths above 13 psi were found with double bubble and DP-110 epoxies and XI-208/ODA-1000 and Castall U-2630 urethanes. Hardman Kalex Tough Stuff'' A-85 hardness urethane gave 18 psi bond strength. Hardman A-85, Tuff-Stuff'' was selected for further evaluation because it produced bond strengths comparable to the adherend cohesive strength. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Multifunctional nitrogen-doped graphene nanoribbon aerogels for superior lithium storage and cell culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Xuzhen; Wan, Wubo; Li, Lingli; Dong, Yanfeng; Zhao, Zongbin; Qiu, Jieshan

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped graphene nanoribbon aerogels (N-GNRAs) are fabricated through the self-assembly of graphene oxide nanoribbons (GONRs) combined with a thermal annealing process. Amino-groups are grafted to the surface of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) by an epoxy ring-opening reaction. High nitrogen doping level (7.6 atm% as confirmed by elemental analysis) is achieved during thermal treatment resulting from functionalization and the rich edge structures of GNRs. The three dimensional (3D) N-GNRAs feature a hierarchical porous structure. The quasi-one dimensional (1D) GNRs act as the building blocks for the construction of fishnet-like GNR sheets, which further create 3D frameworks with micrometer-scale pores. The edge effect of GNRs combined with nitrogen doping and porosity give rise to good electrical conductivity, superhydrophilic, highly compressible and low density GNRAs. As a result, a high capacity of 910 mA h g-1 is achieved at a current density of 0.5 A g-1 when they are tested as anode materials for lithium ion batteries. Further cell culture experiments with the GNRAs as human medulloblastoma DAOY cell scaffolds demonstrate their good biocompatibility, inferring potential applications in the biomedical field.Nitrogen-doped graphene nanoribbon aerogels (N-GNRAs) are fabricated through the self-assembly of graphene oxide nanoribbons (GONRs) combined with a thermal annealing process. Amino-groups are grafted to the surface of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) by an epoxy ring-opening reaction. High nitrogen doping level (7.6 atm% as confirmed by elemental analysis) is achieved during thermal treatment resulting from functionalization and the rich edge structures of GNRs. The three dimensional (3D) N-GNRAs feature a hierarchical porous structure. The quasi-one dimensional (1D) GNRs act as the building blocks for the construction of fishnet-like GNR sheets, which further create 3D frameworks with micrometer-scale pores. The edge effect of GNRs combined with nitrogen

  11. Nanostructural engineering of organic aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Pekala, R.W.; Alviso, C.T.; Lu, X.; Caps, R.; Frocle, J.

    1995-03-01

    Aerogels are a special class of open-cell foams with an ultrafine cell/pore size (<50 nm), high surface area (400-1100 M{sup 2}/g), and a solid matrix composed of interconnected colloidal-like particles or fibers with characteristic diameters of 10 nm. This paper examines the correlation between nanostructure and thermal conductivity in a series of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels prepared under different synthetic conditions.

  12. Boosting Power Density of Microbial Fuel Cells with 3D Nitrogen‐Doped Graphene Aerogel Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Liu, Tianyu; Zhang, Feng; Ye, Dingding; Liao, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    A 3D nitrogen‐doped graphene aerogel (N‐GA) as an anode material for microbial fuel cells (MFCs) is reported. Electron microscopy images reveal that the N‐GA possesses hierarchical porous structure that allows efficient diffusion of both bacterial cells and electron mediators in the interior space of 3D electrode, and thus, the colonization of bacterial communities. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopic measurements further show that nitrogen doping considerably reduces the charge transfer resistance and internal resistance of GA, which helps to enhance the MFC power density. Importantly, the dual‐chamber milliliter‐scale MFC with N‐GA anode yields an outstanding volumetric power density of 225 ± 12 W m−3 normalized to the total volume of the anodic chamber (750 ± 40 W m−3 normalized to the volume of the anode). These power densities are the highest values report for milliliter‐scale MFCs with similar chamber size (25 mL) under the similar measurement conditions. The 3D N‐GA electrode shows great promise for improving the power generation of MFC devices.

  13. Composite Aerogel Multifoil Protective Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    New technologies are needed to survive the temperatures, radiation, and hypervelocity particles that exploration spacecraft encounter. Multilayer insulations (MLIs) have been used on many spacecraft as thermal insulation. Other materials and composites have been used as micrometeorite shielding or radiation shielding. However, no material composite has been developed and employed as a combined thermal insulation, micrometeorite, and radiation shielding. By replacing the scrims that have been used to separate the foil layers in MLIs with various aerogels, and by using a variety of different metal foils, the overall protective performance of MLIs can be greatly expanded to act as thermal insulation, radiation shielding, and hypervelocity particle shielding. Aerogels are highly porous, low-density solids that are produced by the gelation of metal alkoxides and supercritical drying. Aerogels have been flown in NASA missions as a hypervelocity particle capture medium (Stardust) and as thermal insulation (2003 MER). Composite aerogel multifoil protective shielding would be used to provide thermal insulation, while also shielding spacecraft or components from radiation and hypervelocity particle impacts. Multiple layers of foil separated by aerogel would act as a thermal barrier by preventing the transport of heat energy through the composite. The silica aerogel would act as a convective and conductive thermal barrier, while the titania powder and metal foils would absorb and reflect the radiative heat. It would also capture small hypervelocity particles, such as micrometeorites, since it would be a stuffed, multi-shock Whipple shield. The metal foil layers would slow and break up the impacting particles, while the aerogel layers would convert the kinetic energy of the particles to thermal and mechanical energy and stop the particles.

  14. Polyolefin-based aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Je Kyun (Inventor); Gould, Gerogle L. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to cross-linked polyolefin aerogels in simple and fiber-reinforced composite form. Of particular interest are polybutadiene aerogels. Especially aerogels derived from polybutadienes functionalized with anhydrides, amines, hydroxyls, thiols, epoxies, isocyanates or combinations thereof.

  15. Evidence for Changes in 81PIWild 2 Organic Matter Since Collection and Comparison of 82PIWild 2 and IDP Organic Matter to Access the Thermal Effects of Aerogel Capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirick, S.; Flynn, G. J.; Keller, L.; Messenger, Nakamura; Sandford, S. A.; Zolensky, M. E.; Peltzer, C.; Jacobsen, C.

    2009-01-01

    NASA s Stardust spacecraft collected cometary material during its passage through the dust coma of comet 81P/Wild 2 on January 2nd, 2004 and delivered this material to Earth on January 15th 2006. The first fragment we analyzed during the preliminary examination was partially vaporized by the X-ray beam. The carbonaceous material that survived was re-analysis approx.2 months later and the carbon spectrum for this material had significantly changed from what we first observed.. We have observed similar changes to the carbonaceous matter in some interplanetary dust particles ( IDPs). Some of the 81P/Wild 2 organic matter volatilized upon impact with the aerogel as observed using IR spectroscopy where IR spectra were collected several mms away from sample tracks [1]. The time-temperature profile experienced by any particular 81P/Wild 2 grain during aerogel capture is not known, although Brownlee, et al. suggest that fine-grained materials, <1 micron in size, fragmented and then partially vaporized during collection, while particles much larger then 1 micron in size were captured intact [2]. Nearly all organic matter is subject to thermal alteration. To assess the heating and alteration experienced by the 81P/Wild 2 organic matter during capture we are comparing 81P/Wild2 organic matter with IDP organic matter where we have evidence of heating in the IDP [3,4].

  16. Physics of Interplanetary Dust Collection with Aerogel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, William W.

    1998-01-01

    This report presents the results of research undertaken to study various problems associated with hypervelocity capture of dust particles in aerogel. The primary topics investigated were the properties of shocked aerogel and the requirements for reliable capture of particles on the STARDUST mission. In particular, the viscosity of shocked aerogel has been an open question. The results presented here suggest that the viscosity of aerogel at high impact velocities is negligible, although there remains some uncertainty about lower velocities. The model adopted for viscosity treats the mixture of polymeric silica and decomposition products and finds that, for particle velocities of 6-7 km/s, the viscosity is similar to that typical of light gasses at STP. Expressions for the Hugoniot of aerogel as a function of density were also obtained from the available data. All aerogels of interest for cosmic dust collectors have very similar shock velocity-particle velocity Hugoniot curves. The strength behavior of aerogel for low-speed penetration was measured, but further work is needed to study the proper way to apply this to the issue of terminal deceleration of a dust particle. Preliminary calculations designed to maximize the penetration depths were performed to determine the required density of aerogel to reliably stop a particle in a 3 cm thickness of aerogel (the path length expected for a normal impact into the STARDUST collector). In order to stop a particle of density rho(sub p) and diameter d(sub p), the mean density of the aerogel collector should be no less than that given by the expression bar rho(sub 0) = 1.085 X 10(exp -4 )rho(sub p)d(sub p), for densities measured in g/ cu cm and the particle diameter measured in micrometers.

  17. Sorption Properties of Aerogel in Liquid Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wesley L.

    2006-01-01

    Aerogel products are now available as insulation materials of the future. The Cryogenics Test Laboratory at the NASA Kennedy Space Center is developing aerogel-based thermal insulation systems for space launch applications. Aerogel beads (Cabot Nanogel ) and aerogel blankets (Aspen Aerogels Spaceloft ) have outstanding ambient pressure thermal performance that makes them useful for applications where sealing is not possible. Aerogel beads are open-celled silicone dioxide and have tiny pores that run throughout the body of the bead. It has also recently been discovered that aerogel beads can be used as a filtering device for aqueous compounds at room temperature. With their hydrophobic covering, the beads absorb any non-polar substance and they can be chemically altered to absorb hot gases. The combination of the absorption and cryogenic insulating properties of aerogel beads have never been studied together. For future cryogenic insulation applications, it is crucial to know how the beads react while immersed in cryogenic liquids, most notably liquid nitrogen. Aerogel beads in loose-fill situation and aerogel blankets with composite fiber structure have been tested for absorption properties. Depending on the type of aerogel used and the preparation, preliminary results show the material can absorb up to seven times its own weight of liquid nitrogen, corresponding to a volumetric ratio of 0.70 (unit volume nitrogen per unit volume aerogel). These tests allow for an estimate on how much insulation is needed in certain situations. The theory behind the different processes of sorption is necessary for a better understanding of the preparation of the beads before they are used in an insulation system.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of a nanocrystalline diamond aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    Pauzauskie, Peter J.; Crowhurst, Jonathan C.; Worsley, Marcus A.; Laurence, Ted A.; Kilcoyne, A. L. David; Wang, Yinmin; Willey, Trevor M.; Visbeck, Kenneth S.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Evans, William J.; Zaug, Joseph M.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.

    2011-07-06

    Aerogel materials have myriad scientific and technological applications due to their large intrinsic surface areas and ultralow densities. However, creating a nanodiamond aerogel matrix has remained an outstanding and intriguing challenge. Here we report the high-pressure, high-temperature synthesis of a diamond aerogel from an amorphous carbon aerogel precursor using a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Neon is used as a chemically inert, near-hydrostatic pressure medium that prevents collapse of the aerogel under pressure by conformally filling the aerogel's void volume. Electron and X-ray spectromicroscopy confirm the aerogel morphology and composition of the nanodiamond matrix. Time-resolved photoluminescence measurements of recovered material reveal the formation of both nitrogen- and silicon- vacancy point-defects, suggesting a broad range of applications for this nanocrystalline diamond aerogel.

  19. Surface modified aerogel monoliths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventis, Nicholas (Inventor); Johnston, James C. (Inventor); Kuczmarski, Maria A. (Inventor); Meador, Mary Ann B. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    This invention comprises reinforced aerogel monoliths such as silica aerogels having a polymer coating on its outer geometric surface boundary, and to the method of preparing said aerogel monoliths. The polymer coatings on the aerogel monoliths are derived from polymer precursors selected from the group consisting of isocyanates as a precursor, precursors of epoxies, and precursors of polyimides. The coated aerogel monoliths can be modified further by encapsulating the aerogel with the polymer precursor reinforced with fibers such as carbon or glass fibers to obtain mechanically reinforced composite encapsulated aerogel monoliths.

  20. Highly porous PEM fuel cell cathodes based on low density carbon aerogels as Pt-support: Experimental study of the mass-transport losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marie, Julien; Chenitz, Regis; Chatenet, Marian; Berthon-Fabry, Sandrine; Cornet, Nathalie; Achard, Patrick

    Carbon aerogels exhibiting high porous volumes and high surface areas, differentiated by their pore-size distributions were used as Pt-supports in the cathode catalytic layer of H 2/air-fed PEM fuel cell. The cathodes were tested as 50 cm 2 membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs). The porous structure of the synthesized catalytic layers was impacted by the nanostructure of the Pt-doped carbon aerogels (Pt/CAs). In this paper thus we present an experimental study aiming at establishing links between the porous structure of the cathode catalytic layers and the MEAs performances. For that purpose, the polarization curves of the MEAs were decomposed in 3 contributions: the kinetic loss, the ohmic loss and the mass-transport loss. We showed that the MEAs made with the different carbon aerogels had similar kinetic activities (low current density performance) but very different mass-transport voltage losses. It was found that the higher the pore-size of the initial carbon aerogel, the higher the mass-transport voltage losses. Supported by our porosimetry (N 2-adsorption and Hg-porosimetry) measurement, we interpret this apparent contradiction as the consequence of the more important Nafion penetration into the carbon aeorogel with larger pore-size. Indeed, the catalytic layers made from the larger pore-size carbon aerogel had lower porosities. We thus show in this work that carbon aerogels are materials with tailored nanostructured structure which can be used as model materials for experimentally testing the optimization of the PEM fuel cell catalytic layers.

  1. Chromosome Conformation Capture in Primary Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Cortesi, Alice; Bodega, Beatrice

    2016-01-01

    3D organization of the genome, its structural and regulatory function of cell identity, is acquiring prominent features in epigenetics studies; more efforts have been done to develop techniques that allow studying nuclear structure. Chromosome conformation capture (3C) has been set up in 2002 from Dekker and from that moment great investments were made to develop genomics variants of 3C technology (4C, 5C, Hi-C) providing new tools to investigate the shape of the genome in a more systematic and unbiased manner. 3C method allows scientists to fix dynamic and variable 3D interactions in nuclear space, and consequently to study which sequences interact, how a gene is regulated by different and distant enhancer, or how a set of enhancer could regulate transcriptional units; to follow the conformation that mediates regulation change in development; and to evaluate if this fine epigenetic mechanism is impaired in disease condition. PMID:27659988

  2. Flexible Octopus-Shaped Hydrogel Particles for Specific Cell Capture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lynna; An, Harry Z; Haghgooie, Ramin; Shank, Aaron T; Martel, Joseph M; Toner, Mehmet; Doyle, Patrick S

    2016-04-01

    Multiarm hydrogel microparticles with varying geometry are fabricated to specifically capture cells expressing epithelial cell adhesion molecule. Results show that particle shape influences cell-capture efficiency due to differences in surface area, hydrodynamic effects, and steric constraints. These findings can lead to improved particle design for cell separation and diagnostic applications. PMID:26929053

  3. Enhanced performance of TiO2 nanoparticle and aerogel composite electrode for dye sensitized solar cell.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang-Yeoul; Park, Yu-Sik; Hwang, Hae-Jin

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate the effects of specific surface area to the photocurrent conversion efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC), we adopted TiO2 aerogel (TA)/nanoparticle (TP) composite as a photoelectrode. We prepared three types of photoelectrodes, TPs, TAs, and TATPs (1:1 TAs and TPs composite photoelectrode). The performance of TATP composite electrode was compared with that of TP and TAs. TATPs showed the improved cell efficiency, more than 0.5%, compared with a reference TPs below 15 micrometer thickness. Although the introduction of TAs increases the specific surface area for the dye adsorption, DSC composed of only TAs does not show the best efficiency result due to the crack generation. In conclusion, to produce the best photocurrent conversion efficiency, the high specific surface area of TiO2 photoelectrode for high dye adsorption should be balanced with proper control of the good electron transfer path. PMID:22849065

  4. Fiducial Marks for Location of Particles in Aerogel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurewicz, A. J. G.; Tsapin, A. I.; Jones, S. M.

    2004-01-01

    If an extraterrestrial sample is captured in aerogel as a collection of particles, it is important to be able to consistently locate individual grains when changing instruments or laboratories. We report on a feasibility study for applying fiducial marks to aerogel nondestructively so that the marks can eventually be used with optical, X-ray or other (manual or automated) location techniques.

  5. Melamine-formaldehyde aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Alviso, C.T.; Pekala, R.W.

    1991-04-01

    The ability to tailor the structure and properties of aerogels at the nanometer scale opens up exciting possibilities for these unique, low density materials. Traditional inorganic aerogels have been formed from the hydrolysis and condensation of metal alkoxides (e.g. tetramethoxy silane). Previously, we reported the synthesis of organic aerogels based upon the aqueous, polycondensation of resorcinol with formaldehyde. Although these aerogels exhibit minimal light scattering, their dark red color limits their use in certain optical applications. In this paper, we discuss the synthesis and characterization of melamine-formaldehyde aerogels -- a new type of organic aerogel that is both colorless and transparent. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Method for nanoencapsulation of aerogels and nanoencapsulated aerogels produced by such method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Thomas A. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method for increasing the compressive modulus of aerogels comprising: providing aerogel substrate comprising a bubble matrix in a chamber; providing monomer to the chamber, the monomer comprising vapor phase monomer which polymerizes substantially free of polymerization byproducts; depositing monomer from the vapor phase onto the surface of the aerogel substrate under deposition conditions effective to produce a vapor pressure sufficient to cause the vapor phase monomer to penetrate into the bubble matrix and deposit onto the surface of the aerogel substrate, producing a substantially uniform monomer film; and, polymerizing the substantially uniform monomer film under polymerization conditions effective to produce polymer coated aerogel comprising a substantially uniform polymer coating substantially free of polymerization byproducts.Polymer coated aerogel comprising aerogel substrate comprising a substantially uniform polymer coating, said polymer coated aerogel comprising porosity and having a compressive modulus greater than the compressive modulus of the aerogel substrate, as measured by a 100 lb. load cell at 1 mm/minute in the linear range of 20% to 40% compression.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of a nanocrystalline diamond aerogel

    PubMed Central

    Pauzauskie, Peter J.; Crowhurst, Jonathan C.; Worsley, Marcus A.; Laurence, Ted A.; Kilcoyne, A. L. David; Wang, Yinmin; Willey, Trevor M.; Visbeck, Kenneth S.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Evans, William J.; Zaug, Joseph M.; Satcher, Joe H.

    2011-01-01

    Aerogel materials have myriad scientific and technological applications due to their large intrinsic surface areas and ultralow densities. However, creating a nanodiamond aerogel matrix has remained an outstanding and intriguing challenge. Here we report the high-pressure, high-temperature synthesis of a diamond aerogel from an amorphous carbon aerogel precursor using a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Neon is used as a chemically inert, near-hydrostatic pressure medium that prevents collapse of the aerogel under pressure by conformally filling the aerogel’s void volume. Electron and X-ray spectromicroscopy confirm the aerogel morphology and composition of the nanodiamond matrix. Time-resolved photoluminescence measurements of recovered material reveal the formation of both nitrogen- and silicon- vacancy point-defects, suggesting a broad range of applications for this nanocrystalline diamond aerogel. PMID:21555550

  8. Carbon aerogel electrodes for direct energy conversion

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Steven T.; Kaschmitter, James L.; Pekala, Richard W.

    1997-01-01

    A direct energy conversion device, such as a fuel cell, using carbon aerogel electrodes, wherein the carbon aerogel is loaded with a noble catalyst, such as platinum or rhodium and soaked with phosphoric acid, for example. A separator is located between the electrodes, which are placed in a cylinder having plate current collectors positioned adjacent the electrodes and connected to a power supply, and a pair of gas manifolds, containing hydrogen and oxygen positioned adjacent the current collectors. Due to the high surface area and excellent electrical conductivity of carbon aerogels, the problems relative to high polarization resistance of carbon composite electrodes conventionally used in fuel cells are overcome.

  9. Carbon aerogel electrodes for direct energy conversion

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, S.T.; Kaschmitter, J.L.; Pekala, R.W.

    1997-02-11

    A direct energy conversion device, such as a fuel cell, using carbon aerogel electrodes is described, wherein the carbon aerogel is loaded with a noble catalyst, such as platinum or rhodium and soaked with phosphoric acid, for example. A separator is located between the electrodes, which are placed in a cylinder having plate current collectors positioned adjacent the electrodes and connected to a power supply, and a pair of gas manifolds, containing hydrogen and oxygen positioned adjacent the current collectors. Due to the high surface area and excellent electrical conductivity of carbon aerogels, the problems relative to high polarization resistance of carbon composite electrodes conventionally used in fuel cells are overcome. 1 fig.

  10. Low density, resorcinol-formaldehyde aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, R.W.

    1988-05-26

    The polycondensation of resorcinol with formaldehyde under alkaline conditions results in the formation of surface functionalized polymer ''clusters''. The covalent crosslinking of these ''clusters'' produces gels which when processed under supercritical conditions, produce low density, organic aerogels (density less than or equal to100 mg/cc; cell size less than or equal to0.1 microns). The aerogels are transparent,dark red in color and consist of interconnected colloidal-like particles with diameters of about 100 A/degree/. These aerogels may be further carbonized to form low density carbon foams with cell size of about 0.1 micron. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. Low density, resorcinol-formaldehyde aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, Richard W.

    1989-01-01

    The polycondensation of resorcinol with formaldehyde under alkaline conditions results in the formation of surface functionalized polymer "clusters". The covalent crosslinking of these "clusters" produces gels which when processed under supercritical conditions, produce low density, organic aerogels (density .ltoreq.100 mg/cc; cell size .ltoreq.0.1 microns). The aerogels are transparent, dark red in color and consist of interconnected colloidal-like particles with diameters of about 100 .ANG.. These aerogels may be further carbonized to form low density carbon foams with cell size of about 0.1 micron.

  12. Low density, resorcinol-formaldehyde aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, R.W.

    1989-10-10

    The polycondensation of resorcinol with formaldehyde under alkaline conditions results in the formation of surface functionalized polymer clusters. The covalent crosslinking of these clusters produces gels which when processed under supercritical conditions, produce low density, organic aerogels (density [<=]100 mg/cc; cell size [<=]0.1 microns). The aerogels are transparent, dark red in color and consist of interconnected colloidal-like particles with diameters of about 100 [angstrom]. These aerogels may be further carbonized to form low density carbon foams with cell size of about 0.1 micron.

  13. Low density, resorcinol-formaldehyde aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, Richard W.

    1991-01-01

    The polycondensation of resorcinol with formaldehyde under alkaline conditions results in the formation of surface functionalized polymer "Clusters". The covalent crosslinking of these "clusters" produces gels which when processed under supercritical conditions, produce low density, organic aerogels (density.ltoreq.100 mg/cc; cell size .ltoreq.0.1 microns). The aerogels are transparent, dark red in color and consist of interconnected colloidal-like particles with diameters of about 100.circle.. These aerogels may be further carbonized to form low density carbon foams with cell size of about 0.1 micron.

  14. Robust Extraction and Multi-Technique Analysis of Micrometeoroids Captured in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphal, A. J.; Graham, G. A.; Bench, G.; Brennan, S.; Luening, K.; Pianetta, P.; Keller, L. P.; Flynn, G. J.; Snead, C.; Dominquez, G.

    2003-01-01

    The use of low-density silica aerogel as the primary capture cell technology for the NASA Discovery mission Stardust to Comet Wild-2 [1] is a strong motivation for researchers within the Meteoritics community to develop techniques to handle this material. The unique properties of silica aerogel allow dust particles to be captured at hypervelocity speeds and to remain partially intact. The same unique properties present difficulties in the preparation of particles for analysis. Using tools borrowed from microbiologists, we have developed techniques for robustly extracting captured hypervelocity dust particles and their residues from aerogel collectors[2-3]. It is important not only to refine these extraction techniques but also to develop protocols for analyzing the captured particles. Since Stardust does not return material to Earth until 2006, researchers must either analyze particles that are impacted in the laboratory using light-gasgun facilities [e.g. 41 or examine aerogel collectors that have been exposed in low-Earth orbit (LEO) [5]. While there are certainly benefits in laboratory shots, i.e. accelerating known compositions of projectiles into aerogel, the LEO capture particles offer the opportunity to investigate real particles captured under real conditions. The aerogel collectors used in this research are part of the NASA Orbital Debris Collection Experiment that was exposed on the MIR Space Station for 18 months [5]. We have developed the capability at the UCB Space Sciences Laboratory to extract tiny volumes of aerogel that completely contain each impact event, and to mount them on micromachined fixtures so that they can be analyzed with no interfering support (Fig.1). These aerogel keystones simultaneously bring the terminal particle and the particle track to within 10 m (15 g cm- ) of the nearest aerogel surface. The extracted aerogel wedges containing both the impact tracks and the captured particles have been characterized using the synchrotron

  15. Polyimide Aerogel Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann; Guo, Haiquan

    2012-01-01

    Polyimide aerogels have been crosslinked through multifunctional amines. This invention builds on "Polyimide Aerogels With Three-Dimensional Cross-Linked Structure," and may be considered as a continuation of that invention, which results in a polyimide aerogel with a flexible, formable form. Gels formed from polyamic acid solutions, end-capped with anhydrides, and cross-linked with the multifunctional amines, are chemically imidized and dried using supercritical CO2 extraction to give aerogels having density around 0.1 to 0.3 g/cubic cm. The aerogels are 80 to 95% porous, and have high surface areas (200 to 600 sq m/g) and low thermal conductivity (as low as 14 mW/m-K at room temperature). Notably, the cross-linked polyimide aerogels have higher modulus than polymer-reinforced silica aerogels of similar density, and can be fabricated as both monoliths and thin films.

  16. Ambient Dried Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Steven M.; Paik, Jong-Ah

    2013-01-01

    A method has been developed for creating aerogel using normal pressure and ambient temperatures. All spacecraft, satellites, and landers require the use of thermal insulation due to the extreme environments encountered in space and on extraterrestrial bodies. Ambient dried aerogels introduce the possibility of using aerogel as thermal insulation in a wide variety of instances where supercritically dried aerogels cannot be used. More specifically, thermoelectric devices can use ambient dried aerogel, where the advantages are in situ production using the cast-in ability of an aerogel. Previously, aerogels required supercritical conditions (high temperature and high pressure) to be dried. Ambient dried aerogels can be dried at room temperature and pressure. This allows many materials, such as plastics and certain metal alloys that cannot survive supercritical conditions, to be directly immersed in liquid aerogel precursor and then encapsulated in the final, dried aerogel. Additionally, the metalized Mylar films that could not survive the previous methods of making aerogels can survive the ambient drying technique, thus making multilayer insulation (MLI) materials possible. This results in lighter insulation material as well. Because this innovation does not require high-temperature or high-pressure drying, ambient dried aerogels are much less expensive to produce. The equipment needed to conduct supercritical drying costs many tens of thousands of dollars, and has associated running expenses for power, pressurized gasses, and maintenance. The ambient drying process also expands the size of the pieces of aerogel that can be made because a high-temperature, high-pressure system typically has internal dimensions of up to 30 cm in diameter and 60 cm in height. In the case of this innovation, the only limitation on the size of the aerogels produced would be in the ability of the solvent in the wet gel to escape from the gel network.

  17. Selective capture of endothelial and perivascular cells from brain microvessels using laser capture microdissection.

    PubMed

    Kinnecom, Katie; Pachter, Joel S

    2005-12-01

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM) of the major cell types comprising brain microvessels offers a powerful technology to explore the molecular basis of the blood-brain barrier in health and disease. However, the ability to selectively retrieve endothelial or perivascular cells, without cross-contamination from the other, has proven difficult. Additionally, histochemical methods previously described for use with LCM have not allowed for identification of all the different size branches of the microvascular tree. Here, we describe a double immunostaining method, combining bright-field and fluorescence microscopy, and using an extensive dehydration with xylene, to clearly identify and spatially resolve endothelial from perivascular cells within all size microvascular branches in frozen brain sections. LCM of these sections, coupled with RNA analysis by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, revealed that captured endothelial cells show endothelial markers but no detectable markers for astrocytes or smooth muscle cells/pericytes. Conversely, captured astrocytes or smooth muscle cells/pericytes demonstrate their respective markers, but not those of endothelial cells. This approach has applicability to microarray analysis, thereby enabling global gene profiling of the different cell types along the entirety of the brain microvascular tree.

  18. Desalination with carbon aerogel electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.C.; Richardson, J.H.; Fix, D.V.

    1996-10-21

    An electrically regenerated electrosorption process known as carbon aerogel CDI was developed for continuously removing ionic impurities from aqueous streams. A salt solution flows in a channel formed by pairs of parallel carbon aerogel electrodes. Each electrode has a very high BET surface area and very low resistivity. After polarization, anions and cations are removed from electrolyte by the electric field and electrosorbed onto the carbon aerogel. The solution is thus separated into two streams, brine and water. Based on this, carbon aerogel CDI appears to be an energy-efficient alternative to evaporation, electrodialysis, and reverse osmosis. The energy required by this process is about QV/2, plus losses. Estimated energy requirement for sea water desalination is 18-27 Wh gal{sup -1}, depending on cell voltage and flow rate. The requirement for brackish water desalination is less, 1.2-2.5 Wh gal{sup -1} at 1600 ppM. This is assuming that stored electrical energy is reclaimed during regeneration.

  19. Aerogel nanocomposite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, A.J.; Ayers, M.; Cao, W.

    1995-05-01

    Aerogels are porous, low density, nanostructured solids with many unusual properties including very low thermal conductivity, good transparency, high surface area, catalytic activity, and low sound velocity. This research is directed toward developing new nanocomposite aerogel materials for improved thermal insulation and several other applications. A major focus of the research has been to further increase the thermal resistance of silica aerogel by introducing infrared opacification agents into the aerogel to produce a superinsulating composite material. Opacified superinsulating aerogel permit a number of industrial applications for aerogel-based insulation. The primary benefits from this recently developed superinsulating composite aerogel insulation are: to extend the range of applications to higher temperatures, to provide a more compact insulation for space sensitive-applications, and to lower costs of aerogel by as much as 30%. Superinsulating aerogels can replace existing CFC-containing polyurethane in low temperature applications to reduce heat losses in piping, improve the thermal efficiency of refrigeration systems, and reduce energy losses in a variety of industrial applications. Enhanced aerogel insulation can also replace steam and process pipe insulation in higher temperature applications to substantially reduce energy losses and provide much more compact insulation.

  20. Tortuosity of 4He Films on Aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    Ashton, C. E.; Golov, A. I.; Mulders, N.

    2006-09-07

    A torsional oscillator has been used to study the flow of liquid 4He through silica aerogel. The tortuosity and dissipation of the flow in the fractal aerogel environment has been measured, for both capillary condensed films and a fully saturated cell. The scaling of tortuosity as a function of filling fraction has been investigated. We compare the results of our 88%-porous aerogel to a 92%-porous sample where a transverse sound technique was used. Our more sensitive technique has reduced the scatter in both the frequency and dissipation data. Like in the previous transverse sound experiment, we find tortuosity as a function of filling fraction to scale with an exponent of {approx} -1.1. Further experiments are planned, to find the dependence of the exponent on the fractal dimension and porosity of aerogel.

  1. Structure-property relationships of carbon aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Pekala, R.W.; Alviso, C.T.; Kong, F.M.

    1993-12-01

    Of the organic reactions in sol-gel polymerizations, the most studied reaction is the aqueous polycondensation of resorcinol with formaldehyde; the resulting crosslinked gels are supercritically dried from CO{sub 2} to give resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels. These aerogels can be pyrolyzed to form vitreous carbon monoliths with black color, high porosity, ultrafine cell/pore size, high surface area, and interconnected particles of the organic precursor. The structure and properties of the carbon aerogels depend on R/C (resorcinol/catalyst) ratio of starting solution, pyrolysis temperature, and chemical activation. Each variable is discussed. Carbon aerogels provide an almost ideal electrode material (in double-layer capacitors) owing to low electrical resistivity (<40 mohm-cm), controllable pore size distribution (5--500 {angstrom}), and high volumetric surface areas ({approximately}500 m{sup 2}/cm{sup 3}).

  2. Polyolefin-Based Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Je Kyun; Gould, George

    2012-01-01

    An organic polybutadiene (PB) rubberbased aerogel insulation material was developed that will provide superior thermal insulation and inherent radiation protection, exhibiting the flexibility, resiliency, toughness, and durability typical of the parent polymer, yet with the low density and superior insulation properties associated with the aerogels. The rubbery behaviors of the PB rubber-based aerogels are able to overcome the weak and brittle nature of conventional inorganic and organic aerogel insulation materials. Additionally, with higher content of hydrogen in their structure, the PB rubber aerogels will also provide inherently better radiation protection than those of inorganic and carbon aerogels. Since PB rubber aerogels also exhibit good hydrophobicity due to their hydrocarbon molecular structure, they will provide better performance reliability and durability as well as simpler, more economic, and environmentally friendly production over the conventional silica or other inorganic-based aerogels, which require chemical treatment to make them hydrophobic. Inorganic aerogels such as silica aerogels demonstrate many unusual and useful properties. There are several strategies to overcoming the drawbacks associated with the weakness and brittleness of silica aerogels. Development of the flexible fiber-reinforced silica aerogel composite blanket has proven one promising approach, providing a conveniently fielded form factor that is relatively robust toward handling in industrial environments compared to silica aerogel monoliths. However, the flexible silica aerogel composites still have a brittle, dusty character that may be undesirable, or even intolerable, in certain applications. Although the cross-linked organic aerogels such as resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF), polyisocyanurate, and cellulose aerogels show very high impact strength, they are also very brittle with little elongation (i.e., less rubbery). Also, silica and carbon aerogels are less efficient

  3. Technical applications of aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Hrubesh, L.W.

    1997-08-18

    Aerogel materials posses such a wide variety of exceptional properties that a striking number of applications have developed for them. Many of the commercial applications of aerogels such as catalysts, thermal insulation, windows, and particle detectors are still under development and new application as have been publicized since the ISA4 Conference in 1994: e.g.; supercapacitors, insulation for heat storage in automobiles, electrodes for capacitive deionization, etc. More applications are evolving as the scientific and engineering community becomes familiar with the unusual and exceptional physical properties of aerogels, there are also scientific and technical application, as well. This paper discusses a variety of applications under development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for which several types of aerogels are formed in custom sizes and shapes. Particular discussions will focus on the uses of aerogels for physics experiments which rely on the exceptional, sometimes unique, properties of aerogels.

  4. A Versatile Microarray Platform for Capturing Rare Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkmann, Falko; Hirtz, Michael; Haller, Anna; Gorges, Tobias M.; Vellekoop, Michael J.; Riethdorf, Sabine; Müller, Volkmar; Pantel, Klaus; Fuchs, Harald

    2015-10-01

    Analyses of rare events occurring at extremely low frequencies in body fluids are still challenging. We established a versatile microarray-based platform able to capture single target cells from large background populations. As use case we chose the challenging application of detecting circulating tumor cells (CTCs) - about one cell in a billion normal blood cells. After incubation with an antibody cocktail, targeted cells are extracted on a microarray in a microfluidic chip. The accessibility of our platform allows for subsequent recovery of targets for further analysis. The microarray facilitates exclusion of false positive capture events by co-localization allowing for detection without fluorescent labelling. Analyzing blood samples from cancer patients with our platform reached and partly outreached gold standard performance, demonstrating feasibility for clinical application. Clinical researchers free choice of antibody cocktail without need for altered chip manufacturing or incubation protocol, allows virtual arbitrary targeting of capture species and therefore wide spread applications in biomedical sciences.

  5. Method of casting aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Poco, J.F.

    1993-09-07

    The invention describes a method for making monolithic castings of transparent silica aerogel with densities in the range from 0.001 g/cm[sup 3] to 0.6 g/cm[sup 3]. Various shapes of aerogels are cast in flexible polymer molds which facilitate removal and eliminate irregular surfaces. Mold dimensions are preselected to account for shrinkage of aerogel which occurs during the drying step of supercritical extraction of solvent. 2 figures.

  6. Aerogel derived catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, J. G., LLNL

    1996-12-11

    Aerogels area class of colloidal materials which have high surface areas and abundant mesoporous structure. SiO{sub 2} aerogels show unique physical, optical and structural properties. When catalytic metals are incorporated in the aerogel framework, the potential exists for new and very effective catalysts for industrial processes. Three applications of these metal-containing SiO{sub 2} aerogels as catalysts are briefly reviewed in this paper--NO{sub x} reduction, volatile organic compound destruction, and partial oxidation of methane.

  7. Superhydrophobic functionalized graphene aerogels.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yirong; Ehlert, Gregory J; Bukowsky, Colton; Sodano, Henry A

    2011-07-01

    Carbon-based nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes and graphene are excellent candidates for superhydrophobic surfaces because of their intrinsically high surface area and nonpolar carbon structure. This paper demonstrates that graphene aerogels with a silane surface modification can provide superhydrophobicity. Graphene aerogels of various concentrations were synthesized and the receding contact angle of a water droplet was measured. It is shown that graphene aerogels are hydrophobic and become superhydrophobic following the application of a fluorinated surfactant. The aerogels produced for this experiment outperform previous carbon nanomaterials in creating superhydrophobic surfaces and offer a more scalable synthetic procedure for production.

  8. Elastic nonlinearity of aerogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, J.; Fricke, J.; Pekala, R. W.; Hrubesh, L. W.

    1992-06-01

    We have investigated the sound propagation in SiO2 aerogels and three types of organic aerogels: resorcinol formaldehyde, melamine formaldehyde, and vitreous carbon. The main parameter determining the sound velocity is the aerogel density; however, the bond strength and cross linking also influence the stiffness of these materials. Furthermore, we show that at least two types of low-density aerogels become less stiff and consequently the sound velocity is lowered when the specimens are uniaxially compressed. We explain this in terms of a model for the internal structure.

  9. Method of manufacturing aerogel composites

    DOEpatents

    Cao, W.; Hunt, A.J.

    1999-03-09

    Disclosed herewith is a process of forming an aerogel composite which comprises introducing a gaseous material into a formed aerogel monolith or powder, and causing decomposition of said gaseous material in said aerogel in amounts sufficient to cause deposition of the decomposition products of the gas on the surfaces of the pores of the said aerogel.

  10. Aerogel-clad optical fiber

    DOEpatents

    Sprehn, Gregory A.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.; Poco, John F.; Sandler, Pamela H.

    1997-01-01

    An optical fiber is surrounded by an aerogel cladding. For a low density aerogel, the index of refraction of the aerogel is close to that of air, which provides a high numerical aperture to the optical fiber. Due to the high numerical aperture, the aerogel clad optical fiber has improved light collection efficiency.

  11. Aerogel-clad optical fiber

    DOEpatents

    Sprehn, G.A.; Hrubesh, L.W.; Poco, J.F.; Sandler, P.H.

    1997-11-04

    An optical fiber is surrounded by an aerogel cladding. For a low density aerogel, the index of refraction of the aerogel is close to that of air, which provides a high numerical aperture to the optical fiber. Due to the high numerical aperture, the aerogel clad optical fiber has improved light collection efficiency. 4 figs.

  12. Method of manufacturing aerogel composites

    DOEpatents

    Cao, Wanqing; Hunt, Arlon Jason

    1999-01-01

    Disclosed herewith is a process of forming an aerogel composite which comprises introducing a gaseous material into a formed aerogel monolith or powder, and causing decomposition of said gaseous material in said aerogel in amounts sufficient to cause deposition of the decomposition products of the gas on the surfaces of the pores of the said aerogel.

  13. Aerogel and xerogel composites for use as carbon anodes

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.; Tillotson, Thomas M.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.

    2008-08-12

    Disclosed herein are aerogel and xerogel composite materials suitable for use as anodes in fuel cells and batteries. Precursors to the aerogel and xerogel compounds are infused with inorganic polymeric materials or carbon particles and then gelled. The gels are then pyrolyzed to form composites with internal structural support.

  14. Dielectric properties of aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Hrubesh, L.W.; Keene, L.E.; Latorre, V.R. )

    1993-07-01

    We have measured the real (dielectric constant) and imaginary (loss factor) components of the complex relative permittivity at 298 [degree]K using microwave frequencies (2, 10, and 18--40 GHz), for bulk SiO[sub 2]-aerogels and for two types of organic aerogels, resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) and melamine-formaldehyde (MF). Measured dielectric constants are found to vary linearly between values of 1.0 and 2.0 for aerogel densities from 10 to 500 kg/m[sup 3]. For the same range of densities, the measured loss tangents vary linearly between values of 2[times]10[sup [minus]4] and 7[times]10[sup [minus]2]. The observed linearity of the dielectric properties with density in aerogels at microwave frequencies shows that their dielectric behavior is more gas-like than solid-like. The dielectric properties of aerogels are shown to be significantly affected by the adsorbed water internal to the bulk material. For example, water accounts for 7% of the dielectric constant and 70% of the loss at microwave frequencies for silica aerogels. Because of their very high porosity, even with the water content, the aerogels are among the few materials exhibiting such low dielectric properties. Our measurements show that aerogels with greater than 99% porosity have dielectric constants less than 1.03; these are the lowest values ever reported for a bulk solid material.

  15. Aerogels for electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Hrubesh, L.W.

    1994-10-01

    In addition to their other exceptional properties, aerogels also exhibit unusual dielectric and electronic properties due to their nano-sized structures and high porosities. For example, aerogels have the lowest dielectric constants measured for a solid material (having values approaching 1.0); they have exceptionally high dielectric resistivities and strengths (i.e., ability to insulate very high voltages); they exhibit low dielectric loss at microwave frequencies; and some aerogels are electrically conductive and photoconductive. These properties are being exploited to provide the next generation of materials for energy storage, low power consumption, and ultra-fast electronics. We are working toward adapting these unusual materials for microelectronic applications, particularly, making thin aerogel films for dielectric substrates and for energy storage devices such as supercapacitors. Measurements are presented in this paper for the dielectric and electronic properties of aerogels, including the dielectric constant, loss factor, dielectric and electrical conductivity, volume resistivity, and dielectric strength. We also describe methods to form and characterize thin aerogel films which are being developed for numerous electronic applications. Finally, some of the electronic applications proposed for aerogels are presented. Commercialization of aerogels for electronics must await further feasibility, prototype development, and cost studies, but they are one of the key materials and are sure to have a major impact on future electronics.

  16. Cutting Silica Aerogel for Particle Extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.; Brownlee, D. E.; Glesias, R.; Grigoropoulos, C. P.; Weschler, M.

    2005-01-01

    The detailed laboratory analyses of extraterrestrial particles have revolutionized our knowledge of planetary bodies in the last three decades. This knowledge of chemical composition, morphology, mineralogy, and isotopics of particles cannot be provided by remote sensing. In order to acquire these detail information in the laboratories, the samples need be intact, unmelted. Such intact capture of hypervelocity particles has been developed in 1996. Subsequently silica aerogel was introduced as the preferred medium for intact capturing of hypervelocity particles and later showed it to be particularly suitable for the space environment. STARDUST, the 4th NASA Discovery mission to capture samples from 81P/Wild 2 and contemporary interstellar dust, is the culmination of these new technologies. In early laboratory experiments of launching hypervelocity projectiles into aerogel, there was the need to cut aerogel to isolate or extract captured particles/tracks. This is especially challenging for space captures, since there will be many particles/tracks of wide ranging scales closely located, even collocated. It is critical to isolate and extract one particle without compromising its neighbors since the full significance of a particle is not known until it is extracted and analyzed. To date, three basic techniques have been explored: mechanical cutting, lasers cutting and ion beam milling. We report the current findings.

  17. Benzimidazole Based Aerogel Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhine, Wendell E. (Inventor); Mihalcik, David (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention provides aerogel materials based on imidazoles and polyimidazoles. The polyimidazole based aerogel materials can be thermally stable up to 500 C or more, and can be carbonized to produce a carbon aerogel having a char yield of 60% or more, specifically 70% or more. The present invention also provides methods of producing polyimidazole based aerogel materials by reacting at least one monomer in a suitable solvent to form a polybenzimidazole gel precursor solution, casting the polybenzimidazole gel precursor solution into a fiber reinforcement phase, allowing the at least one gel precursor in the precursor solution to transition into a gel material, and drying the gel materials to remove at least a portion of the solvent, to obtain an polybenzimidazole-based aerogel material.

  18. Method for producing hydrophobic aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Hrubesh, Lawrence W.; Poco, John F.; Coronado, Paul R.

    1999-01-01

    A method for treating a dried monolithic aerogel containing non-dispersed particles, with an organometallic surface modifying agent to produce hydrophobic aerogels. The dried, porous hydrophobic aerogels contain a protective layer of alkyl groups, such as methyl groups, on the modified surfaces of the pores of the aerogel. The alkyl groups at the aerogel surface typically contain at least one carbon-metal bond per group.

  19. Epoxy Crosslinked Silica Aerogels (X-Aerogels)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    fabrizio, Eve; Ilhan, Faysal; Meador, Mary Ann; Johnston, Chris; Leventis, Nicholas

    2004-01-01

    NASA is interested in the development of strong lightweight materials for the dual role of thermal insulator and structural component for space vehicles; freeing more weight for useful payloads. Aerogels are very-low density materials (0.010 to 0.5 g/cc) that, due to high porosity (meso- and microporosity), can be, depending on the chemical nature of the network, ideal thermal insulators (thermal conductivity approx. 15 mW/mK). However, aerogels are extremely fragile. For practical application of aerogels, one must increase strength without compromising the physical properties attributed to low density. This has been achieved by templated growth of an epoxy polymer layer that crosslinks the "pearl necklace" network of nanoparticles: the framework of a typical silica aerogel. The requirement for conformal accumulation of the epoxy crosslinker is reaction both with the surface of silica and with itself. After cross-linking, the strength of a typical aerogel monolith increases by a factor of 200, in the expense of only a 2-fold increase in density. Strength is increased further by coupling residual unreacted epoxides with diamine.

  20. Mechanical Properties of Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmenter, Kelly E.; Milstein, Frederick

    1995-01-01

    Aerogels are extremely low density solids that are characterized by a high porosity and pore sizes on the order of nanometers. Their low thermal conductivity and sometimes transparent appearance make them desirable for applications such as insulation in cryogenic vessels and between double paned glass in solar architecture. An understanding of the mechanical properties of aerogels is necessary before aerogels can be used in load bearing applications. In the present study, the mechanical behavior of various types of fiber-reinforced silica aerogels was investigated with hardness, compression, tension and shear tests. Particular attention was paid to the effects of processing parameters, testing conditions, storage environment, and age on the aerogels' mechanical response. The results indicate that the addition of fibers to the aerogel matrix generally resulted in softer, weaker materials with smaller elastic moduli. Furthermore, the testing environment significantly affected compression results. Tests in ethanol show an appreciable amount of scatter, and are not consistent with results for tests in air. In fact, the compression specimens appeared to crack and begin to dissolve upon exposure to the ethanol solution. This is consistent with the inherent hydrophobic nature of these aerogels. In addition, the aging process affected the aerogels' mechanical behavior by increasing their compressive strength and elastic moduli while decreasing their strain at fracture. However, desiccation of the specimens did not appreciably affect the mechanical properties, even though it reduced the aerogel density by removing trapped moisture. Finally, tension and shear test results indicate that the shear strength of the aerogels exceeds the tensile strength. This is consistent with the response of brittle materials. Future work should concentrate on mechanical testing at cryogenic temperatures, and should involve more extensive tensile tests. Moreover, before the mechanical response

  1. Method of patterning an aerogel

    DOEpatents

    Reed, Scott T.

    2012-07-24

    A method for producing a pattern in an aerogel disposed as a coating on a substrate comprises exposing the aerogel coating to the vapors of a hydrophobic silane compound, masking the aerogel coating with a shadow photomask and irradiating the aerogel coating with ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. The exposure to UV through the shadow mask creates a pattern of hydrophobic and hydrophilic regions in the aerogel coating. Etching away the hydrophilic regions of the aerogel coating, preferably with a 1 molar solution of sodium hydroxide, leaves the unwetted and unetched hydrophobic regions of the aerogel layer on the substrate, replicating the pattern of the photomask. The hydrophobic aerogel pattern can be further exposed to UV irradiation if desired, to create a hydrophilic aerogel pattern.

  2. sup 13 C NMR investigation of crosslinking in organic aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, R. L.; Pekala, R. W.

    1989-09-15

    Organic aerogels are a special type of low density foam produced from the supercritical drying of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) gels. These aerogels have continuous porosity, ultrafine cell/pore sizes (<1000 {angstrom}), and a microstructure composed of interconnected colloidal-like particles with diameters ranging from 30-175 {angstrom}. The particle size, surface area, density, and mechanical properties of the aerogels are largely determined by the catalysts concentration used in the sol-gel polymerization. In order to gain some insight into the crosslinks between RF particles, aerogels were labeled with C-13 formaldehyde at various times in the polymerization. CPMAS and IRCP techniques were used to correlate the relaxation behavior of the C-13 enriched aerogels with their different microstructures. 9 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  3. A Versatile Microarray Platform for Capturing Rare Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brinkmann, Falko; Hirtz, Michael; Haller, Anna; Gorges, Tobias M.; Vellekoop, Michael J.; Riethdorf, Sabine; Müller, Volkmar; Pantel, Klaus; Fuchs, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Analyses of rare events occurring at extremely low frequencies in body fluids are still challenging. We established a versatile microarray-based platform able to capture single target cells from large background populations. As use case we chose the challenging application of detecting circulating tumor cells (CTCs) – about one cell in a billion normal blood cells. After incubation with an antibody cocktail, targeted cells are extracted on a microarray in a microfluidic chip. The accessibility of our platform allows for subsequent recovery of targets for further analysis. The microarray facilitates exclusion of false positive capture events by co-localization allowing for detection without fluorescent labelling. Analyzing blood samples from cancer patients with our platform reached and partly outreached gold standard performance, demonstrating feasibility for clinical application. Clinical researchers free choice of antibody cocktail without need for altered chip manufacturing or incubation protocol, allows virtual arbitrary targeting of capture species and therefore wide spread applications in biomedical sciences. PMID:26493176

  4. The aerocapacitor: A carbon aerogel based supercapacitor

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1992-12-01

    During the 1980's, a wide variety of carbon foams, formed by the pyrolysis of polymeric foams, were developed at several Department of Energy Laboratories. These foams are known for their monolithic structure and the ability to tailor their critical parameters (e.g. porosity, density). Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) exclusively developed a unique type of carbon foam, known as carbon aerogels. Carbon aerogels are a special class of open-cell foams with (1) homogeneous ultrafine particle and pore size, (2) very large useful surface area per unit volume, and (3) monolithic structure, that yields (4) excellent electrical conductivity due to the intimate connection of the particles. We have applied carbon aerogels to make an Aerocapacitor''; a high power- and energy-density electrochemical double layer capacitor (EDLC) that uses carbon aerogels as electrodes. Carbon aerogel surface areas range from about 100 to 700 m[sup 2]/cc (as measured by BET analysis), with bulk densities of 0.05 to 1.0 g/cm[sup 3] and their morphology allows stored energy to be released rapidly, resulting in high power-densities.

  5. The aerocapacitor: A carbon aerogel based supercapacitor

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1992-12-01

    During the 1980`s, a wide variety of carbon foams, formed by the pyrolysis of polymeric foams, were developed at several Department of Energy Laboratories. These foams are known for their monolithic structure and the ability to tailor their critical parameters (e.g. porosity, density). Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) exclusively developed a unique type of carbon foam, known as carbon aerogels. Carbon aerogels are a special class of open-cell foams with (1) homogeneous ultrafine particle and pore size, (2) very large useful surface area per unit volume, and (3) monolithic structure, that yields (4) excellent electrical conductivity due to the intimate connection of the particles. We have applied carbon aerogels to make an ``Aerocapacitor``; a high power- and energy-density electrochemical double layer capacitor (EDLC) that uses carbon aerogels as electrodes. Carbon aerogel surface areas range from about 100 to 700 m{sup 2}/cc (as measured by BET analysis), with bulk densities of 0.05 to 1.0 g/cm{sup 3} and their morphology allows stored energy to be released rapidly, resulting in high power-densities.

  6. Capturing relevant extracellular matrices for investigating cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Keely, Patricia; Nain, Amrinder

    2015-01-01

    Much progress in understanding cell migration has been determined by using classic two-dimensional (2D) tissue culture platforms. However, increasingly, it is appreciated that certain properties of cell migration in vivo are not represented by strictly 2D assays. There is much interest in creating relevant three-dimensional (3D) culture environments and engineered platforms to better represent features of the extracellular matrix and stromal microenvironment that are not captured in 2D platforms. Important to this goal is a solid understanding of the features of the extracellular matrix—composition, stiffness, topography, and alignment—in different tissues and disease states and the development of means to capture these features PMID:26918156

  7. Method of casting aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Poco, John F.

    1993-01-01

    The invention describes a method for making monolithic castings of transparent silica aerogel with densities in the range from 0.001 g/cm.sup.3 to 0.6 g/cm.sup.3. Various shapes of aerogels are cast in flexible polymer molds which facilitate removal and eliminate irregular surfaces. Mold dimensions are preselected to account for shrinkage of alcogel which occurs during the drying step of supercritical extraction of solvent.

  8. Parametric control of collision rates and capture rates in geometrically enhanced differential immunocapture (GEDI) microfluidic devices for rare cell capture.

    PubMed

    Smith, James P; Lannin, Timothy B; Syed, Yusef; Santana, Steven M; Kirby, Brian J

    2014-02-01

    The enrichment and isolation of rare cells from complex samples, such as circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from whole blood, is an important engineering problem with widespread clinical applications. One approach uses a microfluidic obstacle array with an antibody surface functionalization to both guide cells into contact with the capture surface and to facilitate adhesion; geometrically enhanced differential immunocapture is a design strategy in which the array is designed to promote target cell–obstacle contact and minimize other interactions (Gleghorn et al. 2010; Kirby et al. 2012). We present a simulation that uses capture experiments in a simple Hele-Shaw geometry (Santana et al. 2012) to inform a target-cell-specific capture model that can predict capture probability in immunocapture microdevices of any arbitrary complex geometry. We show that capture performance is strongly dependent on the array geometry, and that it is possible to select an obstacle array geometry that maximizes capture efficiency (by creating combinations of frequent target cell–obstacle collisions and shear stress low enough to support capture), while simultaneously enhancing purity by minimizing nonspecific adhesion of both smaller contaminant cells (with infrequent cell–obstacle collisions) and larger contaminant cells (by focusing those collisions into regions of high shear stress). PMID:24078270

  9. Parametric control of collision rates and capture rates in geometrically enhanced differential immunocapture (GEDI) microfluidic devices for rare cell capture.

    PubMed

    Smith, James P; Lannin, Timothy B; Syed, Yusef; Santana, Steven M; Kirby, Brian J

    2014-02-01

    The enrichment and isolation of rare cells from complex samples, such as circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from whole blood, is an important engineering problem with widespread clinical applications. One approach uses a microfluidic obstacle array with an antibody surface functionalization to both guide cells into contact with the capture surface and to facilitate adhesion; geometrically enhanced differential immunocapture is a design strategy in which the array is designed to promote target cell–obstacle contact and minimize other interactions (Gleghorn et al. 2010; Kirby et al. 2012). We present a simulation that uses capture experiments in a simple Hele-Shaw geometry (Santana et al. 2012) to inform a target-cell-specific capture model that can predict capture probability in immunocapture microdevices of any arbitrary complex geometry. We show that capture performance is strongly dependent on the array geometry, and that it is possible to select an obstacle array geometry that maximizes capture efficiency (by creating combinations of frequent target cell–obstacle collisions and shear stress low enough to support capture), while simultaneously enhancing purity by minimizing nonspecific adhesion of both smaller contaminant cells (with infrequent cell–obstacle collisions) and larger contaminant cells (by focusing those collisions into regions of high shear stress).

  10. Mycobacteriophage cell binding proteins for the capture of mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Arutyunov, Denis; Singh, Upasana; El-Hawiet, Amr; Seckler, Henrique dos Santos; Nikjah, Sanaz; Joe, Maju; Bai, Yu; Lowary, Todd L; Klassen, John S; Evoy, Stephane; Szymanski, Christine M

    2014-01-01

    Slow growing Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) causes a deadly condition in cattle known as Johne's disease where asymptomatic carriers are the major source of disease transmission. MAP was also shown to be associated with chronic Crohn's disease in humans. Mycobacterium smegmatis is a model mycobacterium that can cause opportunistic infections in a number of human tissues and, rarely, a respiratory disease. Currently, there are no rapid, culture-independent, reliable and inexpensive tests for the diagnostics of MAP or M. smegmatis infections. Bacteriophages are viruses producing a number of proteins that effectively and specifically recognize the cell envelopes of their bacterial hosts. We demonstrate that the mycobacterial phage L5 minor tail protein Gp6 and lysin Gp10 are useful tools for the rapid capture of mycobacteria. Immobilized Gp10 was able to bind both MAP and M. smegmatis cells whereas Gp6 was M. smegmatis specific. Neither of the 2 proteins was able to capture E. coli, salmonella, campylobacter or Mycobacterium marinum cells. Gp6 was detected previously as a component of the phage particle and shows no homology to proteins with known function. Therefore, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry was used to determine whether recombinant Gp6 could bind to a number of chemically synthesized fragments of mycobacterial surface glycans. These findings demonstrate that mycobacteriophage proteins could be used as a pathogen capturing platform that can potentially improve the effectiveness of existing diagnostic methods. PMID:26713219

  11. Compression molding of aerogel microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, Richard W.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.

    1998-03-24

    An aerogel composite material produced by compression molding of aerogel microspheres (powders) mixed together with a small percentage of polymer binder to form monolithic shapes in a cost-effective manner. The aerogel composites are formed by mixing aerogel microspheres with a polymer binder, placing the mixture in a mold and heating under pressure, which results in a composite with a density of 50-800 kg/m.sup.3 (0.05-0.80 g/cc). The thermal conductivity of the thus formed aerogel composite is below that of air, but higher than the thermal conductivity of monolithic aerogels. The resulting aerogel composites are attractive for applications such as thermal insulation since fabrication thereof does not require large and expensive processing equipment. In addition to thermal insulation, the aerogel composites may be utilized for filtration, ICF target, double layer capacitors, and capacitive deionization.

  12. Compression molding of aerogel microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, R.W.; Hrubesh, L.W.

    1998-03-24

    An aerogel composite material produced by compression molding of aerogel microspheres (powders) mixed together with a small percentage of polymer binder to form monolithic shapes in a cost-effective manner is disclosed. The aerogel composites are formed by mixing aerogel microspheres with a polymer binder, placing the mixture in a mold and heating under pressure, which results in a composite with a density of 50--800 kg/m{sup 3} (0.05--0.80 g/cc). The thermal conductivity of the thus formed aerogel composite is below that of air, but higher than the thermal conductivity of monolithic aerogels. The resulting aerogel composites are attractive for applications such as thermal insulation since fabrication thereof does not require large and expensive processing equipment. In addition to thermal insulation, the aerogel composites may be utilized for filtration, ICF target, double layer capacitors, and capacitive deionization. 4 figs.

  13. Ferromagnetic Bare Metal Stent for Endothelial Cell Capture and Retention.

    PubMed

    Uthamaraj, Susheil; Tefft, Brandon J; Hlinomaz, Ota; Sandhu, Gurpreet S; Dragomir-Daescu, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Rapid endothelialization of cardiovascular stents is needed to reduce stent thrombosis and to avoid anti-platelet therapy which can reduce bleeding risk. The feasibility of using magnetic forces to capture and retain endothelial outgrowth cells (EOC) labeled with super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) has been shown previously. But this technique requires the development of a mechanically functional stent from a magnetic and biocompatible material followed by in-vitro and in-vivo testing to prove rapid endothelialization. We developed a weakly ferromagnetic stent from 2205 duplex stainless steel using computer aided design (CAD) and its design was further refined using finite element analysis (FEA). The final design of the stent exhibited a principal strain below the fracture limit of the material during mechanical crimping and expansion. One hundred stents were manufactured and a subset of them was used for mechanical testing, retained magnetic field measurements, in-vitro cell capture studies, and in-vivo implantation studies. Ten stents were tested for deployment to verify if they sustained crimping and expansion cycle without failure. Another 10 stents were magnetized using a strong neodymium magnet and their retained magnetic field was measured. The stents showed that the retained magnetism was sufficient to capture SPION-labeled EOC in our in-vitro studies. SPION-labeled EOC capture and retention was verified in large animal models by implanting 1 magnetized stent and 1 non-magnetized control stent in each of 4 pigs. The stented arteries were explanted after 7 days and analyzed histologically. The weakly magnetic stents developed in this study were capable of attracting and retaining SPION-labeled endothelial cells which can promote rapid healing. PMID:26436434

  14. Ferromagnetic Bare Metal Stent for Endothelial Cell Capture and Retention.

    PubMed

    Uthamaraj, Susheil; Tefft, Brandon J; Hlinomaz, Ota; Sandhu, Gurpreet S; Dragomir-Daescu, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Rapid endothelialization of cardiovascular stents is needed to reduce stent thrombosis and to avoid anti-platelet therapy which can reduce bleeding risk. The feasibility of using magnetic forces to capture and retain endothelial outgrowth cells (EOC) labeled with super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) has been shown previously. But this technique requires the development of a mechanically functional stent from a magnetic and biocompatible material followed by in-vitro and in-vivo testing to prove rapid endothelialization. We developed a weakly ferromagnetic stent from 2205 duplex stainless steel using computer aided design (CAD) and its design was further refined using finite element analysis (FEA). The final design of the stent exhibited a principal strain below the fracture limit of the material during mechanical crimping and expansion. One hundred stents were manufactured and a subset of them was used for mechanical testing, retained magnetic field measurements, in-vitro cell capture studies, and in-vivo implantation studies. Ten stents were tested for deployment to verify if they sustained crimping and expansion cycle without failure. Another 10 stents were magnetized using a strong neodymium magnet and their retained magnetic field was measured. The stents showed that the retained magnetism was sufficient to capture SPION-labeled EOC in our in-vitro studies. SPION-labeled EOC capture and retention was verified in large animal models by implanting 1 magnetized stent and 1 non-magnetized control stent in each of 4 pigs. The stented arteries were explanted after 7 days and analyzed histologically. The weakly magnetic stents developed in this study were capable of attracting and retaining SPION-labeled endothelial cells which can promote rapid healing.

  15. Dielectrophoretic Capture of E. coli Cells at Nanoelectrode Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Lateef U; Liu, Jianwei; Price, Alex; Li, Yi-fen; Culbertson, Christopher; Li, Jun

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports capture and detection of pathogenic bacteria based on AC dielectrophoresis (DEP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) employing an embedded vertically aligned carbon nanofiber (VACNF) nanoelectrode array (NEA) vs. a macroscopic indium tin oxide (ITO) transparent electrode in “points-and-lid” configuration. The nano-DEP device was fabricated using photolithography processes to define an exposed active region on a randomly distributed NEA and a microfluidic channel on ITO to guide the flow of labeled E. coli cells, respectively, and then bond them into a fluidic chip. A high frequency (100 kHz) AC field was applied to generate positive DEP at the tips of exposed CNFs. Enhanced electric field gradient was achieved due to reduction in electrode size down to nanometer scale which helped to overcome the large hydrodynamic drag force experienced by E. coli cells at high flow velocities (up to 1.6 mm/sec). This DEP device was able to effectively capture a significant number of E. coli. Significant decrease in the absolute impedance (|Z|) at the NEA was observed by EIS experiments. The results obtained in this study suggest the possibility of integration of a fully functional electronic device for rapid, reversible and label-free capture and detection of pathogenic bacteria. PMID:21823128

  16. Temperature-stable and optically transparent thin-film zinc oxide aerogel electrodes as model systems for 3D interpenetrating organic-inorganic heterojunction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Krumm, Michael; Pawlitzek, Fabian; Weickert, Jonas; Schmidt-Mende, Lukas; Polarz, Sebastian

    2012-12-01

    Novel, nanostructured electrode materials comprising porous ZnO films with aerogel morphology are presented. Almost any substrate including polymers, metals, or ceramics can be coated using a method that is suitable for mass production. The thin, porous films can be prepared from the wet gels via conventional drying, supercritical drying is not necessary. The filigree ZnO network is thermally very stable and exhibits sufficient electrical conductivity for advanced electronic applications. The latter was tested by realizing a highly desired architecture of organic-inorganic hybrid solar cells. After sensitizing of the ZnO with a purely organic squarine dye (SQ2), a nanostructured, interpenetrating 3D network of the inorganic semiconductor (ZnO) and organic semiconductor (P3HT) was prepared. The solar cell device was tested under illumination with AM 1.5G solar light (100 mW/cm(2)) and exhibited an energy conversion efficiency (η(eff)) of 0.69%.

  17. Serial interactome capture of the human cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Thomas; Albrecht, Anne-Susann; de Melo Costa, Veronica Rodrigues; Sauer, Sascha; Meierhofer, David; Ørom, Ulf Andersson

    2016-04-04

    Novel RNA-guided cellular functions are paralleled by an increasing number of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Here we present 'serial RNA interactome capture' (serIC), a multiple purification procedure of ultraviolet-crosslinked poly(A)-RNA-protein complexes that enables global RBP detection with high specificity. We apply serIC to the nuclei of proliferating K562 cells to obtain the first human nuclear RNA interactome. The domain composition of the 382 identified nuclear RBPs markedly differs from previous IC experiments, including few factors without known RNA-binding domains that are in good agreement with computationally predicted RNA binding. serIC extends the number of DNA-RNA-binding proteins (DRBPs), and reveals a network of RBPs involved in p53 signalling and double-strand break repair. serIC is an effective tool to couple global RBP capture with additional selection or labelling steps for specific detection of highly purified RBPs.

  18. Serial interactome capture of the human cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Thomas; Albrecht, Anne-Susann; de Melo Costa, Veronica Rodrigues; Sauer, Sascha; Meierhofer, David; Ørom, Ulf Andersson

    2016-01-01

    Novel RNA-guided cellular functions are paralleled by an increasing number of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Here we present 'serial RNA interactome capture' (serIC), a multiple purification procedure of ultraviolet-crosslinked poly(A)-RNA-protein complexes that enables global RBP detection with high specificity. We apply serIC to the nuclei of proliferating K562 cells to obtain the first human nuclear RNA interactome. The domain composition of the 382 identified nuclear RBPs markedly differs from previous IC experiments, including few factors without known RNA-binding domains that are in good agreement with computationally predicted RNA binding. serIC extends the number of DNA-RNA-binding proteins (DRBPs), and reveals a network of RBPs involved in p53 signalling and double-strand break repair. serIC is an effective tool to couple global RBP capture with additional selection or labelling steps for specific detection of highly purified RBPs. PMID:27040163

  19. Magnetographic array for the capture and enumeration of single cells and cell pairs.

    PubMed

    Shields, C Wyatt; Livingston, Carissa E; Yellen, Benjamin B; López, Gabriel P; Murdoch, David M

    2014-07-01

    We present a simple microchip device consisting of an overlaid pattern of micromagnets and microwells capable of capturing magnetically labeled cells into well-defined compartments (with accuracies >95%). Its flexible design permits the programmable deposition of single cells for their direct enumeration and pairs of cells for the detailed analysis of cell-cell interactions. This cell arraying device requires no external power and can be operated solely with permanent magnets. Large scale image analysis of cells captured in this array can yield valuable information (e.g., regarding various immune parameters such as the CD4:CD8 ratio) in a miniaturized and portable platform.

  20. Smart Thin Hydrogel Coatings Harnessing Hydrophobicity and Topography to Capture and Release Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Luying; Liu, Hongliang; Zhang, Feilong; Li, Guannan; Wang, Shutao

    2016-09-01

    Smart thin hydrogel coatings are fabricated to capture and release targeted cancer cells by simultaneously tuning surface hydrophobicity and topography. At physiological temperature, the targeted cancer cells are captured on the hydrophobic and wrinkled coating surface. At room temperature, the captured cells are released from the hydrophilic and smooth coating surface.

  1. Smart Thin Hydrogel Coatings Harnessing Hydrophobicity and Topography to Capture and Release Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Luying; Liu, Hongliang; Zhang, Feilong; Li, Guannan; Wang, Shutao

    2016-09-01

    Smart thin hydrogel coatings are fabricated to capture and release targeted cancer cells by simultaneously tuning surface hydrophobicity and topography. At physiological temperature, the targeted cancer cells are captured on the hydrophobic and wrinkled coating surface. At room temperature, the captured cells are released from the hydrophilic and smooth coating surface. PMID:27295294

  2. Silylation of low-density silica and bridged polysilsesquioxane aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    DeFriend, K. A.; Loy, D. A.; Salazar, K. V.; Wilson, K. V.

    2004-01-01

    Silica and bridged polysilsesquioxane aerogels are low-density materials that are attractive for applications such as thermal insulation, porous separation media or catalyst supports, adsorbents, and cometary dust capture agents. However, aerogels are notoriously weak and brittle making it difficult to handle and machine monoliths into desired forms. This complication prevents the development of many applications that would otherwise benefit from the use of the low-density materials. Here, we will describe our efforts to chemically modify and mechanically enhance silica-based aerogels using chemical vapor techniques without sacrificing their characteristic low densities. Monolithic silica and organic-bridged polysilsesquioxane aerogels were prepared by sol-gel polymerization of the respective methoxysilane monomers followed by supercritical carbon dioxide drying of the gels. Then the gels were reactively modified with silylating agents to demonstrate the viability of CVD modification of aerogels, and to determine the effects of silylation of surface silanols on the morphology, surface area, and mechanical properties of the resulting aerogels.

  3. Aerogels Insulate Against Extreme Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    In 1992, NASA started to pursue the development of aerogel for cryogenic insulation. Kennedy Space Center awarded Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts to Aspen Systems Inc., of Marlborough, Massachusetts, that resulted in a new manufacturing process and a new flexible, durable, easy-to-use form of aerogel. Aspen Systems formed Aspen Aerogels Inc., in Northborough, Massachusetts, to market the product, and by 2009, the company had become the leading provider of aerogel in the United States, producing nearly 20 million square feet per year. With an array of commercial applications, the NASA-derived aerogel has most recently been applied to protect and insulate people s hands and feet.

  4. Carbon XANES Data from Six Aerogel Picokeystones Cut from the Top and Bottom Sides of the Stardust Comet Sample Tray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirick, S.; Flynn, G. J.; Frank, D.; Sandford, S. A.; Zolensky, M. E.; Tsou, P.; Peltzer, C.; Jacobsen, C.

    2009-01-01

    Great care and a large effort was made to minimize the amount of organic matter contained within the flight aerogel used to collect Comet 81P/Wild 2 samples. Even so, by the very nature of the production process and silica aerogel s affinity for volatile organics keeping silica aerogel free from organics is a monumental task. Silica aerogel from three production batches was flown on the Stardust sample return mission. All 3 types had layered densities varying from 5mg/ml to 50 mg/ml where the densest aerogel was farthest away from the collection area. A 2 step gelation process was used to make the flight aerogel and organics used in this process were tetraethylorthosilicate, ethanol and acetonitrile. Both ammonium hydroxide and nitric acid were also used in the aerogel production process. The flight aerogel was baked at JPL at 300 C for 72 hours, most of the baking was done at atmosphere but twice a day the oven was pumped to 10 torr for hour [1]. After the aerogel was baked it was stored in a nitrogen purged cabinet until flight time. One aerogel cell was located in the SRC away from any sample collection area as a witness to possible contamination from out gassing of the space craft, re-entry gases and any other organic encounter. This aerogel was aerogel used in the interstellar collection sample tray and is the least dense of the 3 batches of aerogel flown. Organics found in the witness tile include organics containing Si-CH3 bonds, amines and PAHS. Besides organic contamination, hot spots of calcium were reported in the flight aerogel. Carbonates have been detected in comet 81P/Wild2 samples . During preflight analyses, no technique was used to analyze for carbonates in aerogel. To determine if the carbonates found in 81P/Wild2 samples were from the comet, it is necessary to analyze the flight aerogel for carbonate as well as for organics.

  5. Coated Aerogel Beads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littman, Howard (Inventor); Plawsky, Joel L. (Inventor); Paccione, John D. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for coating particulate material are provided. The apparatus includes a vessel having a top and a bottom, a vertically extending conduit having an inlet in the vessel and an outlet outside of the vessel, a first fluid inlet in the bottom of the vessel for introducing a transfer fluid, a second fluid inlet in the bottom of the vessel for introducing a coating fluid, and a fluid outlet from the vessel. The method includes steps of agitating a material, contacting the material with a coating material, and drying the coating material to produce a coated material. The invention may be adapted to coat aerogel beads, among other materials. A coated aerogel bead and an aerogel-based insulation material are also disclosed.

  6. Effects of nanopillar array diameter and spacing on cancer cell capture and cell behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shunqiang; Wan, Yuan; Liu, Yaling

    2014-10-01

    While substrates with nanopillars (NPs) have emerged as promising platforms for isolation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs), the influence of diameter and spacing of NPs on CTC capture is still unclear. In this paper, CTC-capture yield and cell behaviors have been investigated by using antibody functionalized NPs of various diameters (120-1100 nm) and spacings (35-800 nm). The results show a linear relationship between the cell capture yield and effective contact area of NP substrates where a NP array of small diameter and reasonable spacing is preferred; however, spacing that is too small or too large adversely impairs the capture efficiency and specificity, respectively. In addition, the formation of pseudopodia between captured cells and the substrate is found to be dependent not only on cell adhesion status but also on elution strength and shear direction. These findings provide essential guidance in designing NP substrates for more efficient capture of CTCs and manipulation of cytomorphology in future.While substrates with nanopillars (NPs) have emerged as promising platforms for isolation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs), the influence of diameter and spacing of NPs on CTC capture is still unclear. In this paper, CTC-capture yield and cell behaviors have been investigated by using antibody functionalized NPs of various diameters (120-1100 nm) and spacings (35-800 nm). The results show a linear relationship between the cell capture yield and effective contact area of NP substrates where a NP array of small diameter and reasonable spacing is preferred; however, spacing that is too small or too large adversely impairs the capture efficiency and specificity, respectively. In addition, the formation of pseudopodia between captured cells and the substrate is found to be dependent not only on cell adhesion status but also on elution strength and shear direction. These findings provide essential guidance in designing NP substrates for more efficient capture of CTCs

  7. Three-dimensional textural and compositional analysis of particle tracks and fragmentation history in aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    Ebel, Denton S.; Greenberg, Michael; Rivers, Mark L.; Newville, Matthew

    2010-05-04

    We report analyses of aerogel tracks using (1) synchrotron X-ray computed microtomography (XRCMT), (2) laser confocal scanning microscopy (LCSM), and (3) synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SRXRF) of particles and their paths resulting from simulated hypervelocity impacts (1-2), and a single {approx}1 mm aerogel track from the Stardust cometary sample collector (1-3). Large aerogel pieces can be imaged sequentially, resulting in high spatial resolution images spanning many tomographic fields of view ('lambda-tomography'). We report calculations of energy deposited, and tests on aromatic hydrocarbons showing no alteration in tomography experiments. Imaging at resolutions from -17 to -1 micron/pixel edge (XRCMT) and to <100 nm/pixel edge (LCSM) illustrates track geometry and interaction of particles with aerogel, including rifling, particle fragmentation, and final particle location. We present a 3-D deconvolution method using an estimated point-spread function for aerogel, allowing basic corrections of LCSM data for axial distortion. LCSM allows rapid, comprehensive, non-destructive, high information return analysis of tracks in aerogel keystones, prior to destructive grain extraction. SRXRF with LCSM allows spatial correlation of grain size, chemical, and mineralogical data. If optical methods are precluded in future aerogel capture missions, XRCMT is a viable 3D imaging technique. Combinations of these methods allow for complete, nondestructive, quantitative 3-D analysis of captured materials at high spatial resolution. This data is fundamental to understanding the hypervelocity particle-aerogel interaction histories of Stardust grains.

  8. Aerogel Insulation Applications for Liquid Hydrogen Launch Vehicle Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, J. E.; Sass, J.

    2007-01-01

    Aerogel based insulation systems for ambient pressure environments were developed for liquid hydrogen (LH2) tank applications. Solutions to thermal insulation problems were demonstrated for the Space Shuttle External Tank (ET) through extensive testing at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory. Demonstration testing was performed using a 1/10th scale ET LH2 intertank unit and liquid helium as the coolant to provide the 20 K cold boundary temperature. Cryopumping tests in the range of 20K were performed using both constant mass and constant pressure methods. Long-duration tests (up to 10 hours) showed that the nitrogen mass taken up inside the intertank is reduced by a factor of nearly three for the aerogel insulated case as compared to the un-insulated (bare metal flight configuration) case. Test results including thermal stabilization, heat transfer effectiveness, and cryopumping confirm that the aerogel system eliminates free liquid nitrogen within the intertank. Physisorption (or adsorption) of liquid nitrogen within the fine pore structure of aerogel materials was also investigated. Results of a mass uptake method show that the sorption ratio (liquid nitrogen to aerogel beads) is about 62 percent by volume. A novel liquid nitrogen production method of testing the liquid nitrogen physical adsorption capacity of aerogel beads was also performed to more closely approximate the actual launch vehicle cooldown and thermal stabilization effects within the aerogel material. The extraordinary insulating effectiveness of the aerogel material shows that cryopumping is not an open-cell mass transport issue but is strictly driven by thermal communication between warm and cold surfaces. The new aerogel insulation technology is useful to solve heat transfer problem areas and to augment existing thermal protection systems on launch vehicles. Examples are given and potential benefits for producing launch systems that are more reliable, robust, reusable, and efficient are outlined.

  9. Cell migration and antigen capture are antagonistic processes coupled by myosin II in dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Chabaud, Mélanie; Heuzé, Mélina L.; Bretou, Marine; Vargas, Pablo; Maiuri, Paolo; Solanes, Paola; Maurin, Mathieu; Terriac, Emmanuel; Le Berre, Maël; Lankar, Danielle; Piolot, Tristan; Adelstein, Robert S.; Zhang, Yingfan; Sixt, Michael; Jacobelli, Jordan; Bénichou, Olivier; Voituriez, Raphaël; Piel, Matthieu; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria

    2015-01-01

    The immune response relies on the migration of leukocytes and on their ability to stop in precise anatomical locations to fulfil their task. How leukocyte migration and function are coordinated is unknown. Here we show that in immature dendritic cells, which patrol their environment by engulfing extracellular material, cell migration and antigen capture are antagonistic. This antagonism results from transient enrichment of myosin IIA at the cell front, which disrupts the back-to-front gradient of the motor protein, slowing down locomotion but promoting antigen capture. We further highlight that myosin IIA enrichment at the cell front requires the MHC class II-associated invariant chain (Ii). Thus, by controlling myosin IIA localization, Ii imposes on dendritic cells an intermittent antigen capture behaviour that might facilitate environment patrolling. We propose that the requirement for myosin II in both cell migration and specific cell functions may provide a general mechanism for their coordination in time and space. PMID:26109323

  10. Tanpopo: Astrobiology Exposure and Micrometeoroid Capture Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagishi, Akihiko; Yano, Hajime; Okudaira, Kyoko; Kobayashi, Kensei; Yokobori, Shin-Ichi; Tabata, Makoto; Kawai, Hideyuki; Yamashita, Masamichi; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Naraoka, Hiroshi; Mita, Hajime

    Tanpopo, dandelion, is the name of a grass whose seeds with floss are spread by the wind. We propose the analyses of interplanetary migration of microbes, organic compounds and meteoroids on Japan Experimental Module (JEM) of the International Space Station (ISS). In this paper we will introduce the target and basic design of the project. In “Tanpopo” project, ultra low-density aerogel will be used to capture micrometeoroid and debris. Particles captured by aerogel will be used for several analyses after the initial inspection of the gel and tracks. Careful analysis of the tracks in the aerogel will provide the size and velocity dependence of debris flux. The particles will be analyzed for mineralogical, organic and microbiological characteristics. Aerogels are ready for production in Japan. Aerogels and trays are space proven. All the analytical techniques are ready.

  11. Fast transporting ZnO-TiO2 coaxial photoanodes for dye-sensitized solar cells based on ALD-modified SiO2 aerogel frameworks.

    PubMed

    Williams, Vennesa O; Jeong, Nak Cheon; Prasittichai, Chaiya; Farha, Omar K; Pellin, Michael J; Hupp, Joseph T

    2012-07-24

    A doubly coaxial photoanode architecture based on templated SiO(2) aerogels was fabricated on transparent conducting oxides for use in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). These templates were coated with ZnO via atomic layer deposition (ALD) to yield an electronically interconnected, low-density, high-surface-area, semiconductor framework. Addition of a thin conformal layer of a second metal oxide (alumina, zirconia, or titania) via ALD was found to suppress the dissolution of ZnO that otherwise occurs when it is soaked in alcohol solutions containing acidic dyes used for sensitization or in acetonitrile solutions containing a pyridine derivative and the iodide/tri-iodide (I(-)/I(-)(3)) redox shuttle. Electron transport in SiO(2)-ZnO-TiO(2) photoelectrodes was found to be nearly 2 orders of magnitude faster than in SiO(2)-TiO(2) structures, implying that the interior ZnO sheath serves as the primary electron conduit. In contrast, rates of electron interception by the oxidized form of the redox shuttle were observed to decrease when a TiO(2) shell was added to SiO(2)-ZnO, with the decreases becoming more significant as the thickness of the titania shell increases. These effects lead to improvements in efficiency for DSSCs that utilize I(-)/I(-)(3), but much larger improvements for DSSCs utilizing ferrocene/ferrocenium, a notoriously fast redox shuttle. For the former, overall energy conversion efficiencies maximize at 4.0%. From a variety of experiments, the primary factor limiting aerogel-based DSSC performance is light loss due to scattering. Nevertheless, variants of the doubly coaxial structure may prove useful in devising DSSCs that can achieve excellent energy conversion efficiencies even with fast redox shuttles.

  12. Characterization of Aerogel's Optical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Justen, Abigail; Young, Jonathan

    2013-10-01

    Aerogel is used in the kaon aerogel Cerenkov detector at Jefferson Lab. Kaons are identified by the number of photons created through Cerenkov radiation emitted as the kaon travels through the aerogel. Depending on the refractive index of the aerogel, kaons of different momenta can be detected and distinguished from protons. Therefore, a uniform refractive index in the detector is important to reduce uncertainty in the Cerenkov radiation. We found the refractive index of the aerogel by shining a red construction laser through it and measuring how far the beam refracted. The refractive index of aerogel is also directly related to the density of aerogel. The humidity in the air, if absorbed, could also affect the refractive index. To test the effect of humidity on aerogel we used a humidity controlled environment between 80 and 100 percent on aerogel from Matsushita Electric Works, Ltd, Japan Fine Ceramic Center, and Novosibirsk. Finally, we tested the transmittance of aerogel tiles with a UV/Vis photospectrometer to find the correlation between transmittance and the tile's properties. Tiles with the highest transmittance will allow for the most accurate count of the photons produced through Cerenkov radiation. The results from these experiments will be presented. Supported in Part by NSF Grant 1019521 and 1039446.

  13. Desalination with carbon aerogel electrodes. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.C.; Richardson, J.H.; Fix, D.V.; Thomson, S.L.; May, S.C.

    1996-12-04

    Electrically regenerated electrosorption process (carbon aerogel CDI) was developed by LLNL for continuously removing ionic impurities from aqueous streams. A salt solution flows in a channel formed by numerous pairs of parallel carbon aerogel electrodes. Each electrode has a very high BET surface area (2-5.4x10{sup 6}ft{sup 2}lb{sup -1} or 400-1100 m{sup 2}g{sup -1}) and very low electrical resistivity ({le}40 m{Omega}). Ions are removed from the electrolyte by the electric field and electrosorbed onto the carbon aerogel. It is concluded that carbon aerogel CDI may be an energy-efficient alternative to electrodialysis and reverse osmosis for desalination of brackish water ({le}5000 ppM). The intrinsic energy required by this process is about QV/2, where Q is the stored electrical charge and V is the voltage between the electrodes, plus losses. Estimated requirement for desalination of a 2000 ppM feed is -0.53-2.5 Wh/gal{sup -1} (0.5-2.4 kJ L{sup -1}), depending on voltage, flow rate, cell dimensions, aerogel density, recovery ratio, etc. This assumes that 50-70% of the stored electrical energy is reclaimed during regeneration (electrical discharge). Though the energy requirement for desalination of sea water is also low, this application will be much more difficult. Additional work will be required for desalination of streams that contain more than 5000 ppM total dissolved solids (2000 ppM will require electrochemical cells with extremely tight, demanding tolerances). At this present time, the process is best suited for streams with dilute impurities, as recently demonstrated during a field test at LLNL Treatment Facility C.

  14. Intact Capture, Aerogel, SOCCER, Stardust and LIFE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsou, P.

    2013-11-01

    In order to definitively determine many complex exploration curiosities, we must bring samples to terrestrial laboratories for detailed analyses by collaborating laboratories and analysts. We report this endeavor in SOCCER, NEARER, Stardust and LIFE.

  15. Aerogel Fingerprint Media

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Fred S.; Andresen, Brian D.

    1999-09-21

    A fingerprint medium which is made of an aerogel having a predetermined density. The fingerprint medium may have a midrange density for forming plates or may be crushed forming a powder. The fingerprint medium may further include at least one of a metal and metal oxide to enhance characteristics desirable in a fingerprint medium.

  16. Serial interactome capture of the human cell nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Thomas; Albrecht, Anne-Susann; de Melo Costa, Veronica Rodrigues; Sauer, Sascha; Meierhofer, David; Ørom, Ulf Andersson

    2016-01-01

    Novel RNA-guided cellular functions are paralleled by an increasing number of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Here we present ‘serial RNA interactome capture' (serIC), a multiple purification procedure of ultraviolet-crosslinked poly(A)–RNA–protein complexes that enables global RBP detection with high specificity. We apply serIC to the nuclei of proliferating K562 cells to obtain the first human nuclear RNA interactome. The domain composition of the 382 identified nuclear RBPs markedly differs from previous IC experiments, including few factors without known RNA-binding domains that are in good agreement with computationally predicted RNA binding. serIC extends the number of DNA–RNA-binding proteins (DRBPs), and reveals a network of RBPs involved in p53 signalling and double-strand break repair. serIC is an effective tool to couple global RBP capture with additional selection or labelling steps for specific detection of highly purified RBPs. PMID:27040163

  17. Construction of a multi-functional cryogenic propellant tank with cross-linked silica aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinheimer, Preston Glenn

    Aerogels are low-density nanostructured porous materials, whose practical applications have been limited by their poor mechanical properties. Crosslinking the nanoparticle building blocks of silica aerogels with polymeric tethers increases both the modulus and the strength significantly. The polymer coating preserves the mesoporous structure of the silica framework while retaining its low thermal conductivity. The uniqueness of crosslinked silica aerogel has load carrying capabilities in which are determined in tensile, compression and flexural bending tests. Crosslinked silica aerogel testing displays specific compressive strength of 389000 Nm/Kg. Ballistic testing of crosslinked silica aerogel also corroborates its mechanical properties displaying a ballistic limit up to 80 m/s. Its thermal conductivity at 0.041 W/mK supports the use of crosslinked silica aerogel in cryogenic fuel cell applications. Manufacturing practices have been evaluated to obtain an optimal process which reduces time, money and difficulty.

  18. Mechanically Strong, Lightweight Porous Materials Developed (X-Aerogels)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventis, Nicholas

    2005-01-01

    Aerogels are attractive materials for a variety of NASA missions because they are ultralightweight, have low thermal conductivity and low-dielectric constants, and can be readily doped with other materials. Potential NASA applications for these materials include lightweight insulation for spacecraft, habitats, and extravehicular activity (EVA) suits; catalyst supports for fuel cell and in situ resource utilization; and sensors for air- and water-quality monitoring for vehicles, habitats, and EVA suits. Conventional aerogels are extremely fragile and require processing via supercritical fluid extraction, which adds cost to the production of an aerogel and limits the sizes and geometries of samples that can be produced from these materials. These issues have severely hampered the application of aerogels in NASA missions.

  19. A tour-de-force in polymer crosslinked aerogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulik, Sudhir M.

    In the quest of building mechanically strong materials with low density and high porosity, polymer crosslinked aerogels stand as the most promising nano-engineered examples. Covalent attachment of polymers and bridging of skeletal nanoparticles of typical aerogels is demonstrated by using surface initiated polymerization (SIP) with a bidentate free-radical initiator structurally related to azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) and confined on mesoporous silica surfaces. Different monomers were introduced in the mesopores and upon heating at 70 °C, all mesoporous surfaces throughout the entire skeletal framework were coated conformally with a 10-12 nm thick polymer layer indistinguishable spectroscopically from the respective commercial bulk materials. The new materials combine hydrophobicity with vastly improved mechanical properties. Resorcinol formaldehyde (RF) aerogels are pursued as precursors of carbon aerogels, which are electrically conducting. We have developed a HCl-catalyzed gelation process in CH3CN, which is completed in ˜ 2 h at room temperature as opposed to the week-long base-catalyzed literature process. The final aerogels are spectroscopically indistinguishable from typical base-catalyzed samples. Carbon (C-) aerogels are made by pyrolysis of RF aerogels, and combine electrical conductivity with a high open mesoporosity. Nevertheless, macropores facilitate mass-transfer and they could be beneficial for applications in separations or as fuel cell and battery electrodes. Here, we report a method where an open macroporosity is introduced by pyrolysing RF aerogels whose skeletal nanoparticles have been coated conformally and crosslinked chemically with an isocyanate-derived polymer. The new macroporous material was evaluated electrochemically for possible application as an electrode in batteries and fuel cells.

  20. Improved Method for Bacterial Cell Capture after Flow Cytometry Cell Sorting ▿

    PubMed Central

    Guillebault, D.; Laghdass, M.; Catala, P.; Obernosterer, I.; Lebaron, P.

    2010-01-01

    Fixed cells with different nucleic acid contents and scatter properties (low nucleic acid [LNA], high nucleic acid 1 [HNA1], and HNA2) were sorted by flow cytometry (FCM). For each sort, 10,000 cells were efficiently captured on poly-l-lysine-coated microplates, resulting in efficient and reproducible PCR amplification. PMID:20817799

  1. A photonic crystal hydrogel suspension array for the capture of blood cells from whole blood.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Cai, Yunlang; Shang, Luoran; Wang, Huan; Cheng, Yao; Rong, Fei; Gu, Zhongze; Zhao, Yuanjin

    2016-02-14

    Diagnosing hematological disorders based on the separation and detection of cells in the patient's blood is a significant challenge. We have developed a novel barcode particle-based suspension array that can simultaneously capture and detect multiple types of blood cells. The barcode particles are polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogel inverse opal microcarriers with characteristic reflection peak codes that remain stable during cell capture on their surfaces. The hydrophilic PAAm hydrogel scaffolds of the barcode particles can entrap various plasma proteins to capture different cells in the blood, with little damage to captured cells. PMID:26815946

  2. AGING AND IODINE LOADING OF SILVER-FUNCTIONALIZED AEROGELS

    SciTech Connect

    Bruffey, Stephanie H; Jubin, Robert Thomas; Anderson, Kaara K; Walker Jr, Joseph Franklin

    2013-01-01

    Engineered silver-functionalized silica aerogels are being investigated for their application in off-gas treatment at a used nuclear fuel reprocessing facility. Reprocessing will release several key volatile radionuclides, including iodine-129. To achieve regulatory compliance, iodine-129 must be removed from any off-gas stream prior to environmental discharge. Silver-functionalized aerogels have been demonstrated to have high iodine capture capacity, high porosity and potential for conversion into a waste form. Capture materials used in off-gas treatment may be exposed to a heated, high humidity, acidic gas stream for months. Extended exposure to this stream could affect sorbent performance. It was the aim of this study to evaluate what impacts might be observed when Ag0-functionalized aerogels prepared at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory were contacted with a dry air stream for up to 6 months and then used to adsorb iodine from a synthetic off-gas stream. Results demonstrate that there is some loss of iodine capture capacity caused by aging, but that this loss is not as marked as for aging of more traditional iodine sorbents, such as silver-impregnated mordenite. Specifically, aging silver-functionalized aerogel under a dry air stream for up to 6 months can decrease its iodine capacity from 41wt% to 32wt%.

  3. Aging and iodine loading of silver-functionalized aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Bruffey, S.H.; Jubin, R.T.; Anderson, K.K.; Walker, J.F.

    2013-07-01

    Engineered silver-functionalized silica aerogels are being investigated for their potential application in off-gas treatment at a used nuclear fuel reprocessing facility. Reprocessing will release several key volatile radionuclides, including iodine-129. To achieve regulatory compliance, iodine-129 must be removed from any off-gas stream prior to environmental discharge. Ag{sup 0}-functionalized aerogels have been demonstrated to have high iodine-capture capacity, high porosity, and potential for conversion into a waste form. Capture materials used in off-gas treatment may be exposed to a heated, high-humidity, acidic gas stream for months. Extended exposure to this stream could affect sorbent performance. It was the aim of this study to evaluate what impacts might be observed when Ag{sup 0}-functionalized aerogels prepared at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory were contacted with a dry air stream for up to 6 months and then used to adsorb iodine from a synthetic off-gas stream. Results demonstrate that there is some loss of iodine-capture capacity caused by aging, but that this loss is not as marked as for aging of more traditional iodine sorbents, such as silver-impregnated mordenite. Specifically, aging silver-functionalized aerogel under a dry air stream for up to 6 months can decrease its iodine capacity from 41 wt% to 32 wt%. (authors)

  4. Fine-grained material of 81P/Wild 2 in interaction with the Stardust aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroux, Hugues

    2012-04-01

    The deceleration tracks in the Stardust aerogel display a wide range of morphologies, which reveal a large diversity of incoming particles from comet 81P/Wild 2. If the large and dense mineral grains survived the extreme conditions of hypervelocity capture, this was not the case for the fine-grained material that is found strongly damaged within the aerogel. Due to their low mechanical strength, these assemblages were disaggregated, dispersed, and flash melted in the aerogel in walls of bulbous deceleration tracks. Their petrologic and mineralogical properties are found significantly modified by the flash heating of the capture. Originating from a quenched melt mixture of comet material and aerogel, the representative microstructure consists of silica-rich glassy clumps containing Fe-Ni-S inclusions, vesicles and "dust-rich" patches, the latter being remnants of individual silicate components of the impacting aggregate. The average composition of these melted particle fragments is close to the chondritic CI composition. They might originate from ultrafine-grained primitive components comparable to those found in chondritic porous IDPs. Capture effects in aerogel and associated sample biases are discussed in terms of size, chemical and mineralogical properties of the grains. These properties are essential for the grain survival in the extremely hot environment of hypervelocity impact capture in aerogel, and thus for inferring the correct properties of Wild 2 material.

  5. Organic aerogel microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, S.T.; Kong, F.M.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1999-06-01

    Organic aerogel microspheres are disclosed which can be used in capacitors, batteries, thermal insulation, adsorption/filtration media, and chromatographic packings, having diameters ranging from about 1 micron to about 3 mm. The microspheres can be pyrolyzed to form carbon aerogel microspheres. This method involves stirring the aqueous organic phase in mineral oil at elevated temperature until the dispersed organic phase polymerizes and forms nonstick gel spheres. The size of the microspheres depends on the collision rate of the liquid droplets and the reaction rate of the monomers from which the aqueous solution is formed. The collision rate is governed by the volume ratio of the aqueous solution to the mineral oil and the shear rate, while the reaction rate is governed by the chemical formulation and the curing temperature.

  6. Organic aerogel microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Steven T.; Kong, Fung-Ming; Pekala, Richard W.; Kaschmitter, James L.

    1999-01-01

    Organic aerogel microspheres which can be used in capacitors, batteries, thermal insulation, adsorption/filtration media, and chromatographic packings, having diameters ranging from about 1 micron to about 3 mm. The microspheres can be pyrolyzed to form carbon aerogel microspheres. This method involves stirring the aqueous organic phase in mineral oil at elevated temperature until the dispersed organic phase polymerizes and forms nonsticky gel spheres. The size of the microspheres depends on the collision rate of the liquid droplets and the reaction rate of the monomers from which the aqueous solution is formed. The collision rate is governed by the volume ratio of the aqueous solution to the mineral oil and the shear rate, while the reaction rate is governed by the chemical formulation and the curing temperature.

  7. Amyloid Templated Gold Aerogels.

    PubMed

    Nyström, Gustav; Fernández-Ronco, María P; Bolisetty, Sreenath; Mazzotti, Marco; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2016-01-20

    Amyloid fibril-based ultralow-density aerogels are designed by functionalization with gold nanoparticles and microcrystals, leading to hybrids of unprecedented lightness and functionality. By changing the colloidal gold shape, size, and concentration, the gold composition can be tuned to reach contents ≥20 kt equivalent, yet at densities ≈10(3) lighter than any equivalent gold alloys, and combining unique features such as porosity, catalytic properties, pressure sensing, and autofluorescence.

  8. Metal Nanoparticle Aerogel Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Sibille, Laurent; Ignont, Erica; Snow, Lanee; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We have fabricated sol-gels containing gold and silver nanoparticles. Formation of an aerogel produces a blue shift in the surface plasmon resonance as a result of the decrease in the dielectric constant of the matrix upon supercritical extraction of the solvent. However, as a result of chemical interface damping this blue shift does not obey effective medium theories. Annealing the samples in a reducing atmosphere at 400 C eliminates this discrepancy and results in narrowing and further blue shifting of the plasmon resonance. Metal particle aggregation also results in a deviation from the predictions of effective medium theories, but can be controlled through careful handling and by avoiding the use of alcohol. By applying effective medium theories to the heterogeneous interlayer surrounding each metal particle, we extend the technique of immersion spectroscopy to inhomogeneous materials characterized by spatially dependent dielectric constants, such as aerogels. We demonstrate that the shift in the surface plasmon wavelength provides the average fractional composition of each component (air and silica) in this inhomogeneous layer, i.e. the porosity of the aerogel or equivalently, for these materials, the catalytic dispersion. Additionally, the kinetics suggest that collective particle interactions in coagulated metal clusters are perturbed during silica gelation resulting in a change in the aggregate geometry.

  9. Aerogel/polymer composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha K. (Inventor); Smith, Trent M. (Inventor); Fesmire, James E. (Inventor); Roberson, Luke B. (Inventor); Clayton, LaNetra M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The invention provides new composite materials containing aerogels blended with thermoplastic polymer materials at a weight ratio of aerogel to thermoplastic polymer of less than 20:100. The composite materials have improved thermal insulation ability. The composite materials also have better flexibility and less brittleness at low temperatures than the parent thermoplastic polymer materials.

  10. A photonic crystal hydrogel suspension array for the capture of blood cells from whole blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Cai, Yunlang; Shang, Luoran; Wang, Huan; Cheng, Yao; Rong, Fei; Gu, Zhongze; Zhao, Yuanjin

    2016-02-01

    Diagnosing hematological disorders based on the separation and detection of cells in the patient's blood is a significant challenge. We have developed a novel barcode particle-based suspension array that can simultaneously capture and detect multiple types of blood cells. The barcode particles are polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogel inverse opal microcarriers with characteristic reflection peak codes that remain stable during cell capture on their surfaces. The hydrophilic PAAm hydrogel scaffolds of the barcode particles can entrap various plasma proteins to capture different cells in the blood, with little damage to captured cells.Diagnosing hematological disorders based on the separation and detection of cells in the patient's blood is a significant challenge. We have developed a novel barcode particle-based suspension array that can simultaneously capture and detect multiple types of blood cells. The barcode particles are polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogel inverse opal microcarriers with characteristic reflection peak codes that remain stable during cell capture on their surfaces. The hydrophilic PAAm hydrogel scaffolds of the barcode particles can entrap various plasma proteins to capture different cells in the blood, with little damage to captured cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06368j

  11. Selective cell capture and analysis using shallow antibody-coated microchannels

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Kihoon; Tanaka, Yo; Wakabayashi, Jun; Ishii, Reina; Sato, Kae; Mawatari, Kazuma; Nilsson, Mats; Kitamori, Takehiko

    2012-01-01

    Demand for analysis of rare cells such as circulating tumor cells in blood at the single molecule level has recently grown. For this purpose, several cell separation methods based on antibody-coated micropillars have been developed (e.g., Nagrath et al., Nature 450, 1235–1239 (2007)). However, it is difficult to ensure capture of targeted cells by these methods because capture depends on the probability of cell-micropillar collisions. We developed a new structure that actively exploits cellular flexibility for more efficient capture of a small number of cells in a target area. The depth of the sandwiching channel was slightly smaller than the diameter of the cells to ensure contact with the channel wall. For cell selection, we used anti-epithelial cell adhesion molecule antibodies, which specifically bind epithelial cells. First, we demonstrated cell capture with human promyelocytic leukemia (HL-60) cells, which are relatively homogeneous in size; in situ single molecule analysis was verified by our rolling circle amplification (RCA) method. Then, we used breast cancer cells (SK-BR-3) in blood, and demonstrated selective capture and cancer marker (HER2) detection by RCA. Cell capture by antibody-coated microchannels was greater than with negative control cells (RPMI-1788 lymphocytes) and non-coated microchannels. This system can be used to analyze small numbers of target cells in large quantities of mixed samples. PMID:24339850

  12. A comparison of mechanical properties and scaling law relationships for silica aerogels and their organic counterparts

    SciTech Connect

    Pekala, R.W.; Hrubesh, L.W.; Tillotson, T.M.; Alviso, C.T.; Poco, J.F.; LeMay, J.D.

    1990-08-01

    Aerogels are a special class of open-cell foams derived from the supercritical extraction of highly crosslinked, inorganic or organic gels. The resultant materials have ultrafine cell/pore sizes (< 100 nm), high surface areas (350--1000m{sup 2}/g), and a microstructure composed of interconnected colloidal-like particles or polymeric chains with characteristic diameters of 10 nm. TEM and SAXS show that this microstructure is sensitive to variations in processing conditions that influence crosslinking chemistry and growth processes prior to gelation. Traditional silica aerogels are prepared via the hydrolysis and condensation of tetramethoxy silane (TMOS) or tetraethoxy silane (TEOS). Factors such as pH and the (H{sub 2}O)/(TMOS) ratio affect the microstructure of the dried aerogel. It is generally accepted that polymeric' silica aerogels result from acid catalysis while colloidal'silica aerogels result from base catalysis. Recently, Hrubesh and Tillotson developed a new condensed silica' procedure for obtaining silica aerogels with densities as low as 0.004g/cc, i.e. only 3{times} the density of air. Organic aerogels are formed from the aqueous, polycondensation of (1) resorcinol/formaldehyde or (2) melamine/formaldehyde. The microstructure of the resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels is dictated by the amount of base catalyst used in the sol-gel polymerization. In addition, these materials can be pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere to form vitreous carbon aerogels. Melamine- formaldehyde (MF) aerogels that are both colorless and transparent are only formed under acidic conditions (i.e. pH = 1--2). In this paper, the microstructural dependence and scaling law relationships for the compressive modulus of silica, carbon, RF, and MF aerogels will be discussed in detail. 17 refs., 1 fig.

  13. A Multiscale TiO2 Nanorod Array for Ultrasensitive Capture of Circulating Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Na; Li, Xinpan; Wang, Zhili; Zhang, Ruihua; Wang, Jine; Wang, Kewei; Pei, Renjun

    2016-05-25

    In this work, a uniform multiscale TiO2 nanorod array is fabricated to provide a "multi-scale interacting platform" for cell capture, which exhibits excellent capture specificity and sensitivity of the target cells after modification with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and DNA aptamer. After studying the capture performance of the BSA-aptamer TiO2 nanorod substrates and other nanostructured substrates, we can conclude that the multisacle TiO2 nanorod substrates could indeed effectively enhance the capture yields of target cancer cells. The capture yield of artificial blood samples on the BSA-aptamer TiO2 nanorod substrates is up to 85%-95%, revealing the potential application of the TiO2 nanorods on efficient and sensitive capture of rare circulating tumor cells. PMID:27176724

  14. Protective Skins for Aerogel Monoliths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventis, Nicholas; Johnston, James C.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Meador, Ann B.

    2007-01-01

    A method of imparting relatively hard protective outer skins to aerogel monoliths has been developed. Even more than aerogel beads, aerogel monoliths are attractive as thermal-insulation materials, but the commercial utilization of aerogel monoliths in thermal-insulation panels has been inhibited by their fragility and the consequent difficulty of handling them. Therefore, there is a need to afford sufficient protection to aerogel monoliths to facilitate handling, without compromising the attractive bulk properties (low density, high porosity, low thermal conductivity, high surface area, and low permittivity) of aerogel materials. The present method was devised to satisfy this need. The essence of the present method is to coat an aerogel monolith with an outer polymeric skin, by painting or spraying. Apparently, the reason spraying and painting were not attempted until now is that it is well known in the aerogel industry that aerogels collapse in contact with liquids. In the present method, one prevents such collapse through the proper choice of coating liquid and process conditions: In particular, one uses a viscous polymer precursor liquid and (a) carefully controls the amount of liquid applied and/or (b) causes the liquid to become cured to the desired hard polymeric layer rapidly enough that there is not sufficient time for the liquid to percolate into the aerogel bulk. The method has been demonstrated by use of isocyanates, which, upon exposure to atmospheric moisture, become cured to polyurethane/polyurea-type coats. The method has also been demonstrated by use of commercial epoxy resins. The method could also be implemented by use of a variety of other resins, including polyimide precursors (for forming high-temperature-resistant protective skins) or perfluorinated monomers (for forming coats that impart hydrophobicity and some increase in strength).

  15. Nanoencapsulated aerogels produced by monomer vapor deposition and polymerization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Thomas A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Polymer coated aerogel comprising aerogel substrate comprising a substantially uniform polymer coating. In an embodiment, the polymer coated aerogel is comprised of a porosity and has a compressive modulus greater than the compressive modulus of the aerogel substrate.

  16. Investigation of detection conditions of captured microbes in space with PCR Microbes capture experiment on ISS proposed in "Tanpopo" mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Yuko; Sugino, Tomohiro; Yang, Yinjie; Yoshimura, Yoshitaka; Tsuji, Takashi; Kobayashi, Kensei; Tabata, Makoto; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Mita, Hajime; Imai, Eiichi; Kawai, Hideyuki; Okudaira, Kyoko; Hasegawa, Sunao; Yamashita, Masamichi; Yano, Hajime; Yokobori, Shin-Ichi; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    Terrestrial life may fly off into outer space by volcanic eruption meteorological impacts, and so on. Microbes have been collected from high altitude up to 70 km since 1936 [1]. We also isolated microbes at high altitude up to 35 km using an airplane and balloons [2, 3]. The two isolates of these microbes are new species, one of which shows higher UV ray tolerance than Deinococcus radiodurans [2, 3]. On the other hand, there is a hypothesis on the origin of terrestrial life called panspermia [4, 5], in which terrestrial life is thought to have come from space (or astronomical bodies other than Earth). This hypothesis suggests that life may migrate between Earth and other planets. If microbes were to exist at the high altitude of low earth orbit (400 km), it would endorse the possibility of interplanetary migration of terrestrial lifeWe proposed, the Tanpopo mission to examine interplanetary migration of microbes and organic compounds on Japan Experimental Module (JEM) of the International Space Station (ISS). We will capture micro-particles including microbes and micro-meteoroids at the altitude of ISS orbit (400 km) with ultra low-density aerogel exposed to space for a given period of time. After retreaving the aerogel, we will investigate captured micro particles and tracks followed by microbiological, organic chemical and mineralogical analyses.Captured particles will be analyzed after the initial curation of the aerogel and tracks. Particles potentially containing microbes will be used for PCR amplification of small subunit (ss) rRNA gene followed by DNA sequencing. Comparision between the determined sequences and known ss rRNA gene sequences of terrestrial organisms will suggest the origin and properties of the organism.The density of microbes at the ISS altitude might be quite low, and microbe cell number on each captured particle may be quite limited. Therefore, it is necessary to establish the effective PCR procedure for quite small amount of DNA template

  17. Crystallization of 4He in aerogel via mass flow from surrounding solid 4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, H.; Ochi, A.; Isozaki, R.; Minami, S.; Nomura, R.; Pollanen, J.; Halperin, W. P.; Okuda, Y.

    2016-07-01

    The phase boundary between the quantum solid and the liquid phases of 4He is strongly modified in a porous material. However the phase diagram at very low temperatures remains unexplored. We have used a variable-volume experimental cell with optical access to visualize the crystallization of 4He in silica aerogels with independent control of the pressure and temperature. The onset of crystallization was investigated in two aerogel samples with differing porosity both by pressurization at constant temperature and by cooling at constant pressure. With isothermal pressurization we have established a low-temperature phase diagram for each aerogel, and we find that the equilibrium crystallization pressure is reduced with increasing aerogel porosity. Crystals also began to grow in the aerogel on cooling at fixed pressure below an onset temperature Tgrow. We found that below this temperature the crystallization rate increased with decreasing temperature. The aerogel in our cell was surrounded by bulk crystals of 4He , and surprisingly Tgrow was found to be widely distributed when the surrounding bulk crystals were repressurized. In this experimental arrangement, crystallization within the aerogel on cooling requires mass flow from these exterior bulk crystals and is strongly influenced by the disordered structure at the interface between the bulk solid and the helium within the aerogel.

  18. Polybenzoxazine aerogels: Synthesis, characterization, conversion to porous carbons, and energetic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadik-Khanolkar, Shruti

    Aerogels are nanoporous, low-density bulk objects, consisting of three-dimensional assemblies of nanoparticle. Structured similarly, polymeric aerogels are emerging as a mechanically strong alternative to traditional silica aerogels, which are fragile. Amongst polymeric aerogels, those based on polybenzoxazine (PBO - a type of phenolic resin), are extremely robust and comprise an economic alternative to resorcinol-formaldehyde aerogels, also a class of phenolic resins, as the main source of carbon aerogels. The drawback of the PBO chemistry has been the long (days) processing time at high-temperatures (>130 °C). Herewith, we have developed an energy- and time-efficient process to PBO aerogels by inducing acid-catalyzed gelation at room-temperature completed in a few hours. The new aerogels are compared directly with their conventional counterparts and are found equivalent or better in terms of mechanical strength, thermal insulation value, surface area and carbonization yield. Hexahydrated iron chloride (FeCl3.6H2O) is a fairly strong Bronsted acid, which, based on the above, catalyzes formation interpenetrating networks of PBO and iron oxide nanoparticles (PBO-FeOx). Pyrolysis of that intimate mixture of a carbon source (PBO) and iron oxide undergoes smelting to highly porous (>90% v/v) monolithic metallic iron aerogels. The porous network was loaded with oxidizers (e.g., LiClO4) into a new class of energetic materials (thermites, explosives, pyrotechnics). The PBO aerogels developed here comprise a wide-base platform for use as thermal insulators in civil and transportation applications (PBO aerogels themselves), electrodes for fuel cells, lithium ion batteries (nanoporous carbons), catalysts and energetic materials (PBO-FeOx).

  19. Improved Aerogel Vacuum Thermal Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruemmele, Warren P.; Bue, Grant C.

    2009-01-01

    An improved design concept for aerogel vacuum thermal-insulation panels calls for multiple layers of aerogel sandwiched between layers of aluminized Mylar (or equivalent) poly(ethylene terephthalate), as depicted in the figure. This concept is applicable to both the rigid (brick) form and the flexible (blanket) form of aerogel vacuum thermal-insulation panels. Heretofore, the fabrication of a typical aerogel vacuum insulating panel has involved encapsulation of a single layer of aerogel in poly(ethylene terephthalate) and pumping of gases out of the aerogel-filled volume. A multilayer panel according to the improved design concept is fabricated in basically the same way: Multiple alternating layers of aerogel and aluminized poly(ethylene terephthalate) are assembled, then encapsulated in an outer layer of poly(ethylene terephthalate), and then the volume containing the multilayer structure is evacuated as in the single-layer case. The multilayer concept makes it possible to reduce effective thermal conductivity of a panel below that of a comparable single-layer panel, without adding weight or incurring other performance penalties. Implementation of the multilayer concept is simple and relatively inexpensive, involving only a few additional fabrication steps to assemble the multiple layers prior to evacuation. For a panel of the blanket type, the multilayer concept, affords the additional advantage of reduced stiffness.

  20. Aerogel Projects Ongoing in MSFC's Engineering Directorate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shular, D. A.; Smithers, G. A.; Plawsky, J. L.

    2001-01-01

    When we speak of an aerogel material, we are referring more to process and structure than to a specific substance. Aerogel, considered the lightest solid material, has been made from silica for seventy years. Resorcinol-formaldehyde, organic aerogels have been developed more recently. However, aerogel can be made from almost any type of substance, even lead. Because an aerogel is mostly air (about 99%), the solid substance used will affect the weight very little. The problem with aerogels is their low tensile strength and lack of elasticity. Therefore, the challenge is to find ways to make the stronger or ways to circumvent the strength issue. Organic aerogels have slightly higher strength than base silica aerogels, while the carbonized version has three to five times the break strength of the base aerogel.

  1. Intact capture of cosmic dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.

    1991-01-01

    The focus of this development effort is to capture dust particles at hypervelocities intact and unmelted in order to preserve volatile organics. At the same time, the capture process must minimize any organic elemental or compound contamination to prevent any compromise of exobiological analyses. Inorganic silicate aerogel has been developed as a successful capture medium to satisfy both requirements of intact capture and minimal organic contamination. Up to 6 km/s, silicate projectiles from a few microns up to 100 microns have been captured intact without any melting and with minimal loss of mass. Carbon in silicate aerogel can be reduced to less than 1 part in 1000 and hydrogen 3 parts in 1000 when baked in air. Under controlled inert gas environments, additional hydrocarbon reduction can be achieved.

  2. Nanotentacle-structured magnetic particles for efficient capture of circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Jo, Seong-Min; Lee, Joong-jae; Heu, Woosung; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2015-04-24

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have attracted considerable attention as promising markers for diagnosing and monitoring the cancer status. Despite many technological advances in isolating CTCs, the capture efficiency and purity still remain challenges that limit clinical practice. Here, the construction of "nanotentacle"-structured magnetic particles using M13-bacteriophage and their application for the efficient capturing of CTCs is demonstrated. The M13-bacteriophage to magnetic particles followed by modification with PEG is conjugated, and further tethered monoclonal antibodies against the epidermal receptor 2 (HER2). The use of nanotentacle-structured magnetic particles results in a high capture purity (>45%) and efficiency (>90%), even for a smaller number of cancer cells (≈25 cells) in whole blood. Furthermore, the cancer cells captured are shown to maintain a viability of greater than 84%. The approach can be effectively used for capturing CTCs with high efficiency and purity for the diagnosis and monitoring of cancer status. PMID:25504978

  3. Optothermal nonlinearity of silica aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braidotti, Maria Chiara; Gentilini, Silvia; Fleming, Adam; Samuels, Michiel C.; Di Falco, Andrea; Conti, Claudio

    2016-07-01

    We report on the characterization of silica aerogel thermal optical nonlinearity, obtained by z-scan technique. The results show that typical silica aerogels have nonlinear optical coefficient similar to that of glass (≃10-12 m2/W), with negligible optical nonlinear absorption. The nonlinear coefficient can be increased to values in the range of 10-10 m2/W by embedding an absorbing dye in the aerogel. This value is one order of magnitude higher than that observed in the pure dye and in typical highly nonlinear materials like liquid crystals.

  4. Surface Design for Efficient Capturing of Rare Cells in Microfluidic Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yaling; Depietro, Dan; Thomas, Antony; Chen, Chi-Mon; Yang, Shu

    2011-11-01

    This work aims to design, fabricate, and characterize a micro-patterned surface that will be integrated into microfluidic devices to enhance particle and rare cell capture efficiency. Capture of ultralow concentration of circulating tumor cells in a blood sample is of vital importance for early diagnostics of cancer diseases. Despite the significant progress achieved in development of cell capture techniques, the enhancement in capture efficiency is still limited and often accompanied with drawbacks such as low throughput, low selectivity, pre-diluting requirement, and cell viability issues. The goal of this work is to design a biomimetic surface that could significantly enhance particle/cell capture efficacy through computational modeling, surface patterning, and microfluidic integration and testing. A PDMS surface with microscale ripples is functionalized with epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) to capture prostate cancer PC3 cells. Our microfluid chip with micropatterns has shown significantly higher cell capture efficiency and selectivity compared to the chips with plane surface or classical herringbone-grooves.

  5. Surface Design for Efficient Capturing of Rare Cells in Microfluidic Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yaling; Thomas, Antony; Chen, Chi-Mon; Yang, Shu

    2012-02-01

    This work aims to design, fabricate, and characterize a micro-patterned surface that will be integrated into microfluidic devices to enhance particle and rare cell capture efficiency. Capture of ultralow concentration of circulating tumor cells in a blood sample is of vital importance for early diagnostics of cancer diseases. Despite the significant progress achieved in development of cell capture techniques, the enhancement in capture efficiency is still limited and often accompanied with drawbacks such as low throughput, low selectivity, pre-diluting requirement, and cell viability issues. The goal of this work is to design a biomimetic surface that could significantly enhance particle/cell capture efficacy through computational modeling, surface patterning, and microfluidic integration and testing. A PDMS surface with microscale ripples is functionalized with epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) to capture prostate cancer PC3 cells. Our microfluid chip with micropatterns has shown significantly higher cell capture efficiency and selectivity compared to the chips with plane surface or classical herringbone-grooves.

  6. Curcumin cross-linked collagen aerogels with controlled anti-proteolytic and pro-angiogenic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Dharunya, G; Duraipandy, N; Lakra, Rachita; Korapatti, Purna Sai; Jayavel, R; Kiran, Manikantan Syamala

    2016-01-01

    This paper elucidates the development of a curcumin cross-linked collagen aerogel system with controlled anti-proteolytic activity and pro-angiogenic efficacy. The results of this study showed that in situ cross-linking of curcumin with collagen leads to the development of aerogels with enhanced physical and mechanical properties. The integrity of collagen after cross-linking with curcumin was studied via FTIR spectroscopy. The results confirmed that the cross-linking with curcumin did not induce any structural changes in the collagen. The curcumin cross-linked collagen aerogels exhibited potent anti-proteolytic and anti-microbial activity. Scanning electron and atomic force microscopic analysis of curcumin cross-linked collagen aerogels showed a 3D microstructure that enhanced the adhesion and proliferation of cells. The highly organized geometry of collagen-curcumin aerogels enhanced the permeability and water-retaining ability required for the diffusion of nutrients that aid cellular growth. The pro-angiogenic properties of collagen-curcumin aerogels were ascribed to the cumulative effect of the nutraceutical and the collagen molecule, which augmented the restoration of damaged tissue. Further, these aerogels exhibited controlled anti-proteolytic activity, which makes them suitable 3D scaffolds for biomedical applications. This study provides scope for the development of biocompatible and bioresorbable collagen aerogel systems that use a nutraceutical as a cross-linker for biomedical applications. PMID:27509047

  7. Noble metal aerogels-synthesis, characterization, and application as electrocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Herrmann, Anne-Kristin; Bigall, Nadja C; Rodriguez, Paramaconi; Wen, Dan; Oezaslan, Mehtap; Schmidt, Thomas J; Gaponik, Nikolai; Eychmüller, Alexander

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: Metallic and catalytically active materials with high surface area and large porosity are a long-desired goal in both industry and academia. In this Account, we summarize the strategies for making a variety of self-supported noble metal aerogels consisting of extended metal backbone nanonetworks. We discuss their outstanding physical and chemical properties, including their three-dimensional network structure, the simple control over their composition, their large specific surface area, and their hierarchical porosity. Additionally, we show some initial results on their excellent performance as electrocatalysts combining both high catalytic activity and high durability for fuel cell reactions such as ethanol oxidation and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Finally, we give some hints on the future challenges in the research area of metal aerogels. We believe that metal aerogels are a new, promising class of electrocatalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) and will also open great opportunities for other electrochemical energy systems, catalysis, and sensors. The commercialization of PEFCs encounters three critical obstacles, viz., high cost, insufficient activity, and inadequate long-term durability. Besides others, the sluggish kinetics of the ORR and alcohol oxidation and insufficient catalyst stability are important reasons for these obstacles. Various approaches have been taken to overcome these obstacles, e.g., by controlling the catalyst particle size in an optimized range, forming multimetallic catalysts, controlling the surface compositions, shaping the catalysts into nanocrystals, and designing supportless catalysts with extended surfaces such as nanostructured thin films, nanotubes, and porous nanostructures. These efforts have produced plenty of excellent electrocatalysts, but the development of multisynergetic functional catalysts exhibiting low cost, high activity, and high durability still faces great challenges. In this

  8. Microscale magnetic field modulation for enhanced capture and distribution of rare circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peng; Huang, Yu-Yen; Hoshino, Kazunori; Zhang, John X J

    2015-03-04

    Immunomagnetic assay combines the powers of the magnetic separation and biomarker recognition and has been an effective tool to perform rare Circulating Tumor Cells detection. Key factors associated with immunomagnetic assay include the capture rate, which indicates the sensitivity of the system, and distributions of target cells after capture, which impact the cell integrity and other biological properties that are critical to downstream analyses. Here we present a theoretical framework and technical approach to implement a microscale magnetic immunoassay through modulating local magnetic field towards enhanced capture and distribution of rare cancer cells. Through the design of a two-dimensional micromagnet array, we characterize the magnetic field generation and quantify the impact of the micromagnets on rare cell separation. Good agreement is achieved between the theory and experiments using a human colon cancer cell line (COLO205) as the capture targets.

  9. Velocity valleys enable efficient capture and spatial sorting of nanoparticle-bound cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besant, Justin D.; Mohamadi, Reza M.; Aldridge, Peter M.; Li, Yi; Sargent, Edward H.; Kelley, Shana O.

    2015-03-01

    The development of strategies for isolating rare cells from complex matrices like blood is important for a wide variety of applications including the analysis of bloodborne cancer cells, infectious pathogens, and prenatal testing. Due to their high colloidal stability and surface-to-volume ratio, antibody-coated magnetic nanoparticles are excellent labels for cellular surface markers. Unfortunately, capture of nanoparticle-bound cells at practical flow rates is challenging due to the small volume, and thus low magnetic susceptibility, of magnetic nanoparticles. We have developed a means to capture nanoparticle-labeled cells using microstructures which create pockets of locally low linear velocity, termed velocity valleys. Cells that enter a velocity valley slow down momentarily, allowing the magnetic force to overcome the reduced drag force and trap the cells. Here, we describe a model for this mechanism of cell capture and use this model to guide the rational design of a device that efficiently captures rare cells and sorts them according to surface expression in complex matrices with greater than 10 000-fold specificity. By analysing the magnetic and drag forces on a cell, we calculate a threshold linear velocity for capture and relate this to the capture efficiency. We find that the addition of X-shaped microstructures enhances capture efficiency 5-fold compared to circular posts. By tuning the linear velocity, we capture cells with a 100-fold range of surface marker expression with near 100% efficiency and sort these cells into spatially distinct zones. By tuning the flow channel geometry, we reduce non-specific cell adhesion by 5-fold.The development of strategies for isolating rare cells from complex matrices like blood is important for a wide variety of applications including the analysis of bloodborne cancer cells, infectious pathogens, and prenatal testing. Due to their high colloidal stability and surface-to-volume ratio, antibody-coated magnetic

  10. Super-hydrophobic fluorine containing aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Coronado, Paul R.; Poco, John F.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.

    2007-05-01

    An aerogel material with surfaces containing fluorine atoms which exhibits exceptional hydrophobicity, or the ability to repel liquid water. Hydrophobic aerogels are efficient absorbers of solvents from water. Solvents miscible with water are separated from it because the solvents are more volatile than water and they enter the porous aerogel as a vapor across the liquid water/solid interface. Solvents that are immisicble with water are separated from it by selectively wetting the aerogel. The hydrophobic property is achieved by formulating the aerogel using fluorine containing molecules either directly by addition in the sol-gel process, or by treating a standard dried aerogel using the vapor of fluorine containing molecules.

  11. Monolayer coated aerogels and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Zemanian, Thomas Samuel; Fryxell, Glen; Ustyugov, Oleksiy A.

    2006-03-28

    Aerogels having a monolayer coating are described. The aerogel and a monolayer forming precursor are provided in a supercritical fluid, whereupon the aerogel and the monolayer forming precursor are reacted in said supercritical fluid to form a covalent bond between the aerogel and the monolayer forming precursor. Suitable aerogels are ceramic oxides such as silica, alumina, aluminosilicate, and combinations thereof. Suitable monolayer forming precursors include alkyl silanes, chlorosilanes, boranes, chloroboranes, germanes, and combinations thereof. The method may also include providing a surface preparation agent such as water, or hydroetching an aerogel to enhance the coating of the monolayer.

  12. Rapid Extraction of Dust Impact Tracks from Silica Aerogel by Ultrasonic Micro-blades

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, H; Graham, G; Kearsley, A T; Grant, P G; Snead, C J; Bradley, J P

    2005-02-17

    In January 2006, NASA's Stardust Mission will return with its valuable cargo of cometary dust particles, the first brought back to Earth, captured at hypervelocity speeds in silica aerogel collectors. Aerogel, a proven capture medium, is also a candidate for future sample return missions and low-earth orbit (LEO) deployments. Critical to the science return of Stardust and future missions using aerogel is the ability to efficiently extract impacted particles from collector tiles. Researchers will be eager to obtain Stardust samples as quickly as possible, and tools for the rapid extraction of particle impact tracks that require little construction, training, or investment would be an attractive asset. To this end, we have experimented with diamond and steel micro-blades. Applying ultrasonic frequency oscillations to these micro-blades via a piezo-driven holder produces rapid, clean cuts in the aerogel with minimal damage to the surrounding collector tile. With this approach, impact tracks in aerogel fragments with low-roughness cut surfaces have been extracted from aerogel tiles flown on NASA's Orbital Debris Collector Experiment. The smooth surfaces produced during cutting reduce imaging artifacts during analysis by SEM. Some tracks have been dissected to expose the main cavity for eventual isolation of individual impact debris particles and further analysis by techniques such as TEM and nanoSIMS.

  13. Rapid extraction of dust impact tracks from silica aerogel by ultrasonic microblades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, H. A.; Graham, G. A.; Kearsley, A. T.; Grant, P. G.; Snead, C. J.; Bradley, J. P.

    2005-11-01

    In January 2006, NASA's Stardust mission will return with its valuable cargo of the first cometary dust particles captured at hypervelocity speeds in silica aerogel collectors and brought back to Earth. Aerogel, a proven capture medium, is also a candidate for future sample return missions and low-Earth orbit (LEO) deployments. Critical to the science return of Stardust as well as future missions that will use aerogel is the ability to efficiently extract impacted particles from collector tiles. Researchers will be eager to obtain Stardust samples as quickly as possible; tools for the rapid extraction of particle impact tracks that require little construction, training, or investment would be an attractive asset. To this end, we have experimented with diamond and steel microblades. Applying ultrasonic frequency oscillations to these microblades via a piezo-driven holder produces rapid, clean cuts in the aerogel with minimal damage to the surrounding collector tile. With this approach, intact impact tracks and associated particles in aerogel fragments with low-roughness cut surfaces have been extracted from aerogel tiles flown on NASA's Orbital Debris Collector (ODC) experiment. The smooth surfaces produced during cutting reduce imaging artifacts during analysis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Some tracks have been dissected to expose the main cavity for eventual isolation of individual impact debris particles and further analysis using techniques such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and nano-secondary ion mass spectrometry (nanoSIMS).

  14. Removal of carbonaceous contaminants from silica aerogel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Hui-Ping; Gilmour, I.; Pillinger, C. T.; Zolensky, M. E.

    1993-01-01

    Capture of micrometeorite material from low Earth orbit or dust grains around active comets for return to terrestrial laboratories, capable of practicing the most up to date techniques of chemical isotopic and mineralogical analysis, will greatly enhance our knowledge of primitive material in the solar system. The next generation of space launched cosmic dust collectors will undoubtedly include extremely low density target materials such as silica aerogel as the decelerating and arresting medium. This material has been found to be clean from the point of view of inorganic elements and is thus acceptable for the purpose of harvesting grains to be studied by, for example PIXE, INAA, or SXRF. However, the process used in making aerogel leaves substantial carbon and hydrogen containing residues which would negate their suitability for collection and subsequent investigation of the very important CHON particles. Attempts to precondition aerogel by solvent extraction or heating at 500 C and 750 C in air for 24 hours or under a vacuum of 2(7)(exp -7) torr at 260 C were largely ineffective except that pyrolysis did reduce volatile species. In this investigation we have examined the use of supercritical fluids for the purpose of extracting organic residues. The logic of the new approach is that beyond the supercritical point a substance has the solvating properties of a liquid but the viscosity characteristics of a gas. For example carbon dioxide becomes supercritical at a pressure of 73 atmospheres and a temperature of 31 C; in consequence it can transform to a very powerful and ultraclean solvent. It can dissolve organic matter from low molecular weight up to molecules containing 90 carbon atoms. On release of pressure the fluid reverts to a gas which can easily be pumped away and removed from the substrate being extracted.

  15. Aerogel: From Aerospace to Apparel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Aspen Systems Inc. developed an aerogel-manufacturing process solved the handling problems associated with aerogel-based insulation products. Their aerogels can now be manufactured into blankets, thin sheets, beads, and molded parts; and may be transparent, translucent, or opaque. Aspen made the material effective for window and skylight insulation, non-flammable building insulation, and inexpensive firewall insulation that will withstand fires in homes and buildings, and also assist in the prevention of forest fires. Another Aspen product is Spaceloft(TM); an inexpensive, flexible blanket that incorporates a thin layer of aerogel embedded directly into the fabric. Spaceloft, is incorporated into jackets intended for wear in extremely harsh conditions and activities, such as Antarctic expeditions.

  16. Hybrid Multifoil Aerogel Thermal Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Paik, Jong-Ah; Jones, Steven; Nesmith, Bill

    2008-01-01

    This innovation blends the merits of multifoil insulation (MFI) with aerogel-based insulation to develop a highly versatile, ultra-low thermally conductive material called hybrid multifoil aerogel thermal insulation (HyMATI). The density of the opacified aerogel is 240 mg/cm3 and has thermal conductivity in the 20 mW/mK range in high vacuum and 25 mW/mK in 1 atmosphere of gas (such as argon) up to 800 C. It is stable up to 1,000 C. This is equal to commercially available high-temperature thermal insulation. The thermal conductivity of the aerogel is 36 percent lower compared to several commercially available insulations when tested in 1 atmosphere of argon gas up to 800 C.

  17. Aerogel Composites: Strong and Waterproof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan; Hsu, Ming-ta; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Aerogels are exotic materials having superior thermal and physical properties with great potential for both space and industrial uses. Although aerogels are excellent low-density insulators with unique acoustic and optical properties, their commercialization potential is currently limited by moisture absorption, fragility, and cost. This paper describes useful, easily scaled-up solutions to the first two of these three problems. The waterproofing and water-repellent method described here is a cheaper and simpler improvement over previous permanent methods.

  18. Immobilized surfactant-nanotube complexes support selectin-mediated capture of viable circulating tumor cells in the absence of capture antibodies.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Michael J; Castellanos, Carlos A; King, Michael R

    2015-10-01

    The metastatic spread of tumor cells from the primary site to anatomically distant organs leads to a poor patient prognosis. Increasing evidence has linked adhesive interactions between circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and endothelial cells to metastatic dissemination. Microscale biomimetic flow devices hold promise as a diagnostic tool to isolate CTCs and develop metastatic therapies, utilizing E-selectin (ES) to trigger the initial rolling adhesion of tumor cells under flow. To trigger firm adhesion and capture under flow, such devices also typically require antibodies against biomarkers thought to be expressed on CTCs. This approach is challenged by the fact that CTCs are now known to exhibit heterogeneous expression of conventional biomarkers. Here, we describe surfactant-nanotube complexes to enhance ES-mediated capture and isolation of tumor cells without the use of capture antibodies. While the majority of tumor cells exhibited weaker rolling adhesion on halloysite nanotubes (HNT) coated with ES, HNT functionalization with the sodium dodecanoate (NaL) surfactant induced a switch to firm cellular adhesion under flow. Conversely, surfactant-nanotube complexes significantly reduced the number of primary human leukocytes captured via ES-mediated adhesion under flow. The switch in tumor cell adhesion was exploited to capture and isolate tumor cells in the absence of EpCAM antibodies, commonly utilized as the gold standard for CTC isolation. Additionally, HNT-NaL complexes were shown to capture tumor cells with low to negligible EpCAM expression, that are not efficiently captured using conventional approaches.

  19. Immobilized Surfactant-Nanotube Complexes Support Selectin-Mediated Capture of Viable Circulating Tumor Cells in the Absence of Capture Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Michael J.; Castellanos, Carlos A.; King, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    The metastatic spread of tumor cells from the primary site to anatomically distant organs leads to a poor patient prognosis. Increasing evidence has linked adhesive interactions between circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and endothelial cells to metastatic dissemination. Microscale biomimetic flow devices hold promise as a diagnostic tool to isolate CTCs and develop metastatic therapies, utilizing E-selectin (ES) to trigger the initial rolling adhesion of tumor cells under flow. To trigger firm adhesion and capture under flow, such devices also typically require antibodies against biomarkers thought to be expressed on CTCs. This approach is challenged by the fact that CTCs are now known to exhibit heterogeneous expression of conventional biomarkers. Here, we describe surfactant-nanotube complexes to enhance ES-mediated capture and isolation of tumor cells without the use of capture antibodies. While the majority of tumor cells exhibited weaker rolling adhesion on halloysite nanotubes (HNT) coated with ES, HNT functionalization with the sodium dodecanoate (NaL) surfactant induced a switch to firm cellular adhesion under flow. Conversely, surfactant-nanotube complexes significantly reduced the number of primary human leukocytes captured via ES-mediated adhesion under flow. The switch in tumor cell adhesion was exploited to capture and isolate tumor cells in the absence of EpCAM antibodies, commonly utilized as the gold standard for CTC isolation. Additionally, HNT-NaL complexes were shown to capture tumor cells with low to negligible EpCAM expression, that are not efficiently captured using conventional approaches. PMID:25761664

  20. Macroscopic Subdivision of Silica Aerogel Collectors for Sample Return Missions

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, H A; Bradley, J P

    2005-09-14

    Silica aerogel collector tiles have been employed for the collection of particles in low Earth orbit and, more recently, for the capture of cometary particles by NASA's Stardust mission. Reliable, reproducible methods for cutting these and future collector tiles from sample return missions are necessary to maximize the science output from the extremely valuable embedded particles. We present a means of macroscopic subdivision of collector tiles by generating large-scale cuts over several centimeters in silica aerogel with almost no material loss. The cut surfaces are smooth and optically clear allowing visual location of particles for analysis and extraction. This capability is complementary to the smaller-scale cutting capabilities previously described [Westphal (2004), Ishii (2005a, 2005b)] for removing individual impacts and particulate debris in tiny aerogel extractions. Macroscopic cuts enable division and storage or distribution of portions of aerogel tiles for immediate analysis of samples by certain techniques in situ or further extraction of samples suited for other methods of analysis.

  1. Improved Silica Aerogel Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, Jong-Ah; Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Jones, Steven

    2008-01-01

    A family of aerogel-matrix composite materials having thermal-stability and mechanical- integrity properties better than those of neat aerogels has been developed. Aerogels are known to be excellent thermal- and acoustic-insulation materials because of their molecular-scale porosity, but heretofore, the use of aerogels has been inhibited by two factors: (1) Their brittleness makes processing and handling difficult. (2) They shrink during production and shrink more when heated to high temperatures during use. The shrinkage and the consequent cracking make it difficult to use them to encapsulate objects in thermal-insulation materials. The underlying concept of aerogel-matrix composites is not new; the novelty of the present family of materials lies in formulations and processes that result in superior properties, which include (1) much less shrinkage during a supercritical-drying process employed in producing a typical aerogel, (2) much less shrinkage during exposure to high temperatures, and (3) as a result of the reduction in shrinkage, much less or even no cracking.

  2. Engineering cholesterol-based fibers for antibody immobilization and cell capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohn, Celine

    In 2015, the United States is expected to have nearly 600,000 deaths attributed to cancer. Of these 600,000 deaths, 90% will be a direct result of cancer metastasis, the spread of cancer throughout the body. During cancer metastasis, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are shed from primary tumors and migrate through bodily fluids, establishing secondary cancer sites. As cancer metastasis is incredibly lethal, there is a growing emphasis on developing "liquid biopsies" that can screen peripheral blood, search for and identify CTCs. One popular method for capturing CTCs is the use of a detection platform with antibodies specifically suited to recognize and capture cancer cells. These antibodies are immobilized onto the platform and can then bind and capture cells of interest. However, current means to immobilize antibodies often leave them with drastically reduced function. The antibodies are left poorly suited for cell capture, resulting in low cell capture efficiencies. This body of work investigates the use of lipid-based fibers to immobilize proteins in a way that retains protein function, ultimately leading to increased cell capture efficiencies. The resulting increased efficiencies are thought to arise from the retained three-dimensional structure of the protein as well as having a complete coating of the material surface with antibodies that are capable of interacting with their antigens. It is possible to electrospin cholesterol-based fibers that are similar in design to the natural cell membrane, providing proteins a more natural setting during immobilization. Such fibers have been produced from cholesterol-based cholesteryl succinyl silane (CSS). These fibers have previously illustrated a keen aptitude for retaining protein function and increasing cell capture. Herein the work focuses on three key concepts. First, a model is developed to understand the immobilization mechanism used by electrospun CSS fibers. The antibody immobilization and cell capturing

  3. Engineering cholesterol-based fibers for antibody immobilization and cell capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohn, Celine

    In 2015, the United States is expected to have nearly 600,000 deaths attributed to cancer. Of these 600,000 deaths, 90% will be a direct result of cancer metastasis, the spread of cancer throughout the body. During cancer metastasis, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are shed from primary tumors and migrate through bodily fluids, establishing secondary cancer sites. As cancer metastasis is incredibly lethal, there is a growing emphasis on developing "liquid biopsies" that can screen peripheral blood, search for and identify CTCs. One popular method for capturing CTCs is the use of a detection platform with antibodies specifically suited to recognize and capture cancer cells. These antibodies are immobilized onto the platform and can then bind and capture cells of interest. However, current means to immobilize antibodies often leave them with drastically reduced function. The antibodies are left poorly suited for cell capture, resulting in low cell capture efficiencies. This body of work investigates the use of lipid-based fibers to immobilize proteins in a way that retains protein function, ultimately leading to increased cell capture efficiencies. The resulting increased efficiencies are thought to arise from the retained three-dimensional structure of the protein as well as having a complete coating of the material surface with antibodies that are capable of interacting with their antigens. It is possible to electrospin cholesterol-based fibers that are similar in design to the natural cell membrane, providing proteins a more natural setting during immobilization. Such fibers have been produced from cholesterol-based cholesteryl succinyl silane (CSS). These fibers have previously illustrated a keen aptitude for retaining protein function and increasing cell capture. Herein the work focuses on three key concepts. First, a model is developed to understand the immobilization mechanism used by electrospun CSS fibers. The antibody immobilization and cell capturing

  4. Composition containing aerogel substrate loaded with tritium

    DOEpatents

    Ashley, Carol S.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Ellefson, Robert E.; Gill, John T.; Reed, Scott; Walko, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    The invention provides a process for loading an aerogel substrate with tritium and the resultant compositions. According to the process, an aerogel substrate is hydrolyzed so that surface OH groups are formed. The hydrolyzed aerogel is then subjected to tritium exchange employing, for example, a tritium-containing gas, whereby tritium atoms replace H atoms of surface OH groups. OH and/or CH groups of residual alcohol present in the aerogel may also undergo tritium exchange.

  5. Aerogel composites and method of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Cao, Wanqing; Hunt, Arlon Jason

    1999-01-01

    Disclosed herewith is a process of forming an aerogel composite which comprises introducing a gaseous material into a formed aerogel monolith or powder, and causing decomposition of said gaseous material in said aerogel in amounts sufficient to cause deposition of the decomposition products of the gas on the surfaces of the pores of the said aerogel. Also disclosed are the composites made by the process.

  6. Slotted Polyimide-Aerogel-Filled-Waveguide Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez-Solis, Rafael A.; Pacheco, Hector L.; Miranda, Felix A.; Meador, Mary Ann B.

    2013-01-01

    This presentation discussed the potential advantages of developing Slotted Waveguide Arrays using polyimide aerogels. Polyimide (PI) aerogels offer great promise as an enabling technology for lightweight aerospace antenna systems. PI aerogels are highly porous solids possessing low density and low dielectric permittivity combined with good mechanical properties. For slotted waveguide array applications, there are significant advantages in mass that more than compensate for the slightly higher loss of the aerogel filled waveguide when compared to state of practice commercial waveguide.

  7. Improvements to the Synthesis of Polyimide Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Nguyen, Baochau N.; Guo, Haiquan; Vivod, Stephanie; He, Zuhui; Malow, Ericka; Silva, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    Cross-linked polyimide aerogels are viable approach to higher temperature, flexible insulation for inflatable decelerators. Results indicate that the all-polyimide aerogels are as strong or stronger than polymer reinforced silica aerogels at the same density. Currently, examining use of carbon nanofiber and clay nanoparticles to improve performance. Flexible, polyimide aerogels have potential utility in other applications such as space suits, habitats, shelter applications, etc. where low dusting is desired

  8. A Synchrotron-based Facility for Location and In-situ Chemical and Mineralogical Analysis of ~10 mm Particles From Comets and Asteroids Returned to Earth in Aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, G. J.; Lanzirotti, A.; Sutton, S. R.

    In January 2006, NASA's Stardust spacecraft is expected to deliver to Earth more than 1,000 dust particles collected in aerogel capture cells from the coma of Comet Wild-2. These dust particles, which impacted the aerogel surface at ˜ 6 km/sec, are expected to produce cone-shaped entry tracks, each about 100 to 200 times as long as the particle diameter, with the particle at the end of the track. However, weak particles may fragment during capture, leaving debris along the sides of the entry track. In addition, the impact of numerous sub-micron, carbon-rich particles (like the CHON particles identified by the Giotto and VEGA spacecraft at Comet Halley) may discolor the surface of the aerogel, interfering with the visual location/identification of the captured particles. Extraction of these particles from the aerogel will, eventually, be required in order to perform analyses that cannot be performed in-situ. However, extraction involves the risk of particle contamination or particle loss. For this reason, we have developed techniques to employ a synchrotron-based x-ray microprobe and x-ray diffraction facility on Beamline X26A of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory for the in-situ chemical and mineralogical characterization of the Wild-2 particles and particles returned in aerogel capture cells on future space missions. This facility is designed to perform: 3-D particle location by detection of Fe-fluorescence from ˜ 10 μ m particles, in case carbon-rich debris reduces the optical transparency of the aerogel, semi-quantitative x-ray fluorescence chemical analysis on particles ˜ 10 μ m in size for the elements from Ca to Sr, mineral identification by x-ray diffraction on particles ˜ 10 μ m in size, oxidation state characterization by X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy of Fe, Cr, etc. in ˜ 10 μ m particles, chemical analysis of fragments and vapor deposited along the entry track, to reconstruct

  9. 21 CFR 182.1711 - Silica aerogel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Silica aerogel. 182.1711 Section 182.1711 Food and....1711 Silica aerogel. (a) Product. Silica aerogel as a finely powdered microcellular silica foam having a minimum silica content of 89.5 percent. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  10. 21 CFR 582.1711 - Silica aerogel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Silica aerogel. 582.1711 Section 582.1711 Food and....1711 Silica aerogel. (a) Product. Silica aerogel as a finely powdered microcellular silica foam having a minimum silica content of 89.5 percent. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  11. 21 CFR 182.1711 - Silica aerogel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Silica aerogel. 182.1711 Section 182.1711 Food and....1711 Silica aerogel. (a) Product. Silica aerogel as a finely powdered microcellular silica foam having a minimum silica content of 89.5 percent. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  12. 21 CFR 582.1711 - Silica aerogel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Silica aerogel. 582.1711 Section 582.1711 Food and....1711 Silica aerogel. (a) Product. Silica aerogel as a finely powdered microcellular silica foam having a minimum silica content of 89.5 percent. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  13. 21 CFR 582.1711 - Silica aerogel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Silica aerogel. 582.1711 Section 582.1711 Food and....1711 Silica aerogel. (a) Product. Silica aerogel as a finely powdered microcellular silica foam having a minimum silica content of 89.5 percent. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  14. 21 CFR 182.1711 - Silica aerogel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Silica aerogel. 182.1711 Section 182.1711 Food and....1711 Silica aerogel. (a) Product. Silica aerogel as a finely powdered microcellular silica foam having a minimum silica content of 89.5 percent. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  15. 21 CFR 582.1711 - Silica aerogel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Silica aerogel. 582.1711 Section 582.1711 Food and....1711 Silica aerogel. (a) Product. Silica aerogel as a finely powdered microcellular silica foam having a minimum silica content of 89.5 percent. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  16. 21 CFR 182.1711 - Silica aerogel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Silica aerogel. 182.1711 Section 182.1711 Food and....1711 Silica aerogel. (a) Product. Silica aerogel as a finely powdered microcellular silica foam having a minimum silica content of 89.5 percent. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  17. 21 CFR 182.1711 - Silica aerogel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Silica aerogel. 182.1711 Section 182.1711 Food and... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1711 Silica aerogel. (a) Product. Silica aerogel as a finely powdered microcellular silica foam having a minimum silica content of...

  18. 21 CFR 582.1711 - Silica aerogel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Silica aerogel. 582.1711 Section 582.1711 Food and....1711 Silica aerogel. (a) Product. Silica aerogel as a finely powdered microcellular silica foam having a minimum silica content of 89.5 percent. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  19. Dielectrophoretic capture voltage spectrum for measurement of dielectric properties and separation of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liqun; Lanry Yung, Lin-Yue; Lim, Kian-Meng

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, a new dielectrophoresis (DEP) method based on capture voltage spectrum is proposed for measuring dielectric properties of biological cells. The capture voltage spectrum can be obtained from the balance of dielectrophoretic force and Stokes drag force acting on the cell in a microfluidic device with fluid flow and strip electrodes. The method was demonstrated with the measurement of dielectric properties of human colon cancer cells (HT-29 cells). From the capture voltage spectrum, the real part of Clausius-Mossotti factor of HT-29 cells for different frequencies of applied electric field was obtained. The dielectric properties of cell interior and plasma membrane were then estimated by using single-shell dielectric model. The cell interior permittivity and conductivity were found to be insensitive to changes in the conductivity of the medium in which the cells are suspended, but the measured permittivity and conductivity of cell membrane were found to increase with the increase of medium conductivity. In addition, the measurement of capture voltage spectrum was found to be useful in providing the optimum operating conditions for separating HT-29 cells from other cells (such as red blood cells) using dielectrophoresis.

  20. Aerogel Derived Nanostructured Thermoelectric Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wendell E Rhine, PI; Dong, Wenting; Greg Caggiano, PM

    2010-10-08

    America’s dependence on foreign sources for fuel represents a economic and security threat for the country. These non renewable resources are depleting, and the effects of pollutants from fuels such as oil are reaching a problematic that affects the global community. Solar concentration power (SCP) production systems offer the opportunity to harness one of the United States’ most under utilized natural resources; sunlight. While commercialization of this technology is increasing, in order to become a significant source of electricity production in the United States the costs of deploying and operating SCP plants must be further reduced. Parabolic Trough SCP technologies are close to meeting energy production cost levels that would raise interest in the technology and help accelerate its adoption as a method to produce a significant portion of the Country’s electric power needs. During this program, Aspen Aerogels will develop a transparent aerogel insulation that can replace the costly vacuum insulation systems that are currently used in parabolic trough designs. During the Phase I program, Aspen Aerogels will optimize the optical and thermal properties of aerogel to meet the needs of this application. These properties will be tested, and the results will be used to model the performance of a parabolic trough HCE system which uses this novel material in place of vacuum. During the Phase II program, Aspen Aerogels will scale up this technology. Together with industry partners, Aspen Aerogels will build and test a prototype Heat Collection Element that is insulated with the novel transparent aerogel material. This new device will find use in parabolic trough SCP applications.

  1. Ultralight multiwalled carbon nanotube aerogel.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jianhua; Liu, Jianhua; Karakoti, Ajay Singh; Kumar, Amit; Joung, Daeha; Li, Qiang; Khondaker, Saiful I; Seal, Sudipta; Zhai, Lei

    2010-12-28

    Ultralight multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) aerogel is fabricated from a wet gel of well-dispersed pristine MWCNTs. On the basis of a theoretical prediction that increasing interaction potential between CNTs lowers their critical concentration to form an infinite percolation network, poly(3-(trimethoxysilyl) propyl methacrylate) (PTMSPMA) is used to disperse and functionalize MWCNTs where the subsequent hydrolysis and condensation of PTMSPMA introduces strong and permanent chemical bonding between MWCNTs. The interaction is both experimentally and theoretically proven to facilitate the formation of a MWCNT percolation network, which leads to the gelation of MWCNT dispersion at ultralow MWCNT concentration. After removing the liquid component from the MWCNT wet gel, the lightest ever free-standing MWCNT aerogel monolith with a density of 4 mg/cm(3) is obtained. The MWCNT aerogel has an ordered macroporous honeycomb structure with straight and parallel voids in 50-150 μm separated by less than 100 nm thick walls. The entangled MWCNTs generate mesoporous structures on the honeycomb walls, creating aerogels with a surface area of 580 m(2)/g which is much higher than that of pristine MWCNTs (241 m(2)/g). Despite the ultralow density, the MWCNT aerogels have an excellent compression recoverable property as demonstrated by the compression test. The aerogels have an electrical conductivity of 3.2 × 10(-2) S·cm(-1) that can be further increased to 0.67 S·cm(-1) by a high-current pulse method without degrading their structures. The excellent compression recoverable property, hierarchically porous structure with large surface area, and high conductivity grant the MWCNT aerogels exceptional pressure and chemical vapor sensing capabilities. PMID:21090673

  2. Ferromagnetic Micropallets for Magnetic Capture of Single Adherent Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gunn, Nicholas M.; Chang, Ruth; Westerhof, Trisha; Li, Guann-Pyng; Bachman, Mark; Nelson, Edward L.

    2010-01-01

    We present a magnetic micropallet array and demonstration of its capacity to recover specific, individual adherent cells from large populations and deliver them for downstream single cell analysis. A ferromagnetic photopolymer was formulated, characterized, and used to fabricate magnetic micropallets, which are microscale pedestals that provide demarcated cell growth surfaces, with preservation of biophysical properties including photopatternability, biocompatibility, and optical clarity. Each micropallet holds a single adherent cell in culture and hundreds of thousands of micropallets compose a single micropallet array. Any micropallet in the array can be recovered on demand, carrying the adhered cell with it. We used this platform to selectively recover single cells, which were subsequently analyzed using single cell RT-qPCR. PMID:20968293

  3. Polyurea-Based Aerogel Monoliths and Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Je Kyun

    2012-01-01

    aerogel insulation material was developed that will provide superior thermal insulation and inherent radiation protection for government and commercial applications. The rubbery polyureabased aerogel exhibits little dustiness, good flexibility and toughness, and durability typical of the parent polyurea polymer, yet with the low density and superior insulation properties associated with aerogels. The thermal conductivity values of polyurea-based aerogels at lower temperature under vacuum pressures are very low and better than that of silica aerogels. Flexible, rubbery polyurea-based aerogels are able to overcome the weak and brittle nature of conventional inorganic and organic aerogels, including polyisocyanurate aerogels, which are generally prepared with the one similar component to polyurethane rubber aerogels. Additionally, with higher content of hydrogen in their structures, the polyurea rubber-based aerogels will also provide inherently better radiation protection than those of inorganic and carbon aerogels. The aerogel materials also demonstrate good hydrophobicity due to their hydrocarbon molecular structure. There are several strategies to overcoming the drawbacks associated with the weakness and brittleness of silica aerogels. Development of the flexible fiber-reinforced silica aerogel composite blanket has proven to be one promising approach, providing a conveniently fielded form factor that is relatively robust in industrial environments compared to silica aerogel monoliths. However, the flexible, silica aerogel composites still have a brittle, dusty character that may be undesirable, or even intolerable, in certain application environments. Although the cross - linked organic aerogels, such as resorcinol- formaldehyde (RF), polyisocyanurate, and cellulose aerogels, show very high impact strength, they are also very brittle with little elongation (i.e., less rubbery). Also, silica and carbon aerogels are less efficient radiation shielding materials due

  4. Appropriate nonwoven filters effectively capture human peripheral blood cells and mesenchymal stem cells, which show enhanced production of growth factors.

    PubMed

    Hori, Hideo; Iwamoto, Ushio; Niimi, Gen; Shinzato, Masanori; Hiki, Yoshiyuki; Tokushima, Yasuo; Kawaguchi, Kazunori; Ohashi, Atsushi; Nakai, Shigeru; Yasutake, Mikitomo; Kitaguchi, Nobuya

    2015-03-01

    Scaffolds, growth factors, and cells are three essential components in regenerative medicine. Nonwoven filters, which capture cells, provide a scaffold that localizes and concentrates cells near injured tissues. Further, the cells captured on the filters are expected to serve as a local supply of growth factors. In this study, we investigated the growth factors produced by cells captured on nonwoven filters. Nonwoven filters made of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), biodegradable polylactic acid (PLA), or chitin (1.2-22 μm fiber diameter) were cut out as 13 mm disks and placed into cell-capturing devices. Human mesenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissues (h-ASCs) and peripheral blood cells (h-PBCs) were captured on the filter and cultured to evaluate growth factor production. The cell-capture rates strongly depended on the fiber diameter and the number of filter disks. Nonwoven filter disks were composed of PET or PLA fibers with fiber diameters of 1.2-1.8 μm captured over 70% of leukocytes or 90% of h-ASCs added. The production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), transforming growth factor β1, and platelet-derived growth factor AB were significantly enhanced by the h-PBCs captured on PET or PLA filters. h-ASCs on PLA filters showed significantly enhanced production of VEGF. These enhancements varied with the combination of the nonwoven filter and cells. Because of the enhanced growth factor production, the proliferation of human fibroblasts increased in conditioned medium from h-PBCs on PET filters. This device consisting of nonwoven filters and cells should be investigated further for possible use in the regeneration of impaired tissues.

  5. Preparation and application of highly porous aerogel-based bioactive materials in dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttor, Andrea; Szalóki, Melinda; Rente, Tünde; Kerényi, Farkas; Bakó, József; Fábián, István; Lázár, István; Jenei, Attila; Hegedüs, Csaba

    2014-03-01

    In this study, the possibility of preparation and application of highly porous silica aerogel-based bioactive materials are presented. The aerogel was combined with hydroxyapatite and β-tricalcium phosphate as bioactive and osteoinductive agents. The porosity of aerogels was in the mesoporous region with a maximum pore diameter of 7.4 and 12.7 nm for the composite materials. The newly developed bioactive materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The in vitro biological effect of these modified surfaces was also tested on SAOS-2 osteogenic sarcoma cells by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  6. Thermal Insulation Composite Prepared from Carbon Foam and Silica Aerogel Under Ambient Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Heguang; Li, Tiehu; Shi, Yachun; Zhao, Xing

    2015-10-01

    Carbon foam/silica aerogel composite as a promising thermal insulation material was prepared under ambient pressure successfully in the present work. Carbon foam was prepared by pretreatment, foaming, and carbonization process, while silica aerogel was synthesized by sol-gel method. The microstructure, morphology characteristics, compression strength, and thermal properties of composite were characterized by infrared spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, universal testing machine, and laser flash thermal detector, respectively. Results showed that silica aerogel was successfully synthesized in the surface foam cells of carbon foam due to the closed cell structure of carbon foam. Moreover, the compressive strength of the carbon foam was not affected by the silica aerogel in the cell structure of carbon foam, while its thermal insulation property at room temperature was improved.

  7. Advanced Materials for the Recognition and Capture of Whole Cells and Microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Bole, Amanda L; Manesiotis, Panagiotis

    2016-07-01

    Selective cell recognition and capture has recently attracted significant interest due to its potential importance for clinical, diagnostic, environmental, and security applications. Current methods for cell isolation from complex samples are largely dependent on cell size and density, with limited application scope as many of the target cells do not exhibit appreciable differences in this respect. The most recent and forthcoming developments in the area of selective recognition and capture of whole cells, based on natural receptors, as well as synthetic materials utilising physical and chemical properties of the target cell or microorganism, are highlighted. Particular focus is given to the development of cell complementary surfaces using the cells themselves as templating agents, by means of molecular imprinting, and their combination with sensing platforms for rapid cell detection in complex media. The benefits and challenges of each approach are discussed and a perspective of the future of this research area is given.

  8. Biodegradable nano-films for capture and non-invasive release of circulating tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Myoung-Hwan; Castleberry, Steven; Deng, Jason Z.; Hsu, Bryan; Mayner, Sarah; Jensen, Anne E.; Sequist, Lecia V.; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Haber, Daniel A.; Toner, Mehmet; Stott, Shannon L.; Hammond, Paula T.

    2016-01-01

    Selective isolation and purification of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from whole blood is an important capability for both clinical medicine and biological research. Current techniques to perform this task place the isolated cells under excessive stresses that reduce cell viability, and potentially induce phenotype change, therefore losing valuable information about the isolated cells. We present a biodegradable nano-film coating on the surface of a microfluidic chip, which can be used to effectively capture as well as non-invasively release cancer cell lines such as PC-3, LNCaP, DU 145, H1650 and H1975. We have applied layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly to create a library of ultrathin coatings using a broad range of materials through complementary interactions. By developing an LbL nano-film coating with an affinity-based cell-capture surface that is capable of selectively isolating cancer cells from whole blood, and that can be rapidly degraded on command, we are able to gently isolate cancer cells and recover them without compromising cell viability or proliferative potential. Our approach has the capability to overcome practical hurdles and provide viable cancer cells for downstream analyses, such as live cell imaging, single cell genomics, and in vitro cell culture of recovered cells. Furthermore, CTCs from cancer patients were also captured, identified, and successfully released using the LbL-modified microchips. PMID:26142780

  9. Viable capture and release of cancer cells in human whole blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doh, Il; Yoo, Hwan-il; Cho, Young-Ho; Lee, Jinseon; Kwan Kim, Hong; Kim, Jhingook

    2012-07-01

    We present viable cancer cell isolation devices utilizing the physical properties of cells. The tapered slit structure is proposed to isolate cancer cells from blood cells and collect them by reversed flow. From the experimental study using the spiked cancer cells in human whole blood, we verified the capability of the present cancer cell isolation chip in terms of capture efficiency, viability, and release rate. The viable cancer cells obtained from the present chip can be used for the further applications of cancer diagnosis, treatment monitoring, and new target drug development for cancer stem cells.

  10. A minimal physical model captures the shapes of crawling cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjhung, E.; Tiribocchi, A.; Marenduzzo, D.; Cates, M. E.

    2015-01-01

    Cell motility in higher organisms (eukaryotes) is crucial to biological functions ranging from wound healing to immune response, and also implicated in diseases such as cancer. For cells crawling on hard surfaces, significant insights into motility have been gained from experiments replicating such motion in vitro. Such experiments show that crawling uses a combination of actin treadmilling (polymerization), which pushes the front of a cell forward, and myosin-induced stress (contractility), which retracts the rear. Here we present a simplified physical model of a crawling cell, consisting of a droplet of active polar fluid with contractility throughout, but treadmilling connected to a thin layer near the supporting wall. The model shows a variety of shapes and/or motility regimes, some closely resembling cases seen experimentally. Our work strongly supports the view that cellular motility exploits autonomous physical mechanisms whose operation does not need continuous regulatory effort.

  11. Fluorescence imaging of microbe-containing particles shot from a two-stage Light-gas gun into an aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Yuko; Sugino, Tomohiro; Tabata, Makoto; Okudaira, Kyoko; Imai, Eichi; Yano, Hajime; Hasegawa, Sunao; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Yabuta, Hikaru; Kobayashi, Kensei; Kawai, Hideyuki; Mita, Hajime; Yokobori, Shin-ichi; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2014-02-01

    We have proposed an experiment (the Tanpopo mission) to capture microbes on the Japan Experimental Module of the International Space Station. An ultra low-density silica aerogel will be exposed to space for more than 1 year. After retrieving the aerogel, particle tracks and particles found in it will be visualized by fluorescence microscopy after staining it with a DNA-specific fluorescence dye. In preparation for this study, we simulated particle trapping in an aerogel so that methods could be developed to visualize the particles and their tracks. During the Tanpopo mission, particles that have an orbital velocity of ~8 km/s are expected to collide with the aerogel. To simulate these collisions, we shot Deinococcus radiodurans-containing Lucentite particles into the aerogel from a two-stage light-gas gun (acceleration 4.2 km/s). The shapes of the captured particles, and their tracks and entrance holes were recorded with a microscope/camera system for further analysis. The size distribution of the captured particles was smaller than the original distribution, suggesting that the particles had fragmented. We were able to distinguish between microbial DNA and inorganic compounds after staining the aerogel with the DNA-specific fluorescence dye SYBR green I as the fluorescence of the stained DNA and the autofluorescence of the inorganic particles decay at different rates. The developed methods are suitable to determine if microbes exist at the International Space Station altitude.

  12. Fluorescence imaging of microbe-containing particles shot from a two-stage Light-gas gun into an aerogel.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Yuko; Sugino, Tomohiro; Tabata, Makoto; Okudaira, Kyoko; Imai, Eichi; Yano, Hajime; Hasegawa, Sunao; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Yabuta, Hikaru; Kobayashi, Kensei; Kawai, Hideyuki; Mita, Hajime; Yokobori, Shin-ichi; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2014-02-01

    We have proposed an experiment (the Tanpopo mission) to capture microbes on the Japan Experimental Module of the International Space Station. An ultra low-density silica aerogel will be exposed to space for more than 1 year. After retrieving the aerogel, particle tracks and particles found in it will be visualized by fluorescence microscopy after staining it with a DNA-specific fluorescence dye. In preparation for this study, we simulated particle trapping in an aerogel so that methods could be developed to visualize the particles and their tracks. During the Tanpopo mission, particles that have an orbital velocity of ~8 km/s are expected to collide with the aerogel. To simulate these collisions, we shot Deinococcus radiodurans-containing Lucentite particles into the aerogel from a two-stage light-gas gun (acceleration 4.2 km/s). The shapes of the captured particles, and their tracks and entrance holes were recorded with a microscope/camera system for further analysis. The size distribution of the captured particles was smaller than the original distribution, suggesting that the particles had fragmented. We were able to distinguish between microbial DNA and inorganic compounds after staining the aerogel with the DNA-specific fluorescence dye SYBR green I as the fluorescence of the stained DNA and the autofluorescence of the inorganic particles decay at different rates. The developed methods are suitable to determine if microbes exist at the International Space Station altitude.

  13. Fluorescence imaging of microbe-containing particles shot from a two-stage Light-gas gun into an aerogel.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Yuko; Sugino, Tomohiro; Tabata, Makoto; Okudaira, Kyoko; Imai, Eichi; Yano, Hajime; Hasegawa, Sunao; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Yabuta, Hikaru; Kobayashi, Kensei; Kawai, Hideyuki; Mita, Hajime; Yokobori, Shin-ichi; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2014-02-01

    We have proposed an experiment (the Tanpopo mission) to capture microbes on the Japan Experimental Module of the International Space Station. An ultra low-density silica aerogel will be exposed to space for more than 1 year. After retrieving the aerogel, particle tracks and particles found in it will be visualized by fluorescence microscopy after staining it with a DNA-specific fluorescence dye. In preparation for this study, we simulated particle trapping in an aerogel so that methods could be developed to visualize the particles and their tracks. During the Tanpopo mission, particles that have an orbital velocity of ~8 km/s are expected to collide with the aerogel. To simulate these collisions, we shot Deinococcus radiodurans-containing Lucentite particles into the aerogel from a two-stage light-gas gun (acceleration 4.2 km/s). The shapes of the captured particles, and their tracks and entrance holes were recorded with a microscope/camera system for further analysis. The size distribution of the captured particles was smaller than the original distribution, suggesting that the particles had fragmented. We were able to distinguish between microbial DNA and inorganic compounds after staining the aerogel with the DNA-specific fluorescence dye SYBR green I as the fluorescence of the stained DNA and the autofluorescence of the inorganic particles decay at different rates. The developed methods are suitable to determine if microbes exist at the International Space Station altitude. PMID:25086872

  14. Formation of nanoporous aerogels from wheat starch.

    PubMed

    Ubeyitogullari, Ali; Ciftci, Ozan N

    2016-08-20

    Biodegradable nanoporous aerogels were obtained from wheat starch using a simple and green method based on supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) drying. Effects of processing parameters (temperature, wheat starch concentration and mixing rate during gelatinization; temperature, pressure, and flow rate of CO2, during SC-CO2 drying) on the aerogel formation were investigated, and optimized for the highest surface area and smallest pore size of the aerogels. At the optimized conditions, wheat starch aerogels had surface areas between 52.6-59.7m(2)/g and densities ranging between 0.05-0.29g/cm(3). The average pore size of the starch aerogels was 20nm. Starch aerogels were stable up to 280°C. Due to high surface area and nanoporous structure, wheat starch aerogels are promising carrier systems for bioactives and drugs in food and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:27178916

  15. Synthesis, characterization, and modeling of hydrogen storage in carbon aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Pekala, R.W.; Coronado, P.R.; Calef, D.F.

    1995-04-01

    Carbon aerogels are a special class of open-cell foams with an ultrafine cell/pore size (<50 nm), high surface area (600-800 m{sup 2}/g), and a solid matrix composed of interconnected colloidal-like particles or fibers with characteristic diameters of 10 nm. These materials are usually synthesized from the sol-gel polymerization of resorcinol-formaldehyde or phenolic-furfural, followed by supercritical extraction of the solvent and pyrolysis in an inert atmosphere. The resultant aerogel has a nanocrystalline structure with micropores (<2 nm diameter) located within the solid matrix. Carbon aerogel monoliths can be prepared at densities ranging from 0.05-1.0 g/cm{sup 3}, leading to volumetric surface areas (> 500 m{sup 2}/cm{sup 3}) that are much larger than commercially available materials. This research program is directed at optimization of the aerogel structure for maximum hydrogen adsorption over a wide range of temperatures and pressures. Computer modeling of hydrogen adsorption at carbon surfaces was also examined.

  16. Biodegradable pectin/clay aerogels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Bing; Chiou, Bor-Sen; Wang, Yu-Zhong; Schiraldi, David A

    2013-03-13

    Biodegradable, foamlike materials based on renewable pectin and sodium montmorillonite clay were fabricated through a simple, environmentally friendly freeze-drying process. The addition of multivalent cations (Ca(2+) and Al(3+)) resulted in apparent cross-linking of the polymer and enhancement of aerogel properties. The compressive properties increased as the solid contents (both pectin and clay) increased; moduli in the range of 0.04-114 MPa were obtained for materials with bulk densities ranging from 0.03 g/cm(3) to 0.19 g/cm(3), accompanied by microstructural changes from a lamellar structure to a cellular structure. Biodegradability of the aerogels was investigated by detecting CO2 release for 4 weeks in compost media. The results revealed that pectin aerogels possess higher biodegradation rates than wheat starch, which is often used as a standard for effective biodegradation. The addition of clay and multivalent cations surprisingly increased the biodegradation rates. PMID:23406325

  17. Polyimide Cellulose Nanocrystal Composite Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Baochau N.; Meador, Mary Ann; Rowan, Stuart; Cudjoe, Elvis; Sandberg, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Polyimide (PI) aerogels are highly porous solids having low density, high porosity and low thermal conductivity with good mechanical properties. They are ideal for various applications including use in antenna and insulation such as inflatable decelerators used in entry, decent and landing operations. Recently, attention has been focused on stimuli responsive materials such as cellulose nano crystals (CNCs). CNCs are environmentally friendly, bio-renewable, commonly found in plants and the dermis of sea tunicates, and potentially low cost. This study is to examine the effects of CNC on the polyimide aerogels. The CNC used in this project are extracted from mantle of a sea creature called tunicates. A series of polyimide cellulose nanocrystal composite aerogels has been fabricated having 0-13 wt of CNC. Results will be discussed.

  18. Fabrication of endothelial progenitor cell capture surface via DNA aptamer modifying dopamine/polyethyleneimine copolymer film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Deng, Jinchuan; Yuan, Shuheng; Wang, Juan; Luo, Rifang; Chen, Si; Wang, Jin; Huang, Nan

    2016-11-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are mainly located in bone marrow and circulate, and play a crucial role in repairmen of injury endothelium. One of the most promising strategies of stents designs were considered to make in-situ endothelialization in vivo via EPC-capture biomolecules on a vascular graft to capture EPCs directly from circulatory blood. In this work, an EPC specific aptamer with a 34 bases single strand DNA sequence was conjugated onto the stent surface via dopamine/polyethyleneimine copolymer film as a platform and linker. The assembled density of DNA aptamer could be regulated by controlling dopamine percentage in this copolymer film. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), water contact angle (WCA) and fluorescence test confirmed the successful immobilization of DNA aptamer. To confirm its biofunctionality and cytocompatibility, the capturing cells ability of the aptamer modified surface and the effects on the growth behavior of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were investigated. The aptamer functionalized sample revealed a good EPC-capture ability, and had a cellular friendly feature for both EPC and EC growth, while not stimulated the hyperplasia of SMCs. And, the co-culture experiment of three types of cells confirmed the specificity capturing of EPCs to aptamer modified surface, rather than ECs and SMCs. These data suggested that this aptamer functionalized surface may have a large potentiality for the application of vascular grafts with targeted endothelialization.

  19. Dielectrophoretic capture of low abundance cell population using thick electrodes.

    PubMed

    Marchalot, Julien; Chateaux, Jean-François; Faivre, Magalie; Mertani, Hichem C; Ferrigno, Rosaria; Deman, Anne-Laure

    2015-09-01

    Enrichment of rare cell populations such as Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) is a critical step before performing analysis. This paper presents a polymeric microfluidic device with integrated thick Carbon-PolyDimethylSiloxane composite (C-PDMS) electrodes designed to carry out dielectrophoretic (DEP) trapping of low abundance biological cells. Such conductive composite material presents advantages over metallic structures. Indeed, as it combines properties of both the matrix and doping particles, C-PDMS allows the easy and fast integration of conductive microstructures using a soft-lithography approach while preserving O2 plasma bonding properties of PDMS substrate and avoiding a cumbersome alignment procedure. Here, we first performed numerical simulations to demonstrate the advantage of such thick C-PDMS electrodes over a coplanar electrode configuration. It is well established that dielectrophoretic force ([Formula: see text]) decreases quickly as the distance from the electrode surface increases resulting in coplanar configuration to a low trapping efficiency at high flow rate. Here, we showed quantitatively that by using electrodes as thick as a microchannel height, it is possible to extend the DEP force influence in the whole volume of the channel compared to coplanar electrode configuration and maintaining high trapping efficiency while increasing the throughput. This model was then used to numerically optimize a thick C-PDMS electrode configuration in terms of trapping efficiency. Then, optimized microfluidic configurations were fabricated and tested at various flow rates for the trapping of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line. We reached trapping efficiencies of 97% at 20 μl/h and 78.7% at 80 μl/h, for 100 μm thick electrodes. Finally, we applied our device to the separation and localized trapping of CTCs (MDA-MB-231) from a red blood cells sample (concentration ratio of 1:10). PMID:26392836

  20. Dielectrophoretic capture of low abundance cell population using thick electrodes.

    PubMed

    Marchalot, Julien; Chateaux, Jean-François; Faivre, Magalie; Mertani, Hichem C; Ferrigno, Rosaria; Deman, Anne-Laure

    2015-09-01

    Enrichment of rare cell populations such as Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) is a critical step before performing analysis. This paper presents a polymeric microfluidic device with integrated thick Carbon-PolyDimethylSiloxane composite (C-PDMS) electrodes designed to carry out dielectrophoretic (DEP) trapping of low abundance biological cells. Such conductive composite material presents advantages over metallic structures. Indeed, as it combines properties of both the matrix and doping particles, C-PDMS allows the easy and fast integration of conductive microstructures using a soft-lithography approach while preserving O2 plasma bonding properties of PDMS substrate and avoiding a cumbersome alignment procedure. Here, we first performed numerical simulations to demonstrate the advantage of such thick C-PDMS electrodes over a coplanar electrode configuration. It is well established that dielectrophoretic force ([Formula: see text]) decreases quickly as the distance from the electrode surface increases resulting in coplanar configuration to a low trapping efficiency at high flow rate. Here, we showed quantitatively that by using electrodes as thick as a microchannel height, it is possible to extend the DEP force influence in the whole volume of the channel compared to coplanar electrode configuration and maintaining high trapping efficiency while increasing the throughput. This model was then used to numerically optimize a thick C-PDMS electrode configuration in terms of trapping efficiency. Then, optimized microfluidic configurations were fabricated and tested at various flow rates for the trapping of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line. We reached trapping efficiencies of 97% at 20 μl/h and 78.7% at 80 μl/h, for 100 μm thick electrodes. Finally, we applied our device to the separation and localized trapping of CTCs (MDA-MB-231) from a red blood cells sample (concentration ratio of 1:10).

  1. Dielectrophoretic capture of low abundance cell population using thick electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Marchalot, Julien; Chateaux, Jean-François; Faivre, Magalie; Mertani, Hichem C.; Ferrigno, Rosaria; Deman, Anne-Laure

    2015-01-01

    Enrichment of rare cell populations such as Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) is a critical step before performing analysis. This paper presents a polymeric microfluidic device with integrated thick Carbon-PolyDimethylSiloxane composite (C-PDMS) electrodes designed to carry out dielectrophoretic (DEP) trapping of low abundance biological cells. Such conductive composite material presents advantages over metallic structures. Indeed, as it combines properties of both the matrix and doping particles, C-PDMS allows the easy and fast integration of conductive microstructures using a soft-lithography approach while preserving O2 plasma bonding properties of PDMS substrate and avoiding a cumbersome alignment procedure. Here, we first performed numerical simulations to demonstrate the advantage of such thick C-PDMS electrodes over a coplanar electrode configuration. It is well established that dielectrophoretic force (FDEP) decreases quickly as the distance from the electrode surface increases resulting in coplanar configuration to a low trapping efficiency at high flow rate. Here, we showed quantitatively that by using electrodes as thick as a microchannel height, it is possible to extend the DEP force influence in the whole volume of the channel compared to coplanar electrode configuration and maintaining high trapping efficiency while increasing the throughput. This model was then used to numerically optimize a thick C-PDMS electrode configuration in terms of trapping efficiency. Then, optimized microfluidic configurations were fabricated and tested at various flow rates for the trapping of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line. We reached trapping efficiencies of 97% at 20 μl/h and 78.7% at 80 μl/h, for 100 μm thick electrodes. Finally, we applied our device to the separation and localized trapping of CTCs (MDA-MB-231) from a red blood cells sample (concentration ratio of 1:10). PMID:26392836

  2. Highly-efficient single-cell capture in microfluidic array chips using differential hydrodynamic guiding structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Jaehoon; Kim, Young-Ji; Yoon, Euisik

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents a highly efficient single cell capture scheme using hydrodynamic guiding structures in a microwell array. The implemented structure has a capturing efficiency of >80%, and has a capacity to place individual cells into separated microwells, allowing for the time-lapse monitoring on single cell behavior. Feasibility was tested by injecting microbeads (15 μm in diameter) and prostate cancer PC3 cells in an 8×8 microwell array chip and >80% of the microwells were occupied by single ones. Using the chips, the number of cells required for cell assays can be dramatically reduced and this will facilitate overcoming a huddle of assays with scarce supply of cells.

  3. Extraction and microanalysis of cosmic dust captured during sample return missions: laboratory simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, G. A.; Kearsley, A. T.; Butterworth, A. L.; Bland, P. A.; Burchell, M. J.; McPhail, D. S.; Chater, R.; Grady, M. M.; Wright, I. P.

    2004-01-01

    Particles of cometary and asteroidal origin collected at source using dedicated capture cell technologies will be returned to Earth within the next 8 years. Furthermore, coincidental capture of interplanetary dust particles will occur on the exposed surfaces of the Genesis spacecraft. Laboratory simulations using both light-gas-gun and Van de Graaff accelerators have impacted dust analogues at velocities ranging from 5 km s -1 to ca. 72 km s -1 into comparable silicon and aerogel targets. Analysis of the impacts on silicon has shown complete spallation of impact residues for silicate projectiles of 38-53 μm in diameter, however craters formed by 1 μm iron projectiles show that near-intact residues can be preserved. An olivine grain embedded in aerogel has been characterized in situ using Raman micro-spectroscopy. Monte Carlo simulations and laboratory experiments have shown that analytical scanning electron microscopy can also be used to characterize embedded grains. Development of a novel particle extraction methodology using a 266 nm UV laser micro-dissection system has resulted in the recovery of an olivine grain. The extracted particle was then "cleaned up" using focused ion beam (FIB) milling to remove excess aerogel that was fused on the grain surface.

  4. Boron neutron capture therapy induces cell cycle arrest and cell apoptosis of glioma stem/progenitor cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glioma stem cells in the quiescent state are resistant to clinical radiation therapy. An almost inevitable glioma recurrence is due to the persistence of these cells. The high linear energy transfer associated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) could kill quiescent and proliferative cells. Methods The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of BNCT on glioma stem/progenitor cells in vitro. The damage induced by BNCT was assessed using cell cycle progression, apoptotic cell ratio and apoptosis-associated proteins expression. Results The surviving fraction and cell viability of glioma stem/progenitor cells were decreased compared with differentiated glioma cells using the same boronophenylalanine pretreatment and the same dose of neutron flux. BNCT induced cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase and cell apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway, with changes in the expression of associated proteins. Conclusions Glioma stem/progenitor cells, which are resistant to current clinical radiotherapy, could be effectively killed by BNCT in vitro via cell cycle arrest and apoptosis using a prolonged neutron irradiation, although radiosensitivity of glioma stem/progenitor cells was decreased compared with differentiated glioma cells when using the same dose of thermal neutron exposure and boronophenylalanine pretreatment. Thus, BNCT could offer an appreciable therapeutic advantage to prevent tumor recurrence, and may become a promising treatment in recurrent glioma. PMID:23915425

  5. A novel hydrophilic polymer-brush pattern for site-specific capture of blood cells from whole blood.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jianwen; Shi, Qiang; Ye, Wei; Fan, Qunfu; Shi, Hengchong; Wong, Shing-Chung; Xu, Xiaodong; Yin, Jinghua

    2015-03-11

    A novel hydrophilic PAMPS-PAAm brush pattern is fabricated to selectively capture blood cells from whole blood. PAMPS brushes provide antifouling surfaces to resist protein and cell adhesion while PAAm brushes effectively entrap targeted proteins for site-specific and cell-type dependent capture of blood cells. PMID:25469596

  6. High surface area silicon carbide-coated carbon aerogel

    DOEpatents

    Worsley, Marcus A; Kuntz, Joshua D; Baumann, Theodore F; Satcher, Jr, Joe H

    2014-01-14

    A metal oxide-carbon composite includes a carbon aerogel with an oxide overcoat. The metal oxide-carbon composite is made by providing a carbon aerogel, immersing the carbon aerogel in a metal oxide sol under a vacuum, raising the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to atmospheric pressure, curing the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol at room temperature, and drying the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to produce the metal oxide-carbon composite. The step of providing a carbon aerogel can provide an activated carbon aerogel or provide a carbon aerogel with carbon nanotubes that make the carbon aerogel mechanically robust. Carbon aerogels can be coated with sol-gel silica and the silica can be converted to silicone carbide, improved the thermal stability of the carbon aerogel.

  7. A microfluidic device for label-free, physical capture of circulating tumor cell clusters.

    PubMed

    Sarioglu, A Fatih; Aceto, Nicola; Kojic, Nikola; Donaldson, Maria C; Zeinali, Mahnaz; Hamza, Bashar; Engstrom, Amanda; Zhu, Huili; Sundaresan, Tilak K; Miyamoto, David T; Luo, Xi; Bardia, Aditya; Wittner, Ben S; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Shioda, Toshi; Ting, David T; Stott, Shannon L; Kapur, Ravi; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Haber, Daniel A; Toner, Mehmet

    2015-07-01

    Cancer cells metastasize through the bloodstream either as single migratory circulating tumor cells (CTCs) or as multicellular groupings (CTC clusters). Existing technologies for CTC enrichment are designed to isolate single CTCs, and although CTC clusters are detectable in some cases, their true prevalence and significance remain to be determined. Here we developed a microchip technology (the Cluster-Chip) to capture CTC clusters independently of tumor-specific markers from unprocessed blood. CTC clusters are isolated through specialized bifurcating traps under low-shear stress conditions that preserve their integrity, and even two-cell clusters are captured efficiently. Using the Cluster-Chip, we identified CTC clusters in 30-40% of patients with metastatic breast or prostate cancer or with melanoma. RNA sequencing of CTC clusters confirmed their tumor origin and identified tissue-derived macrophages within the clusters. Efficient capture of CTC clusters will enable the detailed characterization of their biological properties and role in metastasis. PMID:25984697

  8. Ultrafast Sol-Gel Synthesis of Graphene Aerogel Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Mathew; Hu, Matthew; Manandhar, Sandeep; Sakshaug, Avery; Strong, Adam; Riley, Leah; Pauzauskie, Peter J.

    2015-12-01

    Graphene aerogels derived from graphene-oxide (GO) starting materials recently have been shown to exhibit a combination of high electrical conductivity, chemical stability, and low cost that has enabled a range of electrochemical applications. Standard synthesis protocols for manufacturing graphene aerogels require the use of sol-gel chemical reactions that are maintained at high temperatures for long periods of time ranging from 12 hours to several days. Here we report an ultrafast, acid-catalyzed sol-gel formation process in acetonitrile in which wet GO-loaded gels are realized within 2 hours at temperatures below 45°C. Spectroscopic and electrochemical analysis following supercritical drying and pyrolysis confirms the reduction of the GO in the aerogels to sp2 carbon crystallites with no residual carbon–nitrogen bonds from the acetonitrile or its derivatives. This rapid synthesis enhances the prospects for large-scale manufacturing of graphene aerogels for use in numerous applications including sorbents for environmental toxins, support materials for electrocatalysis, and high-performance electrodes for electrochemical capacitors and solar cells.

  9. Capillary Condensation of Liquid 4He in Aerogel on Cooling Through {lambda} Point

    SciTech Connect

    Miyashita, W.; Yoneyama, K.; Kato, H.; Nomura, R.; Okuda, Y.

    2006-09-07

    Capillary condensation of liquid 4He in silica aerogel with a 90% porosity was investigated visually. The initial condition of the experiment was such that liquid 4He was present in the sample cell but not in the aerogel. This situation was realized by introducing the liquid into the cell at a fast rate to avoid liquefaction in the aerogel. The free surface of the liquid rose up in the cell with filling and eventually reached the bottom of the aerogel. Then, the aerogel absorbed the liquid by capillary condensation. The height of the liquid in the aerogel rose with time t roughly as t1/2 in the normal fluid phase. This behavior was consistent with the Washburn model. When the system was cooled through the {lambda} point during the condensation, the liquid height started to rise faster in the superfluid phase with a constant velocity of about 0.3 mm/sec. The dynamics of capillary condensation was strongly dependent on whether the liquid 4He was in the normal or the superfluid phase.

  10. Capture of endothelial cells under flow using immobilized vascular endothelial growth factor

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Randall J.; Koobatian, Maxwell T.; Shahini, Aref; Swartz, Daniel D.; Andreadis, Stelios T.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the ability of immobilized vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to capture endothelial cells (EC) with high specificity under fluid flow. To this end, we engineered a surface consisting of heparin bound to poly-L-lysine to permit immobilization of VEGF through the C-terminal heparin-binding domain. The immobilized growth factor retained its biological activity as shown by proliferation of EC and prolonged activation of KDR signaling. Using a microfluidic device we assessed the ability to capture EC under a range of shear stresses from low (0.5 dyne/cm2) to physiological (15 dyne/cm2). Capture was significant for all shear stresses tested. Immobilized VEGF was highly selective for EC as evidenced by significant capture of human umbilical vein and ovine pulmonary artery EC but no capture of human dermal fibroblasts, human hair follicle derived mesenchymal stem cells, or mouse fibroblasts. Further, VEGF could capture EC from mixtures with non-EC under low and high shear conditions as well as from complex fluids like whole human blood under high shear. Our findings may have far reaching implications, as they suggest that VEGF could be used to promote endothelialization of vascular grafts or neovascularization of implanted tissues by rare but continuously circulating EC. PMID:25771020

  11. [A novel and facile microchip based on nitrocellulose membrane toward efficient capture of circulating tumor cells].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Sun, Changlong; Zhang, Ren; Gao, Mingxia; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2013-06-01

    A novel and facile circulating tumor cell (CTC) microchip has been developed for the isolation and detection of cancer cells. The CTC microchip was prepared based on the nitrocellulose membrane substrate, which shows high affinity to proteins and hence can adsorb antibodies naturally. We employed non-small-cells of lung cancer NCI-H1650 as target cells and testified the high capture efficacy of the CTC microchip. Furthermore, we spiked 500 cancer cells to 1 mL healthy donor's whole blood in order to simulate the detection of CTC in patient and detected 182 cancer cells ultimately, indicating the huge application potential in the future.

  12. A smart core-sheath nanofiber that captures and releases red blood cells from the blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Q.; Hou, J.; Zhao, C.; Xin, Z.; Jin, J.; Li, C.; Wong, S.-C.; Yin, J.

    2016-01-01

    A smart core-sheath nanofiber for non-adherent cell capture and release is demonstrated. The nanofibers are fabricated by single-spinneret electrospinning of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm), polycaprolactone (PCL) and nattokinase (NK) solution blends. The self-assembly of PNIPAAm and PCL blends during the electrospinning generates the core-sheath PCL/PNIPAAm nanofibers with PNIPAAm as the sheath. The PNIPAAm-based core-sheath nanofibers are switchable between hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity with temperature change and enhance stability in the blood. When the nanofibers come in contact with blood, the NK is released from the nanofibers to resist platelet adhesion on the nanofiber surface, facilitating the direct capture and isolation of red blood cells (RBCs) from the blood above phase-transition temperature of PNIPAAm. Meanwhile, the captured RBCs are readily released from the nanofibers with temperature stimuli in an undamaged manner. The release efficiency of up to 100% is obtained while maintaining cellular integrity and function. This work presents promising nanofibers to effectively capture non-adherent cells and release for subsequent molecular analysis and diagnosis of single cells.A smart core-sheath nanofiber for non-adherent cell capture and release is demonstrated. The nanofibers are fabricated by single-spinneret electrospinning of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm), polycaprolactone (PCL) and nattokinase (NK) solution blends. The self-assembly of PNIPAAm and PCL blends during the electrospinning generates the core-sheath PCL/PNIPAAm nanofibers with PNIPAAm as the sheath. The PNIPAAm-based core-sheath nanofibers are switchable between hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity with temperature change and enhance stability in the blood. When the nanofibers come in contact with blood, the NK is released from the nanofibers to resist platelet adhesion on the nanofiber surface, facilitating the direct capture and isolation of red blood cells (RBCs) from

  13. Biodegradable Pectin/clay Aerogels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodegradable, foamlike materials based on renewable pectin and sodium montmorillonite clay were fabricated through a simple, environmentally friendly freeze-drying process. Addition of multivalent cations (Ca2+ and Al3+) resulted in apparent crosslinking of the polymer, and enhancement of aerogel p...

  14. Organic carbon aerogels from the sol-gel polymerization of phenolic-furfural mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, Richard W.

    1998-04-28

    The sol-gel polymerization of a phenolic-furfural mixture in dilute solution leads to a highly cross-linked network that can be supercritically dried to form a high surface area foam. These porous materials have cell/pore sizes .ltoreq.1000 .ANG., and although they are dark brown in color, they can be classified as a new type of aerogel. The phenolic-furfural aerogel can be pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere at 1050.degree. C. to produce carbon aerogels. This new aerogel may be used for thermal insulation, chromatographic packing, water filtration, ion-exchange, and carbon electrodes for energy storage devices, such as batteries and double-layer capacitors.

  15. Organic aerogels from the sol-gel polymerization of phenolic-furfural mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, Richard W.

    1996-01-01

    The sol-gel polymerization of a phenolic-furfural mixture in dilute solution leads to a highly cross-linked network that can be supercritically dried to form a high surface area foam. These porous materials have cell/pore sizes .ltoreq.1000.ANG., and although they are dark brown in color, they can be classified as a new type of aerogel. The phenolic-furfural aerogel can be pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere at 1050.degree. C. to produce carbon aerogels. This new aerogel may be used for thermal insulation, chromatographic packing, water filtration, ion-exchange, and carbon electrodes for energy storage devices, such as batteries and double-layer capacitors.

  16. Organic aerogels from the sol-gel polymerization of phenolic-furfural mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, R.W.

    1995-12-19

    The sol-gel polymerization of a phenolic-furfural mixture in dilute solution leads to a highly cross-linked network that can be supercritically dried to form a high surface area foam. These porous materials have cell/pore sizes{<=}1000{angstrom}, and although they are dark brown in color, they can be classified as a new type of aerogel. The phenolic-furfural aerogel can be pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere at 1050 C to produce carbon aerogels. This new aerogel may be used for thermal insulation, chromatographic packing, water filtration, ion-exchange, and carbon electrodes for energy storage devices, such as batteries and double-layer capacitors. 8 figs.

  17. Organic aerogels from the sol-gel polymerization of phenolic-furfural mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, R.W.

    1996-09-17

    The sol-gel polymerization of a phenolic-furfural mixture in dilute solution leads to a highly cross-linked network that can be supercritically dried to form a high surface area foam. These porous materials have cell/pore sizes {<=}1,000{angstrom}, and although they are dark brown in color, they can be classified as a new type of aerogel. The phenolic-furfural aerogel can be pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere at 1,050 C to produce carbon aerogels. This new aerogel may be used for thermal insulation, chromatographic packing, water filtration, ion-exchange, and carbon electrodes for energy storage devices, such as batteries and double-layer capacitors. 8 figs.

  18. Organic aerogels from the sol-gel polymerization of phenolic-furfural mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, Richard W.

    1995-01-01

    The sol-gel polymerization of a phenolic-furfural mixture in dilute solution leads to a highly cross-linked network that can be supercritically dried to form a high surface area foam. These porous materials have cell/pore sizes.ltoreq.1000.ANG., and although they are dark brown in color, they can be classified as a new type of aerogel. The phenolic-furfural aerogel can be pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere at 1050.degree. C. to produce carbon aerogels. This new aerogel may be used for thermal insulation, chromatographic packing, water filtration, ion-exchange, and carbon electrodes for energy storage devices, such as batteries and double-layer capacitors.

  19. Organic carbon aerogels from the sol-gel polymerization of phenolic-furfural mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, R.W.

    1998-04-28

    The sol-gel polymerization of a phenolic-furfural mixture in dilute solution leads to a highly cross-linked network that can be supercritically dried to form a high surface area foam. These porous materials have cell/pore sizes {<=}1000 {angstrom}, and although they are dark brown in color, they can be classified as a new type of aerogel. The phenolic-furfural aerogel can be pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere at 1050 C to produce carbon aerogels. This new aerogel may be used for thermal insulation, chromatographic packing, water filtration, ion-exchange, and carbon electrodes for energy storage devices, such as batteries and double-layer capacitors. 8 figs.

  20. Detection of cells captured with antigens on shear horizontal surface-acoustic-wave sensors.

    PubMed

    Hao, Hsu-Chao; Chang, Hwan-You; Wang, Tsung-Pao; Yao, Da-Jeng

    2013-02-01

    Techniques to separate cells are widely applied in immunology. The technique to separate a specific antigen on a microfluidic platform involves the use of a shear horizontal surface-acoustic-wave (SH-SAW) sensor. With specific antibodies conjugated onto the surface of the SH-SAW sensors, this technique can serve to identify specific cells in bodily fluids. Jurkat cells, used as a target in this work, provide a model of cells in small abundance (1:1000) for isolation and purification with the ultimate goal of targeting even more dilute cells. T cells were separated from a mixed-cell medium on a chip (Jurkat cells/K562 cells, 1/1000). A novel microchamber was developed to capture cells during the purification, which required a large biosample. Cell detection was demonstrated through the performance of genetic identification on the chip.

  1. Complete voltage recovery in quantum dot solar cells due to suppression of electron capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, A.; Yakimov, M.; Tokranov, V.; Mitin, V.; Sablon, K.; Sergeev, A.; Oktyabrsky, S.

    2016-03-01

    Extensive investigations in recent years have shown that addition of quantum dots (QDs) to a single-junction solar cell decreases the open circuit voltage, VOC, with respect to the reference cell without QDs. Despite numerous efforts, the complete voltage recovery in QD cells has been demonstrated only at low temperatures. To minimize the VOC reduction, we propose and investigate a new approach that combines nanoscale engineering of the band structure and the potential profile. Our studies of GaAs solar cells with various InAs QD media demonstrate that the main cause of the VOC reduction is the fast capture of photoelectrons from the GaAs conduction band (CB) to the localized states in QDs. As the photoelectron capture into QDs is mainly realized via the wetting layers (WLs), we substantially reduced the WLs using two monolayer AlAs capping of QDs. In the structures with reduced WLs, the direct CB-to-QD capture is further suppressed due to charging of QDs via doping of the interdot space. The QD devices with suppressed photoelectron capture show the same VOC as the GaAs reference cell together with some improvements in the short circuit current.

  2. Anisotropically structured magnetic aerogel monoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiligtag, Florian J.; Airaghi Leccardi, Marta J. I.; Erdem, Derya; Süess, Martin J.; Niederberger, Markus

    2014-10-01

    Texturing of magnetic ceramics and composites by aligning and fixing of colloidal particles in a magnetic field is a powerful strategy to induce anisotropic chemical, physical and especially mechanical properties into bulk materials. If porosity could be introduced, anisotropically structured magnetic materials would be the perfect supports for magnetic separations in biotechnology or for magnetic field-assisted chemical reactions. Aerogels, combining high porosity with nanoscale structural features, offer an exceptionally large surface area, but they are difficult to magnetically texture. Here we present the preparation of anatase-magnetite aerogel monoliths via the assembly of preformed nanocrystallites. Different approaches are proposed to produce macroscopic bodies with gradient-like magnetic segmentation or with strongly anisotropic magnetic texture.Texturing of magnetic ceramics and composites by aligning and fixing of colloidal particles in a magnetic field is a powerful strategy to induce anisotropic chemical, physical and especially mechanical properties into bulk materials. If porosity could be introduced, anisotropically structured magnetic materials would be the perfect supports for magnetic separations in biotechnology or for magnetic field-assisted chemical reactions. Aerogels, combining high porosity with nanoscale structural features, offer an exceptionally large surface area, but they are difficult to magnetically texture. Here we present the preparation of anatase-magnetite aerogel monoliths via the assembly of preformed nanocrystallites. Different approaches are proposed to produce macroscopic bodies with gradient-like magnetic segmentation or with strongly anisotropic magnetic texture. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Digital photographs of dispersions and gels with different water-to-ethanol ratios; magnetic measurements of an anatase aerogel containing 0.25 mol% Fe3O4 nanoparticles; XRD patterns of the iron oxide and

  3. Cell-Type-Specific Genome-wide Expression Profiling after Laser Capture Microdissection of Living Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, F; Manohar, C F

    2005-02-09

    The purpose of this technical feasibility study was to develop and evaluate robust microgenomic tools for investigations of genome-wide expression of very small numbers of cells isolated from whole tissue sections. Tissues contain large numbers of cell-types that play varied roles in organ function and responses to endogenous and exogenous toxicants whether bacterial, viral, chemical or radiation. Expression studies of whole tissue biopsy are severely limited because heterogeneous cell-types result in an averaging of molecular signals masking subtle but important changes in gene expression in any one cell type(s) or group of cells. Accurate gene expression analysis requires the study of specific cell types in their tissue environment but without contamination from surrounding cells. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) is a new technology to isolate morphologically distinct cells from tissue sections. Alternative methods are available for isolating single cells but not yet for their reliable genome-wide expression analyses. The tasks of this feasibility project were to: (1) Develop efficient protocols for laser capture microdissection of cells from tissues identified by antibody label, or morphological stain. (2) Develop reproducible gene-transcript analyses techniques for single cell-types and determine the numbers of cells needed for reliable genome-wide analyses. (3) Validate the technology for epithelial and endothelial cells isolated from the gastrointestinal tract of mice.

  4. Aerogels derived from multifunctional organic monomers

    SciTech Connect

    Pekala, R.W.; Alviso, C.T.; Kong, F.M.; Hulsey, S.S.

    1991-09-01

    Traditional inorganic aerogels are mad via the hydrolysis and condensation of metal alkoxides. Recently, we reported the synthesis of organic aerogels based upon the aqueous polycondensation of (1) resorcinol with formaldehyde and (2) melamine with formaldehyde. The former materials can also be pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere to form vitreous carbon aerogels. In both the inorganic and organic systems, the structure and properties of the dried aerogel are dictated by polymerization conditions. Factors such as pH, reactant ratio, and temperature influence the crosslinking chemistry and growth processes taking place prior to gelation. The ability to tailor the structure and properties of aerogels at the nanometer scale opens up exciting possibilities for these novel materials. This paper addresses the chemistry-structure-property relationships of organic aerogels. 22 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Dielectric properties and electronic applications of aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Hrubesh, L.W.; Pekala, R.W.

    1993-07-01

    Among their other exceptional properties, aerogels also exhibits unusual dielectric properties due to their nano-sized structures and high porosities. For example, our measurements of the dielectric constants and loss tangents for several aerogel varieties at microwave frequencies show that they both vary linearly with the aerogel density, indicating that the dielectric behavior of aerogels is more gas-like than solid-like. We have also measured the dielectric strength of silica aerogels and find that they are better than ceramics for high voltage insulation. The low dielectric constants and loss tangents of aerogels, along with their controllable thermal expansion properties, make them desirable materials for use as thin films in high speed integrated digital and microwave circuitry.

  6. Aerogel Blanket Insulation Materials for Cryogenic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffman, B. E.; Fesmire, J. E.; White, S.; Gould, G.; Augustynowicz, S.

    2010-04-01

    Aerogel blanket materials for use in thermal insulation systems are now commercially available and implemented by industry. Prototype aerogel blanket materials were presented at the Cryogenic Engineering Conference in 1997 and by 2004 had progressed to full commercial production by Aspen Aerogels. Today, this new technology material is providing superior energy efficiencies and enabling new design approaches for more cost-effective cryogenic systems. Aerogel processing technology and methods are continuing to improve, offering a tailorable array of product formulations for many different thermal and environmental requirements. Many different varieties and combinations of aerogel blankets have been characterized using insulation test cryostats at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory of NASA Kennedy Space Center. Detailed thermal conductivity data for a select group of materials are presented for engineering use. Heat transfer evaluations for the entire vacuum pressure range, including ambient conditions, are given. Examples of current cryogenic applications of aerogel blanket insulation are also given.

  7. Method for producing metal oxide aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Tillotson, T.M.; Poco, J.F.; Hrubesh, L.W.; Thomas, I.M.

    1995-04-25

    A two-step hydrolysis-condensation method was developed to form metal oxide aerogels of any density, including densities of less than 0.003g/cm{sup 3} and greater than 0.27g/cm{sup 3}. High purity metal alkoxide is reacted with water, alcohol solvent, and an additive to form a partially condensed metal intermediate. All solvent and reaction-generated alcohol is removed, and the intermediate is diluted with a nonalcoholic solvent. The intermediate can be stored for future use to make aerogels of any density. The aerogels are formed by reacting the intermediate with water, nonalcoholic solvent, and a catalyst, and extracting the nonalcoholic solvent directly. The resulting monolithic aerogels are hydrophobic and stable under atmospheric conditions, and exhibit good optical transparency, high clarity, and homogeneity. The aerogels have high thermal insulation capacity, high porosity, mechanical strength and stability, and require shorter gelation times than aerogels formed by conventional methods. 8 figs.

  8. Method for producing metal oxide aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Tillotson, Thomas M.; Poco, John F.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.; Thomas, Ian M.

    1995-01-01

    A two-step hydrolysis-condensation method was developed to form metal oxide aerogels of any density, including densities of less than 0.003g/cm.sup.3 and greater than 0.27g/cm.sup.3. High purity metal alkoxide is reacted with water, alcohol solvent, and an additive to form a partially condensed metal intermediate. All solvent and reaction-generated alcohol is removed, and the intermediate is diluted with a nonalcoholic solvent. The intermediate can be stored for future use to make aerogels of any density. The aerogels are formed by reacting the intermediate with water, nonalcoholic solvent, and a catalyst, and extracting the nonalcoholic solvent directly. The resulting monolithic aerogels are hydrophobic and stable under atmospheric conditions, and exhibit good optical transparency, high clarity, and homogeneity. The aerogels have high thermal insulation capacity, high porosity, mechanical strength and stability, and require shorter gelation times than aerogels formed by conventional methods.

  9. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Interplanetary Dust and Aerogel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Contents include the following: Isotopically Primitive Interplanetary Dust Particles of Cometary Origin: Evidence from Nitrogen Isotopic Compositions. The Solar Nebula s First Accretionary Particles (FAPs) Are They Preserved in Collected Interplanetary Dust Samples? On the Origin of GEMS. An Analytical SuperSTEM for Extraterrestrial Materials Research. Sub-Micrometer Scale Minor Element Mapping in Interplanetary Dust Particles: A Test for Stratospheric Contamination. First Report of Taenite in an Asteroidal Interplanetary Dust Particle: Flash-heating Simulates Nebular Dust Evolution. FTIR Analyses of IDPs: Comparison with the InfraRed Spectra of the Interstellar Medium. Mineralogical Study of Hydrated IDPs: X-Ray Diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy. Focused Ion Beam Recovery and Analysis of Interplanetary Dust Particles (IDPs) and Stardust Analogues. Technique for Concentration of Carbonaceous Material from Aerogel Collectors Using HF-Vapor Etching. Synchrotron X-Ray Analysis of Captured Particle Residue in Aerogel. In-Situ Analyses of Earth Orbital Grains Trapped in Aerogel, Using Synchrotron X-Ray Microfluorescence Techniques. Igneous Rims on Micrometeorites and the Sizes of Chondrules in Main Belt Asteroids.

  10. Ultralight and highly compressible graphene aerogels.

    PubMed

    Hu, Han; Zhao, Zongbin; Wan, Wubo; Gogotsi, Yury; Qiu, Jieshan

    2013-04-18

    Chemically converted graphene aerogels with ultralight density and high compressibility are prepared by diamine-mediated functionalization and assembly, followed by microwave irradiation. The resulting graphene aerogels with density as low as 3 mg cm(-3) show excellent resilience and can completely recover after more than 90% compression. The ultralight graphene aerogels possessing high elasticity are promising as compliant and energy-absorbing materials. PMID:23418081

  11. 3D Printing of Graphene Aerogels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Feng; Medarametla, Sai Pradeep; Li, Hui; Zhou, Chi; Lin, Dong

    2016-04-01

    3D printing of a graphene aerogel with true 3D overhang structures is highlighted. The aerogel is fabricated by combining drop-on-demand 3D printing and freeze casting. The water-based GO ink is ejected and freeze-cast into designed 3D structures. The lightweight (<10 mg cm(-3) ) 3D printed graphene aerogel presents superelastic and high electrical conduction.

  12. Aerogels Insulate Missions and Consumer Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Aspen Aerogels, of Northborough, Massachusetts, worked with NASA through an SBIR contract with Kennedy Space Center to develop a robust, flexible form of aerogel for cryogenic insulation for space shuttle launch applications. The company has since used the same manufacturing process developed under the SBIR award to expand its product offerings into the more commercial realms, making the naturally fragile aerogel available for the first time as a standard insulation that can be handled and installed just like standard insulation.

  13. 3D Printing of Graphene Aerogels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Feng; Medarametla, Sai Pradeep; Li, Hui; Zhou, Chi; Lin, Dong

    2016-04-01

    3D printing of a graphene aerogel with true 3D overhang structures is highlighted. The aerogel is fabricated by combining drop-on-demand 3D printing and freeze casting. The water-based GO ink is ejected and freeze-cast into designed 3D structures. The lightweight (<10 mg cm(-3) ) 3D printed graphene aerogel presents superelastic and high electrical conduction. PMID:26861680

  14. IMAC capture of recombinant protein from unclarified mammalian cell feed streams

    PubMed Central

    Kinna, Alexander; Tolner, Berend; Rota, Enrique Miranda; Titchener‐Hooker, Nigel; Nesbeth, Darren

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fusion‐tag affinity chromatography is a key technique in recombinant protein purification. Current methods for protein recovery from mammalian cells are hampered by the need for feed stream clarification. We have developed a method for direct capture using immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) of hexahistidine (His6) tagged proteins from unclarified mammalian cell feed streams. The process employs radial flow chromatography with 300–500 μm diameter agarose resin beads that allow free passage of cells but capture His‐tagged proteins from the feed stream; circumventing expensive and cumbersome centrifugation and/or filtration steps. The method is exemplified by Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell expression and subsequent recovery of recombinant His‐tagged carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA); a heavily glycosylated and clinically relevant protein. Despite operating at a high NaCl concentration necessary for IMAC binding, cells remained over 96% viable after passage through the column with host cell proteases and DNA detected at ∼8 U/mL and 2 ng/μL in column flow‐through, respectively. Recovery of His‐tagged CEA from unclarified feed yielded 71% product recovery. This work provides a basis for direct primary capture of fully glycosylated recombinant proteins from unclarified mammalian cell feed streams. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 130–140. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26174988

  15. IMAC capture of recombinant protein from unclarified mammalian cell feed streams.

    PubMed

    Kinna, Alexander; Tolner, Berend; Rota, Enrique Miranda; Titchener-Hooker, Nigel; Nesbeth, Darren; Chester, Kerry

    2016-01-01

    Fusion-tag affinity chromatography is a key technique in recombinant protein purification. Current methods for protein recovery from mammalian cells are hampered by the need for feed stream clarification. We have developed a method for direct capture using immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) of hexahistidine (His6) tagged proteins from unclarified mammalian cell feed streams. The process employs radial flow chromatography with 300-500 μm diameter agarose resin beads that allow free passage of cells but capture His-tagged proteins from the feed stream; circumventing expensive and cumbersome centrifugation and/or filtration steps. The method is exemplified by Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell expression and subsequent recovery of recombinant His-tagged carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA); a heavily glycosylated and clinically relevant protein. Despite operating at a high NaCl concentration necessary for IMAC binding, cells remained over 96% viable after passage through the column with host cell proteases and DNA detected at ∼ 8 U/mL and 2 ng/μL in column flow-through, respectively. Recovery of His-tagged CEA from unclarified feed yielded 71% product recovery. This work provides a basis for direct primary capture of fully glycosylated recombinant proteins from unclarified mammalian cell feed streams.

  16. A smart core-sheath nanofiber that captures and releases red blood cells from the blood.

    PubMed

    Shi, Q; Hou, J; Zhao, C; Xin, Z; Jin, J; Li, C; Wong, S-C; Yin, J

    2016-01-28

    A smart core-sheath nanofiber for non-adherent cell capture and release is demonstrated. The nanofibers are fabricated by single-spinneret electrospinning of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm), polycaprolactone (PCL) and nattokinase (NK) solution blends. The self-assembly of PNIPAAm and PCL blends during the electrospinning generates the core-sheath PCL/PNIPAAm nanofibers with PNIPAAm as the sheath. The PNIPAAm-based core-sheath nanofibers are switchable between hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity with temperature change and enhance stability in the blood. When the nanofibers come in contact with blood, the NK is released from the nanofibers to resist platelet adhesion on the nanofiber surface, facilitating the direct capture and isolation of red blood cells (RBCs) from the blood above phase-transition temperature of PNIPAAm. Meanwhile, the captured RBCs are readily released from the nanofibers with temperature stimuli in an undamaged manner. The release efficiency of up to 100% is obtained while maintaining cellular integrity and function. This work presents promising nanofibers to effectively capture non-adherent cells and release for subsequent molecular analysis and diagnosis of single cells.

  17. A new synthetic route to organic aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Pekala, R.W.; Alviso, C.T.

    1990-04-11

    The aqueous, sol-gel polymerization of melamine with formaldehyde, followed by supercritical extraction, leads to the formation of a new type of organic aerogel. Synthetic conditions (e.g. reaction time, pH) affect the density, transparency, and microstructure of the resultant aerogels. Unlike previous organic aerogels based upon resorcinol-formaldehyde, the melamine-formaldehyde aerogels are both colorless and transparent. Low densities (0.1-0.8 g/cc), high surface areas ({approximately}1000 m{sup 2}/g), and optical clarity are only a few of the promising characteristics of this new material. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  18. How We 3D-Print Aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    2015-04-23

    A new type of graphene aerogel will make for better energy storage, sensors, nanoelectronics, catalysis and separations. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers have made graphene aerogel microlattices with an engineered architecture via a 3D printing technique known as direct ink writing. The research appears in the April 22 edition of the journal, Nature Communications. The 3D printed graphene aerogels have high surface area, excellent electrical conductivity, are lightweight, have mechanical stiffness and exhibit supercompressibility (up to 90 percent compressive strain). In addition, the 3D printed graphene aerogel microlattices show an order of magnitude improvement over bulk graphene materials and much better mass transport.

  19. Basic science of new aerogels. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    Feasibility of making monolithic composite aerogels containing silica and natural clay minerals, synthetic clay minerals or zeolites has been demonstrated, using two different processes; up to 30 wt% of the mineral phase has been successfully added. Addition of natural and synthetic clay minerals or zeolites to silica aerosols was shown to retard densification. Composite silica aerogels showed significant surface area still present after sintering at 800 or 1000 C. For most samples, 1 wt% of the second phase is equally effective in retarding densification as 10 wt%. Composite aerogels, in general, had lower hardness values than pure silica. Hardness values were inversely proportional to aerogel pore radius.

  20. Aerogel commercialization pilot project. Final program report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-13

    Aerogels are extremely light weight, high surface area, very insulative materials that offer many potential improvements to commercial products. Aerogels have been the subject of extensive research at Department of Energy Laboratories and have been considered one of the technology most ready for commercialization. However, commercialization of the technology had been difficult for the National Laboratories since end users were not interested in the high temperature and high pressure chemical processes involved in manufacturing the raw material. Whereas, Aerojet as a supplier of rocket fuels, specialty chemicals and materials had the manufacturing facilities and experience to commercially produce aerogel-type products. Hence the TRP provided a link between the technology source (National Laboratories), the manufacturing (Aerojet) and the potential end users (other TRP partners). The program successfully produced approximately 500 ft{sup 2} of organic aerogel but failed to make significant quantities of silica aerogel. It is significant that this production represents both the largest volume and biggest pieces of organic aerogel ever produced. Aerogels, available from this program, when tested in several prototype commercial products were expected to improve the products performance, but higher than expected projected production costs for large scale manufacture of aerogels has limited continued commercial interest from these partners. Aerogels do, however, offer potential as a specialty material for some high value technology and defense products.

  1. Aerogel: Tile Composites Toughen a Brittle Superinsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan; Rasky, Daniel; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Pure aerogels, though familiar in the laboratory for decades as exotic lightweight insulators with unusual physical properties, have had limited industrial applications due to their low strength and high brittleness. Composites formed of aerogels and the ceramic fiber matrices used as space shuttle tiles bypass the fragility of pure aerogels and can enhance the performance of space shuttle tiles in their harsh operating environment. Using a layer of aerogel embedded in a tile may open up a wide range of applications where thermal insulation, gas convection control and mechanical strength matter.

  2. Aerogel: Tile Composites Toughen a Brittle Superinsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan; Rasky, Daniel; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Pure aerogels, though familiar in the laboratory for decades as exotic lightweight insulators with unusual physical properties, have had limited industrial applications due to their low strength and high brittleness. Composites formed of aerogels and the ceramic fiber matrices like those used as space shuttle tiles bypass the fragility of pure aerogels and can enhance the performance of space shuttle tiles in their harsh operating environment. Using a layer of aerogel embedded in a tile may open up a wide range of applications where thermal insulation, gas convection control and mechanical strength matter.

  3. Self-propelled carbon nanotube based microrockets for rapid capture and isolation of circulating tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shashwat S.; Jalota-Badhwar, Archana; Zope, Khushbu R.; Todkar, Kiran J.; Mascarenhas, Russel R.; Chate, Govind P.; Khutale, Ganesh V.; Bharde, Atul; Calderon, Marcelo; Khandare, Jayant J.

    2015-05-01

    Here, we report a non-invasive strategy for isolating cancer cells by autonomously propelled carbon nanotube (CNT) microrockets. H2O2-driven oxygen (O2) bubble-propelled microrockets were synthesized using CNT and Fe3O4 nanoparticles in the inner surface and covalently conjugating transferrin on the outer surface. Results show that self-propellant microrockets can specifically capture cancer cells.Here, we report a non-invasive strategy for isolating cancer cells by autonomously propelled carbon nanotube (CNT) microrockets. H2O2-driven oxygen (O2) bubble-propelled microrockets were synthesized using CNT and Fe3O4 nanoparticles in the inner surface and covalently conjugating transferrin on the outer surface. Results show that self-propellant microrockets can specifically capture cancer cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01797a

  4. Electrospun Nanofibrous Sheets for Selective Cell Capturing in Continuous Flow in Microchannels.

    PubMed

    Son, Young Ju; Kang, Jihyun; Kim, Hye Sung; Yoo, Hyuk Sang

    2016-03-14

    Electrospun nanofibrous meshes were surface-modified for selective capturing of specific cells from a continuous flow in PDMS microchannels. We electrospun nanofibrous mats composed of poly(ε-carprolactone) (PCL) and amine-functionalized block copolymers composed of PCL and poly(ethylenimine) (PEI). A mixture of biotinylated PEG and blunt PEG was chemically tethered to the nanofibrous mats via the surface-exposed amines on the mat. The degree of biotinylation was fluorescently and quantitatively assayed for confirming the surface-biotinylation levels for avidin-specific binding. The incorporation level of avidin gradually increased when the blend ratio of biotinylated PEG on the mat increased, confirming the manipulated surfaces with various degree of biotinylation. Biotinylated cells were incubated with avidin-coated biotinylated mats and the specific binding of biotinylated cells was monitored in a microfluidic channel with a continuous flow of culture medium, which suggests efficient and selective capturing of the biotinylated cells on the nanofibrous mat. PMID:26812501

  5. Self-propelled carbon nanotube based microrockets for rapid capture and isolation of circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Shashwat S; Jalota-Badhwar, Archana; Zope, Khushbu R; Todkar, Kiran J; Mascarenhas, Russel R; Chate, Govind P; Khutale, Ganesh V; Bharde, Atul; Calderon, Marcelo; Khandare, Jayant J

    2015-05-21

    Here, we report a non-invasive strategy for isolating cancer cells by autonomously propelled carbon nanotube (CNT) microrockets. H2O2-driven oxygen (O2) bubble-propelled microrockets were synthesized using CNT and Fe3O4 nanoparticles in the inner surface and covalently conjugating transferrin on the outer surface. Results show that self-propellant microrockets can specifically capture cancer cells.

  6. 3D Fluorescent and Reflective Imaging of Whole Stardust Tracks in Aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, M.; Ebel, D.S.

    2011-11-07

    The NASA Stardust mission returned to earth in 2006 with the cometary collector having captured over 1,000 particles in an aerogel medium at a relative velocity of 6.1 km/s. Particles captured in aerogel were heated, disaggregated and dispersed along 'tracks' or cavities in aerogel, singular tracks representing a history of one capture event. It has been our focus to chemically and morphologically characterize whole tracks in 3-dimensions, utilizing solely non-destructive methods. To this end, we have used a variety of methods: 3D Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy (LSCM), synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF), and synchrotron X-ray diffraction (SXRD). In the past months we have developed two new techniques to aid in data collection. (1) We have received a new confocal microscope which has enabled autofluorescent and spectral imaging of aerogel samples. (2) We have developed a stereo-SXRF technique to chemically identify large grains in SXRF maps in 3-space. The addition of both of these methods to our analytic abilities provides a greater understanding of the mechanisms and results of track formation.

  7. Capture and On-chip analysis of Melanoma Cells Using Tunable Surface Shear forces

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Simon Chang-Hao; Vaidyanathan, Ramanathan; Dey, Shuvashis; Carrascosa, Laura G.; Christophi, Christopher; Cebon, Jonathan; Shiddiky, Muhammad J. A.; Behren, Andreas; Trau, Matt

    2016-01-01

    With new systemic therapies becoming available for metastatic melanoma such as BRAF and PD-1 inhibitors, there is an increasing demand for methods to assist with treatment selection and response monitoring. Quantification and characterisation of circulating melanoma cells (CMCs) has been regarded as an excellent non-invasive candidate but a sensitive and efficient tool to do these is lacking. Herein we demonstrate a microfluidic approach for melanoma cell capture and subsequent on-chip evaluation of BRAF mutation status. Our approach utilizes a recently discovered alternating current electrohydrodynamic (AC-EHD)-induced surface shear forces, referred to as nanoshearing. A key feature of nanoshearing is the ability to agitate fluid to encourage contact with surface-bound antibody for the cell capture whilst removing nonspecific cells from the surface. By adjusting the AC-EHD force to match the binding affinity of antibodies against the melanoma-associated chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan (MCSP), a commonly expressed melanoma antigen, this platform achieved an average recovery of 84.7% from biological samples. Subsequent staining with anti-BRAFV600E specific antibody enabled on-chip evaluation of BRAFV600E mutation status in melanoma cells. We believe that the ability of nanoshearing-based capture to enumerate melanoma cells and subsequent on-chip characterisation has the potential as a rapid screening tool while making treatment decisions. PMID:26815318

  8. Detection, isolation, and capture of circulating breast cancer cells with photoacoustic flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Kiran; Njoroge, Martin; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Gaffigan, Brian; Rood, Kyle; Viator, John A.

    2013-03-01

    According to the CDC, breast cancer is the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer related deaths among women. Metastasis, or the presence of secondary tumors caused by the spread of cancer cells via the circulatory or lymphatic systems, significantly worsens the prognosis of any breast cancer patient. In this study, a technique is developed to detect circulating breast cancer cells in human blood using a photoacoustic flow cytometry method. A Q-switched laser with a 5 ns pulse at 532 nm is used to interrogate thousands of cells with one pulse as they flow through the beam path. Cells which are pigmented, either naturally or artificially, emit an ultrasound wave as a result of the photoacoustic (PA) effect. Breast cancer cells are targeted with chromophores through immunochemistry in order to provide pigment. After which, the device is calibrated to demonstrate a single-cell detection limit. Cultured breast cancer cells are added to whole blood to reach a biologically relevant concentration of about 25-45 breast cancer cells per 1 mL of blood. An in vitro photoacoustic flow cytometer is used to detect and isolate these cells followed by capture with the use of a micromanipulator. This method can not only be used to determine the disease state of the patient and the response to therapy, it can also be used for genetic testing and in vitro drug trials since the circulating cell can be captured and studied.

  9. Imaging samples in silica aerogel using an experimental point spread function.

    PubMed

    White, Amanda J; Ebel, Denton S

    2015-02-01

    Light microscopy is a powerful tool that allows for many types of samples to be examined in a rapid, easy, and nondestructive manner. Subsequent image analysis, however, is compromised by distortion of signal by instrument optics. Deconvolution of images prior to analysis allows for the recovery of lost information by procedures that utilize either a theoretically or experimentally calculated point spread function (PSF). Using a laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM), we have imaged whole impact tracks of comet particles captured in silica aerogel, a low density, porous SiO2 solid, by the NASA Stardust mission. In order to understand the dynamical interactions between the particles and the aerogel, precise grain location and track volume measurement are required. We report a method for measuring an experimental PSF suitable for three-dimensional deconvolution of imaged particles in aerogel. Using fluorescent beads manufactured into Stardust flight-grade aerogel, we have applied a deconvolution technique standard in the biological sciences to confocal images of whole Stardust tracks. The incorporation of an experimentally measured PSF allows for better quantitative measurements of the size and location of single grains in aerogel and more accurate measurements of track morphology.

  10. Ultrasonic Micro-Blades for the Rapid Extraction of Impact Tracks from Aerogel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishii, H. A.; Graham, G. A.; Kearsley, A. T.; Grant, P. G.; Snead, C. J.; Bradley, J. P.

    2005-01-01

    The science return of NASA's Stardust Mission with its valuable cargo of cometary debris hinges on the ability to efficiently extract particles from silica aerogel collectors. The current method for extracting cosmic dust impact tracks is a mature procedure involving sequential perforation of the aerogel with glass needles on computer controlled micromanipulators. This method is highly successful at removing well-defined aerogel fragments of reasonable optical clarity while causing minimal damage to the surrounding aerogel collector tile. Such a system will be adopted by the JSC Astromaterials Curation Facility in anticipation of Stardust s arrival in early 2006. In addition to Stardust, aerogel is a possible collector for future sample return missions and is used for capture of hypervelocity ejecta in high power laser experiments of interest to LLNL. Researchers will be eager to obtain Stardust samples for study as quickly as possible, and rapid extraction tools requiring little construction, training, or investment would be an attractive asset. To this end, we have experimented with micro-blades for the Stardust impact track extraction process. Our ultimate goal is a rapid extraction system in a clean electron beam environment, such as an SEM or dual-beam FIB, for in situ sample preparation, mounting and analysis.

  11. Imaging samples in silica aerogel using an experimental point spread function.

    PubMed

    White, Amanda J; Ebel, Denton S

    2015-02-01

    Light microscopy is a powerful tool that allows for many types of samples to be examined in a rapid, easy, and nondestructive manner. Subsequent image analysis, however, is compromised by distortion of signal by instrument optics. Deconvolution of images prior to analysis allows for the recovery of lost information by procedures that utilize either a theoretically or experimentally calculated point spread function (PSF). Using a laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM), we have imaged whole impact tracks of comet particles captured in silica aerogel, a low density, porous SiO2 solid, by the NASA Stardust mission. In order to understand the dynamical interactions between the particles and the aerogel, precise grain location and track volume measurement are required. We report a method for measuring an experimental PSF suitable for three-dimensional deconvolution of imaged particles in aerogel. Using fluorescent beads manufactured into Stardust flight-grade aerogel, we have applied a deconvolution technique standard in the biological sciences to confocal images of whole Stardust tracks. The incorporation of an experimentally measured PSF allows for better quantitative measurements of the size and location of single grains in aerogel and more accurate measurements of track morphology. PMID:25517515

  12. In vivo capture and label-free detection of early metastatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Azarin, Samira M.; Yi, Ji; Gower, Robert M.; Aguado, Brian A.; Sullivan, Megan E.; Goodman, Ashley G.; Jiang, Eric J.; Rao, Shreyas S.; Ren, Yinying; Tucker, Susan L.; Backman, Vadim; Jeruss, Jacqueline S.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of death for women, with mortality resulting from metastasis. Metastases are often detected once tumor cells affect the function of solid organs, with a high disease burden limiting effective treatment. Here we report a method for the early detection of metastasis using an implanted scaffold to recruit and capture metastatic cells in vivo, which achieves high cell densities and reduces the tumor burden within solid organs 10-fold. Recruitment is associated with infiltration of immune cells, which include Gr1hiCD11b+ cells. We identify metastatic cells in the scaffold through a label-free detection system using inverse-spectroscopic optical coherence tomography, which identifies changes to nanoscale tissue architecture associated with the presence of tumor cells. For patients at risk of recurrence, scaffold implantation following completion of primary therapy has the potential to identify metastatic disease at the earliest stage, enabling initiation of therapy while the disease burden is low. PMID:26348915

  13. Soft landing of cell-sized vesicles on solid surfaces for robust vehicle capture/release.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dehui; Wu, Zhengfang; Gao, Aiting; Zhang, Weihong; Kang, Chengying; Tao, Qi; Yang, Peng

    2015-04-28

    Based on a concept of a smooth and steady landing of fragile objects without destruction via a soft cushion, we have developed a model for the soft landing of deformable lipid giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) on solid surfaces. The foundation for a successful soft landing is a solid substrate with a two-layer coating, including a bottom layer of positively charged lysozymes and an upper lipid membrane layer. We came to a clear conclusion that anionic GUVs when sedimented on a surface, the vesicle rupture occurs upon the direct contact with the positively charged lysozyme layer due to the strong coulombic interactions. In contrast, certain separation distances was achieved by the insertion of a soft lipid membrane cushion between the charged GUVs and the lysozyme layer, which attenuated the coulombic force and created a mild buffer zone, ensuring the robust capture of GUVs on the substrate without their rupture. The non-covalent bonding facilitated a fully reversible stimuli-responsive capture/release of GUVs from the biomimetic solid surface, which has never been demonstrated before due to the extreme fragility of GUVs. Moreover, the controllable capture/release of cells has been proven to be of vital importance in biotechnology, and similarity the present approach to capture/release cells is expected to open the previously inaccessible avenues of research. PMID:25787226

  14. Chemical Analyses of Silicon Aerogel Samples

    SciTech Connect

    van der Werf, I.; Palmisano, F.; De Leo, Raffaele; Marrone, Stefano

    2008-04-01

    After five years of operating, two Aerogel counters: A1 and A2, taking data in Hall A at Jefferson Lab, suffered a loss of performance. In this note possible causes of degradation have been studied. In particular, various chemical and physical analyses have been carried out on several Aerogel tiles and on adhesive tape in order to reveal the presence of contaminants.

  15. Nonflammable, Hydrophobic Aerogel Composites for Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redouane, Begag

    2005-01-01

    Aerogel composites that are both nonflammable and hydrophobic have been developed for use as lightweight thermal- insulation materials for cryogenic systems. Aerogels are well known in the industry for their effectiveness as thermal insulators under cryogenic conditions, but the treatments used heretofore to render them hydrophobic also make them flammable. Nonflammability would make it safer to use aerogel insulation, especially in oxygen-rich environments and on cryogenic systems that contain liquid oxygen. A composite of this type is a silica aerogel reinforced with fibers. In comparison with unreinforced aerogels, the aerogel composite is about ten times as stiff and strong, better able to withstand handling, and more amenable to machining to required shapes. The composite can be made hydrophobic and nonflammable by appropriate design of a sol-gel process used to synthesize the aerogel component. In addition to very low thermal conductivity needed for insulation, aerogel composites of this type have been found to exhibit high resistance to moisture and nonflammability in oxygen-rich atmospheres: Samples floating on water for months gained no weight and showed no signs of deterioration. Samples were found to be nonflammable, even in pure oxygen at atmospheric pressure [14.7 psia (0.10 MPa)

  16. Preparation of Biopolymer Aerogels Using Green Solvents

    PubMed Central

    Subrahmanyam, Raman; Gurikov, Pavel; Meissner, Imke; Smirnova, Irina

    2016-01-01

    Although the first reports on aerogels made by Kistler1 in the 1930s dealt with aerogels from both inorganic oxides (silica and others) and biopolymers (gelatin, agar, cellulose), only recently have biomasses been recognized as an abundant source of chemically diverse macromolecules for functional aerogel materials. Biopolymer aerogels (pectin, alginate, chitosan, cellulose, etc.) exhibit both specific inheritable functions of starting biopolymers and distinctive features of aerogels (80-99% porosity and specific surface up to 800 m2/g). This synergy of properties makes biopolymer aerogels promising candidates for a wide gamut of applications such as thermal insulation, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, drug delivery systems, functional foods, catalysts, adsorbents and sensors. This work demonstrates the use of pressurized carbon dioxide (5 MPa) for the ionic cross linking of amidated pectin into hydrogels. Initially a biopolymer/salt dispersion is prepared in water. Under pressurized CO2 conditions, the pH of the biopolymer solution is lowered to 3 which releases the crosslinking cations from the salt to bind with the biopolymer yielding hydrogels. Solvent exchange to ethanol and further supercritical CO2 drying (10 - 12 MPa) yield aerogels. Obtained aerogels are ultra-porous with low density (as low as 0.02 g/cm3), high specific surface area (350 - 500 m2/g) and pore volume (3 - 7 cm3/g for pore sizes less than 150 nm). PMID:27403649

  17. Preparation of Biopolymer Aerogels Using Green Solvents.

    PubMed

    Subrahmanyam, Raman; Gurikov, Pavel; Meissner, Imke; Smirnova, Irina

    2016-01-01

    Although the first reports on aerogels made by Kistler(1) in the 1930s dealt with aerogels from both inorganic oxides (silica and others) and biopolymers (gelatin, agar, cellulose), only recently have biomasses been recognized as an abundant source of chemically diverse macromolecules for functional aerogel materials. Biopolymer aerogels (pectin, alginate, chitosan, cellulose, etc.) exhibit both specific inheritable functions of starting biopolymers and distinctive features of aerogels (80-99% porosity and specific surface up to 800 m(2)/g). This synergy of properties makes biopolymer aerogels promising candidates for a wide gamut of applications such as thermal insulation, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, drug delivery systems, functional foods, catalysts, adsorbents and sensors. This work demonstrates the use of pressurized carbon dioxide (5 MPa) for the ionic cross linking of amidated pectin into hydrogels. Initially a biopolymer/salt dispersion is prepared in water. Under pressurized CO2 conditions, the pH of the biopolymer solution is lowered to 3 which releases the crosslinking cations from the salt to bind with the biopolymer yielding hydrogels. Solvent exchange to ethanol and further supercritical CO2 drying (10 - 12 MPa) yield aerogels. Obtained aerogels are ultra-porous with low density (as low as 0.02 g/cm(3)), high specific surface area (350 - 500 m(2)/g) and pore volume (3 - 7 cm(3)/g for pore sizes less than 150 nm). PMID:27403649

  18. A portable immunomagnetic cell capture system to accelerate culture diagnosis of bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Singh, Saurabh; Upadhyay, Mohita; Sharma, Jyoti; Gupta, Shalini; Vivekanandan, Perumal; Elangovan, Ravikrishnan

    2016-05-23

    Bacterial infections continue to be a major cause of deaths globally, particularly in resource-poor settings. In the absence of rapid and affordable diagnostic solutions, patients are mostly administered broad spectrum antibiotics leading to antibiotics resistance and poor recovery. Culture diagnosis continues to be a gold standard for diagnosis of bacterial infection, despite its long turnaround time of 24 to 48 h. We have developed a portable immunomagnetic cell capture (iMC(2)) system that allows rapid culture diagnosis of bacterial pathogens. Our approach involves the culture growth of the blood samples in broth media for 6 to 8 h, followed by immunomagnetic enrichment of the target cells using the iMC(2) device. The device comprises a disposable capture chip that has two chambers of 5 ml and 50 μl volume connected through a channel with a manual valve. Bacterial cells bound to antibody coated magnetic nanoparticles are swept from the 5 ml sample chamber into the 50 μl recovery chamber by moving an external magnetic field with respect to the capture chip using a linear positioner. This enables specific isolation and up to 100× enrichment of the target cells. The presence of bacteria in the recovered sample is confirmed visually using a lateral flow immunoassay. The system is demonstrated in buffer and blood samples spiked with S. typhi. The method has high sensitivity (10 CFU ml(-1)), specificity and a rapid turnaround time of less than 7 h, a significant improvement over conventional methods. PMID:27118505

  19. Laser cross-linking protein captures for living cells on a biochip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chih-Lang; Pan, Ming-Jeng; Chen, Hai-Wen; Lin, Che-Kuan; Lin, Chuen-Fu; Baldeck, Patrice L.

    2014-03-01

    In this study, bio-sensing pads are proposed to capture living cells, which are fabricated on cover glasses by cross-linking proteins/antibodies using laser induced photochemistry. The biological functions of the cross-linked protein/antibody were verified by capturing Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), Leptospira, and red blood cells (RBCs), separately, with associated protein/antibody sensing pads. The experimental results show that S. aureus were bound on GFP-AcmA' pad after minutes of incubation and phosphate buffered saline (PBS) rinsing. No binding was observed with reference pad made of neutral bovine serum albumin (BSA). Second, A-type RBCs were chosen as the model cell to demonstrate the blood typing feasibility of the anti-A pad in microchannel. The A-type RBCs were captured only by the anti-A pad, but not the reference pad made of BSA. The same experimental model was carried out on the Leptospira, which stuck on the blood serum pad after PBS rinsing, but not BSA pad. This study provides a potential platform for simple and direct detection of living full cells without culture that could be used in point-of-care settings.

  20. Alternating current electrohydrodynamics induced nanoshearing and fluid micromixing for specific capture of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Ramanathan; Rauf, Sakandar; Dray, Eloïse; Shiddiky, Muhammad J A; Trau, Matt

    2014-03-24

    We report a new tuneable alternating current (ac) electrohydrodynamics (ac-EHD) force referred to as “nanoshearing” which involves fluid flow generated within a few nanometers of an electrode surface. This force can be externally tuned via manipulating the applied ac-EHD field strength. The ability to manipulate ac-EHD induced forces and concomitant fluid micromixing can enhance fluid transport within the capture domain of the channel (e.g., transport of analytes and hence increase target–sensor interactions). This also provides a new capability to preferentially select strongly bound analytes over nonspecifically bound cells and molecules. To demonstrate the utility and versatility of nanoshearing phenomenon to specifically capture cancer cells, we present proof-of-concept data in lysed blood using two microfluidic devices containing a long array of asymmetric planar electrode pairs. Under the optimal experimental conditions, we achieved high capture efficiency (e.g., approximately 90%; %RSD=2, n=3) with a 10-fold reduction in nonspecific adsorption of non-target cells for the detection of whole cells expressing Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2). We believe that our ac-EHD devices and the use of tuneable nanoshearing phenomenon may find relevance in a wide variety of biological and medical applications. PMID:24677444

  1. Human Mucosal Mast Cells Capture HIV-1 and Mediate Viral trans-Infection of CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ai-Ping; Jiang, Jin-Feng; Wei, Ji-Fu; Guo, Ming-Gao; Qin, Yan; Guo, Qian-Qian; Ma, Li; Liu, Bao-Chi; Wang, Xiaolei; Veazey, Ronald S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The gastrointestinal mucosa is the primary site where human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) invades, amplifies, and becomes persistently established, and cell-to-cell transmission of HIV-1 plays a pivotal role in mucosal viral dissemination. Mast cells are widely distributed in the gastrointestinal tract and are early targets for invasive pathogens, and they have been shown to have increased density in the genital mucosa in HIV-infected women. Intestinal mast cells express numerous pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and have been shown to combat various viral, parasitic, and bacterial infections. However, the role of mast cells in HIV-1 infection is poorly defined. In this study, we investigated their potential contributions to HIV-1 transmission. Mast cells isolated from gut mucosal tissues were found to express a variety of HIV-1 attachment factors (HAFs), such as DC-SIGN, heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG), and α4β7 integrin, which mediate capture of HIV-1 on the cell surface. Intriguingly, following coculture with CD4+ T cells, mast cell surface-bound viruses were efficiently transferred to target T cells. Prior blocking with anti-HAF antibody or mannan before coculture impaired viral trans-infection. Cell-cell conjunctions formed between mast cells and T cells, to which viral particles were recruited, and these were required for efficient cell-to-cell HIV-1 transmission. Our results reveal a potential function of gut mucosal mast cells in HIV-1 dissemination in tissues. Strategies aimed at preventing viral capture and transfer mediated by mast cells could be beneficial in combating primary HIV-1 infection. IMPORTANCE In this study, we demonstrate the role of human mast cells isolated from mucosal tissues in mediating HIV-1 trans-infection of CD4+ T cells. This finding facilitates our understanding of HIV-1 mucosal infection and will benefit the development of strategies to combat primary HIV-1 dissemination. PMID:26719250

  2. Successful Capture, Extraction and Identification of Hypervelocity CM2 Meteorite Fragments Shot by Light-Gas Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snead, C.; Westphal, A. J.; Dominguez, G.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2003-01-01

    Here we report the successful capture, extraction and identification of two fragments of a CM2 meteorite (ALH83100) into lowdensity aerogel. The shot was carried out at the AVGR at NASAARC. A mixture of powdered ALH83100 and borosilicate glass microspheres was shot at 4.55.0 km/sec into 50 mg cm silicate aerogel.

  3. Thermal properties of methyltrimethoxysilane aerogel thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acquaroli, Leandro N.; Newby, Pascal; Santato, Clara; Peter, Yves-Alain

    2016-10-01

    Aerogels are light and porous solids whose properties, largely determined by their nanostructure, are useful in a wide range of applications, e.g., thermal insulation. In this work, as-deposited and thermally treated air-filled silica aerogel thin films synthesized using the sol-gel method were studied for their thermal properties using the 3-omega technique, at ambient conditions. The thermal conductivity and diffusivity were found to increase as the porosity of the aerogel decreased. Thermally treated films show a clear reduction in thermal conductivity compared with that of as-deposited films, likely due to an increase of porosity. The smallest thermal conductivity and diffusivity found for our aerogels were 0.019 W m-1 K-1 and 9.8 × 10-9 m2 s-1. A model was used to identify the components (solid, gaseous and radiative) of the total thermal conductivity of the aerogel.

  4. Solid phase microextraction device using aerogel

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Fred S.; Andresen, Brian D.

    2005-06-14

    A sample collection substrate of aerogel and/or xerogel materials bound to a support structure is used as a solid phase microextraction (SPME) device. The xerogels and aerogels may be organic or inorganic and doped with metals or other compounds to target specific chemical analytes. The support structure is typically formed of a glass fiber or a metal wire (stainless steel or kovar). The devices are made by applying gel solution to the support structures and drying the solution to form aerogel or xerogel. Aerogel particles may be attached to the wet layer before drying to increase sample collection surface area. These devices are robust, stable in fields of high radiation, and highly effective at collecting gas and liquid samples while maintaining superior mechanical and thermal stability during routine use. Aerogel SPME devices are advantageous for use in GC/MS analyses due to their lack of interfering background and tolerance of GC thermal cycling.

  5. Comment on "Organics captured from comet 81P/Wild 2 by the Stardust spacecraft".

    PubMed

    Spencer, Maegan K; Zare, Richard N

    2007-09-21

    Sandford et al. (Reports, 15 December 2006, p. 1720) reported on organic compounds captured from Comet 81P/Wild 2 by the Stardust spacecraft. We emphasize the difficulty in assigning the origin of compounds detected diffusely along particle impact tracks and show that rapid heating of aerogel that has never been exposed to cometary particle capture can generate complex aromatic molecules from low-mass carbon impurities present in the aerogel.

  6. Neutron capture nuclei-containing carbon nanoparticles for destruction of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kuo Chu; Lai, Po Dong; Chiang, Chi-Shiun; Wang, Pei-Jen; Yuan, Chiun-Jye

    2010-11-01

    HeLa cells were incubated with neutron capture nuclei (boron-10 and gadolinium)-containing carbon nanoparticles, followed by irradiation of slow thermal neutron beam. Under a neutron flux of 6 x 10(11) n/cm(2) (or 10 min irradiation at a neutron flux of 1 x 10(9) n/cm(2) s), the percentages of acute cell death at 8 h after irradiation are 52, 55, and 28% for HeLa cells fed with BCo@CNPs, GdCo@CNPs, and Co@CNPs, respectively. The proliferation capability of the survived HeLa cells was also found to be significantly suppressed. At 48 h after neutron irradiation, the cell viability further decreases to 35 +/- 5% as compared to the control set receiving the same amount of neutron irradiation dose but in the absence of carbon nanoparticles. This work demonstrates "proof-of-concept" examples of neutron capture therapy using (10)B-, (157)Gd-, and (59)Co-containing carbon nanoparticles for effective destruction of cancer cells. It will also be reported the preparation and surface functionalization of boron or gadolinium doped core-shell cobalt/carbon nanoparticles (BCo@CNPs, GdCo@CNPs and Co@CNPs) using a modified DC pulsed arc discharge method, and their characterization by various spectroscopic measurements, including TEM, XRD, SQUID, FT-IR, etc. Tumor cell targeting ability was introduced by surface modification of these carbon nanoparticles with folate moieties.

  7. High specific surface area aerogel cryoadsorber for vacuum pumping applications

    DOEpatents

    Hill, Randal M.; Fought, Eric R.; Biltoft, Peter J.

    2000-01-01

    A cryogenic pumping system is provided, comprising a vacuum environment, an aerogel sorbent formed from a carbon aerogel disposed within the vacuum environment, and cooling means for cooling the aerogel sorbent sufficiently to adsorb molecules from the vacuum environment onto the aerogel sorbent. Embodiments of the invention include a liquid refrigerant cryosorption pump, a compressed helium cryogenic pump, a cryopanel and a Meissner coil, each of which uses carbon aerogel as a sorbent material.

  8. High Specific Surface area Aerogel Cryoadsorber for Vacuum Pumping Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Randal M.; Fought, Eric R.; Biltoft, Peter J.

    1998-12-22

    A cryogenic pumping system is provided, comprising a vacuum environment, an aerogel sorbent formed from a carbon aerogel disposed within the vacuum environment, and cooling means for cooling the aerogel sorbent sufficiently to adsorb molecules from the vacuum environment onto the aerogel sorbent. Embodiments of the invention include a liquid refrigerant cryosorption pump, a compressed helium cryogenic pump, a cryopanel and a Meissner coil, each of which uses carbon aerogel as a sorbent material.

  9. Electrochemical behavior of carbon aerogels derived from different precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Pekala, R.W.; Alviso, C.T.; Nielson, J.K.; Tran, T.D.; Reynolds, G.M.; Dresshaus, M.S.

    1995-04-01

    The ability to tailor the structure and properties of porous carbons has led to their increased use as electrodes in energy storage devices. Our research focuses on the synthesis and characterization of carbon aerogels for use in electrochemical double layer capacitors. Carbon aerogels are formed from the sol-gel polymerization of (1) resorcinol-formaldehyde or (2) phenolic-furfural, followed by supercritical drying from carbon dioxide, and subsequent pyrolysis in an inert atmosphere. These materials can be produced as monoliths, composites, thin films, powders, or microspheres. In all cases, the areogels have an open-cell structure with an ultrafine pore size (<100 nm), high surface area (400-1 100 m{sup 2}/g), and a solid matrix composed of interconnected particles, fibers, or platelets with characteristic dimensions of 10 nm. This paper examines the effects of the carbon precursor and processing conditions on electrochemical performance in aqueous and organic electrolytes.

  10. Superfluid 3He in ``nematically ordered'' aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Vladimir

    2014-03-01

    Liquid 3He immersed in aerogel allows investigation of the influence of impurities on unconventional superfluidity. In most of such experiments silica aerogels are used. These aerogels consist of thin strands which form a ``wisp.'' Although it is established that superfluid phases of 3He in silica aerogels (A-like and B-like) have the same order parameters as A and B phases of bulk 3He, many new phenomena were observed. In particular, it was found that global anisotropy of aerogel (e.g. caused by squeezing or stretching) can orient the order parameter. Depending on prehistory and on the type of the anisotropy the A-like phase may be homogeneous or in a state with random orbital part of the order parameter. Theory predicts that a large stretching anisotropy may even influence the order parameter structure: polar phase (or A phase with polar distortion), which are not realized in bulk 3He, may become more favorable than pure A phase. Large stretching anisotropy is hardly achievable in silica aerogel. Therefore in experiments described in the talk we used a new type of aerogel, consisting of Al2O3 . H2O strands which are parallel to each other, i.e. this aerogel may be considered as infinitely stretched. We found that the superfluid phase diagram of 3He in such ``nematically ordered'' aerogel is different from the case of 3He in silica aerogel and that both observed A and B phases have large polar distortion. This distortion is larger at low pressures and grows on warming. There are indications that a pure polar phase appears near the superfluid transition temperature. Recent results will be also presented.

  11. Characteristics of Cometary Dust Tracks in Stardust Aerogel and Laboratory Calibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burchell, M. J.; Fairey, S. A. J.; Wozniakiewicz, P.; Brownlee, D. E.; Hoerz, F.; Kearsley, A. T.; See, T. H.; Tsou, P.; Westphal, A.; Green, S. F.; Trigo-Rodriguez, J. M.; Dominguez, G.

    2007-01-01

    The cometary tray of the NASA Stardust spacecraft s aerogel collector has been examined to study the dust that was captured during the 2004 fly by of comet 81P/Wild-2. An optical scan of the entire collector surface revealed 256 impact features in the aerogel (width > 100 microns). 20 aerogel blocks (out of a total of 132) were removed from the collector tray for a higher resolution optical scan and 186 tracks were observed (track length > 50 microns and width > 8 microns). The impact features were classified into three types based on their morphology. Laboratory calibrations were conducted which reproduce all three types. This work suggests that the cometary dust consisted of some cohesive, relatively strong particles as well as particles with a more friable or low cohesion matrix containing smaller strong grains. The calibrations also permitted a particle size distribution to be estimated for the cometary dust. We estimate that approximately 1200 particles bigger than 1 micron struck the aerogel. The cumulative size distribution of the captured particles was obtained and compared with observations made by active dust detectors during the encounter. At large sizes (>20 microns) all measures of the dust are compatible, but at micrometer scales and smaller discrepancies exist between the various measurement systems which may reflect structure in the dust flux (streams, clusters etc.) along with some possible instrument effects.

  12. Origin and Evolution of Organic Matter Preserved in Stardust Cometary Aerogel Tracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, D.S.; Clemett, S.J.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.

    2009-01-01

    The STARDUST spacecraft captured dust samples from Comet 81P/Wild 2 at a relative velocity of 6.1 km/s in a low density silica aerogel and returned them to the Earth. One of the main of the scientific goals established for the mission was to determine whether comets contained complex organic materials and, contingently, the nature and abundance of this material. [1] Although contamination concerns due to carbonaceous impurities intrinsic to the flight aerogel remain, it is generally accepted that at least a fraction of the captured dust particles contain an indigenous organic component. [2] However, understanding the nature and abundance of this material is complicated by nature of the collection process. The rapid dissipation of particle s kinetic energy during its impact and deceleration cause both the particle and surrounding aerogel to experience an intense thermal pulse of upwards of 2000K for a period up to several hundred nanoseconds [3]. During this period thermal alteration and or destruction of organic species present in the impacting particle are likely to occur. We have used the technique of ultrafast two-step laser mass spectrometry (ultra L2MS) [4] to investigate how the nature and distribution of aromatic and conjugated organic species varies between and within aerogel cometary tracks and their associated terminal particles.

  13. SpyLigase peptide–peptide ligation polymerizes affibodies to enhance magnetic cancer cell capture

    PubMed Central

    Fierer, Jacob O.; Veggiani, Gianluca; Howarth, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Individual proteins can now often be modified with atomic precision, but there are still major obstacles to connecting proteins into larger assemblies. To direct protein assembly, ideally, peptide tags would be used, providing the minimal perturbation to protein function. However, binding to peptides is generally weak, so assemblies are unstable over time and disassemble with force or harsh conditions. We have recently developed an irreversible protein–peptide interaction (SpyTag/SpyCatcher), based on a protein domain from Streptococcus pyogenes, that locks itself together via spontaneous isopeptide bond formation. Here we develop irreversible peptide–peptide interaction, through redesign of this domain and genetic dissection into three parts: a protein domain termed SpyLigase, which now ligates two peptide tags to each other. All components expressed efficiently in Escherichia coli and peptide tags were reactive at the N terminus, at the C terminus, or at internal sites. Peptide–peptide ligation enabled covalent and site-specific polymerization of affibodies or antibodies against the tumor markers epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and HER2. Magnetic capture of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is one of the most promising approaches to improve cancer prognosis and management, but CTC capture is limited by inefficient recovery of cells expressing low levels of tumor antigen. SpyLigase-assembled protein polymers made possible the isolation of cancerous cells expressing lower levels of tumor antigen and should have general application in enhancing molecular capture. PMID:24639550

  14. Graphene Oxide Nanosheets Modified with Single-Domain Antibodies for Rapid and Efficient Capture of Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guan-Yu; Li, Zeyang; Theile, Christopher S; Bardhan, Neelkanth M; Kumar, Priyank V; Duarte, Joao N; Maruyama, Takeshi; Rashidfarrokh, Ali; Belcher, Angela M; Ploegh, Hidde L

    2015-11-23

    Peripheral blood can provide valuable information on an individual's immune status. Cell-based assays typically target leukocytes and their products. Characterization of leukocytes from whole blood requires their separation from the far more numerous red blood cells.1 Current methods to classify leukocytes, such as recovery on antibody-coated beads or fluorescence-activated cell sorting require long sample preparation times and relatively large sample volumes.2 A simple method that enables the characterization of cells from a small peripheral whole blood sample could overcome limitations of current analytical techniques. We describe the development of a simple graphene oxide surface coated with single-domain antibody fragments. This format allows quick and efficient capture of distinct WBC subpopulations from small samples (∼30 μL) of whole blood in a geometry that does not require any specialized equipment such as cell sorters or microfluidic devices. PMID:26472062

  15. Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination I: Identification of tracks in aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphal, Andrew J.; Anderson, David; Butterworth, Anna L.; Frank, David R.; Lettieri, Robert; Marchant, William; von Korff, Joshua; Zevin, Daniel; Ardizzone, Augusto; Campanile, Antonella; Capraro, Michael; Courtney, Kevin; Criswell, Mitchell N.; Crumpler, Dixon; Cwik, Robert; Gray, Fred Jacob; Hudson, Bruce; Imada, Guy; Karr, Joel; Wah, Lily Lau Wan; Mazzucato, Michele; Motta, Pier Giorgio; Rigamonti, Carlo; Spencer, Ronald C.; Woodrough, Stephens B.; Santoni, Irene Cimmino; Sperry, Gerry; Terry, Jean-Noel; Wordsworth, Naomi; Yahnke, Tom; Allen, Carlton; Ansari, Asna; Bajt, SašA.; Bastien, Ron K.; Bassim, Nabil; Bechtel, Hans A.; Borg, Janet; Brenker, Frank E.; Bridges, John; Brownlee, Donald E.; Burchell, Mark; Burghammer, Manfred; Changela, Hitesh; Cloetens, Peter; Davis, Andrew M.; Doll, Ryan; Floss, Christine; Flynn, George; Gainsforth, Zack; Grün, Eberhard; Heck, Philipp R.; Hillier, Jon K.; Hoppe, Peter; Huth, Joachim; Hvide, Brit; Kearsley, Anton; King, Ashley J.; Lai, Barry; Leitner, Jan; Lemelle, Laurence; Leroux, Hugues; Leonard, Ariel; Nittler, Larry R.; Ogliore, Ryan; Ong, Wei Ja; Postberg, Frank; Price, Mark C.; Sandford, Scott A.; Tresseras, Juan-Angel Sans; Schmitz, Sylvia; Schoonjans, Tom; Silversmit, Geert; Simionovici, Alexandre S.; Solé, Vicente A.; Srama, Ralf; Stephan, Thomas; Sterken, Veerle J.; Stodolna, Julien; Stroud, Rhonda M.; Sutton, Steven; Trieloff, Mario; Tsou, Peter; Tsuchiyama, Akira; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Vekemans, Bart; Vincze, Laszlo; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2014-09-01

    Here, we report the identification of 69 tracks in approximately 250 cm2 of aerogel collectors of the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector. We identified these tracks through Stardust@home, a distributed internet-based virtual microscope and search engine, in which > 30,000 amateur scientists collectively performed >9 × 107 searches on approximately 106 fields of view. Using calibration images, we measured individual detection efficiency, and found that the individual detection efficiency for tracks > 2.5 μm in diameter was >0.6, and was >0.75 for tracks >3 μm in diameter. Because most fields of view were searched >30 times, these results could be combined to yield a theoretical detection efficiency near unity. The initial expectation was that interstellar dust would be captured at very high speed. The actual tracks discovered in the Stardust collector, however, were due to low-speed impacts, and were morphologically strongly distinct from the calibration images. As a result, the detection efficiency of these tracks was lower than detection efficiency of calibrations presented in training, testing, and ongoing calibration. Nevertheless, as calibration images based on low-speed impacts were added later in the project, detection efficiencies for low-speed tracks rose dramatically. We conclude that a massively distributed, calibrated search, with amateur collaborators, is an effective approach to the challenging problem of identification of tracks of hypervelocity projectiles captured in aerogel.

  16. Aerogels for Thermal Insulation of Thermoelectric Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; Snyder, Jeffrey; Jones, Steven; Caillat, Thierry

    2006-01-01

    Silica aerogels have been shown to be attractive for use as thermal-insulation materials for thermoelectric devices. It is desirable to thermally insulate the legs of thermoelectric devices to suppress lateral heat leaks that degrade thermal efficiency. Aerogels offer not only high thermal- insulation effectiveness, but also a combination of other properties that are especially advantageous in thermoelectric- device applications. Aerogels are synthesized by means of sol-gel chemistry, which is ideal for casting insulation into place. As the scale of the devices to be insulated decreases, the castability from liquid solutions becomes increasingly advantageous: By virtue of castability, aerogel insulation can be made to encapsulate devices having any size from macroscopic down to nanoscopic and possibly having complex, three-dimensional shapes. Castable aerogels can permeate voids having characteristic dimensions as small as nanometers. Hence, practically all the void space surrounding the legs of thermoelectric devices could be filled with aerogel insulation, making the insulation highly effective. Because aerogels have the lowest densities of any known solid materials, they would add very little mass to the encapsulated devices. The thermal-conductivity values of aerogels are among the lowest reported for any material, even after taking account of the contributions of convection and radiation (in addition to true thermal conduction) to overall effective thermal conductivities. Even in ambient air, the contribution of convection to effective overall thermal conductivity of an aerogel is extremely low because of the highly tortuous nature of the flow paths through the porous aerogel structure. For applications that involve operating temperatures high enough to give rise to significant amounts of infrared radiation, opacifiers could be added to aerogels to reduce the radiative contributions to overall effective thermal conductivities. One example of an opacifier is

  17. Aerogel Projects Ongoing in MSFC's Engineering Directorate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shular, David A.; Smithers, Gweneth A.; Plawsky, Joel L.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    When we speak of an aerogel material, we are referring more to process and structure am to a specific substance. Aerogel, considered the lightest solid material, has been made from silica for seventy years. Resorcinol-formaldehyde, organic aerogels have been developed more recently. However, aerogel can be made from almost any type of substance, even lead. Because an aerogel is mostly air (about 99 %), the solid substance used will affect the weight very little. The term "aerogel" connotes the sol-gel process used to manufacture the material. The aerogel begins as a liquid "sol," becomes a solid "alcogel," and is then dried to become an "aerogel." The final product has a unique structure, useful for exploitation. It is an "open pore" system with nano-sized particles and pores, has very high surface area, and is highly interconnected. Besides low weight, aerogels have ultimate (lowest) values in other properties: thermal conductivity, refractive index, sound speed, and dielectric constant. Aerogels were first prepared in 1931 by Steven Kistler, who used a supercritical drying step to replace the liquid in a gel with air, preserving the structure (1). Kistler's procedure involved a water-to-alcohol exchange step; in the 1970's, this step was eliminated when a French investigator introduced the use of tetramethylorthosilicate. Still, alcohol drying involved dangerously high temperatures and pressures. In the 1980's, the Microstructured Materials Group at Berkeley Laboratory found that the alcohol in the gel could be replaced with liquid carbon dioxide before supercritical drying, which greatly improved safety (2). 'Me most recent major contribution has been that of Deshpande, Smith and Brinker in New Mexico, who are working to eliminate the supercritical drying step (3). When aerogels were first being developed, they were evaporatively dried. However, the wet gel, when dried, underwent severe shrinkage and cracking; this product was termed "xerogel." When the

  18. Boron neutron capture therapy as new treatment for clear cell sarcoma: trial on different animal model.

    PubMed

    Andoh, Tooru; Fujimoto, Takuya; Sudo, Tamotsu; Suzuki, Minoru; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Sakuma, Toshiko; Moritake, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Tohru; Takeuchi, Tamotsu; Sonobe, Hiroshi; Epstein, Alan L; Fukumori, Yoshinobu; Ono, Koji; Ichikawa, Hideki

    2014-06-01

    Clear cell sarcoma (CCS) is a rare malignant tumor with a poor prognosis. In our previous study, the tumor disappeared under boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) on subcutaneously-transplanted CCS-bearing animals. In the present study, the tumor disappeared under this therapy on model mice intramuscularly implanted with three different human CCS cells. BNCT led to the suppression of tumor-growth in each of the different model mice, suggesting its potentiality as an alternative to, or integrative option for, the treatment of CCS.

  19. Surface-modified hyaluronic acid hydrogels to capture endothelial progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Camci-Unal, Gulden; Aubin, Hug; Ahari, Amirhossein Farajzadeh; Bae, Hojae; Nichol, Jason William; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2010-10-21

    A major challenge to the effective treatment of injured cardiovascular tissues is the promotion of endothelialization of damaged tissues and implanted devices. For this reason, there is a need for new biomaterials that promote endothelialization to enhance vascular repair. The goal of this work was to develop antibody-modified polysaccharide-based hydrogels that could selectively capture endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). We showed that CD34 antibody immobilization on hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels provides a suitable surface to capture EPCs. The effect of CD34 antibody immobilization on EPC adhesion was found to be dependent on antibody concentration. The highest level of EPC attachment was found to be 52.2 cells per mm(2) on 1% HA gels modified with 25 μg mL(-1) antibody concentration. Macrophages did not exhibit significant attachment on these modified hydrogel surfaces compared to the EPCs, demonstrating the selectivity of the system. Hydrogels containing only HA, with or without immobilized CD34, did not allow for spreading of EPCs 48 h after cell seeding, even though the cells were adhered to the hydrogel surface. To promote spreading of EPCs, 2% (w/v) gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) containing HA hydrogels were synthesized and shown to improve cell spreading and elongation. This strategy could potentially be useful to enhance the biocompatibility of implants such as artificial heart valves or in other tissue engineering applications where formation of vascular structures is required.

  20. Laser Capture Microdissection of Embryonic Cells and Preparation of RNA for Microarray Assays

    PubMed Central

    Redmond, Latasha C.; Pang, Christopher J.; Dumur, Catherine; Haar, Jack L.; Lloyd, Joyce A.

    2014-01-01

    In order to compare the global gene expression profiles of different embryonic cell types, it is first necessary to isolate the specific cells of interest. The purpose of this chapter is to provide a step-by-step protocol to perform laser capture microdissection (LCM) on embryo samples and obtain sufficient amounts of high-quality RNA for microarray hybridizations. Using the LCM/microarray strategy on mouse embryo samples has some challenges, because the cells of interest are available in limited quantities. The first step in the protocol is to obtain embryonic tissue, and immediately cryoprotect and freeze it in a cryomold containing Optimal Cutting Temperature freezing media (Sakura Finetek), using a dry ice–isopentane bath. The tissue is then cryosectioned, and the microscope slides are processed to fix, stain, and dehydrate the cells. LCM is employed to isolate specific cell types from the slides, identified under the microscope by virtue of their morphology. Detailed protocols are provided for using the currently available ArcturusXT LCM instrument and CapSure® LCM Caps, to which the selected cells adhere upon laser capture. To maintain RNA integrity, upon removing a slide from the final processing step, or attaching the first cells on the LCM cap, LCM is completed within 20 min. The cells are then immediately recovered from the LCM cap using a denaturing solution that stabilizes RNA integrity. RNA is prepared using standard methods, modified for working with small samples. To ensure the validity of the microarray data, the quality of the RNA is assessed using the Agilent bioanalyzer. Only RNA that is of sufficient integrity and quantity is used to perform microarray assays. This chapter provides guidance regarding troubleshooting and optimization to obtain high-quality RNA from cells of limited availability, obtained from embryo samples by LCM. PMID:24318813

  1. Affinity Capture and Identification of Host Cell Factors Associated with Hepatitis C Virus (+) Strand Subgenomic RNA*

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Alok; Dixit, Updesh; Manvar, Dinesh; Chaturvedi, Nootan; Pandey, Virendra N.

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection leading to chronic hepatitis is a major factor in the causation of liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and liver failure. This process may involve the interplay of various host cell factors, as well as the interaction of these factors with viral RNA and proteins. We report a novel strategy using a sequence-specific biotinylated peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-neamine conjugate targeted to HCV RNA for the in situ capture of subgenomic HCV (+) RNA, along with cellular and viral factors associated with it in MH14 host cells. Using this affinity capture system in conjunction with LC/MS/MS, we have identified 83 cellular factors and three viral proteins (NS5B, NS5A, and NS3–4a protease-helicase) associated with the viral genome. The capture was highly specific. These proteins were not scored with cured MH14 cells devoid of HCV replicons because of the absence of the target sequence in cells for the PNA-neamine probe and also because, unlike oligomeric DNA, cellular proteins have no affinity for PNA. The identified cellular factors belong to different functional groups, including signaling, oncogenic, chaperonin, transcriptional regulators, and RNA helicases as well as DEAD box proteins, ribosomal proteins, translational regulators/factors, and metabolic enzymes, that represent a diverse set of cellular factors associated with the HCV RNA genome. Small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of a diverse class of selected proteins in an HCV replicon cell line either enhanced or inhibited HCV replication/translation, suggesting that these cellular factors have regulatory roles in HCV replication. PMID:23429521

  2. Micro-abrasion package capture cell experiment on the trailing edge of LDEF: Impactor chemistry and whipple bumper shield efficiencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, Howard J.; Yano, Hajime

    1995-01-01

    Four of the eight available double layer microparticle capture cells, flown as the experiment A0023 on the trailing (West) face of LDEF, have been extensively studied. An investigation of the chemistry of impactors has been made using SEM/EDX techniques and the effectiveness of the capture cells as bumper shields has also been examined. Studies of these capture cells gave positive EDX results, with 53 percent of impact sites indicating the presence of some chemical residues, the predominant residue identified as being silicon in varying quantities.

  3. Aerogel Blanket Insulation Materials for Cryogenic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffman, B. E.; Fesmire, J. E.; White, S.; Gould, G.; Augustynowicz, S.

    2009-01-01

    Aerogel blanket materials for use in thermal insulation systems are now commercially available and implemented by industry. Prototype aerogel blanket materials were presented at the Cryogenic Engineering Conference in 1997 and by 2004 had progressed to full commercial production by Aspen Aerogels. Today, this new technology material is providing superior energy efficiencies and enabling new design approaches for more cost effective cryogenic systems. Aerogel processing technology and methods are continuing to improve, offering a tailor-able array of product formulations for many different thermal and environmental requirements. Many different varieties and combinations of aerogel blankets have been characterized using insulation test cryostats at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory of NASA Kennedy Space Center. Detailed thermal conductivity data for a select group of materials are presented for engineering use. Heat transfer evaluations for the entire vacuum pressure range, including ambient conditions, are given. Examples of current cryogenic applications of aerogel blanket insulation are also given. KEYWORDS: Cryogenic tanks, thermal insulation, composite materials, aerogel, thermal conductivity, liquid nitrogen boil-off

  4. Human mast cells capture, store, and release bioactive, exogenous IL-17A.

    PubMed

    Noordenbos, Troy; Blijdorp, Iris; Chen, Sijia; Stap, Jan; Mul, Erik; Cañete, Juan D; Lubberts, Erik; Yeremenko, Nataliya; Baeten, Dominique

    2016-09-01

    IL-17A, a major proinflammatory cytokine, can be produced by a variety of leukocytes, but its exact cellular source in human inflammatory diseases remains incompletely understood. IL-17A protein is abundantly found in mast cells in human tissues, such as inflamed synovium, but surprisingly, mechanistic murine studies failed to demonstrate IL-17A production by mast cells. Here, we demonstrate that primary human tissue mast cells do not produce IL-17A themselves but actively capture exogenous IL-17A through receptor-mediated endocytosis. The exogenous IL-17A is stored in intracellular granules and can subsequently be released in a bioactive form. This novel mechanism confers to mast cells the capacity to steer IL-17A-mediated tissue inflammation by the rapid release of preformed cytokine. PMID:27034403

  5. A new strategy of promoting vascularization of skin substitutes by capturing endothelial progenitor cells automatically.

    PubMed

    Ji, Shi-zhao; Xiao, Shi-chu; Luo, Peng-fei; Huang, Guo-feng; Li, Heng-yu; Zhu, Shi-hui; Xia, Zhao-fan

    2011-10-01

    How to promote vascularization of a skin substitute is the key to successful skin transplantation. Current methods are mainly through releasing angiogenesis-related factors (ARF) or seeding angiogenesis-related cells (ARC), but the efficacy of these methods is not satisfactory, because angiogenesis needs participation of multiple factors, extracellular matrix and related cells. The latest research has demonstrated that endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) originating from bone marrow and existing in peripheral blood are the key element participating in revascularization of adult tissues. They directly participate in both stem cell vasculogenesis of ischemic tissues and local angiogenesis. We therefore hypothesize whether it is possible to construct a new skin substitute and use it to mobilize EPCs in bone marrow to peripheral circulation and capture EPCs automatically as a simple and effective method of promoting vascularization of the skin substitute for the sake of improving its post-transplant survival. PMID:21840131

  6. Essential and nonredundant roles for Diaphanous formins in cortical microtubule capture and directed cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Daou, Pascale; Hasan, Salma; Breitsprecher, Dennis; Baudelet, Emilie; Camoin, Luc; Audebert, Stéphane; Goode, Bruce L.; Badache, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Formins constitute a large family of proteins that regulate the dynamics and organization of both the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons. Previously we showed that the formin mDia1 helps tether microtubules at the cell cortex, acting downstream of the ErbB2 receptor tyrosine kinase. Here we further study the contributions of mDia1 and its two most closely related formins, mDia2 and mDia3, to cortical microtubule capture and ErbB2-dependent breast carcinoma cell migration. We find that depletion of each of these three formins strongly disrupts chemotaxis without significantly affecting actin-based structures. Further, all three formins are required for formation of cortical microtubules in a nonredundant manner, and formin proteins defective in actin polymerization remain active for microtubule capture. Using affinity purification and mass spectrometry analysis, we identify differential binding partners of the formin-homology domain 2 (FH2) of mDia1, mDia2, and mDia3, which may explain their nonredundant roles in microtubule capture. The FH2 domain of mDia1 specifically interacts with Rab6-interacting protein 2 (Rab6IP2). Further, mDia1 is required for cortical localization of Rab6IP2, and concomitant depletion of Rab6IP2 and IQGAP1 severely disrupts cortical capture of microtubules, demonstrating the coinvolvement of mDia1, IQGAP1, and Rab6IP2 in microtubule tethering at the leading edge. PMID:24403606

  7. Trajectory-capture cell instrumentation for measurement of dust particle mass, velocity and trajectory, and particle capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, J. A.; Tuzzolino, A. J.

    1989-01-01

    The development of the polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) dust detector for space missions--such as the Halley Comet Missions where the impact velocity was very high as well as for missions where the impact velocity is low was extended to include: (1) the capability for impact position determination - i.e., x,y coordinate of impact; and (2) the capability for particle velocity determination using two thin PVDF sensors spaced a given distance apart - i.e., by time-of-flight. These developments have led to space flight instrumentation for recovery-type missions, which will measure the masses (sizes), fluxes and trajectories of incoming dust particles and will capture the dust material in a form suitable for later Earth-based laboratory measurements. These laboratory measurements would determine the elemental, isotopic and mineralogical properties of the captured dust and relate these to possible sources of the dust material (i.e., comets, asteroids), using the trajectory information. The instrumentation described here has the unique advantages of providing both orbital characteristics and physical and chemical properties--as well as possible origin--of incoming dust.

  8. Ruthenium / aerogel nanocomposits via Atomic Layer Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, J; Baumann, T F; Wang, Y; Nelson, E J; Kucheyev, S O; Hamza, A V; Kemell, M; Ritala, M; Leskela, M

    2006-08-28

    We present a general approach to prepare metal/aerogel nanocomposites via template directed atomic layer deposition (ALD). In particular, we used a Ru ALD process consisting of alternating exposures to bis(cyclopentadienyl)ruthenium (RuCp{sub 2}) and air at 350 C to deposit metallic Ru nanoparticles on the internal surfaces of carbon and silica aerogels. The process does not affect the morphology of the aerogel template and offers excellent control over metal loading by simply adjusting the number of ALD cycles. We also discuss the limitations of our ALD approach, and suggest ways to overcome these.

  9. Composite Silica Aerogels Opacified with Titania

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, Jon-Ah; Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Jones, Steven; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; DiStefano, Salvador; Nesmith, Bill

    2009-01-01

    A further improvement has been made to reduce the high-temperature thermal conductivities of the aerogel-matrix composite materials described in Improved Silica Aerogel Composite Materials (NPO-44287), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 32, No. 9 (September 2008), page 50. Because the contribution of infrared radiation to heat transfer increases sharply with temperature, the effective high-temperature thermal conductivity of a thermal-insulation material can be reduced by opacifying the material to reduce the radiative contribution. Therefore, the essence of the present improvement is to add an opacifying constituent material (specifically, TiO2 powder) to the aerogel-matrix composites.

  10. Aerogel commercialization: Technology, markets and costs

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, G.; Lewis, D.; McKinley, K.; Richardson, J.; Tillotson, T.

    1994-10-07

    Commercialization of aerogels has been slow due to several factors including cost and manufacturability issues. The technology itself is well enough developed as a result of work over the past decade by an international-community of researchers. Several extensive substantial markets appear to exist for aerogels as thermal and sound insulators, if production costs can keep prices in line with competing established materials. The authors discuss here the elements which they have identified as key cost drivers, and they give a prognosis for the evolution of the technology leading to reduced cost aerogel production.

  11. Waterproofing Nanostructured Aerogel-Ceramic Fiber Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan; Hsu, Ming Ta; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Aerogels are nanoporous materials which can be used to enhance the transport properties of ceramic fiber materials, to exploit their unique properties such as high porosity, large surface area, low density and low thermal conductivity. Numerous applications have been investigated. major obstacle to commercialization is that the structure of aerogels collapses due to the adsorption of water. simple and relatively cheap process has been developed to waterproof silica, alumina and alumina-silica and carbon aerogels and composites incorporating them. Previous waterproofing methods are short lived or expensive and time consuming.

  12. Sound velocity of liquid 4He in aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Koichi; Arai, Osamu; Okuda, Yuichi; Tajiri, Koji

    2000-07-01

    The sound velocity and attenuation of liquid 4He in 93.7% and 94.6% porosity aerogels were measured for a frequency of 10 MHz. The sound velocity in 93.7% aerogel was larger than that in bulk 4He, whereas that in 94.6% was smaller. A model of the aerogel- 4He composite gave satisfactory agreement with the dependence of the sound velocity on the temperature and the aerogel density. This shows that the normal fluid is clamped to aerogel strands, although the viscous penetration depth is comparable to the typical size of a void in the aerogel.

  13. Studies of mobile dust in scrape-off layer plasmas using silica aerogel collectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergsåker, H.; Ratynskaia, S.; Litnovsky, A.; Ogata, D.; Sahle, W.

    2011-08-01

    Dust capture with ultralow density silica aerogel collectors is a new method, which allows time resolved in situ capture of dust particles in the scrape-off layers of fusion devices, without substantially damaging the particles. Particle composition and morphology, particle flux densities and particle velocity distributions can be determined through appropriate analysis of the aerogel surfaces after exposure. The method has been applied in comparative studies of intrinsic dust in the TEXTOR tokamak and in the Extrap T2R reversed field pinch. The analysis methods have been mainly optical microscopy and SEM. The method is shown to be applicable in both devices and the results are tentatively compared between the two plasma devices, which are very different in terms of edge plasma conditions, time scale, geometry and wall materials.

  14. Stardust: An overview of the tracks in the aerogel (calibration, classification and particle size distribution)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchell, M. J.; Fairey, S. J.; Hörz, F.; Wozniakiewicz, P. J.; Kearsley, A. T.; Brownlee, D. E.; See, T. H.; Westphal, A.; Green, S. F.; Trigo-Rodríguez, J. M.

    2007-08-01

    The NASA Stardust mission (1) to comet P/Wild-2 returned to Earth in January 2006 carrying a cargo of dust captured in aerogel and residue rich craters in aluminium foils (2). Aerogel is a low density, highly porous material (3, 4). The aerogel that was carried by Stardust in the cometary dust collector trays was a SiO2 aerogel, arranged in blocks 4 cm x 2 cm (front face) and 3 cm deep, with density which varied smoothly from 5 mg/cc at the front surface to 50 mg/cc at the rear surface (5). A first look at the whole cometary dust tray at NASA showed that there were many impact features in the aerogel. During the Preliminary Examination period about 15% of the aerogel blocks were removed and studied in detail. The tracks observed in these blocks were classified into three groups: Type A were long relatively narrow tracks of "carrot shape", Type B tracks were again fairly long but had a large bulbous region at the top and appear like the bowl and stem of a flute champagne glass, Type C were purely bulbous tracks with no stem emerging beneath them. Data on the sizes and relative populations of these tracks will be given (also see (6)) along with a discussion of their implications for impactor composition. Laboratory calibrations of the impacts in aerogel have been carried out using glass beads and these permit an estimate of the size of the impactor based on the measured track properties (6). When applied to the tracks measured in the Stardust aerogel, a cumulative particle size distribution was obtained (7) which will be discussed. References (1) Brownlee D.E. et al., J. Geophys. Res. 108, E10, 8111, 2003. (2) Brownlee D.E. et al., Science 314, 1711 - 1716. 2006. (3) Kistler S.S., Nature 127, 741, 1931. (4) Burchell M.J. et al., Ann. Rev. Earth. Planet. Sci. 34, 385 - 418, 2006. (5) Tsou P. et al., J. Geophys. Res. 108(E10), 8113, 2003. (6) Burchell et al., submitted to MAPS, 2006. (7) Hörz F. et al., Science 314, 1716 - 1719, 2006.

  15. The application of carbon aerogel electrodes to desalination {ampersand} waste treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.C., Tran, T.D., Richardson, J.H., Fix, D.V., May, S.C., Thomson, S.L.

    1997-08-01

    An electrically-regenerated electrosorption process known as carbon aerogel capacitive deionization (CDI) has been developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for continuously removing ionic impurities from aqueous streams. A salt solution flows through an unobstructed channel formed by numerous pairs of parallel carbon aerogel electrodes. Each electrode has a very high Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) surface area (2.0-5.4 x 1O{sup 6} ft{sup 2} lb{sup -1} or 400-1100) and very low electrical resistivity (< 40 m{omega} cm). Surface areas of 1.3 x 10{sup 7} ft{sup 2} lb{sup -1} (2600 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}) have been achieved activation. After polarization, anions and cations are removed from the electrolyte by the imposed electric field and electrosorbed onto the carbon aerogel. The solution is thus separated into two streams, concentrate and purified water. Based upon this analysis, it is concluded that carbon aerogel CDI may be an energy-efficient alternative to electrodialysis and reverse osmosis for the desalination of brackish water (< 5000 ppm), provided that cell geometries and aerogel properties are carefully tailored for such applications.

  16. Always look on the "light" side of life: sustainable carbon aerogels.

    PubMed

    White, Robin J; Brun, Nicolas; Budarin, Vitaly L; Clark, James H; Titirici, Maria-Magdalena

    2014-03-01

    The production of carbon aerogels based on the conversion of inexpensive and abundant precursors using environmentally friendly processes is a highly attractive subject in materials chemistry today. This article reviews the latest developments regarding the rapidly developing field of carbonaceous aerogels prepared from biomass and biomass-derived precursors, highlighting exciting and innovative approaches to green, sustainable nanomaterial synthesis. A review of the state-of-the-art technologies will be provided with a specific focus on two complimentary synthetic approaches developed upon the principles of green chemistry. These carbonaceous aerogel synthesis strategies, namely the Starbon and carbogel approaches, can be regarded as "top-down" and "bottom-up" strategies, respectively. The structural properties can be easily tailored by controlling synthetic parameters such as the precursor selection and concentration, the drying technique employed and post-synthesis temperature annealing. In addition to these parameters, the behavior of these sustainable carbon aerogel platforms in a variety of environmental and energy-related applications will also be discussed, including water remediation and fuel cell chemistry (i.e., the oxygen reduction reaction). This Review reveals the fascinating variety of highly porous, versatile, nanostructured, and functional carbon-based aerogels accessible through the highlighted sustainable synthetic platforms.

  17. Tanpopo: A New Micrometeoroid Capture and Astrobiology Exposure in LEO: Its First Year Operation and Post-Flight Plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, H.; Yamagishi, A.; Hashimoto, H.; Yokobori, S.; Kebukawa, Y.; Kawaguchi, Y.; Kobayashi, K.; Yabuta, H.; Tabata, M.; Higashide, M.; Tanpopo Project Team

    2015-07-01

    Tanpopo conducts micrometeoroid capture with aerogels and microbe exposure for testing quasi-panspermia hypothesis at ISS since May 2015. Samples will be retrieved in 2016-18 for initial analysis at ISAS and detailed analyses at over 25 labs.

  18. Proteomic analysis of cellular response induced by boron neutron capture reaction in human squamous cell carcinoma SAS cells.

    PubMed

    Sato, Akira; Itoh, Tasuku; Imamichi, Shoji; Kikuhara, Sota; Fujimori, Hiroaki; Hirai, Takahisa; Saito, Soichiro; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Minoru; Murakami, Yasufumi; Baiseitov, Diaz; Berikkhanova, Kulzhan; Zhumadilov, Zhaxybay; Imahori, Yoshio; Itami, Jun; Ono, Koji; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Masutani, Mitsuko

    2015-12-01

    To understand the mechanism of cell death induced by boron neutron capture reaction (BNCR), we performed proteome analyses of human squamous tumor SAS cells after BNCR. Cells were irradiated with thermal neutron beam at KUR after incubation under boronophenylalanine (BPA)(+) and BPA(-) conditions. BNCR mainly induced typical apoptosis in SAS cells 24h post-irradiation. Proteomic analysis in SAS cells suggested that proteins functioning in endoplasmic reticulum, DNA repair, and RNA processing showed dynamic changes at early phase after BNCR and could be involved in the regulation of cellular response to BNCR. We found that the BNCR induces fragments of endoplasmic reticulum-localized lymphoid-restricted protein (LRMP). The fragmentation of LRMP was also observed in the rat tumor graft model 20 hours after BNCT treatment carried out at the National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan. These data suggest that dynamic changes of LRMP could be involved during cellular response to BNCR.

  19. Ceramic Aerogel Composite Materials and Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Aerogels a.k.a "Solid Smoke" are gels with the liquid phase replaced by gas, leaving behind a highly porous material with a nanoscale framework. Due to the porous, nanoscale structure, aerogels have the lowest known density and conductivity of solids. Aerogels have the potential for being a breakthrough material because of their extremely light weight and unique properties. In this paper, we address overcoming their most profound weaknesses: mechanical fragility and very high surface activity, which leads to a lowered sintering temperature. A matrix of ceramic aerogel composite materials was produced to investigate their properties and functionality. Mechanical property measurements and Scanning Electron Micrographs are used to identify trends and structure of these ceramic composite materials. Thermal cycling was used to identify the sintering points of the materials.

  20. Energy dissipation at the silica glass/compressed aerogel interface: The fate of Wild 2 mineral grains and fragments smaller than ~100 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.

    2016-07-01

    Allocation FC6,0,10,0,26 from Stardust track 10 shows a slightly wavy silica glass/compressed silica aerogel interface exposing a patchwork of compressed silica aerogel domains and domains of silica glass with embedded Wild 2 materials in ultra-thin TEM sections. This interface is where molten silica encountered compressed silica aerogel at temperatures <100 °C, and probably near room temperature, causing steep thermal gradients. An Mg, Fe-olivine grain, and a plagioclase-leucite intergrowth survived without melting in silica glass. A Mg-, Al-, Ca-, K-bearing silica globule moved independently as a single object. Two clusters of pure iron, low-Ni iron, and low-Ni, low-sulfur Fe-Ni-S grains also survived intact and came to rest right at the interface between silica glass/compressed silica aerogel. There are numerous Fe-Ni-S nanograins scattered throughout MgO-rich magnesiosilica glass, but compositionally similar Fe-Ni-S are also found in the compressed silica aerogel, where they are not supposed to be. This work could not establish how deep they had penetrated the aerogel. Iron nanograins in this allocation form core-ring grains with a gap between the iron core and a surrounding ring of thermally modified aerogel. This structure was caused when rapid, thermal expansion of the core heated the surrounding compressed aerogel that upon rapid cooling remained fixed in place while the iron core shrank back to its original size. The well-known volume expansion of pure iron allowed reconstruction of the quench temperature for individual core-ring grains. These temperatures showed the small scale of thermal energy loss at the silica glass/compressed silica aerogel interface. The data support fragmentation of olivine, plagioclase, and iron and Fe ± low-Ni grains from comet 81P/Wild 2 during hypervelocity capture.

  1. Tanpopo: Astrobiology exposure and micrometeoroid capture experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagishi, Akihiko; Yano, Hajime; Okudaira, Kyoko; Kobayashi, Kensei; Yokobori, Shin-Ichi; Kawai, Hideyuki; Yamashita, Masamichi; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Yabuta, Hikaru

    There is a long history of the microbe-collection experiments at high altitude (1). Microbes have been collected using balloons, aircraft and meteorological rockets. Spore forming fungi and Bacilli, and Micrococci have been isolated in these experiments (1). It is not clear how high do microbes go up. If the microbes might have been present even at higher altitudes, the fact would endorse the possibility of interplanetary migration of life. Tanpopo, dandelion, is the name of a grass whose seeds with floss are spread by the wind. We propose the analyses of interplanetary migration of microbes, organic compounds and meteoroids on Japan Experimental Module (JEM) of the International Space Station (ISS) (2). Ultra low-density aerogel will be used to capture micrometeoroid and debris. Particles captured by aerogel will be used for several analyses after the initial inspection of the gel and tracks. Careful analysis of the tracks in the aerogel will provide the size and velocity dependence of debris flux. The particles will be analyzed for mineralogical, organic and microbiological characteristics. Aerogels are ready for production in Japan. Aerogels and trays are space proven. All the analytical techniques are ready. In this presentation, we will present the recent results related to the microbiological analyses. The results suggested that the bleaching speeds and the spectra of fluorescence are different between different origins of the fluorescence: whether it is emitted from microbe or not. It is also shown that PCR analysis of the microbe can be used to determine the species. References 1)Yang, Y., Yokobori, S. and Yamagishi, A.: Assessing panspermia hypothesis by microorganisms collected from the high altitude atmosphere. Biol. Sci. Space, 23 (2009), pp. 151-163. 2) Yamagishi, A., H. Yano, K. Kobayashi, K. Kobayashi, S. Yokobori, M. Tabata, H. Kawai, M. Yamashita, H. Hashimoto, H. Naraoka, H. Mita (2008) TANPOPO: astrobi-ology exposure and micrometeoroid capture

  2. Tanpopo: Astrobiology Exposure and Micrometeoroid Capture Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagishi, Akihiko; Yano, Hajime; Yamashita, Masamichi; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Kobayashi, Kensei; Kawai, Hideyuki; Mita, Hajime; Yokobori, Shin-ichi; Tabata, Makoto; Yabuta, Hikaru

    2012-07-01

    There is a long history of the microbe-collection experiments at high altitude (1). Microbes have been collected using balloons, aircraft and meteorological rockets. Spore forming fungi and Bacilli, and Micrococci have been isolated in these experiments (1). It is not clear how high do microbes go up. If the microbes might have been present even at higher altitudes, the fact would endorse the possibility of interplanetary migration of life. Tanpopo, dandelion, is the name of a grass whose seeds with floss are spread by the wind. We propose the analyses of interplanetary migration of microbes, organic compounds and meteoroids on Japan Experimental Module (JEM) of the International Space Station (ISS) (2). Ultra low-density aerogel will be used to capture micrometeoroid and debris. Particles captured by aerogel will be used for several analyses after the initial inspection of the gel and tracks. Careful analysis of the tracks in the aerogel will provide the size and velocity dependence of debris flux. The particles will be analyzed for mineralogical, organic and microbiological characteristics. Aerogels are ready for production in Japan. Aerogels and trays are space proven. All the analytical techniques are ready. In this presentation, we will present the recent results related to the microbiological analyses. The results suggested that the bleaching speeds and the spectra of fluorescence are different between different origins of the fluorescence: whether it is emitted from microbe or not. It is also shown that PCR analysis of the microbe can be used to determine the species. References 1)Yang, Y., Yokobori, S. and Yamagishi, A.: Assessing panspermia hypothesis by microorganisms collected from the high altitude atmosphere. Biol. Sci. Space, 23 (2009), pp. 151-163. 2) Yamagishi, A., H. Yano, K. Kobayashi, K. Kobayashi, S. Yokobori, M. Tabata, H. Kawai, M. Yamashita, H. Hashimoto, H. Naraoka, & H. Mita (2008) TANPOPO: astrobiology exposure and micrometeoroid capture

  3. Method for making monolithic metal oxide aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Droege, M.W.; Coronado, P.R.; Hair, L.M.

    1995-03-07

    Transparent, monolithic metal oxide aerogels of varying densities are produced using a method in which a metal alkoxide solution and a catalyst solution are prepared separately and reacted. The resulting hydrolyzed-condensed colloidal solution is gelled, and the wet gel is contained within a sealed, but gas permeable, containment vessel during supercritical extraction of the solvent. The present invention is especially advantageous for making metal oxides other than silica that are prone to forming opaque, cracked aerogels. 6 figs.

  4. Process for preparing polymer reinforced silica aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B. (Inventor); Capadona, Lynn A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Process for preparing polymer-reinforced silica aerogels which comprises a one-pot reaction of at least one alkoxy silane in the presence of effective amounts of a polymer precursor to obtain a silica reaction product, the reaction product is gelled and subsequently subjected to conditions that promotes polymerization of the precursor and then supercritically dried to obtain the polymer-reinforced monolithic silica aerogels.

  5. Method for making monolithic metal oxide aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Droege, Michael W.; Coronado, Paul R.; Hair, Lucy M.

    1995-01-01

    Transparent, monolithic metal oxide aerogels of varying densities are produced using a method in which a metal alkoxide solution and a catalyst solution are prepared separately and reacted. The resulting hydrolyzed-condensed colloidal solution is gelled, and the wet gel is contained within a sealed, but gas permeable, containment vessel during supercritical extraction of the solvent. The present invention is especially advantageous for making metal oxides other than silica that are prone to forming opaque, cracked aerogels.

  6. Fibrous-Ceramic/Aerogel Composite Insulating Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan M.; Rasky, Daniel J.

    2004-01-01

    Fibrous-ceramic/aerogel composite tiles have been invented to afford combinations of thermal-insulation and mechanical properties superior to those attainable by making tiles of fibrous ceramics alone or aerogels alone. These lightweight tiles can be tailored to a variety of applications that range from insulating cryogenic tanks to protecting spacecraft against re-entry heating. The advantages and disadvantages of fibrous ceramics and aerogels can be summarized as follows: Tiles made of ceramic fibers are known for mechanical strength, toughness, and machinability. Fibrous ceramic tiles are highly effective as thermal insulators in a vacuum. However, undesirably, the porosity of these materials makes them permeable by gases, so that in the presence of air or other gases, convection and gas-phase conduction contribute to the effective thermal conductivity of the tiles. Other disadvantages of the porosity and permeability of fibrous ceramic tiles arise because gases (e.g., water vapor or cryogenic gases) can condense in pores. This condensation contributes to weight, and in the case of cryogenic systems, the heat of condensation undesirably adds to the heat flowing to the objects that one seeks to keep cold. Moreover, there is a risk of explosion associated with vaporization of previously condensed gas upon reheating. Aerogels offer low permeability, low density, and low thermal conductivity, but are mechanically fragile. The basic idea of the present invention is to exploit the best features of fibrous ceramic tiles and aerogels. In a composite tile according to the invention, the fibrous ceramic serves as a matrix that mechanically supports the aerogel, while the aerogel serves as a low-conductivity, low-permeability filling that closes what would otherwise be the open pores of the fibrous ceramic. Because the aerogel eliminates or at least suppresses permeation by gas, gas-phase conduction, and convection, the thermal conductivity of such a composite even at

  7. Zirconium oxide aerogel for effective enrichment of phosphopeptides with high binding capacity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liyuan; Xu, Jin; Sun, Liangliang; Ma, Junfeng; Yang, Kaiguang; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2011-04-01

    In this study, zirconium oxide (ZrO(2)) aerogel was synthesized via a green sol-gel approach, with zirconium oxychloride, instead of the commonly used alkoxide with high toxicity, as the precursor. With such material, phosphopeptides from the digests of 4 pmol of β-casein with the coexistence of 100 times (mol ratio) BSA could be selectively captured, and identified by MALDI-TOF MS. Due to the large surface area (416.0 m(2) g(-1)) and the mesoporous structure (the average pore size of 10.2 nm) of ZrO(2) aerogel, a 20-fold higher loading capacity for phosphopeptide, YKVPQLEIVPN[pS]AEER (MW 1952.12), was obtained compared to that of commercial ZrO(2) microspheres (341.5 vs. 17.87 mg g(-1)). The metal oxide aerogel was further applied in the enrichment of phosphopeptides from 100 ng nonfat milk, and 17 phosphopeptides were positively identified, with a 1.5-fold improvement in phosphopeptide detection compared with previously reported results. These results demonstrate that ZrO(2) aerogel can be a powerful enrichment material for phosphoproteome study.

  8. Chalcogen-Based Aerogels as Sorbents for Radionuclide Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Brian J.; Chun, Jaehun; Um, Wooyong; Lepry, William C.; Matyas, Josef; Olszta, Matthew J.; Li, Xiaohong; Polychronopoulou, Kyriaki; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

    2013-06-13

    The efficient capture of radionuclides having long half-lives such as technetium-99 (99Tc), uranium-238 (238U), and iodine-129 (129I) is pivotal to prevent their transport into groundwater and/or release into the atmosphere. While different sorbents have been considered for capturing each of them, in the current work, a new nanostructured chalcogen-based aerogel, called a chalcogel, is shown to be very effective to capture ionic forms of 99Tc and 238U, as well as nonradioactive gaseous iodine (i.e., a surrogate for 129I), irrespective of the sorbent polarity. Some of the chalcogels performed better than others but the PtGeS sorbent performed the best with capture efficiencies of 98% and 99.4% for 99Tc and 238U, respectively. All sorbents showed >99% capture efficiency for iodine over the test duration. This unified sorbent would be an attractive option in environmental remediation for various radionuclides associated with legacy wastes from nuclear weapons production, wastes from nuclear power production, or potential future nuclear fuel reprocessing.

  9. A comparison of the electrochemical behavior of carbon aerogels and activated carbon fiber cloths

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, T.D.; Alviso, C.T.; Hulsey, S.S.; Nielsen, J.K.; Pekala, R.W.

    1996-05-10

    Electrochemical capacitative behavior of carbon aerogels and commercial carbon fiber cloths was studied in 5M KOH, 3M sulfuric acid, and 0.5M tetrethylammonium tetrafluoroborate/propylene carbonate electrolytes. The resorcinol-formaldehyde based carbon aerogels with a range of denisty (0.2-0.85 g/cc) have open-cell structures with ultrafine pore sizes (5-50 nm), high surface area (400-700 m{sup 2}/g), and a solid matrix composed of interconnected particles or fibers with characteristic diameters of 10 nm. The commercial fiber cloths in the density range 0.2-04g/cc have high surface areas (1000-2500 m{sup 2}/g). The volumetric capacitances of high-density aerogels are shown to be comparable to or exceeding those from activated carbon fibers. Electrochemical behavior of these materials in various electrolytes is compared and related to their physical properties.

  10. High Temperature Aerogels for Thermal Protection Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.; Mbah, Godfrey C.

    2008-01-01

    High temperature aerogels in the Al2O3-SiO2 system are being investigated as possible constituents for lightweight integrated thermal protection system (TPS) designs for use in supersonic and hypersonic applications. Gels are synthesized from ethoxysilanes and AlCl3.6H2O, using an epoxide catalyst. The influence of Al:Si ratio, solvent, water to metal and water to alcohol ratios on aerogel composition, morphology, surface area, and pore size distribution were examined, and phase transformation on heat treatment characterized. Aerogels have been fabricated which maintain porous, fractal structures after brief exposures to 1000 C. Incorporation of nanofibers, infiltration of aerogels into SiC foams, use of polymers for crosslinking the aerogels, or combinations of these, offer potential for toughening and integration of TPS with composite structure. Woven fabric composites having Al2O3-SiO2 aerogels as a matrix also have been fabricated. Continuing work is focused on reduction in shrinkage and optimization of thermal and physical properties.

  11. Aerogel Composites for Aerospace Thermal Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan

    2003-01-01

    Aerogel composites formed by infiltrating organic and/or inorganic aerogels into fiber matrix materials enable us to exploit the low thermal conductivity and low density of aerogels while maintaining the strength, structure and other useful properties of a porous fiber matrix. New materials for extreme heating ranges are needed to insulate future spacecraft against the extreme heat of planetary atmospheric entry, but the insulation mass must be minimized in order to maximize the payload. A reusable system passively insulates to survive heating unchanged for relatively low heating. Ablators, which sacrifice mass to control heating, are used to protect vehicles against more extreme heating for a single use thermal protection system (TPS). Aerogel composites were fabricated and tested for spacecraft thermal protection. The high-temperaturey high heat flux tests described in this paper were performed in NASA Ames arc-jet facilities to simulate spacecraft atmospheric entry, and include heating conditions predicted for the forebody and backshell of the Mars Science Lander (MSL) entry probe. The aerogel composites tested showed excellent thermal performance in the arc-jet tests, functioning both as reusuable insulation under lower heat fluxes, and as ablative aerogels under the extreme heating predicted for the MSL forebody.

  12. Pore morphology study of silica aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, D.W.; Anderson, J.; Haereid, S.; Smith, D.M.

    1994-12-31

    Silica aerogels have numerous properties which suggest applications such as ultra high efficiency thermal insulation. These properties relate directly to the aerogel`s pore size distribution. The micro and meso pore size ranges can be investigated by normal small angle x-ray scattering and possibly, nitrogen adsorption. However, the measurement of larger pores (> 250 {angstrom}) is more difficult. Due to their limited mechanical strength, mercury porosimetry and nitrogen condensation can disrupt the gel structure and electron microscopy provides only limited large scale structure information. The use of small angle light scattering techniques seems to have promise, the only hurdle is that aerogels exhibit significant multiple scattering. This can be avoided if one observes the gels in the wet stage since the structure of the aerogel should be very similar to the wet gel (as the result of supercritical drying). Thus, if one can match the refractive index, the morphology can be probed. The combination of certain alcoholic solvents fit this index matching criteria. Preliminary results for the gel network (micron range) and primary particle structure (manometer) are reported by using small angle light scattering and ultra-small angle x-ray scattering. The effects on structure over the length scale range of <1 nm to >5 {mu}m under different conditions (precursors, pH, etc.) are presented. The change in structure of an aerogel during isostatic compaction to 228 MPa (to simulate drying from wetting solvents) are also discussed.

  13. Ambient pressure process for preparing aerogel thin films reliquified sols useful in preparing aerogel thin films

    DOEpatents

    Brinker, Charles Jeffrey; Prakash, Sai Sivasankaran

    1999-01-01

    A method for preparing aerogel thin films by an ambient-pressure, continuous process. The method of this invention obviates the use of an autoclave and is amenable to the formation of thin films by operations such as dip coating. The method is less energy intensive and less dangerous than conventional supercritical aerogel processing techniques.

  14. Sensitive cytometry based system for enumeration, capture and analysis of gene mutations of circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Takeshi; Watanabe, Masaru; Fujimura, Yuu; Yagishita, Shigehiro; Shimoyama, Tatsu; Maeda, Yoshiharu; Kanda, Shintaro; Yunokawa, Mayu; Tamura, Kenji; Tamura, Tomohide; Minami, Hironobu; Koh, Yasuhiro; Koizumi, Fumiaki

    2016-03-01

    Methods for the enumeration and molecular characterization of circulating tumor cells (CTC) have been actively investigated. However, such methods are still technically challenging. We have developed a novel epithelial cell adhesion molecule independent CTC enumeration system integrated with a sorting system using a microfluidics chip. We compared the number of CTC detected using our system with those detected using the CellSearch system in 46 patients with various cancers. We also evaluated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and PIK3CA mutations of captured CTC in a study of 4 lung cancer and 4 breast cancer patients. The percentage of samples with detected CTC was significantly higher with our system (65.2%) than with CellSearch (28.3%). The number of detected CTC per patient using our system was statistically higher than that using CellSearch (median 5, 0; P = 0.000172, Wilcoxon test). In the mutation analysis study, the number of detected CTC per patient was low (median for lung, 4.5; median for breast, 5.5); however, it was easy to detect EGFR and PIK3CA mutations in the CTC of 2 lung and 1 breast cancer patient, respectively, using a commercially available kit. Our system is more sensitive than CellSearch in CTC enumeration of various cancers and is also capable of detecting EGFR and PIK3CA mutations in the CTC of lung and breast cancer patients, respectively. PMID:26708016

  15. Sensitive capture of circulating tumour cells by functionalized graphene oxide nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Hyeun Joong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Zhang, Zhuo; Azizi, Ebrahim; Pham, Trinh M.; Paoletti, Costanza; Lin, Jules; Ramnath, Nithya; Wicha, Max S.; Hayes, Daniel F.; Simeone, Diane M.; Nagrath, Sunitha

    2013-10-01

    The spread of cancer throughout the body is driven by circulating tumour cells (CTCs). These cells detach from the primary tumour and move from the bloodstream to a new site of subsequent tumour growth. They also carry information about the primary tumour and have the potential to be valuable biomarkers for disease diagnosis and progression, and for the molecular characterization of certain biological properties of the tumour. However, the limited sensitivity and specificity of current methods for measuring and studying these cells in patient blood samples prevents the realization of their full clinical potential. The use of microfluidic devices is a promising method for isolating CTCs. However, the devices are reliant on three-dimensional structures, which limits further characterization and expansion of cells on the chip. Here we demonstrate an effective approach to isolating CTCs from blood samples of pancreatic, breast and lung cancer patients, by using functionalized graphene oxide nanosheets on a patterned gold surface. CTCs were captured with high sensitivity at a low concentration of target cells (73 +/- 32.4% at 3-5 cells per ml blood).

  16. Sensitive capture of circulating tumour cells by functionalized graphene oxide nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyeun Joong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Zhang, Zhuo; Azizi, Ebrahim; Pham, Trinh M; Paoletti, Costanza; Lin, Jules; Ramnath, Nithya; Wicha, Max S; Hayes, Daniel F; Simeone, Diane M; Nagrath, Sunitha

    2013-10-01

    The spread of cancer throughout the body is driven by circulating tumour cells (CTCs). These cells detach from the primary tumour and move from the bloodstream to a new site of subsequent tumour growth. They also carry information about the primary tumour and have the potential to be valuable biomarkers for disease diagnosis and progression, and for the molecular characterization of certain biological properties of the tumour. However, the limited sensitivity and specificity of current methods for measuring and studying these cells in patient blood samples prevents the realization of their full clinical potential. The use of microfluidic devices is a promising method for isolating CTCs. However, the devices are reliant on three-dimensional structures, which limits further characterization and expansion of cells on the chip. Here we demonstrate an effective approach to isolating CTCs from blood samples of pancreatic, breast and lung cancer patients, by using functionalized graphene oxide nanosheets on a patterned gold surface. CTCs were captured with high sensitivity at a low concentration of target cells (73 ± 32.4% at 3-5 cells per ml blood).

  17. Sensitive cytometry based system for enumeration, capture and analysis of gene mutations of circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Takeshi; Watanabe, Masaru; Fujimura, Yuu; Yagishita, Shigehiro; Shimoyama, Tatsu; Maeda, Yoshiharu; Kanda, Shintaro; Yunokawa, Mayu; Tamura, Kenji; Tamura, Tomohide; Minami, Hironobu; Koh, Yasuhiro; Koizumi, Fumiaki

    2016-03-01

    Methods for the enumeration and molecular characterization of circulating tumor cells (CTC) have been actively investigated. However, such methods are still technically challenging. We have developed a novel epithelial cell adhesion molecule independent CTC enumeration system integrated with a sorting system using a microfluidics chip. We compared the number of CTC detected using our system with those detected using the CellSearch system in 46 patients with various cancers. We also evaluated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and PIK3CA mutations of captured CTC in a study of 4 lung cancer and 4 breast cancer patients. The percentage of samples with detected CTC was significantly higher with our system (65.2%) than with CellSearch (28.3%). The number of detected CTC per patient using our system was statistically higher than that using CellSearch (median 5, 0; P = 0.000172, Wilcoxon test). In the mutation analysis study, the number of detected CTC per patient was low (median for lung, 4.5; median for breast, 5.5); however, it was easy to detect EGFR and PIK3CA mutations in the CTC of 2 lung and 1 breast cancer patient, respectively, using a commercially available kit. Our system is more sensitive than CellSearch in CTC enumeration of various cancers and is also capable of detecting EGFR and PIK3CA mutations in the CTC of lung and breast cancer patients, respectively.

  18. Collision rates for rare cell capture in periodic obstacle arrays strongly depend on density of cell suspension.

    PubMed

    Cimrák, I

    2016-11-01

    Recently, computational modelling has been successfully used for determination of collision rates for rare cell capture in periodic obstacle arrays. The models were based on particle advection simulations where the cells were advected according to velocity field computed from two dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. This approach may be used under the assumption of very dilute cell suspensions where no mutual cell collisions occur. We use the object-in-fluid framework to demonstrate that even with low cell-to-fluid ratio, the optimal geometry of the obstacle array significantly changes. We show computational simulations for ratios of 3.5, 6.9 and 10.4% determining the optimal geometry of the periodic obstacle arrays. It was already previously demonstrated that cells in periodic obstacle arrays follow trajectories in two modes: the colliding mode and the zig-zag mode. The colliding mode maximizes the cell-obstacle collision frequency. Our simulations reveal that for dilute suspensions and for suspensions with cell-to-fluid ratio 3.5%, there is a range of column shifts for which the cells follow colliding trajectories. However we showed, that for 6.9 and 10.4%, the cells never follow colliding trajectories. PMID:27023645

  19. Novel Application of Carbonate Fuel Cell for Capturing Carbon Dioxide from Flue Gas Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Jolly, Stephen; Ghezel-Ayagh, Hossein; Willman, Carl; Patel, Dilip; DiNitto, M.; Marina, Olga A.; Pederson, Larry R.; Steen, William A.

    2015-09-30

    To address concerns about climate change resulting from emission of CO2 by coal-fueled power plants, FuelCell Energy, Inc. has developed the Combined Electric Power and Carbon-dioxide Separation (CEPACS) system concept. The CEPACS system utilizes Electrochemical Membrane (ECM) technology derived from the Company’s Direct FuelCell® products. The system separates the CO2 from the flue gas of other plants and produces electric power using a supplementary fuel. FCE is currently evaluating the use of ECM to cost effectively separate CO2 from the flue gas of Pulverized Coal (PC) power plants under a U.S. Department of Energy contract. The overarching objective of the project is to verify that the ECM can achieve at least 90% CO2 capture from the flue gas with no more than 35% increase in the cost of electricity. The project activities include: 1) laboratory scale operational and performance tests of a membrane assembly, 2) performance tests of the membrane to evaluate the effects of impurities present in the coal plant flue gas, in collaboration with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 3) techno-economic analysis for an ECM-based CO2 capture system applied to a 550 MW existing PC plant, in partnership with URS Corporation, and 4) bench scale (11.7 m2 area) testing of an ECM-based CO2 separation and purification system.

  20. Power generation enhancement in novel microbial carbon capture cells with immobilized Chlorella vulgaris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Minghua; He, Huanhuan; Jin, Tao; Wang, Hongyu

    2012-09-01

    With the increasing concerns for global climate change, a sustainable, efficient and renewable energy production from wastewater is imperative. In this study, a novel microbial carbon capture cell (MCC), is constructed for the first time by the introduction of immobilized microalgae (Chlorella vulgaris) into the cathode chamber of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) to fulfill the zero discharge of carbon dioxide. This process can achieve an 84.8% COD removal, and simultaneously the maximum power density can reach 2485.35 mW m-3 at a current density of 7.9 A m-3 and the Coulombic efficiency is 9.40%, which are 88% and 57.7% greater than that with suspended C. vulgaris, respectively. These enhancements in performance demonstrate the feasibility of an economical and effective approach for the simultaneous wastewater treatment, electricity generation and biodiesel production from microalgae.

  1. Durable polymer-aerogel based superhydrophobic coatings: a composite material

    DOEpatents

    Kissel, David J.; Brinker, Charles Jeffrey

    2016-02-02

    Provided are polymer-aerogel composite coatings, devices and articles including polymer-aerogel composite coatings, and methods for preparing the polymer-aerogel composite. The exemplary article can include a surface, wherein the surface includes at least one region and a polymer-aerogel composite coating disposed over the at least one region, wherein the polymer-aerogel composite coating has a water contact angle of at least about 140.degree. and a contact angle hysteresis of less than about 1.degree.. The polymer-aerogel composite coating can include a polymer and an ultra high water content catalyzed polysilicate aerogel, the polysilicate aerogel including a three dimensional network of silica particles having surface functional groups derivatized with a silylating agent and a plurality of pores.

  2. Durable polymer-aerogel based superhydrophobic coatings, a composite material

    DOEpatents

    Kissel, David J; Brinker, Charles Jeffrey

    2014-03-04

    Provided are polymer-aerogel composite coatings, devices and articles including polymer-aerogel composite coatings, and methods for preparing the polymer-aerogel composite. The exemplary article can include a surface, wherein the surface includes at least one region and a polymer-aerogel composite coating disposed over the at least one region, wherein the polymer-aerogel composite coating has a water contact angle of at least about 140.degree. and a contact angle hysteresis of less than about 1.degree.. The polymer-aerogel composite coating can include a polymer and an ultra high water content catalyzed polysilicate aerogel, the polysilicate aerogel including a three dimensional network of silica particles having surface functional groups derivatized with a silylating agent and a plurality of pores.

  3. Contact-active antibacterial aerogels from cellulose nanofibrils.

    PubMed

    Henschen, Jonatan; Illergård, Josefin; Larsson, Per A; Ek, Monica; Wågberg, Lars

    2016-10-01

    The use of cellulose aerogels as antibacterial materials has been investigated by applying a contact-active layer-by-layer modification to the aerogel surface. Studying the adsorption of multilayers of polyvinylamine (PVAm) and polyacrylic acid to aerogels comprising crosslinked cellulose nanofibrils and monitoring the subsequent bacterial adhesion revealed that up to 26mgPVAmgaerogel(-1) was adsorbed without noticeably affecting the aerogel structure. The antibacterial effect was tested by measuring the reduction of viable bacteria in solution when the aerogels were present. The results show that >99.9% of the bacteria adhered to the surface of the aerogels. Microscopy further showed adherence of bacteria to the surfaces of the modified aerogels. These results indicate that it is possible to create materials with three-dimensional cellulose structures that adsorb bacteria with very high efficiency utilizing the high specific surface area of the aerogels in combination with their open structure. PMID:27391038

  4. Contact-active antibacterial aerogels from cellulose nanofibrils.

    PubMed

    Henschen, Jonatan; Illergård, Josefin; Larsson, Per A; Ek, Monica; Wågberg, Lars

    2016-10-01

    The use of cellulose aerogels as antibacterial materials has been investigated by applying a contact-active layer-by-layer modification to the aerogel surface. Studying the adsorption of multilayers of polyvinylamine (PVAm) and polyacrylic acid to aerogels comprising crosslinked cellulose nanofibrils and monitoring the subsequent bacterial adhesion revealed that up to 26mgPVAmgaerogel(-1) was adsorbed without noticeably affecting the aerogel structure. The antibacterial effect was tested by measuring the reduction of viable bacteria in solution when the aerogels were present. The results show that >99.9% of the bacteria adhered to the surface of the aerogels. Microscopy further showed adherence of bacteria to the surfaces of the modified aerogels. These results indicate that it is possible to create materials with three-dimensional cellulose structures that adsorb bacteria with very high efficiency utilizing the high specific surface area of the aerogels in combination with their open structure.

  5. Cross-linking approach to affinity capture of protein complexes from chaotrope-solubilized cell lysates.

    PubMed

    Alloza, Iraide; Martens, Erik; Hawthorne, Susan; Vandenbroeck, Koen

    2004-01-01

    Affinity capture methods are widely used for isolation and analysis of protein complexes. Short peptide tags fused to the protein of interest normally facilitate straightforward purification and detection of interacting proteins. We investigated the suitability of applying C-terminally hexahistidine-tagged interleukin-12 (IL-12) alpha- and beta-chains as "bait" proteins for cocapturing novel binding partners using heterologous recombinant human embryonic kidney-293 (HEK-293) cell lines. The beta-chain, but not the alpha-chain, extracted from cell lysates was capable of binding to the Ni(2+)-nitrilotriacetic acid affinity resin under nondenaturing conditions. Retention of the alpha-chain on this matrix was dependent on treatment of cell lysates with high concentrations of chaotropes such as urea. Since under these conditions any noncovalent protein associations are destroyed, prior cross-linking of proteins interacting with the alpha-chain in intact cells was required. The use of the thiol-cleavable cross-linker 3,3'-dithiobis(succinimidyl proprionate) facilitated dissociation of alpha-chain-binding proteins by means of dithiothreitol following purification. Using this approach we were able to demonstrate a strong interaction between the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone calreticulin (CRT) and the IL-12 alpha-chain that was confirmed in a reciprocal anti-CRT immunoprecipitation assay. The assay presented here provides a simple approach to exposing concealed hexahistidine tags while retaining native noncovalent protein interactions and should be generally applicable in a range of pull-down or affinity capture methods aiming at analysis of protein complexes. PMID:14654056

  6. Aerogels: A new material for emissive display applications

    SciTech Connect

    Glauser, S.A.C.; Lee, H.W.H.

    1997-03-01

    The remarkable optical and electronic properties of doped and undoped silica aerogels establish their utility as unique, multifunctional host materials for fluorescent dyes and other luminescent materials for display and imaging applications. We present results on the photoluminescence and absorption of undoped silica aerogels and aerogels doped with Er{sup 3+}, rhodamine 6G (R6G), and fluorescein. We also demonstrate evidence of Fowler-Nordheim tunneling of electrons in aerogels. 4 refs., 10 figs.

  7. System and method for suppressing sublimation using opacified aerogel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, Jeff S. (Inventor); Snyder, G. Jeffrey (Inventor); Calliat, Thierry (Inventor); Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor); Jones, Steven M. (Inventor); Palk, Jong-Ah (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to a castable, aerogel-based, ultra-low thermal conductivity opacified insulation to suppress sublimation. More specifically, the present invention relates to an aerogel opacified with various opacifying or reflecting constituents to suppress sublimation and provide thermal insulation in thermoelectric modules. The opacifying constituent can be graded within the aerogel for increased sublimation suppression, and the density of the aerogel can similarly be graded to achieve optimal thermal insulation and sublimation suppression.

  8. A synthetic route to ultralight hierarchically micro/mesoporous Al(III)-carboxylate metal-organic aerogels

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Xiang, Shenglin; Cao, Shuqi; Zhang, Jianyong; Ouyang, Gangfeng; Chen, Liuping; Su, Cheng-Yong

    2013-01-01

    Developing a synthetic methodology for the fabrication of hierarchically porous metal-organic monoliths that feature high surface area, low density and tunable porosity is imperative for mass transfer applications, including bulky molecule capture, heterogeneous catalysis and drug delivery. Here we report a versatile and facile synthetic route towards ultralight micro/mesoporous metal-organic aerogels based on the two-step gelation of metal-organic framework nanoparticles. Heating represents a key factor in the control of gelation versus crystallization of Al(III)-multicarboxylate systems. The porosity of the resulting metal-organic aerogels can be readily tuned, leading to the formation of well-ordered intraparticle micropores and aerogel-specific interparticle mesopores, thereby integrating the merits of both crystalline metal-organic frameworks and light aerogels. The hierarchical micro/mesoporosity of the Al-metal-organic aerogels is thoroughly evaluated by N2 sorption. The good accessibility of the micro/mesopores is verified by vapour/dye uptake, and their potential for utilization as effective fibre-coating absorbents is tested in solid-phase microextraction analyses. PMID:23653186

  9. Laser capture.

    PubMed

    Potter, S Steven; Brunskill, Eric W

    2012-01-01

    This chapter describes detailed methods used for laser capture microdissection (LCM) of discrete subpopulations of cells. Topics covered include preparing tissue blocks, cryostat sectioning, processing slides, performing the LCM, and purification of RNA from LCM samples. Notes describe the fine points of each operation, which can often mean the difference between success and failure. PMID:22639264

  10. Capture of Tumor Cells on Anti-EpCAM-Functionalized Poly(acrylic acid)-Coated Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Andree, Kiki C; Barradas, Ana M C; Nguyen, Ai T; Mentink, Anouk; Stojanovic, Ivan; Baggerman, Jacob; van Dalum, Joost; van Rijn, Cees J M; Terstappen, Leon W M M

    2016-06-15

    The presence of tumor cells in blood is predictive of short survival in several cancers and their isolation and characterization can guide toward the use of more effective treatments. These circulating tumor cells (CTC) are, however, extremely rare and require a technology that is sufficiently sensitive and specific to identify CTC against a background of billions of blood cells. Immuno-capture of cells expressing the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) are frequently used to enrich CTC from blood. The choice of bio conjugation strategy and antibody clone is crucial for adequate cell capture but is poorly understood. In this study, we determined the binding affinity constants and epitope binding of the EpCAM antibodies VU1D-9, HO-3, EpAb3-5, and MJ-37 by surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi). Glass surfaces were coated using a poly(acrylic acid) based coating and functionalized with anti-EpCAM antibodies. Binding of cells from the breast carcinoma cell line (SKBR-3) to the functionalized surfaces were compared. Although EpAb3-5 displayed the highest binding affinity HO-3 captured the highest amount of cells. Hence we report differences in the performance of the different antibodies and more importantly that the choice of antibody to capture CTC should be based on multiple assays.

  11. Carbon aerogels: An update on structure, properties, and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pekala, R.W.; Mayer, S.T.; Kaschmitter, J.L.; Kong, F.M.

    1993-07-01

    Aerogels are unique porous materials whose composition, structure, and properties can be controlled at the nanometer scale. This paper examines the synthesis of organic aerogels and their carbonized derivatives. Carbon aerogels have low electrical resistivity, high surface area, and a tunable pore size. These materials are finding applications as electrodes in double layer capacitors.

  12. Enhanced Survival with Implantable Scaffolds That Capture Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Rao, Shreyas S; Bushnell, Grace G; Azarin, Samira M; Spicer, Graham; Aguado, Brian A; Stoehr, Jenna R; Jiang, Eric J; Backman, Vadim; Shea, Lonnie D; Jeruss, Jacqueline S

    2016-09-15

    The onset of distant organ metastasis from primary breast cancer marks the transition to a stage IV diagnosis. Standard imaging modalities often detect distant metastasis when the burden of disease is high, underscoring the need for improved methods of detection to allow for interventions that would impede disease progression. Here, microporous poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds were developed that capture early metastatic cells and thus serve as a sentinel for early detection. These scaffolds were used to characterize the dynamic immune response to the implant spanning the acute and chronic foreign body response. The immune cell composition had stabilized at the scaffold after approximately 1 month and changed dramatically within days to weeks after tumor inoculation, with CD11b(+)Gr1(hi)Ly6C(-) cells having the greatest increase in abundance. Implanted scaffolds recruited metastatic cancer cells that were inoculated into the mammary fat pad in vivo, which also significantly reduced tumor burden in the liver and brain. Additionally, cancer cells could be detected using a label-free imaging modality termed inverse spectroscopic optical coherence tomography, and we tested the hypothesis that subsequent removal of the primary tumor after early detection would enhance survival. Surgical removal of the primary tumor following cancer cell detection in the scaffold significantly improved disease-specific survival. The enhanced disease-specific survival was associated with a systemic reduction in the CD11b(+)Gr1(hi)Ly6C(-) cells as a consequence of the implant, which was further supported by Gr-1 depletion studies. Implementation of the scaffold may provide diagnostic and therapeutic options for cancer patients in both the high-risk and adjuvant treatment settings. Cancer Res; 76(18); 5209-18. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27635043

  13. A Two-Stage Microfluidic Device for the Isolation and Capture of Circulating Tumor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Andrew; Belsare, Sayali; Giorgio, Todd; Mu, Richard

    2014-11-01

    Analysis of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can be critical for studying how tumors grow and metastasize, in addition to personalizing treatment for cancer patients. CTCs are rare events in blood, making it difficult to remove CTCs from the blood stream. Two microfluidic devices have been developed to separate CTCs from blood. The first is a double spiral device that focuses cells into streams, the positions of which are determined by cell diameter. The second device uses ligand-coated magnetic nanoparticles that selectively attach to CTCs. The nanoparticles then pull CTCs out of solution using a magnetic field. These two devices will be combined into a single 2-stage microfluidic device that will capture CTCs more efficiently than either device on its own. The first stage depletes the number of blood cells in the sample by size-based separation. The second stage will magnetically remove CTCs from solution for study and culturing. Thus far, size-based separation has been achieved. Research will also focus on understanding the equations that govern fluid dynamics and magnetic fields in order to determine how the manipulation of microfluidic parameters, such as dimensions and flow rate, will affect integration and optimization of the 2-stage device. NSF-CREST: Center for Physics and Chemistry of Materials. HRD-0420516; Department of Defense, Peer Reviewed Medical Research Program Award W81XWH-13-1-0397.

  14. Proteins deposited in the dermis are rapidly captured and presented by epidermal Langerhans cells

    PubMed Central

    Flacher, Vincent; Tripp, Christoph H.; Stoitzner, Patrizia; Haid, Bernhard; Ebner, Susanne; Koch, Franz; Park, Chae Gyu; Steinman, Ralph M.; Idoyaga, Juliana; Romani, Nikolaus

    2010-01-01

    Antigen-presenting cells can capture antigens that are deposited in the skin, including vaccines given subcutaneously. These include different dendritic cells (DC) such as epidermal Langerhans cells (LC), dermal DC and dermal langerin+ DC. To evaluate access of dermal antigens to skin DC, we used mAb to two C-type lectin endocytic receptors, DEC-205/CD205 and langerin/CD207. When applied to murine and human skin explant cultures, these mAb were efficiently taken up by epidermal LC. Additionally, anti-DEC-205 targeted langerin+ CD103+ and langerin− CD103− mouse dermal DC. Unexpectedly, intradermal injection of either mAb, but not isotype control, resulted in strong and rapid labelling of LC in situ, implying that large molecules can diffuse through the basement membrane into the epidermis. Epidermal LC targeted in vivo by ovalbumin-coupled anti-DEC-205 potently presented antigen to CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Thus, epidermal LC play a major role in uptake of lectin-binding ligands under standard vaccination conditions. PMID:19890348

  15. Electro-osmotic-based catholyte production by Microbial Fuel Cells for carbon capture.

    PubMed

    Gajda, Iwona; Greenman, John; Melhuish, Chris; Santoro, Carlo; Li, Baikun; Cristiani, Pierangela; Ieropoulos, Ioannis

    2015-12-01

    In Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs), the recovery of water can be achieved with the help of both active (electro-osmosis), and passive (osmosis) transport pathways of electrolyte through the semi-permeable selective separator. The electrical current-dependent transport, results in cations and electro-osmotically dragged water molecules reaching the cathode. The present study reports on the production of catholyte on the surface of the cathode, which was achieved as a direct result of electricity generation using MFCs fed with wastewater, and employing Pt-free carbon based cathode electrodes. The highest pH levels (>13) of produced liquid were achieved by the MFCs with the activated carbon cathodes producing the highest power (309 μW). Caustic catholyte formation is presented in the context of beneficial cathode flooding and transport mechanisms, in an attempt to understand the effects of active and passive diffusion. Active transport was dominant under closed circuit conditions and showed a linear correlation with power performance, whereas osmotic (passive) transport was governing the passive flux of liquid in open circuit conditions. Caustic catholyte was mineralised to a mixture of carbonate and bicarbonate salts (trona) thus demonstrating an active carbon capture mechanism as a result of the MFC energy-generating performance. Carbon capture would be valuable for establishing a carbon negative economy and environmental sustainability of the wastewater treatment process.

  16. Electro-osmotic-based catholyte production by Microbial Fuel Cells for carbon capture.

    PubMed

    Gajda, Iwona; Greenman, John; Melhuish, Chris; Santoro, Carlo; Li, Baikun; Cristiani, Pierangela; Ieropoulos, Ioannis

    2015-12-01

    In Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs), the recovery of water can be achieved with the help of both active (electro-osmosis), and passive (osmosis) transport pathways of electrolyte through the semi-permeable selective separator. The electrical current-dependent transport, results in cations and electro-osmotically dragged water molecules reaching the cathode. The present study reports on the production of catholyte on the surface of the cathode, which was achieved as a direct result of electricity generation using MFCs fed with wastewater, and employing Pt-free carbon based cathode electrodes. The highest pH levels (>13) of produced liquid were achieved by the MFCs with the activated carbon cathodes producing the highest power (309 μW). Caustic catholyte formation is presented in the context of beneficial cathode flooding and transport mechanisms, in an attempt to understand the effects of active and passive diffusion. Active transport was dominant under closed circuit conditions and showed a linear correlation with power performance, whereas osmotic (passive) transport was governing the passive flux of liquid in open circuit conditions. Caustic catholyte was mineralised to a mixture of carbonate and bicarbonate salts (trona) thus demonstrating an active carbon capture mechanism as a result of the MFC energy-generating performance. Carbon capture would be valuable for establishing a carbon negative economy and environmental sustainability of the wastewater treatment process. PMID:26343045

  17. Boron neutron capture therapy induces apoptosis of glioma cells through Bcl-2/Bax

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is an alternative treatment modality for patients with glioma. The aim of this study was to determine whether induction of apoptosis contributes to the main therapeutic efficacy of BNCT and to compare the relative biological effect (RBE) of BNCT, γ-ray and reactor neutron irradiation. Methods The neutron beam was obtained from the Xi'an Pulsed Reactor (XAPR) and γ-rays were obtained from [60Co] γ source of the Fourth Military Medical University (FMMU) in China. Human glioma cells (the U87, U251, and SHG44 cell lines) were irradiated by neutron beams at the XAPR or [60Co] γ-rays at the FMMU with different protocols: Group A included control nonirradiated cells; Group B included cells treated with 4 Gy of [60Co] γ-rays; Group C included cells treated with 8 Gy of [60Co] γ-rays; Group D included cells treated with 4 Gy BPA (p-borono-phenylalanine)-BNCT; Group E included cells treated with 8 Gy BPA-BNCT; Group F included cells irradiated in the reactor for the same treatment period as used for Group D; Group G included cells irradiated in the reactor for the same treatment period as used for Group E; Group H included cells irradiated with 4 Gy in the reactor; and Group I included cells irradiated with 8 Gy in the reactor. Cell survival was determined using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium (MTT) cytotoxicity assay. The morphology of cells was detected by Hoechst33342 staining and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The apoptosis rate was detected by flow cytometer (FCM). The level of Bcl-2 and Bax protein was measured by western blot analysis. Results Proliferation of U87, U251, and SHG44 cells was much more strongly inhibited by BPA-BNCT than by irradiation with [60Co] γ-rays (P < 0.01). Nuclear condensation was determined using both a fluorescence technique and electron microscopy in all cell lines treated with BPA-BNCT. Furthermore, the cellular apoptotic rates in Group D and Group E

  18. Quantitative detection of enteroviruses in activated sludge by cell culture and real-time RT-PCR using paramagnetic capturing.

    PubMed

    Pusch, D; Ihle, St; Lebuhn, M; Graeber, I; López-Pila, J M

    2005-09-01

    We have compared in extracts of activated sludge the number of enteroviruses detectable with buffalo green monkey (BGM) cell-cultures versus the number of enteroviral genomes determined by reverse-transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR). In order to find conditions adequate for quantifying enteroviral RNA isolated from (waste)water we have investigated affinity capture of RNA with polystyrene beads (Dynabeads). The capture efficiency strongly depended on the genomic region chosen for the affinity binding. Capture of the RNA by its 3'-tail was most efficient (almost 100%); other regions within the genome yielded variable but lower results. Indirect capture (first hybridization of the RNA to the oligonucleotides, then attachment of the duplex molecules to the beads) was much more efficient than direct capture (attachment of the oligonucleotides to the beads first, then binding of the RNA), and resulted in RNA capture of maximally 60-80%. At least partly, this was due to incomplete hybridization of the RNA to the complementary oligonucleotides. No correlation was found between the number of cytopathic effects (CPE) determined by cell culture and the number of genomes quantified by RT-qPCR; RT-qPCR values were consistently much higher than the number of CPE. This points to overestimation of infectious enteroviruses by RT-qPCR and/or underestimation by the cell culture approach.

  19. TANPOPO: Microbe and micrometeoroid capture experiments on International Space Station.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagishi, Akihiko; Kobayashi, Kensei; Yano, Hajime; Yokobori, Shinichi; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Kawai, Hideyuki; Yamashita, Masamichi

    There is a long history of the microbe-collection experiments at high altitude. Microbes have been collected using balloons, aircraft and meteorological rockets from 1936 to 1976. Spore forming fungi and Bacilli, and Micrococci have been isolated in these experiments. It is not clear how high do microbes go up. If the microbes might have been present even at higher altitudes, the fact would endorse the possibility of interplanetary migration of life. TANPOPO, dandelion, is the name of a grass whose seeds with floss are spread by the wind. We propose the analyses of interplanetary migration of microbes, organic compounds and meteoroids on Japan Experimental Module (JEM) of the International Space Station (ISS). Ultra low-density aerogel will be used to capture micrometeoroid and debris. Particles captured by aerogel will be used for several analyses after the initial inspection of the gel and tracks. Careful analysis of the tracks in the aerogel will provide the size and velocity dependence of debris flux. The particles will be analyzed for mineralogical, organic and microbiological characteristics. Aerogels are ready for production in Japan. Aerogels and trays are space proven. All the analytical techniques are ready. The Tanpopo mission was accepted as a candidate experiments on Exposed Facility of ISS-JEM.

  20. High resolution transmission electron microscopy of melamine-formaldehyde aerogels and silica aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Ruben, G.C. . Dept. of Biological Sciences)

    1991-09-01

    The goal of the high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) was to image the structure of two tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) and two melamine-formaldehyde (MF) aerogels at the single polymer chain level{sup 1,2}. With this level of structural resolution we hoped to interrelate each aerogel's structure with its physical properties and its method of synthesis. Conventional single-step base catalysed TMOS aerogels show strings of spheroidal particles linked together with minimal necking. The spheroidal particles range from 86--132 {Angstrom} and average 113{plus minus}10 {Angstrom} in diameter{sup 2}. In contrast the TMOS aerogels reported on here were made by a two step method. After extended silica chains are grown in solution under acidic conditions with a substoichiometric amount of water, the reaction is stopped and the methanol hydrolysed from TMOS is removed. Then base catalysis and additional water are added to cause gel formation is a nonalcoholic solvent. The MF aerogels were prepared for HRTEM by fracturing them on a stereo microscope stage with razor knife so that fractured pieces with smooth flat surfaces could be selected for platinum-carbon replication. The two silica (TMOS) aerogels were both transparent and difficult to see. These aerogels were fractured on a stereo microscope stage with tweezers. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Aerogel/Particle Composites for Thermoelectric Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, Jong-Ah; Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Jones, Steven

    2006-01-01

    Optimizing solution chemistry and the addition of titania and fumed silica powder reduces shrinkage. These materials would serve to increase thermal efficiency by providing thermal insulation to suppress lateral heat leaks. They would also serve to prolong operational lifetime by suppressing sublimation of certain constituents of thermoelectric materials (e.g., sublimation of Sb from CoSb3) at typical high operating temperatures. [The use of pure silica aerogels as cast-in-place thermal-insulation and sublimation-suppression materials was described in "Aerogels for Thermal Insulation of Thermoelectric Devices" (NPO-40630), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 7 (July 2006), page 50.] A silica aerogel is synthesized in a solgel process that includes preparation of a silica sol, gelation of the sol, and drying of the gel in a solvent at a supercritical temperature and pressure. The utility of pure silica aerogel is diminished by a tendency to shrink (and, therefore, also to crack) during the gelation and supercritical-drying stages. Moreover, to increase suppression of sublimation, it is advantageous to make an aerogel having greater density, but shrinkage and cracking tend to increase with density. A composite material of the type under investigation consists mostly of titania oxide powder particles and a small addition of fumed silica powder, which are mixed into the sol along with other ingredients prior to the gelation stage of processing. The silica aerogel and fumed silica act as a binder, gluing the titania particles together. It is believed that the addition of fumed silica stiffens the aerogel network and reduces shrinkage during the supercritical-drying stage. Minimization of shrinkage enables establishment of intimate contact between thermoelectric legs and the composite material, thereby maximizing the effectiveness of the material for thermal insulation and suppression of sublimation. To some extent, the properties of the composite can be tailored via the

  2. Volatiles in interplanetary dust particles and aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Harmetz, C. P.

    1991-01-01

    Volatiles measured in 25 interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are a mixture of both indigenous materials and contaminants associated with the collection and processing of the ODPs prior to analysis. Most IDPs have been collected in the stratosphere using a silicone oil/freon mixture (20:1 ratio) coated on collector plates. Studies have shown that silicone oil, freon and hexane residues remain with the ODPs, despite attempts to clean the IDPs. Analysis of the IDPs with the LMMS-technique produces spectra with a mixture of indigeneous and contaminants components. The contamination signal can be identified and removed; however, the contamination signal may obscure some of the indigeneous component's signal. Employing spectra stripping techniques, the indigenous volatile constituents associated with the IDPs can be identified. Volatiles are similar to those measured in CI or CM carbonaceous chondrites. Collection of IDPs in low-Earth orbit utilizing a Cosmic Dust Collection Facility attached to Space Station Freedom has been proposed. The low-density material aerogel has been proposed as a collection substrate for IDPs. Our studies have concentrated on identifying volatile contaminants that are associated with aerogel. We have found that solvents used for the preparation of aerogel remain in aerogel and methods must be developed for removing the entrapped solvents before aerogels can be used for an IDP collection substrate.

  3. Hydrogen crystallization in low-density aerogels.

    PubMed

    Kucheyev, S O; Van Cleve, E; Johnston, L T; Gammon, S A; Worsley, M A

    2015-04-01

    Crystallization of liquids confined in disordered low-density nanoporous scaffolds is poorly understood. Here, we use relaxation calorimetry to study the liquid-solid phase transition of H2 in a series of silica and carbon (nanotube- and graphene-based) aerogels with porosities ≳94%. Results show that freezing temperatures of H2 inside all the aerogels studied are depressed but do not follow predictions of the Gibbs-Thomson theory based on average pore diameters measured by conventional gas sorption techniques. Instead, we find that, for each material family investigated, the depression of average freezing temperatures scales linearly with the ratio of the internal surface area (measured by gas sorption) and the total pore volume derived from the density of aerogel monoliths. The slope of such linear dependences is, however, different for silica and carbon aerogels, which we attribute to microporosity of carbons and the presence of macropores in silica aerogels. Our results have important implications for the analysis of pore size distributions of low-density nanoporous materials and for controlling crystallization of fuel layers in targets for thermonuclear fusion energy applications. PMID:25781182

  4. Aerogel Beads as Cryogenic Thermal Insulation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, J. E.; Augustynowicz, S. D.; Rouanet, S.; Thompson, Karen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An investigation of the use of aerogel beads as thermal insulation for cryogenic applications was conducted at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory of NASA Kennedy Space Center. Steady-state liquid nitrogen boiloff methods were used to characterize the thermal performance of aerogel beads in comparison with conventional insulation products such as perlite powder and multilayer insulation (MLI). Aerogel beads produced by Cabot Corporation have a bulk density below 100 kilograms per cubic meter (kg/cubic m) and a mean particle diameter of 1 millimeter (mm). The apparent thermal conductivity values of the bulk material have been determined under steady-state conditions at boundary temperatures of approximately 293 and 77 kelvin (K) and at various cold vacuum pressures (CVP). Vacuum levels ranged from 10(exp -5) torr to 760 torr. All test articles were made in a cylindrical configuration with a typical insulation thickness of 25 mm. Temperature profiles through the thickness of the test specimens were also measured. The results showed the performance of the aerogel beads was significantly better than the conventional materials in both soft-vacuum (1 to 10 torr) and no-vacuum (760 torr) ranges. Opacified aerogel beads performed better than perlite powder under high-vacuum conditions. Further studies for material optimization and system application are in progress.

  5. Process for forming transparent aerogel insulating arrays

    DOEpatents

    Tewari, Param H.; Hunt, Arlon J.

    1986-01-01

    An improved supercritical drying process for forming transparent silica aerogel arrays is described. The process is of the type utilizing the steps of hydrolyzing and condensing aloxides to form alcogels. A subsequent step removes the alcohol to form aerogels. The improvement includes the additional step, after alcogels are formed, of substituting a solvent, such as CO.sub.2, for the alcohol in the alcogels, the solvent having a critical temperature less than the critical temperature of the alcohol. The resulting gels are dried at a supercritical temperature for the selected solvent, such as CO.sub.2, to thereby provide a transparent aerogel array within a substantially reduced (days-to-hours) time period. The supercritical drying occurs at about 40.degree. C. instead of at about 270.degree. C. The improved process provides increased yields of large scale, structurally sound arrays. The transparent aerogel array, formed in sheets or slabs, as made in accordance with the improved process, can replace the air gap within a double glazed window, for example, to provide a substantial reduction in heat transfer. The thus formed transparent aerogel arrays may also be utilized, for example, in windows of refrigerators and ovens, or in the walls and doors thereof or as the active material in detectors for analyzing high energy elementry particles or cosmic rays.

  6. Process for forming transparent aerogel insulating arrays

    DOEpatents

    Tewari, P.H.; Hunt, A.J.

    1985-09-04

    An improved supercritical drying process for forming transparent silica aerogel arrays is described. The process is of the type utilizing the steps of hydrolyzing and condensing aloxides to form alcogels. A subsequent step removes the alcohol to form aerogels. The improvement includes the additional step, after alcogels are formed, of substituting a solvent, such as CO/sub 2/, for the alcohol in the alcogels, the solvent having a critical temperature less than the critical temperature of the alcohol. The resulting gels are dried at a supercritical temperature for the selected solvent, such as CO/sub 2/, to thereby provide a transparent aerogel array within a substantially reduced (days-to-hours) time period. The supercritical drying occurs at about 40/sup 0/C instead of at about 270/sup 0/C. The improved process provides increased yields of large scale, structurally sound arrays. The transparent aerogel array, formed in sheets or slabs, as made in accordance with the improved process, can replace the air gap within a double glazed window, for example, to provide a substantial reduction in heat transfer. The thus formed transparent aerogel arrays may also be utilized, for example, in windows of refrigerators and ovens, or in the walls and doors thereof or as the active material in detectors for analyzing high energy elementary particles or cosmic rays.

  7. Determination of Young's modulus of silica aerogels using holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikode, Prashant P.; Sabale, Sandip R.; Vhatkar, Rajiv S.

    2016-05-01

    Digital holographic interferometry technique is used to determine elastic modulus of silica aerogels. Tetramethoxysilane precursor based Silica aerogels were prepared by the sol-gel process followed by supercritical methanol drying. The alcogels were prepared by keeping the molar ratio of tetramethoxysilane: methyltrimethoxysilane: H2O constant at 1:0.6:4 while the methanol / tetramethoxysilane molar ratio (M) was varied systematically from 12 to 18. Holograms of translucent aerogel samples have been successfully recorded using the digital holographic interferometry technique. Stimulated digital interferograms gives localization of interference fringes on the aerogel surface and these fringes are used to determine the surface deformation and Young's modulus (Y) of the aerogels.

  8. Sonoporation as an enhancing method for boron neutron capture therapy for squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a selective radiotherapy that is dependent on the accumulation of 10B compound in tumors. Low-intensity ultrasound produces a transient pore on cell membranes, sonoporation, which enables extracellular materials to enter cells. The effect of sonoporation on BNCT was examined in oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) xenografts in nude mice. Materials and methods Tumor-bearing mice were administrated boronophenylalanine (BPA) or boronocaptate sodium (BSH) intraperitoneally. Two hours later, tumors were subjected to sonoporation using microbubbles followed by neutron irradiation. Results The 10B concentration was higher in tumors treated with sonoporation than in untreated tumors, although the difference was not significant in BPA. When tumors in mice that received BPA intraperitoneally were treated with sonoporation followed by exposure to thermal neutrons, tumor volume was markedly reduced and the survival rate was prolonged. Such enhancements by sonoporation were not observed in mice treated with BSH-mediated BNCT. Conclusions These results indicate that sonoporation enhances the efficiency of BPA-mediated BNCT for oral SCC. Sonoporation may modulate the microlocalization of BPA and BSH in tumors and increase their intracellular levels. PMID:24295213

  9. Cripto is essential to capture mouse epiblast stem cell and human embryonic stem cell pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Fiorenzano, Alessandro; Pascale, Emilia; D'Aniello, Cristina; Acampora, Dario; Bassalert, Cecilia; Russo, Francesco; Andolfi, Gennaro; Biffoni, Mauro; Francescangeli, Federica; Zeuner, Ann; Angelini, Claudia; Chazaud, Claire; Patriarca, Eduardo J; Fico, Annalisa; Minchiotti, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    Known molecular determinants of developmental plasticity are mainly transcription factors, while the extrinsic regulation of this process has been largely unexplored. Here we identify Cripto as one of the earliest epiblast markers and a key extracellular determinant of the naive and primed pluripotent states. We demonstrate that Cripto sustains mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC) self-renewal by modulating Wnt/β-catenin, whereas it maintains mouse epiblast stem cell (EpiSC) and human ESC pluripotency through Nodal/Smad2. Moreover, we provide unprecedented evidence that Cripto controls the metabolic reprogramming in ESCs to EpiSC transition. Remarkably, Cripto deficiency attenuates ESC lineage restriction in vitro and in vivo, and permits ESC transdifferentiation into trophectoderm lineage, suggesting that Cripto has earlier functions than previously recognized. All together, our studies provide novel insights into the current model of mammalian pluripotency and contribute to the understanding of the extrinsic regulation of the first cell lineage decision in the embryo. PMID:27586544

  10. Cripto is essential to capture mouse epiblast stem cell and human embryonic stem cell pluripotency

    PubMed Central

    Fiorenzano, Alessandro; Pascale, Emilia; D'Aniello, Cristina; Acampora, Dario; Bassalert, Cecilia; Russo, Francesco; Andolfi, Gennaro; Biffoni, Mauro; Francescangeli, Federica; Zeuner, Ann; Angelini, Claudia; Chazaud, Claire; Patriarca, Eduardo J.; Fico, Annalisa; Minchiotti, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    Known molecular determinants of developmental plasticity are mainly transcription factors, while the extrinsic regulation of this process has been largely unexplored. Here we identify Cripto as one of the earliest epiblast markers and a key extracellular determinant of the naive and primed pluripotent states. We demonstrate that Cripto sustains mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC) self-renewal by modulating Wnt/β-catenin, whereas it maintains mouse epiblast stem cell (EpiSC) and human ESC pluripotency through Nodal/Smad2. Moreover, we provide unprecedented evidence that Cripto controls the metabolic reprogramming in ESCs to EpiSC transition. Remarkably, Cripto deficiency attenuates ESC lineage restriction in vitro and in vivo, and permits ESC transdifferentiation into trophectoderm lineage, suggesting that Cripto has earlier functions than previously recognized. All together, our studies provide novel insights into the current model of mammalian pluripotency and contribute to the understanding of the extrinsic regulation of the first cell lineage decision in the embryo. PMID:27586544

  11. Fluorine-Free Oil Absorbents Made from Cellulose Nanofibril Aerogels.

    PubMed

    Mulyadi, Arie; Zhang, Zhe; Deng, Yulin

    2016-02-01

    Aerogels based on cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) have been of great interest as absorbents due to their high absorption capacity, low density, biodegradability, and large surface area. Hydrophobic aerogels have been designed to give excellent oil absorption tendency from water. Herein, we present an in situ method for CNF surface modification and hydrophobic aerogel preparation. Neither solvent exchange nor fluorine chemical is used in aerogel preparations. The as-prepared hydrophobic aerogels exhibit low density (23.2 mg/cm(-3)), high porosity (98.5%), good flexibility, and solvent-induced shape recovery property. Successful surface modification was confirmed through field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and water contact angle measurements. The hydrophobic aerogels show high absorption capacities for various oils, depending on liquid density, up to 47× their original weight but with low water uptake (<0.5 g/g aerogel). PMID:26761377

  12. Scrubbing of contaminants from contaminated air streams with aerogel materials with optional photocatalytic destruction

    DOEpatents

    Attia, Yosry A.

    2000-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for separating a vaporous or gaseous contaminant from an air stream contaminated therewith. This method includes the steps of: (a) passing said contaminated air into a contact zone in which is disposed an aerogel material capable of selecting adsorbing said contaminant from air and therein contacting said contaminated air with an aerogel material; and (b) withdrawing from said zone, air depleted of said contaminant. For present purposes, "contaminant" means a material not naturally occurring in ambient air and/or a material naturally occurring in air but present at a concentration above that found in ambient air. Thus, the present invention scrubs (or treats) air for the purpose of returning it to its ambient composition. Also disclosed herein is a process for the photocatalytic destruction of contaminants from an air stream wherein the contaminated air stream is passed into a control cell or contact zone in which is disposed a photocatalytic aerogel and exposing said aerogel to ultraviolet (UV) radiation for photocatalytically destroying the adsorbed contaminant, and withdrawing from said cell an exhaust air stream depleted in said contaminant.

  13. Enhanced and Differential Capture of Circulating Tumor Cells from Lung Cancer Patients by Microfluidic Assays Using Aptamer Cocktail

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Libo; Tang, Chuanhao; Xu, Li; Zhang, Zhen; Li, Xiaoyan; Hu, Haixu; Cheng, Si; Zhou, Wei; Huang, Mengfei; Fong, Anna; Liu, Bing; Tseng, Hsian-Rong; Gao, Hongjun; Liu, Yi; Fang, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    Collecting circulating tumor cells (CTCs) shed from solid tumor through a minimally invasive approach provides an opportunity to solve a long-standing oncology problem, the real-time monitoring of tumor state and analysis of tumor heterogeneity. However, efficient capture and detection of CTCs with diverse phenotypes is still challenging. In this work, a microfluidic assay is developed using the rationally-designed aptamer cocktails with synergistic effect. Enhanced and differential capture of CTCs for nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients is achieved. It is also demonstrated that the overall consideration of CTC counts obtained by multiple aptamer combinations can provide more comprehensive information in treatment monitoring. PMID:26763166

  14. Carbon nanomaterials in silica aerogel matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Christopher E; Chavez, Manuel E; Duque, Juan G; Gupta, Gautam; Doorn, Stephen K; Dattelbaum, Andrew M; Obrey, Kimberly A D

    2010-01-01

    Silica aerogels are ultra low-density, high surface area materials that are extremely good thermal insulators and have numerous technical applications. However, their mechanical properties are not ideal, as they are brittle and prone to shattering. Conversely, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and graphene-based materials, such as graphene oxide, have extremely high tensile strength and possess novel electronic properties. By introducing SWCNTs or graphene-based materials into aerogel matrices, it is possible to produce composites with the desirable properties of both constituents. We have successfully dispersed SWCNTs and graphene-based materials into silica gels. Subsequent supercritical drying results in monolithic low-density composites having improved mechanical properties. These nanocomposite aerogels have great potential for use in a wide range of applications.

  15. Slotted Polyimide-Aerogel-Filled-Waveguide Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez-Solis, Rafael A.; Pacheco, Hector L.; Miranda, Felix A.; Meador, Mary Ann B.

    2013-01-01

    Polyimide aerogels were considered to serve as a filling for millimeter-wave waveguides. While these waveguides present a slightly higher loss than hollow waveguides, they have less losses than Duroid substrate integrated waveguides (less than 0.15 dB at Ka-band, in a 20 mm section), and exhibit an order of magnitude of mass reduction when compared to commercial waveguides. A Ka-band slotted aerogel-filled-waveguide array was designed, which provided the same gain (9 dBi) as its standard waveguide counterpart, and a slotted aerogel-filled-waveguide array using folded-slots was designed for comparison, obtaining a gain of 9 dB and a bandwidth of 590 MHz.

  16. High strength air-dried aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Coronado, Paul R.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.

    2012-11-06

    A method for the preparation of high strength air-dried organic aerogels. The method involves the sol-gel polymerization of organic gel precursors, such as resorcinol with formaldehyde (RF) in aqueous solvents with R/C ratios greater than about 1000 and R/F ratios less than about 1:2.1. Using a procedure analogous to the preparation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels, this approach generates wet gels that can be air dried at ambient temperatures and pressures. The method significantly reduces the time and/or energy required to produce a dried aerogel compared to conventional methods using either supercritical solvent extraction. The air dried gel exhibits typically less than 5% shrinkage.

  17. Disrupted Endothelial Cell Layer and Exposed Extracellular Matrix Proteins Promote Capture of Late Outgrowth Endothelial Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Mitrofan, Claudia-Gabriela; Appleby, Sarah L; Morrell, Nicholas W; Lever, Andrew M L

    2016-01-01

    Late outgrowth endothelial progenitor cells (LO-EPC) possess a high proliferative potential, differentiate into vascular endothelial cells (EC), and form networks, suggesting they play a role in vascular repair. However, due to their scarcity in the circulation there is a requirement for ex vivo expansion before they could provide a practical cell therapy and it is currently unclear if they would home and engraft to an injury site. Using an in vitro flow system we studied LO-EPC under simulated injury conditions including EC activation, ischaemia, disrupted EC integrity, and exposed basement membrane. Perfused LO-EPC adhered to discontinuous EC paracellularly at junctional regions between adjacent cells under shear stress 0.7 dyn/cm(2). The interaction was not adhesion molecule-dependent and not enhanced by EC activation. LO-EPC expressed high levels of the VE-Cadherin which may explain these findings. Ischaemia reperfusion injury decreased the interaction with LO-EPC due to cell retraction. LO-EPC interacted with exposed extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, fibronectin and vitronectin. The interaction was mediated by integrins α5β3, αvβ1, and αvβ3. This study has demonstrated that an injured local environment presents sufficient adhesive signals to capture flow perfused LO-EPC in vitro and that LO-EPC have properties consistent with their potential role in vascular repair.

  18. Disrupted Endothelial Cell Layer and Exposed Extracellular Matrix Proteins Promote Capture of Late Outgrowth Endothelial Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Mitrofan, Claudia-Gabriela; Appleby, Sarah L; Morrell, Nicholas W; Lever, Andrew M L

    2016-01-01

    Late outgrowth endothelial progenitor cells (LO-EPC) possess a high proliferative potential, differentiate into vascular endothelial cells (EC), and form networks, suggesting they play a role in vascular repair. However, due to their scarcity in the circulation there is a requirement for ex vivo expansion before they could provide a practical cell therapy and it is currently unclear if they would home and engraft to an injury site. Using an in vitro flow system we studied LO-EPC under simulated injury conditions including EC activation, ischaemia, disrupted EC integrity, and exposed basement membrane. Perfused LO-EPC adhered to discontinuous EC paracellularly at junctional regions between adjacent cells under shear stress 0.7 dyn/cm(2). The interaction was not adhesion molecule-dependent and not enhanced by EC activation. LO-EPC expressed high levels of the VE-Cadherin which may explain these findings. Ischaemia reperfusion injury decreased the interaction with LO-EPC due to cell retraction. LO-EPC interacted with exposed extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, fibronectin and vitronectin. The interaction was mediated by integrins α5β3, αvβ1, and αvβ3. This study has demonstrated that an injured local environment presents sufficient adhesive signals to capture flow perfused LO-EPC in vitro and that LO-EPC have properties consistent with their potential role in vascular repair. PMID:27413378

  19. Disrupted Endothelial Cell Layer and Exposed Extracellular Matrix Proteins Promote Capture of Late Outgrowth Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mitrofan, Claudia-Gabriela; Appleby, Sarah L.; Morrell, Nicholas W.; Lever, Andrew M. L.

    2016-01-01

    Late outgrowth endothelial progenitor cells (LO-EPC) possess a high proliferative potential, differentiate into vascular endothelial cells (EC), and form networks, suggesting they play a role in vascular repair. However, due to their scarcity in the circulation there is a requirement for ex vivo expansion before they could provide a practical cell therapy and it is currently unclear if they would home and engraft to an injury site. Using an in vitro flow system we studied LO-EPC under simulated injury conditions including EC activation, ischaemia, disrupted EC integrity, and exposed basement membrane. Perfused LO-EPC adhered to discontinuous EC paracellularly at junctional regions between adjacent cells under shear stress 0.7 dyn/cm2. The interaction was not adhesion molecule-dependent and not enhanced by EC activation. LO-EPC expressed high levels of the VE-Cadherin which may explain these findings. Ischaemia reperfusion injury decreased the interaction with LO-EPC due to cell retraction. LO-EPC interacted with exposed extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, fibronectin and vitronectin. The interaction was mediated by integrins α5β3, αvβ1, and αvβ3. This study has demonstrated that an injured local environment presents sufficient adhesive signals to capture flow perfused LO-EPC in vitro and that LO-EPC have properties consistent with their potential role in vascular repair. PMID:27413378

  20. Chalcogen-based aerogels as sorbents for radionuclide remediation.

    PubMed

    Riley, Brian J; Chun, Jaehun; Um, Wooyong; Lepry, William C; Matyas, Josef; Olszta, Matthew J; Li, Xiaohong; Polychronopoulou, Kyriaki; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2013-07-01

    The efficient capture of radionuclides with long half-lives such as technetium-99 ((99)Tc), uranium-238 ((238)U), and iodine-129 ((129)I) is pivotal to prevent their transport into groundwater and/or release into the atmosphere. While different sorbents have been considered for capturing each of them, in the current work, nanostructured chalcogen-based aerogels called chalcogels are shown to be very effective at capturing ionic forms of (99)Tc and (238)U, as well as nonradioactive gaseous iodine (i.e., a surrogate for (129)I2), irrespective of the sorbent polarity. The chalcogel chemistries studied were Co0.7Bi0.3MoS4, Co0.7Cr0.3MoS4, Co0.5Ni0.5MoS4, PtGe2S5, and Sn2S3. The PtGe2S5 sorbent performed the best overall with capture efficiencies of 98.0% and 99.4% for (99)Tc and (238)U, respectively, and >99.0% for I2(g) over the duration of the experiment. The capture efficiencies for (99)Tc and (238)U varied between the different sorbents, ranging from 57.3-98.0% and 68.1-99.4%, respectively. All chalcogels showed >99.0% capture efficiency for iodine over the test duration. This versatile nature of chalcogels can provide an attractive option for the environmental remediation of the radionuclides associated with legacy wastes from nuclear weapons production as well as wastes generated during nuclear power production or nuclear fuel reprocessing. PMID:23763706

  1. Chalcogen-based aerogels as sorbents for radionuclide remediation.

    PubMed

    Riley, Brian J; Chun, Jaehun; Um, Wooyong; Lepry, William C; Matyas, Josef; Olszta, Matthew J; Li, Xiaohong; Polychronopoulou, Kyriaki; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2013-07-01

    The efficient capture of radionuclides with long half-lives such as technetium-99 ((99)Tc), uranium-238 ((238)U), and iodine-129 ((129)I) is pivotal to prevent their transport into groundwater and/or release into the atmosphere. While different sorbents have been considered for capturing each of them, in the current work, nanostructured chalcogen-based aerogels called chalcogels are shown to be very effective at capturing ionic forms of (99)Tc and (238)U, as well as nonradioactive gaseous iodine (i.e., a surrogate for (129)I2), irrespective of the sorbent polarity. The chalcogel chemistries studied were Co0.7Bi0.3MoS4, Co0.7Cr0.3MoS4, Co0.5Ni0.5MoS4, PtGe2S5, and Sn2S3. The PtGe2S5 sorbent performed the best overall with capture efficiencies of 98.0% and 99.4% for (99)Tc and (238)U, respectively, and >99.0% for I2(g) over the duration of the experiment. The capture efficiencies for (99)Tc and (238)U varied between the different sorbents, ranging from 57.3-98.0% and 68.1-99.4%, respectively. All chalcogels showed >99.0% capture efficiency for iodine over the test duration. This versatile nature of chalcogels can provide an attractive option for the environmental remediation of the radionuclides associated with legacy wastes from nuclear weapons production as well as wastes generated during nuclear power production or nuclear fuel reprocessing.

  2. Spermatozoa capture HIV-1 through heparan sulfate and efficiently transmit the virus to dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Ceballos, Ana; Remes Lenicov, Federico; Sabatté, Juan; Rodríguez Rodrígues, Christian; Cabrini, Mercedes; Jancic, Carolina; Raiden, Silvina; Donaldson, Mónica; Agustín Pasqualini, Rodolfo; Marin-Briggiler, Clara; Vazquez-Levin, Mónica; Capani, Francisco; Amigorena, Sebastián

    2009-01-01

    Semen is the main vector for HIV-1 dissemination worldwide. It contains three major sources of infectious virus: free virions, infected leukocytes, and spermatozoa-associated virions. We focused on the interaction of HIV-1 with human spermatozoa and dendritic cells (DCs). We report that heparan sulfate is expressed in spermatozoa and plays an important role in the capture of HIV-1. Spermatozoa-attached virus is efficiently transmitted to DCs, macrophages, and T cells. Interaction of spermatozoa with DCs not only leads to the transmission of HIV-1 and the internalization of the spermatozoa but also results in the phenotypic maturation of DCs and the production of IL-10 but not IL-12p70. At low values of extracellular pH (∼6.5 pH units), similar to those found in the vaginal mucosa after sexual intercourse, the binding of HIV-1 to the spermatozoa and the consequent transmission of HIV-1 to DCs were strongly enhanced. Our observations support the notion that far from being a passive carrier, spermatozoa acting in concert with DCs might affect the early course of sexual transmission of HIV-1 infection. PMID:19858326

  3. Incorporation of noble metals into aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Hair, Lucy M.; Sanner, Robert D.; Coronado, Paul R.

    1998-01-01

    Aerogels or xerogels containing atomically dispersed noble metals for applications such environmental remediation. New noble metal precursors, such as Pt--Si or Pd(Si--P).sub.2, have been created to bridge the incompatibility between noble metals and oxygen, followed by their incorporation into the aerogel or xerogel through sol-gel chemistry and processing. Applications include oxidation of hydrocarbons and reduction of nitrogen oxide species, complete oxidation of volatile organic carbon species, oxidative membranes for photocatalysis and partial oxidation for synthetic applications.

  4. Monolithic aerogels with nanoporous crystalline phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, Christophe; Guerra, Gaetano

    2015-05-01

    High porosity monolithic aerogels with nanoporous crystalline phases can be obtained from syndiotactic polystyrene and poly(2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene)oxide thermoreversible gels by removing the solvent with supercritical CO2. The presence of crystalline nanopores in the aerogels based on these polymers allows a high uptake associated with a high selectivity of volatile organic compounds from vapor phase or aqueous solutions even at very low activities. The sorption and the fast kinetics make these materials particularly suitable as sorption medium to remove traces of pollutants from water and moist air.

  5. Tailoring aerogel electrodes for electrochemical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Jeffrey Steven

    2001-07-01

    The principal theme of the dissertation research was determining the relation between aerogel electrode morphology and electrochemical performance. Issues such as electrical wiring and mass transport in transition metal oxide, aerogel electrodes were addressed and designs were tailored for electrochemical applications. Single-wall carbon nanotubes were used to form the electronically conducting network in lithium intercalation electrodes that incorporated vanadium oxide aerogel as the active material. The similarities in morphology and dimensional scale for the nanotubes and V2O5 ribbons enabled excellent electrical contact to be made between the two phases without seriously affecting the aerogel nanostructure. The electrodes exhibited specific capacities in excess of 400 mAh/g at high discharge rates and retained this level of capacity on cycling. A second research goal was to improve mass transport within the aerogel electrode by minimizing tortuosity. In this research, hierarchically ordered vanadium oxide aerogel electrodes were designed and fabricated. The electrodes have two discrete and independent levels or porosity. At one level, ordered, interconnected macropores were fabricated using the templating process. At another level, interconnected mesopores were created using sol-gel synthesis and ambient drying. Electrochemical activity towards lithium was demonstrated using cyclic voltammetry and chronopotentiometry. These data are believed to be the first to demonstrate electrochemical activity for the class of materials based on the inverse opal structure. Several Group I cations and multivalent cations were reversibly, and electrochemically reacted with vanadium oxide aerogel. The molar capacities of the Group I elements (Na+ = 3.0 moles and K+ = 2.0) were high and comparable to Li+ (3.6 moles). Interestingly, the electron equivalent capacity for Mg2+ (4.0) was higher than Li+ and agrees well with the chemical titration capacity. Galvanostatic rate

  6. Incorporation of noble metals into aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Hair, L.M.; Sanner, R.D.; Coronado, P.R.

    1998-12-22

    Aerogels or xerogels containing atomically dispersed noble metals for applications such as environmental remediation are disclosed. New noble metal precursors, such as Pt--Si or Pd(Si--P){sub 2}, have been created to bridge the incompatibility between noble metals and oxygen, followed by their incorporation into the aerogel or xerogel through sol-gel chemistry and processing. Applications include oxidation of hydrocarbons and reduction of nitrogen oxide species, complete oxidation of volatile organic carbon species, oxidative membranes for photocatalysis and partial oxidation for synthetic applications.

  7. Capture and release of cancer cells using electrospun etchable MnO2 nanofibers integrated in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui-qin; Yu, Xiao-lei; Cai, Bo; You, Su-jian; He, Zhao-bo; Huang, Qin-qin; Rao, Lang; Li, Sha-sha; Liu, Chang; Sun, Wei-wei; Liu, Wei; Guo, Shi-shang; Zhao, Xing-zhong

    2015-03-01

    This paper introduces a cancer cell capture/release microchip based on the self-sacrificed MnO2 nanofibers. Through electrospinning, lift-off and soft-lithography procedures, MnO2 nanofibers are tactfully fabricated in microchannels to implement enrichment and release of cancer cells in liquid samples. The MnO2 nanofiber net which mimics the extra cellular matrix can lead to high capture ability with the help of a cancer cell-specific antibody bio-conjugation. Subsequently, an effective and friendly release method is carried out by using low concentration of oxalic acid to dissolve the MnO2 nanofiber substrate while keeping high viability of those released cancer cells at the same time. It is conceivable that our microchip may have potentials in realizing biomedical analysis of circulating tumor cells for biological and clinical researches in oncology.

  8. Cell death and renewal during prey capture and digestion in the carnivorous sponge Asbestopluma hypogea (Porifera: Poecilosclerida).

    PubMed

    Martinand-Mari, Camille; Vacelet, Jean; Nickel, Michael; Wörheide, Gert; Mangeat, Paul; Baghdiguian, Stephen

    2012-11-15

    The sponge Asbestopluma hypogea is unusual among sponges due to its peculiar carnivorous feeding habit. During various stages of its nutrition cycle, the sponge is subjected to spectacular morphological modifications. Starved animals are characterized by many elongated filaments, which are crucial for the capture of prey. After capture, and during the digestion process, these filaments actively regress before being regenerated during a subsequent period of starvation. Here, we demonstrate that these morphological events rely on a highly dynamic cellular turnover, implying a coordinated sequence of programmed cell death (apoptosis and autophagy), cell proliferation and cell migration. A candidate niche for cell renewal by stem cell proliferation and differentiation was identified at the base of the sponge peduncle, characterized by higher levels of BrdU/EdU incorporation. Therefore, BrdU/EdU-positive cells of the peduncle base are candidate motile cells responsible for the regeneration of the prey-capturing main sponge body, i.e. the dynamic filaments. Altogether, our results demonstrate that dynamics of cell renewal in sponge appear to be regulated by cellular mechanisms as multiple and complex as those already identified in bilaterian metazoans.

  9. Formation of Carbon Nanostructures in Cobalt- and Nickel-Doped Carbon Aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, R; Baumann, T F; Cronin, S; Dresselhaus, G; Dresselhaus, M; Satcher, Jr., J H

    2004-11-09

    We have prepared carbon aerogels (CAs) doped with cobalt or nickel through sol-gel polymerization of formaldehyde with the potassium salt of 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, followed by ion-exchange with M(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} (where M = Co{sup 2+} or Ni{sup 2+}), supercritical drying with liquid CO{sub 2} and carbonization at temperatures between 400 C and 1050 C under an N{sub 2} atmosphere. The nanostructures of these metal-doped carbon aerogels were characterized by elemental analysis, nitrogen adsorption, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Metallic nickel and cobalt nanoparticles are generated during the carbonization process at about 400 C and 450 C, respectively, forming nanoparticles that are {approx}4 nm in diameter. The sizes and size dispersion of the metal particles increase with increasing carbonization temperatures for both materials. The carbon frameworks of the Ni- and Co-doped aerogels carbonized below 600 C mainly consist of interconnected carbon particles with a size of 15 to 30 nm. When the samples are pyrolyzed at 1050 C, the growth of graphitic nanoribbons with different curvatures is observed in the Ni and Co-doped carbon aerogel materials. The distance of graphite layers in the nanoribbons is about 0.38 nm. These metal-doped CAs retain the overall open cell structure of metal-free CAs, exhibiting high surface areas and pore diameters in the micro and mesoporic region.

  10. Encapsulating Cytochrome c in Silica Aerogel Nanoarchitectures without Metal Nanoparticles while Retaining Gas-phase Bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Harper-Leatherman, Amanda S.; Pacer, Elizabeth R.; Kosciuszek, Nina D.

    2016-01-01

    Applications such as sensors, batteries, and fuel cells have been improved through the use of highly porous aerogels when functional compounds are encapsulated within the aerogels. However, few reports on encapsulating proteins within sol–gels that are processed to form aerogels exist. A procedure for encapsulating cytochrome c (cyt. c) in silica (SiO2) sol-gels that are supercritically processed to form bioaerogels with gas-phase activity for nitric oxide (NO) is presented. Cyt. c is added to a mixed silica sol under controlled protein concentration and buffer strength conditions. The sol mixture is then gelled and the liquid filling the gel pores is replaced through a series of solvent exchanges with liquid carbon dioxide. The carbon dioxide is brought to its critical point and vented off to form dry aerogels with cyt. c encapsulated inside. These bioaerogels are characterized with UV-visible spectroscopy and circular dichroism spectroscopy and can be used to detect the presence of gas-phase nitric oxide. The success of this procedure depends on regulating the cyt. c concentration and the buffer concentration and does not require other components such as metal nanoparticles. It may be possible to encapsulate other proteins using a similar approach making this procedure important for potential future bioanalytical device development. PMID:26967257

  11. Encapsulating Cytochrome c in Silica Aerogel Nanoarchitectures without Metal Nanoparticles while Retaining Gas-phase Bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Harper-Leatherman, Amanda S; Pacer, Elizabeth R; Kosciuszek, Nina D

    2016-01-01

    Applications such as sensors, batteries, and fuel cells have been improved through the use of highly porous aerogels when functional compounds are encapsulated within the aerogels. However, few reports on encapsulating proteins within sol-gels that are processed to form aerogels exist. A procedure for encapsulating cytochrome c (cyt. c) in silica (SiO2) sol-gels that are supercritically processed to form bioaerogels with gas-phase activity for nitric oxide (NO) is presented. Cyt. c is added to a mixed silica sol under controlled protein concentration and buffer strength conditions. The sol mixture is then gelled and the liquid filling the gel pores is replaced through a series of solvent exchanges with liquid carbon dioxide. The carbon dioxide is brought to its critical point and vented off to form dry aerogels with cyt. c encapsulated inside. These bioaerogels are characterized with UV-visible spectroscopy and circular dichroism spectroscopy and can be used to detect the presence of gas-phase nitric oxide. The success of this procedure depends on regulating the cyt. c concentration and the buffer concentration and does not require other components such as metal nanoparticles. It may be possible to encapsulate other proteins using a similar approach making this procedure important for potential future bioanalytical device development. PMID:26967257

  12. An emerging platform for drug delivery: aerogel based systems.

    PubMed

    Ulker, Zeynep; Erkey, Can

    2014-03-10

    Over the past few decades, advances in "aerogel science" have provoked an increasing interest for these materials in pharmaceutical sciences for drug delivery applications. Because of their high surface areas, high porosities and open pore structures which can be tuned and controlled by manipulation of synthesis conditions, nanostructured aerogels represent a promising class of materials for delivery of various drugs as well as enzymes and proteins. Along with biocompatible inorganic aerogels and biodegradable organic aerogels, more complex systems such as surface functionalized aerogels, composite aerogels and layered aerogels have also been under development and possess huge potential. Emphasis is given to the details of the aerogel synthesis and drug loading methods as well as the influence of synthesis parameters and loading methods on the adsorption and release of the drugs. Owing to their ability to increase the bioavailability of low solubility drugs, to improve both their stability and their release kinetics, there are an increasing number of research articles concerning aerogels in different drug delivery applications. This review presents an up to date overview of the advances in all kinds of aerogel based drug delivery systems which are currently under investigation.

  13. Microbial carbon capture cell using cyanobacteria for simultaneous power generation, carbon dioxide sequestration and wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Soumya; Nayak, Bikram Kumar; Das, Debabrata

    2012-03-01

    Microbial carbon capture cells (MCCs) were constructed with cyanobacteria growing in a photo biocathode in dual-chambered flat plate mediator-less MFCs separated by an anion exchange membrane from the anode compartment containing Shewanella putrefaciens. The performance of the MCC with Anabaena sparged with CO(2)-air mixture was compared with that of a conventional cathode sparged with air only. The power densities achieved were 57.8 mW/m(2) for Anabaena sparged with a CO(2)-air mixture, 39.2 mW/m(2) for CO(2)-air mixture sparging only, 29.7 mW/m(2) for Anabaena sparged with air, and 19.6 mW/m(2) for air sparging only. The pH of the cathode containing Anabaena gradually increased from 7 to 9.12 and power generation decreased from 34.7 to 23.8 mW/m(2) 17 due to pH imbalance associated voltage losses without CO(2)-air mixture sparging. Sparging with a 5% CO(2)-air mixture produced maximum power of 100.1 mW/m(2). In addition, the power density of MCC increased by 31% when nitrate was added into the catholyte.

  14. Stripe-like Clay Nanotubes Patterns in Glass Capillary Tubes for Capture of Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingxian; He, Rui; Yang, Jing; Zhao, Wei; Zhou, Changren

    2016-03-01

    Here, we used capillary tubes to evaporate an aqueous dispersion of halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) in a controlled manner to prepare a patterned surface with ordered alignment of the nanotubes . Sodium polystyrenesulfonate (PSS) was added to improve the surface charges of the tubes. An increased negative charge of HNTs is realized by PSS coating (from -26.1 mV to -52.2 mV). When the HNTs aqueous dispersion concentration is higher than 10%, liquid crystal phenomenon of the dispersion is found. A typical shear flow behavior and decreased viscosity upon shear is found when HNTs dispersions with concentrations higher than 10%. Upon drying the HNTs aqueous dispersion in capillary tubes, a regular pattern is formed in the wall of the tube. The width and spacing of the bands increase with HNTs dispersion concentration and decrease with the drying temperature for a given initial concentration. Morphology results show that an ordered alignment of HNTs is found especially for the sample of 10%. The patterned surface can be used as a model for preparing PDMS molding with regular micro-/nanostructure. Also, the HNTs rough surfaces can provide much higher tumor cell capture efficiency compared to blank glass surfaces. The HNTs ordered surfaces provide promising application for biomedical areas such as biosensors. PMID:26967539

  15. Carbon Aerogels for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, T F; Worsley, M; Satcher, J H

    2008-08-11

    This effort is focused on the design of new nanostructured carbon-based materials that meet the DOE 2010 targets for on-board vehicle hydrogen storage. Carbon aerogels (CAs) are a unique class of porous materials that possess a number of desirable structural features for the storage of hydrogen, including high surface areas (over 3000 m{sup 2}/g), continuous and tunable porosities, and variable densities. In addition, the flexibility associated with CA synthesis allows for the incorporation of modifiers or catalysts into the carbon matrix in order to alter hydrogen sorption enthalpies in these materials. Since the properties of the doped CAs can be systematically modified (i.e. amount/type of dopant, surface area, porosity), novel materials can be fabricated that exhibit enhanced hydrogen storage properties. We are using this approach to design new H{sub 2} sorbent materials that can storage appreciable amounts of hydrogen at room temperature through a process known as hydrogen spillover. The spillover process involves the dissociative chemisorption of molecular hydrogen on a supported metal catalyst surface (e.g. platinum or nickel), followed by the diffusion of atomic hydrogen onto the surface of the support material. Due to the enhanced interaction between atomic hydrogen and the carbon support, hydrogen can be stored in the support material at more reasonable operating temperatures. While the spillover process has been shown to increase the reversible hydrogen storage capacities at room temperature in metal-loaded carbon nanostructures, a number of issues still exist with this approach, including slow kinetics of H{sub 2} uptake and capacities ({approx} 1.2 wt% on carbon) below the DOE targets. The ability to tailor different structural aspects of the spillover system (i.e. the size/shape of the catalyst particle, the catalyst-support interface and the support morphology) should provide valuable mechanistic information regarding the critical aspects of the

  16. Manufacturing complex silica aerogel target components

    SciTech Connect

    Defriend Obrey, Kimberly Ann; Day, Robert D; Espinoza, Brent F; Hatch, Doug; Patterson, Brian M; Feng, Shihai

    2008-01-01

    Aerogel is a material used in numerous components in High Energy Density Physics targets. In the past these components were molded into the proper shapes. Artifacts left in the parts from the molding process, such as contour irregularities from shrinkage and density gradients caused by the skin, have caused LANL to pursue machining as a way to make the components.

  17. Lightweight and thermally insulating aerogel glass materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Tao; Jelle, Bjørn Petter; Gustavsen, Arild; He, Jianying

    2014-07-01

    Glass represents an important and widely used building material, and crucial aspects to be addressed include thermal conductivity, visible light transmittance, and weight for windows with improved energy efficiency. In this work, by sintering monolithic silica aerogel precursors at elevated temperatures, aerogel glass materials were successfully prepared, which were characterized by low thermal conductivity [k ≈ 0.17-0.18 W/(mK)], high visible transparency (T vis ≈ 91-96 % at 500 nm), low density (ρ ≈ 1.60-1.79 g/cm3), and enhanced mechanical strength (typical elastic modulus E r ≈ 2.0-6.4 GPa). These improved properties were derived from a series of successive gelation and aging steps during the desiccation of silica aerogels. The involved sol → gel → glass transformation was investigated by means of thermo-gravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy, nanoindentation, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Strategies of improving further the mechanical strength of the obtained aerogel glass materials are also discussed.

  18. Aerogel insulation systems for space launch applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fesmire, J. E.

    2006-02-01

    New developments in materials science in the areas of solution gelation processes and nanotechnology have led to the recent commercial production of aerogels. Concurrent with these advancements has been the development of new approaches to cryogenic thermal insulation systems. For example, thermal and physical characterizations of aerogel beads under cryogenic-vacuum conditions have been performed at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory of the NASA Kennedy Space Center. Aerogel-based insulation system demonstrations have also been conducted to improve performance for space launch applications. Subscale cryopumping experiments show the thermal insulating ability of these fully breathable nanoporous materials. For a properly executed thermal insulation system, these breathable aerogel systems are shown to not cryopump beyond the initial cooldown and thermal stabilization phase. New applications are being developed to augment the thermal protection systems of space launch vehicles, including the Space Shuttle External Tank. These applications include a cold-boundary temperature of 90 K with an ambient air environment in which both weather and flight aerodynamics are important considerations. Another application is a nitrogen-purged environment with a cold-boundary temperature of 20 K where both initial cooldown and launch ascent profiles must be considered. Experimental results and considerations for these flight system applications are discussed.

  19. Aerogel Insulation Systems for Space Launch Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, James E.

    2005-01-01

    New developments in materials science in the areas of solution gelation processes and nanotechnology have led to the recent commercial production of aerogels. Concurrent with these advancements has been the development of new approaches to cryogenic thermal insulation systems. For example, thermal and physical characterizations of aerogel beads under cryogenic-vacuum conditions have been performed at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory of the NASA Kennedy Space Center. Aerogel-based insulation system demonstrations have also been conducted to improve performance for space launch applications. Subscale cryopumping experiments show the thermal insulating ability of these fully breathable nanoporous materials. For a properly executed thermal insulation system, these breathable aerogel systems are shown to not cryopump beyond the initial cooldown and thermal stabilization phase. New applications are being developed to augment the thermal protection systems of space launch vehicles, including the Space Shuttle External Tank. These applications include a cold-boundary temperature of 90 K with an ambient air environment in which both weather and flight aerodynamics are important considerations. Another application is a nitrogen-purged environment with a cold-boundary temperature of 20 K where both initial cooldown and launch ascent profiles must be considered. Experimental results and considerations for these flight system applications are discussed.

  20. Mechanically Robust Polymer-Graphene Aerogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Heonjoo; Shanmuganathan, Kadhiravan; Ellison, Christopher

    2015-03-01

    Graphene has been intensely studied for the past several years due to its many attractive properties. Graphene oxide (GO) aerogels are particularly interesting due to their light weight and excellent performance in various applications, such as environmental remediation, super-hydrophobic and super-oleophilic materials, energy storage, etc. However, GO aerogels are generally weak and delicate which complicates their handling and potentially limits their application outside the research lab. The focus of this work is to synthesize mechanically stable aerogels that are robust and easy to handle without substantially sacrificing their low density. To overcome this challenge, we found that by intermixing a small amount of readily available and thermally crosslinkable polymer can enhance the mechanical properties without disrupting other characteristic intrinsic properties of the aerogel itself. This method is a simple straight-forward procedure that does not include any tedious chemical reactions or harsh chemicals. Furthermore, we will demonstrate the performance of these materials as a super-absorbent and pressure sensor.

  1. View of a Cometary Impact Into Aerogel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Closeup view of a cometary impact (upper right) into aerogel was inspected by scientists at a laboratory at the Johnson Space Center hours after the Stardust Sample Return Canister was delivered to the Johnson Space Center from the spacecraft's landing site in Utah.

  2. Strong, conductive, lightweight, neat graphene aerogel fibers with aligned pores.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhen; Zhang, Yuan; Li, Peigang; Gao, Chao

    2012-08-28

    Liquid crystals of anisotropic colloids are of great significance in the preparation of their ordered macroscopic materials, for example, in the cases of carbon nanotubes and graphene. Here, we report a facile and scalable spinning process to prepare neat "core-shell" structured graphene aerogel fibers and three-dimensional cylinders with aligned pores from the flowing liquid crystalline graphene oxide (GO) gels. The uniform alignment of graphene sheets, inheriting the lamellar orders from GO liquid crystals, offers the porous fibers high specific tensile strength (188 kN m kg(-1)) and the porous cylinders high compression modulus (3.3 MPa). The porous graphene fibers have high specific surface area up to 884 m(2) g(-1) due to their interconnected pores and exhibit fine electrical conductivity (2.6 × 10(3) to 4.9 × 10(3) S m(-1)) in the wide temperature range of 5-300 K. The decreasing conductivity with decreasing temperature illustrates a typical semiconducting behavior, and the 3D interconnected network of 2D graphene sheets determines a dual 2D and 3D hopping conduction mechanism. The strong mechanical strength, high porosity, and fine electrical conductivity enable this novel material of ordered graphene aerogels to be greatly useful in versatile catalysts, supercapacitors, flexible batteries and cells, lightweight conductive fibers, and functional textiles. PMID:22799441

  3. Aerogel and xerogel composites for use as carbon anodes

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.; Tillotson, Thomas M.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.

    2010-10-12

    A method for forming a reinforced rigid anode monolith and fuel and product of such method. The method includes providing a solution of organic aerogel or xerogel precursors including at least one of a phenolic resin, phenol (hydroxybenzene), resorcinol(1,3-dihydroxybenzene), or catechol(1,2-dihydroxybenzene); at least one aldehyde compound selected from the group consisting of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and furfuraldehyde; and an alkali carbonate or phosphoric acid catalyst; adding internal reinforcement materials comprising carbon to said precursor solution to form a precursor mixture; gelling said precursor mixture to form a composite gel; drying said composite gel; and pyrolyzing said composite gel to form a wettable aerogel/carbon composite or a wettable xerogel/carbon composite, wherein said composites comprise chars and said internal reinforcement materials, and wherein said composite is suitable for use as an anode with the chars being fuel capable of being combusted in a molten salt electrochemical fuel cell in the range from 500 C to 800 C to produce electrical energy. Additional methods and systems/compositions are also provided.

  4. Strong, conductive, lightweight, neat graphene aerogel fibers with aligned pores.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhen; Zhang, Yuan; Li, Peigang; Gao, Chao

    2012-08-28

    Liquid crystals of anisotropic colloids are of great significance in the preparation of their ordered macroscopic materials, for example, in the cases of carbon nanotubes and graphene. Here, we report a facile and scalable spinning process to prepare neat "core-shell" structured graphene aerogel fibers and three-dimensional cylinders with aligned pores from the flowing liquid crystalline graphene oxide (GO) gels. The uniform alignment of graphene sheets, inheriting the lamellar orders from GO liquid crystals, offers the porous fibers high specific tensile strength (188 kN m kg(-1)) and the porous cylinders high compression modulus (3.3 MPa). The porous graphene fibers have high specific surface area up to 884 m(2) g(-1) due to their interconnected pores and exhibit fine electrical conductivity (2.6 × 10(3) to 4.9 × 10(3) S m(-1)) in the wide temperature range of 5-300 K. The decreasing conductivity with decreasing temperature illustrates a typical semiconducting behavior, and the 3D interconnected network of 2D graphene sheets determines a dual 2D and 3D hopping conduction mechanism. The strong mechanical strength, high porosity, and fine electrical conductivity enable this novel material of ordered graphene aerogels to be greatly useful in versatile catalysts, supercapacitors, flexible batteries and cells, lightweight conductive fibers, and functional textiles.

  5. Functionalization and cellular uptake of boron carbide nanoparticles. The first step toward T cell-guided boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, M W; Björkdahl, O; Sørensen, P G; Hansen, T; Jensen, M R; Gundersen, H J G; Bjørnholm, T

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present surface modification strategies of boron carbide nanoparticles, which allow for bioconjugation of the transacting transcriptional activator (TAT) peptide and fluorescent dyes. Coated nanoparticles can be translocated into murine EL4 thymoma cells and B16 F10 malignant melanoma cells in amounts as high as 0.3 wt. % and 1 wt. %, respectively. Neutron irradiation of a test system consisting of untreated B16 cells mixed with B16 cells loaded with boron carbide nanoparticles were found to inhibit the proliferative capacity of untreated cells, showing that cells loaded with boron-containing nanoparticles can hinder the growth of neighboring cells upon neutron irradiation. This could provide the first step toward a T cell-guided boron neutron capture therapy.

  6. Impact of polishing on the light scattering at aerogel surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnyakov, A. Yu.; Barnyakov, M. Yu.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Danilyuk, A. F.; Katcin, A. A.; Kononov, S. A.; Kirilenko, P. S.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Kuyanov, I. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Ovtin, I. V.; Predein, A. Yu.; Protsenko, R. S.

    2016-07-01

    Particle identification power of modern aerogel RICH detectors strongly depends on optical quality of radiators. It was shown that wavelength dependence of aerogel tile transparency after polishing cannot be described by the standard Hunt formula. The Hunt formula has been modified to describe scattering in a thin layer of silica dust on the surface of aerogel tile. Several procedures of polishing of aerogel tile have been tested. The best result has been achieved while using natural silk tissue. The resulting block has optical smooth surfaces. The measured decrease of aerogel transparency due to surface scattering is about few percent. This result could be used for production of radiators for the Focusing Aerogel RICH detectors.

  7. Flexible aerogel composite for mechanical stability and process of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Coronado, Paul R.; Poco, John F.

    1999-01-01

    A flexible aerogel and process of fabrication. An aerogel solution is mixed with fibers in a mold and allowed to gel. The gel is then processed by supercritical extraction, or by air drying, to produce a flexible aerogel formed to the shape of the mold. The flexible aerogel has excellent thermal and acoustic properties, and can be utilized in numerous applications, such as for energy absorption, insulation (temperature and acoustic), to meet the contours of aircraft shapes, and where space is limited since an inch of aerogel is a 4-5 times better insulator than an inch of fiberglass. The flexible aerogel may be of an inorganic (silica) type or an organic (carbon) type, but containing fibers, such as glass or carbon fibers.

  8. Flexible aerogel composite for mechanical stability and process of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Coronado, Paul R.; Poco, John F.

    2000-01-01

    A flexible aerogel and process of fabrication. An aerogel solution is mixed with fibers in a mold and allowed to gel. The gel is then processed by supercritical extraction, or by air drying, to produce a flexible aerogel formed to the shape of the mold. The flexible aerogel has excellent thermal and acoustic properties, and can be utilized in numerous applications, such as for energy absorption, insulation (temperature and acoustic), to meet the contours of aircraft shapes, and where space is limited since an inch of aerogel is a 4-5 times better insulator than an inch of fiberglass. The flexible aerogel may be of an inorganic (silica) type or an organic (carbon) type, but containing fibers, such as glass or carbon fibers.

  9. Highly compressible 3D periodic graphene aerogel microlattices

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Cheng; Han, T. Yong-Jin; Duoss, Eric B.; Golobic, Alexandra M.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Worsley, Marcus A.

    2015-01-01

    Graphene is a two-dimensional material that offers a unique combination of low density, exceptional mechanical properties, large surface area and excellent electrical conductivity. Recent progress has produced bulk 3D assemblies of graphene, such as graphene aerogels, but they possess purely stochastic porous networks, which limit their performance compared with the potential of an engineered architecture. Here we report the fabrication of periodic graphene aerogel microlattices, possessing an engineered architecture via a 3D printing technique known as direct ink writing. The 3D printed graphene aerogels are lightweight, highly conductive and exhibit supercompressibility (up to 90% compressive strain). Moreover, the Young's moduli of the 3D printed graphene aerogels show an order of magnitude improvement over bulk graphene materials with comparable geometric density and possess large surface areas. Adapting the 3D printing technique to graphene aerogels realizes the possibility of fabricating a myriad of complex aerogel architectures for a broad range of applications. PMID:25902277

  10. Synthesis and biomedical applications of aerogels: Possibilities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Maleki, Hajar; Durães, Luisa; García-González, Carlos A; Del Gaudio, Pasquale; Portugal, António; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2016-10-01

    Aerogels are an exceptional group of nanoporous materials with outstanding physicochemical properties. Due to their unique physical, chemical, and mechanical properties, aerogels are recognized as promising candidates for diverse applications including, thermal insulation, catalysis, environmental cleaning up, chemical sensors, acoustic transducers, energy storage devices, metal casting molds and water repellant coatings. Here, we have provided a comprehensive overview on the synthesis, processing and drying methods of the mostly investigated types of aerogels used in the biological and biomedical contexts, including silica aerogels, silica-polymer composites, polymeric and biopolymer aerogels. In addition, the very recent challenges on these aerogels with regard to their applicability in biomedical field as well as for personalized medicine applications are considered and explained in detail.

  11. Flexible aerogel composite for mechanical stability and process of fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Coronado, P.R.; Poco, J.F.

    1999-10-26

    A flexible aerogel and process of fabrication are disclosed. An aerogel solution is mixed with fibers in a mold and allowed to gel. The gel is then processed by supercritical extraction, or by air drying, to produce a flexible aerogel formed to the shape of the mold. The flexible aerogel has excellent thermal and acoustic properties, and can be utilized in numerous applications, such as for energy absorption, insulation (temperature and acoustic), to meet the contours of aircraft shapes, and where space is limited since an inch of aerogel is a 4--5 times better insulator than an inch of fiberglass. The flexible aerogel may be of an inorganic (silica) type or an organic (carbon) type, but containing fibers, such as glass or carbon fibers.

  12. Flexible aerogel composite for mechanical stability and process of fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Coronado, P.R.; Poco, J.F.

    2000-07-11

    A flexible aerogel and process of fabrication are disclosed. An aerogel solution is mixed with fibers in a mold and allowed to gel. The gel is then processed by supercritical extraction, or by air drying, to produce a flexible aerogel formed to the shape of the mold. The flexible aerogel has excellent thermal and acoustic properties, and can be utilized in numerous applications, such as for energy absorption, insulation (temperature and acoustic), to meet the contours of aircraft shapes, and where space is limited since an inch of aerogel is a 4--5 times better insulator than an inch of fiberglass. The flexible aerogel may be of an inorganic (silica) type or an organic (carbon) type, but containing fibers, such as glass or carbon fibers.

  13. Evaluating Dimethyldiethoxysilane for use in Polyurethane Crosslinked Silica Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, Jason P.; Meador, Mary Ann B.; Jana, Sadhan C.

    2008-01-01

    Silica aerogels are highly porous materials which exhibit exceptionally low density and thermal conductivity. Their "pearl necklace" nanostructure, however, is inherently weak; most silica aerogels are brittle and fragile. The strength of aerogels can be improved by employing an additional crosslinking step using isocyanates. In this work, dimethyldiethoxysilane (DMDES) is evaluated for use in the silane backbone of polyurethane crosslinked aerogels. Approximately half of the resulting aerogels exhibited a core/shell morphology of hard crosslinked aerogel surrounding a softer, uncrosslinked center. Solid state NMR and scanning electron microscopy results indicate the DMDES incorporated itself as a conformal coating around the outside of the secondary silica particles, in much the same manner as isocyanate crosslinking. Response surface curves were generated from compression data, indicating levels of reinforcement comparable to that in previous literature, despite the core/shell morphology.

  14. Highly compressible 3D periodic graphene aerogel microlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Cheng; Han, T. Yong-Jin; Duoss, Eric B.; Golobic, Alexandra M.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Worsley, Marcus A.

    2015-04-22

    Graphene is a two-dimensional material that offers a unique combination of low density, exceptional mechanical properties, large surface area and excellent electrical conductivity. Recent progress has produced bulk 3D assemblies of graphene, such as graphene aerogels, but they possess purely stochastic porous networks, which limit their performance compared with the potential of an engineered architecture. Here we report the fabrication of periodic graphene aerogel microlattices, possessing an engineered architecture via a 3D printing technique known as direct ink writing. The 3D printed graphene aerogels are lightweight, highly conductive and exhibit supercompressibility (up to 90% compressive strain). Moreover, the Young’s moduli of the 3D printed graphene aerogels show an order of magnitude improvement over bulk graphene materials with comparable geometric density and possess large surface areas. Ultimately, adapting the 3D printing technique to graphene aerogels realizes the possibility of fabricating a myriad of complex aerogel architectures for a broad range of applications.

  15. Catalytic graphitization of carbon aerogels by transition metals

    SciTech Connect

    Maldonado-Hodar, F.J.; Moreno-Castilla, C.; Rivera-Utrilla, J.; Hanzawa, Y.; Yamada, Y.

    2000-05-02

    Carbon aerogels and Cr-, Fe-, Co-, and Ni-containing carbon aerogels were obtained by pyrolysis, at temperatures between 500 and 1,800 C, of the corresponding aerogels prepared by the sol-gel method from polymerization of resorcinol with formaldehyde. All samples were characterized by mercury porosimetry, nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and Raman spectroscopy. Results obtained show that carbon aerogels are, essentially, macroporous materials that maintain large pore volumes even after pyrolysis at 1,800 C. For pyrolysis at temperatures higher than 1,000 C, the presence of the transition metals produced graphitized areas with three-dimensional stacking order, as shown by HRTEM, XRD, and Raman spectroscopy. HRTEM also showed that the metal-carbon containing aerogels were formed by polyhedral structures. Cr and Fe seem to be the best catalysts for graphitization of carbon aerogels.

  16. Synthesis and biomedical applications of aerogels: Possibilities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Maleki, Hajar; Durães, Luisa; García-González, Carlos A; Del Gaudio, Pasquale; Portugal, António; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2016-10-01

    Aerogels are an exceptional group of nanoporous materials with outstanding physicochemical properties. Due to their unique physical, chemical, and mechanical properties, aerogels are recognized as promising candidates for diverse applications including, thermal insulation, catalysis, environmental cleaning up, chemical sensors, acoustic transducers, energy storage devices, metal casting molds and water repellant coatings. Here, we have provided a comprehensive overview on the synthesis, processing and drying methods of the mostly investigated types of aerogels used in the biological and biomedical contexts, including silica aerogels, silica-polymer composites, polymeric and biopolymer aerogels. In addition, the very recent challenges on these aerogels with regard to their applicability in biomedical field as well as for personalized medicine applications are considered and explained in detail. PMID:27321857

  17. Highly compressible 3D periodic graphene aerogel microlattices.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Cheng; Han, T Yong-Jin; Duoss, Eric B; Golobic, Alexandra M; Kuntz, Joshua D; Spadaccini, Christopher M; Worsley, Marcus A

    2015-04-22

    Graphene is a two-dimensional material that offers a unique combination of low density, exceptional mechanical properties, large surface area and excellent electrical conductivity. Recent progress has produced bulk 3D assemblies of graphene, such as graphene aerogels, but they possess purely stochastic porous networks, which limit their performance compared with the potential of an engineered architecture. Here we report the fabrication of periodic graphene aerogel microlattices, possessing an engineered architecture via a 3D printing technique known as direct ink writing. The 3D printed graphene aerogels are lightweight, highly conductive and exhibit supercompressibility (up to 90% compressive strain). Moreover, the Young's moduli of the 3D printed graphene aerogels show an order of magnitude improvement over bulk graphene materials with comparable geometric density and possess large surface areas. Adapting the 3D printing technique to graphene aerogels realizes the possibility of fabricating a myriad of complex aerogel architectures for a broad range of applications.

  18. Highly compressible 3D periodic graphene aerogel microlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Cheng; Han, T. Yong-Jin; Duoss, Eric B.; Golobic, Alexandra M.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Worsley, Marcus A.

    2015-04-01

    Graphene is a two-dimensional material that offers a unique combination of low density, exceptional mechanical properties, large surface area and excellent electrical conductivity. Recent progress has produced bulk 3D assemblies of graphene, such as graphene aerogels, but they possess purely stochastic porous networks, which limit their performance compared with the potential of an engineered architecture. Here we report the fabrication of periodic graphene aerogel microlattices, possessing an engineered architecture via a 3D printing technique known as direct ink writing. The 3D printed graphene aerogels are lightweight, highly conductive and exhibit supercompressibility (up to 90% compressive strain). Moreover, the Young's moduli of the 3D printed graphene aerogels show an order of magnitude improvement over bulk graphene materials with comparable geometric density and possess large surface areas. Adapting the 3D printing technique to graphene aerogels realizes the possibility of fabricating a myriad of complex aerogel architectures for a broad range of applications.

  19. Capturing CD4 cells using a functionalized circular microfluidic device and glutaraldehyde as biolinker for tuberculosis detection and diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Yeu-Farn; Huang, Nien-Tsu; Lee, Chih-Kung

    2015-03-01

    It is estimated that about one-third of the world's population has already been infected by tuberculosis. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, in general, can result in an active case of tuberculosis in approximately 5%-10% of those who suffer from latent tuberculosis and the chance of becoming ill is the highest within one of year of getting the disease. Although a newly developed methods called interferon gamma release assay (IGRA) can monitor CD4 cells secreted cytokine to diagnose tuberculosis (TB) condition. However, it is difficult to count total numbers of cytokine secreted CD4 cells, which make the diagnosis less accurate. Therefore, we develop a functionalized polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) device using glutaraldehyde to capture CD4 cells. To enhance the capture efficiency, we use COMSOL simulation to optimize the arrangement of PDMS micro pillars to make cells uniformly distributed in the device. Our preliminary data showed the microfluidic configuration in a circular shape with HCP patterned micro pillars turned 30 degrees offers the highest cell capture rate.

  20. Enhancement of Capture Sensitivity for Circulating Tumor Cells in a Breast Cancer Patient's Blood by Silicon Nanowire Platform.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Joo; Choi, Mun-Ki; Jeong, Jin-Tak; Lim, Jung-Taek; Lee, Han-Byoel; Han, Wonshik; Lee, Sang-Kwon

    2016-04-01

    The separation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from the blood of cancer patients with high sensitivity is an essential technique for selecting chemotherapeutic agents at a patient-by-patient level. Recently, various research groups have reported a nanostructure-based platform for rare cell capture due to its high surface area and 3D nanotopographic features. However, evaluation of capture sensitivity based on chemical modification of the nanostructure surface has not yet been performed. Here, we evaluated the capture sensitivity for CTCs from the blood of three patients diagnosed with stage IV metastatic breast cancer by using the following three platforms: streptavidin-conjugated silicon nanowire (STR-SiNW), poly-l-lysine-coated silicon nanowire (PLL-SiNW), and poly-l-lysine-coated glass (PLL-glass). The number of evaluated CTCs on STR-SiNW, PLL-SiNW, and PLL-glass were 16.2 ± 5.5 cells, 7.3 ± 2.9 cells, and 4.7 ± 1.5 cells, respectively, per 0.5 ml. Therefore, we suggest that the STR-SiNW platform is highly adaptable for the quantitative evaluation of CTCs from the blood of cancer patients in the clinical setting.

  1. NO2 Aging and Iodine Loading of Silver-Functionalized Aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, K K; Bruffey, S H; Walker, J F; Jubin, R T

    2014-07-31

    Off-gas treatment systems in used fuel reprocessing which use fixed-bed adsorbers are typically designed to operate for an extended period of time before replacement or regeneration of the adsorbent. During this time, the sorbent material will be exposed to the off-gas stream. Exposure could last for months, depending on the replacement cycle time. The gas stream will be at elevated temperature and will possibly contain a mixture of water vapor, NOx, nitric acid vapors, and a variety of other constituents in addition to the radionuclides of capture interest. A series of studies were undertaken to evaluate the effects of long-term exposure, or aging, on proposed iodine sorbent materials under increasingly harsh off-gas conditions. Previous studies have evaluated the effects of up to 6 months of aging under dry air and under humid air conditions on the iodine loading behavior of Ag0-functionalized aerogels. This study examines the effects of extended exposure (up to 6 months) to NO2 on the iodine loading capacity of Ag0- functionalized aerogels. Material aged for 1 and 2 months appeared to have a similar total loading capacity to fresh material. Over an aging period of 4 months, a loss of approximately 15% of the total iodine capacity was seen. The iodine capacity loss on silver-functionalized aerogels due to NO2 was smaller than the iodine capacity loss due to humid or dry air aging.

  2. Observation of viscoelasticity in boron nitride nanosheet aerogel.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiaoliang; Ye, Lei; Sun, Rong; Xu, Jianbin; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2015-07-14

    The viscoelasticity of boron nitride nanosheet (BNNS) aerogel has been observed and investigated. It is found that the BNNS aerogel has a high damping ratio (0.2), while it exhibits lightweight and negligible temperature dependence below 180 °C. The creep behavior of the BNNS aerogel markedly demonstrates its strain dependence on stress magnitude and temperature, and can be well simulated by the classical models.

  3. At the interface of silica glass and compressed silica aerogel in Stardust track 10: Comet Wild 2 is not a goldmine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.

    2016-03-01

    In Stardust tracks C2044,0,38, C2044,0,39, and C2044,0,42 (Brennan et al.) and Stardust track 10 (this work) gold is present in excess of its cosmochemical abundance. Ultra-thin sections of allocation FC6,0,10,0,26 (track 10) show a somewhat wavy, compressed silica aerogel/silica glass interface which challenges exact location identification, i.e., silica glass, compressed silica aerogel, or areas of overlap. In addition to domains of pure silica ranging from SiO2 to SiO3 glass, there is MgO-rich silica glass with a deep metastable composition, MgO = 14 ± 6 wt%, due to assimilation of Wild 2 Mg-silicate matter in silica melt. This magnesiosilica composition formed when temperatures during hypervelocity capture reached >2000 °C followed by ultrafast quenching of the magnesiosilica melt when it came into contact with compressed aerogel at ~155 °C. The compressed silica aerogel in track 10 has a continuous Au background as result of the melting point depression of gold particles <5 nm that showed liquid-like behavior. Larger gold particles are scattered found throughout the silica aerogel matrix and in aggregates up to ~50 nm in size. No gold is found in MgO-rich silica glass. Gold in track 10 is present at the silica aerogel/silica glass interface. In the other tracks gold was likely near-surface contamination possibly from an autoclave used in processing of these particular aerogel tiles. So far gold contamination is documented in these four different tracks. Whether they are the only tiles with gold present in excess of its cosmochemical abundance or whether more tiles will show excess gold abundances is unknown.

  4. Thio-,amine-,nitro-,and macrocyclic containing organic aerogels & xerogels

    DOEpatents

    Fox, Glenn A.; Tillotson, Thomas M.

    2005-08-02

    An organic aerogel or xerogel formed by a sol-gel reaction using starting materials that exhibit similar reactivity to the most commonly used resorcinol starting material. The new starting materials, including thio-, amine- and nitro-containing molecules and functionalized macrocyclic molecules will produce organic xerogels and aerogels that have improved performance in the areas of detection and sensor technology, as well as water stream remediation. Also, further functionalization of these new organic aerogels or xerogels will yield material that can be extracted with greater facility than current organic aerogels.

  5. Aerogel Materials by Evaporative Drying: Potential for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plawsky, Joel L.

    1999-01-01

    Aerogel wafers were made using an evaporative drying procedure. The main steps were sol formulation, gelation, aging, capping, and drying. Of these, the most critical step was drying. Both the rate of evaporation and temperature of the system must be controlled for best results. Aerogel materials should be benchmarked against more traditional foams and current systems may have to be redesigned to make best use of aerogel strengths. Finally, the flexibility of this procedure lends itself to producing aerogel materials for many uses other than insulation. Such uses may include catalysis, sensing, and composite materials.

  6. Multiscale Modeling of Heat Conduction in Carbon Nanotube Aerogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Feng; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios; Duong, Hai

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) aerogels have attracted a lot of interest due to their ultrahigh strength/weight and surface area/weight ratios. They are promising advanced materials used in energy storage systems, hydrogen storage media and weight-conscious devices such as satellites, because of their ultralight and highly porous quality. CNT aerogels can have excellent electrical conductivity and mechanical strength. However, the thermal conductivity of CNT aerogels are as low as 0.01-0.1 W/mK, which is five orders of magnitude lower than that of CNT (2000-5000 W/mK). To investigate the mechanisms for the low thermal conductivity of CNT aerogels, multiscale models are built in this study. Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations are first carried out to investigate the heat transfer between CNT and different gases (e.g. nitrogen and hydrogen), and the thermal conductance at CNT-CNT interface. The interfacial thermal resistances of CNT-gas and CNT-CNT are estimated from the MD simulations. Mesoscopic modeling of CNT aerogels are then built using an off-lattice Monte Carlo (MC) simulations to replicate the realistic CNT aerogels. The interfacial thermal resistances estimated from MD simulations are used as inputs in the MC models to predict the thermal conductivity of CNT aerogels. The volume fractions and the complex morphologies of CNTs are also quantified to study their effects on the thermal conductivity of CNT aerogels. The quantitative findings may help researchers to obtain the CNT aerogels with expected thermal conductivity.

  7. Mechanically Strong Lightweight Materials for Aerospace Applications (x-aerogels)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventis, Nicholas

    2005-01-01

    The X-Aerogel is a new NASA-developed strong lightweight material made by reacting the mesoporous surfaces of 3-D networks of inorganic nanoparticles with polymeric crosslinkers. Since the relative amount of the crosslinker and the backbone are comparable, X-Aerogels can be viewed either as aerogels modified by templated accumulation of polymer on the skeletal nanoparticles, or as nanoporous polymers made by templated casting of polymeric precursors on a nanostructured framework. The most striking feature of X-Aerogels is that for a nominal 3-fold increase in density (still a ultralightweight material), the mechanical strength can be up to 300 times higher than the strength of the underlying native aerogel. Thus, X-Aerogels combine a multiple of the specific compressive strength of steel, with the thermal conductivity of styrofoam. XAerogels have been demonstrated with several polymers such as polyurethanes/polyureas, epoxies and polyolefins, while crosslinking of approximately 35 different oxide aerogels yields a wide variety of dimensionally stable, porous lightweight materials with interesting structural, magnetic and optical properties. X-Aerogels are evaluated for cryogenic rocket fuel storage tanks and for Advanced EVA suits, where they will play the dual role of the thermal insulator/structural material. Along the same lines, major impact is also expected by the use of X-Aerogels in structural components/thermal protection for small satellites, spacecrafts, planetary vehicles and habitats.

  8. Radiowave dielectric investigation of boron compounds distribution in cultured tumour cells: relevance to boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capuani, S.; Gili, T.; Cametti, C.; Maraviglia, B.; Colasanti, M.; Muolo, M.; Venturini, G.

    2002-07-01

    The distribution of two main Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) agents, borocaptate sodium ( BSH) and borono-phenylalanine ( BPA), in C6 rat glioma cells has been investigated by means of radiowave dielectric spectroscopy measurements. Significant differences between cells treated with the two different boron carriers were found in the magnitude of passive electrical cell parameters. This technique offers a new procedure for the measurement of boron compounds interactions with different biological environments at cellular level and is suggested to have the potentiality for becoming an attractive tool for biodistribution studies of BNCT compounds in biological tissues.

  9. On the correlation between the porous structure and the electrochemical response of powdered and monolithic carbon aerogels as electrodes for capacitive deionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macías, C.; Lavela, P.; Rasines, G.; Zafra, M. C.; Tirado, J. L.; Ania, C. O.

    2016-10-01

    The combined effect of resorcinol/catalyst (100≤R/C≤800) and resorcinol/water (0.04≤R/W≤0.13) molar ratio on the textural and capacitive properties of carbon aerogels with potential application for capacitive deionization has been evaluated. Activated and pyrolyzed aerogels were synthesized by the sol-gel polymerization of resorcinol-formaldehyde mixtures and dried in supercritical conditions. Data show that high R/C and R/W molar ratios lead to materials with large pores in the mesopore range, whereas the surface area and micropore volumes remain somewhat the same. The activation of the aerogels increased the differences in the specific surface and micropore volumes due to the development of microporosity. This effect was more remarkable for the samples with low R/C whatever the R/W ratio, indicating that the carbon aerogel obtained using high amounts of catalyst are more prone to be activated. Regarding the electrochemical features of the aerogels, low capacitance values were measured in aerogels combining low R/W and high R/C and reciprocally low R/C and high R/W molar ratios, due to their higher resistance. Polarization resistances were found to be slightly higher for the pyrolyzed than for activated aerogels, and followed a decreasing trend with the mesoporosity, indicating the outstanding contribution of the mesoporous network to provide a good kinetic response. The desalting capacity of monolithic aerogels showed a simultaneous dependence with the surface area and the resistivity of the electrodes, pointing out the importance of performing electrochemical measurements in adequate cell configurations (i.e., desalting units) upon the intended application.

  10. Li-air, rechargeable, solid-state batteries using graphene and boron nitride aerogel matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ergen, Onur; Thoan Pham, Thang; Demaio-Turner, Sally; Zettl, Alex

    The recent explosion of research on Li-Air batteries has provided new insights into developing more efficient air cathodes. Graphene and boron nitride aerogel matrix is anticipated to be an ideal candidate to produce a high throughput air-breathing system. We developed a Li-Air battery model that accounts for efficient O2 throughput. These unique aerogel matrices exhibit the ability to orient the O2 passing through and keep out H2O, CO2, and N2. Thus, the solid-state cells demonstrate a long cycle life, thermal stability, and high rechargeable characteristics. These cells also show an explicit discharge capacity with a constant discharge current density of 0.1mA/cm2. 1 Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Ca 94720, USA 2 Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Ca, 94720, USA 3 Kavli Energy Nanosciences Institute at the University of California, Berkeley, Ca, 94720, US.

  11. Comparative Investigation on Thermal Insulation of Polyurethane Composites Filled with Silica Aerogel and Hollow Silica Microsphere.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunyuan; Kim, Jin Seuk; Kwon, Younghwan

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a comparative study on thermal conductivity of PU composites containing open-cell nano-porous silica aerogel and closed-cell hollow silica microsphere, respectively. The thermal conductivity of PU composites is measured at 30 degrees C with transient hot bridge method. The insertion of polymer in pores of silica aerogel creates mixed interfaces, increasing the thermal conductivity of resulting composites. The measured thermal conductivity of PU composites filled with hollow silica microspheres is estimated using theoretical models, and is in good agreement with Felske model. It appears that the thermal conductivity of composites decreases with increasing the volume fraction (phi) when hollow silica microsphere (eta = 0.916) is used. PMID:27433652

  12. Comparative Investigation on Thermal Insulation of Polyurethane Composites Filled with Silica Aerogel and Hollow Silica Microsphere.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunyuan; Kim, Jin Seuk; Kwon, Younghwan

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a comparative study on thermal conductivity of PU composites containing open-cell nano-porous silica aerogel and closed-cell hollow silica microsphere, respectively. The thermal conductivity of PU composites is measured at 30 degrees C with transient hot bridge method. The insertion of polymer in pores of silica aerogel creates mixed interfaces, increasing the thermal conductivity of resulting composites. The measured thermal conductivity of PU composites filled with hollow silica microspheres is estimated using theoretical models, and is in good agreement with Felske model. It appears that the thermal conductivity of composites decreases with increasing the volume fraction (phi) when hollow silica microsphere (eta = 0.916) is used.

  13. 3D graphene oxide-polymer hydrogel: near-infrared light-triggered active scaffold for reversible cell capture and on-demand release.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Wang, Jiasi; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2013-12-10

    An active cell scaffold based on a graphene-polymer hydrogel has been successfully fabricated. The macroporous hydrogel can efficiently capture cells not only through the bioadhesive ligand RGD but also through on-demand release of cells with an NIR light stimulus. The latter process shows better dynamic control over cells than traditional passive-hydrogel-based cell depots.

  14. M-Trap: Exosome-Based Capture of Tumor Cells as a New Technology in Peritoneal Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    de la Fuente, Alexandre; Alonso-Alconada, Lorena; Costa, Clotilde; Cueva, Juan; Garcia-Caballero, Tomas; Lopez-Lopez, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Background: Remodeling targeted tissues for reception of tumor cells metastasizing from primary lesions is a consequence of communication between the tumor and the environment that governs metastasis. This study describes a novel approach that aims to disrupt the process of metastasis by interfering with this intense dialogue. Methods: Proteomics and adhesion assays identified exosomes purified from the ascitic fluid of ovarian cancer patients (n = 9) as intermediaries of tumor cell attachment. A novel tumor cell capture device was fabricated by embedding exosomes onto a 3D scaffold (metastatic trap [M-Trap]). Murine models of ovarian metastasis (n = 3 to 34 mice per group) were used to demonstrate the efficacy of M-Trap to capture metastatic cells disseminating in the peritoneal cavity. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were used to estimate cumulative survival probabilities. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: The exosome-based M-Trap device promoted tumor cell adhesion with a nonpharmacological mode of action. M-Trap served as a preferential site for metastasis formation and completely remodeled the pattern of peritoneal metastasis in clinically relevant models of ovarian cancer. Most importantly, M-Trap demonstrated a statistically significant benefit in survival outcomes, with mean survival increasing from 117.5 to 198.8 days in the presence of M-Trap; removal of the device upon tumor cell capture further improved survival to a mean of 309.4 days (P < .001). Conclusions: A potent artificial premetastatic niche based on exosomes is an effective approach to impair the crosstalk between metastatic cells and their environment. In the clinical setting, the capacity to modulate the pattern of dissemination represents an opportunity to control the process of metastasis. In summary, M-Trap transforms a systemic, fatal disease into a focalized disease where proven therapeutic approaches such as surgery can extend survival. PMID:26150590

  15. Aerogel-Based Multilayer Insulation with Micrometeoroid Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begag, Redouane; White, Shannon

    2013-01-01

    Ultra-low-density, highly hydrophobic, fiber-reinforced aerogel material integrated with MLI (aluminized Mylar reflectors and B4A Dacron separators) offers a highly effective insulation package by providing unsurpassed thermal performance and significant robustness, delivering substantial MMOD protection via the addition of a novel, durable, external aerogel layer. The hydrophobic nature of the aerogel is an important property for maintaining thermal performance if the material is exposed to the environment (i.e. rain, snow, etc.) during ground installations. The hybrid aerogel/MLI/MMOD solution affords an attractive alternative because it will perform thermally in the same range as MLI at all vacuum levels (including high vacuum), and offers significant protection from micrometeoroid damage. During this effort, the required low-density and resilient aerogel materials have been developed that are needed to optimize the thermal performance for space (high vacuum) cryotank applications. The proposed insulation/MMOD package is composed of two sections: a stack of interleaved aerogel layers and MLI intended for cryotank thermal insulation, and a 1.5- to 1-in. (.2.5- to 3.8- cm) thick aerogel layer (on top of the insulation portion) for MMOD protection. Learning that low-density aerogel cannot withstand the hypervelocity impact test conditions, the innovators decided during the course of the program to fabricate a high-density and strong material based on a cross-linked aerogel (X-aerogel; developed elsewhere by the innovators) for MMOD protection. This system has shown a very high compressive strength that is capable of withstanding high-impact tests if a proper configuration of the MMOD aerogel layer is used. It was learned that by stacking two X-aerogel layers [1.5-in. (.3.8-cm) thick] separated by an air gap, the system would be able to hold the threat at a speed of 5 km/s and gpass h the test. The first aerogel panel stopped the projectile from damaging the second

  16. Aerogel Keystones: Extraction Of Complete Hypervelocity Impact Events From Aerogel Collectors

    SciTech Connect

    Westphal, A J; Snead, C; Butterworth, A; Graham, G A; Bradley, J; Bajt, S; Grant, P G; Bench, G; Brennan, S; Piannetta, P

    2003-11-07

    In January 2006, the Stardust mission will return the first samples from a solid solar-system body since Apollo, and the first samples of contemporary interstellar dust ever collected. Although sophisticated laboratory instruments exist for the analysis of Stardust samples, techniques for the recovery of particles and particle residues from aerogel collectors remain primitive. Here we describe our recent progress in developing techniques for extracting small volumes of aerogel, which we have called ''keystones,'' which completely contain particle impacts but minimize the damage to the surrounding aerogel collector. These keystones can be fixed to custom-designed micromachined silicon fixtures (so-called ''microforklifts''). In this configuration the samples are self-supporting, which can be advantageous in situations in which interference from a supporting substrate is undesirable. The keystones may also be extracted and placed onto a substrate without a fixture. We have also demonstrated the capability of homologously crushing these unmounted keystones for analysis techniques which demand flat samples.

  17. Chemical modification of silicon nitride microsieves for capture of MCF-7 circulating tumor cells of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dien To, Thien; Thoai Le, Huyen; Thi Dinh, Mai Ngoc; Nguyen, Anh Tuan; Doan, Tin Chanh Duc; Mau Dang, Chien

    2015-01-01

    Chemical modification of silicon nitride (SiN) microsieves with glutaraldehyde and 3-glycidoxypropyldimethylethoxysilane (GOPS) for bio-coupling with an antibody to capture MCF-7 circulating tumor cells of breast cancer is reported. In this research, the antibody monoclonal anti-cytokerantin-FITC with fluorescein isothiocyanate label was used due to its good selectivity to MCF-7 circulating tumor cells of breast cancer. Modification efficiency was determined by the variation of contact angle. The increase in contact angle of the microsieves treated with glutaraldehyde and GOPS indicated that the microsieve surface changed from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. These results confirmed the successful immobilization of glutaraldehyde and GOPS onto SiN microsieves. Antibody binding effect was evaluated by fluorescence microscopy. Fluorescent images exhibited that GOPS was more effective than the glutaraldehyde treatment. The GOPS-treated microsieves were then used for capture of MCF-7 cells in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). The fluorescent images proved that the surface modification of SiN microsieves with GOPS helped to increase the efficiency of MCF-7 capture.

  18. Organic aerogel microspheres and fabrication method therefor

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, S.T.; Kong, F.M.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1996-04-16

    Organic aerogel microspheres which can be used in capacitors, batteries, thermal insulation, adsorption/filtration media, and chromatographic packings, having diameters ranging from about 1 micron to about 3 mm. The microspheres can be pyrolyzed to form carbon aerogel microspheres. This method involves stirring the aqueous organic phase in mineral oil at elevated temperature until the dispersed organic phase polymerizes and forms nonsticky gel spheres. The size of the microspheres depends on the collision rate of the liquid droplets and the reaction rate of the monomers from which the aqueous solution is formed. The collision rate is governed by the volume ratio of the aqueous solution to the mineral oil and the shear rate, while the reaction rate is governed by the chemical formulation and the curing temperature.

  19. Organic aerogel microspheres and fabrication method therefor

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Steven T.; Kong, Fung-Ming; Pekala, Richard W.; Kaschmitter, James L.

    1996-01-01

    Organic aerogel microspheres which can be used in capacitors, batteries, thermal insulation, adsorption/filtration media, and chromatographic packings, having diameters ranging from about 1 micron to about 3 mm. The microspheres can be pyrolyzed to form carbon aerogel microspheres. This method involves stirring the aqueous organic phase in mineral oil at elevated temperature until the dispersed organic phase polymerizes and forms nonsticky gel spheres. The size of the microspheres depends on the collision rate of the liquid droplets and the reaction rate of the monomers from which the aqueous solution is formed. The collision rate is governed by the volume ratio of the aqueous solution to the mineral oil and the shear rate, while the reaction rate is governed by the chemical formulation and the curing temperature.

  20. Transparent monolithic metal ion containing nanophase aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Risen, W. M., Jr.; Hu, X.; Ji, S.; Littrell, K.

    1999-12-01

    The formation of monolithic and transparent transition metal containing aerogels has been achieved through cooperative interactions of high molecular weight functionalized carbohydrates and silica precursors, which strongly influence the kinetics of gelation. After initial gelation, subsequent modification of the ligating character of the system, coordination of the group VIII metal ions, and supercritical extraction afford the aerogels. The structures at the nanophase level have been probed by photon and electron transmission and neutron scattering techniques to help elucidate the basis for structural integrity together with the small entity sizes that permit transparency in the visible range. They also help with understanding the chemical reactivities of the metal-containing sites in these very high surface area materials. These results are discussed in connection with new reaction studies.

  1. Carbonates Found in Stardust Aerogel Tracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirick, S.; Leroux, H.; Tomeoka, K.; Zolensky, M.; Flynn, T.; Tyliszczak, T.; Butterworth, A.; Tomioka, N.; Ohnishi, I.; Messenger, K. Nakamura; Sandford, S.; Keller, L.; Jacobsen, C.

    2007-01-01

    Preliminary examination of particles collected from Comet Wild 2 suggest that this comet is chondritic and formed under multiple processes. The lack of any hydrated minerals strongly suggests that most, if not all of these processes were anhydrous [1,2,3]. However, carbonates were found in particles extracted from 4 different tracks in the aerogel. It is our belief that these carbonates have a terrestrial origin and are a contaminant in these samples.

  2. Computer Simulation of Fracture in Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, Brian S.

    2006-01-01

    Aerogels are of interest to the aerospace community primarily for their thermal properties, notably their low thermal conductivities. While the gels are typically fragile, recent advances in the application of conformal polymer layers to these gels has made them potentially useful as lightweight structural materials as well. In this work, we investigate the strength and fracture behavior of silica aerogels using a molecular statics-based computer simulation technique. The gels' structure is simulated via a Diffusion Limited Cluster Aggregation (DLCA) algorithm, which produces fractal structures representing experimentally observed aggregates of so-called secondary particles, themselves composed of amorphous silica primary particles an order of magnitude smaller. We have performed multi-length-scale simulations of fracture in silica aerogels, in which the interaction b e e n two secondary particles is assumed to be described by a Morse pair potential parameterized such that the potential range is much smaller than the secondary particle size. These Morse parameters are obtained by atomistic simulation of models of the experimentally-observed amorphous silica "bridges," with the fracture behavior of these bridges modeled via molecular statics using a Morse/Coulomb potential for silica. We consider the energetics of the fracture, and compare qualitative features of low-and high-density gel fracture.

  3. Cellulose nanofibrils aerogels generated from jute fibers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jinyou; Yu, Liangbo; Tian, Feng; Zhao, Nie; Li, Xiuhong; Bian, Fenggang; Wang, Jie

    2014-08-30

    In this work, we report the cellulose nanofibrils extracted from the pristine jute fibers via the pretreatments followed by the TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical)-mediated oxidation and mechanical disintegration. The effects of pretreatments by using the NaOH solution and dimethyl sulfoxide solvent on the fiber morphology and macro/micro-structures were investigated by polarizing microscope and synchrotron radiation wide/small-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS/SAXS). The cellulose nanofibrils exhibit a diameter ranging from 5 nm to 20 nm and a length of several micrometers, which have been assembled into cellulose aerogels by the lyophilization of as-prepared nanofibrils dispersions with various concentrations. The results indicated that the hierarchical structures of as-prepared cellulose aerogels were dependent on the dispersion concentrations. The WAXS results show that the typical cellulose aerogels are coexistence of cellulose I and cellulose II, which has a great promise for many potential applications, such as pharmaceutical, liquid filtration, catalysts, bio-nanocomposites, and tissue engineering scaffolds.

  4. Structure and performance of carbon aerogel electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Pekala, R.W.; Mayer, S.T.; Poco, J.F.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1994-03-01

    The chemistry and physics of small clusters of atoms (1--100 nm) has received considerable attention in recent years because these assemblies often have properties between the molecular and bulk solid-state limits. The different properties can be explained in terms of the large fraction of atoms that are at the surface of a cluster as compared to the interior. Although the synthesis and properties of metal and. semiconductor clusters, metallocarbohedrenes, fullerenes, and nanotubes are the subject of extensive investigations, little attention has been paid to cluster-assembled porous materials. This oversight is of particular interest to us since we believe that aerogels are one of the few monolithic materials presently available where the benefits of cluster assembly can be demonstrated. In particular, the unique optical, thermal, acoustic, mechanical, and electrical properties of aerogels are directly related to their nanostructure, which is composed of interconnected particles (3--30 nm) with small interstitial pores (< 50 nm). This structure leads to extremely high surface areas (400--1100 m{sup 2}/g) with a large fraction of the atoms covering the surface of the interconnected particles. As a result of these structural features, carbon aerogels are finding applications as electrodes in supercapacitors with high energy and power densities.

  5. Cellulose nanofibrils aerogels generated from jute fibers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jinyou; Yu, Liangbo; Tian, Feng; Zhao, Nie; Li, Xiuhong; Bian, Fenggang; Wang, Jie

    2014-08-30

    In this work, we report the cellulose nanofibrils extracted from the pristine jute fibers via the pretreatments followed by the TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical)-mediated oxidation and mechanical disintegration. The effects of pretreatments by using the NaOH solution and dimethyl sulfoxide solvent on the fiber morphology and macro/micro-structures were investigated by polarizing microscope and synchrotron radiation wide/small-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS/SAXS). The cellulose nanofibrils exhibit a diameter ranging from 5 nm to 20 nm and a length of several micrometers, which have been assembled into cellulose aerogels by the lyophilization of as-prepared nanofibrils dispersions with various concentrations. The results indicated that the hierarchical structures of as-prepared cellulose aerogels were dependent on the dispersion concentrations. The WAXS results show that the typical cellulose aerogels are coexistence of cellulose I and cellulose II, which has a great promise for many potential applications, such as pharmaceutical, liquid filtration, catalysts, bio-nanocomposites, and tissue engineering scaffolds. PMID:24815398

  6. Investigation of Biological Adhesives and Polyurea Crosslinked Silica-Based Aerogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, Laura; Cauble, Meagan; Cole, Judith; Sabri, Firouzeh

    2009-11-01

    One of the key steps towards developing new technology for nerve repair is to look at the interaction mechanism and strength of biological components with the material under investigation. The existing technology for peripheral nerve repair relies on suturing techniques for attaching and immobilization of the implant. It is also limited to connecting two nerve components only, through a cylindrical-shaped unit which we will refer to as 1-D. The focus of our work is to develop an aerogel-based printed circuit board (PCB) system for precise guidance of multiple (n-D) neuronal components, simultaneously. Here we report on the adhesion strength of sciatic nerve segments removed from cadaver Sprague Dawley rats and the surface of treated and untreated polyurea cross-linked silica-based aerogels. The adhesion strength of the nerve to the aerogel surface was studied under varying environmental conditions as well as surface coating types. The coatings tested were basement membrane extract (BME), Cell Tak, and the combination. Since the mechanism of adhesion to cells and other surfaces is different and non-competing for BME and Cell Tak it is expected that a stronger adhesion should be accomplished by combining these two adhesives. The effect of temperature, nerve elasticity, and ionic concentration on the strength of adhesion was investigated also and will be reported.

  7. Acoustic Spectroscopy of Superfluid 3He in Aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J. P.; Choi, H.; Pollanen, J.; Halperin, W. P.

    2006-09-07

    We have designed an experiment to study the role of global anisotropic quasiparticle scattering on the dirty aerogel superfluid 3He system. We observe significant regions of two stable phases at temperatures below the superfluid transition at a pressure of 25 bar for a 98% aerogel.

  8. Tailoring of morphology and surface properties of syndiotactic polystyrene aerogels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Jana, Sadhan C

    2013-05-01

    This study evaluates a method for rendering syndiotactic polystyrene (sPS) aerogels hydrophilic using polyethylene oxide (PEO) of different molecular weights. The highly porous sPS aerogels are inherently hydrophobic although applications involving absorption of moisture and removal of particulate solids may benefit from the high surface area of sPS aerogels provided some degree of hydrophilicity is induced in these materials. In this work, sPS gels are prepared by thermo-reversible gelation in tetrahydrofuran in the presence of PEO. The gels are dried under supercritical conditions to obtain aerogels. The aerogels are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen-adsorption porosimetry, helium pycnometry, and contact angle measurements. The data reveal that the pore structures and surface energy can be controlled by varying the concentration and molecular weight of PEO and using different cooling rates during thermo-reversible gelation. In the first case, sPS aerogels, aerogels containing PEO of a low molecular weight or low concentration show superhydrophobic surface presenting the "lotus effect". In the second case, PEO at a higher concentration or with higher molecular weight forms phase-separated domains yielding new hydrophilic macropores (>10 μm) in the aerogel structures. These macropores contribute to the superhydrophobic surface with the "petal effect". The cooling rate during gelation shows a strong influence on these two cases. PMID:23573990

  9. Highly porous ceramic oxide aerogels having improved flexibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B. (Inventor); Nguyen, Baochau N. (Inventor); Guo, Haiquan (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Ceramic oxide aerogels having improved flexibility are disclosed. Preferred embodiments exhibit high modulus and other strength properties despite their improved flexibility. The gels may be polymer cross-linked via organic polymer chains to further improve strength properties, without substantially detracting from the improved flexibility. Methods of making such aerogels are also disclosed.

  10. Centrosome repositioning in T cells is biphasic and driven by microtubule end-on capture-shrinkage

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Jason; Wu, Xufeng; Chung, Andrew H.; Chen, James K.; Kapoor, Tarun M.

    2013-01-01

    T cells rapidly reposition their centrosome to the center of the immunological synapse (IS) to drive polarized secretion in the direction of the bound target cell. Using an optical trap for spatial and temporal control over target presentation, we show that centrosome repositioning in Jurkat T cells exhibited kinetically distinct polarization and docking phases and required calcium flux and signaling through both the T cell receptor and integrin to be robust. In “frustrated” conjugates where the centrosome is stuck behind the nucleus, the center of the IS invaginated dramatically to approach the centrosome. Consistently, imaging of microtubules during normal repositioning revealed a microtubule end-on capture-shrinkage mechanism operating at the center of the IS. In agreement with this mechanism, centrosome repositioning was impaired by inhibiting microtubule depolymerization or dynein. We conclude that dynein drives centrosome repositioning in T cells via microtubule end-on capture-shrinkage operating at the center of the IS and not cortical sliding at the IS periphery, as previously thought. PMID:23979719

  11. In vitro and in vivo studies of boron neutron capture therapy: boron uptake/washout and cell death.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, C; Bakeine, J; Ballarini, F; Boninella, A; Bortolussi, S; Bruschi, P; Cansolino, L; Clerici, A M; Coppola, A; Di Liberto, R; Dionigi, P; Protti, N; Stella, S; Zonta, A; Zonta, C; Altieri, S

    2011-04-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a binary radiotherapy based on thermal-neutron irradiation of cells enriched with (10)B, which produces α particles and (7)Li ions of short range and high biological effectiveness. The selective uptake of boron by tumor cells is a crucial issue for BNCT, and studies of boron uptake and washout associated with cell survival studies can be of great help in developing clinical applications. In this work, boron uptake and washout were characterized both in vitro for the DHDK12TRb (DHD) rat colon carcinoma cell line and in vivo using rats bearing liver metastases from DHD cells. Despite a remarkable uptake, a large boron release was observed after removal of the boron-enriched medium from in vitro cell cultures. However, analysis of boron washout after rat liver perfusion in vivo did not show a significant boron release, suggesting that organ perfusion does not limit the therapeutic effectiveness of the treatment. The survival of boron-loaded cells exposed to thermal neutrons was also assessed; the results indicated that the removal of extracellular boron does not limit treatment effectiveness if adequate amounts of boron are delivered and if the cells are kept at low temperature. Cell survival was also investigated theoretically using a mechanistic model/Monte Carlo code originally developed for radiation-induced chromosome aberrations and extended here to cell death; good agreement between simulation outcomes and experimental data was obtained.

  12. In vitro and in vivo studies of boron neutron capture therapy: boron uptake/washout and cell death.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, C; Bakeine, J; Ballarini, F; Boninella, A; Bortolussi, S; Bruschi, P; Cansolino, L; Clerici, A M; Coppola, A; Di Liberto, R; Dionigi, P; Protti, N; Stella, S; Zonta, A; Zonta, C; Altieri, S

    2011-04-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a binary radiotherapy based on thermal-neutron irradiation of cells enriched with (10)B, which produces α particles and (7)Li ions of short range and high biological effectiveness. The selective uptake of boron by tumor cells is a crucial issue for BNCT, and studies of boron uptake and washout associated with cell survival studies can be of great help in developing clinical applications. In this work, boron uptake and washout were characterized both in vitro for the DHDK12TRb (DHD) rat colon carcinoma cell line and in vivo using rats bearing liver metastases from DHD cells. Despite a remarkable uptake, a large boron release was observed after removal of the boron-enriched medium from in vitro cell cultures. However, analysis of boron washout after rat liver perfusion in vivo did not show a significant boron release, suggesting that organ perfusion does not limit the therapeutic effectiveness of the treatment. The survival of boron-loaded cells exposed to thermal neutrons was also assessed; the results indicated that the removal of extracellular boron does not limit treatment effectiveness if adequate amounts of boron are delivered and if the cells are kept at low temperature. Cell survival was also investigated theoretically using a mechanistic model/Monte Carlo code originally developed for radiation-induced chromosome aberrations and extended here to cell death; good agreement between simulation outcomes and experimental data was obtained. PMID:21133762

  13. Method for preparing a solid phase microextraction device using aerogel

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Fred S.; Andresen, Brian D.

    2006-10-24

    A sample collection substrate of aerogel and/or xerogel materials bound to a support structure is used as a solid phase microextraction (SPME) device. The xerogels and aerogels may be organic or inorganic and doped with metals or other compounds to target specific chemical analytes. The support structure is typically formed of a glass fiber or a metal wire (stainless steel or kovar). The devices are made by applying gel solution to the support structures and drying the solution to form aerogel or xerogel. Aerogel particles may be attached to the wet layer before drying to increase sample collection surface area. These devices are robust, stable in fields of high radiation, and highly effective at collecting gas and liquid samples while maintaining superior mechanical and thermal stability during routine use. Aerogel SPME devices are advantageous for use in GC/MS analyses due to their lack of interfering background and tolerance of GC thermal cycling.

  14. Synthesis and Characterization of a Nanocrystalline Thoria Aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    Reibold, R A; Satcher, Jr, J H; Baumann, T F; Simpson, R L; Poco, J F

    2004-02-04

    We report the synthesis and characterization for the first example of a low-density nanocrystalline thoria aerogel. The monolithic aerogels were prepared through the solgel polymerization of hydrated thorium nitrate in ethanol using ammonium hydroxide and propylene oxide as gelation initiators. The dried ThO{sub 2} aerogel was characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and nitrogen adsorption/desorption analyses. The aerogel network was determined to be composed of spherical primary particles with features in the 5-20 nm range. These particles were also determined to be highly crystalline as evidenced by the higher magnification TEM examination. The thoria aerogel possesses high surface area (120 m{sup 2}/g) and pore diameters in the micro- and mesoporous range.

  15. Organic aerogels: A new type of ultrastructured polymer

    SciTech Connect

    Pekala, R.W.; Alviso, C.T.; LeMay, J.D.

    1991-02-01

    Organic aerogels with different ultrastructures can be successfully synthesized from the aqueous sol-gel polymerization of (1) resorcinol with formaldehyde or (2) melamine with formaldehyde. In addition, RF aerogels can be pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere to give vitreous carbon aerogels. The (resorcinol)/(sodium carbonate) ratio is the major variable in the RF polymerization while pH and acid type regulate the MF polymerization. Mechanical property, TEM, and surface area data provide evidence that organic aerogels are similar to their silica counterparts. Based upon these data, we are continuing to explore commonalities between inorganic and organic aerogels so that a universal model might be developed for the structure and properties of these unique materials. Such a model would have a major impact upon the materials science community by opening up new routes for the nanodesign of microporous materials with novel compositions, ultrastructures, and properties. 33 refs., 8 figs.

  16. An easy way to prepare monolithic inorganic oxide aerogels.

    PubMed

    Ren, Lili; Cui, Sumin; Cao, Fengchao; Guo, Qinghui

    2014-09-15

    Inorganic oxide aerogels have unique thermal, optical, electrical, magnetic, and chemical properties, which result in them potentially having a broad range of applications. However, their preparation is commonly based on a supercritical drying method, which greatly limits real applications of aerogels and their commercialization. Here we demonstrate a general method for drying wet gels to form aerogels that is based on the sublimation of organic solvent. The organic solvent must have a low surface tension, undergo sublimation easily, and have a high freezing point to allow the rapid synthesis of monolithic inorganic oxide aerogels under vacuum conditions. This cost-effective process will facilitate application of aerogel materials. This approach may also be used for the preparation of other porous materials, whose theoretical and practical applications should be investigated.

  17. Composite ceria-coated aerogels and methods of making the same

    DOEpatents

    Eyring, Edward M; Ernst, Richard D; Turpin, Gregory C; Dunn, Brian C

    2013-05-07

    Ceria-coated aerogels can include an aerogel support material having a stabilized ceria coating thereon. The ceria coating can be formed by solution or vapor deposition of alcogels or aerogels. Additional catalytic metal species can also be incorporated into the coating to form multi-metallic compounds having improved catalytic activity. Further, the ceria coated aerogels retain high surface areas at elevated temperatures. Thus, improvements in catalytic activity and thermal stability can be achieved using these ceria-coated composite aerogels.

  18. Clustering of Cancer Cell Lines Using A Promoter- Targeted Liquid Hybridization Capture-Based Bisulfite Sequencing Approach.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Wang, Junwen; Ji, Guanyu; Liu, Siyang; Yao, Yu; Wang, Tong; Wu, Honglong; Xia, Yudong; Gong, Desheng; Jiang, Hui; Yang, Huanming; Zhang, Xiuqing

    2015-08-01

    DNA methylation plays a significant role in assuring cell identity, thus potentiating its application in molecular classification of cancers in respect to tissue-origins or clinically and etiologically distinct subtypes. In this study, we optimized our liquid hybridization capture-based bisulfite sequencing (LHC-BS) approach on the gene promoter regions of 11 cell lines. Our results indicated that promoter methylomes could not only cluster cancer cell lines with respect to tissue origins but also differentiate cancer subtypes based on CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP). Promoter-targeted LHC-BS as means for comprehensive screening and classifying cancer cells with promoter methylomes provided a powerful strategy for further complex clinical studies. PMID:26269607

  19. Clustering of Cancer Cell Lines Using A Promoter- Targeted Liquid Hybridization Capture-Based Bisulfite Sequencing Approach.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Wang, Junwen; Ji, Guanyu; Liu, Siyang; Yao, Yu; Wang, Tong; Wu, Honglong; Xia, Yudong; Gong, Desheng; Jiang, Hui; Yang, Huanming; Zhang, Xiuqing

    2015-08-01

    DNA methylation plays a significant role in assuring cell identity, thus potentiating its application in molecular classification of cancers in respect to tissue-origins or clinically and etiologically distinct subtypes. In this study, we optimized our liquid hybridization capture-based bisulfite sequencing (LHC-BS) approach on the gene promoter regions of 11 cell lines. Our results indicated that promoter methylomes could not only cluster cancer cell lines with respect to tissue origins but also differentiate cancer subtypes based on CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP). Promoter-targeted LHC-BS as means for comprehensive screening and classifying cancer cells with promoter methylomes provided a powerful strategy for further complex clinical studies.

  20. Optical Analysis of Impact Features in Aerogel From the Orbital Debris Collection Experiment on the MIR Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoerz, Friedrich; Cress, Glen; Zolensky, Mike; See, Thomas H.; Bernhard, Ronald P.; Warren, Jack L.

    1999-01-01

    The Mir Environmental Effects Package (MEEP) was deployed on the Mir station and retrieved after 18 months in space. The payload included the orbital debris collector (ODC), designed and built at the Johnson Space Center to capture and return analyzable residues of the man-made and natural particulate environment in low-Earth orbit for a detailed assessment of its compositional makeup and potential origins. The ODC exposed 2 identical trays, with highly porous, low-density SiO2 aerogel as the basic collector medium, pointed in opposite directions. The aerogel was expected to gently decelerate and capture hypervelocity particles, as opposed to other media that resulted in melting or vaporization of many impactors. Even cursory examination of the returned ODC collectors revealed a surprising variety of impact features. The compositional analyses using scanning electron "miccroscope-energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy concentrated on a survey-type inventory of diverse particle types and associated impact features. Detections, in the form of carrot-shaped tracks and shallow pits, included metallic Al, stainless steel, soldering compounds, human waste, and paint flakes. Many pits contained no detectable impactor residue (it was assumed to have vaporized), but most of the tracks contained analyzable residue. The study showed that aerogel would be useful for future low-velocity impact analysis.

  1. In Vivo Ultrasonic Detection of Polyurea Crosslinked Silica Aerogel Implants

    PubMed Central

    Sabri, Firouzeh; Sebelik, Merry E.; Meacham, Ryan; Boughter, John D.; Challis, Mitchell J.; Leventis, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Background Polyurea crosslinked silica aerogels are highly porous, lightweight, and mechanically strong materials with great potential for in vivo applications. Recent in vivo and in vitro studies have demonstrated the biocompatibility of this type of aerogel. The highly porous nature of aerogels allows for exceptional thermal, electric, and acoustic insulating capabilities that can be taken advantage of for non-invasive external imaging techniques. Sound-based detection of implants is a low cost, non-invasive, portable, and rapid technique that is routinely used and readily available in major clinics and hospitals. Methodology In this study the first in vivo ultrasound response of polyurea crosslinked silica aerogel implants was investigated by means of a GE Medical Systems LogiQe diagnostic ultrasound machine with a linear array probe. Aerogel samples were inserted subcutaneously and sub-muscularly in a) fresh animal model and b) cadaveric human model for analysis. For comparison, samples of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) were also imaged under similar conditions as the aerogel samples. Conclusion/significance Polyurea crosslinked silica aerogel (X-Si aerogel) implants were easily identified when inserted in either of the regions in both fresh animal model and cadaveric model. The implant dimensions inferred from the images matched the actual size of the implants and no apparent damage was sustained by the X-Si aerogel implants as a result of the ultrasonic imaging process. The aerogel implants demonstrated hyperechoic behavior and significant posterior shadowing. Results obtained were compared with images acquired from the PDMS implants inserted at the same location. PMID:23799093

  2. Micropallet arrays for the capture, isolation and culture of circulating tumor cells from whole blood of mice engrafted with primary human pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gach, Philip C; Attayek, Peter J; Whittlesey, Rebecca L; Yeh, Jen Jen; Allbritton, Nancy L

    2014-04-15

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are important biomarkers of cancer progression and metastatic potential. The rarity of CTCs in peripheral blood has driven the development of technologies to isolate these tumor cells with high specificity; however, there are limited techniques available for isolating target CTCs following enumeration. A strategy is described to capture and isolate viable tumor cells from whole blood using an array of releasable microstructures termed micropallets. Specific capture of nucleated cells or cells expressing epithelial cell adhesion molecules (EpCAM) was achieved by functionalizing micropallet surfaces with either fibronectin, Matrigel or anti-EpCAM antibody. Surface grafting of poly(acrylic acid) followed by covalent binding of protein A/G enabled efficient capture of EpCAM antibody on the micropallet surface. MCF-7 cells, a human breast adenocarcinoma, were retained on the array surface with 90±8% efficiency when using an anti-EpCAM-coated array. To demonstrate the efficiency of tumor cell retention on micropallet arrays in the presence of blood, MCF-7 cells were mixed into whole blood and added to small arrays (71 mm(2)) coated with fibronectin, Matrigel or anti-EpCAM. These approaches achieved MCF-7 cell capture from ≤10 µL of whole blood with efficiencies greater than 85%. Furthermore, MCF-7 cells intermixed with 1 mL blood and loaded onto large arrays (7171 mm(2)) were captured with high efficiencies (≥97%), could be isolated from the array by a laser-based approach and were demonstrated to yield a high rate of colony formation (≥85%) after removal from the array. Clinical utility of this technology was shown through the capture, isolation and successful culture of CTCs from the blood of mice engrafted with primary human pancreatic tumors. Direct capture and isolation of living tumor cells from blood followed by analysis or culture will be a valuable tool for cancer cell characterization.

  3. Magneto-controllable capture and release of cancer cells by using a micropillar device decorated with graphite oxide-coated magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaolei; He, Rongxiang; Li, Shasha; Cai, Bo; Zhao, Libo; Liao, Lei; Liu, Wei; Zeng, Qian; Wang, Hao; Guo, Shi-Shang; Zhao, Xing-Zhong

    2013-11-25

    Aiming to highly efficient capture and analysis of circulating tumor cells, a micropillar device decorated with graphite oxide-coated magnetic nanoparticles is developed for magneto-controllable capture and release of cancer cells. Graphite oxide-coated, Fe3 O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are synthesized by solution mixing and functionalized with a specific antibody, following by the immobilization of such modified MNPs on our designed micropillar device. For the proof-of-concept study, a HCT116 colorectal cancer cell line is employed to exam the capture efficiency. Under magnetic field manipulation, the high density packing of antibody-modified MNPs on the micropillars increases the local concentration of antibody, as well as the topographic interactions between cancer cells and micropillar surfaces. The flow rate and the micropillar geometry are optimized by studying their effects on capture efficiency. Then, a different number of HCT116 cells spiked in two kinds of cell suspension are investigated, yielding capture efficiency >70% in culture medium and >40% in blood sample, respectively. Moreover, the captured HCT116 cells are able to be released from the micropillars with a saturated efficiency of 92.9% upon the removal of applied magnetic field and it is found that 78% of the released cancer cells are viable, making them suitable for subsequent biological analysis.

  4. Structural basis for hemoglobin capture by Staphylococcus aureus cell-surface protein, IsdH.

    PubMed

    Krishna Kumar, Kaavya; Jacques, David A; Pishchany, Gleb; Caradoc-Davies, Tom; Spirig, Thomas; Malmirchegini, G Reza; Langley, David B; Dickson, Claire F; Mackay, Joel P; Clubb, Robert T; Skaar, Eric P; Guss, J Mitchell; Gell, David A

    2011-11-01

    Pathogens must steal iron from their hosts to establish infection. In mammals, hemoglobin (Hb) represents the largest reservoir of iron, and pathogens express Hb-binding proteins to access this source. Here, we show how one of the commonest and most significant human pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus, captures Hb as the first step of an iron-scavenging pathway. The x-ray crystal structure of Hb bound to a domain from the Isd (iron-regulated surface determinant) protein, IsdH, is the first structure of a Hb capture complex to be determined. Surface mutations in Hb that reduce binding to the Hb-receptor limit the capacity of S. aureus to utilize Hb as an iron source, suggesting that Hb sequence is a factor in host susceptibility to infection. The demonstration that pathogens make highly specific recognition complexes with Hb raises the possibility of developing inhibitors of Hb binding as antibacterial agents.

  5. Structural Basis for Hemoglobin Capture by Staphylococcus aureus Cell-surface Protein, IsdH

    PubMed Central

    Krishna Kumar, Kaavya; Jacques, David A.; Pishchany, Gleb; Caradoc-Davies, Tom; Spirig, Thomas; Malmirchegini, G. Reza; Langley, David B.; Dickson, Claire F.; Mackay, Joel P.; Clubb, Robert T.; Skaar, Eric P.; Guss, J. Mitchell; Gell, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Pathogens must steal iron from their hosts to establish infection. In mammals, hemoglobin (Hb) represents the largest reservoir of iron, and pathogens express Hb-binding proteins to access this source. Here, we show how one of the commonest and most significant human pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus, captures Hb as the first step of an iron-scavenging pathway. The x-ray crystal structure of Hb bound to a domain from the Isd (iron-regulated surface determinant) protein, IsdH, is the first structure of a Hb capture complex to be determined. Surface mutations in Hb that reduce binding to the Hb-receptor limit the capacity of S. aureus to utilize Hb as an iron source, suggesting that Hb sequence is a factor in host susceptibility to infection. The demonstration that pathogens make highly specific recognition complexes with Hb raises the possibility of developing inhibitors of Hb binding as antibacterial agents. PMID:21917915

  6. From radiation-induced chromosome damage to cell death: modelling basic mechanisms and applications to boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Ballarini, F; Bortolussi, S; Clerici, A M; Ferrari, C; Protti, N; Altieri, S

    2011-02-01

    Cell death is a crucial endpoint in radiation-induced biological damage: on one side, cell death is a reference endpoint to characterise the action of radiation in biological targets; on the other side, any cancer therapy aims to kill tumour cells. Starting from Lea's target theory, many models have been proposed to interpret radiation-induced cell killing; after briefly discussing some of these models, in this paper, a mechanistic approach based on an experimentally observed link between chromosome aberrations and cell death was presented. More specifically, a model and a Monte Carlo code originally developed for chromosome aberrations were extended to simulate radiation-induced cell death applying an experimentally observed one-to-one relationship between the average number of 'lethal aberrations' (dicentrics, rings and deletions) per cell and -ln S, S being the fraction of surviving cells. Although such observation was related to X rays, in the present work, the approach was also applied to protons and alpha particles. A good agreement between simulation outcomes and literature data provided a model validation for different radiation types. The same approach was then successfully applied to simulate the survival of cells enriched with boron and irradiated with thermal neutrons at the Triga Mark II reactor in Pavia, to mimic a typical treatment for boron neutron capture therapy. PMID:21159746

  7. Fabrication of hydrophobic, electrically conductive and flame-resistant carbon aerogels by pyrolysis of regenerated cellulose aerogels.

    PubMed

    Wan, Caichao; Lu, Yun; Jiao, Yue; Jin, Chunde; Sun, Qingfeng; Li, Jian

    2015-03-15

    In this paper, we reported miscellaneous carbon aerogels prepared by pyrolysis of regenerated cellulose aerogels that were fabricated by dissolution in a mild NaOH/PEG solution, freeze-thaw treatment, regeneration, and freeze drying. The as-prepared carbon aerogels were subsequently characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), nitrogen adsorption measurements, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and water contact angle (WCA) tests. The results showed that the carbon aerogels with pore diameters of 1-60 nm maintained interconnected three-dimensional (3D) network after the pyrolysis, and showed type-IV adsorption isotherm. The pyrolysis process leaded to the decomposition of oxygen-containing functional groups, the destruction of cellulose crystalline structure, and the formation of highly disordered amorphous graphite. Moreover, the carbon aerogels also had strong hydrophobicity, electrical conductivity and flame retardance, which held great potential in the fields of waterproof, electronic devices and fireproofing.

  8. Fabrication of hydrophobic, electrically conductive and flame-resistant carbon aerogels by pyrolysis of regenerated cellulose aerogels.

    PubMed

    Wan, Caichao; Lu, Yun; Jiao, Yue; Jin, Chunde; Sun, Qingfeng; Li, Jian

    2015-03-15

    In this paper, we reported miscellaneous carbon aerogels prepared by pyrolysis of regenerated cellulose aerogels that were fabricated by dissolution in a mild NaOH/PEG solution, freeze-thaw treatment, regeneration, and freeze drying. The as-prepared carbon aerogels were subsequently characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), nitrogen adsorption measurements, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and water contact angle (WCA) tests. The results showed that the carbon aerogels with pore diameters of 1-60 nm maintained interconnected three-dimensional (3D) network after the pyrolysis, and showed type-IV adsorption isotherm. The pyrolysis process leaded to the decomposition of oxygen-containing functional groups, the destruction of cellulose crystalline structure, and the formation of highly disordered amorphous graphite. Moreover, the carbon aerogels also had strong hydrophobicity, electrical conductivity and flame retardance, which held great potential in the fields of waterproof, electronic devices and fireproofing. PMID:25542115

  9. Label-free capture of breast cancer cells spiked in buffy coats using carbon nanotube antibody micro-arrays

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi, Farhad; Trainor, Patrick; Rai, Shesh N; Kloecker, Goetz; Wickstrom, Eric; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the rapid and label-free capture of breast cancer cells spiked in buffy coats using nanotube-antibody micro-arrays. Single wall carbon nanotube arrays were manufactured using photo-lithography, metal deposition, and etching techniques. Anti-epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) antibodies were functionalized to the surface of the nanotube devices using 1-pyrene-butanoic acid succinimidyl ester functionalization method. Following functionalization, plain buffy coat and MCF7 cell spiked buffy coats were adsorbed on to the nanotube device and electrical signatures were recorded for differences in interaction between samples. A statistical classifier for the ‘liquid biopsy’ was developed to create a predictive model based on dynamic time warping to classify device electrical signals that corresponded to plain (control) or spiked buffy coats (case). In training test, the device electrical signals originating from buffy versus spiked buffy samples were classified with ~100% sensitivity, ~91% specificity and ~96% accuracy. In the blinded test, the signals were classified with ~91% sensitivity, ~82% specificity and ~86% accuracy. A heatmap was generated to visually capture the relationship between electrical signatures and the sample condition. Confocal microscopic analysis of devices that were classified as spiked buffy coats based on their electrical signatures confirmed the presence of cancer cells, their attachment to the device and overexpression of EpCAM receptors. The cell numbers were counted to be ~1—17 cells per 5 µl per device suggesting single cell sensitivity in spiked buffy coats that is scalable to higher volumes using the micro-arrays. PMID:26901310

  10. Label-free capture of breast cancer cells spiked in buffy coats using carbon nanotube antibody micro-arrays.

    PubMed

    Khosravi, Farhad; Trainor, Patrick; Rai, Shesh N; Kloecker, Goetz; Wickstrom, Eric; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate the rapid and label-free capture of breast cancer cells spiked in buffy coats using nanotube-antibody micro-arrays. Single wall carbon nanotube arrays were manufactured using photo-lithography, metal deposition, and etching techniques. Anti-epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) antibodies were functionalized to the surface of the nanotube devices using 1-pyrene-butanoic acid succinimidyl ester functionalization method. Following functionalization, plain buffy coat and MCF7 cell spiked buffy coats were adsorbed on to the nanotube device and electrical signatures were recorded for differences in interaction between samples. A statistical classifier for the 'liquid biopsy' was developed to create a predictive model based on dynamic time warping to classify device electrical signals that corresponded to plain (control) or spiked buffy coats (case). In training test, the device electrical signals originating from buffy versus spiked buffy samples were classified with ∼100% sensitivity, ∼91% specificity and ∼96% accuracy. In the blinded test, the signals were classified with ∼91% sensitivity, ∼82% specificity and ∼86% accuracy. A heatmap was generated to visually capture the relationship between electrical signatures and the sample condition. Confocal microscopic analysis of devices that were classified as spiked buffy coats based on their electrical signatures confirmed the presence of cancer cells, their attachment to the device and overexpression of EpCAM receptors. The cell numbers were counted to be ∼1-17 cells per 5 μl per device suggesting single cell sensitivity in spiked buffy coats that is scalable to higher volumes using the micro-arrays.

  11. Label-free capture of breast cancer cells spiked in buffy coats using carbon nanotube antibody micro-arrays.

    PubMed

    Khosravi, Farhad; Trainor, Patrick; Rai, Shesh N; Kloecker, Goetz; Wickstrom, Eric; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate the rapid and label-free capture of breast cancer cells spiked in buffy coats using nanotube-antibody micro-arrays. Single wall carbon nanotube arrays were manufactured using photo-lithography, metal deposition, and etching techniques. Anti-epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) antibodies were functionalized to the surface of the nanotube devices using 1-pyrene-butanoic acid succinimidyl ester functionalization method. Following functionalization, plain buffy coat and MCF7 cell spiked buffy coats were adsorbed on to the nanotube device and electrical signatures were recorded for differences in interaction between samples. A statistical classifier for the 'liquid biopsy' was developed to create a predictive model based on dynamic time warping to classify device electrical signals that corresponded to plain (control) or spiked buffy coats (case). In training test, the device electrical signals originating from buffy versus spiked buffy samples were classified with ∼100% sensitivity, ∼91% specificity and ∼96% accuracy. In the blinded test, the signals were classified with ∼91% sensitivity, ∼82% specificity and ∼86% accuracy. A heatmap was generated to visually capture the relationship between electrical signatures and the sample condition. Confocal microscopic analysis of devices that were classified as spiked buffy coats based on their electrical signatures confirmed the presence of cancer cells, their attachment to the device and overexpression of EpCAM receptors. The cell numbers were counted to be ∼1-17 cells per 5 μl per device suggesting single cell sensitivity in spiked buffy coats that is scalable to higher volumes using the micro-arrays. PMID:26901310

  12. Label-free capture of breast cancer cells spiked in buffy coats using carbon nanotube antibody micro-arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosravi, Farhad; Trainor, Patrick; Rai, Shesh N.; Kloecker, Goetz; Wickstrom, Eric; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate the rapid and label-free capture of breast cancer cells spiked in buffy coats using nanotube-antibody micro-arrays. Single wall carbon nanotube arrays were manufactured using photo-lithography, metal deposition, and etching techniques. Anti-epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) antibodies were functionalized to the surface of the nanotube devices using 1-pyrene-butanoic acid succinimidyl ester functionalization method. Following functionalization, plain buffy coat and MCF7 cell spiked buffy coats were adsorbed on to the nanotube device and electrical signatures were recorded for differences in interaction between samples. A statistical classifier for the ‘liquid biopsy’ was developed to create a predictive model based on dynamic time warping to classify device electrical signals that corresponded to plain (control) or spiked buffy coats (case). In training test, the device electrical signals originating from buffy versus spiked buffy samples were classified with ˜100% sensitivity, ˜91% specificity and ˜96% accuracy. In the blinded test, the signals were classified with ˜91% sensitivity, ˜82% specificity and ˜86% accuracy. A heatmap was generated to visually capture the relationship between electrical signatures and the sample condition. Confocal microscopic analysis of devices that were classified as spiked buffy coats based on their electrical signatures confirmed the presence of cancer cells, their attachment to the device and overexpression of EpCAM receptors. The cell numbers were counted to be ˜1-17 cells per 5 μl per device suggesting single cell sensitivity in spiked buffy coats that is scalable to higher volumes using the micro-arrays.

  13. Silica/Polymer and Silica/Polymer/Fiber Composite Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ou, Danny; Stepanian, Christopher J.; Hu, Xiangjun

    2010-01-01

    Aerogels that consist, variously, of neat silica/polymer alloys and silica/polymer alloy matrices reinforced with fibers have been developed as materials for flexible thermal-insulation blankets. In comparison with prior aerogel blankets, these aerogel blankets are more durable and less dusty. These blankets are also better able to resist and recover from compression . an important advantage in that maintenance of thickness is essential to maintenance of high thermal-insulation performance. These blankets are especially suitable as core materials for vacuum- insulated panels and vacuum-insulated boxes of advanced, nearly seamless design. (Inasmuch as heat leakage at seams is much greater than heat leakage elsewhere through such structures, advanced designs for high insulation performance should provide for minimization of the sizes and numbers of seams.) A silica/polymer aerogel of the present type could be characterized, somewhat more precisely, as consisting of multiply bonded, linear polymer reinforcements within a silica aerogel matrix. Thus far, several different polymethacrylates (PMAs) have been incorporated into aerogel networks to increase resistance to crushing and to improve other mechanical properties while minimally affecting thermal conductivity and density. The polymethacrylate phases are strongly linked into the silica aerogel networks in these materials. Unlike in other organic/inorganic blended aerogels, the inorganic and organic phases are chemically bonded to each other, by both covalent and hydrogen bonds. In the process for making a silica/polymer alloy aerogel, the covalent bonds are introduced by prepolymerization of the methacrylate monomer with trimethoxysilylpropylmethacrylate, which serves as a phase cross-linker in that it contains both organic and inorganic monomer functional groups and hence acts as a connector between the organic and inorganic phases. Hydrogen bonds are formed between the silanol groups of the inorganic phase and the

  14. Insights into the Controllable Chemical Composition of Metal Oxide Nanowires and Graphene Aerogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Anna Patrice

    The design and synthesis of materials that absorb visible light and create fuel to store solar energy is a pursuit that has captivated chemists for decades. In order to take part in solar water splitting, i.e. the production of hydrogen and oxygen gas from water and sunlight, electrode materials must fit specific requirements in terms of their electronic structure. Zinc oxide (ZnO) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) are both of interest for their ability to produce oxygen from photogenerated holes, but their band gaps are too large to capture a significant portion of the solar spectrum. We address this challenge by modifying the crystal structures of ZnO and TiO 2 to make lower band gap materials. Furthermore, we use nanowires as the synthetic template for these materials because they provide a large semiconductor-liquid interfacial area. ZnO nanowires can be alloyed with In3+, Fe3+ and other trivalent metal ions to form a unique structure with the formula M2O3(ZnO)n, also known as MZO. We synthesize indium zinc oxide (IZO) and indium iron zinc oxide (IFZO) nanowires and study their crystal structure using atomically-resolved transmission electron microscopy (TEM), among other methods. We elucidate a structural model for MZO that resolves inconsistencies in the existing literature, based on the identification of the zigzag layer as an inversion domain boundary. These nanowires are shown to have a lower band gap than ZnO and produce photocurrent under visible light illumination. The solid-state diffusion reaction to form ternary titanates is also studied by TEM. TiO2 nanowires are coated with metal oxides by a variety of deposition methods, and then converted to MTiO3 at high temperatures, where M is a divalent transition metal ion such as Mn 2+, CO2+, or Ni2+. When Co3O 4 particles attached to TiO2 nanowires are annealed for a short time, we observe the formation of a CoO(111)/TiO2 (010) interface. If the nanowires are instead coated with Co(NO3)2 salt and then annealed

  15. Target Identification of Compounds from a Cell Viability Phenotypic Screen Using a Bead/Lysate-Based Affinity Capture Platform.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hua; Duggan, Shannon; Richardson, Paul L; Marin, Violeta; Warder, Scott E; McLoughlin, Shaun M

    2016-02-01

    The pharmaceutical industry has been continually challenged by dwindling target diversity. To obviate this trend, phenotypic screens have been adopted, complementing target-centric screening approaches. Phenotypic screens identify drug leads using clinically relevant and translatable mechanisms, remaining agnostic to targets. While target anonymity is advantageous early in the drug discovery process, it poses challenges to hit progression, including the development of backup series, retaining desired pharmacology during optimization, discovery of markers, and understanding mechanism-driven toxicity. Consequently, significant effort has been expended to elaborate the targets and mechanisms at work for promising screening hits. Affinity capture is commonly leveraged, where the compounds are linked to beads and targets are abstracted from cell homogenates. This technique has proven effective for identifying targets of kinase, PARP, and HDAC inhibitors, and examples of new targets have been reported. Herein, a three-pronged approach to target deconvolution by affinity capture is described, including the implementation of a uniqueness index that helps discriminate between bona fide targets and background. The effectiveness of this approach is demonstrated using characterized compounds that act on known and noncanonical target classes. The platform is subsequently applied to phenotypic screening hits, identifying candidate targets. The success rate of bead-based affinity capture is discussed.

  16. Development of an Automated and Sensitive Microfluidic Device for Capturing and Characterizing Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) from Clinical Blood Samples.

    PubMed

    Gogoi, Priya; Sepehri, Saedeh; Zhou, Yi; Gorin, Michael A; Paolillo, Carmela; Capoluongo, Ettore; Gleason, Kyle; Payne, Austin; Boniface, Brian; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Morgan, Todd M; Fortina, Paolo; Pienta, Kenneth J; Handique, Kalyan; Wang, Yixin

    2016-01-01

    Current analysis of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is hindered by sub-optimal sensitivity and specificity of devices or assays as well as lack of capability of characterization of CTCs with clinical biomarkers. Here, we validate a novel technology to enrich and characterize CTCs from blood samples of patients with metastatic breast, prostate and colorectal cancers using a microfluidic chip which is processed by using an automated staining and scanning system from sample preparation to image processing. The Celsee system allowed for the detection of CTCs with apparent high sensitivity and specificity (94% sensitivity and 100% specificity). Moreover, the system facilitated rapid capture of CTCs from blood samples and also allowed for downstream characterization of the captured cells by immunohistochemistry, DNA and mRNA fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH). In a subset of patients with prostate cancer we compared the technology with a FDA-approved CTC device, CellSearch and found a higher degree of sensitivity with the Celsee instrument. In conclusion, the integrated Celsee system represents a promising CTC technology for enumeration and molecular characterization.

  17. Development of an Automated and Sensitive Microfluidic Device for Capturing and Characterizing Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) from Clinical Blood Samples

    PubMed Central

    Gogoi, Priya; Sepehri, Saedeh; Zhou, Yi; Gorin, Michael A.; Paolillo, Carmela; Capoluongo, Ettore; Gleason, Kyle; Payne, Austin; Boniface, Brian; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Morgan, Todd M.; Fortina, Paolo; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Handique, Kalyan; Wang, Yixin

    2016-01-01

    Current analysis of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is hindered by sub-optimal sensitivity and specificity of devices or assays as well as lack of capability of characterization of CTCs with clinical biomarkers. Here, we validate a novel technology to enrich and characterize CTCs from blood samples of patients with metastatic breast, prostate and colorectal cancers using a microfluidic chip which is processed by using an automated staining and scanning system from sample preparation to image processing. The Celsee system allowed for the detection of CTCs with apparent high sensitivity and specificity (94% sensitivity and 100% specificity). Moreover, the system facilitated rapid capture of CTCs from blood samples and also allowed for downstream characterization of the captured cells by immunohistochemistry, DNA and mRNA fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH). In a subset of patients with prostate cancer we compared the technology with a FDA-approved CTC device, CellSearch and found a higher degree of sensitivity with the Celsee instrument. In conclusion, the integrated Celsee system represents a promising CTC technology for enumeration and molecular characterization. PMID:26808060

  18. Cell cultures from marine invertebrates: new insights for capturing endless stemness.

    PubMed

    Rinkevich, Baruch

    2011-06-01

    Despite several decades of extensive research efforts, there is yet no single permanent cell line available from marine invertebrates as these cells stop dividing in vitro within 24-72 h after their isolation, starting cellular quiescence. This ubiquitous quiescent state should be modified in a way that at least some of the quiescent cells will become pluripotent, so they will have the ability to divide and become immortal. Following the above need, this essay introduces the rationale that the discipline of marine invertebrates' cell culture should gain from applying of two research routes, relevant to mammalian systems but less explored in the marine arena. The first is the use of adult stem cells (ASC) from marine organisms. Many marine invertebrate taxa maintain large pools of ASC in adulthood. Ample evidence attests that these cells from sponges, cnidarians, flatworms, crustaceans, mollusks, echinoderms, and ascidians play important roles in maintenance, regeneration, and asexual cloning, actively proliferating in vivo, resembling the vertebrates' cancer stem cells features. The second route is to target resting somatic cell constituents, manipulating them in the same way as has recently been performed on mammalian induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. While "iPS cells" are the outcome of an experimental manipulation, ASC are natural and rather frequent in a number of marine invertebrates. Above two cell categories reveal that there are more than a few types of seeds (cells) waiting to be sowed in the right soil (in vitro environmental conditions) for acquiring stemness and immortality. This rationale carries the potential to revolutionize the discipline of marine invertebrate cell cultures. When cultured "correctly," ASC and "iPS cells" from marine invertebrates may stay in their primitive stage and proliferate without differentiating into cells lineages, harnessing the stem cell's inherent abilities of self-replication versus differentiated progenies, toward

  19. Temperature and moisture dependence of dielectric constant for silica aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Hrubesh, L.H., LLNL

    1997-03-01

    The dielectric constants of silica aerogels are among the lowest measured for any solid material. The silica aerogels also exhibit low thermal expansion and are thermally stable to temperatures exceeding 500{degrees}C. However, due to the open porosity and large surface areas for aerogels, their dielectric constants are strongly affected by moisture and temperature. This paper presents data for the dielectric constants of silica aerogels as a function of moisture content at 25{degrees}C, and as a function of temperature, for temperatures in the range from 25{degrees}C to 450{degrees}C. Dielectric constant data are also given for silica aerogels that are heat treated in dry nitrogen at 500{degrees}C, then cooled to 25{degrees}C for measurements in dry air. All measurements are made on bulk aerogel spheres at 22GHz microwave frequency, using a cavity perturbation method. The results of the dependence found here for bulk materials can be inferred to apply also to thin films of silica aerogels having similar nano-structures and densities.

  20. Synthesis and properties of Chitosan-silica hybrid aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Ayers, Michael R.; Hunt, Arlon J.

    2001-06-01

    Chitosan, a polymer that is soluble in dilute aqueous acid, is derived from chitin, a natural polyglucosamide. Aquagels where the solid phase consists of both chitosan and silica can be easily prepared by using an acidic solution of chitosan to catalyze the hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethylorthosilicate. Gels with chitosan/TEOS mass ratios of 0.1-1.1 have been prepared by this method. Standard drying processes using CO{sub 2} give the corresponding aerogels. The amount of chitosan in the gel plays a role in the shrinkage of the aerogel during drying. Gels with the lowest chitosan/silica ratios show the most linear shrinkage, up to 24%, while those with the highest ratios show only a 7% linear shrinkage. Pyrolysis at 700 C under nitrogen produces a darkened aerogel due to the thermal decomposition of the chitosan, however, the aerogel retains its monolithic form. The pyrolyzed aerogels absorb slightly more infrared radiation in the 2-5 {micro}m region than the original aerogels. B.E.T. surface areas of these aerogels range from 470-750 m{sup 2}/g. Biocompatibility screening of this material shows a very high value for hemolysis, but a low value for cytotoxicity.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of highly crystalline graphene aerogels.

    PubMed

    Worsley, Marcus A; Pham, Thang T; Yan, Aiming; Shin, Swanee J; Lee, Jonathan R I; Bagge-Hansen, Michael; Mickelson, William; Zettl, Alex

    2014-10-28

    Aerogels are used in a broad range of scientific and industrial applications due to their large surface areas, ultrafine pore sizes, and extremely low densities. Recently, a large number of reports have described graphene aerogels based on the reduction of graphene oxide (GO). Though these GO-based aerogels represent a considerable advance relative to traditional carbon aerogels, they remain significantly inferior to individual graphene sheets due to their poor crystallinity. Here, we report a straightforward method to synthesize highly crystalline GO-based graphene aerogels via high-temperature processing common in commercial graphite production. The crystallization of the graphene aerogels versus annealing temperature is characterized using Raman and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and electron microscopy. Nitrogen porosimetry shows that the highly crystalline graphene macrostructure maintains a high surface area and ultrafine pore size. Because of their enhanced crystallinity, these graphene aerogels exhibit a ∼ 200 °C improvement in oxidation temperature and an order of magnitude increase in electrical conductivity. PMID:25283720

  2. Performance assessment of natural gas and biogas fueled molten carbonate fuel cells in carbon capture configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barelli, Linda; Bidini, Gianni; Campanari, Stefano; Discepoli, Gabriele; Spinelli, Maurizio

    2016-07-01

    The ability of MCFCs as carbon dioxide concentrator is an alternative solution among the carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies to reduce the CO2 emission of an existing plant, providing energy instead of implying penalties. Moreover, the fuel flexibility exhibited by MCFCs increases the interest on such a solution. This paper provides the performance characterization of MCFCs operated in CCS configuration and fed with either natural gas or biogas. Experimental results are referred to a base CCS unit constituted by a MCFC stack fed from a reformer and integrated with an oxycombustor. A comparative analysis is carried out to evaluate the effect of fuel composition on energy efficiency and CO2 capture performance. A higher CO2 removal ability is revealed for the natural feeding case, bringing to a significant reduction in MCFC total area (-11.5%) and to an increase in produced net power (+13%). Moreover, the separated CO2 results in 89% (natural gas) and 86.5% (biogas) of the CO2 globally delivered by the CCS base unit. Further investigation will be carried out to provide a comprehensive assessment of the different solutions eco-efficiency considering also the biogas source and availability.

  3. An aerogel obtained from chemo-enzymatically oxidized fenugreek galactomannans as a versatile delivery system.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Bianca; Campia, Paola; Merlini, Luca; Brasca, Milena; Pastori, Nadia; Farris, Stefano; Melone, Lucio; Punta, Carlo; Galante, Yves M

    2016-06-25

    We describe a new aerogel obtained from laccase-oxidized galactomannans of the leguminous plant fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) and suggest its potential practical use. Laccase/TEMPO oxidation of fenugreek in aqueous solution caused a viscosity increase of over 15-fold. A structured, elastic, stable hydrogel was generated, due to formation of carbonyl groups from primary OH of galactose side units and subsequent establishment of hemiacetalic bonds with available free hydroxyl groups. Upon lyophilization of this hydrogel, a water-insoluble aerogel was obtained (EOLFG), capable of uptaking aqueous or organic solvents over 20 times its own weight. The material was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, FT-IR, elemental analysis and (13)C CP-MAS NMR spectroscopy and its mechanical properties were investigated. To test the EOLFG as a delivery system, the anti-microbial enzyme lysozyme was used as model active principle. Lysozyme was added before or after formation of the aerogel, entrapped or absorbed in the gel, retained and released in active form, as proven by its hydrolytic glycosidase activity on lyophilized Micrococcus lysodeikticus cells wall peptidoglycans. This new biomaterial, composed of a chemo-enzymatically modified plant polysaccharide, might represent a versatile, biocompatible "delivery system" of active principles in food and non-food products. PMID:27083827

  4. An aerogel obtained from chemo-enzymatically oxidized fenugreek galactomannans as a versatile delivery system.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Bianca; Campia, Paola; Merlini, Luca; Brasca, Milena; Pastori, Nadia; Farris, Stefano; Melone, Lucio; Punta, Carlo; Galante, Yves M

    2016-06-25

    We describe a new aerogel obtained from laccase-oxidized galactomannans of the leguminous plant fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) and suggest its potential practical use. Laccase/TEMPO oxidation of fenugreek in aqueous solution caused a viscosity increase of over 15-fold. A structured, elastic, stable hydrogel was generated, due to formation of carbonyl groups from primary OH of galactose side units and subsequent establishment of hemiacetalic bonds with available free hydroxyl groups. Upon lyophilization of this hydrogel, a water-insoluble aerogel was obtained (EOLFG), capable of uptaking aqueous or organic solvents over 20 times its own weight. The material was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, FT-IR, elemental analysis and (13)C CP-MAS NMR spectroscopy and its mechanical properties were investigated. To test the EOLFG as a delivery system, the anti-microbial enzyme lysozyme was used as model active principle. Lysozyme was added before or after formation of the aerogel, entrapped or absorbed in the gel, retained and released in active form, as proven by its hydrolytic glycosidase activity on lyophilized Micrococcus lysodeikticus cells wall peptidoglycans. This new biomaterial, composed of a chemo-enzymatically modified plant polysaccharide, might represent a versatile, biocompatible "delivery system" of active principles in food and non-food products.

  5. Dimensional and Structural Control of Silica Aerogel Membranes for Miniaturized Motionless Gas Pumps.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shanyu; Jiang, Bo; Maeder, Thomas; Muralt, Paul; Kim, Nayoung; Matam, Santhosh Kumar; Jeong, Eunho; Han, Yen-Lin; Koebel, Matthias M

    2015-08-26

    With growing public interest in portable electronics such as micro fuel cells, micro gas total analysis systems, and portable medical devices, the need for miniaturized air pumps with minimal electrical power consumption is on the rise. Thus, the development and downsizing of next-generation thermal transpiration gas pumps has been investigated intensively during the last decades. Such a system relies on a mesoporous membrane that generates a thermomolecular pressure gradient under the action of an applied temperature bias. However, the development of highly miniaturized active membrane materials with tailored porosity and optimized pumping performance remains a major challenge. Here we report a systematic study on the manufacturing of aerogel membranes using an optimized, minimal-shrinkage sol-gel process, leading to low thermal conductivity and high air conductance. This combination of properties results in superior performance for miniaturized thermomolecular air pump applications. The engineering of such aerogel membranes, which implies pore structure control and chemical surface modification, requires both chemical processing know-how and a detailed understanding of the influence of the material properties on the spatial flow rate density. Optimal pumping performance was found for devices with integrated membranes with a density of 0.062 g cm(-3) and an average pore size of 142.0 nm. Benchmarking of such low-density hydrophobic active aerogel membranes gave an air flow rate density of 3.85 sccm·cm(-2) at an operating temperature of 400 °C. Such a silica aerogel membrane based system has shown more than 50% higher pumping performance when compared to conventional transpiration pump membrane materials as well as the ability to withstand higher operating temperatures (up to 440 °C). This study highlights new perspectives for the development of miniaturized thermal transpiration air pumps while offering insights into the fundamentals of molecular pumping in

  6. Dimensional and Structural Control of Silica Aerogel Membranes for Miniaturized Motionless Gas Pumps.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shanyu; Jiang, Bo; Maeder, Thomas; Muralt, Paul; Kim, Nayoung; Matam, Santhosh Kumar; Jeong, Eunho; Han, Yen-Lin; Koebel, Matthias M

    2015-08-26

    With growing public interest in portable electronics such as micro fuel cells, micro gas total analysis systems, and portable medical devices, the need for miniaturized air pumps with minimal electrical power consumption is on the rise. Thus, the development and downsizing of next-generation thermal transpiration gas pumps has been investigated intensively during the last decades. Such a system relies on a mesoporous membrane that generates a thermomolecular pressure gradient under the action of an applied temperature bias. However, the development of highly miniaturized active membrane materials with tailored porosity and optimized pumping performance remains a major challenge. Here we report a systematic study on the manufacturing of aerogel membranes using an optimized, minimal-shrinkage sol-gel process, leading to low thermal conductivity and high air conductance. This combination of properties results in superior performance for miniaturized thermomolecular air pump applications. The engineering of such aerogel membranes, which implies pore structure control and chemical surface modification, requires both chemical processing know-how and a detailed understanding of the influence of the material properties on the spatial flow rate density. Optimal pumping performance was found for devices with integrated membranes with a density of 0.062 g cm(-3) and an average pore size of 142.0 nm. Benchmarking of such low-density hydrophobic active aerogel membranes gave an air flow rate density of 3.85 sccm·cm(-2) at an operating temperature of 400 °C. Such a silica aerogel membrane based system has shown more than 50% higher pumping performance when compared to conventional transpiration pump membrane materials as well as the ability to withstand higher operating temperatures (up to 440 °C). This study highlights new perspectives for the development of miniaturized thermal transpiration air pumps while offering insights into the fundamentals of molecular pumping in

  7. Polyimide Aerogels with Three-Dimensional Cross-Linked Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panek, John

    2010-01-01

    Polyimide aerogels with three-dimensional cross-linked structure are made using linear oligomeric segments of polyimide, and linked with one of the following into a 3D structure: trifunctional aliphatic or aromatic amines, latent reactive end caps such as nadic anhydride or phenylethynylphenyl amine, and silica or silsesquioxane cage structures decorated with amine. Drying the gels supercritically maintains the solid structure of the gel, creating a polyimide aerogel with improved mechanical properties over linear polyimide aerogels. Lightweight, low-density structures are desired for acoustic and thermal insulation for aerospace structures, habitats, astronaut equipment, and aeronautic applications. Aerogels are a unique material for providing such properties because of their extremely low density and small pore sizes. However, plain silica aerogels are brittle. Reinforcing the aerogel structure with a polymer (X-Aerogel) provides vast improvements in strength while maintaining low density and pore structure. However, degradation of polymers used in cross-linking tends to limit use temperatures to below 150 C. Organic aerogels made from linear polyimide have been demonstrated, but gels shrink substantially during supercritical fluid extraction and may have lower use temperature due to lower glass transition temperatures. The purpose of this innovation is to raise the glass transition temperature of all organic polyimide aerogel by use of tri-, tetra-, or poly-functional units in the structure to create a 3D covalently bonded network. Such cross-linked polyimides typically have higher glass transition temperatures in excess of 300 400 C. In addition, the reinforcement provided by a 3D network should improve mechanical stability, and prevent shrinkage on supercritical fluid extraction. The use of tri-functional aromatic or aliphatic amine groups in the polyimide backbone will provide such a 3D structure.

  8. Polysaccharide-based aerogel microspheres for oral drug delivery.

    PubMed

    García-González, C A; Jin, M; Gerth, J; Alvarez-Lorenzo, C; Smirnova, I

    2015-03-01

    Polysaccharide-based aerogels in the form of microspheres were investigated as carriers of poorly water soluble drugs for oral administration. These bio-based carriers may combine the biocompatibility of polysaccharides and the enhanced drug loading capacity of dry aerogels. Aerogel microspheres from starch, pectin and alginate were loaded with ketoprofen (anti-inflammatory drug) and benzoic acid (used in the management of urea cycle disorders) via supercritical CO2-assisted adsorption. Amount of drug loaded depended on the aerogel matrix structure and composition and reached values up to 1.0×10(-3) and 1.7×10(-3) g/m(2) for ketoprofen and benzoic acid in starch microspheres. After impregnation, drugs were in the amorphous state in the aerogel microspheres. Release behavior was evaluated in different pH media (pH 1.2 and 6.8). Controlled drug release from pectin and alginate aerogel microspheres fitted Gallagher-Corrigan release model (R(2)>0.99 in both cases), with different relative contribution of erosion and diffusion mechanisms depending on the matrix composition. Release from starch aerogel microspheres was driven by dissolution, fitting the first-order kinetics due to the rigid starch aerogel structure, and showed different release rate constant (k1) depending on the drug (0.075 and 0.160 min(-1) for ketoprofen and benzoic acid, respectively). Overall, the results point out the possibilities of tuning drug loading and release by carefully choosing the polysaccharide used to prepare the aerogels.

  9. Adsorption in sparse networks. 2: Silica aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, G.W.; Calas, S.; Sempere, R.

    1998-06-15

    The model developed in Part 1 is applied to nitrogen adsorption isotherms obtained for a series of silica aerogels whose densities are varied by partial sintering. The isotherms are adequately described by a cubic network model, with all of the pores falling in the mesopore range; the adsorption and desorption branches are fit by the same pore size distribution. For the least dense gels, a substantial portion of the pore volume is not detected by condensation. The model attributes this effect to the shape of the adsorbate/adsorptive interface, which can adopt zero curvature even in mesopores, because of the shape of the network.

  10. Reversible Oligonucleotide Chain Blocking Enables Bead Capture and Amplification of T-Cell Receptor α and β Chain mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Hanson, W Miachel; Chen, Zhe; Jackson, Laurie K; Attaf, Meriem; Sewell, Andrew K; Heemstra, Jennifer M; Phillips, John D

    2016-09-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has proven to be an exceptionally powerful tool for studying genetic variation and differences in gene expression profiles between cell populations. However, these population-wide studies are limited by their inability to detect variation between individual cells within a population, inspiring the development of single-cell techniques such as Drop-seq, which add a unique barcode to the mRNA from each cell prior to sequencing. Current Drop-seq technology enables capture, amplification, and barcoding of the entire mRNA transcriptome of individual cells. NGS can then be used to sequence the 3'-end of each message to build a cell-specific transcriptional landscape. However, current technology does not allow high-throughput capture of information distant from the mRNA poly-A tail. Thus, gene profiling would have much greater utility if beads could be generated having multiple transcript-specific capture sequences. Here we report the use of a reversible chain blocking group to enable synthesis of DNA barcoded beads having capture sequences for the constant domains of the T-cell receptor α and β chain mRNAs. We demonstrate that these beads can be used to capture and pair TCRα and TCRβ sequences from total T-cell RNA, enabling reverse transcription and PCR amplification of these sequences. This is the first example of capture beads having more than one capture sequence, and we envision that this technology will be of high utility for applications such as pairing the antigen receptor chains that give rise to autoimmune diseases or measuring the ratios of mRNA splice variants in cancer stem cells. PMID:27478996

  11. Reversible Oligonucleotide Chain Blocking Enables Bead Capture and Amplification of T-Cell Receptor α and β Chain mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Hanson, W Miachel; Chen, Zhe; Jackson, Laurie K; Attaf, Meriem; Sewell, Andrew K; Heemstra, Jennifer M; Phillips, John D

    2016-09-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has proven to be an exceptionally powerful tool for studying genetic variation and differences in gene expression profiles between cell populations. However, these population-wide studies are limited by their inability to detect variation between individual cells within a population, inspiring the development of single-cell techniques such as Drop-seq, which add a unique barcode to the mRNA from each cell prior to sequencing. Current Drop-seq technology enables capture, amplification, and barcoding of the entire mRNA transcriptome of individual cells. NGS can then be used to sequence the 3'-end of each message to build a cell-specific transcriptional landscape. However, current technology does not allow high-throughput capture of information distant from the mRNA poly-A tail. Thus, gene profiling would have much greater utility if beads could be generated having multiple transcript-specific capture sequences. Here we report the use of a reversible chain blocking group to enable synthesis of DNA barcoded beads having capture sequences for the constant domains of the T-cell receptor α and β chain mRNAs. We demonstrate that these beads can be used to capture and pair TCRα and TCRβ sequences from total T-cell RNA, enabling reverse transcription and PCR amplification of these sequences. This is the first example of capture beads having more than one capture sequence, and we envision that this technology will be of high utility for applications such as pairing the antigen receptor chains that give rise to autoimmune diseases or measuring the ratios of mRNA splice variants in cancer stem cells.

  12. The dominant role of CD8+ dendritic cells in cross-presentation is not dictated by antigen capture

    PubMed Central

    Schnorrer, Petra; Behrens, Georg M. N.; Wilson, Nicholas S.; Pooley, Joanne L.; Smith, Christopher M.; El-Sukkari, Dima; Davey, Gayle; Kupresanin, Fiona; Li, Ming; Maraskovsky, Eugene; Belz, Gabrielle T.; Carbone, Francis R.; Shortman, Ken; Heath, William R.; Villadangos, Jose A.

    2006-01-01

    Mouse spleens contain three populations of conventional (CD11chigh) dendritic cells (DCs) that play distinct functions. The CD8+ DC are unique in that they can present exogenous antigens on their MHC class I molecules, a process known as cross-presentation. It is unclear whether this special ability is because only the CD8+ DC can capture the antigens used in cross-presentation assays, or because this is the only DC population that possesses specialized machinery for cross-presentation. To solve this important question we examined the splenic DC subsets for their ability to both present via MHC class II molecules and cross-present via MHC class I using four different forms of the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA). These forms include a cell-associated form, a soluble form, OVA expressed in bacteria, or OVA bound to latex beads. With the exception of bacterial antigen, which was poorly cross-presented by all DC, all antigenic forms were cross-presented much more efficiently by the CD8+ DC. This pattern could not be attributed simply to a difference in antigen capture because all DC subsets presented the antigen via MHC class II. Indeed, direct assessments of endocytosis showed that CD8+ and CD8− DC captured comparable amounts of soluble and bead-associated antigen, yet only the CD8+ DC cross-presented these antigenic forms. Our results indicate that cross-presentation requires specialized machinery that is expressed by CD8+ DC but largely absent from CD8− DC. This conclusion has important implications for the design of vaccination strategies based on antigen targeting to DC. PMID:16807294

  13. Uncooled thin film pyroelectric IR detector with aerogel thermal isolation

    DOEpatents

    Ruffner, Judith A.; Bullington, Jeff A.; Clem, Paul G.; Warren, William L.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Tuttle, Bruce A.; Schwartz, Robert W.

    1999-01-01

    A monolithic infrared detector structure which allows integration of pyroelectric thin films atop low thermal conductivity aerogel thin films. The structure comprises, from bottom to top, a substrate, an aerogel insulating layer, a lower electrode, a pyroelectric layer, and an upper electrode layer capped by a blacking layer. The aerogel can offer thermal conductivity less than that of air, while providing a much stronger monolithic alternative to cantilevered or suspended air-gap structures for pyroelectric thin film pixel arrays. Pb(Zr.sub.0.4 Ti.sub.0.6)O.sub.3 thin films deposited on these structures displayed viable pyroelectric properties, while processed at 550.degree. C.

  14. Highly porous and mechanically strong ceramic oxide aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventis, Nicholas (Inventor); Meador, Mary Ann B. (Inventor); Johnston, James C. (Inventor); Fabrizio, Eve F. (Inventor); Ilhan, Ulvi F. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Structurally stable and mechanically strong ceramic oxide aerogels are provided. The aerogels are cross-linked via organic polymer chains that are attached to and extend from surface-bound functional groups provided or present over the internal surfaces of a mesoporous ceramic oxide particle network via appropriate chemical reactions. The functional groups can be hydroxyl groups, which are native to ceramic oxides, or they can be non-hydroxyl functional groups that can be decorated over the internal surfaces of the ceramic oxide network. Methods of preparing such mechanically strong ceramic oxide aerogels also are provided.

  15. Highly porous and mechanically strong ceramic oxide aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventis, Nicholas (Inventor); Meador, Mary Ann B. (Inventor); Johnston, James C. (Inventor); Fabrizio, Eve F. (Inventor); Ilhan, Ulvi F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Structurally stable and mechanically strong ceramic oxide aerogels are provided. The aerogels are cross-linked via organic polymer chains that are attached to and extend from surface-bound functional groups provided or present over the internal surfaces of a mesoporous ceramic oxide particle network via appropriate chemical reactions. The functional groups can be hydroxyl groups, which are native to ceramic oxides, or they can be non-hydroxyl functional groups that can be decorated over the internal surfaces of the ceramic oxide network. Methods of preparing such mechanically strong ceramic oxide aerogels also are provided.

  16. Anisotropic phases of superfluid ^{3}he in compressed aerogel.

    PubMed

    Li, J I A; Zimmerman, A M; Pollanen, J; Collett, C A; Halperin, W P

    2015-03-13

    It has been shown that the relative stabilities of various superfluid states of ^{3}He can be influenced by anisotropy in a silica aerogel framework. We prepared a suite of aerogel samples compressed up to 30% for which we performed pulsed NMR on ^{3}He imbibed within the aerogel. We identified A and B phases and determined their magnetic field-temperature phase diagrams as a function of strain. From these results, we infer that the B phase is distorted by negative strain forming an anisotropic superfluid state more stable than the A phase.

  17. REAL-Select: Full-Length Antibody Display and Library Screening by Surface Capture on Yeast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Günther, Ralf; Becker, Stefan; Kolmar, Harald; Hock, Björn

    2014-01-01

    We describe a novel approach named REAL-Select for the non-covalent display of IgG-molecules on the surface of yeast cells for the purpose of antibody engineering and selection. It relies on the capture of secreted native full-length antibodies on the cell surface via binding to an externally immobilized ZZ domain, which tightly binds antibody Fc. It is beneficial for high-throughput screening of yeast-displayed IgG-libraries during antibody discovery and development. In a model experiment, antibody-displaying yeast cells were isolated from a 1∶1,000,000 mixture with control cells confirming the maintenance of genotype-phenotype linkage. Antibodies with improved binding characteristics were obtained by affinity maturation using REAL-Select, demonstrating the ability of this system to display antibodies in their native form and to detect subtle changes in affinity by flow cytometry. The biotinylation of the cell surface followed by functionalization with a streptavidin-ZZ fusion protein is an approach that is independent of the genetic background of the antibody-producing host and therefore can be expected to be compatible with other eukaryotic expression hosts such as P. pastoris or mammalian cells. PMID:25501029

  18. Milestone Report - M3FT-15OR03120211 - Complete Iodine Loading of NO Aged Ag0-functionalized Aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    Bruffey, Stephanie H.; Patton, Kaara K.; Jubin, Robert Thomas

    2015-05-29

    In off-gas treatment systems within a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant, capture materials will be exposed to a gas stream for extended periods during their lifetime. This gas stream may be at elevated temperature and could contain water, NOx gas, or a variety of other constituents. For this reason, it is important to understand the effects of long-term exposure, or aging, on proposed capture materials. One material under consideration for iodine sequestration is silver-functionalized silica aerogel (Ag0-aerogel). The aim of this study was to determine the effect of extended exposure at 150°C to an air stream containing NO on the iodine capture capacity of Ag0-aerogel. Ag0-aerogel was provided by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), which manufactures the material at a lab scale. Prior to aging, the material has an iodine loading capacity of approximately 290 mg I/g Ag0-aerogel. Previous studies have aged the material in a dry air stream or in a moist air stream for up to 6 months. Both tests resulted in a 22% loss in iodine capacity. Aging the material in a static 2% NO2 environment for up to 2 months results in a 15% loss of iodine capacity.3 In this study, exposure of Ag0-aerogel to 1% NO at 150°C for 2 months produced a loss of 43% in iodine loading capacity. This is largest loss observed for aerogel aging studies to date. The performance of Ag0-aerogel in this study was compared to the performance of reduced silver mordenite (Ag0Z) in similar studies. Ag0Z is a zeolite mineral considered to be the current standard technology for iodine removal from off-gas streams of a potential US used fuel processing plant. In an aging study exposing Ag0Z to 1% NO for 2 months, an iodine capacity loss of over 80% was observed. This corresponds to a silver utilization of 13.5% for 2 month NO-aged Ag0Z, compared to 57% silver utilization for 2

  19. CO2 Fixation, Lipid Production, and Power Generation by a Novel Air-Lift-Type Microbial Carbon Capture Cell System.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xia; Liu, Baojun; Zhou, Jiti; Jin, Ruofei; Qiao, Sen; Liu, Guangfei

    2015-09-01

    An air-lift-type microbial carbon capture cell (ALMCC) was constructed for the first time by using an air-lift-type photobioreactor as the cathode chamber. The performance of ALMCC in fixing high concentration of CO2, producing energy (power and biodiesel), and removing COD together with nutrients was investigated and compared with the traditional microbial carbon capture cell (MCC) and air-lift-type photobioreactor (ALP). The ALMCC system produced a maximum power density of 972.5 mW·m(-3) and removed 86.69% of COD, 70.52% of ammonium nitrogen, and 69.24% of phosphorus, which indicate that ALMCC performed better than MCC in terms of power generation and wastewater treatment efficiency. Besides, ALMCC demonstrated 9.98- and 1.88-fold increases over ALP and MCC in the CO2 fixation rate, respectively. Similarly, the ALMCC significantly presented a higher lipid productivity compared to those control reactors. More importantly, the preliminary analysis of energy balance suggested that the net energy of the ALMCC system was significantly superior to other systems and could theoretically produce enough energy to cover its consumption. In this work, the established ALMCC system simultaneously achieved the high level of CO2 fixation, energy recycle, and municipal wastewater treatment effectively and efficiently.

  20. Dynamic Polymeric Microtubes for the Remote-Controlled Capture, Guidance, and Release of Sperm Cells.

    PubMed

    Magdanz, Veronika; Guix, Maria; Hebenstreit, Franziska; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2016-06-01

    Remote-controlled release of single sperm cells is demonstrated by the use of polymeric microtubes that unfold upon temperature increase to 38 °C. Thermoresponsive, ferromagnetic multilayers are tailored to catch sperm cells and remotely control them by external magnetic fields. These polymeric spermbots are propelled by the sperm flagella. When the temperature is increased, the tubes unfold and the cell is set free. PMID:27003908