Science.gov

Sample records for aerogel substrate loaded

  1. Composition containing aerogel substrate loaded with tritium

    DOEpatents

    Ashley, Carol S.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Ellefson, Robert E.; Gill, John T.; Reed, Scott; Walko, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    The invention provides a process for loading an aerogel substrate with tritium and the resultant compositions. According to the process, an aerogel substrate is hydrolyzed so that surface OH groups are formed. The hydrolyzed aerogel is then subjected to tritium exchange employing, for example, a tritium-containing gas, whereby tritium atoms replace H atoms of surface OH groups. OH and/or CH groups of residual alcohol present in the aerogel may also undergo tritium exchange.

  2. Low dielectric polyimide aerogels as substrates for lightweight patch antennas.

    PubMed

    Meador, Mary Ann B; Wright, Sarah; Sandberg, Anna; Nguyen, Baochau N; Van Keuls, Frederick W; Mueller, Carl H; Rodríguez-Solís, Rafael; Miranda, Félix A

    2012-11-01

    The dielectric properties and loss tangents of low-density polyimide aerogels have been characterized at various frequencies. Relative dielectric constants as low as 1.16 were measured for polyimide aerogels made from 2,2'-dimethylbenzidine (DMBZ) and biphenyl 3,3',4,4'-tetracarbozylic dianhydride (BPDA) cross-linked with 1,3,5-triaminophenoxybenzene (TAB). This formulation was used as the substrate to fabricate and test prototype microstrip patch antennas and benchmark against state of practice commercial antenna substrates. The polyimide aerogel antennas exhibited broader bandwidth, higher gain, and lower mass than the antennas made using commercial substrates. These are very encouraging results, which support the potential advantages of the polyimide aerogel-based antennas for aerospace applications.

  3. Nanogel Aerogel as Load Bearing Insulation for Cryogenic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koravos, J. J.; Miller, T. M.; Fesmire, J. E.; Coffman, B. E.

    2010-04-01

    Load support structures in cryogenic storage, transport and processing systems are large contributors to the total heat leak of the system. Conventional insulation systems require the use of these support members in order to stabilize the process fluid enclosure and prevent degradation of insulation performance due to compression. Removal of these support structures would substantially improve system efficiency. Nanogel aerogel insulation performance is tested at vacuum pressures ranging from high vacuum to atmospheric pressure and under loads from loosely packed to greater than 10,000 Pa. Insulation performance is determined using boil-off calorimetry with liquid nitrogen as the latent heat recipient. Two properties of the aerogel insulation material suit it to act as a load bearing "structure" in a process vessel: (1) Ability to maintain thermal performance under load; (2) Elasticity when subjected to load. Results of testing provide positive preliminary indication that these properties allow Nanogel aerogel to effectively be used as a load bearing insulation in cryogenic systems.

  4. Whey protein aerogel as blended with cellulose crystalline particles or loaded with fish oil.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Maede; Madadlou, Ashkan; Saboury, Ali Akbar

    2016-04-01

    Whey protein hydrogels blended with nanocrystalline and microcrystalline cellulose particles (NCC and MCC, respectively) were prepared, followed by freeze-drying, to produce aerogels. NCC blending increased the Young's modulus, and elastic character, of the protein aerogel. Aerogels were microporous and mesoporous materials, as characterized by the pores sizing 1.2 nm and 12.2 nm, respectively. Blending with NCC decreased the count of both microporous and mesoporous-classified pores at the sub-100 nm pore size range investigated. In contrast, MCC blending augmented the specific surface area and pores volume of the aerogel. It also increased moisture sorption affinity of aerogel. The feasibility of conveying hydrophobic nutraceuticals by aerogels was evaluated through loading fish oil into the non-blended aerogel. Oil loading altered its microstructure, corresponding to a peak displacement in Fourier-transform infra-red spectra, which was ascribed to increased hydrophobic interactions. Surface coating of aerogel with zein decreased the oxidation susceptibility of the loaded oil during subsequent storage.

  5. The extraction of uranium using graphene aerogel loading organic solution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mumei; Li, Zheng; Li, Jihao; Li, Jingye; Li, Qingnuan; Zhang, Lan

    2017-05-01

    A new approach for uranium extraction employing graphene aerogel (GA) as a skeleton loading organic solution (GA-LOS) is proposed and investigated. Firstly, the GA with super-hydrophobicity and high organic solution absorption capacity was fabricated by one-step reduction and self-assembly of graphene oxide with ethylenediamine. By adsorbing Tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)/n-dodecane solution to prepare GA-LOS, the extraction of U(VI) from nitric acid medium using GA-LOS was investigated and compared with conventional solvent extraction. It is found that the GA-LOS method can provide several advantages over conventional solvent extraction and adsorption due to the elimination of aqueous-organic mixing-separation procedures and easy solid-liquid separation. Furthermore, it also possesses higher extraction capacity (the saturated extraction capacity of GA loading TBP for U(VI) was 316.3mgg(-1) ) and lower consumption of organic diluents, leading to less organic waste. Moreover, the stability of GA-LOS in aqueous solution and cycling test were also studied, and it shows a remarkable regeneration capability, making it an ideal candidate for metal extraction from aqueous solution.

  6. Pt loaded carbon aerogel catalyst for catalytic exchange reactions between water and hydrogen gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rashmi; Singh, Ashish; Kohli, D. K.; Singh, M. K.; Gupta, P. K.

    2013-06-01

    We report development and characterization of platinum doped carbon aerogel catalyst for catalytic exchange reactions between water and hydrogen gas. The carbon aerogel with uniformly dispersed platinum nanoparticles was prepared by adding platinum precursor during the sol-gel process. Thereafter colloidal PTFE was mixed with the platinum doped carbon aerogel powder and coated on Dixon rings to obtain hydrophobic catalyst with required mechanical strength. Detailed studies have been carried out to observe the effect of physical characteristics of the catalyst powder (surface area and pore size of aerogels, Pt cluster size and its valence state etc) and the different coating parameters (PTFE to Pt-CA ratio and Pt loading on Dixon ring) on volume transfer rate (Ky.a) for H/D reaction. Ky.a values of ˜0.8 m3 (STP).s-1. m-3 were obtained for Pt loading of 7% and Pt cluster size of 3 nm at atmospheric pressure.

  7. Assessment of Methods to Consolidate Iodine-Loaded Silver-Functionalized Silica Aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    Matyas, Josef; Engler, Robert K.

    2013-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is currently investigating alternative sorbents for the removal and immobilization of radioiodine from the gas streams in a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. One of these new sorbents, Ag0-functionalized silica aerogels, shows great promise as a potential replacement for Ag-bearing mordenites because of its high selectivity and sorption capacity for iodine. Moreover, a feasible consolidation of iodine-loaded Ag0-functionalized silica aerogels to a durable SiO2-based waste form makes this aerogel an attractive choice for sequestering radioiodine. This report provides a preliminary assessment of the methods that can be used to consolidate iodine-loaded Ag0-functionalized silica aerogels into a final waste form. In particular, it focuses on experimental investigation of densification of as prepared Ag0-functionalized silica aerogels powders, with or without organic moiety and with or without sintering additive (colloidal silica), with three commercially available techniques: 1) hot uniaxial pressing (HUP), 2) hot isostatic pressing (HIP), and 3) spark plasma sintering (SPS). The densified products were evaluated with helium gas pycnometer for apparent density, with the Archimedes method for apparent density and open porosity, and with high-resolution scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) for the extent of densification and distribution of individual elements. The preliminary investigation of HUP, HIP, and SPS showed that these sintering methods can effectively consolidate powders of Ag0-functionalized silica aerogel into products of near-theoretical density. Also, removal of organic moiety and adding 5.6 mass% of colloidal silica to Ag0-functionalized silica aerogel powders before processing provided denser products. Furthermore, the ram travel data for SPS indicated that rapid consolidation of powders can be performed at temperatures below 950°C.

  8. Aging and iodine loading of silver-functionalized aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Bruffey, S.H.; Jubin, R.T.; Anderson, K.K.; Walker, J.F.

    2013-07-01

    Engineered silver-functionalized silica aerogels are being investigated for their potential application in off-gas treatment at a used nuclear fuel reprocessing facility. Reprocessing will release several key volatile radionuclides, including iodine-129. To achieve regulatory compliance, iodine-129 must be removed from any off-gas stream prior to environmental discharge. Ag{sup 0}-functionalized aerogels have been demonstrated to have high iodine-capture capacity, high porosity, and potential for conversion into a waste form. Capture materials used in off-gas treatment may be exposed to a heated, high-humidity, acidic gas stream for months. Extended exposure to this stream could affect sorbent performance. It was the aim of this study to evaluate what impacts might be observed when Ag{sup 0}-functionalized aerogels prepared at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory were contacted with a dry air stream for up to 6 months and then used to adsorb iodine from a synthetic off-gas stream. Results demonstrate that there is some loss of iodine-capture capacity caused by aging, but that this loss is not as marked as for aging of more traditional iodine sorbents, such as silver-impregnated mordenite. Specifically, aging silver-functionalized aerogel under a dry air stream for up to 6 months can decrease its iodine capacity from 41 wt% to 32 wt%. (authors)

  9. AGING AND IODINE LOADING OF SILVER-FUNCTIONALIZED AEROGELS

    SciTech Connect

    Bruffey, Stephanie H; Jubin, Robert Thomas; Anderson, Kaara K; Walker Jr, Joseph Franklin

    2013-01-01

    Engineered silver-functionalized silica aerogels are being investigated for their application in off-gas treatment at a used nuclear fuel reprocessing facility. Reprocessing will release several key volatile radionuclides, including iodine-129. To achieve regulatory compliance, iodine-129 must be removed from any off-gas stream prior to environmental discharge. Silver-functionalized aerogels have been demonstrated to have high iodine capture capacity, high porosity and potential for conversion into a waste form. Capture materials used in off-gas treatment may be exposed to a heated, high humidity, acidic gas stream for months. Extended exposure to this stream could affect sorbent performance. It was the aim of this study to evaluate what impacts might be observed when Ag0-functionalized aerogels prepared at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory were contacted with a dry air stream for up to 6 months and then used to adsorb iodine from a synthetic off-gas stream. Results demonstrate that there is some loss of iodine capture capacity caused by aging, but that this loss is not as marked as for aging of more traditional iodine sorbents, such as silver-impregnated mordenite. Specifically, aging silver-functionalized aerogel under a dry air stream for up to 6 months can decrease its iodine capacity from 41wt% to 32wt%.

  10. Method for nanoencapsulation of aerogels and nanoencapsulated aerogels produced by such method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Thomas A. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method for increasing the compressive modulus of aerogels comprising: providing aerogel substrate comprising a bubble matrix in a chamber; providing monomer to the chamber, the monomer comprising vapor phase monomer which polymerizes substantially free of polymerization byproducts; depositing monomer from the vapor phase onto the surface of the aerogel substrate under deposition conditions effective to produce a vapor pressure sufficient to cause the vapor phase monomer to penetrate into the bubble matrix and deposit onto the surface of the aerogel substrate, producing a substantially uniform monomer film; and, polymerizing the substantially uniform monomer film under polymerization conditions effective to produce polymer coated aerogel comprising a substantially uniform polymer coating substantially free of polymerization byproducts.Polymer coated aerogel comprising aerogel substrate comprising a substantially uniform polymer coating, said polymer coated aerogel comprising porosity and having a compressive modulus greater than the compressive modulus of the aerogel substrate, as measured by a 100 lb. load cell at 1 mm/minute in the linear range of 20% to 40% compression.

  11. Nanoencapsulated aerogels produced by monomer vapor deposition and polymerization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Thomas A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Polymer coated aerogel comprising aerogel substrate comprising a substantially uniform polymer coating. In an embodiment, the polymer coated aerogel is comprised of a porosity and has a compressive modulus greater than the compressive modulus of the aerogel substrate.

  12. NO2 Aging and Iodine Loading of Silver-Functionalized Aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, K K; Bruffey, S H; Walker, J F; Jubin, R T

    2014-07-31

    Off-gas treatment systems in used fuel reprocessing which use fixed-bed adsorbers are typically designed to operate for an extended period of time before replacement or regeneration of the adsorbent. During this time, the sorbent material will be exposed to the off-gas stream. Exposure could last for months, depending on the replacement cycle time. The gas stream will be at elevated temperature and will possibly contain a mixture of water vapor, NOx, nitric acid vapors, and a variety of other constituents in addition to the radionuclides of capture interest. A series of studies were undertaken to evaluate the effects of long-term exposure, or aging, on proposed iodine sorbent materials under increasingly harsh off-gas conditions. Previous studies have evaluated the effects of up to 6 months of aging under dry air and under humid air conditions on the iodine loading behavior of Ag0-functionalized aerogels. This study examines the effects of extended exposure (up to 6 months) to NO2 on the iodine loading capacity of Ag0- functionalized aerogels. Material aged for 1 and 2 months appeared to have a similar total loading capacity to fresh material. Over an aging period of 4 months, a loss of approximately 15% of the total iodine capacity was seen. The iodine capacity loss on silver-functionalized aerogels due to NO2 was smaller than the iodine capacity loss due to humid or dry air aging.

  13. Da-KGM based GO-reinforced FMBO-loaded aerogels for efficient arsenic removal in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Ye, Shuxin; Jin, Weiping; Huang, Qing; Hu, Ying; Li, Yan; Li, Jing; Li, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Composites based on deacetylated konjac glucomannan (Da-KGM) and graphene oxide (GO) aerogels with iron and manganese oxides (FMBO) for effective removal of arsenic from contaminated water. Da-KGM, which was used as supporting composite matrix here, were firstly treated with GO and loaded FMBO. The obtained Da-KGM/GO/FMBO composite aerogels were characterized by compression test, thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The characteristic results showed that addition of GO exhibited enhanced mechanical properties towards Da-KGM aerogels. What's more, results of FTIR indicated the strong intermolecular hydrogen bond interaction between KGM and GO. Batch adsorption tests were used to evaluate arsenic removal capacity. Da-KGM/GO loaded FMBO composite aerogels exhibited high adsorption ability for arsenite [As(III)] and arsenate [As(V)]. The adsorption results showed that the arsenic for both arsenite [As(III)] and arsenate [As(V)] removal process followed a pseudo-second-order rate equation and Langmuir monolayer adsorption. The maximum As(III) and As(V) uptake capacity of Da-KGM/GO(10%)/FMBO composite aerogels reached 30.21mgg(-1) and 12.08mgg(-1) respectively according to Langmuir isotherm at pH 7 and 323K.

  14. Ultra-low loading Pt nanocatalysts prepared by atomic layer deposition on carbon aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    King, J S; Wittstock, A; Biener, J; Kucheyev, S O; Wang, Y M; Baumann, T F; Giri, S; Hamza, A V; Baeumer, M; Bent, S F

    2008-04-21

    Using atomic layer deposition (ALD), we show that Pt nanoparticles can be deposited on the inner surfaces of carbon aerogels (CA). The resultant Pt-loaded materials exhibit high catalytic activity for the oxidation of CO even at loading levels as low as {approx}0.05 mg Pt/cm{sup 2}. We observe a conversion efficiency of nearly 100% in the temperatures range 150-250 C, and the total conversion rate seems to be only limited by the thermal stability of our CA support in ambient oxygen. Our ALD approach described here is universal in nature, and can be applied to the design of new catalytic materials for a variety of applications, including fuel cells, hydrogen storage, pollution control, green chemistry, and liquid fuel production.

  15. Aerogel Poly(butylene succinate) Biomaterial Substrate for RF and Microwave Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib Ullah, M.; Mahadi, W. N. L.; Latef, T. A.

    2015-08-01

    Polybutylene succinate (PBS) has become a potential candidate, similar to polypropylene (PP) and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), for use as an organic plastic material due to its outstanding mechanical properties as well as high thermal deformation characteristics. A new composition of silica aerogel nanoparticles extracted from rice waste with PBS is proposed for use as a dielectric (ɛr = 4.5) substrate for microwave applications. A microstrip patch antenna was fabricated on the proposed dielectric substrate for multi-resonant ultra-wideband (UWB) applications. The performance characteristics of the proposed biomaterial-based antenna were investigated in a far-field measurement environment. The results indicate that the proposed biocompatible material-based antenna covered a bandwidth of 9.4 (2.3-11.7) GHz with stop bands from 5.5 GHz to 5.8 GHz and 7.0 GHz to 8.3 GHz. Peak gains of 9.82 dBi, 7.59 dBi, 8.0 dBi and 7.68 dBi were measured at resonant frequencies of 2.7 GHz, 4.6 GHz, 6.3 GHz and 9.5 GHz, respectively.

  16. Aerogel Poly(butylene succinate) Biomaterial Substrate for RF and Microwave Applications.

    PubMed

    Habib Ullah, M; Mahadi, W N L; Latef, T A

    2015-08-04

    Polybutylene succinate (PBS) has become a potential candidate, similar to polypropylene (PP) and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), for use as an organic plastic material due to its outstanding mechanical properties as well as high thermal deformation characteristics. A new composition of silica aerogel nanoparticles extracted from rice waste with PBS is proposed for use as a dielectric (εr = 4.5) substrate for microwave applications. A microstrip patch antenna was fabricated on the proposed dielectric substrate for multi-resonant ultra-wideband (UWB) applications. The performance characteristics of the proposed biomaterial-based antenna were investigated in a far-field measurement environment. The results indicate that the proposed biocompatible material-based antenna covered a bandwidth of 9.4 (2.3-11.7) GHz with stop bands from 5.5 GHz to 5.8 GHz and 7.0 GHz to 8.3 GHz. Peak gains of 9.82 dBi, 7.59 dBi, 8.0 dBi and 7.68 dBi were measured at resonant frequencies of 2.7 GHz, 4.6 GHz, 6.3 GHz and 9.5 GHz, respectively.

  17. Aerogel Poly(butylene succinate) Biomaterial Substrate for RF and Microwave Applications

    PubMed Central

    Habib Ullah, M.; Mahadi, W. N. L.; Latef, T. A.

    2015-01-01

    Polybutylene succinate (PBS) has become a potential candidate, similar to polypropylene (PP) and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), for use as an organic plastic material due to its outstanding mechanical properties as well as high thermal deformation characteristics. A new composition of silica aerogel nanoparticles extracted from rice waste with PBS is proposed for use as a dielectric (εr = 4.5) substrate for microwave applications. A microstrip patch antenna was fabricated on the proposed dielectric substrate for multi-resonant ultra-wideband (UWB) applications. The performance characteristics of the proposed biomaterial-based antenna were investigated in a far-field measurement environment. The results indicate that the proposed biocompatible material-based antenna covered a bandwidth of 9.4 (2.3–11.7) GHz with stop bands from 5.5 GHz to 5.8 GHz and 7.0 GHz to 8.3 GHz. Peak gains of 9.82 dBi, 7.59 dBi, 8.0 dBi and 7.68 dBi were measured at resonant frequencies of 2.7 GHz, 4.6 GHz, 6.3 GHz and 9.5 GHz, respectively. PMID:26238975

  18. Method of patterning an aerogel

    DOEpatents

    Reed, Scott T [Edgewood, NM

    2012-07-24

    A method for producing a pattern in an aerogel disposed as a coating on a substrate comprises exposing the aerogel coating to the vapors of a hydrophobic silane compound, masking the aerogel coating with a shadow photomask and irradiating the aerogel coating with ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. The exposure to UV through the shadow mask creates a pattern of hydrophobic and hydrophilic regions in the aerogel coating. Etching away the hydrophilic regions of the aerogel coating, preferably with a 1 molar solution of sodium hydroxide, leaves the unwetted and unetched hydrophobic regions of the aerogel layer on the substrate, replicating the pattern of the photomask. The hydrophobic aerogel pattern can be further exposed to UV irradiation if desired, to create a hydrophilic aerogel pattern.

  19. Structural studies of carbon aerogels and their metal-loaded derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Dafei

    Carbon aerogels (CAs) are a class of mesoporous materials derived from the sol-gel polymerization of resorcinol (R) and formaldehyde (F) under base catalyse (C) in an aqueous solution, followed by supercritical drying and pyrolysis. CAs are characterized by highly-uniform pore sizes that can be tailored according to the reaction conditions, high surface areas, low densities, and high electrical conductivities. Due to the combination of these properties, CAs receive wide attention for such applications as the electrodes in fuel cells and supercapacitors, and supports for catalytic noble metals, to name but a few. Their high infrared optical absorption coefficients also make them promising materials for high-temperature thermal insulation and black broad-band absorption. This dissertation is a comprehensive study of the structural aspects of naked CAs and their metal-loaded derivatives. As-prepared CAs were also subjected to a series of post-pyrolysis treatments, such as high-temperature heat-treatment and in-situ electron irradiation in TEM. In the first part of this study, it is shown using nitrogen physisorption and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) that the pore characters of CAs can be engineered by systematically adjusting the key parameters of the initial R-F reaction. These parameters include the ratio of resorcinol to catalyst (R/C) and the ratio of resorcinol to water (R/W). Such adjustments resulted in the preparation of a series of CAs with average pore diameter ranging from 4 to 22nm. In a parallel study, it is shown that the use of acidic catalyst caused a drastic change in the pore type of the resulting materials. In this case, macropores are dominant. A selected group of noble metals (ruthenium and platinum) were incorporated into CA substrates via a novel supercritical carbon dioxide deposition, followed by a thermal reduction of the metal precursor. TEM results show that the metal nanoparticles thus prepared exhibit surprisingly uniform size

  20. Photocatalytic performance of highly amorphous titania-silica aerogels with mesopores: The adverse effect of the in situ adsorption of some organic substrates during photodegradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lázár, István; Kalmár, József; Peter, Anca; Szilágyi, Anett; Győri, Enikő; Ditrói, Tamás; Fábián, István

    2015-11-01

    Titania-silica composite aerogels with 16-29% Ti-content by the mass were synthesized by the sol-gel method from different Ti-precursors, and calcined at 500 °C. These aerogels are highly amorphous as no crystalline TiO2 phase can be detected in them by X-ray diffraction methods, and show the dominating presence of either mesopores or macropores. The incorporation of Ti into the silica structure is shown by the appearance of characteristic IR transitions of Sisbnd Osbnd Ti vibrations. The characteristic band-gap energies of the different aerogels are estimated to be between 3.6 and 3.9 eV from UV reflection spectra. Band-gap energy decreases with decreasing pore-size. When suspended in solution, even these highly amorphous aerogels accelerate the photodegradation of salicylic acid and methylene blue compared to simple photolysis. Kinetic experiments were conducted under illumination, and also in the dark to study the adsorption of the substrates onto the suspended aerogels. We assume that the fast in situ adsorption of the organic substrates mask the suspended aerogel particles from UV photons, which reduces the rate of photocatalysis. We managed to mathematically separate the parallel processes of photocatalysis and adsorption, and develop a simple kinetic model to describe the reaction system.

  1. Iron-Doped Carbon Aerogels: Novel Porous Substrates for Direct Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Steiner, S. A.; Baumann, T. F.; Kong, J.; Satcher, J. H.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    2007-02-20

    We present the synthesis and characterization of Fe-doped carbon aerogels (CAs) and demonstrate the ability to grow carbon nanotubes directly on monoliths of these materials to afford novel carbon aerogel-carbon nanotube composites. Preparation of the Fe-doped CAs begins with the sol-gel polymerization of the potassium salt of 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid with formaldehyde, affording K{sup +}-doped gels that can then be converted to Fe{sup 2+}- or Fe{sup 3+}-doped gels through an ion exchange process, dried with supercritical CO{sub 2} and subsequently carbonized under an inert atmosphere. Analysis of the Fe-doped CAs by TEM, XRD and XPS revealed that the doped iron species are reduced during carbonization to form metallic iron and iron carbide nanoparticles. The sizes and chemical composition of the reduced Fe species were related to pyrolysis temperature as well as the type of iron salt used in the ion exchange process. Raman spectroscopy and XRD analysis further reveal that, despite the presence of the Fe species, the CA framework is not significantly graphitized during pyrolysis. The Fe-doped CAs were subsequently placed in a thermal CVD reactor and exposed to a mixture of CH{sub 4} (1000 sccm), H{sub 2} (500 sccm), and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} (20 sccm) at temperatures ranging from 600 to 800 C for 10 minutes, resulting in direct growth of carbon nanotubes on the aerogel monoliths. Carbon nanotubes grown by this method appear to be multiwalled ({approx}25 nm in diameter and up to 4 mm long) and grow through a tip-growth mechanism that pushes catalytic iron particles out of the aerogel framework. The highest yield of CNTs were grown on Fe-doped CAs pyrolyzed at 800 C treated at CVD temperatures of 700 C.

  2. Iron-Doped Carbon Aerogels: Novel Porous Substrates for Direct Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, S A; Baumann, T F; Kong, J; Satcher, J H; Dresselhaus, M S

    2007-02-15

    We present the synthesis and characterization of Fe-doped carbon aerogels (CAs) and demonstrate the ability to grow carbon nanotubes directly on monoliths of these materials to afford novel carbon aerogel-carbon nanotube composites. Preparation of the Fe-doped CAs begins with the sol-gel polymerization of the potassium salt of 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid with formaldehyde, affording K{sup +}-doped gels that can then be converted to Fe{sup 2+}- or Fe{sup 3+}-doped gels through an ion exchange process, dried with supercritical CO{sub 2} and subsequently carbonized under an inert atmosphere. Analysis of the Fe-doped CAs by TEM, XRD and XPS revealed that the doped iron species are reduced during carbonization to form metallic iron and iron carbide nanoparticles. The sizes and chemical composition of the reduced Fe species were related to pyrolysis temperature as well as the type of iron salt used in the ion exchange process. Raman spectroscopy and XRD analysis further reveal that, despite the presence of the Fe species, the CA framework is not significantly graphitized during pyrolysis. The Fe-doped CAs were subsequently placed in a thermal CVD reactor and exposed to a mixture of CH{sub 4} (1000 sccm), H{sub 2} (500 sccm), and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} (20 sccm) at temperatures ranging from 600 to 800 C for 10 minutes, resulting in direct growth of carbon nanotubes on the aerogel monoliths. Carbon nanotubes grown by this method appear to be multiwalled ({approx}25 nm in diameter and up to 4 mm long) and grow through a tip-growth mechanism that pushes catalytic iron particles out of the aerogel framework. The highest yield of CNTs were grown on Fe-doped CAs pyrolyzed at 800 C treated at CVD temperatures of 700 C.

  3. Sulfur loaded in micropore-rich carbon aerogel as cathode of lithium-sulfur battery with improved cyclic stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zihao; Li, Xiaogang; Liao, Youhao; Li, Xiaoping; Li, Weishan

    2016-12-01

    We report a novel composite of sulfur loaded in micropore-rich carbon aerogel (CA-S), as cathode of lithium-sulfur battery. Carbon aerogel (CA) is synthesized through phenol-formaldehyde reaction with a low catalyst concentration and carbonization under high temperature, and loaded with sulfur via chemical deposition and heat treatment. The physical properties of the resulting CA and the electrochemical performances of the resulting CA-S are investigated by scanning electron microscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller characterization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and galvanostatic discharge/charge test, with a comparison of a common carbon material, acetylene black (AB), and sulfur loaded in AB (AB-S). It is found that the CA is micropore-rich with micropore volume over 66% of total pore volume, and the CA-S exhibits significantly improved cyclic stability compared with AB-S. The improved performance of CA-S is attributed to the confinement of the micropores in CA to small sulfur allotropes and corresponding lithium sulfides.

  4. Electroless synthesis of cellulose-metal aerogel composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schestakow, M.; Muench, F.; Reimuth, C.; Ratke, L.; Ensinger, W.

    2016-05-01

    An environmentally benign electroless plating procedure enables a dense coating of silver nanoparticles onto complex cellulose aerogel structures. In the course of the nanoparticle deposition, the morphological characteristics of the aerogel are preserved, such as the continuous self-supporting network structure. While achieving a high metal loading, the large specific surface area as well as the low density is retained in the cellulose-metal aerogel composite. Due to the interesting features of cellulose aerogel substrates (e.g., the accessibility of its open-porous network) and electroless plating (e.g., the possibility to control the density, size, and composition of the deposited metal nanoparticles), the outlined synthetic scheme provides a facile and flexible route towards advanced materials in heterogeneous catalysis, plasmonics, and sensing.

  5. Mechanical Properties of Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmenter, Kelly E.; Milstein, Frederick

    1995-01-01

    Aerogels are extremely low density solids that are characterized by a high porosity and pore sizes on the order of nanometers. Their low thermal conductivity and sometimes transparent appearance make them desirable for applications such as insulation in cryogenic vessels and between double paned glass in solar architecture. An understanding of the mechanical properties of aerogels is necessary before aerogels can be used in load bearing applications. In the present study, the mechanical behavior of various types of fiber-reinforced silica aerogels was investigated with hardness, compression, tension and shear tests. Particular attention was paid to the effects of processing parameters, testing conditions, storage environment, and age on the aerogels' mechanical response. The results indicate that the addition of fibers to the aerogel matrix generally resulted in softer, weaker materials with smaller elastic moduli. Furthermore, the testing environment significantly affected compression results. Tests in ethanol show an appreciable amount of scatter, and are not consistent with results for tests in air. In fact, the compression specimens appeared to crack and begin to dissolve upon exposure to the ethanol solution. This is consistent with the inherent hydrophobic nature of these aerogels. In addition, the aging process affected the aerogels' mechanical behavior by increasing their compressive strength and elastic moduli while decreasing their strain at fracture. However, desiccation of the specimens did not appreciably affect the mechanical properties, even though it reduced the aerogel density by removing trapped moisture. Finally, tension and shear test results indicate that the shear strength of the aerogels exceeds the tensile strength. This is consistent with the response of brittle materials. Future work should concentrate on mechanical testing at cryogenic temperatures, and should involve more extensive tensile tests. Moreover, before the mechanical response

  6. Gel versus aerogel to collect high velocity ejectas from laser shock-loaded metallic targets for postrecovery analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lescoute, Emilien; De Rességuier, Thibaut; Chevalier, Jean-Marc

    2012-03-01

    Soft recovery of fast objects is an issue of considerable interest for many applications involving shock wave loading, such as ballistics, armor design, or more recently laser-driven inertial confinement fusion, where the characterization of the debris ejected from metallic shells subjected to intense laser irradiation conditions the design of the experiments. In this work, we compare the high velocity ejecta recovery efficiency of two materials: silica aerogel (density 0.03 g/cm3), which has been used as fragment collector for many years, and "varagel" (density 0.9 g/cm3), which we have tested recently in laser shock experiments. Ejected fragments have been recovered in both types of collectors. Then, samples have been analyzed by X-ray tomography at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). Three-dimensional reconstructions of the fragments populations have been achieved, and quantitative comparisons between both collecting materials, used in the same conditions, have been performed.

  7. Milestone Report - M3FT-15OR03120211 - Complete Iodine Loading of NO Aged Ag0-functionalized Aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    Bruffey, Stephanie H.; Patton, Kaara K.; Jubin, Robert Thomas

    2015-05-29

    In off-gas treatment systems within a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant, capture materials will be exposed to a gas stream for extended periods during their lifetime. This gas stream may be at elevated temperature and could contain water, NOx gas, or a variety of other constituents. For this reason, it is important to understand the effects of long-term exposure, or aging, on proposed capture materials. One material under consideration for iodine sequestration is silver-functionalized silica aerogel (Ag0-aerogel). The aim of this study was to determine the effect of extended exposure at 150°C to an air stream containing NO on the iodine capture capacity of Ag0-aerogel. Ag0-aerogel was provided by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), which manufactures the material at a lab scale. Prior to aging, the material has an iodine loading capacity of approximately 290 mg I/g Ag0-aerogel. Previous studies have aged the material in a dry air stream or in a moist air stream for up to 6 months. Both tests resulted in a 22% loss in iodine capacity. Aging the material in a static 2% NO2 environment for up to 2 months results in a 15% loss of iodine capacity.3 In this study, exposure of Ag0-aerogel to 1% NO at 150°C for 2 months produced a loss of 43% in iodine loading capacity. This is largest loss observed for aerogel aging studies to date. The performance of Ag0-aerogel in this study was compared to the performance of reduced silver mordenite (Ag0Z) in similar studies. Ag0Z is a zeolite mineral considered to be the current standard technology for iodine removal from off-gas streams of a potential US used fuel processing plant. In an aging study exposing Ag0Z to 1% NO for 2 months, an iodine capacity loss of over 80% was observed. This corresponds to a silver utilization of 13.5% for 2 month NO-aged Ag0Z, compared to 57% silver utilization for 2

  8. Graphene aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Pauzauskie, Peter J; Worsley, Marcus A; Baumann, Theodore F; Satcher, Jr., Joe H; Biener, Juergen

    2015-03-31

    Graphene aerogels with high conductivity and surface areas including a method for making a graphene aerogel, including the following steps: (1) preparing a reaction mixture comprising a graphene oxide suspension and at least one catalyst; (2) curing the reaction mixture to produce a wet gel; (3) drying the wet gel to produce a dry gel; and (4) pyrolyzing the dry gel to produce a graphene aerogel. Applications include electrical energy storage including batteries and supercapacitors.

  9. Aerogel Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahai, Rashmi K.

    2005-01-01

    Aerogel is one of the most promising materials of the future. It's unique properties, including high porosity, transparency, very high thermal tolerance, and environmental friendliness give it the potential of replacing many different products used in society today. However, the market for aerogel is still very limited because of the cost of producing the material and its fragility. The principle objective of my project has been to find new ways to apply aerogel in order to increase its practicality and appeal to different aspects of society. More specifically, I have focused on finding different chemicals that will coat aerogel and increase its durability. Because aerogel is so fragile and will crumble under the pressure of most coatings this has been no easy task. However, by experimenting with many different coatings and combinations of aerogel properties, I have made several significant discoveries. Aerogel (ideally, high density and hydrophobic) can be coated with several acrylic polymers, including artist's gel and nail polish. These materials provide a protective layering around the aerogel and keep it from breaking as easily. Because fragility is one of the main reasons applications of aerogel are limited, these discoveries will hopefully aid in finding future applications for this extraordinary material.

  10. Material Properties for Fiber-Reinforced Silica Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan; Rouanet, Stephane; Moses, John; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Ceramic fiber-reinforced silica aerogels are novel materials for high performance insulation, including thermal protection materials. Experimental data are presented for the thermal and mechanical properties, showing the trends exhibited over a range of fiber loadings and silica aerogel densities. Test results are compared to that of unreinforced bulk aerogels.

  11. Polyolefin-based aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Je Kyun (Inventor); Gould, Gerogle L. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to cross-linked polyolefin aerogels in simple and fiber-reinforced composite form. Of particular interest are polybutadiene aerogels. Especially aerogels derived from polybutadienes functionalized with anhydrides, amines, hydroxyls, thiols, epoxies, isocyanates or combinations thereof.

  12. Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Hydrotropic Pulps at Different Substrate Loadings.

    PubMed

    Denisova, Marina N; Makarova, Ekaterina I; Pavlov, Igor N; Budaeva, Vera V; Sakovich, Gennady V

    2016-03-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic raw materials to produce nutrient broths for microbiological synthesis of ethanol and other valuable products is an important field of modern biotechnology. Biotechnological processing implies the selection of an effective pretreatment technique for raw materials. In this study, the hydrotropic treatment increased the reactivity of the obtained substrates toward enzymatic hydrolysis by 7.1 times for Miscanthus and by 7.3 times for oat hulls. The hydrotropic pulp from oat hulls was more reactive toward enzymatic hydrolysis compared to that from Miscanthus, despite that the substrates had similar compositions. As the initial substrate loadings were raised during enzymatic hydrolysis of the hydrotropic Miscanthus and oat hull pulps, the concentration of reducing sugars increased by 34 g/dm(3) and the yield of reducing sugars decreased by 31 %. The findings allow us to predict the efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis of hydrotropic pulps from Miscanthus and oat hulls when scaling up the process by volume.

  13. Aerogel sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Begag, Redouane; Rhine, Wendell E; Dong, Wenting

    2016-04-05

    The current invention describes methods and compositions of various sorbents based on aerogels of various silanes and their use as sorbent for carbon dioxide. Methods further provide for optimizing the compositions to increase the stability of the sorbents for prolonged use as carbon dioxide capture matrices.

  14. Solid phase microextraction device using aerogel

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Fred S.; Andresen, Brian D.

    2005-06-14

    A sample collection substrate of aerogel and/or xerogel materials bound to a support structure is used as a solid phase microextraction (SPME) device. The xerogels and aerogels may be organic or inorganic and doped with metals or other compounds to target specific chemical analytes. The support structure is typically formed of a glass fiber or a metal wire (stainless steel or kovar). The devices are made by applying gel solution to the support structures and drying the solution to form aerogel or xerogel. Aerogel particles may be attached to the wet layer before drying to increase sample collection surface area. These devices are robust, stable in fields of high radiation, and highly effective at collecting gas and liquid samples while maintaining superior mechanical and thermal stability during routine use. Aerogel SPME devices are advantageous for use in GC/MS analyses due to their lack of interfering background and tolerance of GC thermal cycling.

  15. Particle Tracks in Aerogel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    In an experiment using a special air gun, particles are shot into aerogel at high velocities. Closeup of particles that have been captured in aerogel are shown here. The particles leave a carrot-shaped trail in the aerogel. Aerogel was used on the Stardust spacecraft to capture comet particles from Comet Wild 2.

  16. Surface modified aerogel monoliths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventis, Nicholas (Inventor); Johnston, James C. (Inventor); Kuczmarski, Maria A. (Inventor); Meador, Mary Ann B. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    This invention comprises reinforced aerogel monoliths such as silica aerogels having a polymer coating on its outer geometric surface boundary, and to the method of preparing said aerogel monoliths. The polymer coatings on the aerogel monoliths are derived from polymer precursors selected from the group consisting of isocyanates as a precursor, precursors of epoxies, and precursors of polyimides. The coated aerogel monoliths can be modified further by encapsulating the aerogel with the polymer precursor reinforced with fibers such as carbon or glass fibers to obtain mechanically reinforced composite encapsulated aerogel monoliths.

  17. Carbon aerogel electrodes for direct energy conversion

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, S.T.; Kaschmitter, J.L.; Pekala, R.W.

    1997-02-11

    A direct energy conversion device, such as a fuel cell, using carbon aerogel electrodes is described, wherein the carbon aerogel is loaded with a noble catalyst, such as platinum or rhodium and soaked with phosphoric acid, for example. A separator is located between the electrodes, which are placed in a cylinder having plate current collectors positioned adjacent the electrodes and connected to a power supply, and a pair of gas manifolds, containing hydrogen and oxygen positioned adjacent the current collectors. Due to the high surface area and excellent electrical conductivity of carbon aerogels, the problems relative to high polarization resistance of carbon composite electrodes conventionally used in fuel cells are overcome. 1 fig.

  18. Carbon aerogel electrodes for direct energy conversion

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Steven T.; Kaschmitter, James L.; Pekala, Richard W.

    1997-01-01

    A direct energy conversion device, such as a fuel cell, using carbon aerogel electrodes, wherein the carbon aerogel is loaded with a noble catalyst, such as platinum or rhodium and soaked with phosphoric acid, for example. A separator is located between the electrodes, which are placed in a cylinder having plate current collectors positioned adjacent the electrodes and connected to a power supply, and a pair of gas manifolds, containing hydrogen and oxygen positioned adjacent the current collectors. Due to the high surface area and excellent electrical conductivity of carbon aerogels, the problems relative to high polarization resistance of carbon composite electrodes conventionally used in fuel cells are overcome.

  19. Ruthenium / aerogel nanocomposits via Atomic Layer Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, J; Baumann, T F; Wang, Y; Nelson, E J; Kucheyev, S O; Hamza, A V; Kemell, M; Ritala, M; Leskela, M

    2006-08-28

    We present a general approach to prepare metal/aerogel nanocomposites via template directed atomic layer deposition (ALD). In particular, we used a Ru ALD process consisting of alternating exposures to bis(cyclopentadienyl)ruthenium (RuCp{sub 2}) and air at 350 C to deposit metallic Ru nanoparticles on the internal surfaces of carbon and silica aerogels. The process does not affect the morphology of the aerogel template and offers excellent control over metal loading by simply adjusting the number of ALD cycles. We also discuss the limitations of our ALD approach, and suggest ways to overcome these.

  20. An emerging platform for drug delivery: aerogel based systems.

    PubMed

    Ulker, Zeynep; Erkey, Can

    2014-03-10

    Over the past few decades, advances in "aerogel science" have provoked an increasing interest for these materials in pharmaceutical sciences for drug delivery applications. Because of their high surface areas, high porosities and open pore structures which can be tuned and controlled by manipulation of synthesis conditions, nanostructured aerogels represent a promising class of materials for delivery of various drugs as well as enzymes and proteins. Along with biocompatible inorganic aerogels and biodegradable organic aerogels, more complex systems such as surface functionalized aerogels, composite aerogels and layered aerogels have also been under development and possess huge potential. Emphasis is given to the details of the aerogel synthesis and drug loading methods as well as the influence of synthesis parameters and loading methods on the adsorption and release of the drugs. Owing to their ability to increase the bioavailability of low solubility drugs, to improve both their stability and their release kinetics, there are an increasing number of research articles concerning aerogels in different drug delivery applications. This review presents an up to date overview of the advances in all kinds of aerogel based drug delivery systems which are currently under investigation.

  1. Polyimide Aerogel Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann; Guo, Haiquan

    2012-01-01

    Polyimide aerogels have been crosslinked through multifunctional amines. This invention builds on "Polyimide Aerogels With Three-Dimensional Cross-Linked Structure," and may be considered as a continuation of that invention, which results in a polyimide aerogel with a flexible, formable form. Gels formed from polyamic acid solutions, end-capped with anhydrides, and cross-linked with the multifunctional amines, are chemically imidized and dried using supercritical CO2 extraction to give aerogels having density around 0.1 to 0.3 g/cubic cm. The aerogels are 80 to 95% porous, and have high surface areas (200 to 600 sq m/g) and low thermal conductivity (as low as 14 mW/m-K at room temperature). Notably, the cross-linked polyimide aerogels have higher modulus than polymer-reinforced silica aerogels of similar density, and can be fabricated as both monoliths and thin films.

  2. Ambient Dried Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Steven M.; Paik, Jong-Ah

    2013-01-01

    A method has been developed for creating aerogel using normal pressure and ambient temperatures. All spacecraft, satellites, and landers require the use of thermal insulation due to the extreme environments encountered in space and on extraterrestrial bodies. Ambient dried aerogels introduce the possibility of using aerogel as thermal insulation in a wide variety of instances where supercritically dried aerogels cannot be used. More specifically, thermoelectric devices can use ambient dried aerogel, where the advantages are in situ production using the cast-in ability of an aerogel. Previously, aerogels required supercritical conditions (high temperature and high pressure) to be dried. Ambient dried aerogels can be dried at room temperature and pressure. This allows many materials, such as plastics and certain metal alloys that cannot survive supercritical conditions, to be directly immersed in liquid aerogel precursor and then encapsulated in the final, dried aerogel. Additionally, the metalized Mylar films that could not survive the previous methods of making aerogels can survive the ambient drying technique, thus making multilayer insulation (MLI) materials possible. This results in lighter insulation material as well. Because this innovation does not require high-temperature or high-pressure drying, ambient dried aerogels are much less expensive to produce. The equipment needed to conduct supercritical drying costs many tens of thousands of dollars, and has associated running expenses for power, pressurized gasses, and maintenance. The ambient drying process also expands the size of the pieces of aerogel that can be made because a high-temperature, high-pressure system typically has internal dimensions of up to 30 cm in diameter and 60 cm in height. In the case of this innovation, the only limitation on the size of the aerogels produced would be in the ability of the solvent in the wet gel to escape from the gel network.

  3. Aerogel nanocomposite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, A.J.; Ayers, M.; Cao, W.

    1995-05-01

    Aerogels are porous, low density, nanostructured solids with many unusual properties including very low thermal conductivity, good transparency, high surface area, catalytic activity, and low sound velocity. This research is directed toward developing new nanocomposite aerogel materials for improved thermal insulation and several other applications. A major focus of the research has been to further increase the thermal resistance of silica aerogel by introducing infrared opacification agents into the aerogel to produce a superinsulating composite material. Opacified superinsulating aerogel permit a number of industrial applications for aerogel-based insulation. The primary benefits from this recently developed superinsulating composite aerogel insulation are: to extend the range of applications to higher temperatures, to provide a more compact insulation for space sensitive-applications, and to lower costs of aerogel by as much as 30%. Superinsulating aerogels can replace existing CFC-containing polyurethane in low temperature applications to reduce heat losses in piping, improve the thermal efficiency of refrigeration systems, and reduce energy losses in a variety of industrial applications. Enhanced aerogel insulation can also replace steam and process pipe insulation in higher temperature applications to substantially reduce energy losses and provide much more compact insulation.

  4. Volatiles in interplanetary dust particles and aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Harmetz, C. P.

    1991-01-01

    Volatiles measured in 25 interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are a mixture of both indigenous materials and contaminants associated with the collection and processing of the ODPs prior to analysis. Most IDPs have been collected in the stratosphere using a silicone oil/freon mixture (20:1 ratio) coated on collector plates. Studies have shown that silicone oil, freon and hexane residues remain with the ODPs, despite attempts to clean the IDPs. Analysis of the IDPs with the LMMS-technique produces spectra with a mixture of indigeneous and contaminants components. The contamination signal can be identified and removed; however, the contamination signal may obscure some of the indigeneous component's signal. Employing spectra stripping techniques, the indigenous volatile constituents associated with the IDPs can be identified. Volatiles are similar to those measured in CI or CM carbonaceous chondrites. Collection of IDPs in low-Earth orbit utilizing a Cosmic Dust Collection Facility attached to Space Station Freedom has been proposed. The low-density material aerogel has been proposed as a collection substrate for IDPs. Our studies have concentrated on identifying volatile contaminants that are associated with aerogel. We have found that solvents used for the preparation of aerogel remain in aerogel and methods must be developed for removing the entrapped solvents before aerogels can be used for an IDP collection substrate.

  5. Polyolefin-Based Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Je Kyun; Gould, George

    2012-01-01

    An organic polybutadiene (PB) rubberbased aerogel insulation material was developed that will provide superior thermal insulation and inherent radiation protection, exhibiting the flexibility, resiliency, toughness, and durability typical of the parent polymer, yet with the low density and superior insulation properties associated with the aerogels. The rubbery behaviors of the PB rubber-based aerogels are able to overcome the weak and brittle nature of conventional inorganic and organic aerogel insulation materials. Additionally, with higher content of hydrogen in their structure, the PB rubber aerogels will also provide inherently better radiation protection than those of inorganic and carbon aerogels. Since PB rubber aerogels also exhibit good hydrophobicity due to their hydrocarbon molecular structure, they will provide better performance reliability and durability as well as simpler, more economic, and environmentally friendly production over the conventional silica or other inorganic-based aerogels, which require chemical treatment to make them hydrophobic. Inorganic aerogels such as silica aerogels demonstrate many unusual and useful properties. There are several strategies to overcoming the drawbacks associated with the weakness and brittleness of silica aerogels. Development of the flexible fiber-reinforced silica aerogel composite blanket has proven one promising approach, providing a conveniently fielded form factor that is relatively robust toward handling in industrial environments compared to silica aerogel monoliths. However, the flexible silica aerogel composites still have a brittle, dusty character that may be undesirable, or even intolerable, in certain applications. Although the cross-linked organic aerogels such as resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF), polyisocyanurate, and cellulose aerogels show very high impact strength, they are also very brittle with little elongation (i.e., less rubbery). Also, silica and carbon aerogels are less efficient

  6. Cellulose-silica aerogels.

    PubMed

    Demilecamps, Arnaud; Beauger, Christian; Hildenbrand, Claudia; Rigacci, Arnaud; Budtova, Tatiana

    2015-05-20

    Aerogels based on interpenetrated cellulose-silica networks were prepared and characterised. Wet coagulated cellulose was impregnated with silica phase, polyethoxydisiloxane, using two methods: (i) molecular diffusion and (ii) forced flow induced by pressure difference. The latter allowed an enormous decrease in the impregnation times, by almost three orders of magnitude, for a sample with the same geometry. In both cases, nanostructured silica gel was in situ formed inside cellulose matrix. Nitrogen adsorption analysis revealed an almost threefold increase in pores specific surface area, from cellulose aerogel alone to organic-inorganic composite. Morphology, thermal conductivity and mechanical properties under uniaxial compression were investigated. Thermal conductivity of composite aerogels was lower than that of cellulose aerogel due to the formation of superinsulating mesoporous silica inside cellulose pores. Furthermore, composite aerogels were stiffer than each of reference aerogels.

  7. Technical applications of aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Hrubesh, L.W.

    1997-08-18

    Aerogel materials posses such a wide variety of exceptional properties that a striking number of applications have developed for them. Many of the commercial applications of aerogels such as catalysts, thermal insulation, windows, and particle detectors are still under development and new application as have been publicized since the ISA4 Conference in 1994: e.g.; supercapacitors, insulation for heat storage in automobiles, electrodes for capacitive deionization, etc. More applications are evolving as the scientific and engineering community becomes familiar with the unusual and exceptional physical properties of aerogels, there are also scientific and technical application, as well. This paper discusses a variety of applications under development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for which several types of aerogels are formed in custom sizes and shapes. Particular discussions will focus on the uses of aerogels for physics experiments which rely on the exceptional, sometimes unique, properties of aerogels.

  8. Method of casting aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Poco, J.F.

    1993-09-07

    The invention describes a method for making monolithic castings of transparent silica aerogel with densities in the range from 0.001 g/cm[sup 3] to 0.6 g/cm[sup 3]. Various shapes of aerogels are cast in flexible polymer molds which facilitate removal and eliminate irregular surfaces. Mold dimensions are preselected to account for shrinkage of aerogel which occurs during the drying step of supercritical extraction of solvent. 2 figures.

  9. Aerogel-supported filament

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, C.R.; Tillotson, T.M.; Johnson, C.V. III

    1995-05-16

    The present invention is a thin filament embedded in a low density aerogel for use in radiation detection instruments and incandescent lamps. The aerogel provides a supportive matrix that is thermally and electrically nonconductive, mechanically strong, highly porous, gas-permeable, and transparent to ionizing radiation over short distances. A low density, open-cell aerogel is cast around a fine filament or wire, which allows the wire to be positioned with little or no tension and keeps the wire in place in the event of breakage. The aerogel support reduces the stresses on the wire caused by vibrational, gravitational, electrical, and mechanical forces. 6 Figs.

  10. Aerogel derived catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, J. G., LLNL

    1996-12-11

    Aerogels area class of colloidal materials which have high surface areas and abundant mesoporous structure. SiO{sub 2} aerogels show unique physical, optical and structural properties. When catalytic metals are incorporated in the aerogel framework, the potential exists for new and very effective catalysts for industrial processes. Three applications of these metal-containing SiO{sub 2} aerogels as catalysts are briefly reviewed in this paper--NO{sub x} reduction, volatile organic compound destruction, and partial oxidation of methane.

  11. Aerogel-supported filament

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, Craig R.; Tillotson, Thomas M.; Johnson, III, Coleman V.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention is a thin filament embedded in a low density aerogel for use in radiation detection instruments and incandescent lamps. The aerogel provides a supportive matrix that is thermally and electrically nonconductive, mechanically strong, highly porous, gas-permeable, and transparent to ionizing radiation over short distances. A low density, open-cell aerogel is cast around a fine filament or wire, which allows the wire to be positioned with little or no tension and keeps the wire in place in the event of breakage. The aerogel support reduces the stresses on the wire caused by vibrational, gravitational, electrical, and mechanical forces.

  12. Method for preparing a solid phase microextraction device using aerogel

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Fred S.; Andresen, Brian D.

    2006-10-24

    A sample collection substrate of aerogel and/or xerogel materials bound to a support structure is used as a solid phase microextraction (SPME) device. The xerogels and aerogels may be organic or inorganic and doped with metals or other compounds to target specific chemical analytes. The support structure is typically formed of a glass fiber or a metal wire (stainless steel or kovar). The devices are made by applying gel solution to the support structures and drying the solution to form aerogel or xerogel. Aerogel particles may be attached to the wet layer before drying to increase sample collection surface area. These devices are robust, stable in fields of high radiation, and highly effective at collecting gas and liquid samples while maintaining superior mechanical and thermal stability during routine use. Aerogel SPME devices are advantageous for use in GC/MS analyses due to their lack of interfering background and tolerance of GC thermal cycling.

  13. Method of manufacturing aerogel composites

    DOEpatents

    Cao, Wanqing; Hunt, Arlon Jason

    1999-01-01

    Disclosed herewith is a process of forming an aerogel composite which comprises introducing a gaseous material into a formed aerogel monolith or powder, and causing decomposition of said gaseous material in said aerogel in amounts sufficient to cause deposition of the decomposition products of the gas on the surfaces of the pores of the said aerogel.

  14. Aerogel-clad optical fiber

    DOEpatents

    Sprehn, Gregory A.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.; Poco, John F.; Sandler, Pamela H.

    1997-01-01

    An optical fiber is surrounded by an aerogel cladding. For a low density aerogel, the index of refraction of the aerogel is close to that of air, which provides a high numerical aperture to the optical fiber. Due to the high numerical aperture, the aerogel clad optical fiber has improved light collection efficiency.

  15. Aerogel-clad optical fiber

    DOEpatents

    Sprehn, G.A.; Hrubesh, L.W.; Poco, J.F.; Sandler, P.H.

    1997-11-04

    An optical fiber is surrounded by an aerogel cladding. For a low density aerogel, the index of refraction of the aerogel is close to that of air, which provides a high numerical aperture to the optical fiber. Due to the high numerical aperture, the aerogel clad optical fiber has improved light collection efficiency. 4 figs.

  16. Method of manufacturing aerogel composites

    DOEpatents

    Cao, W.; Hunt, A.J.

    1999-03-09

    Disclosed herewith is a process of forming an aerogel composite which comprises introducing a gaseous material into a formed aerogel monolith or powder, and causing decomposition of said gaseous material in said aerogel in amounts sufficient to cause deposition of the decomposition products of the gas on the surfaces of the pores of the said aerogel.

  17. SC-CO2 assisted process for high energy density aerogel supercapacitor: the effect of GO loading.

    PubMed

    Sarno, Maria; Baldino, Lucia; Scudieri, Carmela; Cardea, Stefano; Ciambelli, Paolo; Reverchon, Ernesto

    2017-03-20

    Energy density, safety, simple and environmentally friendly preparation methods are very significant aspects in the realization of a compact supercapacitor. Herein we report the use of a supercritical CO2 assisted gel drying process (SC-CO2) for the preparation of porous electrodes containing dispersed graphene in a Poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVDF-HFP) binder membrane to sandwich in a new portable supercapacitor based on graphene oxide (GO). A GO loading of 60 wt.% has been found to give the better combination of factors (porosity, wettability, mechanical and electrochemical properties,..). Cycling voltammetry and charge/discharge studies showed an excellent capacitance behaviour and stability in a ionic liquid electrolyte, suggesting SC-CO2 processing as promising platform to produce highly bulky and porous films for supercapacitors. The supercapacitor device delivers a very high energy density of 79.2 Wh/Kg at a power density of 0.23 KW/kg (current density 0.5 A/g, specific capacitance 36.2 F/g) that steel remains 50.3 Wh/kg at a power density of 2.8 KW/kg (current density 6 A/g, specific capacitance 23.5 F/g).

  18. Initial Effects of NOx on Idodine and Methyl Iodine Loading of AgZ and Aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Bruffey, Stephanie H.; Jubin, Robert Thomas

    2015-03-31

    This initial evaluation provides insight into the effect of NO on the adsorption of both I2 and CH3I onto reduced silver-exchanged mordenite (Ag0Z). It was determined that adsorption of CH3I onto Ag0Z occurs at approximately 50% of the rate of I2 adsorption onto Ag0Z, although total iodine capacities are comparable. Addition of 1% NO to the simulated off-gas stream results in very similar loading behaviors and iodine capacities for both iodine species. This is most likely an effect of CH3I oxidation to I2 by NO prior to contact with the sorbent bed. Completion of tests including NO2 in the simulated off-gas stream was delayed due to vendor NO2 production schedules. A statistically designed test matrix is partially completed, and upon conclusion of the suggested experiments, the effects of temperature, NO, NO2, and water vapor on the sorption of CH3I and I2 onto Ag0Z will be able to be statistically resolved. This work represents progress towards that aim.

  19. Polysaccharide-based aerogel microspheres for oral drug delivery.

    PubMed

    García-González, C A; Jin, M; Gerth, J; Alvarez-Lorenzo, C; Smirnova, I

    2015-03-06

    Polysaccharide-based aerogels in the form of microspheres were investigated as carriers of poorly water soluble drugs for oral administration. These bio-based carriers may combine the biocompatibility of polysaccharides and the enhanced drug loading capacity of dry aerogels. Aerogel microspheres from starch, pectin and alginate were loaded with ketoprofen (anti-inflammatory drug) and benzoic acid (used in the management of urea cycle disorders) via supercritical CO2-assisted adsorption. Amount of drug loaded depended on the aerogel matrix structure and composition and reached values up to 1.0×10(-3) and 1.7×10(-3) g/m(2) for ketoprofen and benzoic acid in starch microspheres. After impregnation, drugs were in the amorphous state in the aerogel microspheres. Release behavior was evaluated in different pH media (pH 1.2 and 6.8). Controlled drug release from pectin and alginate aerogel microspheres fitted Gallagher-Corrigan release model (R(2)>0.99 in both cases), with different relative contribution of erosion and diffusion mechanisms depending on the matrix composition. Release from starch aerogel microspheres was driven by dissolution, fitting the first-order kinetics due to the rigid starch aerogel structure, and showed different release rate constant (k1) depending on the drug (0.075 and 0.160 min(-1) for ketoprofen and benzoic acid, respectively). Overall, the results point out the possibilities of tuning drug loading and release by carefully choosing the polysaccharide used to prepare the aerogels.

  20. Slotted Polyimide-Aerogel-Filled-Waveguide Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez-Solis, Rafael A.; Pacheco, Hector L.; Miranda, Felix A.; Meador, Mary Ann B.

    2013-01-01

    Polyimide aerogels were considered to serve as a filling for millimeter-wave waveguides. While these waveguides present a slightly higher loss than hollow waveguides, they have less losses than Duroid substrate integrated waveguides (less than 0.15 dB at Ka-band, in a 20 mm section), and exhibit an order of magnitude of mass reduction when compared to commercial waveguides. A Ka-band slotted aerogel-filled-waveguide array was designed, which provided the same gain (9 dBi) as its standard waveguide counterpart, and a slotted aerogel-filled-waveguide array using folded-slots was designed for comparison, obtaining a gain of 9 dB and a bandwidth of 590 MHz.

  1. Crystalline boron nitride aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Rousseas, Michael; Goldstein, Anna P.; Mickelson, William; Worsley, Marcus A.; Woo, Leta

    2017-04-04

    This disclosure provides methods and materials related to boron nitride aerogels. In one aspect, a material comprises an aerogel comprising boron nitride. The boron nitride has an ordered crystalline structure. The ordered crystalline structure may include atomic layers of hexagonal boron nitride lying on top of one another, with atoms contained in a first layer being superimposed on atoms contained in a second layer.

  2. Melamine-formaldehyde aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, Richard W.

    1992-01-01

    Organic aerogels that are transparent and essentially colorless are prepa from the aqueous, sol-gel polymerization of melamine with formaldehyde. The melamine-formaldehyde (MF) aerogels have low densities, high surface areas, continuous porsity, ultrafine cell/pore sizes, and optical clarity.

  3. Melamine-formaldehyde aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, R.W.

    1992-01-14

    Organic aerogels that are transparent and essentially colorless are prepared from the aqueous, sol-gel polymerization of melamine with formaldehyde. The melamine-formaldehyde (MF) aerogels have low densities, high surface areas, continuous porosity, ultrafine cell/pore sizes, and optical clarity. 3 figs.

  4. Benzimidazole Based Aerogel Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhine, Wendell E. (Inventor); Mihalcik, David (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention provides aerogel materials based on imidazoles and polyimidazoles. The polyimidazole based aerogel materials can be thermally stable up to 500 C or more, and can be carbonized to produce a carbon aerogel having a char yield of 60% or more, specifically 70% or more. The present invention also provides methods of producing polyimidazole based aerogel materials by reacting at least one monomer in a suitable solvent to form a polybenzimidazole gel precursor solution, casting the polybenzimidazole gel precursor solution into a fiber reinforcement phase, allowing the at least one gel precursor in the precursor solution to transition into a gel material, and drying the gel materials to remove at least a portion of the solvent, to obtain an polybenzimidazole-based aerogel material.

  5. Method for producing hydrophobic aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Hrubesh, Lawrence W.; Poco, John F.; Coronado, Paul R.

    1999-01-01

    A method for treating a dried monolithic aerogel containing non-dispersed particles, with an organometallic surface modifying agent to produce hydrophobic aerogels. The dried, porous hydrophobic aerogels contain a protective layer of alkyl groups, such as methyl groups, on the modified surfaces of the pores of the aerogel. The alkyl groups at the aerogel surface typically contain at least one carbon-metal bond per group.

  6. Epoxy Crosslinked Silica Aerogels (X-Aerogels)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    fabrizio, Eve; Ilhan, Faysal; Meador, Mary Ann; Johnston, Chris; Leventis, Nicholas

    2004-01-01

    NASA is interested in the development of strong lightweight materials for the dual role of thermal insulator and structural component for space vehicles; freeing more weight for useful payloads. Aerogels are very-low density materials (0.010 to 0.5 g/cc) that, due to high porosity (meso- and microporosity), can be, depending on the chemical nature of the network, ideal thermal insulators (thermal conductivity approx. 15 mW/mK). However, aerogels are extremely fragile. For practical application of aerogels, one must increase strength without compromising the physical properties attributed to low density. This has been achieved by templated growth of an epoxy polymer layer that crosslinks the "pearl necklace" network of nanoparticles: the framework of a typical silica aerogel. The requirement for conformal accumulation of the epoxy crosslinker is reaction both with the surface of silica and with itself. After cross-linking, the strength of a typical aerogel monolith increases by a factor of 200, in the expense of only a 2-fold increase in density. Strength is increased further by coupling residual unreacted epoxides with diamine.

  7. Aerogel Keystones: Extraction Of Complete Hypervelocity Impact Events From Aerogel Collectors

    SciTech Connect

    Westphal, A J; Snead, C; Butterworth, A; Graham, G A; Bradley, J; Bajt, S; Grant, P G; Bench, G; Brennan, S; Piannetta, P

    2003-11-07

    In January 2006, the Stardust mission will return the first samples from a solid solar-system body since Apollo, and the first samples of contemporary interstellar dust ever collected. Although sophisticated laboratory instruments exist for the analysis of Stardust samples, techniques for the recovery of particles and particle residues from aerogel collectors remain primitive. Here we describe our recent progress in developing techniques for extracting small volumes of aerogel, which we have called ''keystones,'' which completely contain particle impacts but minimize the damage to the surrounding aerogel collector. These keystones can be fixed to custom-designed micromachined silicon fixtures (so-called ''microforklifts''). In this configuration the samples are self-supporting, which can be advantageous in situations in which interference from a supporting substrate is undesirable. The keystones may also be extracted and placed onto a substrate without a fixture. We have also demonstrated the capability of homologously crushing these unmounted keystones for analysis techniques which demand flat samples.

  8. Uncooled thin film pyroelectric IR detector with aerogel thermal isolation

    DOEpatents

    Ruffner, Judith A.; Bullington, Jeff A.; Clem, Paul G.; Warren, William L.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Tuttle, Bruce A.; Schwartz, Robert W.

    1999-01-01

    A monolithic infrared detector structure which allows integration of pyroelectric thin films atop low thermal conductivity aerogel thin films. The structure comprises, from bottom to top, a substrate, an aerogel insulating layer, a lower electrode, a pyroelectric layer, and an upper electrode layer capped by a blacking layer. The aerogel can offer thermal conductivity less than that of air, while providing a much stronger monolithic alternative to cantilevered or suspended air-gap structures for pyroelectric thin film pixel arrays. Pb(Zr.sub.0.4 Ti.sub.0.6)O.sub.3 thin films deposited on these structures displayed viable pyroelectric properties, while processed at 550.degree. C.

  9. 3D Porous Graphene Aerogel Cathode with High Sulfur Loading and Embedded TiO2 Nanoparticles for Advanced Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian-Qiu; Wang, Zhenyu; Xu, Zheng-Long; Chong, Woon Gie; Qin, Xianying; Wang, Xiangyu; Kim, Jang-Kyo

    2016-10-07

    Three-dimensional graphene aerogel/TiO2/sulfur (GA/TiO2/S) composites are synthesized through a facile, one-pot hydrothermal route as the cathode for lithium-sulfur batteries. With a high sulfur content of 75.1 wt%, the conductive, highly porous composite electrode delivers a high discharge capacity of 512 mAh/g after 250 cycles at a current rate of 1 C with a low capacity decay of 0.128% per cycle. The excellent capacities and cyclic stability arise from several unique functional features of the cathode. (i) The conductive graphene aerogel framework ameliorates ion/electron transfer while accommodating the volume expansion induced during discharge; and (ii) TiO2 nanoparticles play an important role in restricting the dissolution of polysulfides by chemical bonds with sulfur.

  10. Advanced Aerogel Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Steven

    2013-01-01

    The JPL Aerogel Laboratory has made aerogels for NASA flight missions, e.g., Stardust, 2003 Mars Exploration Rovers and the 2011 Mars Science Laboratory, as well as NASA research projects for the past 14 years. During that time it has produced aerogels of a range of shapes, sizes, densities and compositions. Research is ongoing in the development of aerogels for future sample capture and return missions and for thermal insulation for both spacecraft and scientific instruments. For the past several years, the JPL Aerogel Laboratory has been developing, producing and testing a new composite material for use as the high temperature thermal insulation in the Advanced Sterling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) being developed by Lockheed Martin and NASA. The composite is made up of a glass fiber felt, silica aerogel, Titania powder, and silica powder. The oxide powders are included to reduce irradiative heat transport at elevated temperatures. These materials have thermal conductivity values that are the same as the best commercially produced high temperature insulation materials, and yet are 40% lighter. By greatly reducing the amount of oxide powder in the composite, the density, and therefore for the value of the thermal conductivity, would be reduced. The JPL Aerogel Laboratory has experimented with using glass fiber felt, expanded glass fiber felt and loose fibers to add structural integrity to silica aerogels. However, this work has been directed toward high temperature applications. By conducting a brief investigation of the optimal combination of fiber reinforcement and aerogel density, a durable, extremely efficient thermal insulation material for ambient temperature applications would be produced. If a transparent thermal insulation is desired, then aerogel is an excellent candidate material. At typical ambient temperatures, silica aerogel prevents the transport of heat via convection and conduction due to its highly porous nature. To prevent irradiative thermal

  11. Low Substrate Loading Limits Methanogenesis and Leads to High Coulombic Efficiency in Bioelectrochemical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Sleutels, Tom H. J. A.; Molenaar, Sam D.; Heijne, Annemiek Ter; Buisman, Cees J. N.

    2016-01-01

    A crucial aspect for the application of bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) as a wastewater treatment technology is the efficient oxidation of complex substrates by the bioanode, which is reflected in high Coulombic efficiency (CE). To achieve high CE, it is essential to give a competitive advantage to electrogens over methanogens. Factors that affect CE in bioanodes are, amongst others, the type of wastewater, anode potential, substrate concentration and pH. In this paper, we focus on acetate as a substrate and analyze the competition between methanogens and electrogens from a thermodynamic and kinetic point of view. We reviewed experimental data from earlier studies and propose that low substrate loading in combination with a sufficiently high anode overpotential plays a key-role in achieving high CE. Low substrate loading is a proven strategy against methanogenic activity in large-scale reactors for sulfate reduction. The combination of low substrate loading with sufficiently high overpotential is essential because it results in favorable growth kinetics of electrogens compared to methanogens. To achieve high current density in combination with low substrate concentrations, it is essential to have a high specific anode surface area. New reactor designs with these features are essential for BESs to be successful in wastewater treatment in the future. PMID:27681899

  12. Chemical and morphological effects on the electrochemical properties of carbon aerogels and ruthenium dioxide/carbon aerogel nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, John Martin

    The development of high performance electrode materials for electrochemical capacitors has been an active area of research over the past ten years due to the demand for high power portable energy storage devices. One class of material which has shown promising capacitive characteristics in aqueous electrolytes is carbon aerogels. These unique materials exhibit low resistivity, high surface area, and a controllable open microstructure. In this work, the interrelationships between the electrochemical characteristics of the carbon aerogel materials in sulfuric acid electrolytes and the chemical and physical nature of the aerogels have been identified. Specifically, this study examines the influence of surface chemistry and microstructure on the voltammetric response of the carbon aerogel electrodes. Carbon aerogels exhibit a specific capacitance greater than 80 F/g in 1.0 M Hsb2SOsb4. This value is is dependent upon the specific surface area of each sample but is relatively independent of the bulk density of the aerogel. The density of the material does, however, influence the charging time of the electrode due to distributed capacitance effects. The surface of the carbon aerogels can be electrochemically activated to supplement the double-layer charging of the surface with a pseudocapacitive charge storage mechanism at redox-active surface functionalities. A second aspect of this work addresses improving the capacitance of the carbon aerogel materials by chemically modifying the surface of the aerogels. Hydrous ruthenium dioxide, which has shown exceptional pseudocapacitance ({>} 750\\ F/g)sp3, was deposited onto the surface of the carbon aerogel materials by two approaches: chemical vapor impregnation and electrodeposition. Ruthenium metal loadings of greater than 50 wt.% could be achieved using chemical vapor impregnation. Transmission electron microscopy revealed 20A metal particles uniformly distributed on the large interior surface of the aerogels. These

  13. Simplified Waterproofing of Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Ming-Ta S.; Chen, Timothy S.; White, Susan; Rasky, Daniel J.

    2003-01-01

    A relatively simple silanization process has been developed for waterproofing or rewaterproofing aerogels, xerogels, and aerogel/tile composites, and other, similar low-density, highly microporous materials. Such materials are potentially attractive for a variety of applications especially for thermal-insulation panels that are required to be thin and lightweight. Unfortunately, such materials are also hydrophilic and tend to collapse after adsorbing water from the air. Hence, an effective means of waterproofing is necessary to enable practical exploitation of aerogels and the like. Older processes for waterproofing aerogels are time-consuming, labor-intensive, and expensive, relative to the present process. Each of the older processes includes a number of different chemical treatment steps, and some include the use of toxic halogenated surface-modifying compounds, pressures as high as hundreds of atmospheres, and/or temperatures as high as 1,000 C.

  14. Experiments evaluating subsidence generated within a subaqueous deformable substrate due to varying differential sediment loading patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foreman, B.; Chatmas, E. S.; Abeyta, A.; Paola, C.

    2013-12-01

    The intraslope areas of many passive margins display a complex bathymetry of topographic depressions and crests that form series of minibasins. These minibasins are linked to the deformation of subsurface salt layers and act as localized sediment traps. Many mechanisms have been proposed for the initiation of minibasins, including tectonic forces (both extensional and contractional), regional gravitational sliding, density inversion between salt layers and overburden, and differential sediment loading. Regardless of initiation mechanism, it is widely recognized that synkinematic deposition plays a active role in determining subsidence patterns and sediment routing within and among the minibasins. We undertook a series of simplified 1-D and 2-D experiments 1) to evaluate the feasibility of developing a series of well-defined minibasins created exclusively by differential sediment loading and 2) to quantitatively determine the effects of substrate thickness, density contrast, and sedimentation rate on the resultant subsidence pattern. We also present an initial non-dimensionalized formulation of the problem that relates density contrasts, clinoform thickness, substrate thickness, progradation rate, and viscosity of the deformable substrate. Two sets of experiments were performed. The first set (1-D) vertically loaded a subaqueous corn syrup substrate (capturing the rheology of subsurface salt as a Newtonian fluid) with walnut sand. The second set (2-D) of experiments prograded a walnut sediment clinoform across a corn syrup substrate. We systematically varied sedimentation rate, substrate thickness, and, in the case of the prograding clinoform, base level. In no cases did we successfully reproduce a series of minibasins similar to those observed in natural settings. Instead the substrate was simply displaced laterally as sediment was deposited, forming a single depression. High sedimentation rates tended to produce wider zones of subsidence, however, if given

  15. Method of casting aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Poco, John F.

    1993-01-01

    The invention describes a method for making monolithic castings of transparent silica aerogel with densities in the range from 0.001 g/cm.sup.3 to 0.6 g/cm.sup.3. Various shapes of aerogels are cast in flexible polymer molds which facilitate removal and eliminate irregular surfaces. Mold dimensions are preselected to account for shrinkage of alcogel which occurs during the drying step of supercritical extraction of solvent.

  16. Compression molding of aerogel microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, Richard W.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.

    1998-03-24

    An aerogel composite material produced by compression molding of aerogel microspheres (powders) mixed together with a small percentage of polymer binder to form monolithic shapes in a cost-effective manner. The aerogel composites are formed by mixing aerogel microspheres with a polymer binder, placing the mixture in a mold and heating under pressure, which results in a composite with a density of 50-800 kg/m.sup.3 (0.05-0.80 g/cc). The thermal conductivity of the thus formed aerogel composite is below that of air, but higher than the thermal conductivity of monolithic aerogels. The resulting aerogel composites are attractive for applications such as thermal insulation since fabrication thereof does not require large and expensive processing equipment. In addition to thermal insulation, the aerogel composites may be utilized for filtration, ICF target, double layer capacitors, and capacitive deionization.

  17. Compression molding of aerogel microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, R.W.; Hrubesh, L.W.

    1998-03-24

    An aerogel composite material produced by compression molding of aerogel microspheres (powders) mixed together with a small percentage of polymer binder to form monolithic shapes in a cost-effective manner is disclosed. The aerogel composites are formed by mixing aerogel microspheres with a polymer binder, placing the mixture in a mold and heating under pressure, which results in a composite with a density of 50--800 kg/m{sup 3} (0.05--0.80 g/cc). The thermal conductivity of the thus formed aerogel composite is below that of air, but higher than the thermal conductivity of monolithic aerogels. The resulting aerogel composites are attractive for applications such as thermal insulation since fabrication thereof does not require large and expensive processing equipment. In addition to thermal insulation, the aerogel composites may be utilized for filtration, ICF target, double layer capacitors, and capacitive deionization. 4 figs.

  18. Combined influence of streaming potential and substrate compliance on load capacity of a planar slider bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Jeevanjyoti; Chakraborty, Suman

    2011-08-01

    In the present study, we investigate the combined interplay of streaming potential and substrate compliance with sliding dynamics on the load carrying capacity of a planar slider bearing. We relax previously utilized simplifying assumptions to model the electrokinetic effects and demonstrate that the streaming potential may augment the load carrying capacity of the bearing to a considerable extent. Interestingly, we also reveal that the electrokinetically augmented load carrying capacity exhibits strong dependencies on a combination of the compliance and the sliding dynamics, which have, hitherto, not been extensively explored. This rich interplay reveals certain parametric regimes of interest, which are significant from the viewpoint of practical design considerations.

  19. Loading Rates and Impacts of Substrate Delivery for Enhanced Anaerobic Bioremediation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    IMPROVED/ALTERNATIVE DELIVERY TECHNIQUES .............................. 20 5.5 ALTERNATE DEGRADATION PROCESSES ...contaminants subject to anaerobic degradation processes . The authors acknowledge the assistance of numerous individuals who provided site data and...reduction (redox) conditions for anaerobic degradation processes to occur. Substrate loading rates are defined as the volume, concentration, and

  20. Alginate-based hybrid aerogel microparticles for mucosal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, V S S; Gurikov, P; Poejo, J; Matias, A A; Heinrich, S; Duarte, C M M; Smirnova, I

    2016-10-01

    The application of biopolymer aerogels as drug delivery systems (DDS) has gained increased interest during the last decade since these structures have large surface area and accessible pores allowing for high drug loadings. Being biocompatible, biodegradable and presenting low toxicity, polysaccharide-based aerogels are an attractive carrier to be applied in pharmaceutical industry. Moreover, some polysaccharides (e.g. alginate and chitosan) present mucoadhesive properties, an important feature for mucosal drug delivery. This feature allows to extend the contact of DDS with biological membranes, thereby increasing the absorption of drugs through the mucosa. Alginate-based hybrid aerogels in the form of microparticles (<50μm) were investigated in this work as carriers for mucosal administration of drugs. Low methoxyl pectin and κ-carrageenan were co-gelled with alginate and further dried with supercritical CO2 (sc-CO2). Spherical mesoporous aerogel microparticles were obtained for alginate, hybrid alginate/pectin and alginate/κ-carrageenan aerogels, presenting high specific surface area (370-548m(2)g(-1)) and mucoadhesive properties. The microparticles were loaded with ketoprofen via adsorption from its solution in sc-CO2, and with quercetin via supercritical anti-solvent precipitation. Loading of ketoprofen was in the range between 17 and 22wt% whereas quercetin demonstrated loadings of 3.1-5.4wt%. Both the drugs were present in amorphous state. Loading procedure allowed the preservation of antioxidant activity of quercetin. Release of both drugs from alginate/κ-carrageenan aerogel was slightly faster compared to alginate/pectin. The results indicate that alginate-based aerogel microparticles can be viewed as promising matrices for mucosal drug delivery applications.

  1. Aerogels Insulate Against Extreme Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    In 1992, NASA started to pursue the development of aerogel for cryogenic insulation. Kennedy Space Center awarded Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts to Aspen Systems Inc., of Marlborough, Massachusetts, that resulted in a new manufacturing process and a new flexible, durable, easy-to-use form of aerogel. Aspen Systems formed Aspen Aerogels Inc., in Northborough, Massachusetts, to market the product, and by 2009, the company had become the leading provider of aerogel in the United States, producing nearly 20 million square feet per year. With an array of commercial applications, the NASA-derived aerogel has most recently been applied to protect and insulate people s hands and feet.

  2. Atomistic simulations of the load dependant friction force between silicon tip and diamond substrate.

    PubMed

    Bu, Hao; Chen, Yunfei

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, the load dependence on the interfacial friction between a cubic silicon tip and diamond substrate was investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. With the increase of the applied load, the sliding process experiences the states of superlubricity, single slip instability, double slip instability and plastic stage. The transitions from one state to the next one occur at the contact pressure 5.3 GPa, 8.0 GPa and 10.8 GPa, sequentially. In the superlubricity state, both friction and dissipated energy approach zero, independent of the load. However, in the single slip state the friction has a linear relationship with load, while the double slip mode induces decreased frictional force and lower damping. The coupling of the structure and forces in the plastic regime leads to the reduction of friction. These behaviors show good agreement with the recent experimental observations and theoretical predictions.

  3. Coated Aerogel Beads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littman, Howard (Inventor); Plawsky, Joel L. (Inventor); Paccione, John D. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for coating particulate material are provided. The apparatus includes a vessel having a top and a bottom, a vertically extending conduit having an inlet in the vessel and an outlet outside of the vessel, a first fluid inlet in the bottom of the vessel for introducing a transfer fluid, a second fluid inlet in the bottom of the vessel for introducing a coating fluid, and a fluid outlet from the vessel. The method includes steps of agitating a material, contacting the material with a coating material, and drying the coating material to produce a coated material. The invention may be adapted to coat aerogel beads, among other materials. A coated aerogel bead and an aerogel-based insulation material are also disclosed.

  4. Aerogel Fingerprint Media

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Fred S.; Andresen, Brian D.

    1999-09-21

    A fingerprint medium which is made of an aerogel having a predetermined density. The fingerprint medium may have a midrange density for forming plates or may be crushed forming a powder. The fingerprint medium may further include at least one of a metal and metal oxide to enhance characteristics desirable in a fingerprint medium.

  5. Mechanically Strong, Polymer Cross-linked Aerogels (X-Aerogels)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventis, Nicholas

    2006-01-01

    Aerogels comprise a class of low-density, high porous solid objects consisting of dimensionally quasi-stable self-supported three-dimensional assemblies of nanoparticles. Aerogels are pursued because of properties above and beyond those of the individual nanoparticles, including low thermal conductivity, low dielectric constant and high acoustic impedance. Possible applications include thermal and vibration insulation, dielectrics for fast electronics, and hosting of functional guests for a wide variety of optical, chemical and electronic applications. Aerogels, however, are extremely fragile materials, hence they have found only limited application in some very specialized environments, for example as Cerenkov radiation detectors in certain types of nuclear reactors, aboard spacecraft as collectors of hypervelocity particles (refer to NASA's Stardust program) and as thermal insulators on planetary vehicles on Mars (refer to Sojourner Rover in 1997 and Spirit and Opportunity in 2004). Along these lines, the X-Aerogel is a new NASA-developed strong lightweight material that has resolved the fragility problem of traditional (native) aerogels. X-Aerogels are made by applying a conformal polymer coating on the surfaces of the skeletal nanoparticles of native aerogels (see Scanning Electron Micrographs). Since the relative amounts of the polymeric crosslinker and the backbone are comparable, X-Aerogels can be viewed either as aerogels modified by the templated accumulation of polymer on the skeletal nanoparticles, or as nanoporous polymers made by remplated casting of polymer on a nanostructured framework. The most striking feature of X-Aerogels is that for a nominal 3-fold increase in density (still a ultralighweight material), the mechanical strength can be up to 300 times higher than the strength of the underlying native aerogel. Thus, X-Aerogels combine a multiple of the specific compressive strength of steel, with the the thermal conductivity of styrofoam. X-Aerogels

  6. Sulfate reduction in freshwater wetland soils and the effects of sulfate and substrate loading

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, J.; Hsieh, Y.P.

    1998-07-01

    Elevated sulfate and organic C loadings in freshwater wetlands could stimulate dissimilatory sulfate reduction that oxidizes organic C, produces hydrogen sulfide and alkalinity, and sequesters trace metals. The authors determined the extent of sulfate reduction in two freshwater wetland soils, that is black gum (Nyssa biflona) swamp soils and titi (Cliftonia monophylla) swamp soils, in northern Florida. They also investigated the potential of sulfate reduction in the wetland soils by adding sulfate, organic substrate, and lime. Sulfate reduction was found to be an active process in both swamp soils without any amendment, where the pore water pH was as low as 3.6 and sulfate concentration was as low as 5 mg L{sup {minus}1}. Without amendment, 11 to 14% of organic C was oxidized through sulfate reduction in the swamp soils. Sulfate loading, liming, and substrate addition significantly increased sulfate reduction in the black gum swamp soil, but none of those treatments increase sulfate reduction in the titi swamp soil. The limiting factor for sulfate reduction in the titi swamp soil were likely texture and soil aggregate related properties. The results suggested that wastewater loading may increase sulfate reduction in some freshwater wetlands such as the black swamps while it has no stimulating effect on other wetlands such as the titi swamps.

  7. Aerogel-Based Antennas for Aerospace and Terrestrial Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann (Inventor); Miranda, Felix (Inventor); Van Keuls, Frederick (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Systems and methods for lightweight, customizable antenna with improved performance and mechanical properties are disclosed. In some aspects, aerogels can be used, for example, as a substrate for antenna fabrication. The reduced weight and expense, as well as the increased ability to adapt antenna designs, permits a systems to mitigate a variety of burdens associated with antennas while providing added benefits.

  8. Synthesis of reduced graphene oxide/thorn-like titanium dioxide nanofiber aerogels with enhanced electrochemical performance for supercapacitor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Woong; Park, Soo-Jin

    2017-01-15

    Reduced graphene oxide (rGO)/thorn-like TiO2 nanofiber (TTF) aerogels, or GTTF aerogels, with different TTF weight ratios were successfully prepared by electrospinning, silica etching and hydrothermal combination method. During the hydrothermal reaction, the rGO nanosheets and TTF self-assembled into three-dimensional (3D) interconnected networks, in which the TTF is loaded onto the rGO nanosheets. The electrochemical performance of the GTTF aerogels was assessed using cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge-discharge measurements in a 1M aqueous Na2SO4 electrolyte. The TTF-to-rGO ratio of the aerogel material significantly affected the electrochemical performance of the aerogel electrodes, and the GTTF aerogels prepared with 20wt% TTF (denoted GTTF-20) exhibited excellent electrochemical performance. The maximum specific capacitance of this aerogel electrode was 178F/g at a current density of 1A/g. The GTTF-20 aerogel also exhibited good electrochemical stability with a capacitance degradation of less than 10% after 3000cycles. We can deduce that the electrochemical performance of the as-prepared aerogels may be enhanced by increasing the chemical interactions between rGO and TiO2. The results indicate that the GTTF aerogels show enormous potential for application in energy storage devices.

  9. Characterization of Dry-Air Aged Granules of Silver-Functionalized Silica Aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    Matyas, Josef; Fryxell, Glen E.; Robinson, Matthew J.

    2012-09-01

    This is a letter report to complete level 3 milestone "Assess aging characteristics of silica aerogels" for DOE FCRD program. Recently, samples of Ag0-functionalized silica aerogel were aged in flowing dry air for up to 6 months and then loaded with iodine. This dry-air aging simulated the impact of long-term exposure to process gases during process idling. The 6-month aged sample exhibited an iodine sorption capacity of 32 mass%, which was 9 mass % lower than that for an un-aged Ag0-functionalized silica aerogel. In an attempt to understand this decrease in sorption capacity, we characterized physical properties of the aged samples with Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and high resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed no impact of aging on the aerogel microstructure or the silver nanoparticles in the aerogel, including their spatial distribution and morphology.

  10. Improvements of reinforced silica aerogel nanocomposites thermal properties for architecture applications.

    PubMed

    Saboktakin, Amin; Saboktakin, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    An 1,4-cis polybutadiene rubber/carboxymethyl starch (CMS)-based silica aerogel nanocomposites as a insulation material was developed that will provide superior thermal insulation properties, flexibility, toughness, durability of the parent polymer, yet with the low density and superior insulation properties associated with the aerogels. In this study, reinforced 1,4-cis polybutadiene-CMS-silica aerogel nanocomposites were prepared from a silica aerogel with a surface area 710 m(2) g(-1), a pore size of 25.3 nm and a pore volume of 4.7 cm(3) g(-1). The tensile properties and dynamic mechanical properties of 1,4-cis polybutadiene/CMS nanocomposites were systematically enhanced at low silica loading. Similar improvements in tensile modulus and strength have been observed for 1,4-cis polybutadiene/CMS mesoporous silica aerogel nanocomposites.

  11. Organic aerogel microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Steven T.; Kong, Fung-Ming; Pekala, Richard W.; Kaschmitter, James L.

    1999-01-01

    Organic aerogel microspheres which can be used in capacitors, batteries, thermal insulation, adsorption/filtration media, and chromatographic packings, having diameters ranging from about 1 micron to about 3 mm. The microspheres can be pyrolyzed to form carbon aerogel microspheres. This method involves stirring the aqueous organic phase in mineral oil at elevated temperature until the dispersed organic phase polymerizes and forms nonsticky gel spheres. The size of the microspheres depends on the collision rate of the liquid droplets and the reaction rate of the monomers from which the aqueous solution is formed. The collision rate is governed by the volume ratio of the aqueous solution to the mineral oil and the shear rate, while the reaction rate is governed by the chemical formulation and the curing temperature.

  12. Organic aerogel microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, S.T.; Kong, F.M.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1999-06-01

    Organic aerogel microspheres are disclosed which can be used in capacitors, batteries, thermal insulation, adsorption/filtration media, and chromatographic packings, having diameters ranging from about 1 micron to about 3 mm. The microspheres can be pyrolyzed to form carbon aerogel microspheres. This method involves stirring the aqueous organic phase in mineral oil at elevated temperature until the dispersed organic phase polymerizes and forms nonstick gel spheres. The size of the microspheres depends on the collision rate of the liquid droplets and the reaction rate of the monomers from which the aqueous solution is formed. The collision rate is governed by the volume ratio of the aqueous solution to the mineral oil and the shear rate, while the reaction rate is governed by the chemical formulation and the curing temperature.

  13. Metal Nanoparticle Aerogel Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Sibille, Laurent; Ignont, Erica; Snow, Lanee; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We have fabricated sol-gels containing gold and silver nanoparticles. Formation of an aerogel produces a blue shift in the surface plasmon resonance as a result of the decrease in the dielectric constant of the matrix upon supercritical extraction of the solvent. However, as a result of chemical interface damping this blue shift does not obey effective medium theories. Annealing the samples in a reducing atmosphere at 400 C eliminates this discrepancy and results in narrowing and further blue shifting of the plasmon resonance. Metal particle aggregation also results in a deviation from the predictions of effective medium theories, but can be controlled through careful handling and by avoiding the use of alcohol. By applying effective medium theories to the heterogeneous interlayer surrounding each metal particle, we extend the technique of immersion spectroscopy to inhomogeneous materials characterized by spatially dependent dielectric constants, such as aerogels. We demonstrate that the shift in the surface plasmon wavelength provides the average fractional composition of each component (air and silica) in this inhomogeneous layer, i.e. the porosity of the aerogel or equivalently, for these materials, the catalytic dispersion. Additionally, the kinetics suggest that collective particle interactions in coagulated metal clusters are perturbed during silica gelation resulting in a change in the aggregate geometry.

  14. Dielectric and other properties of polyimide aerogels containing fluorinated blocks.

    PubMed

    Meador, Mary Ann B; McMillon, Emily; Sandberg, Anna; Barrios, Elizabeth; Wilmoth, Nathan G; Mueller, Carl H; Miranda, Félix A

    2014-05-14

    The dielectric and other properties of a series of low-density polyimide block copolymer aerogels have been characterized. Two different anhydride-capped polyimide oligomers were synthesized: one from 2,2-bis(3,4-dicarboxyphenyl)hexafluoropropane dianhydride (6FDA) and 4,4'-oxidianiline (ODA) and the other from biphenyl-3,3',4,4'-tetracarboxylic dianhydride and ODA. The oligomers were combined with 1,3,5-triaminophenoxybenzene to form a block copolymer networked structure that gelled in under 1 h. The polyimide gels were supercritically dried to give aerogels with relative dielectric constants as low as 1.08. Increasing the amount of 6FDA blocks by up to 50% of the total dianhydride decreased the density of the aerogels, presumably by increasing the free volume and also by decreasing the amount of shrinkage seen upon processing, resulting in a concomitant decrease in the dielectric properties. In this study, we have also altered the density independent of fluorine substitution by changing the polymer concentration in the gelation reactions and showed that the change in dielectric due to density is the same with and without fluorine substitution. The aerogels with the lowest dielectric properties and lowest densities still had compressive moduli of 4-8 MPa (40 times higher than silica aerogels at the same density), making them suitable as low dielectric substrates for lightweight antennas for aeronautic and space applications.

  15. Production of hollow aerogel microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhye, R.S.; Henning, S.A.

    1990-12-31

    A method is described for making hollow aerogel microspheres of 800--1200{mu} diameter and 100--300{mu} wall thickness by forming hollow alcogel microspheres during the sol/gel process in a catalytic atmosphere and capturing them on a foam surface containing catalyst. Supercritical drying of the formed hollow alcogel microspheres yields hollow aerogel microspheres which are suitable for ICF targets.

  16. Aerogel/polymer composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha K. (Inventor); Smith, Trent M. (Inventor); Fesmire, James E. (Inventor); Roberson, Luke B. (Inventor); Clayton, LaNetra M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The invention provides new composite materials containing aerogels blended with thermoplastic polymer materials at a weight ratio of aerogel to thermoplastic polymer of less than 20:100. The composite materials have improved thermal insulation ability. The composite materials also have better flexibility and less brittleness at low temperatures than the parent thermoplastic polymer materials.

  17. Production of hollow aerogel microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Upadhye, Ravindra S.; Henning, Sten A.

    1993-01-01

    A method is described for making hollow aerogel microspheres of 800-1200 .mu. diameter and 100-300 .mu. wall thickness by forming hollow alcogel microspheres during the sol/gel process in a catalytic atmosphere and capturing them on a foam surface containing catalyst. Supercritical drying of the formed hollow alcogel microspheres yields hollow aerogel microspheres which are suitable for ICF targets.

  18. Pressure drop increase by biofilm accumulation in spiral wound RO and NF membrane systems: role of substrate concentration, flow velocity, substrate load and flow direction.

    PubMed

    Vrouwenvelder, J S; Hinrichs, C; Van der Meer, W G J; Van Loosdrecht, M C M; Kruithof, J C

    2009-01-01

    In an earlier study, it was shown that biofouling predominantly is a feed spacer channel problem. In this article, pressure drop development and biofilm accumulation in membrane fouling simulators have been studied without permeate production as a function of the process parameters substrate concentration, linear flow velocity, substrate load and flow direction. At the applied substrate concentration range, 100-400 microg l(-1) as acetate carbon, a higher concentration caused a faster and greater pressure drop increase and a greater accumulation of biomass. Within the range of linear flow velocities as applied in practice, a higher linear flow velocity resulted in a higher initial pressure drop in addition to a more rapid and greater pressure drop increase and biomass accumulation. Reduction of the linear flow velocity resulted in an instantaneous reduction of the pressure drop caused by the accumulated biomass, without changing the biofilm concentration. A higher substrate load (product of substrate concentration and flow velocity) was related to biomass accumulation. The effect of the same amount of accumulated biomass on the pressure drop increase was related to the linear flow velocity. A decrease of substrate load caused a gradual decline in time of both biomass concentration and pressure drop increase. It was concluded that the pressure drop increase over spiral wound reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membrane systems can be reduced by lowering both substrate load and linear flow velocity. There is a need for RO and NF systems with a low pressure drop increase irrespective of the biomass formation. Current efforts to control biofouling of spiral wound membranes focus in addition to pretreatment on membrane improvement. According to these authors, adaptation of the hydrodynamics, spacers and pressure vessel configuration offer promising alternatives. Additional approaches may be replacing heavily biofouled elements and flow direction reversal.

  19. Protective Skins for Aerogel Monoliths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventis, Nicholas; Johnston, James C.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Meador, Ann B.

    2007-01-01

    A method of imparting relatively hard protective outer skins to aerogel monoliths has been developed. Even more than aerogel beads, aerogel monoliths are attractive as thermal-insulation materials, but the commercial utilization of aerogel monoliths in thermal-insulation panels has been inhibited by their fragility and the consequent difficulty of handling them. Therefore, there is a need to afford sufficient protection to aerogel monoliths to facilitate handling, without compromising the attractive bulk properties (low density, high porosity, low thermal conductivity, high surface area, and low permittivity) of aerogel materials. The present method was devised to satisfy this need. The essence of the present method is to coat an aerogel monolith with an outer polymeric skin, by painting or spraying. Apparently, the reason spraying and painting were not attempted until now is that it is well known in the aerogel industry that aerogels collapse in contact with liquids. In the present method, one prevents such collapse through the proper choice of coating liquid and process conditions: In particular, one uses a viscous polymer precursor liquid and (a) carefully controls the amount of liquid applied and/or (b) causes the liquid to become cured to the desired hard polymeric layer rapidly enough that there is not sufficient time for the liquid to percolate into the aerogel bulk. The method has been demonstrated by use of isocyanates, which, upon exposure to atmospheric moisture, become cured to polyurethane/polyurea-type coats. The method has also been demonstrated by use of commercial epoxy resins. The method could also be implemented by use of a variety of other resins, including polyimide precursors (for forming high-temperature-resistant protective skins) or perfluorinated monomers (for forming coats that impart hydrophobicity and some increase in strength).

  20. Aerogel Projects Ongoing in MSFC's Engineering Directorate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shular, D. A.; Smithers, G. A.; Plawsky, J. L.

    2001-01-01

    When we speak of an aerogel material, we are referring more to process and structure than to a specific substance. Aerogel, considered the lightest solid material, has been made from silica for seventy years. Resorcinol-formaldehyde, organic aerogels have been developed more recently. However, aerogel can be made from almost any type of substance, even lead. Because an aerogel is mostly air (about 99%), the solid substance used will affect the weight very little. The problem with aerogels is their low tensile strength and lack of elasticity. Therefore, the challenge is to find ways to make the stronger or ways to circumvent the strength issue. Organic aerogels have slightly higher strength than base silica aerogels, while the carbonized version has three to five times the break strength of the base aerogel.

  1. Optothermal nonlinearity of silica aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braidotti, Maria Chiara; Gentilini, Silvia; Fleming, Adam; Samuels, Michiel C.; Di Falco, Andrea; Conti, Claudio

    2016-07-01

    We report on the characterization of silica aerogel thermal optical nonlinearity, obtained by z-scan technique. The results show that typical silica aerogels have nonlinear optical coefficient similar to that of glass (≃10-12 m2/W), with negligible optical nonlinear absorption. The nonlinear coefficient can be increased to values in the range of 10-10 m2/W by embedding an absorbing dye in the aerogel. This value is one order of magnitude higher than that observed in the pure dye and in typical highly nonlinear materials like liquid crystals.

  2. Monolayer coated aerogels and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Zemanian, Thomas Samuel; Fryxell, Glen; Ustyugov, Oleksiy A.

    2006-03-28

    Aerogels having a monolayer coating are described. The aerogel and a monolayer forming precursor are provided in a supercritical fluid, whereupon the aerogel and the monolayer forming precursor are reacted in said supercritical fluid to form a covalent bond between the aerogel and the monolayer forming precursor. Suitable aerogels are ceramic oxides such as silica, alumina, aluminosilicate, and combinations thereof. Suitable monolayer forming precursors include alkyl silanes, chlorosilanes, boranes, chloroboranes, germanes, and combinations thereof. The method may also include providing a surface preparation agent such as water, or hydroetching an aerogel to enhance the coating of the monolayer.

  3. Super-hydrophobic fluorine containing aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Coronado, Paul R.; Poco, John F.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.

    2007-05-01

    An aerogel material with surfaces containing fluorine atoms which exhibits exceptional hydrophobicity, or the ability to repel liquid water. Hydrophobic aerogels are efficient absorbers of solvents from water. Solvents miscible with water are separated from it because the solvents are more volatile than water and they enter the porous aerogel as a vapor across the liquid water/solid interface. Solvents that are immisicble with water are separated from it by selectively wetting the aerogel. The hydrophobic property is achieved by formulating the aerogel using fluorine containing molecules either directly by addition in the sol-gel process, or by treating a standard dried aerogel using the vapor of fluorine containing molecules.

  4. Modern Inorganic Aerogels.

    PubMed

    Eychmüller, Alexander; Ziegler, Christoph; Wolf, André; Liu, Wei; Herrmann, Anne-Kristin; Gaponik, Nikolai

    2017-02-03

    Essentially, the term aerogel describes a special geometric structure of matter. It is neither limited to any material nor to any synthesis procedure. Hence, the possible variety of materials and therefore the multitude of their applications are almost unbounded. In fact, the same applies for nanoparticles. These are also just defined by their geometrical properties. In the past decades nano-sized materials were intensively studied and possible applications appeared in nearly all areas of natural sciences. To date a large variety of metal, semiconductor, oxide and other nanoparticles are available from colloidal synthesis. However, for many applications of these materials an assembly into macroscopic structures is needed. Here we present a comprehensive picture of the developments that enabled the fusion of the colloidal nanoparticle and the aerogel world. This became possible by the controlled destabilization of pre-formed nanoparticles, which leads to their assembly into three-dimensional macroscopic networks. This revolutionary approach makes it possible to use precisely controlled nanoparticles as building blocks for macroscopic porous structures with programmable properties.

  5. Inorganic hollow nanotube aerogels by atomic layer deposition onto native nanocellulose templates.

    PubMed

    Korhonen, Juuso T; Hiekkataipale, Panu; Malm, Jari; Karppinen, Maarit; Ikkala, Olli; Ras, Robin H A

    2011-03-22

    Hollow nano-objects have raised interest in applications such as sensing, encapsulation, and drug-release. Here we report on a new class of porous materials, namely inorganic nanotube aerogels that, unlike other aerogels, have a framework consisting of inorganic hollow nanotubes. First we show a preparation method for titanium dioxide, zinc oxide, and aluminum oxide nanotube aerogels based on atomic layer deposition (ALD) on biological nanofibrillar aerogel templates, that is, nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC), also called microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) or nanocellulose. The aerogel templates are prepared from nanocellulose hydrogels either by freeze-drying in liquid nitrogen or liquid propane or by supercritical drying, and they consist of a highly porous percolating network of cellulose nanofibrils. They can be prepared as films on substrates or as freestanding objects. We show that, in contrast to freeze-drying, supercritical drying produces nanocellulose aerogels without major interfibrillar aggregation even in thick films. Uniform oxide layers are readily deposited by ALD onto the fibrils leading to organic-inorganic core-shell nanofibers. We further demonstrate that calcination at 450 °C removes the organic core leading to purely inorganic self-supporting aerogels consisting of hollow nanotubular networks. They can also be dispersed by grinding, for example, in ethanol to create a slurry of inorganic hollow nanotubes, which in turn can be deposited to form a porous film. Finally we demonstrate the use of a titanium dioxide nanotube network as a resistive humidity sensor with a fast response.

  6. Mechanism of drug release from silica-gelatin aerogel-Relationship between matrix structure and release kinetics.

    PubMed

    Veres, Péter; Kéri, Mónika; Bányai, István; Lázár, István; Fábián, István; Domingo, Concepción; Kalmár, József

    2017-04-01

    Specific features of a silica-gelatin aerogel (3 wt.% gelatin content) in relation to drug delivery has been studied. It was confirmed that the release of both ibuprofen (IBU) and ketoprofen (KET) is about tenfold faster from loaded silica-gelatin aerogel than from pure silica aerogel, although the two matrices are structurally very similar. The main goal of the study was to understand the mechanistic background of the striking difference between the delivery properties of these closely related porous materials. Hydrated and dispersed silica-gelatin aerogel has been characterized by NMR cryoporometry, diffusiometry and relaxometry. The pore structure of the silica aerogel remains intact when it disintegrates in water. In contrast, dispersed silica-gelatin aerogel develops a strong hydration sphere, which reshapes the pore walls and deforms the pore structure. The drug release kinetics was studied on a few minutes time scale with 1s time resolution. Simultaneous evaluation of all relevant kinetic and structural information confirmed that strong hydration of the silica-gelatin skeleton facilitates the rapid desorption and dissolution of the drugs from the loaded aerogel. Such a driving force is not operative in pure silica aerogels.

  7. Hybrid Multifoil Aerogel Thermal Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Paik, Jong-Ah; Jones, Steven; Nesmith, Bill

    2008-01-01

    This innovation blends the merits of multifoil insulation (MFI) with aerogel-based insulation to develop a highly versatile, ultra-low thermally conductive material called hybrid multifoil aerogel thermal insulation (HyMATI). The density of the opacified aerogel is 240 mg/cm3 and has thermal conductivity in the 20 mW/mK range in high vacuum and 25 mW/mK in 1 atmosphere of gas (such as argon) up to 800 C. It is stable up to 1,000 C. This is equal to commercially available high-temperature thermal insulation. The thermal conductivity of the aerogel is 36 percent lower compared to several commercially available insulations when tested in 1 atmosphere of argon gas up to 800 C.

  8. Aerogel: From Aerospace to Apparel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Aspen Systems Inc. developed an aerogel-manufacturing process solved the handling problems associated with aerogel-based insulation products. Their aerogels can now be manufactured into blankets, thin sheets, beads, and molded parts; and may be transparent, translucent, or opaque. Aspen made the material effective for window and skylight insulation, non-flammable building insulation, and inexpensive firewall insulation that will withstand fires in homes and buildings, and also assist in the prevention of forest fires. Another Aspen product is Spaceloft(TM); an inexpensive, flexible blanket that incorporates a thin layer of aerogel embedded directly into the fabric. Spaceloft, is incorporated into jackets intended for wear in extremely harsh conditions and activities, such as Antarctic expeditions.

  9. Methods of selectively incorporating metals onto substrates

    DOEpatents

    Ernst; Richard D. , Eyring; Edward M. , Turpin; Gregory C. , Dunn; Brian C.

    2008-09-30

    A method for forming multi-metallic sites on a substrate is disclosed and described. A substrate including active groups such as hydroxyl can be reacted with a pretarget metal complex. The target metal attached to the active group can then be reacted with a secondary metal complex such that an oxidation-reduction (redox) reaction occurs to form a multi-metallic species. The substrate can be a highly porous material such as aerogels, xerogels, zeolites, and similar materials. Additional metal complexes can be reacted to increase catalyst loading or control co-catalyst content. The resulting compounds can be oxidized to form oxides or reduced to form metals in the ground state which are suitable for practical use.

  10. Aerogel Composites: Strong and Waterproof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan; Hsu, Ming-ta; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Aerogels are exotic materials having superior thermal and physical properties with great potential for both space and industrial uses. Although aerogels are excellent low-density insulators with unique acoustic and optical properties, their commercialization potential is currently limited by moisture absorption, fragility, and cost. This paper describes useful, easily scaled-up solutions to the first two of these three problems. The waterproofing and water-repellent method described here is a cheaper and simpler improvement over previous permanent methods.

  11. Improved Silica Aerogel Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, Jong-Ah; Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Jones, Steven

    2008-01-01

    A family of aerogel-matrix composite materials having thermal-stability and mechanical- integrity properties better than those of neat aerogels has been developed. Aerogels are known to be excellent thermal- and acoustic-insulation materials because of their molecular-scale porosity, but heretofore, the use of aerogels has been inhibited by two factors: (1) Their brittleness makes processing and handling difficult. (2) They shrink during production and shrink more when heated to high temperatures during use. The shrinkage and the consequent cracking make it difficult to use them to encapsulate objects in thermal-insulation materials. The underlying concept of aerogel-matrix composites is not new; the novelty of the present family of materials lies in formulations and processes that result in superior properties, which include (1) much less shrinkage during a supercritical-drying process employed in producing a typical aerogel, (2) much less shrinkage during exposure to high temperatures, and (3) as a result of the reduction in shrinkage, much less or even no cracking.

  12. Removal of carbonaceous contaminants from silica aerogel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Hui-Ping; Gilmour, I.; Pillinger, C. T.; Zolensky, M. E.

    1993-01-01

    Capture of micrometeorite material from low Earth orbit or dust grains around active comets for return to terrestrial laboratories, capable of practicing the most up to date techniques of chemical isotopic and mineralogical analysis, will greatly enhance our knowledge of primitive material in the solar system. The next generation of space launched cosmic dust collectors will undoubtedly include extremely low density target materials such as silica aerogel as the decelerating and arresting medium. This material has been found to be clean from the point of view of inorganic elements and is thus acceptable for the purpose of harvesting grains to be studied by, for example PIXE, INAA, or SXRF. However, the process used in making aerogel leaves substantial carbon and hydrogen containing residues which would negate their suitability for collection and subsequent investigation of the very important CHON particles. Attempts to precondition aerogel by solvent extraction or heating at 500 C and 750 C in air for 24 hours or under a vacuum of 2(7)(exp -7) torr at 260 C were largely ineffective except that pyrolysis did reduce volatile species. In this investigation we have examined the use of supercritical fluids for the purpose of extracting organic residues. The logic of the new approach is that beyond the supercritical point a substance has the solvating properties of a liquid but the viscosity characteristics of a gas. For example carbon dioxide becomes supercritical at a pressure of 73 atmospheres and a temperature of 31 C; in consequence it can transform to a very powerful and ultraclean solvent. It can dissolve organic matter from low molecular weight up to molecules containing 90 carbon atoms. On release of pressure the fluid reverts to a gas which can easily be pumped away and removed from the substrate being extracted.

  13. Slotted Polyimide-Aerogel-Filled-Waveguide Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez-Solis, Rafael A.; Pacheco, Hector L.; Miranda, Felix A.; Meador, Mary Ann B.

    2013-01-01

    This presentation discussed the potential advantages of developing Slotted Waveguide Arrays using polyimide aerogels. Polyimide (PI) aerogels offer great promise as an enabling technology for lightweight aerospace antenna systems. PI aerogels are highly porous solids possessing low density and low dielectric permittivity combined with good mechanical properties. For slotted waveguide array applications, there are significant advantages in mass that more than compensate for the slightly higher loss of the aerogel filled waveguide when compared to state of practice commercial waveguide.

  14. Improvements to the Synthesis of Polyimide Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Nguyen, Baochau N.; Guo, Haiquan; Vivod, Stephanie; He, Zuhui; Malow, Ericka; Silva, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    Cross-linked polyimide aerogels are viable approach to higher temperature, flexible insulation for inflatable decelerators. Results indicate that the all-polyimide aerogels are as strong or stronger than polymer reinforced silica aerogels at the same density. Currently, examining use of carbon nanofiber and clay nanoparticles to improve performance. Flexible, polyimide aerogels have potential utility in other applications such as space suits, habitats, shelter applications, etc. where low dusting is desired

  15. Aerogel composites and method of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Cao, Wanqing; Hunt, Arlon Jason

    1999-01-01

    Disclosed herewith is a process of forming an aerogel composite which comprises introducing a gaseous material into a formed aerogel monolith or powder, and causing decomposition of said gaseous material in said aerogel in amounts sufficient to cause deposition of the decomposition products of the gas on the surfaces of the pores of the said aerogel. Also disclosed are the composites made by the process.

  16. Dry anaerobic digestion of food waste and cardboard at different substrate loads, solid contents and co-digestion proportions.

    PubMed

    Capson-Tojo, Gabriel; Trably, Eric; Rouez, Maxime; Crest, Marion; Steyer, Jean-Philippe; Delgenès, Jean-Philippe; Escudié, Renaud

    2017-06-01

    The increasing food waste production calls for developing efficient technologies for its treatment. Anaerobic processes provide an effective waste valorization. The influence of the initial substrate load on the performance of batch dry anaerobic co-digestion reactors treating food waste and cardboard was investigated. The load was varied by modifying the substrate to inoculum ratio (S/X), the total solids content and the co-digestion proportions. The results showed that the S/X was a crucial parameter. Within the tested values (0.25, 1 and 4gVS·gVS(-1)), only the reactors working at 0.25 produced methane. Methanosarcina was the main archaea, indicating its importance for efficient methanogenesis. Acidogenic fermentation was predominant at higher S/X, producing hydrogen and other metabolites. Higher substrate conversions (≤48%) and hydrogen yields (≤62mL·gVS(-1)) were achieved at low loads. This study suggests that different value-added compounds can be produced in dry conditions, with the initial substrate load as easy-to-control operational parameter.

  17. Simplified procedure for encapsulating cytochrome c in silica aerogel nanoarchitectures while retaining gas-phase bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Harper-Leatherman, Amanda S; Iftikhar, Mariam; Ndoi, Adela; Scappaticci, Steven J; Lisi, George P; Buzard, Kaitlyn L; Garvey, Elizabeth M

    2012-10-16

    Cytochrome c (cyt. c) has been encapsulated in silica sol-gels and processed to form bioaerogels with gas-phase activity for nitric oxide through a simplified synthetic procedure. Previous reports demonstrated a need to adsorb cyt. c to metal nanoparticles prior to silica sol-gel encapsulation and processing to form aerogels. We report that cyt. c can be encapsulated in aerogels without added nanoparticles and retain structural stability and gas-phase activity for nitric oxide. While the UV-visible Soret absorbance and nitric oxide response indicate that cyt. c encapsulated with nanoparticles in aerogels remains slightly more stable and functional than cyt. c encapsulated alone, these properties are not very different in the two types of aerogels. From UV-visible and Soret circular dichroism results, we infer that cyt. c encapsulated alone self-organizes to reduce contact with the silica gel in a way that may bear at least some resemblance to the way cyt. c self-organizes into superstructures of protein within aerogels when nanoparticles are present. Both the buffer concentration and the cyt. c concentration of solutions used to synthesize the bioaerogels affect the structural integrity of the protein encapsulated alone within the dried aerogels. Optimized bioaerogels are formed when cyt. c is encapsulated from 40 mM phosphate buffered solutions, and when the loaded cyt. c concentration in the aerogel is in the range of 5 to 15 μM. Increased viability of cyt. c in aerogels is also observed when supercritical fluid used to produce aerogels is vented over relatively long times.

  18. Characterisation of Aerogel Inner Structure with Superfluid Helium Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, S.; Vassilicos, J. C.

    2006-09-07

    We have developed a numerical technique that firstly obtains the shape of an adsorbed film on a fractal structure via minimisation of the grand potential functional of the system. This film shape is then used to define the geometry of a potential flow problem, which models the flow of the superfluid film due to an external pressure gradient, with the assumption that the flow velocities are so small so as not to alter the shape of the film. Using a microscopic definition of tortuosity, it is found that in 2D, tortuosity scales with the amount of fluid condensed on the substrate, with an exponent {epsilon} = -1.5. These results are in qualitative agreement with previous experimental results using aerogel as the substrate. Our results also show that {epsilon} is a function of the fractal dimension, Df, and the random walk dimension, Dw of the aerogel, in contrast with previous theories.

  19. Aerogel Derived Nanostructured Thermoelectric Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wendell E Rhine, PI; Dong, Wenting; Greg Caggiano, PM

    2010-10-08

    America’s dependence on foreign sources for fuel represents a economic and security threat for the country. These non renewable resources are depleting, and the effects of pollutants from fuels such as oil are reaching a problematic that affects the global community. Solar concentration power (SCP) production systems offer the opportunity to harness one of the United States’ most under utilized natural resources; sunlight. While commercialization of this technology is increasing, in order to become a significant source of electricity production in the United States the costs of deploying and operating SCP plants must be further reduced. Parabolic Trough SCP technologies are close to meeting energy production cost levels that would raise interest in the technology and help accelerate its adoption as a method to produce a significant portion of the Country’s electric power needs. During this program, Aspen Aerogels will develop a transparent aerogel insulation that can replace the costly vacuum insulation systems that are currently used in parabolic trough designs. During the Phase I program, Aspen Aerogels will optimize the optical and thermal properties of aerogel to meet the needs of this application. These properties will be tested, and the results will be used to model the performance of a parabolic trough HCE system which uses this novel material in place of vacuum. During the Phase II program, Aspen Aerogels will scale up this technology. Together with industry partners, Aspen Aerogels will build and test a prototype Heat Collection Element that is insulated with the novel transparent aerogel material. This new device will find use in parabolic trough SCP applications.

  20. Composite Aerogel Multifoil Protective Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    New technologies are needed to survive the temperatures, radiation, and hypervelocity particles that exploration spacecraft encounter. Multilayer insulations (MLIs) have been used on many spacecraft as thermal insulation. Other materials and composites have been used as micrometeorite shielding or radiation shielding. However, no material composite has been developed and employed as a combined thermal insulation, micrometeorite, and radiation shielding. By replacing the scrims that have been used to separate the foil layers in MLIs with various aerogels, and by using a variety of different metal foils, the overall protective performance of MLIs can be greatly expanded to act as thermal insulation, radiation shielding, and hypervelocity particle shielding. Aerogels are highly porous, low-density solids that are produced by the gelation of metal alkoxides and supercritical drying. Aerogels have been flown in NASA missions as a hypervelocity particle capture medium (Stardust) and as thermal insulation (2003 MER). Composite aerogel multifoil protective shielding would be used to provide thermal insulation, while also shielding spacecraft or components from radiation and hypervelocity particle impacts. Multiple layers of foil separated by aerogel would act as a thermal barrier by preventing the transport of heat energy through the composite. The silica aerogel would act as a convective and conductive thermal barrier, while the titania powder and metal foils would absorb and reflect the radiative heat. It would also capture small hypervelocity particles, such as micrometeorites, since it would be a stuffed, multi-shock Whipple shield. The metal foil layers would slow and break up the impacting particles, while the aerogel layers would convert the kinetic energy of the particles to thermal and mechanical energy and stop the particles.

  1. Polyurea-Based Aerogel Monoliths and Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Je Kyun

    2012-01-01

    aerogel insulation material was developed that will provide superior thermal insulation and inherent radiation protection for government and commercial applications. The rubbery polyureabased aerogel exhibits little dustiness, good flexibility and toughness, and durability typical of the parent polyurea polymer, yet with the low density and superior insulation properties associated with aerogels. The thermal conductivity values of polyurea-based aerogels at lower temperature under vacuum pressures are very low and better than that of silica aerogels. Flexible, rubbery polyurea-based aerogels are able to overcome the weak and brittle nature of conventional inorganic and organic aerogels, including polyisocyanurate aerogels, which are generally prepared with the one similar component to polyurethane rubber aerogels. Additionally, with higher content of hydrogen in their structures, the polyurea rubber-based aerogels will also provide inherently better radiation protection than those of inorganic and carbon aerogels. The aerogel materials also demonstrate good hydrophobicity due to their hydrocarbon molecular structure. There are several strategies to overcoming the drawbacks associated with the weakness and brittleness of silica aerogels. Development of the flexible fiber-reinforced silica aerogel composite blanket has proven to be one promising approach, providing a conveniently fielded form factor that is relatively robust in industrial environments compared to silica aerogel monoliths. However, the flexible, silica aerogel composites still have a brittle, dusty character that may be undesirable, or even intolerable, in certain application environments. Although the cross - linked organic aerogels, such as resorcinol- formaldehyde (RF), polyisocyanurate, and cellulose aerogels, show very high impact strength, they are also very brittle with little elongation (i.e., less rubbery). Also, silica and carbon aerogels are less efficient radiation shielding materials due

  2. Ultrafast Sol-Gel Synthesis of Graphene Aerogel Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Mathew; Hu, Matthew; Manandhar, Sandeep; Sakshaug, Avery; Strong, Adam; Riley, Leah; Pauzauskie, Peter J.

    2015-12-01

    Graphene aerogels derived from graphene-oxide (GO) starting materials recently have been shown to exhibit a combination of high electrical conductivity, chemical stability, and low cost that has enabled a range of electrochemical applications. Standard synthesis protocols for manufacturing graphene aerogels require the use of sol-gel chemical reactions that are maintained at high temperatures for long periods of time ranging from 12 hours to several days. Here we report an ultrafast, acid-catalyzed sol-gel formation process in acetonitrile in which wet GO-loaded gels are realized within 2 hours at temperatures below 45°C. Spectroscopic and electrochemical analysis following supercritical drying and pyrolysis confirms the reduction of the GO in the aerogels to sp2 carbon crystallites with no residual carbon–nitrogen bonds from the acetonitrile or its derivatives. This rapid synthesis enhances the prospects for large-scale manufacturing of graphene aerogels for use in numerous applications including sorbents for environmental toxins, support materials for electrocatalysis, and high-performance electrodes for electrochemical capacitors and solar cells.

  3. Graphene oxide-silver nanocomposite as SERS substrate for dye detection: Effects of silver loading amount and composite dosage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Guihong; Xie, Shi; Liu, Ying; Wang, Li; Xu, Fugang

    2015-08-01

    Hybrid of graphene or graphene oxide (GO) with gold or silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) as substrate for SERS detection often brings large background and low signal to noise ratio, which leads to poor sensitivity. In this study, it is proposed that the silver loading amount on GO and dosage of GO-Ag composite have significant influence on its SERS activity (SERS signal intensity and signal to noise ratio). The adsorption ability and SERS activity of GO-Ag composite for several dye molecules were investigated in detail. It was found increasing the dosage of GO-Ag or AgNPs loading on GO always enhances its absorption to dye molecules, while in both cases the SERS signal first increase and then decrease. The reason for this fluctuation of SERS signal was investigated and discussed, which indicate high silver loading amount leads to enhanced background response, while high composite dosage could decrease the signal of target molecule. Finally, an optimized GO-Ag substrate providing strong SERS signal and high signal to noise ratio was used for the detection of several dye molecules by SERS with the lowest detectable concentration down to 1 μM. Our results indicated that great caution should be paid on the silver loading amount and dosage of GO-Au/Ag when using GO-Au/Ag as SERS substrate for molecule sensing or comparing different results reported in reference.

  4. Modified ADM1 for modelling an UASB reactor laboratory plant treating starch wastewater and synthetic substrate load tests.

    PubMed

    Hinken, L; Huber, M; Weichgrebe, D; Rosenwinkel, K-H

    2014-11-01

    A laboratory plant consisting of two UASB reactors was used for the treatment of industrial wastewater from the wheat starch industry. Several load tests were carried out with starch wastewater and the synthetic substrates glucose, acetate, cellulose, butyrate and propionate to observe the impact of changing loads on gas yield and effluent quality. The measurement data sets were used for calibration and validation of the Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1). For a precise simulation of the detected glucose degradation during load tests with starch wastewater and glucose, it was necessary to incorporate the complete lactic acid fermentation into the ADM1, which contains the formation and degradation of lactate and a non-competitive inhibition function. The modelling results of both reactors based on the modified ADM1 confirm an accurate calculation of the produced gas and the effluent concentrations. Especially, the modelled lactate effluent concentrations for the load cases are similar to the measurements and justified by literature.

  5. Effect of substrate load and nutrients concentration on the polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) production using mixed consortia through wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Venkateswar Reddy, M; Venkata Mohan, S

    2012-06-01

    Production of biodegradable plastics in the form of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) especially from renewable substrates is gaining interest. The present work mainly aims to investigate the influence of substrate load and nutrient concentration (nitrogen and phosphorous) on PHA production using wastewater as substrate and mixed culture as biocatalyst. PHA accumulation was high at higher substrate load [OLR3, 40.3% of dry cell weight (DCW)], low nitrogen (N(1), 45.1% DCW) and low phosphorous (P(1), 54.2% DCW) conditions. With optimized nutrient conditions production efficiency increased by 14%. Fractional composition of PHA showed co-polymer [poly(β-OH) butyrate-co-poly(β-OH) valerate, P3(HB-co-HV)] contains PHB (88%) in more concentration compared to PHV (8%). Dehydrogenase and phosphatase enzymatic activities were monitored during process operation. Good substrate degradation (as COD) of 75% was registered during PHA production. The phylogenetic profile of 16S rRNA sequencing showed the dominance of Firmicutes (71.4%) and Proteobacteria (28.6%), which are known to involve in PHA accumulation and waste treatment.

  6. Polyimide Cellulose Nanocrystal Composite Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Baochau N.; Meador, Mary Ann; Rowan, Stuart; Cudjoe, Elvis; Sandberg, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Polyimide (PI) aerogels are highly porous solids having low density, high porosity and low thermal conductivity with good mechanical properties. They are ideal for various applications including use in antenna and insulation such as inflatable decelerators used in entry, decent and landing operations. Recently, attention has been focused on stimuli responsive materials such as cellulose nano crystals (CNCs). CNCs are environmentally friendly, bio-renewable, commonly found in plants and the dermis of sea tunicates, and potentially low cost. This study is to examine the effects of CNC on the polyimide aerogels. The CNC used in this project are extracted from mantle of a sea creature called tunicates. A series of polyimide cellulose nanocrystal composite aerogels has been fabricated having 0-13 wt of CNC. Results will be discussed.

  7. Mesochanneled hierarchically porous aluminosiloxane aerogel microspheres as a stable support for pH-responsive controlled drug release.

    PubMed

    Vazhayal, Linsha; Talasila, Sindhoor; Abdul Azeez, Peer Mohamed; Solaiappan, Ananthakumar

    2014-09-10

    The molecular-scale self-assembly of a 3D aluminosiloxane (Al-O-Si) hybrid gel network was successfully performed via the cocondensation of hydrolyzed alumina (AlOOH) and (3-aminopropyl)trimethoxysilane (APS). It was transformed into a microspherical aerogel framework of Al-O-Si containing mesochannels with tunable hierarchically bimodal meso/macroporosities by a subcritical drying technique. Good homogeneity of AlOOH and APS brought during the synthesis guaranteed a uniform distribution of two metal oxides in a single body. A systematic characterization of the aerogel support was carried out using FTIR, SEM, TEM, nitrogen adsorption/desorption analysis, WAXS, SAXS, and ξ-potential measurement in order to explore the material for drug uptake and release. The drug loading and release capacity and chemical stability of an aluminosiloxane aerogel were studied using two nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, ibuprofen and aspirin. A comprehensive evaluation of the aluminosiloxane aerogel with ordered mesoporous MCM-41 was also performed. Aerogel supports showed a high drug loading capacity and a pH-responsive controlled-release property compared to MCM-41. Meanwhile, kinetic modeling studies indicate that the drug releases with a zero-order profile following the Korsmeyer-Peppas model. The biocompatibility of aluminosiloxane aerogels was established via ex vivo and in vivo studies. We also outline the use of aluminosiloxane aerogel as a support for a possible 3D matrix for an osteoconductive structure for bone tissue engineering.

  8. Loading Rates and Impacts of Substrate Delivery for Enhanced Anaerobic Bioremediation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    substrate is dispersed over a large volume of the aquifer. In the case of emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) products , the retention of the oil droplets is a... substrates , and further research and product development will be beneficial for sites with low buffering capacity. In practice, the amount of site...typically rely on calculated substrate requirements because the product is usually applied in a single event (e.g., see Appendix G of AFCEE, 2007). More

  9. High surface area silicon carbide-coated carbon aerogel

    DOEpatents

    Worsley, Marcus A; Kuntz, Joshua D; Baumann, Theodore F; Satcher, Jr, Joe H

    2014-01-14

    A metal oxide-carbon composite includes a carbon aerogel with an oxide overcoat. The metal oxide-carbon composite is made by providing a carbon aerogel, immersing the carbon aerogel in a metal oxide sol under a vacuum, raising the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to atmospheric pressure, curing the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol at room temperature, and drying the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to produce the metal oxide-carbon composite. The step of providing a carbon aerogel can provide an activated carbon aerogel or provide a carbon aerogel with carbon nanotubes that make the carbon aerogel mechanically robust. Carbon aerogels can be coated with sol-gel silica and the silica can be converted to silicone carbide, improved the thermal stability of the carbon aerogel.

  10. Development of Improved Aerogels for Spacecraft Hypervelocity Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisse, C. M.; Cheng, A. F.; Chabot, N. L.; Dello Russo, N.; Satcher, J. H.; Zolensky, M. E.; Cintala, M. J.; Glavin, D. P.; Sandford, S. A.

    2008-03-01

    We report on progress to date of an aerogel technology development and test program, to develop improved aerogel capture media for spacecraft capture of dust particles, utilizing silica, tantala, and alumina based aerogels with lower densities and organic impurity levels.

  11. Room-temperature embedment of anatase titania nanoparticles into porous cellulose aerogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Yue; Wan, Caichao; Li, Jian

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, a facile easy method for room-temperature embedment of anatase titania (TiO2) nanoparticles into porous cellulose aerogels was reported. The obtained anatase TiO2/cellulose (ATC) aerogels were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption measurements, and thermogravimetric analysis. The results showed that high-purity anatase TiO2 nanoparticles with sizes of 3.69 ± 0.77 nm were evenly dispersed in the cellulose aerogels, which leaded to the significant improvement in specific surface area and pore volume of ATC aerogels. Meanwhile, the hybrid ATC aerogels also had a high loading content of TiO2 (ca. 17.7 %). Furthermore, through a simple photocatalytic degradation test of indigo carmine dye under UV light, ATC aerogels exhibited superior photocatalytic activity and shape stability, which might be useful in some fields like governance of water pollution, and chemical leaks.

  12. Biodegradable Pectin/clay Aerogels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodegradable, foamlike materials based on renewable pectin and sodium montmorillonite clay were fabricated through a simple, environmentally friendly freeze-drying process. Addition of multivalent cations (Ca2+ and Al3+) resulted in apparent crosslinking of the polymer, and enhancement of aerogel p...

  13. Desalination with carbon aerogel electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.C.; Richardson, J.H.; Fix, D.V.

    1996-10-21

    An electrically regenerated electrosorption process known as carbon aerogel CDI was developed for continuously removing ionic impurities from aqueous streams. A salt solution flows in a channel formed by pairs of parallel carbon aerogel electrodes. Each electrode has a very high BET surface area and very low resistivity. After polarization, anions and cations are removed from electrolyte by the electric field and electrosorbed onto the carbon aerogel. The solution is thus separated into two streams, brine and water. Based on this, carbon aerogel CDI appears to be an energy-efficient alternative to evaporation, electrodialysis, and reverse osmosis. The energy required by this process is about QV/2, plus losses. Estimated energy requirement for sea water desalination is 18-27 Wh gal{sup -1}, depending on cell voltage and flow rate. The requirement for brackish water desalination is less, 1.2-2.5 Wh gal{sup -1} at 1600 ppM. This is assuming that stored electrical energy is reclaimed during regeneration.

  14. Organically modified silicate aerogels, ``Aeromosils``

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S.J.; Mackenzie, J.D.; Rubio-Alonso, F.

    1996-12-31

    Aerogels derived from sol-gel oxides such as silica have become quite scientifically popular because of their extremely low densities, high surface areas, and their interesting optical, dielectric, thermal and acoustic properties. However, their commercial applicability has thus far been rather limited, due in great part to their brittleness and hydrophilicity. In prior work by the research group, modifying silicate gel structures with flexible, organic containing polymers such as polydimethylsiloxane imparted significant compliance (even rubbery behavior) and hydrophobicity. These materials have been referred to as Ormosils. This study expounds on the current effort to extend these desirable properties to aerogels, and in-so-doing, creating novel ``Aeromosils``. Reactive incorporation of hydroxy-terminal polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) into silica sol-gels was made using both acid and two-step acid/base catalyzed processes. Aerogels were derived by employing the supercritical CO{sub 2} technique. Analyses of microstructure were made using nitrogen adsorption (BET surface area and pore size distribution), and some mechanical strengths were derived from tensile strength testing. Interesting Aeromosil properties obtained include optical transparency, surface areas of up to 1,200 m{sup 2}/g, rubberiness, and better strength than corresponding silica aerogels with elongations at break exceeding 5% in some cases.

  15. Method for producing metal oxide aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Tillotson, Thomas M.; Poco, John F.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.; Thomas, Ian M.

    1995-01-01

    A two-step hydrolysis-condensation method was developed to form metal oxide aerogels of any density, including densities of less than 0.003g/cm.sup.3 and greater than 0.27g/cm.sup.3. High purity metal alkoxide is reacted with water, alcohol solvent, and an additive to form a partially condensed metal intermediate. All solvent and reaction-generated alcohol is removed, and the intermediate is diluted with a nonalcoholic solvent. The intermediate can be stored for future use to make aerogels of any density. The aerogels are formed by reacting the intermediate with water, nonalcoholic solvent, and a catalyst, and extracting the nonalcoholic solvent directly. The resulting monolithic aerogels are hydrophobic and stable under atmospheric conditions, and exhibit good optical transparency, high clarity, and homogeneity. The aerogels have high thermal insulation capacity, high porosity, mechanical strength and stability, and require shorter gelation times than aerogels formed by conventional methods.

  16. Method for producing metal oxide aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Tillotson, T.M.; Poco, J.F.; Hrubesh, L.W.; Thomas, I.M.

    1995-04-25

    A two-step hydrolysis-condensation method was developed to form metal oxide aerogels of any density, including densities of less than 0.003g/cm{sup 3} and greater than 0.27g/cm{sup 3}. High purity metal alkoxide is reacted with water, alcohol solvent, and an additive to form a partially condensed metal intermediate. All solvent and reaction-generated alcohol is removed, and the intermediate is diluted with a nonalcoholic solvent. The intermediate can be stored for future use to make aerogels of any density. The aerogels are formed by reacting the intermediate with water, nonalcoholic solvent, and a catalyst, and extracting the nonalcoholic solvent directly. The resulting monolithic aerogels are hydrophobic and stable under atmospheric conditions, and exhibit good optical transparency, high clarity, and homogeneity. The aerogels have high thermal insulation capacity, high porosity, mechanical strength and stability, and require shorter gelation times than aerogels formed by conventional methods. 8 figs.

  17. Broad Substrate Specificity of the Loading Didomain of the Lipomycin Polyketide Synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Yuzawa, S; Eng, CH; Katz, L; Keasling, JD

    2013-06-04

    LipPks1, a polyketide synthase subunit of the lipomycin synthase, is believed to catalyze the polyketide chain initiation reaction using isobutyryl-CoA as a substrate, followed by an elongation reaction with methylmalonyl-CoA to start the biosynthesis of antibiotic alpha-lipomycin in Streptomyces aureofaciens Tu117. Recombinant LipPks1, containing the thioesterase domain from the 6-deoxyerythronolide B synthase, was produced in Escherichia coli, and its substrate specificity was investigated in vitro. Surprisingly, several different acyl-CoAs, including isobutyryl-CoA, were accepted as the starter substrates, while no product was observed with acetyl-CoA. These results demonstrate the broad substrate specificity of LipPks1 and may be applied to producing new antibiotics.

  18. Substrate specificity and copper loading of the manganese-oxidizing multicopper oxidase Mnx from Bacillus sp. PL-12.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Cristina N; Tebo, Bradley M

    2017-02-22

    Manganese(ii) oxidation in the environment is thought to be driven by bacteria because enzymatic catalysis is many orders of magnitude faster than the abiotic processes. The heterologously purified Mn oxidase (Mnx) from marine Bacillus sp. PL-12 is made up of the multicopper oxidase (MCO) MnxG and two small Cu and heme-binding proteins of unknown function, MnxE and MnxF. Mnx binds Cu and oxidizes both Mn(ii) and Mn(iii), generating Mn(iv) oxide minerals that resemble those found on the Bacillus spore surface. Spectroscopic techniques have illuminated details about the metallo-cofactors of Mnx, but very little is known about their requirement for catalytic activity, and even less is known about the substrate specificity of Mnx. Here we quantify the canonical MCO Cu and persistent peripheral Cu bound to Mnx, and test Mnx oxidizing ability toward different substrates at varying pH. Mn(ii) appears to be the best substrate in terms of kcat, but its oxidation does not follow Michaelis-Menten kinetics, instead showing a sigmoidal cooperative behavior. Mnx also oxidizes Fe(ii) substrate, but in a Michaelis-Menten manner and with a decreased activity, as well as organic substrates. The reduced metals are more rapidly consumed than the larger organic substrates, suggesting the hypothesis that the Mnx substrate site is small and tuned for metal oxidation. Of biological relevance is the result that Mnx has the highest catalytic efficiency for Mn(ii) at the pH of sea water, especially when the protein is loaded with greater than the requisite four MCO copper atoms, suggesting that the protein has evolved specifically for Mn oxidation.

  19. Sorption Properties of Aerogel in Liquid Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wesley L.

    2006-01-01

    Aerogel products are now available as insulation materials of the future. The Cryogenics Test Laboratory at the NASA Kennedy Space Center is developing aerogel-based thermal insulation systems for space launch applications. Aerogel beads (Cabot Nanogel ) and aerogel blankets (Aspen Aerogels Spaceloft ) have outstanding ambient pressure thermal performance that makes them useful for applications where sealing is not possible. Aerogel beads are open-celled silicone dioxide and have tiny pores that run throughout the body of the bead. It has also recently been discovered that aerogel beads can be used as a filtering device for aqueous compounds at room temperature. With their hydrophobic covering, the beads absorb any non-polar substance and they can be chemically altered to absorb hot gases. The combination of the absorption and cryogenic insulating properties of aerogel beads have never been studied together. For future cryogenic insulation applications, it is crucial to know how the beads react while immersed in cryogenic liquids, most notably liquid nitrogen. Aerogel beads in loose-fill situation and aerogel blankets with composite fiber structure have been tested for absorption properties. Depending on the type of aerogel used and the preparation, preliminary results show the material can absorb up to seven times its own weight of liquid nitrogen, corresponding to a volumetric ratio of 0.70 (unit volume nitrogen per unit volume aerogel). These tests allow for an estimate on how much insulation is needed in certain situations. The theory behind the different processes of sorption is necessary for a better understanding of the preparation of the beads before they are used in an insulation system.

  20. 3D Printing of Graphene Aerogels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Feng; Medarametla, Sai Pradeep; Li, Hui; Zhou, Chi; Lin, Dong

    2016-04-06

    3D printing of a graphene aerogel with true 3D overhang structures is highlighted. The aerogel is fabricated by combining drop-on-demand 3D printing and freeze casting. The water-based GO ink is ejected and freeze-cast into designed 3D structures. The lightweight (<10 mg cm(-3) ) 3D printed graphene aerogel presents superelastic and high electrical conduction.

  1. Processing and Mechanical Characterization of Polyurea Aerogels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    PROCESSING AND MECHANICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF POLYUREA AEROGELS by JARED MICHAEL LOEBS A THESIS Presented to the Faculty of the Graduate School of...SUBTITLE Processing and Mechanical Characterization of Polyurea Aerogels 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The use of aerogels historically has been limited to extreme cases largely in part to the nature

  2. Aerogels Insulate Missions and Consumer Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Aspen Aerogels, of Northborough, Massachusetts, worked with NASA through an SBIR contract with Kennedy Space Center to develop a robust, flexible form of aerogel for cryogenic insulation for space shuttle launch applications. The company has since used the same manufacturing process developed under the SBIR award to expand its product offerings into the more commercial realms, making the naturally fragile aerogel available for the first time as a standard insulation that can be handled and installed just like standard insulation.

  3. Aerogel commercialization pilot project. Final program report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-13

    Aerogels are extremely light weight, high surface area, very insulative materials that offer many potential improvements to commercial products. Aerogels have been the subject of extensive research at Department of Energy Laboratories and have been considered one of the technology most ready for commercialization. However, commercialization of the technology had been difficult for the National Laboratories since end users were not interested in the high temperature and high pressure chemical processes involved in manufacturing the raw material. Whereas, Aerojet as a supplier of rocket fuels, specialty chemicals and materials had the manufacturing facilities and experience to commercially produce aerogel-type products. Hence the TRP provided a link between the technology source (National Laboratories), the manufacturing (Aerojet) and the potential end users (other TRP partners). The program successfully produced approximately 500 ft{sup 2} of organic aerogel but failed to make significant quantities of silica aerogel. It is significant that this production represents both the largest volume and biggest pieces of organic aerogel ever produced. Aerogels, available from this program, when tested in several prototype commercial products were expected to improve the products performance, but higher than expected projected production costs for large scale manufacture of aerogels has limited continued commercial interest from these partners. Aerogels do, however, offer potential as a specialty material for some high value technology and defense products.

  4. How We 3D-Print Aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    2015-04-23

    A new type of graphene aerogel will make for better energy storage, sensors, nanoelectronics, catalysis and separations. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers have made graphene aerogel microlattices with an engineered architecture via a 3D printing technique known as direct ink writing. The research appears in the April 22 edition of the journal, Nature Communications. The 3D printed graphene aerogels have high surface area, excellent electrical conductivity, are lightweight, have mechanical stiffness and exhibit supercompressibility (up to 90 percent compressive strain). In addition, the 3D printed graphene aerogel microlattices show an order of magnitude improvement over bulk graphene materials and much better mass transport.

  5. Basic science of new aerogels. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    Feasibility of making monolithic composite aerogels containing silica and natural clay minerals, synthetic clay minerals or zeolites has been demonstrated, using two different processes; up to 30 wt% of the mineral phase has been successfully added. Addition of natural and synthetic clay minerals or zeolites to silica aerosols was shown to retard densification. Composite silica aerogels showed significant surface area still present after sintering at 800 or 1000 C. For most samples, 1 wt% of the second phase is equally effective in retarding densification as 10 wt%. Composite aerogels, in general, had lower hardness values than pure silica. Hardness values were inversely proportional to aerogel pore radius.

  6. Synthesis and properties of vanadium oxide aerogel films. Technical report, 1 June 1995-31 May 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, H.P.; Dunn, B.; Salloux, K.; Chaput, F.; Breiter, M.W.

    1996-06-18

    The fine colloid size, high surface area and controllable density of vanadium oxide aerogels make these materials interesting candidates for lithium insertion electrodes. Thin films of vanadium oxide aerogels were prepared using an alkoxide precursor sol and supercritical drying with CO2. Film preparation methods included spin coating of fine aerogel particles suspended in a solvent and dip coating of the precursor sol onto carbon paper substrates. The room temperature electrical conductivity of partially dehydrated materials (V2O5 0.5 H2O) varies from 10(exp {minus}5) S/cm to 10(exp {minus}4) S/cm depending upon the density of the final aerogel. Potential sweep measurements indicate that the films possess good insertion capacity (approx. 2 Li a per V2O5) and can be cycled reversibly.

  7. Histological Evaluation of the Biocompatibility of Polyurea Crosslinked Silica Aerogel Implants in a Rat Model: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Sabri, Firouzeh; Boughter Jr, John D.; Gerth, David; Skalli, Omar; Phung, Thien-Chuong N.; Tamula, George-Rudolph M.; Leventis, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Background Aerogels are a versatile group of nanostructured/nanoporous materials with physical and chemical properties that can be adjusted to suit the application of interest. In terms of biomedical applications, aerogels are particularly suitable for implants such as membranes, tissue growth scaffolds, and nerve regeneration and guidance inserts. The mesoporous nature of aerogels can also be used for diffusion based release of drugs that are loaded during the drying stage of the material. From the variety of aerogels polyurea crosslinked silica aerogels have the most potential for future biomedical applications and are explored here. Methodology This study assessed the short and long term biocompatibility of polyurea crosslinked silica aerogel implants in a Sprague-Dawley rat model. Implants were inserted at two different locations a) subcutaneously (SC), at the dorsum and b) intramuscularly (IM), between the gluteus maximus and biceps femoris of the left hind extremity. Nearby muscle and other internal organs were evaluated histologically for inflammation, tissue damage, fibrosis and movement (travel) of implant. Conclusion/Significance In general polyurea crosslinked silica aerogel (PCSA) was well tolerated as a subcutaneous and an intramuscular implant in the Sprague-Dawley rat with a maximum incubation time of twenty months. In some cases a thin fibrous capsule surrounded the aerogel implant and was interpreted as a normal response to foreign material. No noticeable toxicity was found in the tissues surrounding the implants nor in distant organs. Comparison was made with control rats without any implants inserted, and animals with suture material present. No obvious or noticeable changes were sustained by the implants at either location. Careful necropsy and tissue histology showed age-related changes only. An effective sterilization technique for PCSA implants as well as staining and sectioning protocol has been established. These studies further support the

  8. Cocoon-in-web-like superhydrophobic aerogels from hydrophilic polyurea and use in environmental remediation.

    PubMed

    Leventis, Nicholas; Chidambareswarapattar, Chakkaravarthy; Bang, Abhishek; Sotiriou-Leventis, Chariklia

    2014-05-14

    Polyurea (PUA) develops H-bonding with water and is inherently hydrophilic. The water contact angle on smooth dense PUA derived from an aliphatic triisocyanate and water was measured at θ=69.1±0.2°. Nevertheless, texture-related superhydrophobic PUA aerogels (θ'=150.2°) were prepared from the same monomer in one step with no additives, templates, or surfactants via sol-gel polymerization carried out in polar, weakly H-bonding acetonitrile. Those materials display a unique nanostructure consisting of micrometer-size spheres distributed randomly and trapped in a nanofiber web of the same polymer. Morphostructurally, as well as in terms of their hydrophobic properties, those PUA aerogels are analogous to well-studied electrospun fiber mats incorporating particle-like defects. PUA aerogels have the advantage of easily scalable synthesis and low cost of the raw materials. Despite large contact angles and small contact areas, water droplets (5 μL) stick to the aerogels surface when the substrate is turned upside-down. That so-called Petal effect is traced to H-bonding at the points of contact between the water droplet and the apexes of the roughness of the aerogel surface. Monoliths are flexible and display oleophilicity in inverse order to their hydrophobicity; oil fills all the available open porosity (94% v/v) of cocoon-in-web like aerogels with bulk density ρb=0.073 g cm(-3); that capacity for oil absorption is >10:1 w/w and translates into ∼6:1 w/v relative to state-of-the-art materials (e.g., graphene-derived aerogels). Oil soaked monoliths float on water and can be harvested off.

  9. Thermal properties of organic and modified inorganic aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Pekala, R.W.; Hrubesh, L.W.

    1992-08-01

    Aerogels are open-cell foams that have already been shown to be among the best thermal insulating solid materials known. Improvements in the thermal insulating properties of aerogels are possible by synthesizing new organic varieties, by using additives within existing aerogel matrix, and by optimizing their nanostructures. We discuss these approaches and give some examples of aerogels which demonstrate the improvements.

  10. Chemical Analyses of Silicon Aerogel Samples

    SciTech Connect

    van der Werf, I.; Palmisano, F.; De Leo, Raffaele; Marrone, Stefano

    2008-04-01

    After five years of operating, two Aerogel counters: A1 and A2, taking data in Hall A at Jefferson Lab, suffered a loss of performance. In this note possible causes of degradation have been studied. In particular, various chemical and physical analyses have been carried out on several Aerogel tiles and on adhesive tape in order to reveal the presence of contaminants.

  11. Preparation of Biopolymer Aerogels Using Green Solvents

    PubMed Central

    Subrahmanyam, Raman; Gurikov, Pavel; Meissner, Imke; Smirnova, Irina

    2016-01-01

    Although the first reports on aerogels made by Kistler1 in the 1930s dealt with aerogels from both inorganic oxides (silica and others) and biopolymers (gelatin, agar, cellulose), only recently have biomasses been recognized as an abundant source of chemically diverse macromolecules for functional aerogel materials. Biopolymer aerogels (pectin, alginate, chitosan, cellulose, etc.) exhibit both specific inheritable functions of starting biopolymers and distinctive features of aerogels (80-99% porosity and specific surface up to 800 m2/g). This synergy of properties makes biopolymer aerogels promising candidates for a wide gamut of applications such as thermal insulation, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, drug delivery systems, functional foods, catalysts, adsorbents and sensors. This work demonstrates the use of pressurized carbon dioxide (5 MPa) for the ionic cross linking of amidated pectin into hydrogels. Initially a biopolymer/salt dispersion is prepared in water. Under pressurized CO2 conditions, the pH of the biopolymer solution is lowered to 3 which releases the crosslinking cations from the salt to bind with the biopolymer yielding hydrogels. Solvent exchange to ethanol and further supercritical CO2 drying (10 - 12 MPa) yield aerogels. Obtained aerogels are ultra-porous with low density (as low as 0.02 g/cm3), high specific surface area (350 - 500 m2/g) and pore volume (3 - 7 cm3/g for pore sizes less than 150 nm). PMID:27403649

  12. Nonflammable, Hydrophobic Aerogel Composites for Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redouane, Begag

    2005-01-01

    Aerogel composites that are both nonflammable and hydrophobic have been developed for use as lightweight thermal- insulation materials for cryogenic systems. Aerogels are well known in the industry for their effectiveness as thermal insulators under cryogenic conditions, but the treatments used heretofore to render them hydrophobic also make them flammable. Nonflammability would make it safer to use aerogel insulation, especially in oxygen-rich environments and on cryogenic systems that contain liquid oxygen. A composite of this type is a silica aerogel reinforced with fibers. In comparison with unreinforced aerogels, the aerogel composite is about ten times as stiff and strong, better able to withstand handling, and more amenable to machining to required shapes. The composite can be made hydrophobic and nonflammable by appropriate design of a sol-gel process used to synthesize the aerogel component. In addition to very low thermal conductivity needed for insulation, aerogel composites of this type have been found to exhibit high resistance to moisture and nonflammability in oxygen-rich atmospheres: Samples floating on water for months gained no weight and showed no signs of deterioration. Samples were found to be nonflammable, even in pure oxygen at atmospheric pressure [14.7 psia (0.10 MPa)

  13. High specific surface area aerogel cryoadsorber for vacuum pumping applications

    DOEpatents

    Hill, Randal M.; Fought, Eric R.; Biltoft, Peter J.

    2000-01-01

    A cryogenic pumping system is provided, comprising a vacuum environment, an aerogel sorbent formed from a carbon aerogel disposed within the vacuum environment, and cooling means for cooling the aerogel sorbent sufficiently to adsorb molecules from the vacuum environment onto the aerogel sorbent. Embodiments of the invention include a liquid refrigerant cryosorption pump, a compressed helium cryogenic pump, a cryopanel and a Meissner coil, each of which uses carbon aerogel as a sorbent material.

  14. Preparation, Characterization and Activity of a Peptide-Cellulosic Aerogel Protease Sensor from Cotton

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, J. Vincent; Fontenot, Krystal R.; Prevost, Nicolette T.; Pircher, Nicole; Liebner, Falk; Condon, Brian D.

    2016-01-01

    Nanocellulosic aerogels (NA) provide a lightweight biocompatible material with structural properties, like interconnected high porosity and specific surface area, suitable for biosensor design. We report here the preparation, characterization and activity of peptide-nanocellulose aerogels (PepNA) made from unprocessed cotton and designed with protease detection activity. Low-density cellulosic aerogels were prepared from greige cotton by employing calcium thiocyanate octahydrate/lithium chloride as a direct cellulose dissolving medium. Subsequent casting, coagulation, solvent exchange and supercritical carbon dioxide drying afforded homogeneous cellulose II aerogels of fibrous morphology. The cotton-based aerogel had a porosity of 99% largely dominated by mesopores (2–50 nm) and an internal surface of 163 m2·g−1. A fluorescent tripeptide-substrate (succinyl-alanine-proline-alanine-4-amino-7-methyl-coumarin) was tethered to NA by (1) esterification of cellulose C6 surface hydroxyl groups with glycidyl-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl (FMOC), (2) deprotection and (3) coupling of the immobilized glycine with the tripeptide. Characterization of the NA and PepNA included techniques, such as elemental analysis, mass spectral analysis, attenuated total reflectance infrared imaging, nitrogen adsorption, scanning electron microscopy and bioactivity studies. The degree of substitution of the peptide analog attached to the anhydroglucose units of PepNA was 0.015. The findings from mass spectral analysis and attenuated total reflectance infrared imaging indicated that the peptide substrate was immobilized on to the surface of the NA. Nitrogen adsorption revealed a high specific surface area and a highly porous system, which supports the open porous structure observed from scanning electron microscopy images. Bioactivity studies of PepNA revealed a detection sensitivity of 0.13 units/milliliter for human neutrophil elastase, a diagnostic biomarker for inflammatory diseases. The

  15. Preparation, Characterization and Activity of a Peptide-Cellulosic Aerogel Protease Sensor from Cotton.

    PubMed

    Edwards, J Vincent; Fontenot, Krystal R; Prevost, Nicolette T; Pircher, Nicole; Liebner, Falk; Condon, Brian D

    2016-10-26

    Nanocellulosic aerogels (NA) provide a lightweight biocompatible material with structural properties, like interconnected high porosity and specific surface area, suitable for biosensor design. We report here the preparation, characterization and activity of peptide-nanocellulose aerogels (PepNA) made from unprocessed cotton and designed with protease detection activity. Low-density cellulosic aerogels were prepared from greige cotton by employing calcium thiocyanate octahydrate/lithium chloride as a direct cellulose dissolving medium. Subsequent casting, coagulation, solvent exchange and supercritical carbon dioxide drying afforded homogeneous cellulose II aerogels of fibrous morphology. The cotton-based aerogel had a porosity of 99% largely dominated by mesopores (2-50 nm) and an internal surface of 163 m²·g(-1). A fluorescent tripeptide-substrate (succinyl-alanine-proline-alanine-4-amino-7-methyl-coumarin) was tethered to NA by (1) esterification of cellulose C6 surface hydroxyl groups with glycidyl-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl (FMOC), (2) deprotection and (3) coupling of the immobilized glycine with the tripeptide. Characterization of the NA and PepNA included techniques, such as elemental analysis, mass spectral analysis, attenuated total reflectance infrared imaging, nitrogen adsorption, scanning electron microscopy and bioactivity studies. The degree of substitution of the peptide analog attached to the anhydroglucose units of PepNA was 0.015. The findings from mass spectral analysis and attenuated total reflectance infrared imaging indicated that the peptide substrate was immobilized on to the surface of the NA. Nitrogen adsorption revealed a high specific surface area and a highly porous system, which supports the open porous structure observed from scanning electron microscopy images. Bioactivity studies of PepNA revealed a detection sensitivity of 0.13 units/milliliter for human neutrophil elastase, a diagnostic biomarker for inflammatory diseases. The

  16. Cellulose aerogels prepared from an aqueous zinc chloride salt hydrate melt.

    PubMed

    Schestakow, Maria; Karadagli, Ilknur; Ratke, Lorenz

    2016-02-10

    Monolithic cellulose aerogels are prepared using a salt hydrate melt based on cheap zinc chloride tetrahydrate (ZnCl2·4H2O) that can be washed out of the wet gel-body by using common solvents such as water, ethanol, isopropanol or acetone. Cellulose aerogels with concentrations of 1-5 wt.% cellulose were produced. These aerogels are characterized with respect to shrinkage, density and surface area as well as mechanical properties and micro-structure via SEM. Cellulose aerogels regenerated in acetone show a specific surface area of around 340 m(2)g(-1) being 60% higher than those regenerated in water. The onset of irreversible plastic deformation under compressive load is around 0.8 MPa for acetone-regenerated aerogels and thus a factor of two larger compared to ethanol regenerated ones. The Young's modulus depends almost linearly on the cellulose concentration which is observed for all regenerative fluids with the exception of water. The results achieved are presented in light of the polarity and ability of solvation of ZnCl2·4H2O in the regenerative fluids used.

  17. Superfluid 3He in ``nematically ordered'' aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Vladimir

    2014-03-01

    Liquid 3He immersed in aerogel allows investigation of the influence of impurities on unconventional superfluidity. In most of such experiments silica aerogels are used. These aerogels consist of thin strands which form a ``wisp.'' Although it is established that superfluid phases of 3He in silica aerogels (A-like and B-like) have the same order parameters as A and B phases of bulk 3He, many new phenomena were observed. In particular, it was found that global anisotropy of aerogel (e.g. caused by squeezing or stretching) can orient the order parameter. Depending on prehistory and on the type of the anisotropy the A-like phase may be homogeneous or in a state with random orbital part of the order parameter. Theory predicts that a large stretching anisotropy may even influence the order parameter structure: polar phase (or A phase with polar distortion), which are not realized in bulk 3He, may become more favorable than pure A phase. Large stretching anisotropy is hardly achievable in silica aerogel. Therefore in experiments described in the talk we used a new type of aerogel, consisting of Al2O3 . H2O strands which are parallel to each other, i.e. this aerogel may be considered as infinitely stretched. We found that the superfluid phase diagram of 3He in such ``nematically ordered'' aerogel is different from the case of 3He in silica aerogel and that both observed A and B phases have large polar distortion. This distortion is larger at low pressures and grows on warming. There are indications that a pure polar phase appears near the superfluid transition temperature. Recent results will be also presented.

  18. Physics of Interplanetary Dust Collection with Aerogel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, William W.

    1998-01-01

    This report presents the results of research undertaken to study various problems associated with hypervelocity capture of dust particles in aerogel. The primary topics investigated were the properties of shocked aerogel and the requirements for reliable capture of particles on the STARDUST mission. In particular, the viscosity of shocked aerogel has been an open question. The results presented here suggest that the viscosity of aerogel at high impact velocities is negligible, although there remains some uncertainty about lower velocities. The model adopted for viscosity treats the mixture of polymeric silica and decomposition products and finds that, for particle velocities of 6-7 km/s, the viscosity is similar to that typical of light gasses at STP. Expressions for the Hugoniot of aerogel as a function of density were also obtained from the available data. All aerogels of interest for cosmic dust collectors have very similar shock velocity-particle velocity Hugoniot curves. The strength behavior of aerogel for low-speed penetration was measured, but further work is needed to study the proper way to apply this to the issue of terminal deceleration of a dust particle. Preliminary calculations designed to maximize the penetration depths were performed to determine the required density of aerogel to reliably stop a particle in a 3 cm thickness of aerogel (the path length expected for a normal impact into the STARDUST collector). In order to stop a particle of density rho(sub p) and diameter d(sub p), the mean density of the aerogel collector should be no less than that given by the expression bar rho(sub 0) = 1.085 X 10(exp -4 )rho(sub p)d(sub p), for densities measured in g/ cu cm and the particle diameter measured in micrometers.

  19. Cellulose nanofiber aerogel as a promising biomaterial for customized oral drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Jyoti; Mishra, Harshita; Mishra, Pawan Kumar; Wimmer, Rupert; Ahmad, Farhan J; Talegaonkar, Sushama

    2017-01-01

    Cellulose nanofiber (CNF) aerogels with favorable floatability and mucoadhesive properties prepared by the freeze-drying method have been introduced as new possible carriers for oral controlled drug delivery system. Bendamustine hydrochloride is considered as the model drug. Drug loading was carried out by the physical adsorption method, and optimization of drug-loaded formulation was done using central composite design. A very lightweight-aerogel-with-matrix system was produced with drug loading of 18.98%±1.57%. The produced aerogel was characterized for morphology, tensile strength, swelling tendency in media with different pH values, floating behavior, mucoadhesive detachment force and drug release profiles under different pH conditions. The results showed that the type of matrix was porous and woven with excellent mechanical properties. The drug release was assessed by dialysis, which was fitted with suitable mathematical models. Approximately 69.205%±2.5% of the drug was released in 24 hours in medium of pH 1.2, whereas ~78%±2.28% of drug was released in medium of pH 7.4, with floating behavior for ~7.5 hours. The results of in vivo study showed a 3.25-fold increase in bioavailability. Thus, we concluded that CNF aerogels offer a great possibility for a gastroretentive drug delivery system with improved bioavailability.

  20. Cellulose nanofiber aerogel as a promising biomaterial for customized oral drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Bhandari, Jyoti; Mishra, Harshita; Mishra, Pawan Kumar; Wimmer, Rupert; Ahmad, Farhan J; Talegaonkar, Sushama

    2017-01-01

    Cellulose nanofiber (CNF) aerogels with favorable floatability and mucoadhesive properties prepared by the freeze-drying method have been introduced as new possible carriers for oral controlled drug delivery system. Bendamustine hydrochloride is considered as the model drug. Drug loading was carried out by the physical adsorption method, and optimization of drug-loaded formulation was done using central composite design. A very lightweight-aerogel-with-matrix system was produced with drug loading of 18.98%±1.57%. The produced aerogel was characterized for morphology, tensile strength, swelling tendency in media with different pH values, floating behavior, mucoadhesive detachment force and drug release profiles under different pH conditions. The results showed that the type of matrix was porous and woven with excellent mechanical properties. The drug release was assessed by dialysis, which was fitted with suitable mathematical models. Approximately 69.205%±2.5% of the drug was released in 24 hours in medium of pH 1.2, whereas ~78%±2.28% of drug was released in medium of pH 7.4, with floating behavior for ~7.5 hours. The results of in vivo study showed a 3.25-fold increase in bioavailability. Thus, we concluded that CNF aerogels offer a great possibility for a gastroretentive drug delivery system with improved bioavailability. PMID:28352172

  1. Chemistry in an inorganic-organic hybrid aerogel: Chitosan-silica aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xipeng

    2005-11-01

    In this thesis, chemistry in a nanoporous inorganic-organic hybrid aerogel (X-silica aerogel) has been explored. The aerogel typically consisted of 10%w/w bioderived polymer (chitosan), and 90%w/w inorganic silica, which interact at the molecule level. The aerogel has a low density in the range of 0.2--0.3 g/cm3, high surface area in the range of 500--950m 2/g, and large pore volume about 90%. The pores are about 3--5 nm in diameter and the size of the primary particles comprising the aerogel network is about 1.5nm. Chemical studies of X-silica aerogels were carried out in the first instance with organic molecules, including dansyl chloride (DC), succinic anhydride (SA), bis(4-isocynatocyclohexyl) methane (HMDI), and isocyanatoethyl methacrylate (IEMA). These reactions lead to modified X-silica aerogel products imparted with valuable functionalities, including fluorescence, carboxylic acid groups, and pendant isocyanate and methacrylate groups. The functionalized aerogels then were utilized to form novel composites. The isocyanate functionalized aerogels were combined with amine-containing silicone polymers to produce aerogel-silicone polymer composites, and methacrylate functionalized aerogels were reacted with hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA) monomer to produce aerogel-polyHEMA composites. The chemical studies were extended to gold-ion Au(III)-X-silica aerogels. Photoreduction of the Au(IIl)-X-silica aerogels by UV irradiation at 254nm reduced the Au(III) ions into Au(0) nanoparticles (AuNPs) while oxidizing the chitosan. Various sizes of AuNPs, with mean diameters from 8--87nm were obtained by varying the Au(III) ions concentration in aerogels from Au(III)/-NH 2 (-NH2 amine groups on chitosan) ratio 1:120 to 1:5. The intensity and time of exposure to the UV light were varied to explore their effect. Two dimensional patterns of Au(0)-X-silica aerogels were achieved by UV irradiation through a mask. Photo-reduction of Au(III)-X-silica aerogels in the presence of

  2. Aerogel Projects Ongoing in MSFC's Engineering Directorate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shular, David A.; Smithers, Gweneth A.; Plawsky, Joel L.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    When we speak of an aerogel material, we are referring more to process and structure am to a specific substance. Aerogel, considered the lightest solid material, has been made from silica for seventy years. Resorcinol-formaldehyde, organic aerogels have been developed more recently. However, aerogel can be made from almost any type of substance, even lead. Because an aerogel is mostly air (about 99 %), the solid substance used will affect the weight very little. The term "aerogel" connotes the sol-gel process used to manufacture the material. The aerogel begins as a liquid "sol," becomes a solid "alcogel," and is then dried to become an "aerogel." The final product has a unique structure, useful for exploitation. It is an "open pore" system with nano-sized particles and pores, has very high surface area, and is highly interconnected. Besides low weight, aerogels have ultimate (lowest) values in other properties: thermal conductivity, refractive index, sound speed, and dielectric constant. Aerogels were first prepared in 1931 by Steven Kistler, who used a supercritical drying step to replace the liquid in a gel with air, preserving the structure (1). Kistler's procedure involved a water-to-alcohol exchange step; in the 1970's, this step was eliminated when a French investigator introduced the use of tetramethylorthosilicate. Still, alcohol drying involved dangerously high temperatures and pressures. In the 1980's, the Microstructured Materials Group at Berkeley Laboratory found that the alcohol in the gel could be replaced with liquid carbon dioxide before supercritical drying, which greatly improved safety (2). 'Me most recent major contribution has been that of Deshpande, Smith and Brinker in New Mexico, who are working to eliminate the supercritical drying step (3). When aerogels were first being developed, they were evaporatively dried. However, the wet gel, when dried, underwent severe shrinkage and cracking; this product was termed "xerogel." When the

  3. Versatile fabrication of a superhydrophobic and ultralight cellulose-based aerogel for oil spillage clean-up.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Li, Yuqi; Xu, Yaoguang; Lu, Zexiang; Chen, Lihui; Huang, Liulian; Fan, Mizi

    2016-10-12

    To deal with marine oil spillage and chemical leakage issues, a highly efficient absorbent (cellulose based aerogel) with a low density (ρ < 0.034 g cm(-3), φ > 98.5%) and high mechanical strength was fabricated via a novel physical-chemical foaming method, plasma treatment and subsequent silane modification process. This aerogel has a perfect 3D skeleton and interconnected pores similar to honeycomb, which are favorable to oil adsorption and storage. More importantly, without introducing additional micro/nanoparticles, the rough micro/nano structure of the surface was directly constructed using plasma irradiation in this study. The low surface energy substrate was further introduced using a simple physical-soaking method and the resulting aerogel exhibited excellent superhydrophobicity (WCA > 156°) and superoleophilicity (OCA = 0°), which can selectively and efficiently absorb various oils or organic solvents from polluted water. In addition, this aerogel has a high storage capacity and absorption capacity (up to 4300% and 99% of its weight and volume, respectively). More interestingly, this aerogel exhibits excellent mechanical abrasion resistance and corrosion resistance even in strong acid, alkali solution and salt marine environment. The aerogel could be reused more than 30 times after removal of the absorbed oil by rinsing with ethanol.

  4. Preparation and characterization of Ni-doped carbon aerogel for supercapacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shasha; Yan, Meifang; Liu, Haihua; Xu, Yuelong; Zhang, Lihui; Liu, Zhenfa

    2017-01-01

    Ni-doped carbon aerogel was prepared by impregnation methods, physical structure, and electrochemical properties were investigated. Electrochemical properties of prepared Ni-doped carbon aerogel and carbon aerogel electrodes were measured by galvanostatic charge/discharge measurements. The results show Ni-doped carbon aerogels maintain the elementary structure of carbon aerogel, but they exhibited higher specific capacitance than carbon aerogel.

  5. Aerogel Blanket Insulation Materials for Cryogenic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffman, B. E.; Fesmire, J. E.; White, S.; Gould, G.; Augustynowicz, S.

    2009-01-01

    Aerogel blanket materials for use in thermal insulation systems are now commercially available and implemented by industry. Prototype aerogel blanket materials were presented at the Cryogenic Engineering Conference in 1997 and by 2004 had progressed to full commercial production by Aspen Aerogels. Today, this new technology material is providing superior energy efficiencies and enabling new design approaches for more cost effective cryogenic systems. Aerogel processing technology and methods are continuing to improve, offering a tailor-able array of product formulations for many different thermal and environmental requirements. Many different varieties and combinations of aerogel blankets have been characterized using insulation test cryostats at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory of NASA Kennedy Space Center. Detailed thermal conductivity data for a select group of materials are presented for engineering use. Heat transfer evaluations for the entire vacuum pressure range, including ambient conditions, are given. Examples of current cryogenic applications of aerogel blanket insulation are also given. KEYWORDS: Cryogenic tanks, thermal insulation, composite materials, aerogel, thermal conductivity, liquid nitrogen boil-off

  6. Composite aerogel insulation for cryogenic liquid storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyeongho, Kim; Hyungmook, Kang; Soojin, Shin; In Hwan, Oh; Changhee, Son; Hyung, Cho Yun; Yongchan, Kim; Sarng Woo, Karng

    2017-02-01

    High porosity materials such as aerogel known as a good insulator in a vacuum range (10-3 ∼ 1 Torr) was widely used to storage and to transport cryogenic fluids. It is necessary to be investigated the performance of aerogel insulations for cryogenic liquid storage in soft vacuum range to atmospheric pressure. A one-dimensional insulating experimental apparatus was designed and fabricated to consist of a cold mass tank, a heat absorber and an annular vacuum space with 5-layer (each 10 mm thickness) of the aerogel insulation materials. Aerogel blanket for cryogenic (used maximum temperature is 400K), aerogel blanket for normal temperature (used maximum temperature is 923K), and combination of the two kinds of aerogel blankets were 5-layer laminated between the cryogenic liquid wall and the ambient wall in vacuum space. Also, 1-D effective thermal conductivities of the insulation materials were evaluated by measuring boil-off rate from liquid nitrogen and liquid argon. In this study, the effective thermal conductivities and the temperature-thickness profiles of the two kinds of insulators and the layered combination of the two different aerogel blankets were presented.

  7. Low density, resorcinol-formaldehyde aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, Richard W.

    1991-01-01

    The polycondensation of resorcinol with formaldehyde under alkaline conditions results in the formation of surface functionalized polymer "Clusters". The covalent crosslinking of these "clusters" produces gels which when processed under supercritical conditions, produce low density, organic aerogels (density.ltoreq.100 mg/cc; cell size .ltoreq.0.1 microns). The aerogels are transparent, dark red in color and consist of interconnected colloidal-like particles with diameters of about 100.circle.. These aerogels may be further carbonized to form low density carbon foams with cell size of about 0.1 micron.

  8. Low density, resorcinol-formaldehyde aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, Richard W.

    1989-01-01

    The polycondensation of resorcinol with formaldehyde under alkaline conditions results in the formation of surface functionalized polymer "clusters". The covalent crosslinking of these "clusters" produces gels which when processed under supercritical conditions, produce low density, organic aerogels (density .ltoreq.100 mg/cc; cell size .ltoreq.0.1 microns). The aerogels are transparent, dark red in color and consist of interconnected colloidal-like particles with diameters of about 100 .ANG.. These aerogels may be further carbonized to form low density carbon foams with cell size of about 0.1 micron.

  9. Low density, resorcinol-formaldehyde aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, R.W.

    1989-10-10

    The polycondensation of resorcinol with formaldehyde under alkaline conditions results in the formation of surface functionalized polymer clusters. The covalent crosslinking of these clusters produces gels which when processed under supercritical conditions, produce low density, organic aerogels (density [<=]100 mg/cc; cell size [<=]0.1 microns). The aerogels are transparent, dark red in color and consist of interconnected colloidal-like particles with diameters of about 100 [angstrom]. These aerogels may be further carbonized to form low density carbon foams with cell size of about 0.1 micron.

  10. Low density, resorcinol-formaldehyde aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, R.W.

    1988-05-26

    The polycondensation of resorcinol with formaldehyde under alkaline conditions results in the formation of surface functionalized polymer ''clusters''. The covalent crosslinking of these ''clusters'' produces gels which when processed under supercritical conditions, produce low density, organic aerogels (density less than or equal to100 mg/cc; cell size less than or equal to0.1 microns). The aerogels are transparent,dark red in color and consist of interconnected colloidal-like particles with diameters of about 100 A/degree/. These aerogels may be further carbonized to form low density carbon foams with cell size of about 0.1 micron. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. Composite Silica Aerogels Opacified with Titania

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, Jon-Ah; Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Jones, Steven; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; DiStefano, Salvador; Nesmith, Bill

    2009-01-01

    A further improvement has been made to reduce the high-temperature thermal conductivities of the aerogel-matrix composite materials described in Improved Silica Aerogel Composite Materials (NPO-44287), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 32, No. 9 (September 2008), page 50. Because the contribution of infrared radiation to heat transfer increases sharply with temperature, the effective high-temperature thermal conductivity of a thermal-insulation material can be reduced by opacifying the material to reduce the radiative contribution. Therefore, the essence of the present improvement is to add an opacifying constituent material (specifically, TiO2 powder) to the aerogel-matrix composites.

  12. Preparation of superhydrophobic and transparent micro-nano hybrid coatings from polymethylhydroxysiloxane and silica ormosil aerogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagappan, Saravanan; Park, Jin Joo; Park, Sung Soo; Ha, Chang-Sik

    2014-12-01

    Superhydrophobic and transparent polymethylhydroxysiloxane (PMHOS)/silica ormosil aerogel hybrids were prepared successfully by mixing of PMHOS with various weight percentages of silica ormosil aerogels (as synthesized from methyltriethoxysilane (MTES) and methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMS) precursors) in separate seal perfume glass vials. The hybrids were spin coated on glass substrate at 1000 rpm for 60 seconds and used for further analysis. The surface morphology and chemical compositions of the hybrids were analyzed by high resolution scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, atomic force spectroscopy, adsorption and desorption isotherm, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The transparency, thermal decomposition and static contact angle (SCA) of each sample were measured by UV-Visible spectrophotometer, TGA and drop shape analysis system, respectively. The spin coated substrates showed good superhydrophobic properties, thermal stability as well as transparency on the glass substrates.

  13. Method for making monolithic metal oxide aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Droege, M.W.; Coronado, P.R.; Hair, L.M.

    1995-03-07

    Transparent, monolithic metal oxide aerogels of varying densities are produced using a method in which a metal alkoxide solution and a catalyst solution are prepared separately and reacted. The resulting hydrolyzed-condensed colloidal solution is gelled, and the wet gel is contained within a sealed, but gas permeable, containment vessel during supercritical extraction of the solvent. The present invention is especially advantageous for making metal oxides other than silica that are prone to forming opaque, cracked aerogels. 6 figs.

  14. Method for making monolithic metal oxide aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Droege, Michael W.; Coronado, Paul R.; Hair, Lucy M.

    1995-01-01

    Transparent, monolithic metal oxide aerogels of varying densities are produced using a method in which a metal alkoxide solution and a catalyst solution are prepared separately and reacted. The resulting hydrolyzed-condensed colloidal solution is gelled, and the wet gel is contained within a sealed, but gas permeable, containment vessel during supercritical extraction of the solvent. The present invention is especially advantageous for making metal oxides other than silica that are prone to forming opaque, cracked aerogels.

  15. Fibrous-Ceramic/Aerogel Composite Insulating Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan M.; Rasky, Daniel J.

    2004-01-01

    Fibrous-ceramic/aerogel composite tiles have been invented to afford combinations of thermal-insulation and mechanical properties superior to those attainable by making tiles of fibrous ceramics alone or aerogels alone. These lightweight tiles can be tailored to a variety of applications that range from insulating cryogenic tanks to protecting spacecraft against re-entry heating. The advantages and disadvantages of fibrous ceramics and aerogels can be summarized as follows: Tiles made of ceramic fibers are known for mechanical strength, toughness, and machinability. Fibrous ceramic tiles are highly effective as thermal insulators in a vacuum. However, undesirably, the porosity of these materials makes them permeable by gases, so that in the presence of air or other gases, convection and gas-phase conduction contribute to the effective thermal conductivity of the tiles. Other disadvantages of the porosity and permeability of fibrous ceramic tiles arise because gases (e.g., water vapor or cryogenic gases) can condense in pores. This condensation contributes to weight, and in the case of cryogenic systems, the heat of condensation undesirably adds to the heat flowing to the objects that one seeks to keep cold. Moreover, there is a risk of explosion associated with vaporization of previously condensed gas upon reheating. Aerogels offer low permeability, low density, and low thermal conductivity, but are mechanically fragile. The basic idea of the present invention is to exploit the best features of fibrous ceramic tiles and aerogels. In a composite tile according to the invention, the fibrous ceramic serves as a matrix that mechanically supports the aerogel, while the aerogel serves as a low-conductivity, low-permeability filling that closes what would otherwise be the open pores of the fibrous ceramic. Because the aerogel eliminates or at least suppresses permeation by gas, gas-phase conduction, and convection, the thermal conductivity of such a composite even at

  16. Silica Aerogel Captures Cosmic Dust Intact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.

    1994-01-01

    The mesostructure of silica aerogel resembles stings of grapes, ranging in size from 10 to 100 angstrom. This fine mesostructure transmits nearly 90 percent of incident light in the visible, while providing sufficiently gentle dissipation of the kinetric energy of hypervelocity cosmic dust particles to permit their intact capture. We introduced silica aerogel in 1987 as capture medium to take advantage of its low density, fine mesostruicture and most importantly, its transparency, allowing optical location of captured micron sized particles.

  17. Process for preparing polymer reinforced silica aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B. (Inventor); Capadona, Lynn A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Process for preparing polymer-reinforced silica aerogels which comprises a one-pot reaction of at least one alkoxy silane in the presence of effective amounts of a polymer precursor to obtain a silica reaction product, the reaction product is gelled and subsequently subjected to conditions that promotes polymerization of the precursor and then supercritically dried to obtain the polymer-reinforced monolithic silica aerogels.

  18. Strain-driven and ultrasensitive resistive sensor/switch based on conductive alginate/nitrogen-doped carbon-nanotube-supported Ag hybrid aerogels with pyramid design.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Songfang; Zhang, Guoping; Gao, Yongju; Deng, Libo; Li, Jinhui; Sun, Rong; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2014-12-24

    Flexible strain-driven sensor is an essential component in the flexible electronics. Especially, high durability and sensitivity to strain are required. Here, we present an efficient and low-cost fabrication strategy to construct a highly sensitive and flexible pressure sensor based on a conductive, elastic aerogel with pyramid design. When pressure is loaded, the contact area between the interfaces of the conductive aerogel and the copper electrode as well as among the building blocks of the nitrogen-doped carbon-nanotube-supported Ag (N-CNTs/Ag) aerogel monoliths, changes in reversible and directional manners. This contact resistance mechanism enables the hybrid aerogels to act as strain-driven sensors with high sensitivity and excellent on/off swithching behavior, and the gauge factor (GF) is ∼15 under strain of 3%, which is superior to those reported for other aerogels. In addition, robust, elastomeric and conductive nanocomposites can be fabricated by injecting polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) into alginate/N-CNTs/Ag aerogels. Importantly, the building blocks forming the aerogels retain their initial contact and percolation after undergoing large-strain deformation, PDMS infiltration, and cross-linking of PDMS, suggesting their potential applications as strain sensors.

  19. High Temperature Aerogels for Thermal Protection Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.; Mbah, Godfrey C.

    2008-01-01

    High temperature aerogels in the Al2O3-SiO2 system are being investigated as possible constituents for lightweight integrated thermal protection system (TPS) designs for use in supersonic and hypersonic applications. Gels are synthesized from ethoxysilanes and AlCl3.6H2O, using an epoxide catalyst. The influence of Al:Si ratio, solvent, water to metal and water to alcohol ratios on aerogel composition, morphology, surface area, and pore size distribution were examined, and phase transformation on heat treatment characterized. Aerogels have been fabricated which maintain porous, fractal structures after brief exposures to 1000 C. Incorporation of nanofibers, infiltration of aerogels into SiC foams, use of polymers for crosslinking the aerogels, or combinations of these, offer potential for toughening and integration of TPS with composite structure. Woven fabric composites having Al2O3-SiO2 aerogels as a matrix also have been fabricated. Continuing work is focused on reduction in shrinkage and optimization of thermal and physical properties.

  20. Cytochrome C stabilization and immobilization in aerogels.

    PubMed

    Harper-Leatherman, Amanda S; Wallace, Jean Marie; Rolison, Debra R

    2011-01-01

    Sol-gel-derived aerogels are three-dimensional, nanoscale materials that combine large surface areas and high porosities. These traits make them useful for any rate-critical chemical process, particularly sensing or electrochemical applications, once physical or chemical moieties are incorporated into the gels to add their functionality into the ultraporous scaffold. Incorporating biomolecules into aerogels has been challenging due to the inability of most biomolecules to remain structurally intact within the gels during the necessary supercritical fluid processing. However, the heme protein cytochrome c (cyt. c) forms self-organized superstructures around gold (or silver) nanoparticles in buffer that can be encapsulated within silica and processed to form aerogels in which cyt. c retains its characteristic visible absorption. The gold (or silver) nanoparticle-nucleated superstructures protect the majority of the protein from the harsh physicochemical conditions necessary to form an aerogel. The Au∼cyt. c superstructures exhibit rapid gas-phase recognition of nitric oxide (NO) within the aerogel matrix, as facilitated by the high-quality pore structure of the aerogel, and remain viable for weeks at room temperature.

  1. Ambient pressure process for preparing aerogel thin films reliquified sols useful in preparing aerogel thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Brinker, C.J.; Prakash, S.S.

    1999-09-07

    A method for preparing aerogel thin films by an ambient-pressure, continuous process is disclosed. The method of this invention obviates the use of an autoclave and is amenable to the formation of thin films by operations such as dip coating. The method is less energy intensive and less dangerous than conventional supercritical aerogel processing techniques.

  2. Ambient pressure process for preparing aerogel thin films reliquified sols useful in preparing aerogel thin films

    DOEpatents

    Brinker, Charles Jeffrey; Prakash, Sai Sivasankaran

    1999-01-01

    A method for preparing aerogel thin films by an ambient-pressure, continuous process. The method of this invention obviates the use of an autoclave and is amenable to the formation of thin films by operations such as dip coating. The method is less energy intensive and less dangerous than conventional supercritical aerogel processing techniques.

  3. Contact-active antibacterial aerogels from cellulose nanofibrils.

    PubMed

    Henschen, Jonatan; Illergård, Josefin; Larsson, Per A; Ek, Monica; Wågberg, Lars

    2016-10-01

    The use of cellulose aerogels as antibacterial materials has been investigated by applying a contact-active layer-by-layer modification to the aerogel surface. Studying the adsorption of multilayers of polyvinylamine (PVAm) and polyacrylic acid to aerogels comprising crosslinked cellulose nanofibrils and monitoring the subsequent bacterial adhesion revealed that up to 26mgPVAmgaerogel(-1) was adsorbed without noticeably affecting the aerogel structure. The antibacterial effect was tested by measuring the reduction of viable bacteria in solution when the aerogels were present. The results show that >99.9% of the bacteria adhered to the surface of the aerogels. Microscopy further showed adherence of bacteria to the surfaces of the modified aerogels. These results indicate that it is possible to create materials with three-dimensional cellulose structures that adsorb bacteria with very high efficiency utilizing the high specific surface area of the aerogels in combination with their open structure.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of a nanocrystalline diamond aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    Pauzauskie, Peter J.; Crowhurst, Jonathan C.; Worsley, Marcus A.; Laurence, Ted A.; Kilcoyne, A. L. David; Wang, Yinmin; Willey, Trevor M.; Visbeck, Kenneth S.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Evans, William J.; Zaug, Joseph M.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.

    2011-07-06

    Aerogel materials have myriad scientific and technological applications due to their large intrinsic surface areas and ultralow densities. However, creating a nanodiamond aerogel matrix has remained an outstanding and intriguing challenge. Here we report the high-pressure, high-temperature synthesis of a diamond aerogel from an amorphous carbon aerogel precursor using a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Neon is used as a chemically inert, near-hydrostatic pressure medium that prevents collapse of the aerogel under pressure by conformally filling the aerogel's void volume. Electron and X-ray spectromicroscopy confirm the aerogel morphology and composition of the nanodiamond matrix. Time-resolved photoluminescence measurements of recovered material reveal the formation of both nitrogen- and silicon- vacancy point-defects, suggesting a broad range of applications for this nanocrystalline diamond aerogel.

  5. Durable polymer-aerogel based superhydrophobic coatings, a composite material

    DOEpatents

    Kissel, David J; Brinker, Charles Jeffrey

    2014-03-04

    Provided are polymer-aerogel composite coatings, devices and articles including polymer-aerogel composite coatings, and methods for preparing the polymer-aerogel composite. The exemplary article can include a surface, wherein the surface includes at least one region and a polymer-aerogel composite coating disposed over the at least one region, wherein the polymer-aerogel composite coating has a water contact angle of at least about 140.degree. and a contact angle hysteresis of less than about 1.degree.. The polymer-aerogel composite coating can include a polymer and an ultra high water content catalyzed polysilicate aerogel, the polysilicate aerogel including a three dimensional network of silica particles having surface functional groups derivatized with a silylating agent and a plurality of pores.

  6. Durable polymer-aerogel based superhydrophobic coatings: a composite material

    DOEpatents

    Kissel, David J.; Brinker, Charles Jeffrey

    2016-02-02

    Provided are polymer-aerogel composite coatings, devices and articles including polymer-aerogel composite coatings, and methods for preparing the polymer-aerogel composite. The exemplary article can include a surface, wherein the surface includes at least one region and a polymer-aerogel composite coating disposed over the at least one region, wherein the polymer-aerogel composite coating has a water contact angle of at least about 140.degree. and a contact angle hysteresis of less than about 1.degree.. The polymer-aerogel composite coating can include a polymer and an ultra high water content catalyzed polysilicate aerogel, the polysilicate aerogel including a three dimensional network of silica particles having surface functional groups derivatized with a silylating agent and a plurality of pores.

  7. System and method for suppressing sublimation using opacified aerogel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, Jeff S. (Inventor); Snyder, G. Jeffrey (Inventor); Calliat, Thierry (Inventor); Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor); Jones, Steven M. (Inventor); Palk, Jong-Ah (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to a castable, aerogel-based, ultra-low thermal conductivity opacified insulation to suppress sublimation. More specifically, the present invention relates to an aerogel opacified with various opacifying or reflecting constituents to suppress sublimation and provide thermal insulation in thermoelectric modules. The opacifying constituent can be graded within the aerogel for increased sublimation suppression, and the density of the aerogel can similarly be graded to achieve optimal thermal insulation and sublimation suppression.

  8. Eureka! Aerogel capture of meteoroids in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brownlee, D. E.; Horz, F.; Hrubsch, L.; Mcdonnell, J. A. M.; Tsou, P.; Williams, J.

    1994-01-01

    Light gas gun studies have shown that 6 km/s solid mineral and glass test particles can be successively captured in 0.05 g cm(exp -3) aerogel without severe heating or fragmentation. In spite of this work, there has been uncertainty in the performance of aerogel for hypervelocity capture of real meteoroids. Natural impacts differ from simulations in that the particles are likely to be structurally weak and they typically impact at higher velocity that can be simulated in the laboratory. We are fortunate now to have had two successful capture experiments using aerogel exposed in space. These experiments provide fundamental data for the assessment of the value of silica aerogel for capture of hypervelocity meteoroids from spacecraft. The first experiment used 0.02 g cm(exp -3) aerogel flown on the lid of a Shuttle Get Away Special canister. During its 9 day exposure, the 0.165 m(exp 2) of aerogel in this Sample Return Experiment (SRE) captured two long 'carrot-shaped' tracks and one highly fractured bowl shaped 'crater'. The second collection was with 0.04 m(exp 2) of 0.05 g cm(exp -3) aerogel exposed on ESA's Eureca freeflying spacecraft that was exposed for 11 months before recovery by the Shuttle. The Eureca aerogel exposure consisted of four 10x10 cm module trays that were part of the TiCCE meteoroid collector built by the University of Kent at Canterbury. To date we have found ten 'carrot-shaped' tracks and two 'craters' on this experiment. The longest tracks in both exposures are over 2 mm long. Two of the TiCCE modules had a 0.1 micron Al film suspended a millimeter above the aerogel. On these modules several of the projectiles fragmented during passage through the film producing fields of carrot shaped tracks from the resulting miniature 'meteor' shower. Most of the tracks in these showers have observable particles at their ends. We have extracted one of the carrot track meteoroids and mounted it in epoxy for sectioning. So far the examination of these 14

  9. Carbon aerogels: An update on structure, properties, and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pekala, R.W.; Mayer, S.T.; Kaschmitter, J.L.; Kong, F.M.

    1993-07-01

    Aerogels are unique porous materials whose composition, structure, and properties can be controlled at the nanometer scale. This paper examines the synthesis of organic aerogels and their carbonized derivatives. Carbon aerogels have low electrical resistivity, high surface area, and a tunable pore size. These materials are finding applications as electrodes in double layer capacitors.

  10. Uncooled thin film pyroelectric IR detector with aerogel thermal isolation

    SciTech Connect

    Ruffner, J.A.; Clem, P.G.; Tuttle, B.A.

    1998-01-01

    Uncooled pyroelectric IR imaging systems, such as night vision goggles, offer important strategic advantages in battlefield scenarios and reconnaissance surveys. Until now, the current technology for fabricating these devices has been limited by low throughput and high cost which ultimately limit the availability of these sensor devices. We have developed and fabricated an alternative design for pyroelectric IR imaging sensors that utilizes a multilayered thin film deposition scheme to create a monolithic thin film imaging element on an active silicon substrate for the first time. This approach combines a thin film pyroelectric imaging element with a thermally insulating SiO{sub 2} aerogel thin film to produce a new type of uncooled IR sensor that offers significantly higher thermal, spatial, and temporal resolutions at a substantially lower cost per unit. This report describes the deposition, characterization and optimization of the aerogel thermal isolation layer and an appropriate pyroelectric imaging element. It also describes the overall integration of these components along with the appropriate planarization, etch stop, adhesion, electrode, and blacking agent thin film layers into a monolithic structure. 19 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Hydrophilic silica aerogels as dermal drug delivery systems--dithranol as a model drug.

    PubMed

    Guenther, U; Smirnova, I; Neubert, R H H

    2008-08-01

    A special class of porous silica materials, silica aerogels, was recently shown to be a potential candidate for oral drug delivery systems. It was demonstrated, that stability of drugs and their dissolution rate can essentially be improved through the adsorption on to these materials. In this work, drug loaded silica aerogels are firstly applied as dermal drug delivery systems. Dithranol is used as a representative drug since there is a need to enhance its dermal availability. The unstable and nearly water-insoluble drug exhibits a poor penetration. Release of dithranol from aerogels into various semi-solid formulations and its dissolution as well as the release and penetration into artificial membranes were investigated by Fourier-transform infrared attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy. Two model membranes (one hydrophilic and one lipophilic) were applied. Several formulations were tested and the most promising one was used in order to study the penetration of dithranol into human stratum corneum (SC). Dithranol adsorbed on hydrophilic silica aerogels exhibited superior penetration behaviour compared to that of the standard ointment (dithranol in white soft paraffin).

  12. Zirconium oxide aerogel for effective enrichment of phosphopeptides with high binding capacity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liyuan; Xu, Jin; Sun, Liangliang; Ma, Junfeng; Yang, Kaiguang; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2011-04-01

    In this study, zirconium oxide (ZrO(2)) aerogel was synthesized via a green sol-gel approach, with zirconium oxychloride, instead of the commonly used alkoxide with high toxicity, as the precursor. With such material, phosphopeptides from the digests of 4 pmol of β-casein with the coexistence of 100 times (mol ratio) BSA could be selectively captured, and identified by MALDI-TOF MS. Due to the large surface area (416.0 m(2) g(-1)) and the mesoporous structure (the average pore size of 10.2 nm) of ZrO(2) aerogel, a 20-fold higher loading capacity for phosphopeptide, YKVPQLEIVPN[pS]AEER (MW 1952.12), was obtained compared to that of commercial ZrO(2) microspheres (341.5 vs. 17.87 mg g(-1)). The metal oxide aerogel was further applied in the enrichment of phosphopeptides from 100 ng nonfat milk, and 17 phosphopeptides were positively identified, with a 1.5-fold improvement in phosphopeptide detection compared with previously reported results. These results demonstrate that ZrO(2) aerogel can be a powerful enrichment material for phosphoproteome study.

  13. Effect of Boron-Doping on the Graphene Aerogel Used as Cathode for the Lithium-Sulfur Battery.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yang; Meng, Zhen; Cai, Tingwei; Han, Wei-Qiang

    2015-11-18

    A porous interconnected 3D boron-doped graphene aerogel (BGA) was prepared via a one-pot hydrothermal treatment. The BGA material was first loaded with sulfur to serve as cathode in lithium-sulfur batteries. Boron was positively polarized on the graphene framework, allowing for chemical adsorption of negative polysufide species. Compared with nitrogen-doped and undoped graphene aerogel, the BGA-S cathode could deliver a higher capacity of 994 mA h g(-1) at 0.2 C after 100 cycles, as well as an outstanding rate capability, which indicated the BGA was an ideal cathode material for lithium-sulfur batteries.

  14. Towards an aerogel-based coating for aerospace applications: reconstituting aerogel particles via spray drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bheekhun, N.; Abu Talib, A. R.; Mustapha, S.; Ibrahim, R.; Hassan, M. R.

    2016-10-01

    Silica aerogel is an ultralight and highly porous nano-structured ceramic with its thermal conductivity being the lowest than any solids. Although aerogels possess fascinating physical properties, innovative solutions to tackle today's problems were limited due to their relative high manufacturing cost in comparison to conventional materials. Recently, some producers have brought forward quality aerogels at competitive costs, and thereby opening a panoply of applied research in this field. In this paper, the feasibility of spray-drying silica aerogel to tailor its granulometric property is studied for thermal spraying, a novel application of aerogels that is never tried before in the academic arena. Aerogel-based slurries with yttria stabilised zirconia as a secondary ceramic were prepared and spray-dried according to modified T aguchi experimental design in order to appreciate the effect of both the slurry formulation and drying conditions such as the solid content, the ratio of yttria stabilised zirconia:aerogel added, the amount of dispersant and binder, inlet temperature, atomisation pressure and feeding rate on the median particle size of the resulting spray-dried powder. The latter was found to be affected by all the aforementioned independent variables at different degree of significance and inclination. Based on the derived relationships, an optimised condition to achieve maximum median particle size was then predicted.

  15. Surface nature of nanoparticle zinc-titanium oxide aerogel catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chien-Tsung; Lin, Jen-Chieh

    2008-05-01

    Nanoparticle zinc-titanium oxide materials were prepared by the aerogel approach. Their structure, surface state and reactivity were investigated. Zinc titanate powders formed at higher zinc loadings possessed a higher surface area and smaller particle size. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed a stronger electronic interaction between Zn and Ti atoms in the mixed oxide structure and showed the formation of oxygen vacancy due to zinc doping into titania or zinc titanate matrices. The 8-45 nm aerogel particles were evaluated as catalysts for methanol oxidation in an ambient flow reactor. Carbon dioxide was favorably produced on the oxides with anion defects. Titanium based oxides exhibited a high selectivity to dimethyl ether, so that a strong Lewis acidic character suggested for the catalysts was associated primarily with the Ti 4+ center. Both methanol conversion and dimethyl ether formation rates increased with increasing the zinc content added to the oxide support. Results demonstrate that cubic zinc titanate phases produce new Lewis acid sites having also a higher reactivity and that the nature of the catalytic surface transforms from Lewis acidic to basic characters due to the presence of reactive oxygen vacancies.

  16. Aerogel/Particle Composites for Thermoelectric Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, Jong-Ah; Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Jones, Steven

    2006-01-01

    Optimizing solution chemistry and the addition of titania and fumed silica powder reduces shrinkage. These materials would serve to increase thermal efficiency by providing thermal insulation to suppress lateral heat leaks. They would also serve to prolong operational lifetime by suppressing sublimation of certain constituents of thermoelectric materials (e.g., sublimation of Sb from CoSb3) at typical high operating temperatures. [The use of pure silica aerogels as cast-in-place thermal-insulation and sublimation-suppression materials was described in "Aerogels for Thermal Insulation of Thermoelectric Devices" (NPO-40630), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 7 (July 2006), page 50.] A silica aerogel is synthesized in a solgel process that includes preparation of a silica sol, gelation of the sol, and drying of the gel in a solvent at a supercritical temperature and pressure. The utility of pure silica aerogel is diminished by a tendency to shrink (and, therefore, also to crack) during the gelation and supercritical-drying stages. Moreover, to increase suppression of sublimation, it is advantageous to make an aerogel having greater density, but shrinkage and cracking tend to increase with density. A composite material of the type under investigation consists mostly of titania oxide powder particles and a small addition of fumed silica powder, which are mixed into the sol along with other ingredients prior to the gelation stage of processing. The silica aerogel and fumed silica act as a binder, gluing the titania particles together. It is believed that the addition of fumed silica stiffens the aerogel network and reduces shrinkage during the supercritical-drying stage. Minimization of shrinkage enables establishment of intimate contact between thermoelectric legs and the composite material, thereby maximizing the effectiveness of the material for thermal insulation and suppression of sublimation. To some extent, the properties of the composite can be tailored via the

  17. Aerogel Beads as Cryogenic Thermal Insulation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, J. E.; Augustynowicz, S. D.; Rouanet, S.; Thompson, Karen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An investigation of the use of aerogel beads as thermal insulation for cryogenic applications was conducted at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory of NASA Kennedy Space Center. Steady-state liquid nitrogen boiloff methods were used to characterize the thermal performance of aerogel beads in comparison with conventional insulation products such as perlite powder and multilayer insulation (MLI). Aerogel beads produced by Cabot Corporation have a bulk density below 100 kilograms per cubic meter (kg/cubic m) and a mean particle diameter of 1 millimeter (mm). The apparent thermal conductivity values of the bulk material have been determined under steady-state conditions at boundary temperatures of approximately 293 and 77 kelvin (K) and at various cold vacuum pressures (CVP). Vacuum levels ranged from 10(exp -5) torr to 760 torr. All test articles were made in a cylindrical configuration with a typical insulation thickness of 25 mm. Temperature profiles through the thickness of the test specimens were also measured. The results showed the performance of the aerogel beads was significantly better than the conventional materials in both soft-vacuum (1 to 10 torr) and no-vacuum (760 torr) ranges. Opacified aerogel beads performed better than perlite powder under high-vacuum conditions. Further studies for material optimization and system application are in progress.

  18. The Aerocapacitor: A carbon aerogel based supercapacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, S. T.; Pekala, R. W.; Kaschmitter, J. L.

    1992-12-01

    During the 1980's, a wide variety of carbon foams, formed by the pyrolysis of polymeric foams, were developed at several Department of Energy Laboratories. These foams are known for their monolithic structure and the ability to tailor their critical parameters (e.g. porosity, density). Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) exclusively developed a unique type of carbon foam, known as carbon aerogels. Carbon aerogels are a special class of open-cell foams with (1) homogeneous ultrafine particle and pore size, (2) very large useful surface area per unit volume, and (3) monolithic structure, that yields (4) excellent electrical conductivity due to the intimate connection of the particles. We have applied carbon aerogels to make an 'Aerocapacitor'; a high power- and energy-density electrochemical double layer capacitor (EDLC) that uses carbon aerogels as electrodes. Carbon aerogel surface areas range from about 100 to 700 m(sup 2)/cc (as measured by BET analysis), with bulk densities of 0.05 to 1.0 g/cm(sup 3) and their morphology allows stored energy to be released rapidly, resulting in high power-densities.

  19. Process for forming transparent aerogel insulating arrays

    DOEpatents

    Tewari, P.H.; Hunt, A.J.

    1985-09-04

    An improved supercritical drying process for forming transparent silica aerogel arrays is described. The process is of the type utilizing the steps of hydrolyzing and condensing aloxides to form alcogels. A subsequent step removes the alcohol to form aerogels. The improvement includes the additional step, after alcogels are formed, of substituting a solvent, such as CO/sub 2/, for the alcohol in the alcogels, the solvent having a critical temperature less than the critical temperature of the alcohol. The resulting gels are dried at a supercritical temperature for the selected solvent, such as CO/sub 2/, to thereby provide a transparent aerogel array within a substantially reduced (days-to-hours) time period. The supercritical drying occurs at about 40/sup 0/C instead of at about 270/sup 0/C. The improved process provides increased yields of large scale, structurally sound arrays. The transparent aerogel array, formed in sheets or slabs, as made in accordance with the improved process, can replace the air gap within a double glazed window, for example, to provide a substantial reduction in heat transfer. The thus formed transparent aerogel arrays may also be utilized, for example, in windows of refrigerators and ovens, or in the walls and doors thereof or as the active material in detectors for analyzing high energy elementary particles or cosmic rays.

  20. Process for forming transparent aerogel insulating arrays

    DOEpatents

    Tewari, Param H.; Hunt, Arlon J.

    1986-01-01

    An improved supercritical drying process for forming transparent silica aerogel arrays is described. The process is of the type utilizing the steps of hydrolyzing and condensing aloxides to form alcogels. A subsequent step removes the alcohol to form aerogels. The improvement includes the additional step, after alcogels are formed, of substituting a solvent, such as CO.sub.2, for the alcohol in the alcogels, the solvent having a critical temperature less than the critical temperature of the alcohol. The resulting gels are dried at a supercritical temperature for the selected solvent, such as CO.sub.2, to thereby provide a transparent aerogel array within a substantially reduced (days-to-hours) time period. The supercritical drying occurs at about 40.degree. C. instead of at about 270.degree. C. The improved process provides increased yields of large scale, structurally sound arrays. The transparent aerogel array, formed in sheets or slabs, as made in accordance with the improved process, can replace the air gap within a double glazed window, for example, to provide a substantial reduction in heat transfer. The thus formed transparent aerogel arrays may also be utilized, for example, in windows of refrigerators and ovens, or in the walls and doors thereof or as the active material in detectors for analyzing high energy elementry particles or cosmic rays.

  1. Aerogel insulation applications for liquid hydrogen launch vehicle tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fesmire, J. E.; Sass, J. P.

    2008-05-01

    Solutions to thermal insulation problems using aerogel beads were demonstrated for space launch vehicles using a model of the space shuttle external tank's liquid hydrogen (LH 2) intertank. Test results using liquid helium show that with aerogel, the nitrogen mass inside the intertank is greatly reduced and free liquid nitrogen is eliminated. Physisorption within the aerogel was also investigated, showing that the sorption ratio (liquid nitrogen to aerogel beads) is about 62%. The insulating effectiveness of the aerogel shows that cryopumping is driven by thermal communication between warm and cold surfaces. This technology can solve heat transfer problems and augment existing thermal protection systems on launch vehicles.

  2. Water extractable arabinoxylan aerogels prepared by supercritical CO2 drying.

    PubMed

    Marquez-Escalante, Jorge; Carvajal-Millan, Elizabeth; Miki-Yoshida, Mario; Alvarez-Contreras, Lorena; Toledo-Guillén, Alma Rosa; Lizardi-Mendoza, Jaime; Rascón-Chu, Agustín

    2013-05-14

    Water extractable arabinoxylan (WEAX) aerogels were prepared by extracting the solvent from the alcogels (WEAX hydrogels with an alcohol as the solvent) with carbon dioxide under supercritical conditions. WEAX aerogels were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and adsorption and desorption nitrogen isotherms. The micrographs indicate a heterogeneous porous network structure in WEAX aerogel. Adsorption/desorption nitrogen isotherms of this material were type IV, which confirm that this material possess a mesoporous structure. WEAX aerogels rehydration capability was evaluated and the water absorption mechanism was determined. The WEAX aerogels water absorption mechanism was non-Fickian (n = 0.54).

  3. Determination of Young's modulus of silica aerogels using holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikode, Prashant P.; Sabale, Sandip R.; Vhatkar, Rajiv S.

    2016-05-01

    Digital holographic interferometry technique is used to determine elastic modulus of silica aerogels. Tetramethoxysilane precursor based Silica aerogels were prepared by the sol-gel process followed by supercritical methanol drying. The alcogels were prepared by keeping the molar ratio of tetramethoxysilane: methyltrimethoxysilane: H2O constant at 1:0.6:4 while the methanol / tetramethoxysilane molar ratio (M) was varied systematically from 12 to 18. Holograms of translucent aerogel samples have been successfully recorded using the digital holographic interferometry technique. Stimulated digital interferograms gives localization of interference fringes on the aerogel surface and these fringes are used to determine the surface deformation and Young's modulus (Y) of the aerogels.

  4. Improving the fermentation performance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by laccase during ethanol production from steam-exploded wheat straw at high-substrate loadings.

    PubMed

    Alvira, Pablo; Moreno, Antonio D; Ibarra, David; Sáez, Felicia; Ballesteros, Mercedes

    2013-01-01

    Operating the saccharification and fermentation processes at high-substrate loadings is a key factor for making ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass economically viable. However, increasing the substrate loading presents some disadvantages, including a higher concentration of inhibitors (furan derivatives, weak acids, and phenolic compounds) in the media, which negatively affect the fermentation performance. One strategy to eliminate soluble inhibitors is filtering and washing the pretreated material. In this study, it was observed that even if the material was previously washed, inhibitory compounds were released during the enzymatic hydrolysis step. Laccase enzymatic treatment was evaluated as a method to reduce these inhibitory effects. The laccase efficiency was analyzed in a presaccharification and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation process at high-substrate loadings. Water-insoluble solids fraction from steam-exploded wheat straw was used as substrate and Saccharomyces cerevisiae as fermenting microorganism. Laccase supplementation reduced strongly the phenolic content in the media, without affecting weak acids and furan derivatives. This strategy resulted in an improved yeast performance during simultaneous saccharification and fermentation process, increasing significantly ethanol productivity.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of a nanocrystalline diamond aerogel

    PubMed Central

    Pauzauskie, Peter J.; Crowhurst, Jonathan C.; Worsley, Marcus A.; Laurence, Ted A.; Kilcoyne, A. L. David; Wang, Yinmin; Willey, Trevor M.; Visbeck, Kenneth S.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Evans, William J.; Zaug, Joseph M.; Satcher, Joe H.

    2011-01-01

    Aerogel materials have myriad scientific and technological applications due to their large intrinsic surface areas and ultralow densities. However, creating a nanodiamond aerogel matrix has remained an outstanding and intriguing challenge. Here we report the high-pressure, high-temperature synthesis of a diamond aerogel from an amorphous carbon aerogel precursor using a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Neon is used as a chemically inert, near-hydrostatic pressure medium that prevents collapse of the aerogel under pressure by conformally filling the aerogel’s void volume. Electron and X-ray spectromicroscopy confirm the aerogel morphology and composition of the nanodiamond matrix. Time-resolved photoluminescence measurements of recovered material reveal the formation of both nitrogen- and silicon- vacancy point-defects, suggesting a broad range of applications for this nanocrystalline diamond aerogel. PMID:21555550

  6. Carbon nanomaterials in silica aerogel matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Christopher E; Chavez, Manuel E; Duque, Juan G; Gupta, Gautam; Doorn, Stephen K; Dattelbaum, Andrew M; Obrey, Kimberly A D

    2010-01-01

    Silica aerogels are ultra low-density, high surface area materials that are extremely good thermal insulators and have numerous technical applications. However, their mechanical properties are not ideal, as they are brittle and prone to shattering. Conversely, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and graphene-based materials, such as graphene oxide, have extremely high tensile strength and possess novel electronic properties. By introducing SWCNTs or graphene-based materials into aerogel matrices, it is possible to produce composites with the desirable properties of both constituents. We have successfully dispersed SWCNTs and graphene-based materials into silica gels. Subsequent supercritical drying results in monolithic low-density composites having improved mechanical properties. These nanocomposite aerogels have great potential for use in a wide range of applications.

  7. High strength air-dried aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Coronado, Paul R.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.

    2012-11-06

    A method for the preparation of high strength air-dried organic aerogels. The method involves the sol-gel polymerization of organic gel precursors, such as resorcinol with formaldehyde (RF) in aqueous solvents with R/C ratios greater than about 1000 and R/F ratios less than about 1:2.1. Using a procedure analogous to the preparation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels, this approach generates wet gels that can be air dried at ambient temperatures and pressures. The method significantly reduces the time and/or energy required to produce a dried aerogel compared to conventional methods using either supercritical solvent extraction. The air dried gel exhibits typically less than 5% shrinkage.

  8. Cytochrome c Stabilization and Immobilization in Aerogels.

    PubMed

    Harper-Leatherman, Amanda S; Wallace, Jean Marie; Rolison, Debra R

    2017-01-01

    Sol-gel-derived aerogels are three-dimensional, nanoscale materials that combine large surface area with high porosity. These traits make them useful for any rate-critical chemical process, particularly sensing or electrochemical applications, once physical or chemical moieties are incorporated into the gels to add their functionality to the ultraporous scaffold. Incorporating biomolecules into aerogels, other than such rugged species as lipases or cellulose, has been challenging due to the inability of most biomolecules to remain structurally intact within the gels during the necessary supercritical fluid (SCF) processing. However, the heme protein cytochrome c (cyt.c) forms self-organized superstructures around gold (or silver) nanoparticles in buffer that can be encapsulated into wet gels as the sol undergoes gelation. The guest-host wet gel can then be processed to form composite aerogels in which cyt.c retains its characteristic visible absorption. The gold (or silver) nanoparticle-nucleated superstructures protect the majority of the protein from the harsh physicochemical conditions necessary to form an aerogel. The Au~cyt.c superstructures exhibit rapid gas-phase recognition of nitric oxide (NO) within the bioaerogel matrix, as facilitated by the high-quality pore structure of the aerogel, while remaining viable for weeks at room temperature. More recently, careful control of synthetic parameters (e.g., buffer concentration, protein concentration, SCF extraction rate) have allowed for the preparation of cyt.c-silica aerogels, sans nucleating nanoparticles; these bioaerogels also exhibit rapid gas-phase sensing while retaining protein structural stability.

  9. Incorporation of noble metals into aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Hair, L.M.; Sanner, R.D.; Coronado, P.R.

    1998-12-22

    Aerogels or xerogels containing atomically dispersed noble metals for applications such as environmental remediation are disclosed. New noble metal precursors, such as Pt--Si or Pd(Si--P){sub 2}, have been created to bridge the incompatibility between noble metals and oxygen, followed by their incorporation into the aerogel or xerogel through sol-gel chemistry and processing. Applications include oxidation of hydrocarbons and reduction of nitrogen oxide species, complete oxidation of volatile organic carbon species, oxidative membranes for photocatalysis and partial oxidation for synthetic applications.

  10. Incorporation of noble metals into aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Hair, Lucy M.; Sanner, Robert D.; Coronado, Paul R.

    1998-01-01

    Aerogels or xerogels containing atomically dispersed noble metals for applications such environmental remediation. New noble metal precursors, such as Pt--Si or Pd(Si--P).sub.2, have been created to bridge the incompatibility between noble metals and oxygen, followed by their incorporation into the aerogel or xerogel through sol-gel chemistry and processing. Applications include oxidation of hydrocarbons and reduction of nitrogen oxide species, complete oxidation of volatile organic carbon species, oxidative membranes for photocatalysis and partial oxidation for synthetic applications.

  11. Structure-Property Relationships in Porous 3-D Nanostructures as a Function of Preparation Conditions: Isocyanate Cross-Linked Silica Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Capadona, Lynn A.; McCorkle, Linda; Padadopoulos, Demetrios S.; Leventis, Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    Sol-gel derived silica aerogels are attractive candidates for many unique thermal, optical, catalytic, and chemical applications because of their low density and high mesoporosity. However, their inherent fragility has restricted use of aerogel monoliths to applications where they are not subject to any load. We have previously reported cross-linking the mesoporous silica structure of aerogels with di-isocyanates, styrenes or epoxies reacting with amine decorated silica surfaces. These approaches have been shown to significantly increase the strength of aerogels with only a small effect on density or porosity. Though density is a prime predictor of properties such as strength and thermal conductivity for aerogels, it is becoming clear from previous studies that varying the silica backbone and size of the polymer cross-link independently can give rise to combinations of properties which cannot be predicted from density alone. Herein, we examine the effects of four processing parameters for producing this type of polymer cross-linked aerogel on properties of the resulting monoliths. We focus on the results of C-13 CP-MAS NMR which gives insight to the size and structure of polymer cross-link present in the monoliths, and relates the size of the cross-links to microstructure, mechanical properties and other characteristics of the materials obtained.

  12. Structure-Property Relationships in Porous 3-D Nanostructures as a Function of Preparation Conditions: Isocyanate Cross-Linked Silica Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Capadona, Lynn A.; McCorkle, Linda; Papadopoulos, Demetrios S.; Leventis, Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    Sol-gel derived silica aerogels are attractive candidates for many unique thermal, optical, catalytic, and chemical applications because of their low density and high mesoporosity. However, their inherent fragility has restricted use of aerogel monoliths to applications where they are not subject to any load. We have previously reported cross-linking the mesoporous silica structure of aerogels with di-isocyanates, styrenes or epoxies reacting with amine decorated silica surfaces. These approaches have been shown to significantly increase the strength of aerogels with only a small effect on density or porosity. Though density is a prime predictor of properties such as strength and thermal conductivity for aerogels, it is becoming clear from previous studies that varying the silica backbone and size of the polymer cross-link independently can give rise to combinations of properties which cannot be predicted from density alone. Herein, we examine the effects of four processing parameters for producing this type of polymer cross-linked aerogel on properties of the resulting monoliths. We focus on the results of 13C CP-MAS NMR which gives insight to the size and structure of polymer cross-link present in the monoliths, and relates the size of the cross-links to microstructure, mechanical properties and other characteristics of the materials obtained.

  13. Ultrafast laser-induced birefringence in various porosity silica glasses: from fused silica to aerogel.

    PubMed

    Cerkauskaite, Ausra; Drevinskas, Rokas; Rybaltovskii, Alexey O; Kazansky, Peter G

    2017-04-03

    We compare a femtosecond laser induced modification in silica matrices with three different degrees of porosity. In single pulse regime, the decrease of substrate density from fused silica to high-silica porous glass and to silica aerogel glass results in tenfold increase of laser affected region with the formation of a symmetric cavity surrounded by the compressed silica shell with pearl like structures. In multi-pulse regime, if the cavity produced by the first pulse is relatively large, the subsequent pulses do not cause further modifications. If not, the transition from void to the anisotropic structure with the optical axis oriented parallel to the incident polarization is observed. The maximum retardance value achieved in porous glass is twofold higher than in fused silica, and tenfold greater than in aerogel. The polarization sensitive structuring in porous glass by two pulses of ultrafast laser irradiation is demonstrated, as well as no observable stress is generated at any conditions.

  14. The compressive behavior of isocyanate-crosslinked silica aerogel at high strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, H.; Lu, H.; Leventis, N.

    2006-06-01

    Aerogels are low-density, highly nano-porous materials. Their engineering applications are limited due to their brittleness and hydrophilicity. Recently, a strong lightweight crosslinked silica aerogel has been developed by encapsulating the skeletal framework of amine-modified silica aerogels with polyureas derived by isocyanate. The mesoporous structure of the underlying silica framework is preserved through conformal polymer coating, and the thermal conductivity remains low. Characterization has been conducted on the thermal, physical properties and the mechanical properties under quasi-static loading conditions. In this paper, we present results on the dynamic compressive behavior of the crosslinked silica aerogel (CSA) using a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB). A new tubing pulse shaper was employed to help reach the dynamic stress equilibrium and constant strain rate. The stress-strain relationship was determined at high strain rates within 114-4386 s-1. The effects of strain rate, density, specimen thickness and water absorption on the dynamic behavior of the CSA were investigated through a series of dynamic experiments. The Young’s moduli (or 0.2% offset compressive yield strengths) at a strain rate ˜350 s-1 were determined as 10.96/2.08, 159.5/6.75, 192.2/7.68, 304.6/11.46, 407.0/20.91 and 640.5/30.47 MPa for CSA with densities 0.205, 0.454, 0.492, 0.551, 0.628 and 0.731 g cm-3, respectively. The deformation and failure behaviors of a native silica aerogel with density (0.472 g cm-3), approximately the same as a typical CSA sample were observed with a high speed digital camera. Digital image correlation technique was used to determine the surface strains through a series of images acquired using high speed photography. The relative uniform axial deformation indicated that localized compaction did not occur at a compressive strain level of ˜17%, suggesting most likely failure mechanism at high strain rate to be different from that under quasi

  15. The Compressive Behavior of Isocyanate-crosslinked Silica Aerogel at High Strain Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luo, H.; Lu, H.; Leventis, N.

    2006-01-01

    Aerogels are low-density, highly nano-porous materials. Their engineering applications are limited due to their brittleness and hydrophilicity. Recently, a strong lightweight crosslinked silica aerogel has been developed by encapsulating the skeletal framework of amine-modified silica aerogels with polyureas derived by isocyanate. The mesoporous structure of the underlying silica framework is preserved through conformal polymer coating, and the thermal conductivity remains low. Characterization has been conducted on the thermal, physical properties and the mechanical properties under quasi-static loading conditions. In this paper, we present results on the dynamic compressive behavior of the crosslinked silica aerogel (CSA) using a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB). A new tubing pulse shaper was employed to help reach the dynamic stress equilibrium and constant strain rate. The stress-strain relationship was determined at high strain rates within 114-4386/s. The effects of strain rate, density, specimen thickness and water absorption on the dynamic behavior of the CSA were investigated through a series of dynamic experiments. The Young's moduli (or 0.2% offset compressive yield strengths) at a strain rate approx.350/s were determined as 10.96/2.08, 159.5/6.75, 192.2/7.68, 304.6/11.46, 407.0/20.91 and 640.5/30.47 MPa for CSA with densities 0.205, 0.454, 0.492, 0.551,0.628 and 0.731 g/cu cm, respectively. The deformation and failure behaviors of a native silica aerogel with density (0.472 g/cu cm ), approximately the same as a typical CSA sample were observed with a high speed digital camera. Digital image correlation technique was used to determine the surface strains through a series of images acquired using high speed photography. The relative uniform axial deformation indicated that localized compaction did not occur at a compressive strain level of approx.17%, suggesting most likely failure mechanism at high strain rate to be different from that under quasi

  16. Aerogel Insulation Systems for Space Launch Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, James E.

    2005-01-01

    New developments in materials science in the areas of solution gelation processes and nanotechnology have led to the recent commercial production of aerogels. Concurrent with these advancements has been the development of new approaches to cryogenic thermal insulation systems. For example, thermal and physical characterizations of aerogel beads under cryogenic-vacuum conditions have been performed at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory of the NASA Kennedy Space Center. Aerogel-based insulation system demonstrations have also been conducted to improve performance for space launch applications. Subscale cryopumping experiments show the thermal insulating ability of these fully breathable nanoporous materials. For a properly executed thermal insulation system, these breathable aerogel systems are shown to not cryopump beyond the initial cooldown and thermal stabilization phase. New applications are being developed to augment the thermal protection systems of space launch vehicles, including the Space Shuttle External Tank. These applications include a cold-boundary temperature of 90 K with an ambient air environment in which both weather and flight aerodynamics are important considerations. Another application is a nitrogen-purged environment with a cold-boundary temperature of 20 K where both initial cooldown and launch ascent profiles must be considered. Experimental results and considerations for these flight system applications are discussed.

  17. Lightweight and thermally insulating aerogel glass materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Tao; Jelle, Bjørn Petter; Gustavsen, Arild; He, Jianying

    2014-07-01

    Glass represents an important and widely used building material, and crucial aspects to be addressed include thermal conductivity, visible light transmittance, and weight for windows with improved energy efficiency. In this work, by sintering monolithic silica aerogel precursors at elevated temperatures, aerogel glass materials were successfully prepared, which were characterized by low thermal conductivity [k ≈ 0.17-0.18 W/(mK)], high visible transparency (T vis ≈ 91-96 % at 500 nm), low density (ρ ≈ 1.60-1.79 g/cm3), and enhanced mechanical strength (typical elastic modulus E r ≈ 2.0-6.4 GPa). These improved properties were derived from a series of successive gelation and aging steps during the desiccation of silica aerogels. The involved sol → gel → glass transformation was investigated by means of thermo-gravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy, nanoindentation, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Strategies of improving further the mechanical strength of the obtained aerogel glass materials are also discussed.

  18. Mechanically Robust Polymer-Graphene Aerogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Heonjoo; Shanmuganathan, Kadhiravan; Ellison, Christopher

    2015-03-01

    Graphene has been intensely studied for the past several years due to its many attractive properties. Graphene oxide (GO) aerogels are particularly interesting due to their light weight and excellent performance in various applications, such as environmental remediation, super-hydrophobic and super-oleophilic materials, energy storage, etc. However, GO aerogels are generally weak and delicate which complicates their handling and potentially limits their application outside the research lab. The focus of this work is to synthesize mechanically stable aerogels that are robust and easy to handle without substantially sacrificing their low density. To overcome this challenge, we found that by intermixing a small amount of readily available and thermally crosslinkable polymer can enhance the mechanical properties without disrupting other characteristic intrinsic properties of the aerogel itself. This method is a simple straight-forward procedure that does not include any tedious chemical reactions or harsh chemicals. Furthermore, we will demonstrate the performance of these materials as a super-absorbent and pressure sensor.

  19. 21 CFR 182.1711 - Silica aerogel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Silica aerogel. 182.1711 Section 182.1711 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances §...

  20. Aerogel insulation systems for space launch applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fesmire, J. E.

    2006-02-01

    New developments in materials science in the areas of solution gelation processes and nanotechnology have led to the recent commercial production of aerogels. Concurrent with these advancements has been the development of new approaches to cryogenic thermal insulation systems. For example, thermal and physical characterizations of aerogel beads under cryogenic-vacuum conditions have been performed at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory of the NASA Kennedy Space Center. Aerogel-based insulation system demonstrations have also been conducted to improve performance for space launch applications. Subscale cryopumping experiments show the thermal insulating ability of these fully breathable nanoporous materials. For a properly executed thermal insulation system, these breathable aerogel systems are shown to not cryopump beyond the initial cooldown and thermal stabilization phase. New applications are being developed to augment the thermal protection systems of space launch vehicles, including the Space Shuttle External Tank. These applications include a cold-boundary temperature of 90 K with an ambient air environment in which both weather and flight aerodynamics are important considerations. Another application is a nitrogen-purged environment with a cold-boundary temperature of 20 K where both initial cooldown and launch ascent profiles must be considered. Experimental results and considerations for these flight system applications are discussed.

  1. Manufacturing complex silica aerogel target components

    SciTech Connect

    Defriend Obrey, Kimberly Ann; Day, Robert D; Espinoza, Brent F; Hatch, Doug; Patterson, Brian M; Feng, Shihai

    2008-01-01

    Aerogel is a material used in numerous components in High Energy Density Physics targets. In the past these components were molded into the proper shapes. Artifacts left in the parts from the molding process, such as contour irregularities from shrinkage and density gradients caused by the skin, have caused LANL to pursue machining as a way to make the components.

  2. Efficient Fabrication of Hierarchically Porous Graphene-Derived Aerogel and Its Application in Lithium Sulfur Battery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Qin, Furong; Lai, Yanqing; Li, Jie; Lei, Xiaoke; Wang, Mengran; Lu, Hai; Fang, Jing

    2016-03-09

    Hierarchically porous carbon/graphene aerogel (CGA) with relatively high surface area and pore volume is synthesized through an efficient fabrication strategy, which involves forming hydrothermal carbon layer on the pore wall as upholder and directly carbonizing the wet hydrogel from hydrothermal reaction, without using any special drying techniques. Cassava powder is used as carbon precursor which enables sustainable synthesis. Carbonizing the wet hydrothermal product is found to be a self-activation process, through which abundant pores are generated. The aerogel is used as host to encapsulate sulfur for lithium sulfur battery. Graphene, served as highly conductive scaffold, accelerates the transport of the electrons. The hierarchically porous structure is in favor of improving the electrochemical performance of lithium sulfur battery. Therefore, the cathode with high sulfur loading and high sulfur content can deliver very good performance.

  3. Desalination with carbon aerogel electrodes. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.C.; Richardson, J.H.; Fix, D.V.; Thomson, S.L.; May, S.C.

    1996-12-04

    Electrically regenerated electrosorption process (carbon aerogel CDI) was developed by LLNL for continuously removing ionic impurities from aqueous streams. A salt solution flows in a channel formed by numerous pairs of parallel carbon aerogel electrodes. Each electrode has a very high BET surface area (2-5.4x10{sup 6}ft{sup 2}lb{sup -1} or 400-1100 m{sup 2}g{sup -1}) and very low electrical resistivity ({le}40 m{Omega}). Ions are removed from the electrolyte by the electric field and electrosorbed onto the carbon aerogel. It is concluded that carbon aerogel CDI may be an energy-efficient alternative to electrodialysis and reverse osmosis for desalination of brackish water ({le}5000 ppM). The intrinsic energy required by this process is about QV/2, where Q is the stored electrical charge and V is the voltage between the electrodes, plus losses. Estimated requirement for desalination of a 2000 ppM feed is -0.53-2.5 Wh/gal{sup -1} (0.5-2.4 kJ L{sup -1}), depending on voltage, flow rate, cell dimensions, aerogel density, recovery ratio, etc. This assumes that 50-70% of the stored electrical energy is reclaimed during regeneration (electrical discharge). Though the energy requirement for desalination of sea water is also low, this application will be much more difficult. Additional work will be required for desalination of streams that contain more than 5000 ppM total dissolved solids (2000 ppM will require electrochemical cells with extremely tight, demanding tolerances). At this present time, the process is best suited for streams with dilute impurities, as recently demonstrated during a field test at LLNL Treatment Facility C.

  4. Synthesis and biomedical applications of aerogels: Possibilities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Maleki, Hajar; Durães, Luisa; García-González, Carlos A; Del Gaudio, Pasquale; Portugal, António; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2016-10-01

    Aerogels are an exceptional group of nanoporous materials with outstanding physicochemical properties. Due to their unique physical, chemical, and mechanical properties, aerogels are recognized as promising candidates for diverse applications including, thermal insulation, catalysis, environmental cleaning up, chemical sensors, acoustic transducers, energy storage devices, metal casting molds and water repellant coatings. Here, we have provided a comprehensive overview on the synthesis, processing and drying methods of the mostly investigated types of aerogels used in the biological and biomedical contexts, including silica aerogels, silica-polymer composites, polymeric and biopolymer aerogels. In addition, the very recent challenges on these aerogels with regard to their applicability in biomedical field as well as for personalized medicine applications are considered and explained in detail.

  5. Evaluating Dimethyldiethoxysilane for use in Polyurethane Crosslinked Silica Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, Jason P.; Meador, Mary Ann B.; Jana, Sadhan C.

    2008-01-01

    Silica aerogels are highly porous materials which exhibit exceptionally low density and thermal conductivity. Their "pearl necklace" nanostructure, however, is inherently weak; most silica aerogels are brittle and fragile. The strength of aerogels can be improved by employing an additional crosslinking step using isocyanates. In this work, dimethyldiethoxysilane (DMDES) is evaluated for use in the silane backbone of polyurethane crosslinked aerogels. Approximately half of the resulting aerogels exhibited a core/shell morphology of hard crosslinked aerogel surrounding a softer, uncrosslinked center. Solid state NMR and scanning electron microscopy results indicate the DMDES incorporated itself as a conformal coating around the outside of the secondary silica particles, in much the same manner as isocyanate crosslinking. Response surface curves were generated from compression data, indicating levels of reinforcement comparable to that in previous literature, despite the core/shell morphology.

  6. Highly compressible 3D periodic graphene aerogel microlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Cheng; Han, T. Yong-Jin; Duoss, Eric B.; Golobic, Alexandra M.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Worsley, Marcus A.

    2015-04-22

    Graphene is a two-dimensional material that offers a unique combination of low density, exceptional mechanical properties, large surface area and excellent electrical conductivity. Recent progress has produced bulk 3D assemblies of graphene, such as graphene aerogels, but they possess purely stochastic porous networks, which limit their performance compared with the potential of an engineered architecture. Here we report the fabrication of periodic graphene aerogel microlattices, possessing an engineered architecture via a 3D printing technique known as direct ink writing. The 3D printed graphene aerogels are lightweight, highly conductive and exhibit supercompressibility (up to 90% compressive strain). Moreover, the Young’s moduli of the 3D printed graphene aerogels show an order of magnitude improvement over bulk graphene materials with comparable geometric density and possess large surface areas. Ultimately, adapting the 3D printing technique to graphene aerogels realizes the possibility of fabricating a myriad of complex aerogel architectures for a broad range of applications.

  7. Highly compressible 3D periodic graphene aerogel microlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Cheng; Han, T. Yong-Jin; Duoss, Eric B.; Golobic, Alexandra M.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Worsley, Marcus A.

    2015-04-01

    Graphene is a two-dimensional material that offers a unique combination of low density, exceptional mechanical properties, large surface area and excellent electrical conductivity. Recent progress has produced bulk 3D assemblies of graphene, such as graphene aerogels, but they possess purely stochastic porous networks, which limit their performance compared with the potential of an engineered architecture. Here we report the fabrication of periodic graphene aerogel microlattices, possessing an engineered architecture via a 3D printing technique known as direct ink writing. The 3D printed graphene aerogels are lightweight, highly conductive and exhibit supercompressibility (up to 90% compressive strain). Moreover, the Young's moduli of the 3D printed graphene aerogels show an order of magnitude improvement over bulk graphene materials with comparable geometric density and possess large surface areas. Adapting the 3D printing technique to graphene aerogels realizes the possibility of fabricating a myriad of complex aerogel architectures for a broad range of applications.

  8. Impact of polishing on the light scattering at aerogel surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnyakov, A. Yu.; Barnyakov, M. Yu.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Danilyuk, A. F.; Katcin, A. A.; Kononov, S. A.; Kirilenko, P. S.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Kuyanov, I. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Ovtin, I. V.; Predein, A. Yu.; Protsenko, R. S.

    2016-07-01

    Particle identification power of modern aerogel RICH detectors strongly depends on optical quality of radiators. It was shown that wavelength dependence of aerogel tile transparency after polishing cannot be described by the standard Hunt formula. The Hunt formula has been modified to describe scattering in a thin layer of silica dust on the surface of aerogel tile. Several procedures of polishing of aerogel tile have been tested. The best result has been achieved while using natural silk tissue. The resulting block has optical smooth surfaces. The measured decrease of aerogel transparency due to surface scattering is about few percent. This result could be used for production of radiators for the Focusing Aerogel RICH detectors.

  9. Non-silica aerogels as hypervelocity particle capture materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Steven M.

    2010-01-01

    The Stardust sample return mission to the comet Wild 2 used silica aerogel as the principal cometary and interstellar particle capture and return medium. However, since both cometary dust and interstellar grains are composed largely of silica, using a silica collector complicates the science that can be accomplished with these particles. The use of non-silica aerogel in future extra-terrestrial particle capture and return missions would expand the scientific value of these missions. Alumina, titania, germania, zirconia, tin oxide, and resorcinol/formaldehyde aerogels were produced and impact tested with 20, 50, and 100μm glass microspheres to determine the suitability of different non-silica aerogels as hypervelocity particle capture mediums. It was found that non-silica aerogels do perform as efficient hypervelocity capture mediums, with alumina, zirconia, and resorcinol/formaldehyde aerogels proving to be the best of the materials tested.

  10. Highly compressible 3D periodic graphene aerogel microlattices

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Cheng; Han, T. Yong-Jin; Duoss, Eric B.; Golobic, Alexandra M.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Worsley, Marcus A.

    2015-01-01

    Graphene is a two-dimensional material that offers a unique combination of low density, exceptional mechanical properties, large surface area and excellent electrical conductivity. Recent progress has produced bulk 3D assemblies of graphene, such as graphene aerogels, but they possess purely stochastic porous networks, which limit their performance compared with the potential of an engineered architecture. Here we report the fabrication of periodic graphene aerogel microlattices, possessing an engineered architecture via a 3D printing technique known as direct ink writing. The 3D printed graphene aerogels are lightweight, highly conductive and exhibit supercompressibility (up to 90% compressive strain). Moreover, the Young's moduli of the 3D printed graphene aerogels show an order of magnitude improvement over bulk graphene materials with comparable geometric density and possess large surface areas. Adapting the 3D printing technique to graphene aerogels realizes the possibility of fabricating a myriad of complex aerogel architectures for a broad range of applications. PMID:25902277

  11. Tailoring mechanical properties of aerogels for aerospace applications.

    PubMed

    Randall, Jason P; Meador, Mary Ann B; Jana, Sadhan C

    2011-03-01

    Silica aerogels are highly porous solid materials consisting of three-dimensional networks of silica particles and are typically obtained by removing the liquid in silica gels under supercritical conditions. Several unique attributes such as extremely low thermal conductivity and low density make silica aerogels excellent candidates in the quest for thermal insulation materials used in space missions. However, native silica aerogels are fragile at relatively low stresses. More durable aerogels with higher strength and stiffness are obtained by proper selection of silane precursors and by reinforcement with polymers. This paper first presents a brief review of the literature on methods of silica aerogel reinforcement and then discusses our recent activities in improving not only the strength but also the elastic response of polymer-reinforced silica aerogels. Several alkyl-linked bis-silanes were used in promoting flexibility of the silica networks in conjunction with polymer reinforcement by epoxy.

  12. Flexible aerogel composite for mechanical stability and process of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Coronado, Paul R.; Poco, John F.

    1999-01-01

    A flexible aerogel and process of fabrication. An aerogel solution is mixed with fibers in a mold and allowed to gel. The gel is then processed by supercritical extraction, or by air drying, to produce a flexible aerogel formed to the shape of the mold. The flexible aerogel has excellent thermal and acoustic properties, and can be utilized in numerous applications, such as for energy absorption, insulation (temperature and acoustic), to meet the contours of aircraft shapes, and where space is limited since an inch of aerogel is a 4-5 times better insulator than an inch of fiberglass. The flexible aerogel may be of an inorganic (silica) type or an organic (carbon) type, but containing fibers, such as glass or carbon fibers.

  13. Flexible aerogel composite for mechanical stability and process of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Coronado, Paul R.; Poco, John F.

    2000-01-01

    A flexible aerogel and process of fabrication. An aerogel solution is mixed with fibers in a mold and allowed to gel. The gel is then processed by supercritical extraction, or by air drying, to produce a flexible aerogel formed to the shape of the mold. The flexible aerogel has excellent thermal and acoustic properties, and can be utilized in numerous applications, such as for energy absorption, insulation (temperature and acoustic), to meet the contours of aircraft shapes, and where space is limited since an inch of aerogel is a 4-5 times better insulator than an inch of fiberglass. The flexible aerogel may be of an inorganic (silica) type or an organic (carbon) type, but containing fibers, such as glass or carbon fibers.

  14. Drying Using Supercritical Fluid Technology as a Potential Method for Preparation of Chitosan Aerogel Microparticles.

    PubMed

    Obaidat, Rana M; Tashtoush, Bassam M; Bayan, Mohammad F; Al Bustami, Rana T; Alnaief, Mohammad

    2015-12-01

    Supercritical fluid technology offers several advantages in preparation of microparticles. These include uniformity in particle size, morphology, and drug distribution without degradation of the product. One of the recent advantages is preparation of porous aerogel carrier with proper aerodynamic properties. In this study, we aimed to prepare chitosan aerogel microparticles using supercritical fluid (SCF) technology and compare that with microparticles produced by freeze drying (FD). Loading the prepared carriers with a model drug (salbutamol) was also performed. Comparisons of the particle properties and physicochemical characterizations were undertaken by evaluating particle size, density, specific surface area, and porosity. In vitro drug release studies were also investigated. The effect of many variables, such as molecular weight of chitosan oligomers, concentrations of chitosan, and concentrations of tripolyphosphate on the release, were also investigated. Chitosan aerogels were efficiently produced by SCF technology with an average particle size of 10 μm with a tapped density values around 0.12 g/mL, specific surface area (73-103) m(2)/g, and porosity (0.20-0.29) cc/g. Whereas, microparticles produced by FD method were characterized as cryogels with larger particle size (64 microns) with clear cracking at the surface. Sustained release profile was achieved for all prepared microparticles of salbutamol produced by the aforementioned methods as compared with pure drug. The results also demonstrates that chitosan molecular weight, polymer concentration, and tripolyphosphate concentration affected the release profile of salbutamol from the prepared microparticles. In conclusion, SCF technology was able to produce chitosan aerogel microparticles loaded with salbutamol that could be suitable for pulmonary drug delivery system.

  15. Foldable Transparent Substrates with Embedded Electrodes for Flexible Electronics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Hoon; Park, Jin-Woo

    2015-08-26

    We present highly flexible transparent electrodes composed of silver nanowire (AgNW) networks and silica aerogels embedded into UV-curable adhesive photopolymers (APPs). Because the aerogels have an extremely high surface-to-volume ratio, the enhanced van der Waals forces of the aerogel surfaces result in more AgNWs being uniformly coated onto a release substrate and embedded into the APP when mixed with an AgNW solution at a fixed concentration. The uniform distribution of the embedded composite electrodes of AgNWs and aerogels was verified by the Joule heating test. The APP with the composite electrodes has a lower sheet resistance (Rs) and a better mechanical stability compared with APP without aerogels. The APP with the embedded electrodes is a freestanding flexible substrate and can be used as an electrode coating on a polymer substrate, such as polydimethylsiloxane and polyethylene terephthalate. On the basis of the bending test results, the APPs with composite electrodes were sufficiently flexible to withstand a 1 mm bending radius (rb) and could be foldable with a slight change in Rs. Organic light emitting diodes were successfully fabricated on the APP with the composite electrodes, indicating the strong potential of the proposed flexible TEs for application as highly flexible transparent conductive substrates.

  16. Mechanically Strong Lightweight Materials for Aerospace Applications (x-aerogels)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventis, Nicholas

    2005-01-01

    The X-Aerogel is a new NASA-developed strong lightweight material made by reacting the mesoporous surfaces of 3-D networks of inorganic nanoparticles with polymeric crosslinkers. Since the relative amount of the crosslinker and the backbone are comparable, X-Aerogels can be viewed either as aerogels modified by templated accumulation of polymer on the skeletal nanoparticles, or as nanoporous polymers made by templated casting of polymeric precursors on a nanostructured framework. The most striking feature of X-Aerogels is that for a nominal 3-fold increase in density (still a ultralightweight material), the mechanical strength can be up to 300 times higher than the strength of the underlying native aerogel. Thus, X-Aerogels combine a multiple of the specific compressive strength of steel, with the thermal conductivity of styrofoam. XAerogels have been demonstrated with several polymers such as polyurethanes/polyureas, epoxies and polyolefins, while crosslinking of approximately 35 different oxide aerogels yields a wide variety of dimensionally stable, porous lightweight materials with interesting structural, magnetic and optical properties. X-Aerogels are evaluated for cryogenic rocket fuel storage tanks and for Advanced EVA suits, where they will play the dual role of the thermal insulator/structural material. Along the same lines, major impact is also expected by the use of X-Aerogels in structural components/thermal protection for small satellites, spacecrafts, planetary vehicles and habitats.

  17. Thio-,amine-,nitro-,and macrocyclic containing organic aerogels & xerogels

    DOEpatents

    Fox, Glenn A.; Tillotson, Thomas M.

    2005-08-02

    An organic aerogel or xerogel formed by a sol-gel reaction using starting materials that exhibit similar reactivity to the most commonly used resorcinol starting material. The new starting materials, including thio-, amine- and nitro-containing molecules and functionalized macrocyclic molecules will produce organic xerogels and aerogels that have improved performance in the areas of detection and sensor technology, as well as water stream remediation. Also, further functionalization of these new organic aerogels or xerogels will yield material that can be extracted with greater facility than current organic aerogels.

  18. Multiscale Modeling of Heat Conduction in Carbon Nanotube Aerogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Feng; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios; Duong, Hai

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) aerogels have attracted a lot of interest due to their ultrahigh strength/weight and surface area/weight ratios. They are promising advanced materials used in energy storage systems, hydrogen storage media and weight-conscious devices such as satellites, because of their ultralight and highly porous quality. CNT aerogels can have excellent electrical conductivity and mechanical strength. However, the thermal conductivity of CNT aerogels are as low as 0.01-0.1 W/mK, which is five orders of magnitude lower than that of CNT (2000-5000 W/mK). To investigate the mechanisms for the low thermal conductivity of CNT aerogels, multiscale models are built in this study. Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations are first carried out to investigate the heat transfer between CNT and different gases (e.g. nitrogen and hydrogen), and the thermal conductance at CNT-CNT interface. The interfacial thermal resistances of CNT-gas and CNT-CNT are estimated from the MD simulations. Mesoscopic modeling of CNT aerogels are then built using an off-lattice Monte Carlo (MC) simulations to replicate the realistic CNT aerogels. The interfacial thermal resistances estimated from MD simulations are used as inputs in the MC models to predict the thermal conductivity of CNT aerogels. The volume fractions and the complex morphologies of CNTs are also quantified to study their effects on the thermal conductivity of CNT aerogels. The quantitative findings may help researchers to obtain the CNT aerogels with expected thermal conductivity.

  19. Effects of Microstructure and Loading on Fracture of Sn-3.8Ag-0.7Cu Joints on Cu Substrates with ENIG Surface Finish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Z.; Kumar, P.; Dutta, I.; Sidhu, R.; Renavikar, M.; Mahajan, R.

    2014-12-01

    When dropped, electronic packages often undergo failure by propagation of an interfacial crack in solder joints under a combination of tensile and shear loading. Hence, it is crucial to understand and predict the fracture behavior of solder joints under mixed-mode high-rate loading conditions. In this work, the effects of the loading conditions (strain rate and loading angle) and microstructure [interfacial intermetallic compound (IMC) morphology and solder yield strength] on the mixed-mode fracture toughness of Sn-3.8 wt.%Ag-0.7 wt.%Cu solder joints sandwiched between two Cu substrates with electroless nickel immersion gold (ENIG) metallization have been studied, and compared with the fracture behavior of joints attached to bare Cu. Irrespective of the surface finish, the fracture toughness of the solder joints decreased monotonically with strain rate and mode-mixity, both resulting in increased fracture proportion through the interfacial IMC layer. Furthermore, the proportion of crack propagation through the interfacial IMC layer increased with increase in the thickness and the roughness of the interfacial IMC layer and the yield strength of the solder, resulting in a decrease in the fracture toughness of the joint. However, under most conditions, solder joints with ENIG finish showed higher resistance to fracture than joints attached directly to Cu substrates without ENIG metallization. Based on the experimental observations, a fracture mechanism map is constructed correlating the yield strength of the solder, the morphology and thickness of the interfacial IMC, and the fracture mechanisms as well as the fracture toughness values for different solder joints under mode I loading.

  20. Micromorphological changes and mechanism associated with wet ball milling of Pinus radiata substrate and consequences for saccharification at low enzyme loading.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Alankar A; Donaldson, Lloyd A; Newman, Roger H; Suckling, Ian D; Campion, Sylke H; Lloyd, John A; Murton, Karl D

    2016-08-01

    In this work, substrates prepared from thermo-mechanical treatment of Pinus radiata chips were vibratory ball milled for different times. In subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis, percent glucan conversion passed through a maximum value at a milling time of around 120min and then declined. Scanning electron microscopy revealed breakage of fibers to porous fragments in which lamellae and fibrils were exposed during ball milling. Over-milling caused compression of the porous fragments to compact globular particles with a granular texture, decreasing accessibility to enzymes. Carbon-13 NMR spectroscopy showed partial loss of interior cellulose in crystallites, leveling off once fiber breakage was complete. A mathematical model based on observed micromorphological changes supports ball milling mechanism. At a low enzyme loading of 2FPU/g of substrate and milling time of 120min gave a total monomeric sugar yield of 306g/kg of pulp which is higher than conventional pretreatment method such as steam exploded wood.

  1. Hybrid aerogel rigid ceramic fiber insulation and method of producing same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barney, Andrea O. (Inventor); Heng, Vann (Inventor); Oka, Kris Shigeko (Inventor); Santos, Maryann (Inventor); Zinn, Alfred A. (Inventor); Droege, Michael (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A hybrid insulation material comprises of porous ceramic substrate material impregnated with nanoporous material and method of making the same is the topic of this invention. The porous substrate material has bulk density ranging from 6 to 20 lb/ft.sup.3 and is composed of about 60 to 80 wt % silica (SiO.sub.2) 20 to 40 wt % alumina (Al.sub.2 O.sub.3) fibers, and with about 0.1 to 1.0 wt % boron-containing constituent as the sintering agent. The nanoporous material has density ranging from 1.0 to 10 lb/ft.sup.3 and is either fully or partially impregnated into the substrate to block the pores, resulting in substantial reduction in conduction via radiation and convention. The nanoporous material used to impregnate the fiber substrate is preferably formed from a precursor of alkoxysilane, alcohol, water, and an acid or base catalyst for silica aerogels, and from a precursor of aluminum alkoxide, alcohol, water, and an acid or base catalyst for alumina aerogels.

  2. Effect of larval host food substrate on egg load dynamics, egg size and adult female size in four species of braconid fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae) parasitoids.

    PubMed

    Cicero, Lizette; Sivinski, John; Rull, Juan; Aluja, Martin

    2011-11-01

    Life history theory predicts that individuals will allocate resources to different traits so as to maximize overall fitness. Because conditions experienced during early development can have strong downstream effects on adult phenotype and fitness, we investigated how four species of synovigenic, larval-pupal parasitoids that vary sharply in their degree of specialization (niche breadth) and life history (Diachasmimorpha longicaudata, Doryctobracon crawfordi, Opius hirtus and Utetes anastrephae), allocate resources acquired during the larval stage towards adult reproduction. Parasitoid larvae developed in a single host species reared on four different substrates that differed in quality. We measured parasitoid egg load at the moment of emergence and at 24 h, egg numbers over time, egg size, and also adult size. We predicted that across species the most specialized would have a lower capacity to respond to changes in host substrate quality than wasps with a broad host range, and that within species, females that emerged from hosts that developed in better quality substrates would have the most resources to invest in reproduction. Consistent with our predictions, the more specialized parasitoids were less plastic in some responses to host diet than the more generalist. However, patterns of egg load and size were variable across species. In general, there was a remarkable degree of reproductive effort-allocation constancy within parasitoid species. This may reflect more "time-limited" rather than "egg-limited" foraging strategies where the most expensive component of reproductive success is to locate and handle patchily-distributed and fruit-sequestered hosts. If so, egg costs, independent of degree of specialization, are relatively trivial and sufficient resources are available in fly larvae stemming from all of the substrates tested.

  3. Aerogel-Based Multilayer Insulation with Micrometeoroid Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begag, Redouane; White, Shannon

    2013-01-01

    Ultra-low-density, highly hydrophobic, fiber-reinforced aerogel material integrated with MLI (aluminized Mylar reflectors and B4A Dacron separators) offers a highly effective insulation package by providing unsurpassed thermal performance and significant robustness, delivering substantial MMOD protection via the addition of a novel, durable, external aerogel layer. The hydrophobic nature of the aerogel is an important property for maintaining thermal performance if the material is exposed to the environment (i.e. rain, snow, etc.) during ground installations. The hybrid aerogel/MLI/MMOD solution affords an attractive alternative because it will perform thermally in the same range as MLI at all vacuum levels (including high vacuum), and offers significant protection from micrometeoroid damage. During this effort, the required low-density and resilient aerogel materials have been developed that are needed to optimize the thermal performance for space (high vacuum) cryotank applications. The proposed insulation/MMOD package is composed of two sections: a stack of interleaved aerogel layers and MLI intended for cryotank thermal insulation, and a 1.5- to 1-in. (.2.5- to 3.8- cm) thick aerogel layer (on top of the insulation portion) for MMOD protection. Learning that low-density aerogel cannot withstand the hypervelocity impact test conditions, the innovators decided during the course of the program to fabricate a high-density and strong material based on a cross-linked aerogel (X-aerogel; developed elsewhere by the innovators) for MMOD protection. This system has shown a very high compressive strength that is capable of withstanding high-impact tests if a proper configuration of the MMOD aerogel layer is used. It was learned that by stacking two X-aerogel layers [1.5-in. (.3.8-cm) thick] separated by an air gap, the system would be able to hold the threat at a speed of 5 km/s and gpass h the test. The first aerogel panel stopped the projectile from damaging the second

  4. Miniaturized bandpass filter using a meandered stepped-impedance resonator with a meandered-line stub-load on a GaAs substrate.

    PubMed

    Chuluunbaatar, Z; Wang, C; Kim, N Y

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports a compact bandpass filter with improved skirt selectivity using integrated passive device fabrication technology on a GaAs substrate. The structure of the filter consists of electromagnetically coupled meandered-line symmetric stepped-impedance resonators. The strength of the coupling between the resonators is enhanced by using a meandered-line stub-load inside the resonators to improve the selectivity and miniaturize the size of the filter. In addition, the center frequency of the filter can be flexibly controlled by varying degrees of the capacitive coupling between resonator and stub-load. To verify the proposed concept, a protocol bandpass filter with center frequency of 6.53 GHz was designed, fabricated, and measured, with a return loss and insertion loss of 39.1 dB and 1.63 dB.

  5. Chemical, Physical, and Mechanical Characterization of Isocyanate Cross-linked Amine-Modified Silica Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, Atul; Shimpi, Nilesh; Roy, Samit; Lu, Hongbing; Fabrizio, Eve F.; Dass, Amala; Capadona, Lynn A.; Leventis, Nicholas

    2006-01-01

    We describe a new mechanically strong lightweight porous composite material obtained by encapsulating the skeletal framework of amine-modified silica aerogels with polyurea. The conformal polymer coating preserves the mesoporous structure of the underlying silica framework and the thermal conductivity remains low at 0.041 plus or minus 0.001 W m(sup -1 K(sup -1). The potential of the new cross-linked silica aerogels for load-carrying applications was determined through characterization of their mechanical behavior under compression, three-point bending, and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). A primary glass transition temperature of 130 C was identified through DMA. At room temperature, results indicate a hyperfoam behavior where in compression cross-linked aerogels are linearly elastic under small strains (less than 4%) and then exhibit yield behavior (until 40% strain), followed by densification and inelastic hardening. At room temperature the compressive Young's modulus and the Poisson's ratio were determined to be 129 plus or minus 8 MPa and 0.18, respectively, while the strain at ultimate failure is 77% and the average specific compressive stress at ultimate failure is 3.89 x 10(exp 5) N m kg(sup -1). The specific flexural strength is 2.16 x 10(exp 4) N m kg(sup -1). Effects on the compressive behavior of strain rate and low temperature were also evaluated.

  6. High resolution patterning of silica aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Bertino, M.F.; Hund, J.F.; Sosa, J.; Zhang, G.; Sotiriou-Leventis, C.; Leventis, N.; Tokuhiro, A.T.; Terry, J.

    2008-10-30

    Three-dimensional metallic structures are fabricated with high spatial resolution in silica aerogels. In our method, silica hydrogels are prepared with a standard base-catalyzed route, and exchanged with an aqueous solution typically containing Ag{sup +} ions (1 M) and 2-propanol (0.2 M). The metal ions are reduced photolytically with a table-top ultraviolet lamp, or radiolytically, with a focused X-ray beam. We fabricated dots and lines as small as 30 x 70 {micro}m, protruding for several mm into the bulk of the materials. The hydrogels are eventually supercritically dried to yield aerogels, without any measurable change in the shape and spatial resolution of the lithographed structures. Transmission electron microscopy shows that illuminated regions are composed by Ag clusters with a size of several {micro}m, separated by thin layers of silica.

  7. Transparent monolithic metal ion containing nanophase aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Risen, W. M., Jr.; Hu, X.; Ji, S.; Littrell, K.

    1999-12-01

    The formation of monolithic and transparent transition metal containing aerogels has been achieved through cooperative interactions of high molecular weight functionalized carbohydrates and silica precursors, which strongly influence the kinetics of gelation. After initial gelation, subsequent modification of the ligating character of the system, coordination of the group VIII metal ions, and supercritical extraction afford the aerogels. The structures at the nanophase level have been probed by photon and electron transmission and neutron scattering techniques to help elucidate the basis for structural integrity together with the small entity sizes that permit transparency in the visible range. They also help with understanding the chemical reactivities of the metal-containing sites in these very high surface area materials. These results are discussed in connection with new reaction studies.

  8. Organic aerogel microspheres and fabrication method therefor

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Steven T.; Kong, Fung-Ming; Pekala, Richard W.; Kaschmitter, James L.

    1996-01-01

    Organic aerogel microspheres which can be used in capacitors, batteries, thermal insulation, adsorption/filtration media, and chromatographic packings, having diameters ranging from about 1 micron to about 3 mm. The microspheres can be pyrolyzed to form carbon aerogel microspheres. This method involves stirring the aqueous organic phase in mineral oil at elevated temperature until the dispersed organic phase polymerizes and forms nonsticky gel spheres. The size of the microspheres depends on the collision rate of the liquid droplets and the reaction rate of the monomers from which the aqueous solution is formed. The collision rate is governed by the volume ratio of the aqueous solution to the mineral oil and the shear rate, while the reaction rate is governed by the chemical formulation and the curing temperature.

  9. Organic aerogel microspheres and fabrication method therefor

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, S.T.; Kong, F.M.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1996-04-16

    Organic aerogel microspheres which can be used in capacitors, batteries, thermal insulation, adsorption/filtration media, and chromatographic packings, having diameters ranging from about 1 micron to about 3 mm. The microspheres can be pyrolyzed to form carbon aerogel microspheres. This method involves stirring the aqueous organic phase in mineral oil at elevated temperature until the dispersed organic phase polymerizes and forms nonsticky gel spheres. The size of the microspheres depends on the collision rate of the liquid droplets and the reaction rate of the monomers from which the aqueous solution is formed. The collision rate is governed by the volume ratio of the aqueous solution to the mineral oil and the shear rate, while the reaction rate is governed by the chemical formulation and the curing temperature.

  10. Method for making monolithic metal oxide aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Coronado, Paul R.

    1999-01-01

    Transparent, monolithic metal oxide aerogels of varying densities are produced using a method in which a metal alkoxide solution and a catalyst solution are prepared separately and reacted. The resulting hydrolyzed-condensed colloidal solution is gelled, and the wet gel is contained within a sealed, but gas permeable, containment vessel during supercritical extraction of the solvent. The containment vessel is enclosed within an aqueous atmosphere that is above the supercritical temperature and pressure of the solvent of the metal alkoxide solution.

  11. Octahedral Tin Dioxide Nanocrystals Anchored on Vertically Aligned Carbon Aerogels as High Capacity Anode Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mingkai; Liu, Yuqing; Zhang, Yuting; Li, Yiliao; Zhang, Peng; Yan, Yan; Liu, Tianxi

    2016-08-01

    A novel binder-free graphene - carbon nanotubes - SnO2 (GCNT-SnO2) aerogel with vertically aligned pores was prepared via a simple and efficient directional freezing method. SnO2 octahedrons exposed of {221} high energy facets were uniformly distributed and tightly anchored on multidimensional graphene/carbon nanotube (GCNT) composites. Vertically aligned pores can effectively prevent the emersion of “closed” pores which cannot load the active SnO2 nanoparticles, further ensure quick immersion of electrolyte throughout the aerogel, and can largely shorten the transport distance between lithium ions and active sites of SnO2. Especially, excellent electrical conductivity of GCNT-SnO2 aerogel was achieved as a result of good interconnected networks of graphene and CNTs. Furthermore, meso- and macroporous structures with large surface area created by the vertically aligned pores can provide great benefit to the favorable transport kinetics for both lithium ion and electrons and afford sufficient space for volume expansion of SnO2. Due to the well-designed architecture of GCNT-SnO2 aerogel, a high specific capacity of 1190 mAh/g with good long-term cycling stability up to 1000 times was achieved. This work provides a promising strategy for preparing free-standing and binder-free active electrode materials with high performance for lithium ion batteries and other energy storage devices.

  12. Octahedral Tin Dioxide Nanocrystals Anchored on Vertically Aligned Carbon Aerogels as High Capacity Anode Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mingkai; Liu, Yuqing; Zhang, Yuting; Li, Yiliao; Zhang, Peng; Yan, Yan; Liu, Tianxi

    2016-01-01

    A novel binder-free graphene - carbon nanotubes - SnO2 (GCNT-SnO2) aerogel with vertically aligned pores was prepared via a simple and efficient directional freezing method. SnO2 octahedrons exposed of {221} high energy facets were uniformly distributed and tightly anchored on multidimensional graphene/carbon nanotube (GCNT) composites. Vertically aligned pores can effectively prevent the emersion of “closed” pores which cannot load the active SnO2 nanoparticles, further ensure quick immersion of electrolyte throughout the aerogel, and can largely shorten the transport distance between lithium ions and active sites of SnO2. Especially, excellent electrical conductivity of GCNT-SnO2 aerogel was achieved as a result of good interconnected networks of graphene and CNTs. Furthermore, meso- and macroporous structures with large surface area created by the vertically aligned pores can provide great benefit to the favorable transport kinetics for both lithium ion and electrons and afford sufficient space for volume expansion of SnO2. Due to the well-designed architecture of GCNT-SnO2 aerogel, a high specific capacity of 1190 mAh/g with good long-term cycling stability up to 1000 times was achieved. This work provides a promising strategy for preparing free-standing and binder-free active electrode materials with high performance for lithium ion batteries and other energy storage devices. PMID:27510357

  13. Strength-controllable graphene oxide amphiprotic aerogels as highly efficient carrier for anionic and cationic azo molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Jiaqing; Jiao, Chenlu; Xu, Sijun; Tao, Jin; Zhang, Desuo; Lin, Hong; Chen, Yuyue

    2015-06-01

    Ice-bath self-assembly was employed to fabricate the GO/AP-MCC/CS aerogel based on natural materials. The components are amphiprotic microcrystalline cellulose (AP-MCC), chitosan (CS), and graphene oxide (GO), which act as the main framework, auxiliary framework and adhesive, respectively. The results of characterization determines the components form the GO/AP-MCC/CS aerogel according to chemical interactions. The mechanical properties depend largely on the mass ratio of AP-MCC/CS, which can be regulated by controlling the contents of AP-MCC and CS. The resultant GO/AP-MCC/CS aerogel was observed possessing three-dimensional (3D) interpenetrating porous networks with wrinkled structure on the inner wall, which provide a good encapsulation capacity for the guest molecules. As expected, owing to the amphiprotic properties and large specific surface area, GO/AP-MCC/CS aerogel exhibits high-efficiency load capacity for both anionic (CR) and cationic azo molecules (MB), which can reach up to about 132.2 mg/g for CR and 123.2 mg/g for MB, respectively.

  14. Cellulose nanofibrils aerogels generated from jute fibers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jinyou; Yu, Liangbo; Tian, Feng; Zhao, Nie; Li, Xiuhong; Bian, Fenggang; Wang, Jie

    2014-08-30

    In this work, we report the cellulose nanofibrils extracted from the pristine jute fibers via the pretreatments followed by the TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical)-mediated oxidation and mechanical disintegration. The effects of pretreatments by using the NaOH solution and dimethyl sulfoxide solvent on the fiber morphology and macro/micro-structures were investigated by polarizing microscope and synchrotron radiation wide/small-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS/SAXS). The cellulose nanofibrils exhibit a diameter ranging from 5 nm to 20 nm and a length of several micrometers, which have been assembled into cellulose aerogels by the lyophilization of as-prepared nanofibrils dispersions with various concentrations. The results indicated that the hierarchical structures of as-prepared cellulose aerogels were dependent on the dispersion concentrations. The WAXS results show that the typical cellulose aerogels are coexistence of cellulose I and cellulose II, which has a great promise for many potential applications, such as pharmaceutical, liquid filtration, catalysts, bio-nanocomposites, and tissue engineering scaffolds.

  15. Cutting Silica Aerogel for Particle Extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.; Brownlee, D. E.; Glesias, R.; Grigoropoulos, C. P.; Weschler, M.

    2005-01-01

    The detailed laboratory analyses of extraterrestrial particles have revolutionized our knowledge of planetary bodies in the last three decades. This knowledge of chemical composition, morphology, mineralogy, and isotopics of particles cannot be provided by remote sensing. In order to acquire these detail information in the laboratories, the samples need be intact, unmelted. Such intact capture of hypervelocity particles has been developed in 1996. Subsequently silica aerogel was introduced as the preferred medium for intact capturing of hypervelocity particles and later showed it to be particularly suitable for the space environment. STARDUST, the 4th NASA Discovery mission to capture samples from 81P/Wild 2 and contemporary interstellar dust, is the culmination of these new technologies. In early laboratory experiments of launching hypervelocity projectiles into aerogel, there was the need to cut aerogel to isolate or extract captured particles/tracks. This is especially challenging for space captures, since there will be many particles/tracks of wide ranging scales closely located, even collocated. It is critical to isolate and extract one particle without compromising its neighbors since the full significance of a particle is not known until it is extracted and analyzed. To date, three basic techniques have been explored: mechanical cutting, lasers cutting and ion beam milling. We report the current findings.

  16. Computer Simulation of Fracture in Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, Brian S.

    2006-01-01

    Aerogels are of interest to the aerospace community primarily for their thermal properties, notably their low thermal conductivities. While the gels are typically fragile, recent advances in the application of conformal polymer layers to these gels has made them potentially useful as lightweight structural materials as well. In this work, we investigate the strength and fracture behavior of silica aerogels using a molecular statics-based computer simulation technique. The gels' structure is simulated via a Diffusion Limited Cluster Aggregation (DLCA) algorithm, which produces fractal structures representing experimentally observed aggregates of so-called secondary particles, themselves composed of amorphous silica primary particles an order of magnitude smaller. We have performed multi-length-scale simulations of fracture in silica aerogels, in which the interaction b e e n two secondary particles is assumed to be described by a Morse pair potential parameterized such that the potential range is much smaller than the secondary particle size. These Morse parameters are obtained by atomistic simulation of models of the experimentally-observed amorphous silica "bridges," with the fracture behavior of these bridges modeled via molecular statics using a Morse/Coulomb potential for silica. We consider the energetics of the fracture, and compare qualitative features of low-and high-density gel fracture.

  17. Synthesis and use of organic biodegradable aerogels as drug carriers.

    PubMed

    Veronovski, Anja; Novak, Zoran; Knez, Željko

    2012-01-01

    Aerogels of natural polysaccharides possess both biocharacteristics of polysaccharides, such as good biological compatibility and cell or enzyme-controlled degradability, and aerogel characteristics, such as very high porosity and specific surface areas that makes them highly attractive in drug delivery. Biodegradable alginate aerogels were synthesized via a sol-gel process. In the present work two methods of ionic cross-linking were used to prepare alginate hydrogels as monoliths and spheres, which can be further easily converted to high surface area aerogels. The aerogels obtained were further used as drug carriers. We investigated the effect of process parameters, such as starting concentration and viscosity of alginate solution, on synthesis products and on model drug (nicotinic acid) release. The results indicate that by using the internal setting cross-linking method for obtaining monolithic aerogels nicotinic acid was released in a more controlled manner. The aerogels thus obtained also exhibited smaller volume shrinkage than the ones described in other publications. However, with increasing alginate concentration in both types of synthesis more compact and cross-linked aerogels were formed.

  18. Organic and composite aerogels through ring opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohite, Dhairyashil P.

    Aerogels are open-cell nanoporous materials, unique in terms of low density, low thermal conductivity, low dielectric constants and high acoustic attenuation. Those exceptional properties stem from their complex hierarchical solid framework (agglomerates of porous, fractal secondary nanoparticles), but they also come at a cost: low mechanical strength. This issue has been resolved by crosslinking silica aerogels with organic polymers. The crosslinking polymer has been assumed to form a conformal coating on the surface of the skeletal framework by covalent bridging elementary building blocks. However, "assuming" is not enough: for correlating nanostructure with bulk material properties, it is important to know the exact location of the polymer on the aerogel backbone. For that investigation, we synthesized a new norbornene derivative of triethoxysilane (Si-NAD) that can be attached to skeletal silica nanoparticles. Those norbornene-modified silica aerogels were crosslinked with polynorbornene by ring opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP). The detailed correlation between nanostructure and mechanical strength was probed with a wide array of characterization methods ranging from molecular to bulk through nano. Subsequently, it was reasoned that since the polymer dominates the exceptional mechanical properties of polymer crosslinked aerogels, purely organic aerogels with the same nanostructure and interparticle connectivity should behave similarly. That was explored and confirmed by: (a) synthesis of a difunctional nadimide monomer (bis-NAD), and preparation of robust polyimide aerogels by ROMP of its norbornene end-caps; and, (b) synthesis of dimensionally stable ROMP-derived polydicyclopentadiene aerogels by grafting the nanostructure with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) via free radical chemistry.

  19. Aerogel and xerogel composites for use as carbon anodes

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.; Tillotson, Thomas M.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.

    2008-08-12

    Disclosed herein are aerogel and xerogel composite materials suitable for use as anodes in fuel cells and batteries. Precursors to the aerogel and xerogel compounds are infused with inorganic polymeric materials or carbon particles and then gelled. The gels are then pyrolyzed to form composites with internal structural support.

  20. Highly porous ceramic oxide aerogels having improved flexibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B. (Inventor); Nguyen, Baochau N. (Inventor); Guo, Haiquan (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Ceramic oxide aerogels having improved flexibility are disclosed. Preferred embodiments exhibit high modulus and other strength properties despite their improved flexibility. The gels may be polymer cross-linked via organic polymer chains to further improve strength properties, without substantially detracting from the improved flexibility. Methods of making such aerogels are also disclosed.

  1. Synthesis and Characterization of a Nanocrystalline Thoria Aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    Reibold, R A; Satcher, Jr, J H; Baumann, T F; Simpson, R L; Poco, J F

    2004-02-04

    We report the synthesis and characterization for the first example of a low-density nanocrystalline thoria aerogel. The monolithic aerogels were prepared through the solgel polymerization of hydrated thorium nitrate in ethanol using ammonium hydroxide and propylene oxide as gelation initiators. The dried ThO{sub 2} aerogel was characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and nitrogen adsorption/desorption analyses. The aerogel network was determined to be composed of spherical primary particles with features in the 5-20 nm range. These particles were also determined to be highly crystalline as evidenced by the higher magnification TEM examination. The thoria aerogel possesses high surface area (120 m{sup 2}/g) and pore diameters in the micro- and mesoporous range.

  2. sup 13 C NMR investigation of crosslinking in organic aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, R. L.; Pekala, R. W.

    1989-09-15

    Organic aerogels are a special type of low density foam produced from the supercritical drying of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) gels. These aerogels have continuous porosity, ultrafine cell/pore sizes (<1000 {angstrom}), and a microstructure composed of interconnected colloidal-like particles with diameters ranging from 30-175 {angstrom}. The particle size, surface area, density, and mechanical properties of the aerogels are largely determined by the catalysts concentration used in the sol-gel polymerization. In order to gain some insight into the crosslinks between RF particles, aerogels were labeled with C-13 formaldehyde at various times in the polymerization. CPMAS and IRCP techniques were used to correlate the relaxation behavior of the C-13 enriched aerogels with their different microstructures. 9 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  3. Composite ceria-coated aerogels and methods of making the same

    DOEpatents

    Eyring, Edward M; Ernst, Richard D; Turpin, Gregory C; Dunn, Brian C

    2013-05-07

    Ceria-coated aerogels can include an aerogel support material having a stabilized ceria coating thereon. The ceria coating can be formed by solution or vapor deposition of alcogels or aerogels. Additional catalytic metal species can also be incorporated into the coating to form multi-metallic compounds having improved catalytic activity. Further, the ceria coated aerogels retain high surface areas at elevated temperatures. Thus, improvements in catalytic activity and thermal stability can be achieved using these ceria-coated composite aerogels.

  4. Morphological Characterization of ALD and Doping Effects on Mesoporous SnO2 Aerogels by XPS and Quantitative SEM Image Analysis.

    PubMed

    Correa-Baena, Juan-Pablo; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Santoro, Carlo; Atanassov, Plamen; Agrios, Alexander G

    2016-04-20

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is unsurpassed in its ability to create thin conformal coatings over very rough and/or porous materials. Yet although the coating thickness on flat surfaces can be measured by ellipsometry, characterization of these coatings on rough surfaces is difficult. Here, two techniques are demonstrated to provide such characterization of ALD-coated TiO2 over mesoporous SnO2 aerogel films on glass substrates, and insights are gained as to the ALD process. First, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used to determine the coating thickness over the aerogel, and the results (0.04 nm/cycle) agree well with ellipsometry on flat surfaces up to a coating thickness limit of about 6 nm. Second, quantitative analysis of SEM images of the aerogel cross section is used to determine porosity and roughness, from which coating thickness can be inferred. The analysis reveals increasing porosity from the aerogel/air interface to the aerogel/substrate interface, indicating a thicker ALD coating near the air side, which is consistent with tortuous diffusion through the pores limiting access of ALD precursors to deeper parts of the film. SEM-derived porosity is generally useful in a thin film because bulk methods like nitrogen physisorption or mercury porosimetry are impractical for use with thin-film samples. Therefore, in this study SEM was also used to characterize quantitatively the morphologogical changes in SnO2 aerogel thin films due to doping with Sb. This study can be used as a methodology to understand morphological changes in different types of porous and/or rough materials.

  5. Controlling Atomic Layer Deposition of TiO2 in Aerogels through Surface Functionalization

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosal, S; Baumann, T F; King, J S; Kucheyev, S; Wang, Y; Worsley, M A; Biener, J; Bent, S F; Hamza, A V

    2009-03-09

    This report demonstrates a chemical functionalization method for controlling atomic layer deposition (ALD) of TiO{sub 2} in low-density nanoporous materials. Functionalization of silica aerogel with trimethylsilane is shown to strongly suppress TiO{sub 2} growth via ALD. Subsequent modification of the functionalization through selective removal of the hydrocarbon groups reactivates the aerogel towards TiO{sub 2} deposition. These results demonstrate the potential use of ALD as a selective tool for creating novel nanoporous materials. Nanoporous materials present significant technological advantage for a wide range of applications, including catalysis, energy storage and conversion, nanoelectronics to name just a few (1-4). Hence, there is considerable interest in developing synthetic pathways for the fabrication of nanoporous materials with tailored properties. Aerogels (AGs) are unique low-density, open-cell porous materials consisting of submicrometer pores and ligaments that can be used as a robust material platform for designing novel nanoporous materials. In recent years, a synthetic approach based on ALD on AG templates has emerged as a promising method for the directed growth of nanoporous materials (5-11, 18). This approach has been used successfully to prepare millimeter-sized high aspect ratio aerogels coated uniformly with zinc oxide (ZnO), tungsten (W) and alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) (10, 11). The ALD process utilizes two sequential, self-limiting surface reactions resulting in a layer-by-layer growth mode. The self limiting nature of the surface reactions makes ALD a particularly suitable technique for uniform deposition onto high aspect ratio porous substrates. Additionally, chemical specificity of the surface reactions in ALD enables one to control the deposition process through selective functionalization of the substrate surface. In fact the functionalization of planar substrates such as silicon wafers with organosilane groups (R{sub n}SiX{sub 4-n

  6. Aerogel volatiles concentrator and analyzer (AVCA) - Collection and concentration of trace volatile organics in aerogel for spectroscopic detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsapin, A.; Jones, S.; Petkov, M.; Borchardt, D.; Anderson, M.

    2017-03-01

    A study was conducted to determine the efficacy of using silica aerogel to collect and concentrate ambient trace organics for spectroscopic analysis. Silica aerogel was exposed to atmospheres containing trace amounts of polycyclic aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. The organics present were concentrated in the aerogels by factors varying from 10 to more than 1000 over the levels found in the atmospheres, depending on the specific organic present. Since silica aerogel is transparent over a wide range of optical and near infrared wavelengths, UV-induced fluorescence, Raman and infrared spectroscopies were used to detect and identify the organics collected by the aerogel. Measurements were conducted to determine the sensitivity of these spectroscopic methods for determining organics concentrated by aerogels and the effectiveness of this method for identifying systems containing multiple organic species. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were added to simulated Mars regolith and then vaporized by modest heating in the presence of aerogel. The aerogels adsorbed and concentrated the PAHs, which were detected by induced fluorescence and Raman and FTIR spectroscopies.

  7. In Vivo Ultrasonic Detection of Polyurea Crosslinked Silica Aerogel Implants

    PubMed Central

    Sabri, Firouzeh; Sebelik, Merry E.; Meacham, Ryan; Boughter, John D.; Challis, Mitchell J.; Leventis, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Background Polyurea crosslinked silica aerogels are highly porous, lightweight, and mechanically strong materials with great potential for in vivo applications. Recent in vivo and in vitro studies have demonstrated the biocompatibility of this type of aerogel. The highly porous nature of aerogels allows for exceptional thermal, electric, and acoustic insulating capabilities that can be taken advantage of for non-invasive external imaging techniques. Sound-based detection of implants is a low cost, non-invasive, portable, and rapid technique that is routinely used and readily available in major clinics and hospitals. Methodology In this study the first in vivo ultrasound response of polyurea crosslinked silica aerogel implants was investigated by means of a GE Medical Systems LogiQe diagnostic ultrasound machine with a linear array probe. Aerogel samples were inserted subcutaneously and sub-muscularly in a) fresh animal model and b) cadaveric human model for analysis. For comparison, samples of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) were also imaged under similar conditions as the aerogel samples. Conclusion/significance Polyurea crosslinked silica aerogel (X-Si aerogel) implants were easily identified when inserted in either of the regions in both fresh animal model and cadaveric model. The implant dimensions inferred from the images matched the actual size of the implants and no apparent damage was sustained by the X-Si aerogel implants as a result of the ultrasonic imaging process. The aerogel implants demonstrated hyperechoic behavior and significant posterior shadowing. Results obtained were compared with images acquired from the PDMS implants inserted at the same location. PMID:23799093

  8. Silica/Polymer and Silica/Polymer/Fiber Composite Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ou, Danny; Stepanian, Christopher J.; Hu, Xiangjun

    2010-01-01

    Aerogels that consist, variously, of neat silica/polymer alloys and silica/polymer alloy matrices reinforced with fibers have been developed as materials for flexible thermal-insulation blankets. In comparison with prior aerogel blankets, these aerogel blankets are more durable and less dusty. These blankets are also better able to resist and recover from compression . an important advantage in that maintenance of thickness is essential to maintenance of high thermal-insulation performance. These blankets are especially suitable as core materials for vacuum- insulated panels and vacuum-insulated boxes of advanced, nearly seamless design. (Inasmuch as heat leakage at seams is much greater than heat leakage elsewhere through such structures, advanced designs for high insulation performance should provide for minimization of the sizes and numbers of seams.) A silica/polymer aerogel of the present type could be characterized, somewhat more precisely, as consisting of multiply bonded, linear polymer reinforcements within a silica aerogel matrix. Thus far, several different polymethacrylates (PMAs) have been incorporated into aerogel networks to increase resistance to crushing and to improve other mechanical properties while minimally affecting thermal conductivity and density. The polymethacrylate phases are strongly linked into the silica aerogel networks in these materials. Unlike in other organic/inorganic blended aerogels, the inorganic and organic phases are chemically bonded to each other, by both covalent and hydrogen bonds. In the process for making a silica/polymer alloy aerogel, the covalent bonds are introduced by prepolymerization of the methacrylate monomer with trimethoxysilylpropylmethacrylate, which serves as a phase cross-linker in that it contains both organic and inorganic monomer functional groups and hence acts as a connector between the organic and inorganic phases. Hydrogen bonds are formed between the silanol groups of the inorganic phase and the

  9. Biodegradation of BTEX in a fungal biofilter: influence of operational parameters, effect of shock-loads and substrate stratification.

    PubMed

    Rene, Eldon R; Mohammad, Balsam T; Veiga, María C; Kennes, Christian

    2012-07-01

    The effect of relative humidity (RH: 30% to >95%) of a gas-phase mixture composed of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and para-, meta- and ortho-xylenes (BTEX), inlet concentrations (0.2-12.6 g m(-3)), and empty bed residence times (EBRTs) (48-144 s) was tested in a fungi-dominant biofilter. A maximum elimination capacity (EC(max)) of 244.2 gBTEX m(-3) h(-1) was achieved at a total inlet loading rate (ILR(T)) of 371.2 gBTEXm(-3) h(-1) (RH: 65%). The transient-state response was tested by increasing the ILR(T), in two steps, from ~50 to 850 gm(-3) h(-1) and from ~50 to 320 g m(-3) h(-1), at a constant EBRT of 41.7s. Increasing the ILR(T) reduced the total BTEX removal efficiency (RE(T)) from >97% to 35%, and from >90% to 60% during medium and high shock-load, respectively. When subjected to short (4d) and long-term (7d) shut-down periods, the biofilter was able to recover high EC(max) of, respectively, 200 and 72 gBTEX m(-)3 h(-1) after resuming operation.

  10. Nanofibrous poly(lactide-co-glycolide) membranes loaded with diamond nanoparticles as promising substrates for bone tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Parizek, Martin; Douglas, Timothy EL; Novotna, Katarina; Kromka, Alexander; Brady, Mariea A; Renzing, Andrea; Voss, Eske; Jarosova, Marketa; Palatinus, Lukas; Tesarek, Pavel; Ryparova, Pavla; Lisa, Věra; dos Santos, Ana M; Bacakova, Lucie

    2012-01-01

    Background Nanofibrous scaffolds loaded with bioactive nanoparticles are promising materials for bone tissue engineering. Methods In this study, composite nanofibrous membranes containing a copolymer of L-lactide and glycolide (PLGA) and diamond nanoparticles were fabricated by an electrospinning technique. PLGA was dissolved in a mixture of methylene chloride and dimethyl formamide (2:3) at a concentration of 2.3 wt%, and nanodiamond (ND) powder was added at a concentration of 0.7 wt% (about 23 wt% in dry PLGA). Results In the composite scaffolds, the ND particles were either arranged like beads in the central part of the fibers or formed clusters protruding from the fibers. In the PLGA-ND membranes, the fibers were thicker (diameter 270 ± 9 nm) than in pure PLGA meshes (diameter 218 ± 4 nm), but the areas of pores among these fibers were smaller than in pure PLGA samples (0.46 ± 0.02 μm2 versus 1.28 ± 0.09 μm2 in pure PLGA samples). The PLGA-ND membranes showed higher mechanical resistance, as demonstrated by rupture tests of load and deflection of rupture probe at failure. Both types of membranes enabled the attachment, spreading, and subsequent proliferation of human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells to a similar extent, although these values were usually lower than on polystyrene dishes. Nevertheless, the cells on both types of membranes were polygonal or spindle-like in shape, and were distributed homogeneously on the samples. From days 1–7 after seeding, their number rose continuously, and at the end of the experiment, these cells were able to create a confluent layer. At the same time, the cell viability, evaluated by a LIVE/DEAD viability/cytotoxicity kit, ranged from 92% to 97% on both types of membranes. In addition, on PLGA-ND membranes, the cells formed well developed talin-containing focal adhesion plaques. As estimated by the determination of tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels in the culture medium and concentration of intercellular adhesion

  11. Hypervelocity Capture of Meteoritic Particles in Nonsilica Aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    S Jones; G Flynn

    2011-12-31

    The Stardust mission captured particles from the comet 81P/Wild 2 in gradient density silica aerogel and returned the collected samples to earth in 2006. The analyses of these particles have revealed several new insights into the formation of our solar system. However, since the aerogel used as the capture material was silica, the elemental analyses of the silica-rich particles were made more complicated in certain ways due to the mixing of the silicon of the particles and that of the aerogel. By using a nonsilica aerogel, future elemental analyses of silica-rich particles captured in aerogel could be made more straightforward. Resorcinol/formaldehyde (RF), alumina, and zirconia aerogels were impact tested with meteoritic fragments and the captured fragments were mapped with synchrotron-based X-ray microprobe (XRM) and the particles were analyzed with X-ray fluorescence (XRF). The resorcinol/formaldehyde aerogel proved to be the best capture material, in that it could be keystoned and XRF could be used to locate and analyze particles that were less than 10 {micro}m.

  12. Synthesis and properties of Chitosan-silica hybrid aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Ayers, Michael R.; Hunt, Arlon J.

    2001-06-01

    Chitosan, a polymer that is soluble in dilute aqueous acid, is derived from chitin, a natural polyglucosamide. Aquagels where the solid phase consists of both chitosan and silica can be easily prepared by using an acidic solution of chitosan to catalyze the hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethylorthosilicate. Gels with chitosan/TEOS mass ratios of 0.1-1.1 have been prepared by this method. Standard drying processes using CO{sub 2} give the corresponding aerogels. The amount of chitosan in the gel plays a role in the shrinkage of the aerogel during drying. Gels with the lowest chitosan/silica ratios show the most linear shrinkage, up to 24%, while those with the highest ratios show only a 7% linear shrinkage. Pyrolysis at 700 C under nitrogen produces a darkened aerogel due to the thermal decomposition of the chitosan, however, the aerogel retains its monolithic form. The pyrolyzed aerogels absorb slightly more infrared radiation in the 2-5 {micro}m region than the original aerogels. B.E.T. surface areas of these aerogels range from 470-750 m{sup 2}/g. Biocompatibility screening of this material shows a very high value for hemolysis, but a low value for cytotoxicity.

  13. Flame Retardant Effect of Aerogel and Nanosilica on Engineered Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha K.; Smith, Trent M.; Roberson, Luke B.; Yang, Feng; Nelson, Gordon L.

    2010-01-01

    Aerogels are typically manufactured vIa high temperature and pressure-critical-point drying of a colloidal metal oxide gel filled with solvents. Aerogel materials derived from silica materials represent a structural morphology (amorphous, open-celled nanofoams) rather than a particular chemical constituency. Aerogel is not like conventional foams in that it is a porous material with extreme microporosity and composed of individual features only a few nanometers in length with a highly porous dendriticlike structure. This unique substance has unusual properties such as low thermal conductivity, refractive index and sound suppression; in addition to its exceptional ability to capture fast moving dust. The highly porous nature of the aerogel's structure provides large amounts of surface area per unit weight. For instance, a silica aerogel material with a density of 100 kilograms per cubic meters can have surface areas of around 800 to 1500 square meters per gram depending on the precursors and process utilized to produce it. To take advantage of the unique properties of silica aerogels, especially the ultra light weight and low thermal conductivity, their composites with various engineering polymers were prepared and their flammability was investigated by Cone Calorimetry. The flammability of various polystyrene/silica aerogel nanocomposites were measured. The combination of these nanocomposites with a NASA patented flame retardant SINK were also studied. The results were compared with the base polymer to show the differences between composites with different forms of silica.

  14. Aerogel Insulation Applications for Liquid Hydrogen Launch Vehicle Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, J. E.; Sass, J.

    2007-01-01

    Aerogel based insulation systems for ambient pressure environments were developed for liquid hydrogen (LH2) tank applications. Solutions to thermal insulation problems were demonstrated for the Space Shuttle External Tank (ET) through extensive testing at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory. Demonstration testing was performed using a 1/10th scale ET LH2 intertank unit and liquid helium as the coolant to provide the 20 K cold boundary temperature. Cryopumping tests in the range of 20K were performed using both constant mass and constant pressure methods. Long-duration tests (up to 10 hours) showed that the nitrogen mass taken up inside the intertank is reduced by a factor of nearly three for the aerogel insulated case as compared to the un-insulated (bare metal flight configuration) case. Test results including thermal stabilization, heat transfer effectiveness, and cryopumping confirm that the aerogel system eliminates free liquid nitrogen within the intertank. Physisorption (or adsorption) of liquid nitrogen within the fine pore structure of aerogel materials was also investigated. Results of a mass uptake method show that the sorption ratio (liquid nitrogen to aerogel beads) is about 62 percent by volume. A novel liquid nitrogen production method of testing the liquid nitrogen physical adsorption capacity of aerogel beads was also performed to more closely approximate the actual launch vehicle cooldown and thermal stabilization effects within the aerogel material. The extraordinary insulating effectiveness of the aerogel material shows that cryopumping is not an open-cell mass transport issue but is strictly driven by thermal communication between warm and cold surfaces. The new aerogel insulation technology is useful to solve heat transfer problem areas and to augment existing thermal protection systems on launch vehicles. Examples are given and potential benefits for producing launch systems that are more reliable, robust, reusable, and efficient are outlined.

  15. Polyimide Aerogels with Three-Dimensional Cross-Linked Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panek, John

    2010-01-01

    Polyimide aerogels with three-dimensional cross-linked structure are made using linear oligomeric segments of polyimide, and linked with one of the following into a 3D structure: trifunctional aliphatic or aromatic amines, latent reactive end caps such as nadic anhydride or phenylethynylphenyl amine, and silica or silsesquioxane cage structures decorated with amine. Drying the gels supercritically maintains the solid structure of the gel, creating a polyimide aerogel with improved mechanical properties over linear polyimide aerogels. Lightweight, low-density structures are desired for acoustic and thermal insulation for aerospace structures, habitats, astronaut equipment, and aeronautic applications. Aerogels are a unique material for providing such properties because of their extremely low density and small pore sizes. However, plain silica aerogels are brittle. Reinforcing the aerogel structure with a polymer (X-Aerogel) provides vast improvements in strength while maintaining low density and pore structure. However, degradation of polymers used in cross-linking tends to limit use temperatures to below 150 C. Organic aerogels made from linear polyimide have been demonstrated, but gels shrink substantially during supercritical fluid extraction and may have lower use temperature due to lower glass transition temperatures. The purpose of this innovation is to raise the glass transition temperature of all organic polyimide aerogel by use of tri-, tetra-, or poly-functional units in the structure to create a 3D covalently bonded network. Such cross-linked polyimides typically have higher glass transition temperatures in excess of 300 400 C. In addition, the reinforcement provided by a 3D network should improve mechanical stability, and prevent shrinkage on supercritical fluid extraction. The use of tri-functional aromatic or aliphatic amine groups in the polyimide backbone will provide such a 3D structure.

  16. Anisotropic Phases of Superfluid 3He in Compressed Aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. I. A.; Zimmerman, A. M.; Pollanen, J.; Collett, C. A.; Halperin, W. P.

    2015-03-01

    It has been shown that the relative stabilities of various superfluid states of 3He can be influenced by anisotropy in a silica aerogel framework. We prepared a suite of aerogel samples compressed up to 30% for which we performed pulsed NMR on 3He imbibed within the aerogel. We identified A and B phases and determined their magnetic field-temperature phase diagrams as a function of strain. From these results, we infer that the B phase is distorted by negative strain forming an anisotropic superfluid state more stable than the A phase.

  17. Nanoengineering mechanically robust aerogels via control of foam morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucheyev, S. O.; Baumann, T. F.; Cox, C. A.; Wang, Y. M.; Satcher, J. H.; Hamza, A. V.; Bradby, J. E.

    2006-07-01

    Potential of aerogels for technological applications is often limited by their poor mechanical properties. Here, we demonstrate that alumina aerogel monoliths with excellent mechanical properties can be made by controlling the crystallographic phase, shape, and size of nanoligaments. In particular, we show that thermal processing of aerogels with a morphology of interconnected nanoleaflets causes dehydration and associated curling of the nanoleaflets, resulting in a dramatic improvement of mechanical properties. This study shows an effective way to control mechanical properties of the nanoporous solids that can be synthesized with ligaments having a quasi-two-dimensional shape, such as platelets, ribbons, or leaflets.

  18. Surfactant doped silica aerogels dried at supercritical pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parale, V. G.; Mahadik, D. B.; Kavale, M. S.; Rao, A. Venkateswara; Vhatkar, R. S.; Wagh, P. B.; Gupta, Satish C.

    2013-02-01

    By combining the molecular silica precursor methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMS) with methanol, water and Tween-80 solution, we get surfactant-doped silica alcogels. The wet alcogels can be exchanged with methanol and then supercritically extracted with nitrogen to produce surfactant-doped silica aerogels (SDSAs). SDSAs represent a new class of aerogels that are composed of aggregated submicron porous particles that have tunable interparticle nanoporosity. As we increased the percentage of surfactant, the physical properties of silica aerogels changes. In this study we characterized the SDSAs by SEM for morphological study, FTIR for the material composition, contact angle for hydrophobicity determination and thermal conductivity measurements are carried out for thermal insulation application.

  19. Highly porous and mechanically strong ceramic oxide aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventis, Nicholas (Inventor); Meador, Mary Ann B. (Inventor); Johnston, James C. (Inventor); Fabrizio, Eve F. (Inventor); Ilhan, Ulvi F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Structurally stable and mechanically strong ceramic oxide aerogels are provided. The aerogels are cross-linked via organic polymer chains that are attached to and extend from surface-bound functional groups provided or present over the internal surfaces of a mesoporous ceramic oxide particle network via appropriate chemical reactions. The functional groups can be hydroxyl groups, which are native to ceramic oxides, or they can be non-hydroxyl functional groups that can be decorated over the internal surfaces of the ceramic oxide network. Methods of preparing such mechanically strong ceramic oxide aerogels also are provided.

  20. Highly porous and mechanically strong ceramic oxide aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventis, Nicholas (Inventor); Meador, Mary Ann B. (Inventor); Johnston, James C. (Inventor); Fabrizio, Eve F. (Inventor); Ilhan, Ulvi F. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Structurally stable and mechanically strong ceramic oxide aerogels are provided. The aerogels are cross-linked via organic polymer chains that are attached to and extend from surface-bound functional groups provided or present over the internal surfaces of a mesoporous ceramic oxide particle network via appropriate chemical reactions. The functional groups can be hydroxyl groups, which are native to ceramic oxides, or they can be non-hydroxyl functional groups that can be decorated over the internal surfaces of the ceramic oxide network. Methods of preparing such mechanically strong ceramic oxide aerogels also are provided.

  1. Biodegradation of 4-chlorophenol in an airlift inner loop bioreactor with mixed consortium: effect of HRT, loading rate and biogenic substrate.

    PubMed

    Patel, Bhishma P; Kumar, Arvind

    2016-12-01

    In the present work, removal of 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) by the mixed microbial consortium was evaluated in an airlift inner loop bioreactor. During the study, the effect of various reactor parameters such as hydraulic retention time (HRT), biogenetic substrate concentration, loading rate, and initial substrate concentration on the removal efficiency of 4-CP was investigated. Bioreactor showed a maximum removal rate of 16.59 mg/L/h at the optimum conditions of 24 h HRT, 400 mg/L initial 4-CP, and 0.2 g/L peptone. The optimum HRT found was 24 h after that the washout occured, and the degradation efficiency almost dropped to 50 % at 18 h HRT. Effect of peptone showed that lower concentration of peptone improves 4-CP removal efficiency of the bioreactor. Also, the mixed consortium had utilized 4-CP as a carbon source, as evidenced by the increasing biomass concentration with 4-CP at constant peptone concentration. The presence of 5-chloro 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde in the reactor infers that the mixed consortium has followed the meta-cleavage pathway for 4-CP degradation.

  2. Temperature measurements of shocked silica aerogel foam

    DOE PAGES

    Falk, K.; McCoy, C. A.; Fryer, C. L.; ...

    2014-09-12

    We present recent results of equation-of-state (EOS) measurements of shocked silica (SiO2) aerogel foam at the OMEGA laser facility. Silica aerogel is an important low-density pressure standard used in many high energy density experiments, including the novel technique of shock and release. Due to its many applications, it has been a heavily studied material and has a well-known Hugoniot curve. This work then complements the velocity and pressure measurements with additional temperature data providing the full EOS information within the warm dense matter regime for the temperature interval of 1–15 eV and shock velocities between 10 and 40 km/s correspondingmore » to shock pressures of 0.3–2 Mbar. The experimental results were compared with hydrodynamic simulations and EOS models. We found that the measured temperature was systematically lower than suggested by theoretical calculations. As a result, simulations provide a possible explanation that the emission measured by optical pyrometry comes from a radiative precursor rather than from the shock front, which could have important implications for such measurements.« less

  3. Temperature measurements of shocked silica aerogel foam

    SciTech Connect

    Falk, K.; McCoy, C. A.; Fryer, C. L.; Greeff, C. W.; Hungerford, A. L.; Montgomery, D. S.; Schmidt, D. W.; Sheppard, D. G.; Williams, J. R.; Boehly, T. R.; Benage, J. F.

    2014-09-12

    We present recent results of equation-of-state (EOS) measurements of shocked silica (SiO2) aerogel foam at the OMEGA laser facility. Silica aerogel is an important low-density pressure standard used in many high energy density experiments, including the novel technique of shock and release. Due to its many applications, it has been a heavily studied material and has a well-known Hugoniot curve. This work then complements the velocity and pressure measurements with additional temperature data providing the full EOS information within the warm dense matter regime for the temperature interval of 1–15 eV and shock velocities between 10 and 40 km/s corresponding to shock pressures of 0.3–2 Mbar. The experimental results were compared with hydrodynamic simulations and EOS models. We found that the measured temperature was systematically lower than suggested by theoretical calculations. As a result, simulations provide a possible explanation that the emission measured by optical pyrometry comes from a radiative precursor rather than from the shock front, which could have important implications for such measurements.

  4. Multiscale Computer Simulation of Failure in Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, Brian S.

    2008-01-01

    Aerogels have been of interest to the aerospace community primarily for their thermal properties, notably their low thermal conductivities. While such gels are typically fragile, recent advances in the application of conformal polymer layers to these gels has made them potentially useful as lightweight structural materials as well. We have previously performed computer simulations of aerogel thermal conductivity and tensile and compressive failure, with results that are in qualitative, and sometimes quantitative, agreement with experiment. However, recent experiments in our laboratory suggest that gels having similar densities may exhibit substantially different properties. In this work, we extend our original diffusion limited cluster aggregation (DLCA) model for gel structure to incorporate additional variation in DLCA simulation parameters, with the aim of producing DLCA clusters of similar densities that nevertheless have different fractal dimension and secondary particle coordination. We perform particle statics simulations of gel strain on these clusters, and consider the effects of differing DLCA simulation conditions, and the resultant differences in fractal dimension and coordination, on gel strain properties.

  5. Multifunctional electroactive heteroatom-doped carbon aerogels.

    PubMed

    You, Bo; Yin, Peiqun; An, Linna

    2014-11-12

    The design and synthesis of highly active, durable, and cheap nanomaterials for various renewable energy storage and conversion applications is extremely desirable but remains challenging. Here, a green and efficient strategy to produce CoOx nanoparticles and surface N-co-doped carbon aerogels (Co-N-CAs) is reported by multicomponent surface self-assembly of commercially melamine sponge (CMS). In the methodology, the CMS simultaneously function as green N precursor for surface N doping and 3D support. The resulting Co-N-CAs exhibit 3D hierarchical, interconnected macro- and bimodal meso-porosity (6.3 nm and <4 nm), high surface area (1383 m(2) g(-1)), and highly dispersed, semi-exposured CoOx nanoparticles (diameter of 12.5 nm). The surface doping of N, semi-exposured configuration of CoOx nanoparticles and the penetrated complementary pores (<4 nm) in the carbon walls provide highly accessibility between electroactive components and electrolytes to improve reactivity. With their tailored architecture, the Co-N-CAs show superior electrocatalytic oxygen reduction (ORR) activities comparable to the commercially Pt/C catalysts, high specific capacitance (433 F g(-1)), excellent lithium storage (938 mAh g(-1)), and outstanding durability, making them very promising for advanced energy conversion and storage. In addition, the presented strategy can be extended to fabricate other metal oxide- and N-co-doped carbon aerogels for diverse energy-related applications.

  6. Temperature measurements of shocked silica aerogel foam.

    PubMed

    Falk, K; McCoy, C A; Fryer, C L; Greeff, C W; Hungerford, A L; Montgomery, D S; Schmidt, D W; Sheppard, D G; Williams, J R; Boehly, T R; Benage, J F

    2014-09-01

    We present recent results of equation-of-state (EOS) measurements of shocked silica (SiO_{2}) aerogel foam at the OMEGA laser facility. Silica aerogel is an important low-density pressure standard used in many high energy density experiments, including the novel technique of shock and release. Due to its many applications, it has been a heavily studied material and has a well-known Hugoniot curve. This work then complements the velocity and pressure measurements with additional temperature data providing the full EOS information within the warm dense matter regime for the temperature interval of 1-15 eV and shock velocities between 10 and 40 km/s corresponding to shock pressures of 0.3-2 Mbar. The experimental results were compared with hydrodynamic simulations and EOS models. We found that the measured temperature was systematically lower than suggested by theoretical calculations. Simulations provide a possible explanation that the emission measured by optical pyrometry comes from a radiative precursor rather than from the shock front, which could have important implications for such measurements.

  7. Method for net-shaping using aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Ashey, Carol S.; Reed, Scott T.; Sriram, Chunangad S.; Harris, Thomas M.

    2001-01-01

    A method of net-shaping using aerogel materials is provided by first forming a sol, aging the sol to form a gel, with the gel having a fluid component and having been formed into a medium selected from the group consisting of a powder, bulk material, or granular aerobeads, derivatizing the surface of the gel to render the surface unreactive toward further condensation, removing a portion of the fluid component of the final shaped gel to form a partially dried medium, placing the medium into a cavity, wherein the volume of said medium is less that the volume of the cavity, and removing a portion of the fluid component of the medium. The removal, such as by heating at a temperature of approximately less than 50.degree. C., applying a vacuum, or both, causes the volume of the medium to increase and to form a solid aerogel. The material can be easily removed by exposing the material to a solvent, thereby reducing the volume of the material. In another embodiment, the gel is derivatized and then formed into a shaped medium, where subsequent drying reduces the volume of the shaped medium, forming a net-shaping material. Upon further drying, the material increases in volume to fill a cavity. The present invention is both a method of net-shaping and the material produced by the method.

  8. Creep- and fatigue-resistant, rapid piezoresistive responses of elastomeric graphene-coated carbon nanotube aerogels over a wide pressure range.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Michelle N; Islam, Mohammad F

    2017-01-19

    Lightweight, flexible piezoresistive materials with wide operational pressure ranges are in demand for applications such as human physical activity and health monitoring, robotics, and for functional interfacing between living systems and wearable electronics. Piezoresistivity of many elastomeric foams of polymers and carbon allotropes satisfies much of the required characteristics for these applications except creep and fatigue resistance due to their viscoelasticity, critically limiting the reliability and lifetime of integrated devices. We report the piezoresistive responses from aerogels of graphene-coated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), made using a facile and versatile sol-gel method. Graphene crosslinks the junctions of the underlying random network of SWCNTs, generating lightweight elastomeric aerogels with a mass density of ≈11 mg mL(-1) (volume fraction ≈7.7 × 10(-3)) and a Young's modulus of ≈0.4 MPa. The piezoresistivity of these aerogels spans wide compressive pressures up to at least 120 kPa with sensitivity that exhibit ultrafast temporal responses of <27 ms and <3% delay ratio over 10(4) compressive loading-unloading cycles at rates between 0.1-10 Hz. Most importantly, the piezoresistive responses do not show any creep at least for 1 hour and 80 kPa of compressive static loading. We suggest that the fatigue- and creep-resistant, ultrafast piezoresistive responses of these elastomeric aerogels are highly attractive for use in dynamic and static lightweight, pressure sensing applications such as human activity monitoring and soft robotics.

  9. Aerogel Antennas Communications Study Using Error Vector Magnitude Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.; Mueller, Carl H.; Meador, Mary Ann B.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation discusses an aerogel antennas communication study using error vector magnitude (EVM) measurements. The study was performed using 2x4 element polyimide (PI) aerogel-based phased arrays designed for operation at 5 GHz as transmit (Tx) and receive (Rx) antennas separated by a line of sight (LOS) distance of 8.5 meters. The results of the EVM measurements demonstrate that polyimide aerogel antennas work appropriately to support digital communication links with typically used modulation schemes such as QPSK and 4 DQPSK. As such, PI aerogel antennas with higher gain, larger bandwidth and lower mass than typically used microwave laminates could be suitable to enable aerospace-to- ground communication links with enough channel capacity to support voice, data and video links from CubeSats, unmanned air vehicles (UAV), and commercial aircraft.

  10. Aerogel Antennas Communications Study Using Error Vector Magnitude Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.; Mueller, Carl H.; Meador, Mary Ann B.

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses an aerogel antennas communication study using error vector magnitude (EVM) measurements. The study was performed using 4x2 element polyimide (PI) aerogel-based phased arrays designed for operation at 5 GHz as transmit (Tx) and receive (Rx) antennas separated by a line of sight (LOS) distance of 8.5 meters. The results of the EVM measurements demonstrate that polyimide aerogel antennas work appropriately to support digital communication links with typically used modulation schemes such as QPSK and pi/4 DQPSK. As such, PI aerogel antennas with higher gain, larger bandwidth and lower mass than typically used microwave laminates could be suitable to enable aerospace-to-ground communication links with enough channel capacity to support voice, data and video links from cubesats, unmanned air vehicles (UAV), and commercial aircraft.

  11. Mechanically Strong, Lightweight Porous Materials Developed (X-Aerogels)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventis, Nicholas

    2005-01-01

    Aerogels are attractive materials for a variety of NASA missions because they are ultralightweight, have low thermal conductivity and low-dielectric constants, and can be readily doped with other materials. Potential NASA applications for these materials include lightweight insulation for spacecraft, habitats, and extravehicular activity (EVA) suits; catalyst supports for fuel cell and in situ resource utilization; and sensors for air- and water-quality monitoring for vehicles, habitats, and EVA suits. Conventional aerogels are extremely fragile and require processing via supercritical fluid extraction, which adds cost to the production of an aerogel and limits the sizes and geometries of samples that can be produced from these materials. These issues have severely hampered the application of aerogels in NASA missions.

  12. High surface area aerogels for energy storage and efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, Ryan Patrick

    The dissertation is divided into two main chapters, each focused on a different application for aerogel. The first chapter concerns the development of silica aerogel for thermal insulation. It begins with initial characterization of a silica aerogel insulation for a next-generation Advanced Radioisotope Stirling Generator for space vehicles. While the aerogel as made performs well, it is apparent that further improvements in mechanical strength and durability are necessary. The chapter then continues with the exploration of chlorotrimethysilane surface modification, which somewhat surprisingly provides a drastic increase in mechanical properties, allowing the inherently brittle silica network to deform plastically to >80% strain. It is hypothesized that the hydrophobic surface groups reduce capillary forces during drying, lowering the number of microcracks that may form and weaken the gel. This surface modification scheme is then implemented in a fiber-reinforced, opacified aerogel insulation for a prototypical thermoelectric generator for automotive waste heat recovery. This is the first known report of aerogel insulation for thermoelectrics. The aerogel insulation is able to increase the efficiency of the thermoelectric generator by 40% compared with commercial high-temperature insulating wool. Unfortunately, the supercritical drying process adds significant cost to the aerogel insulation, limiting its commercial viability. The chapter then culminates in the development and characterization of an Ambiently Dried Aerogel Insulation (ADAI) that eliminates the need for expensive supercritical drying. It is believed that this report represents the first aerogel insulation that can be dried without undergoing a large volume change before "springing back" to near its original volume, which allows it to be cast into place into complex geometries and around rigid inclusions. This reduces a large barrier to the commercial viability of aerogel insulation. The advantages of

  13. Photoluminescence properties of silica aerogel/porous silicon nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlash, A. Yu; Zakharko, Yu E.; Skryshevsky, V. A.; Tsiganova, A. I.; Kuznetsov, G. V.

    2010-08-01

    The luminescent properties of nanocomposite pellets based on silica aerogel and porous Si powder are studied depending on the ratio of chemical compounds. The photoluminescence of nanocomposites is characterized by a red-orange band related to silicon nanoparticles and a blue-green band related to silica aerogel with close values of decay time and activation energy. Remarkable tuning of nanocomposites' photoluminescence spectra in the RGB region is established allowing their use as promising phosphor materials for light-emitting diodes. The outgoing spectra of pellet photoluminescence are guided by the chemical composition ratio, porous Si and silica aerogel technology, and the storage time in ambient atmosphere. It was shown that using the silica aerogel as a dielectric matrix considerably increases the stability of photoluminescence yield of silicon nanoparticles.

  14. Comparison of ionic and non-ionic drug release from multi-membrane spherical aerogels.

    PubMed

    Veronovski, Anja; Knez, Zeljko; Novak, Zoran

    2013-09-15

    The presented research was oriented towards the preparation of dry biodegradable alginate aerogels with multi-membranes using a multi-step sol-gel process with potential applications as carriers during oral drug delivery. First alginate spherical hydrogels were formed in CaCl2 or BaCl2 solutions by ionic cross-linking. These cores were further immersed into alginate sodium solution, filtered through a sieve, and dropped into the salt solution again. Multi-membrane hydrogels were obtained by repeating the above process. They were further converted into aerogels by supercritical drying. The effect of the number of membranes was investigated regarding the loading and release of the model drugs nicotinic acid and theophylline. Moreover, the efficiencies of Ba(2+) and Ca(2+) metal ions for forming tridimensional networks that retain and extend drug release were also investigated. Nicotinic acid release was prolonged by adding membranes around the core and using Ca(2+) for cross-linking. However, retarded theophylline release was only obtained by using Ba(2+) for cross-linking. Namely, by increasing the number of membranes and BaCl2 concentration drug release became linear versus time in all studied cases. In the case of nicotinic acid loading increased by adding membranes around the core, however, for theophylline the opposite results were obtained due to the different nature of the model drugs.

  15. Effects of Microgravity on the Formation of Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, A. J.; Ayers, M. R.; Sibille, L.; Cronise, R. J.; Noever, D. A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes research to investigate fundamental aspects of the effects of microgravity on the formation of the microstructure of metal oxide alcogels and aerogels. We are studying the role of gravity on pore structure and gel uniformity in collaboration with Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) on gelling systems under microgravity conditions. While this project was just initiated in May 1998, related research performed earlier is described along with the plans and rationale for the current microgravity investigation to provide background and describe newly developing techniques that should be useful for the current gellation studies. The role of gravity in materials processing must be investigated through the study of well-mastered systems. Sol-gel processed materials are near-perfect candidates to determine the effect of gravity on the formation and growth of random clusters from hierarchies of aggregated units. The processes of hydrolysis, condensation, aggregation and gellation in the formation of alcogels are affected by gravity and therefore provide a rich system to study under microgravity conditions. Supercritical drying of the otherwise unstable wet alcogel preserves the alcogel structure produced during sol-gel processing as aerogel. Supercritically dried aerogel provides for the study of material microstructures without interference from the effects of surface tension, evaporation, and solvent flow. Aerogels are microstructured, low density open-pore solids. They have many unusual properties including: transparency, excellent thermal resistance, high surface area, very low refractive index, a dielectric constant approaching that of air, and extremely low sound velocity. Aerogels are synthesized using sol-gel processing followed by supercritical solvent extraction that leaves the original gel structure virtually intact. These studies will elucidate the effects of microgravity on the homogeneity of the microstructure and porosity of aerogel. The

  16. Self-assembled and pyrolyzed carbon aerogels: an overview of their preparation mechanisms, properties and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allahbakhsh, Ahmad; Bahramian, Ahmad Reza

    2015-08-01

    An overview of the synthesis conditions and mechanisms for the fabrication of different types of carbon aerogels, as well as the structural and functional properties of these materials, is presented here. In this overview, carbon aerogels are classified into three major categories: (i) conventional pyrolyzed organic-based carbon aerogels, which are products of the pyrolysis process of organic aerogels; (ii) self-assembled carbon aerogels, which are products of a reduction process; and (iii) nanocomposite carbon aerogels. Synthesis mechanisms for the sol-gel process of organic aerogels are reviewed using different mechanisms suggested in the literature. Moreover, the overall fabrication process of self-assembled carbon aerogels (graphene and carbon nanotube aerogels) is covered and the suggested mechanism for the gelation process of self-assembled carbon aerogels during the reduction process is investigated using reported mechanisms. The structural performance and functional properties (electrochemical and thermal properties) of different types of carbon aerogels are covered in detail. Moreover, different structural features of carbon aerogels and the influence of synthesis conditions on these structural characteristics are assessed and compared. Based on the literature results covered in this review paper, carbon aerogels are perfect candidates for the fabrication of ultra-low density supercapacitors, as well as thermal insulating materials.

  17. Polyimide-Foam/Aerogel Composites for Thermal Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha; Fesmire, James; Sass, Jared; Smith, Trent; Weoser. Erol

    2009-01-01

    Composites of specific types of polymer foams and aerogel particles or blankets have been proposed to obtain thermal insulation performance superior to those of the neat polyimide foams. These composites have potential to also provide enhanced properties for vibration dampening or acoustic attenuation. The specific type of polymer foam is denoted "TEEK-H", signifying a series, denoted H, within a family of polyimide foams that were developed at NASA s Langley Research Center and are collectively denoted TEEK (an acronym of the inventors names). The specific types of aerogels include Nanogel aerogel particles from Cabot Corporation in Billerica, MA. and of Spaceloft aerogel blanket from Aspen Aerogels in Northborough, MA. The composites are inherently flame-retardant and exceptionally thermally stable. There are numerous potential uses for these composites, at temperatures from cryogenic to high temperatures, in diverse applications that include aerospace vehicles, aircraft, ocean vessels, buildings, and industrial process equipment. Some low-temperature applications, for example, include cryogenic storage and transfer or the transport of foods, medicines, and chemicals. Because of thermal cycling, aging, and weathering most polymer foams do not perform well at cryogenic temperatures and will undergo further cracking over time. The TEEK polyimides are among the few exceptions to this pattern, and the proposed composites are intended to have all the desirable properties of TEEK-H foams, plus improved thermal performance along with enhanced vibration or acoustic-attenuation performance. A composite panel as proposed would be fabricated by adding an appropriate amount of TEEK friable balloons into a mold to form a bottom layer. A piece of flexible aerogel blanket material, cut to the desired size and shape, would then be placed on the bottom TEEK layer and sandwiched between another top layer of polyimide friable balloons so that the aerogel blanket would become

  18. Electron Beam Diagnostics using Coherent Cherenkov Radiation in Aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhoplav, R.; Knyazik, A.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Ruelas, M.

    2009-01-22

    The use of coherent Cherenkov radiation as a diagnostic tool for longitudinal distribution of an electron beam is studied in this paper. Coherent Cherenkov radiation is produced in an aerogel with an index of refraction close to unity. An aerogel spectral properties are experimentally studied and analyzed. This method will be employed for the helical IFEL bunching experiment at Neptune linear accelerator facility at UCLA.

  19. Minimum thermal conductivity considerations in aerogel thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Patrick E.; Kaehr, Bryan; Piekos, Edward S.; Dunphy, Darren; Jeffrey Brinker, C.

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrate the use time domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) to measure the thermal conductivity of the solid silica network of aerogel thin-films. TDTR presents a unique experimental capability for measuring the thermal conductivity of porous media due to the nanosecond time domain aspect of the measurement. In short, TDTR is capable of explicitly measuring the change in temperature with time of the solid portion of porous media independently from the pores or effective media. This makes TDTR ideal for determining the thermal transport through the solid network of the aerogel film. We measure the thermal conductivity of the solid silica networks of an aerogel film that is 10% solid, and the thermal conductivity of the same type of film that has been calcined to remove the terminating methyl groups. We find that for similar densities, the thermal conductivity through the silica in the aerogel thin films is similar to that of bulk aerogels. We theoretically describe the thermal transport in the aerogel films with a modified minimum limit to thermal conductivity that accounts for porosity through a reduction in phonon velocity. Our porous minimum limit agrees well with a wide range of experimental data in addition to sound agreement with differential effective medium theory. This porous minimum limit therefore demonstrates an approach to predict the thermal conductivity of porous disordered materials with no a priori knowledge of the corresponding bulk phase, unlike differential effective medium theory.

  20. Highly compressible 3D periodic graphene aerogel microlattices

    DOE PAGES

    Zhu, Cheng; Han, T. Yong-Jin; Duoss, Eric B.; ...

    2015-04-22

    Graphene is a two-dimensional material that offers a unique combination of low density, exceptional mechanical properties, large surface area and excellent electrical conductivity. Recent progress has produced bulk 3D assemblies of graphene, such as graphene aerogels, but they possess purely stochastic porous networks, which limit their performance compared with the potential of an engineered architecture. Here we report the fabrication of periodic graphene aerogel microlattices, possessing an engineered architecture via a 3D printing technique known as direct ink writing. The 3D printed graphene aerogels are lightweight, highly conductive and exhibit supercompressibility (up to 90% compressive strain). Moreover, the Young’s modulimore » of the 3D printed graphene aerogels show an order of magnitude improvement over bulk graphene materials with comparable geometric density and possess large surface areas. Ultimately, adapting the 3D printing technique to graphene aerogels realizes the possibility of fabricating a myriad of complex aerogel architectures for a broad range of applications.« less

  1. Comparative study of aerogels obtained from differently prepared nanocellulose fibers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenshuai; Li, Qing; Wang, Youcheng; Yi, Xin; Zeng, Jie; Yu, Haipeng; Liu, Yixing; Li, Jian

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the fabrication of nanocellulose fibers (NCFs) with different morphologies and surface properties from biomass resources as well as their self-aggregation into lightweight aerogels. By carefully modulating the nanofibrillation process, four types of NCFs could be readily fabricated, including long aggregated nanofiber bundles, long individualized nanofibers with surface C6 -carboxylate groups, short aggregated nanofibers, and short individualized nanofibers with surface sulfate groups. Free-standing lightweight aerogels were obtained from the corresponding aqueous NCF suspensions through freeze-drying. The structure of the aerogels could be controlled by manipulating the type of NCFs and the concentration of their suspensions. A possible mechanism for the self-aggregation of NCFs into two- or three-dimensional aerogel nanostructures was further proposed. Owing to web-like structure, high porosity, and high surface reactivity, the NCF aerogels exhibited high mechanical flexibility and ductility, and excellent properties for water uptake, removal of dye pollutants, and the use as thermal insulation materials. The aerogels also displayed sound-adsorption capability at high frequencies.

  2. Modeling silica aerogel optical performance by determining its radiative properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lin; Yang, Sungwoo; Bhatia, Bikram; Strobach, Elise; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2016-02-01

    Silica aerogel has been known as a promising candidate for high performance transparent insulation material (TIM). Optical transparency is a crucial metric for silica aerogels in many solar related applications. Both scattering and absorption can reduce the amount of light transmitted through an aerogel slab. Due to multiple scattering, the transmittance deviates from the Beer-Lambert law (exponential attenuation). To better understand its optical performance, we decoupled and quantified the extinction contributions of absorption and scattering separately by identifying two sets of radiative properties. The radiative properties are deduced from the measured total transmittance and reflectance spectra (from 250 nm to 2500 nm) of synthesized aerogel samples by solving the inverse problem of the 1-D Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE). The obtained radiative properties are found to be independent of the sample geometry and can be considered intrinsic material properties, which originate from the aerogel's microstructure. This finding allows for these properties to be directly compared between different samples. We also demonstrate that by using the obtained radiative properties, we can model the photon transport in aerogels of arbitrary shapes, where an analytical solution is difficult to obtain.

  3. Calorimetric Aerogel Collectors/Detectors of Hypervelocity Dust Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, G.; Westphal, A. J.; Phillips, M. L. F.; Jones, S. M.

    Distinguishing between lower velocity (<8 km/s) orbital debris impacts and higher velocity extraterrestrial particles collected in aerogels was the primary driver behind our development of calorimetric aerogels. While low-density aerogels have been shown to be superior at maximizing the survival of captured hypervelocity projectiles, reconstructing the impact velocity has not been possible. We have previously demonstrated that the shock heating experienced by Gd:Tb doped alumina aerogels results in the production of permanently fluorescent impact cavities. In addition, we have shown that the amount of induced (with UV illumination) fluorescence correlates with the kinetic energy of the captured projectile. Improvements in our production capabilities have recently allowed us to measure, using a Ti-doped Si/Al aerogel, the intrinsic resolution of using this technique to reconstruct the velocity of captured hypervelocity projectiles. We are currently exploring composition space in order to optimize the sensitivity and mechanical properties of these collector/detectors. We report on the results from our latest round of hypervelocity tests as well as the expected collection statistics of deploying a 3 square meter array of calorimetric aerogels in low-Earth-orbit (LEO).

  4. Shock Propagation and Instability Structures in Compressed Silica Aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, W M; Molitoris, J D; DeHaven, M R; Gash, A E; Satcher, J H

    2002-05-30

    We have performed a series of experiments examining shock propagation in low density aerogels. High-pressure ({approx}100 kbar) shock waves are produced by detonating high explosives. Radiography is used to obtain a time sequence imaging of the shocks as they enter and traverse the aerogel. We compress the aerogel by impinging shocks waves on either one or both sides of an aerogel slab. The shock wave initially transmitted to the aerogel is very narrow and flat, but disperses and curves as it propagates. Optical images of the shock front reveal the initial formation of a hot dense region that cools and evolves into a well-defined microstructure. Structures observed in the shock front are examined in the framework of hydrodynamic instabilities generated as the shock traverses the low-density aerogel. The primary features of shock propagation are compared to simulations, which also include modeling the detonation of the high explosive, with a 2-D Arbitrary Lagrange Eulerian hydrodynamics code The code includes a detailed thermochemical equation of state and rate law kinetics. We will present an analysis of the data from the time resolved imaging diagnostics and form a consistent picture of the shock transmission, propagation and instability structure.

  5. Clay Nanocomposite/Aerogel Sandwich Structures for Cryotanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sandi; Leventis, Nicholas; Johnston, J. Chris; Meador, Michael

    2006-01-01

    GRC research has led to the development of epoxy-clay nanocomposites with 60-70% lower gas permeability than the base epoxy resin. Filament wound carbon fiber reinforced tanks made with this nanocomposite had a five-fold lower helium leak rate than the corresponding tanks made without clay. More recent work has produced new composites with more than a 100-fold reduction in helium permeability. Use of these advanced, high barrier composites would eliminate the need for a liner in composite cryotanks, thereby simplifying construction and reducing propellant leakage. Aerogels are attractive materials for use as cryotank insulation because of their low density and low thermal conductivity. However, aerogels are fragile and have poor environmental stability, which have limited their use to certain applications in specialized environments (e.g., in certain types of nuclear reactors as Cerenkov radiation detectors, and as thermal insulators aboard space rovers on Mars). New GRC developed polymer crosslinked aerogels (X-Aerogels) retain the low density of conventional aerogels, but they demonstrate a 300-fold increase in their mechanical strength. Currently, our strongest materials combine a density of approx. 0.45 g/cc, a thermal conductivity of approx. 0.04 W/mK and a compressive strength of 185 MPa. Use of these novel aerogels as insulation materials/structural components in combination with the low permeability of epoxy-clay nanocomposites could significantly reduce cryotank weight and improve durability.

  6. Isocyanate Cross-Linked Silica: Structurally Strong Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventis, Nicholas; Sotiriou-Leventis, Chariklia; Zhang, Guo-Hui; Rawashdeh, Abdel-Monem M.

    2002-01-01

    Molecular-level synergism between the silica nanoparticles of pre-formed monoliths and molecular cross-linkers inverts the relative host-guest roles in glass-polymer composites, leading to new strong low-density materials. Attempts to load gels with variable amounts of polyurethane precursors such as di-ISO and diol end-capped polybutylene adipate followed by heat treatment, washing, and supercritical drying led to opaque materials, somewhat stronger than silica but still quite brittle and much inferior to the materials described above. Direct mixing of a diisocyanate and an alcohol-free sol has been attempted recently by Yim et al. Reportedly, that procedure leads to week-long gelation times and requires an at least equally long aging period. In our attempt to add various amounts of di-ISO in a base-catalyzed sol in PC, we also noticed a week-long gelation time. The resulting aerogels were translucent but no less brittle than native silica. According to more recent studies, if propylene carbonate is replaced with acetone, it leads not only to shorter processing times, but also to much stronger gels that can tolerate loads in excess of 40 kg in the arrangement presented. We attribute that behavior to the lower viscosity of acetone, that allows faster diffusion of the di-ISO solution within the pores before di-ISO has time to react with the surface of silica. Further studies are underway to vary the chemical identity of the diisocyanate, as well as the composition and density of silica.

  7. Monolithic three-dimensional electrochemical energy storage system on aerogel or nanotube scaffold

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C; Stadermann, Michael

    2013-11-12

    A monolithic three-dimensional electrochemical energy storage system is provided on an aerogel or nanotube scaffold. An anode, separator, cathode, and cathodic current collector are deposited on the aerogel or nanotube scaffold.

  8. Monolithic three-dimensional electrochemical energy storage system on aerogel or nanotube scaffold

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph Collin; Stadermann, Michael

    2014-07-15

    A monolithic three-dimensional electrochemical energy storage system is provided on an aerogel or nanotube scaffold. An anode, separator, cathode, and cathodic current collector are deposited on the aerogel or nanotube scaffold.

  9. Computational Study of Uniaxial Deformations in Silica Aerogel Using a Coarse-Grained Model.

    PubMed

    Ferreiro-Rangel, Carlos A; Gelb, Lev D

    2015-07-09

    Simulations of a flexible coarse-grained model are used to study silica aerogels. This model, introduced in a previous study (J. Phys. Chem. C 2007, 111, 15792), consists of spherical particles which interact through weak nonbonded forces and strong interparticle bonds that may form and break during the simulations. Small-deformation simulations are used to determine the elastic moduli of a wide range of material models, and large-deformation simulations are used to probe structural evolution and plastic deformation. Uniaxial deformation at constant transverse pressure is simulated using two methods: a hybrid Monte Carlo approach combining molecular dynamics for the motion of individual particles and stochastic moves for transverse stress equilibration, and isothermal molecular dynamics simulations at fixed Poisson ratio. Reasonable agreement on elastic moduli is obtained except at very low densities. The model aerogels exhibit Poisson ratios between 0.17 and 0.24, with higher-density gels clustered around 0.20, and Young's moduli that vary with aerogel density according to a power-law dependence with an exponent near 3.0. These results are in agreement with reported experimental values. The models are shown to satisfy the expected homogeneous isotropic linear-elastic relationship between bulk and Young's moduli at higher densities, but there are systematic deviations at the lowest densities. Simulations of large compressive and tensile strains indicate that these materials display a ductile-to-brittle transition as the density is increased, and that the tensile strength varies with density according to a power law, with an exponent in reasonable agreement with experiment. Auxetic behavior is observed at large tensile strains in some models. Finally, at maximum tensile stress very few broken bonds are found in the materials, in accord with the theory that only a small fraction of the material structure is actually load-bearing.

  10. Porous substrates filled with nanomaterials

    DOEpatents

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Stadermann, Michael

    2014-08-19

    A composition comprising: at least one porous carbon monolith, such as a carbon aerogel, comprising internal pores, and at least one nanomaterial, such as carbon nanotubes, disposed uniformly throughout the internal pores. The nanomaterial can be disposed in the middle of the monolith. In addition, a method for making a monolithic solid with both high surface area and good bulk electrical conductivity is provided. A porous substrate having a thickness of 100 microns or more and comprising macropores throughout its thickness is prepared. At least one catalyst is deposited inside the porous substrate. Subsequently, chemical vapor deposition is used to uniformly deposit a nanomaterial in the macropores throughout the thickness of the porous substrate. Applications include electrical energy storage, such as batteries and capacitors, and hydrogen storage.

  11. Using Silica Sol as a Nanoglue to Prepare Nanoscale Mesoporous Composite Gel and Aerogels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-03-31

    entitled: "USING SILICA SOL AS A NANOGLUE TO PREPARE NANOSCALE MESOPOROUS COMPOSITE GEL AND AEROGELS" Request for release for publication. REF...L. Anderson, Karen E. Swider Lyons, Ceha I. Merzbacher, Joseph V. Ryan and Veronica M. Cepak 3 MESOPOROUS COMPOSITE GELS AND AEROGELS 4 5 6 1...to mesoporous composite gels and aerogels and their various uses. 9 10 2. Description of the Background Art 11 Xerogels and aerogels

  12. Novel Cryogenic Insulation Materials: Aerogel Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan

    2001-01-01

    New insulation materials are being developed to economically and reliably insulate future reusable spacecraft cryogenic tanks over a planned lifecycle of extreme thermal challenges. These insulation materials must prevent heat loss as well as moisture and oxygen condensation on the cryogenic tanks during extended groundhold, must withstand spacecraft launch conditions, and must protect a partly full or empty reusable cryogenic tank from significant reentry heating. To perform over such an extreme temperature range, novel composites were developed from aerogels and high-temperature matrix material such as Space Shuttle tile. These materials were fabricated and tested for use both as cryogenic insulation and as high-temperature insulation. The test results given in this paper were generated during spacecraft re-entry heating simulation tests using cryogenic cooling.

  13. Reinforced plastics and aerogels by nanocrystalline cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Alfred C. W.; Lam, Edmond; Chong, Jonathan; Hrapovic, Sabahudin; Luong, John H. T.

    2013-05-01

    Nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC), a rigid rod-like nanoscale material, can be produced from cellulosic biomass in powder, liquid, or gel forms by acid and chemical hydrolysis. Owing to its unique and exceptional physicochemical properties, the incorporation of a small amount of NCC into plastic enhances the mechanical strength of the latter by several orders of magnitudes. Carbohydrate-based NCC poses no serious environmental concerns, providing further impetus for the development and applications of this green and renewable biomaterial to fabricate lightweight and biodegradable composites and aerogels. Surface functionalization of NCC remains the main focus of NCC research to tailor its properties for dispersion in hydrophilic or hydrophobic media. It is of uttermost importance to develop tools and protocols for imaging of NCC in a complex matrix and quantify its reinforcement effect.

  14. Aerogel and Porous Silicon MEMS for on-Chip Vacuum Packaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-31

    August 31, 2004 Aerogel & Porous Silicon MEMS for on-chip Vacuum Packaging Extension to "Aerogel MEMS for High Acceleration and High Shock...High Acceleration and Shock Applications (Aerogel & DAAHOI-99-C-R220 Porous Silicon MEMS for on-chip Vacuum Packaging ) 5b. GRANT NUMBER Sc. PROGRAM

  15. Aerogel as a Sample Collector and Sample Mount for Transmission XRD Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bish, D. L.; Vaniman, D. T.; Chipera, S. J.; Yen, A. S.; Jones, S. M.

    2001-01-01

    Silica aerogel can be used for dust collection and in situ X-ray analysis. Aerogels can be less absorbing than Be, and it is feasible to obtain X-ray transmission factors >50% using typical aerogels together with a 100-micrometer Be backing foil. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  16. Impact of the substrate loading regime and phosphoric acid supplementation on performance of biogas reactors and microbial community dynamics during anaerobic digestion of chicken wastes.

    PubMed

    Belostotskiy, Dmitry E; Ziganshina, Elvira E; Siniagina, Maria; Boulygina, Eugenia A; Miluykov, Vasili A; Ziganshin, Ayrat M

    2015-10-01

    This study evaluates the effects of increasing organic loading rate (OLR) and decreasing hydraulic retention time (HRT) as well as phosphoric acid addition on mesophilic reactors' performance and biogas production from chicken wastes. Furthermore, microbial community composition in reactors was characterized by a 16S rRNA gene-based pyrosequencing analysis. Each step of increasing OLR impacted on the activity of microorganisms what caused a temporary decrease in biogas production. The addition of phosphoric acid resulted in the increased biogas production with values between 361 and 447 mL g(VS)(-1) from day 61 to day 74 compared to control reactor (309-350 mL g(VS)(-1)). With reactors' operation, Bacteroidetes phylotypes were noticeably replaced with Firmicutes representatives, and significant increase of Clostridium sp. was identified. Within Euryarchaeota, Methanosarcina sp. dominated in all analyzed samples, in which high ammonium levels were detected (3.4-4.9 NH4(+)-N g L(-1)). These results can help in better understanding the anaerobic digestion process of simultaneously ammonium/phosphate-rich substrates.

  17. High-loading-substrate enzymatic hydrolysis of palm plantation waste followed by unsterilized-mixed-culture fermentation for bio-ethanol production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardant, Teuku Beuna; Winarni, Ina; Sukmana, Hadid

    2017-01-01

    It was desired to obtain a general formula for producing bio-ethanol from any part of lignocelluloses wastes that came from palm oil industries due to its abundance. Optimum condition that obtained by using RSM for conducting high-loading-substrate enzymatic hydrolysis of palm oil empty fruit bunch was applied to palm oil trunks and then followed by unsterilized fermentation for producing bio-ethanol. From several optimized conditions investigated, the resulted ethanol concentration could reach 7.92 %v by using 36.5 %w of palm oil trunks but the results were averagely 2.46 %v lower than palm oil empty fruit bunch. The results was statistically compared and showed best correlative coefficient at 0.808 (in scale 0-1) which support the conclusion that the optimum condition for empty fruit bunch and trunks are similar. Utilization of mixed-culture yeast was investigated to produce ethanol from unsterilized hydrolysis product but the improvement wasn't significant compares to single culture yeast.

  18. Iodine Adsorption by Ag-Aerogel under Prototypical Vessel Off-Gas Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Bruffey, Stephanie H.; Jubin, Robert Thomas

    2016-08-01

    U.S. regulations will require the removal of 129I from the off-gas streams of any used nuclear fuel (UNF) reprocessing plant prior to discharge of the off-gas to the environment. The required plant decontamination factor for iodine will vary based on fuel burnup, cooling time, and other factors but is very likely to be >1000 and could be as high as 8000. Multiple off-gas streams within a UNF reprocessing plant combine prior to environmental release, and each of these streams contains some amount of iodine. To achieve the decontamination factors (DFs) that are likely to be required by regulations, iodine removal from the vessel off-gas will be necessary. The vessel off-gas contains iodine at very dilute concentrations (ppb levels), and will also contain water vapor. Iodine species present are likely to include both elemental and organic iodides. There will also be solvent vapors and volatile radiolysis products. The United States has considered the use of silver-based sorbents for removal of iodine from UNF off-gas streams, but little is known about the behavior of those sorbents at very dilute iodine concentrations. The purpose of this study was to expose silver-functionalized silica aerogel (AgAerogel) to a prototypical vessel off-gas stream containing 40 ppb methyl iodide to obtain information about organic iodine capture by silver-sorbents at very low iodine concentrations. The design of this extended duration testing was such that information about the rate of adsorption, the penetration of the iodine species, and the overall system DF could be obtained. Results show that CH3I penetrates into a AgAerogel sorbent bed to a depth of 3.9 cm under prototypical vessel off-gas conditions. An iodine loading of 22 mg I/g AgAerogel was observed in the first 0.3 cm of the bed. Of the iodine delivered to the system, 48% could not be accounted for, and future efforts will investigate this concern. Direct calculation of the decontamination factor is not

  19. KGM-based magnetic carbon aerogels matrix for the uptake of methylene blue and methyl orange.

    PubMed

    Ye, Shuxin; Jin, Weiping; Huang, Qing; Hu, Ying; Li, Yan; Li, Bin

    2016-11-01

    In this study, the preparation of magnetic Fe and Mn oxides (Mag-FMBO) loaded carbon aerogels (CA) based on konjac glucomannan (KGM) and their performance for dyes adsorption were investigated. The prepared magnetic carbon aerogels (Mag-CA) materials were characterized by various methods, including BET surface area analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). What's more, the Mag-CA materials were used as adsorbents to remove dyes [anionic methyl orange (MO) and cationic methylene blue (MB)] from aqueous solutions. The results showed that Mag-CA had an excellent adsorption performance towards MO and MB. The adsorption equilibrium data of both MO and MB can be well described by Langmuir model. The maximum MO and MB uptake capacity of Mag-CA reached 7.42mgg(-1) and 9.37mgg(-1) according to Langmuir isotherm at 303K, respectively. Thermodynamic parameters such as ΔG, ΔH and ΔS were estimated to understand the adsorption mechanism of MO and MB. The adsorption processes of MO and MB could be well described by the pseudo-second-order model. Moreover, Mag-CA with dyes (MO or MB) were successfully regenerated by ethanol and then easily separated from aqueous solution by applying magnetic field.

  20. Monolithic cobalt-doped carbon aerogel for efficient catalytic activation of peroxymonosulfate in water.

    PubMed

    Hu, Peidong; Long, Mingce; Bai, Xue; Wang, Cheng; Cai, Caiyun; Fu, Jiajun; Zhou, Baoxue; Zhou, Yongfeng

    2017-03-06

    As an emerging carbonaceous material, carbon aerogels (CAs) display a great potential in environmental cleanup. In this study, a macroscopic three-dimensional monolithic cobalt-doped carbon aerogel was developed by co-condensation of graphene oxide sheets and resorcinol-formaldehyde resin in the presence of cobalt ions, followed by lyophilization, carbonization and thermal treatment in air. Cobalt ions were introduced as a polymerization catalyst to bridge the organogel framework, and finally cobalt species were retained as both metallic cobalt and Co3O4, wrapped by graphitized carbon layers. The material obtained after a thermal treatment in air (CoCA-A) possesses larger BET specific surface area and pore volume, better hydrophilicity and lower leaching of cobalt ions than that without the post-treatment (CoCA). Despite of a lower loading of cobalt content and a larger mass transfer resistance than traditional powder catalysts, CoCA-A can efficiently eliminate organic contaminants by activation of peroxymonosulfate with a low activation energy. CoCA-A can float beneath the surface of aqueous solution and can be taken out completely without any changes in morphology. The monolith is promising to be developed into an alternative water purification technology due to the easily separable feature.

  1. Noble metal aerogels-synthesis, characterization, and application as electrocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Herrmann, Anne-Kristin; Bigall, Nadja C; Rodriguez, Paramaconi; Wen, Dan; Oezaslan, Mehtap; Schmidt, Thomas J; Gaponik, Nikolai; Eychmüller, Alexander

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: Metallic and catalytically active materials with high surface area and large porosity are a long-desired goal in both industry and academia. In this Account, we summarize the strategies for making a variety of self-supported noble metal aerogels consisting of extended metal backbone nanonetworks. We discuss their outstanding physical and chemical properties, including their three-dimensional network structure, the simple control over their composition, their large specific surface area, and their hierarchical porosity. Additionally, we show some initial results on their excellent performance as electrocatalysts combining both high catalytic activity and high durability for fuel cell reactions such as ethanol oxidation and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Finally, we give some hints on the future challenges in the research area of metal aerogels. We believe that metal aerogels are a new, promising class of electrocatalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) and will also open great opportunities for other electrochemical energy systems, catalysis, and sensors. The commercialization of PEFCs encounters three critical obstacles, viz., high cost, insufficient activity, and inadequate long-term durability. Besides others, the sluggish kinetics of the ORR and alcohol oxidation and insufficient catalyst stability are important reasons for these obstacles. Various approaches have been taken to overcome these obstacles, e.g., by controlling the catalyst particle size in an optimized range, forming multimetallic catalysts, controlling the surface compositions, shaping the catalysts into nanocrystals, and designing supportless catalysts with extended surfaces such as nanostructured thin films, nanotubes, and porous nanostructures. These efforts have produced plenty of excellent electrocatalysts, but the development of multisynergetic functional catalysts exhibiting low cost, high activity, and high durability still faces great challenges. In this

  2. X-Aerogels for Structural Components and High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Future NASA missions and space explorations rely on the use of materials that are strong ultra lightweight and able to withstand extreme temperatures. Aerogels are low density (0.01-0.5 g/cu cm) high porosity materials that contain a glass like structure formed through standard sol-gel chemistry. As a result of these structural properties, aerogels are excellent thermal insulators and are able to withstand temperatures in excess of l,000 C. The open structure of aerogels, however, renders these materials extremely fragile (fracturing at stress forces less than 0.5 N/sq cm). The goal of NASA Glenn Research Center is to increase the strength of these materials by templating polymers and metals onto the surface of an aerogel network facilitating the use of this material for practical applications such as structural components of space vehicles used in exploration. The work this past year focused on two areas; (1) the research and development of new templated aerogels materials and (2) process development for future manufacturing of structural components. Research and development occurred on the production and characterization of new templating materials onto the standard silica aerogel. Materials examined included polymers such as polyimides, fluorinated isocyanates and epoxies, and, metals such as silver, gold and platinum. The final properties indicated that the density of the material formed using an isocyanate is around 0.50 g/cc with a strength greater than that of steel and has low thermal conductivity. The process used to construct these materials is extremely time consuming and labor intensive. One aspect of the project involved investigating the feasibility of shortening the process time by preparing the aerogels in the templating solvent. Traditionally the polymerization used THF as the solvent and after several washes to remove any residual monomers and water, the solvent around the aerogels was changed to acetonitrile for the templating step. This process

  3. Low-Density, Aerogel-Filled Thermal-Insulation Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santos, Maryann; Heng, Vann; Barney, Andrea; Oka, Kris; Droege, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Aerogel fillings have been investigated in a continuing effort to develop low-density thermal-insulation tiles that, relative to prior such tiles, have greater dimensional stability (especially less shrinkage), equal or lower thermal conductivity, and greater strength and durability. In preparation for laboratory tests of dimensional and thermal stability, prototypes of aerogel-filled versions of recently developed low-density tiles have been fabricated by impregnating such tiles to various depths with aerogel formations ranging in density from 1.5 to 5.6 lb/ft3 (about 53 to 200 kg/cu m). Results available at the time of reporting the information for this article showed that the thermal-insulation properties of the partially or fully aerogel- impregnated tiles were equivalent or superior to those of the corresponding non-impregnated tiles and that the partially impregnated tiles exhibited minimal (<1.5 percent) shrinkage after multiple exposures at a temperature of 2,300 F (1,260 C). Latest developments have shown that tiles containing aerogels at the higher end of the density range are stable after multiple exposures at the said temperature.

  4. Van der Waal Interactions in Ultrafine Nanocellulose Aerogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritch, Byron; Bradley, Derek; Kidd, Tim

    Nanocellulose aerogels have shown an ability to be used in many different applications ranging from oil sponges to conductive materials to possibly a low calorie food substitute. Not much is known about the structural and physical property changes that occur when the composition of the aerogel changes. We studied what properties change when the aerogel amounts change, as well as how sticky the aerogels are and how strong they are. The higher concentrations appeared to have more plate-like structures while the lower concentrations had a more fibrous material. These fibers in the low concentrations had a smaller diameter than a human hair. Only the low concentration aerogels were able to stick to a glass surface in the adhesion test, but were able to support a mass much larger than their own. These low concentrations also would stick to your finger when lightly touched. Preliminary tests show that a concentration that is not too low, but not too high, is best for tensile strength. All concentrations were able to hold many times their own mass. Cellulose should be studied more because it is a renewable material and is easily accessed. Nanocellulose is also not environmentally dangerous allowing it to be used in applications involving humans and the environment like noted above. National Science Foundation Grant DMR-1410496.

  5. Thermal Performance Testing of Order Dependancy of Aerogels Multilayered Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wesley L.; Fesmire, James E.; Demko, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    Robust multilayer insulation systems have long been a goal of many research projects. Such insulation systems must provide some degree of structural support and also mechanical integrity during loss of vacuum scenarios while continuing to provide insulative value to the vessel. Aerogel composite blankets can be the best insulation materials in ambient pressure environments; in high vacuum, the thermal performance of aerogel improves by about one order of magnitude. Standard multilayer insulation (MU) is typically 50% worse at ambient pressure and at soft vacuum, but as much as two or three orders of magnitude better at high vacuum. Different combinations of aerogel and multilayer insulation systems have been tested at Cryogenics Test Laboratory of NASA Kennedy Space Center. Analysis performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory showed an importance to the relative location of the MU and aerogel blankets. Apparent thermal conductivity testing under cryogenic-vacuum conditions was performed to verify the analytical conclusion. Tests results are shown to be in agreement with the analysis which indicated that the best performance is obtained with aerogel layers located in the middle of the blanket insulation system.

  6. Synthesis and Properties of Cross-Linked Polyamide Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Jarrod; Meador, Mary Ann; McCorkle, Linda

    2014-01-01

    We report our ongoing research on polyamide aerogels made by step growth polymerization using a combination of terephthaloyl chloride, isophthaloyl chloride and m-phenylenediamine. Crosslinking of the amine capped polymer chains with 1,3,5-benzenetricarbonyl trichloride causes gelation in as little as two to five minutes. Removing the reaction solvent is accomplished through solvent exchange, followed by drying using supercritical CO2 extraction to give colorless aerogels with densities ranging from 0.07 to 0.33 grams per cubic centimeter and surface areas as high as 440 square meters per gram. Statistical experimental design methodology has been utilized to investigate dependence of properties of these aerogels, such as density, compressive modulus, and surface area, on changes in fabrication parameters including formulated number of amide oligomer repeat units (n-value), acid chloride (meta, para or combination), and solids concentration of solution used for gelation. For example, the density of these materials was found to be dependent on the acid chloride type and the solids concentration, but n was not a significant variable. However, surface area was significantly influenced by all three parameters. The polyamide aerogels represent a potential cost savings over previously reported polyimide aerogels, since monomers are all inexpensive and commercially available. Surface area and density were both highest when 100 terephthaloyl chloride was used but a combination of 5 solid concentration, 100 terephthaloyl chloride and n of 20 gave the best combination of properties.

  7. Efficiently dense hierarchical graphene based aerogel electrode for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Lu, Chengxing; Peng, Huifen; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Zhenkun; Wang, Gongkai

    2016-08-01

    Boosting gravimetric and volumetric capacitances simultaneously at a high rate is still a discrepancy in development of graphene based supercapacitors. We report the preparation of dense hierarchical graphene/activated carbon composite aerogels via a reduction induced self-assembly process coupled with a drying post treatment. The compact and porous structures of composite aerogels could be maintained. The drying post treatment has significant effects on increasing the packing density of aerogels. The introduced activated carbons play the key roles of spacers and bridges, mitigating the restacking of adjacent graphene nanosheets and connecting lateral and vertical graphene nanosheets, respectively. The optimized aerogel with a packing density of 0.67 g cm-3 could deliver maximum gravimetric and volumetric capacitances of 128.2 F g-1 and 85.9 F cm-3, respectively, at a current density of 1 A g-1 in aqueous electrolyte, showing no apparent degradation to the specific capacitance at a current density of 10 A g-1 after 20000 cycles. The corresponding gravimetric and volumetric capacitances of 116.6 F g-1 and 78.1 cm-3 with an acceptable cyclic stability are also achieved in ionic liquid electrolyte. The results show a feasible strategy of designing dense hierarchical graphene based aerogels for supercapacitors.

  8. Method to produce alumina aerogels having porosities greater than 80 percent

    DOEpatents

    Poco, John F.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.

    2003-09-16

    A two-step method for producing monolithic alumina aerogels having porosities of greater than 80 percent. Very strong, very low density alumina aerogel monoliths are prepared using the two-step sol-gel process. The method of preparing pure alumina aerogel modifies the prior known sol method by combining the use of substoichiometric water for hydrolysis, the use of acetic acid to control hydrolysis/condensation, and high temperature supercritical drying, all of which contribute to the formation of a polycrystalline aerogel microstructure. This structure provides exceptional mechanical properties of the alumina aerogel, as well as enhanced thermal resistance and high temperature stability.

  9. Mechanically robust, electrically conductive ultralow-density carbon nanotube-based aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.

    2016-10-04

    Disclosed here is a device comprising a porous carbon aerogel or composite thereof as an energy storage material, catalyst support, sensor or adsorbent, wherein the porous carbon aerogel comprises a network of interconnected struts comprising carbon nanotube bundles covalently crosslinked by graphitic carbon nanoparticles, wherein the carbon nanotubes account for 5 to 95 wt. % of the aerogel and the graphitic carbon nanoparticles account for 5 to 95 wt. % of the aerogel, and wherein the aerogel has an electrical conductivity of at least 10 S/m and is capable of withstanding strains of more than 10% before fracture.

  10. MnO2-Based Electrochemical Supercapacitors on Flexible Carbon Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadjer, Marko J.; Mastro, Michael A.; Rojo, José M.; Mojena, Alberto Boscá; Calle, Fernando; Kub, Francis J.; Eddy, Charles R.

    2014-04-01

    Manganese dioxide films were grown on large area flexible carbon aerogel substrates. Characterization by x-ray diffraction confirmed α-MnO2 growth. Three types of films were compared as a function of hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) concentration during growth. The highest concentration of HM TA produced MnO2 flower-like films, as observed by scanning electron microscopy, whose thickness and surface coverage lead to both a higher specific capacitance and higher series resistance. Specific capacitance was measured to be 64 F/g using a galvanostatic setup, compared to the 47 F/g-specific capacitance of the carbon aerogel substrate. Such supercapacitor devices can be fabricated on large area sheets of carbon aerogel to achieve high total capacitance.

  11. Trapping and aerogelation of nanoparticles in negative gravity hydrocarbon flames

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarty, Rajan K.; Novosselov, Igor V.; Beres, Nicholas D.; Moosmüller, Hans; Sorensen, Christopher M.; Stipe, Christopher B.

    2014-06-16

    We report the experimental realization of continuous carbon aerogel production using a flame aerosol reactor by operating it in negative gravity (−g; up-side-down configuration). Buoyancy opposes the fuel and air flow forces in −g, which eliminates convectional outflow of nanoparticles from the flame and traps them in a distinctive non-tipping, flicker-free, cylindrical flame body, where they grow to millimeter-size aerogel particles and gravitationally fall out. Computational fluid dynamics simulations show that a closed-loop recirculation zone is set up in −g flames, which reduces the time to gel for nanoparticles by ≈10{sup 6} s, compared to positive gravity (upward rising) flames. Our results open up new possibilities of one-step gas-phase synthesis of a wide variety of aerogels on an industrial scale.

  12. Electrochemical behavior of carbon aerogels derived from different precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Pekala, R.W.; Alviso, C.T.; Nielsen, J.K.; Tran, T.D.; Reynolds, G.A.M.; Dresselhaus, M.S.

    1995-12-31

    The ability to tailor the structure and properties of porous carbons has led to their increased use as electrodes in energy storage devices. The research focuses on the synthesis and characterization of carbon aerogels for use in electrochemical double layer capacitors.Carbon aerogels are formed from the sol-gel polymerization of (1) resorcinol-formaldehyde or (2) phenolic-furfural, followed by supercritical drying from carbon dioxide, and subsequent pyrolysis in an inert atmosphere. These materials can be produced as monoliths, composites, thin films, powders, or microspheres. In all cases, the aerogels have an open-cell structure with an ultrafine pore size (< 100 nm), high surface area (400--1,100 m{sup 2}/g), and a solid matrix composed of interconnected particles, fibers, or platelets with characteristic dimensions of 10 nm. This paper examines the effects of the carbon precursor and processing conditions on electrochemical performance in aqueous and organic electrolytes.

  13. Aerogel-Based Insulation for Industrial Steam Distribution Systems

    SciTech Connect

    John Williams

    2011-03-30

    Thermal losses in industrial steam distribution systems account for 977 trillion Btu/year in the US, more than 1% of total domestic energy consumption. Aspen Aerogels worked with Department of Energy’s Industrial Technologies Program to specify, develop, scale-up, demonstrate, and deliver Pyrogel XT®, an aerogel-based pipe insulation, to market to reduce energy losses in industrial steam systems. The product developed has become Aspen’s best selling flexible aerogel blanket insulation and has led to over 60 new jobs. Additionally, this product has delivered more than ~0.7 TBTU of domestic energy savings to date, and could produce annual energy savings of 149 TBTU by 2030. Pyrogel XT’s commercial success has been driven by it’s 2-4X better thermal performance, improved durability, greater resistance to corrosion under insulation (CUI), and faster installation times than incumbent insulation materials.

  14. Analytical Methods for Discriminating Stardust in Aerogel Capture Media

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, S; Ishii, H A; Bradley, J P; Luening, K; Ignatyev, K; Pianetta, P

    2007-09-04

    Comet 81P/Wild 2's serendipitous orbit change to the inner solar system in 1974 offered researchers a rare opportunity to sample cometary material from the Kuiper belt, a repository of material left over from solar system formation {approx}4.6 Gyr ago. NASA's Stardust mission intercepted the comet in January 2004 and returned with material collected from its tail in January 2006. The cometary material, consisting of particles ranging from 10 microns down to <2 nm, was collected in aerogel, a very low density ({approx}3 mg/cm cm3) silica foam, to minimize the effects of deceleration from 6.1 km/s. The entire deceleration track is extracted from the aerogel block as a pyramidal shape known as a keystone which can be mapped using x-ray fluorescence prior to extraction of terminal or intermediate particles for other analyses. One goal of the track mapping is to determine the bulk composition of the cometary material returned. Unfortunately, although the aerogel is predominantly SiO{sub 2}, there are sufficient quantities of trace elements similar to those expected in the cometary material to require sophisticated discrimination techniques in order to decide whether a fluorescence map pixel contains only aerogel or both aerogel and cometary material. We have developed a dual threshold analysis approach for better distinguishing cometary material from aerogel contaminants and have applied it to five Stardust impact tracks and terminal particles. Here, we present aspects of the dual threshold approach and demonstrate its impact on track composition for one track.

  15. 3D MoS2-graphene hybrid aerogels as catalyst for enhanced efficient hydrogen evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaobing; Sun, Yuan; Qiao, Wen; Zhang, Xing; Chen, Xing; Song, Xueyin; Wu, Liqian; Zhong, Wei; Du, Youwei

    2017-02-01

    Aerogel composite materials consisting of MoS2 and reduced graphite oxide (rGO) are synthesized by a facile general hydrothermal method, where GO is utilized as a template and provides a novel substrate for the nucleation and subsequent growth of MoS2. These MoS2/rGO hybrid nanostructures exhibit three-dimensional (3D) leaf-like morphology, and show excellent electrocatalytic activities of hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), with a low overpotential of approximately 105 mV, a small Tafel slope of 51 mV/dec and a large exchange current density (j0) of 3.28 × 10-5 A/cm2. The superior electrochemical performance should be attributed to the 3D porous MoS2/rGO hybrid architecture, which enhances the conductivity from graphene to MoS2 as well as the HER activity.

  16. Highly transparent, flexible, and thermally stable superhydrophobic ORMOSIL aerogel thin films.

    PubMed

    Budunoglu, Hulya; Yildirim, Adem; Guler, Mustafa O; Bayindir, Mehmet

    2011-02-01

    We report preparation of highly transparent, flexible, and thermally stable superhydrophobic organically modified silica (ORMOSIL) aerogel thin films from colloidal dispersions at ambient conditions. The prepared dispersions are suitable for large area processing with ease of coating and being directly applicable without requiring any pre- or post-treatment on a variety of surfaces including glass, wood, and plastics. ORMOSIL films exhibit and retain superhydrophobic behavior up to 500 °C and even on bent flexible substrates. The surface of the films can be converted from superhydrophobic (contact angle of 179.9°) to superhydrophilic (contact angle of <5°) by calcination at high temperatures. The wettability of the coatings can be changed by tuning the calcination temperature and duration. The prepared films also exhibit low refractive index and high porosity making them suitable as multifunctional coatings for many application fields including solar cells, flexible electronics, and lab on papers.

  17. Thermoelectric Polymers and their Elastic Aerogels.

    PubMed

    Khan, Zia Ullah; Edberg, Jesper; Hamedi, Mahiar Max; Gabrielsson, Roger; Granberg, Hjalmar; Wågberg, Lars; Engquist, Isak; Berggren, Magnus; Crispin, Xavier

    2016-06-01

    Electronically conducting polymers constitute an emerging class of materials for novel electronics, such as printed electronics and flexible electronics. Their properties have been further diversified to introduce elasticity, which has opened new possibility for "stretchable" electronics. Recent discoveries demonstrate that conducting polymers have thermoelectric properties with a low thermal conductivity, as well as tunable Seebeck coefficients - which is achieved by modulating their electrical conductivity via simple redox reactions. Using these thermoelectric properties, all-organic flexible thermoelectric devices, such as temperature sensors, heat flux sensors, and thermoelectric generators, are being developed. In this article we discuss the combination of the two emerging fields: stretchable electronics and polymer thermoelectrics. The combination of elastic and thermoelectric properties seems to be unique for conducting polymers, and difficult to achieve with inorganic thermoelectric materials. We introduce the basic concepts, and state of the art knowledge, about the thermoelectric properties of conducting polymers, and illustrate the use of elastic thermoelectric conducting polymer aerogels that could be employed as temperature and pressure sensors in an electronic-skin.

  18. System and method for 3D printing of aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Duoss, Eric; Kuntz, Joshua; Spadaccini, Christopher; Zhu, Cheng

    2016-03-08

    A method of forming an aerogel. The method may involve providing a graphene oxide powder and mixing the graphene oxide powder with a solution to form an ink. A 3D printing technique may be used to write the ink into a catalytic solution that is contained in a fluid containment member to form a wet part. The wet part may then be cured in a sealed container for a predetermined period of time at a predetermined temperature. The cured wet part may then be dried to form a finished aerogel part.

  19. Silicon Oxycarbide Aerogels for High-Temperature Thermal Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Owen; Rhine, Wendell; Coutinho, Decio

    2010-01-01

    This work has shown that the use of SOC-A35 leads to aerogel materials containing a significant concentration of carbidic species and limited amorphous free carbon. Substitution of the divalent oxide species in silica with tetravalent carbidic carbon has directly led to materials that exhibit increased network viscosity, reduced sintering, and limited densification. The SiOC aerogels produced in this work have the highest carbide content of any dense or porous SiOC glass reported in the literature at that time, and exhibit tremendous long-term thermal stability.

  20. Highly porous ceramic oxide aerogels having improved flexibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B. (Inventor); Nguyen, Baochau N. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Ceramic oxide aerogels incorporating periodically dispersed flexible linkages are provided. The flexible linkages impart greater flexibility than the native aerogels without those linkages, and have been shown to reduce or eliminate the need for supercritical CO.sub.2-mediated drying of the corresponding wet gels. The gels may also be polymer cross-linked via organic polymer chains that are attached to and extend from surface-bound functional groups provided or present over the internal surfaces of a mesoporous ceramic oxide particle network via appropriate chemical reactions.

  1. Process for Preparing Epoxy-Reinforced Silica Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    One-pot reaction process for preparing epoxy-reinforced monolithic silica aerogels comprising the reaction of at least one silicon compound selected from the group consisting of alkoxysilanes, orthosilicates and combination thereof in any ratio with effective amounts of an epoxy monomer and an aminoalkoxy silane to obtain an epoxy monomer-silica sol in solution, subsequently preparing an epoxy-monomer silica gel from said silica sol solution followed by initiating polymerization of the epoxy monomer to obtain the epoxy-reinforced monolithic silica aerogel.

  2. Ultralight boron nitride aerogels via template-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yangxi; Li, Bin; Yang, Siwei; Ding, Guqiao; Zhang, Changrui; Xie, Xiaoming

    2015-05-01

    Boron nitride (BN) aerogels are porous materials with a continuous three-dimensional network structure. They are attracting increasing attention for a wide range of applications. Here, we report the template-assisted synthesis of BN aerogels by catalyst-free, low-pressure chemical vapor deposition on graphene-carbon nanotube composite aerogels using borazine as the B and N sources with a relatively low temperature of 900 °C. The three-dimensional structure of the BN aerogels was achieved through the structural design of carbon aerogel templates. The BN aerogels have an ultrahigh specific surface area, ultralow density, excellent oil absorbing ability, and high temperature oxidation resistance. The specific surface area of BN aerogels can reach up to 1051 m2 g-1, 2-3 times larger than the reported BN aerogels. The mass density can be as low as 0.6 mg cm-3, much lower than that of air. The BN aerogels exhibit high hydrophobic properties and can absorb up to 160 times their weight in oil. This is much higher than porous BN nanosheets reported previously. The BN aerogels can be restored for reuse after oil absorption simply by burning them in air. This is because of their high temperature oxidation resistance and suggests broad utility as water treatment tools.

  3. Ultralight boron nitride aerogels via template-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yangxi; Li, Bin; Yang, Siwei; Ding, Guqiao; Zhang, Changrui; Xie, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    Boron nitride (BN) aerogels are porous materials with a continuous three-dimensional network structure. They are attracting increasing attention for a wide range of applications. Here, we report the template-assisted synthesis of BN aerogels by catalyst-free, low-pressure chemical vapor deposition on graphene-carbon nanotube composite aerogels using borazine as the B and N sources with a relatively low temperature of 900 °C. The three-dimensional structure of the BN aerogels was achieved through the structural design of carbon aerogel templates. The BN aerogels have an ultrahigh specific surface area, ultralow density, excellent oil absorbing ability, and high temperature oxidation resistance. The specific surface area of BN aerogels can reach up to 1051 m2 g−1, 2-3 times larger than the reported BN aerogels. The mass density can be as low as 0.6 mg cm−3, much lower than that of air. The BN aerogels exhibit high hydrophobic properties and can absorb up to 160 times their weight in oil. This is much higher than porous BN nanosheets reported previously. The BN aerogels can be restored for reuse after oil absorption simply by burning them in air. This is because of their high temperature oxidation resistance and suggests broad utility as water treatment tools. PMID:25976019

  4. Polyimide Aerogels with Three-Dimensional Cross-Linked Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for creating a three dimensional cross-linked polyimide structure includes dissolving a diamine, a dianhydride, and a triamine in a solvent, imidizing a polyamic acid gel by heating the gel, extracting the gel in a second solvent, supercritically drying the gel, and removing the solvent to create a polyimide aerogel.

  5. Porous silicon nanocrystals in a silica aerogel matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amonkosolpan, Jamaree; Wolverson, Daniel; Goller, Bernhard; Polisski, Sergej; Kovalev, Dmitry; Rollings, Matthew; Grogan, Michael D. W.; Birks, Timothy A.

    2012-07-01

    Silicon nanoparticles of three types (oxide-terminated silicon nanospheres, micron-sized hydrogen-terminated porous silicon grains and micron-size oxide-terminated porous silicon grains) were incorporated into silica aerogels at the gel preparation stage. Samples with a wide range of concentrations were prepared, resulting in aerogels that were translucent (but weakly coloured) through to completely opaque for visible light over sample thicknesses of several millimetres. The photoluminescence of these composite materials and of silica aerogel without silicon inclusions was studied in vacuum and in the presence of molecular oxygen in order to determine whether there is any evidence for non-radiative energy transfer from the silicon triplet exciton state to molecular oxygen adsorbed at the silicon surface. No sensitivity to oxygen was observed from the nanoparticles which had partially H-terminated surfaces before incorporation, and so we conclude that the silicon surface has become substantially oxidised. Finally, the FTIR and Raman scattering spectra of the composites were studied in order to establish the presence of crystalline silicon; by taking the ratio of intensities of the silicon and aerogel Raman bands, we were able to obtain a quantitative measure of the silicon nanoparticle concentration independent of the degree of optical attenuation.

  6. Aerogel-Based Insulation for High-Temperature Industrial Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Owen Evans

    2011-10-13

    Under this program, Aspen Aerogels has developed an industrial insulation called Pyrogel HT, which is 4-5 times more thermally efficient than current non-aerogel technology. Derived from nanoporous silica aerogels, Pyrogel HT was specifically developed to address a high temperature capability gap not currently met with Aspen Aerogels{trademark} flagship product, Pyrogel XT. Pyrogel XT, which was originally developed on a separate DOE contract (DE-FG36-06GO16056), was primarily optimized for use in industrial steam processing systems, where application temperatures typically do not exceed 400 C. At the time, further improvements in thermal performance above 400 C could not be reasonably achieved for Pyrogel XT without significantly affecting other key material properties using the current technology. Cumulative sales of Pyrogel HT into domestic power plants should reach $125MM through 2030, eventually reaching about 10% of the total insulation market share in that space. Global energy savings would be expected to scale similarly. Over the same period, these sales would reduce domestic energy consumption by more than 65 TBtu. Upon branching out into all industrial processes in the 400 C-650 C regime, Pyrogel HT would reach annual sales levels of $150MM, with two-thirds of that being exported.

  7. Reinforcement of bacterial cellulose aerogels with biocompatible polymers

    PubMed Central

    Pircher, N.; Veigel, S.; Aigner, N.; Nedelec, J.M.; Rosenau, T.; Liebner, F.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) aerogels, which are fragile, ultra-lightweight, open-porous and transversally isotropic materials, have been reinforced with the biocompatible polymers polylactic acid (PLA), polycaprolactone (PCL), cellulose acetate (CA), and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), respectively, at varying BC/polymer ratios. Supercritical carbon dioxide anti-solvent precipitation and simultaneous extraction of the anti-solvent using scCO2 have been used as core techniques for incorporating the secondary polymer into the BC matrix and to convert the formed composite organogels into aerogels. Uniaxial compression tests revealed a considerable enhancement of the mechanical properties as compared to BC aerogels. Nitrogen sorption experiments at 77 K and scanning electron micrographs confirmed the preservation (or even enhancement) of the surface-area-to-volume ratio for most of the samples. The formation of an open-porous, interpenetrating network of the second polymer has been demonstrated by treatment of BC/PMMA hybrid aerogels with EMIM acetate, which exclusively extracted cellulose, leaving behind self-supporting organogels. PMID:25037381

  8. Thin Aerogel as a Spacer in Multilayer Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moroz, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Cryogenic fluid management is a critical technical area that is needed for future space exploration. A key challenge is the storability of liquid hydrogen (LH2), liquid methane (LCH4), and liquid oxygen (LOX) propellants for long-duration missions. The storage tanks must be well-insulated to prevent over-pressurization and venting, which can lead to unacceptable propellant losses for long-duration missions to Mars and beyond. Aspen Aerogels had validated the key process step to enable the fabrication of thin, low-density aerogel materials. The multilayer aerogel insulation (MLAI) system prototypes were prepared using sheets of aerogel materials with superior thermal performance exceeding current state-of-the-art insulation for space applications. The exceptional properties of this system include a new breakthrough in high-vacuum cryogenic thermal insulation, providing a durable material with excellent thermal performance at a reduced cost when compared to longstanding state-of-the-art multilayer insulation systems. During the Phase II project, further refinement and qualification/system-level testing of the MLAI system will be performed for use in cryogenic storage applications. Aspen has been in discussions with United Launch Alliance, LLC; NASA's Kennedy Space Center; and Yetispace, Inc., to test the MLAI system on rea-lworld tanks such as Vibro-Acoustic Test Article (VATA) or the Cryogenic Orbital Testbed (CRYOTE).

  9. Thin Aerogel as a Spacer in Multilayer Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moroz, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Cryogenic fluid management is a critical technical area that is needed for future space exploration. A key challenge is the storability of liquid hydrogen (LH2), liquid methane (LCH4), and liquid oxygen (LOX) propellants for long-duration missions. The storage tanks must be well-insulated to prevent over-pressurization and venting, which can lead to unacceptable propellant losses for long-duration missions to Mars and beyond. Aspen Aerogels had validated the key process step to enable the fabrication of thin, low-density aerogel materials. The multilayer aerogel insulation (MLAI) system prototypes were prepared using sheets of aerogel materials with superior thermal performance exceeding current state-of-the-art insulation for space applications. The exceptional properties of this system include a new breakthrough in high-vacuum cryogenic thermal insulation, providing a durable material with excellent thermal performance at a reduced cost when compared to longstanding state-of-the-art multilayer insulation systems. During the Phase II project, further refinement and qualification/system-level testing of the MLAI system will be performed for use in cryogenic storage applications. Aspen has been in discussions with United Launch Alliance, LLC; NASA's Kennedy Space Center; and Yetispace, Inc., to test the MLAI system on real-world tanks such as Vibro-Acoustic Test Article (VATA) or the Cryogenic Orbital Testbed (CRYOTE).

  10. Transparent conducting aerogels of antimony-doped tin oxide.

    PubMed

    Correa Baena, Juan Pablo; Agrios, Alexander G

    2014-11-12

    Bulk antimony-doped tin oxide aerogels are prepared by epoxide-initiated sol-gel processing. Tin and antimony precursors are dissolved in ethanol and water, respectively, and propylene oxide is added to cause rapid gelation of the sol, which is then dried supercritically. The Sb:Sn precursor mole ratio is varied from 0 to 30% to optimize the material conductivity and absorbance. The materials are characterized by electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), nitrogen physisorption analysis, a four-point probe resistivity measurement, and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The samples possess morphology typical of aerogels without significant change with the amount of doping. Calcination at 450 °C produces a cassiterite crystal structure in all aerogel samples. Introduction of Sb at 15% in the precursor (7.6% Sb by XPS) yields a resistivity more than 3 orders of magnitude lower than an undoped SnO2 aerogel. Calcination at 800 °C reduces the resistivity by an additional 2 orders of magnitude to 30 Ω·cm, but results in a significant decrease in surface area and pore volume.

  11. Nitridation under ammonia of high surface area vanadium aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Merdrignac-Conanec, Odile . E-mail: odile.merdrignac@univ-rennes1.fr; El Badraoui, Khadija; L'Haridon, Paul

    2005-01-15

    Vanadium pentoxide gels have been obtained from decavanadic acid prepared by ion exchange on a resin from ammonium metavanadate solution. The progressive removal of water by solvent exchange in supercritical conditions led to the formation of high surface area V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, 1.6H{sub 2}O aerogels. Heat treatment under ammonia has been performed on these aerogels in the 450-900 deg. C temperature range. The oxide precursors and oxynitrides have been characterized by XRD, SEM, TGA, BET. Nitridation leads to divided oxynitride powders in which the fibrous structure of the aerogel is maintained. The use of both very low heating rates and high surface area aerogel precursors allows a higher rate and a lower threshold of nitridation than those reported in previous works. By adjusting the nitridation temperature, it has been possible to prepare oxynitrides with various nitrogen enrichment and vanadium valency states. Whatever the V(O,N) composition, the oxidation of the oxynitrides in air starts between 250 and 300 deg. C. This determines their potential use as chemical gas sensors at a maximum working temperature of 250 deg. C.

  12. Synthesis and Properties of Cross-Linked Polyamide Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Jarrod C.; Meador, Mary Ann; McCorkle, Linda

    2015-01-01

    We report the first synthesis of cross-linked polyamide aerogels through step growth polymerization using a combination of diamines, diacid chloride and triacid chloride. Polyamide oligomers endcapped with amines are prepared as stable solutions in N-methylpyrrolidinone from several different diamine precursors and 1,3-benzenedicarbonyl dichloride. Addition of 1,3,5-benzenetricarbonyl trichloride yields gels which form in under five minutes according to the scheme shown. Solvent exchange of the gels into ethanol, followed by drying using supercritical CO2 extraction gives colorless aerogels with densities around 0.1 to 0.2 gcm3. Thicker monolithes of the polyamide aerogels are stiff and strong, while thin films of certain formulations are highly flexible, durable, and even translucent. These materials may have use as insulation for deployable space structures, rovers, habitats or extravehicular activity suits as well as in many terrestrial applications. Strucure property relationships of the aerogels, including surface area, mechanical properties, and thermal conductivity will be discussed.

  13. Macroscopic Subdivision of Silica Aerogel Collectors for Sample Return Missions

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, H A; Bradley, J P

    2005-09-14

    Silica aerogel collector tiles have been employed for the collection of particles in low Earth orbit and, more recently, for the capture of cometary particles by NASA's Stardust mission. Reliable, reproducible methods for cutting these and future collector tiles from sample return missions are necessary to maximize the science output from the extremely valuable embedded particles. We present a means of macroscopic subdivision of collector tiles by generating large-scale cuts over several centimeters in silica aerogel with almost no material loss. The cut surfaces are smooth and optically clear allowing visual location of particles for analysis and extraction. This capability is complementary to the smaller-scale cutting capabilities previously described [Westphal (2004), Ishii (2005a, 2005b)] for removing individual impacts and particulate debris in tiny aerogel extractions. Macroscopic cuts enable division and storage or distribution of portions of aerogel tiles for immediate analysis of samples by certain techniques in situ or further extraction of samples suited for other methods of analysis.

  14. Preparing Silica Aerogel Monoliths via a Rapid Supercritical Extraction Method

    PubMed Central

    Gorka, Caroline A.

    2014-01-01

    A procedure for the fabrication of monolithic silica aerogels in eight hours or less via a rapid supercritical extraction process is described. The procedure requires 15-20 min of preparation time, during which a liquid precursor mixture is prepared and poured into wells of a metal mold that is placed between the platens of a hydraulic hot press, followed by several hours of processing within the hot press. The precursor solution consists of a 1.0:12.0:3.6:3.5 x 10-3 molar ratio of tetramethylorthosilicate (TMOS):methanol:water:ammonia. In each well of the mold, a porous silica sol-gel matrix forms. As the temperature of the mold and its contents is increased, the pressure within the mold rises. After the temperature/pressure conditions surpass the supercritical point for the solvent within the pores of the matrix (in this case, a methanol/water mixture), the supercritical fluid is released, and monolithic aerogel remains within the wells of the mold. With the mold used in this procedure, cylindrical monoliths of 2.2 cm diameter and 1.9 cm height are produced. Aerogels formed by this rapid method have comparable properties (low bulk and skeletal density, high surface area, mesoporous morphology) to those prepared by other methods that involve either additional reaction steps or solvent extractions (lengthier processes that generate more chemical waste).The rapid supercritical extraction method can also be applied to the fabrication of aerogels based on other precursor recipes. PMID:24637334

  15. Porous silicon nanocrystals in a silica aerogel matrix

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Silicon nanoparticles of three types (oxide-terminated silicon nanospheres, micron-sized hydrogen-terminated porous silicon grains and micron-size oxide-terminated porous silicon grains) were incorporated into silica aerogels at the gel preparation stage. Samples with a wide range of concentrations were prepared, resulting in aerogels that were translucent (but weakly coloured) through to completely opaque for visible light over sample thicknesses of several millimetres. The photoluminescence of these composite materials and of silica aerogel without silicon inclusions was studied in vacuum and in the presence of molecular oxygen in order to determine whether there is any evidence for non-radiative energy transfer from the silicon triplet exciton state to molecular oxygen adsorbed at the silicon surface. No sensitivity to oxygen was observed from the nanoparticles which had partially H-terminated surfaces before incorporation, and so we conclude that the silicon surface has become substantially oxidised. Finally, the FTIR and Raman scattering spectra of the composites were studied in order to establish the presence of crystalline silicon; by taking the ratio of intensities of the silicon and aerogel Raman bands, we were able to obtain a quantitative measure of the silicon nanoparticle concentration independent of the degree of optical attenuation. PMID:22805684

  16. New organic aerogels based upon a phenolic-furfural reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Hrubesh, L.W.

    1994-09-01

    The aqueous polycondensation of (1) resorcinol with formaldehyde and (2) melamine with formaldehyde are two proven synthetic routes for the formation of organic aerogels. Recently, we have discovered a new type of organic aerogel based upon a phenolic-furfural (PF) reaction. This sol-gel polymerization has a major advantage over past approaches since it can be conducted in alcohol (e.g., 1-propanol), thereby eliminating the need for a solvent exchange step prior to supercritical drying from carbon dioxide. The resultant aerogels are dark brown in color and can be converted to a carbonized version upon pyrolysis in an inert atmosphere. BET surface areas of 350--600 m{sup 2}/g have been measured, and transmission electron microscopy reveals an interconnected structure of irregularly-shaped particles or platelets with {approximately}10 nm dimensions. Thermal conductivities as low as 0.015 W/m-K have been recorded for PF aerogels under ambient conditions. This paper describes the chemistry-structure-property relationships of these new materials in detail.

  17. Synthesis, characterization, and modeling of hydrogen storage in carbon aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Pekala, R.W.; Coronado, P.R.; Calef, D.F.

    1995-04-01

    Carbon aerogels are a special class of open-cell foams with an ultrafine cell/pore size (<50 nm), high surface area (600-800 m{sup 2}/g), and a solid matrix composed of interconnected colloidal-like particles or fibers with characteristic diameters of 10 nm. These materials are usually synthesized from the sol-gel polymerization of resorcinol-formaldehyde or phenolic-furfural, followed by supercritical extraction of the solvent and pyrolysis in an inert atmosphere. The resultant aerogel has a nanocrystalline structure with micropores (<2 nm diameter) located within the solid matrix. Carbon aerogel monoliths can be prepared at densities ranging from 0.05-1.0 g/cm{sup 3}, leading to volumetric surface areas (> 500 m{sup 2}/cm{sup 3}) that are much larger than commercially available materials. This research program is directed at optimization of the aerogel structure for maximum hydrogen adsorption over a wide range of temperatures and pressures. Computer modeling of hydrogen adsorption at carbon surfaces was also examined.

  18. Preparing silica aerogel monoliths via a rapid supercritical extraction method.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Mary K; Anderson, Ann M; Gorka, Caroline A

    2014-02-28

    A procedure for the fabrication of monolithic silica aerogels in eight hours or less via a rapid supercritical extraction process is described. The procedure requires 15-20 min of preparation time, during which a liquid precursor mixture is prepared and poured into wells of a metal mold that is placed between the platens of a hydraulic hot press, followed by several hours of processing within the hot press. The precursor solution consists of a 1.0:12.0:3.6:3.5 x 10(-3) molar ratio of tetramethylorthosilicate (TMOS):methanol:water:ammonia. In each well of the mold, a porous silica sol-gel matrix forms. As the temperature of the mold and its contents is increased, the pressure within the mold rises. After the temperature/pressure conditions surpass the supercritical point for the solvent within the pores of the matrix (in this case, a methanol/water mixture), the supercritical fluid is released, and monolithic aerogel remains within the wells of the mold. With the mold used in this procedure, cylindrical monoliths of 2.2 cm diameter and 1.9 cm height are produced. Aerogels formed by this rapid method have comparable properties (low bulk and skeletal density, high surface area, mesoporous morphology) to those prepared by other methods that involve either additional reaction steps or solvent extractions (lengthier processes that generate more chemical waste).The rapid supercritical extraction method can also be applied to the fabrication of aerogels based on other precursor recipes.

  19. Optical properties of single-walled carbon nanotube aerogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostojic, Gordana

    2012-02-01

    A network of connected single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) is created by a novel DNA-protein complex directed assembly. Due to a point-like nature of connectors, the SWNT aerogel represents a network of self-suspended nanotubes with a record ultra-low density of less 0.75 mg/cm^3. The assembly method and low density enables a direct comparison of optical properties of nanotubes in solvent and air to surfactant solubilized nanotubes. Optical properties of SWNT gels are investigated using optical absorption, photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy. Gelled nanotubes in water and in the low population regime behave similar to solubilized nanotubes. In contrast, photoluminescence of SWNT aerogels exhibit nonlinear effects and a phonon-induced broadening. In addition, aerogels show a previously unobserved photoluminescence peak at 1.3 eV that corresponds to a phonon-assisted recombination of photoexcited charges. Raman spectra of carbon nanotube aerogels display narrow peaks due to the phonon decoupling of suspended SWNTs in air and a redistribution of G phonon population due to nonlinear effects.

  20. Tailoring Advanced Nanoscale Materials Through Synthesis of Composite Aerogel Architectures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    Introducing a desired solid guest to an about-to- gel silica sol prevents complete encapsulation of the guest particles by the silica, such that the...engineered at multiple points during sol gel processing by modifying the host solid, the guest solid, the composite gel , or the composite aerogel.

  1. Nanocrystalline iron oxide aerogels as mesoporous magnetic architectures.

    PubMed

    Long, Jeffrey W; Logan, Michael S; Rhodes, Christopher P; Carpenter, Everett E; Stroud, Rhonda M; Rolison, Debra R

    2004-12-29

    We have developed crystalline nanoarchitectures of iron oxide that exhibit superparamagnetic behavior while still retaining the desirable bicontinuous pore-solid networks and monolithic nature of an aerogel. Iron oxide aerogels are initially produced in an X-ray-amorphous, high-surface-area form, by adapting recently established sol-gel methods using Fe(III) salts and epoxide-based proton scavengers. Controlled temperature/atmosphere treatments convert the as-prepared iron oxide aerogels into nanocrystalline forms with the inverse spinel structure. As a function of the bathing gas, treatment temperature, and treatment history, these nanocrystalline forms can be reversibly tuned to predominantly exhibit either Fe(3)O(4) (magnetite) or gamma-Fe(2)O(3) (maghemite) phases, as verified by electron microscopy, X-ray and electron diffraction, microprobe Raman spectroscopy, and magnetic analysis. Peak deconvolution of the Raman-active Fe-O bands yields valuable information on the local structure and vacancy content of the various aerogel forms, and facilitates the differentiation of Fe(3)O(4) and gamma-Fe(2)O(3) components, which are difficult to assign using only diffraction methods. These nanocrystalline, magnetic forms retain the inherent characteristics of aerogels, including high surface area (>140 m(2) g(-1)), through-connected porosity concentrated in the mesopore size range (2-50 nm), and nanoscale particle sizes (7-18 nm). On the basis of this synthetic and processing protocol, we produce multifunctional nanostructured materials with effective control of the pore-solid architecture, the nanocrystalline phase, and subsequent magnetic properties.

  2. Polymethylsilsesquioxane-cellulose nanofiber biocomposite aerogels with high thermal insulation, bendability, and superhydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Hayase, Gen; Kanamori, Kazuyoshi; Abe, Kentaro; Yano, Hiroyuki; Maeno, Ayaka; Kaji, Hironori; Nakanishi, Kazuki

    2014-06-25

    Polymethylsilsesquioxane-cellulose nanofiber (PMSQ-CNF) composite aerogels have been prepared through sol-gel in a solvent containing a small amount of CNFs as suspension. Since these composite aerogels do not show excessive aggregation of PMSQ and CNF, the original PMSQ networks are not disturbed. Composite aerogels with low density (0.020 g cm(-3) at lowest), low thermal conductivity (15 mW m(-1) K(-1)), visible light translucency, bending flexibility, and superhydrophobicity thus have been successfully obtained. In particular, the lowest density and bending flexibility have been achieved with the aid of the physical supporting effect of CNFs, and the lowest thermal conductivity is comparable with the original PMSQ aerogels and standard silica aerogels. The PMSQ-CNF composite aerogels would be a candidate to practical high-performance thermal insulating materials.

  3. Recent Advances in Research on the Synthetic Fiber Based Silica Aerogel Nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Ślosarczyk, Agnieszka

    2017-01-01

    The presented paper contains a brief review on the synthesis and characterization of silica aerogels and its nanocomposites with nanofibers and fibers based on a literature study over the past twenty years and my own research. Particular attention is focused on carbon fiber-based silica aerogel nanocomposites. Silica aerogel is brittle in nature, therefore, it is necessary to improve this drawback, e.g., by polymer modification or fiber additives. Nevertheless, there are very few articles in the literature devoted to the synthesis of silica aerogel/fiber nanocomposites, especially those focusing on carbon fibers and nanofibers. Carbon fibers are very interesting materials, namely due to their special properties: high conductivity, high mechanical properties in relation to very low bulk densities, high thermal stability, and chemical resistance in the silica aerogel matrix, which can help enhance silica aerogel applications in the future. PMID:28336876

  4. Robust superhydrophobic bridged silsesquioxane aerogels with tunable performances and their applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Wang, Dong; Qian, Zhenchao; Guo, Jing; Dong, Haixia; Zhao, Ning; Xu, Jian

    2015-01-28

    Aerogels are a family of highly porous materials whose applications are commonly restricted by poor mechanical properties. Herein, thiol-ene chemistry is employed to synthesize a series of novel bridged silsesquioxane (BSQ) precursors with various alkoxy groups. On the basis of the different hydrolyzing rates of the methoxy and ethoxy groups, robust superhydrophobic BSQ aerogels with tailorable morphology and mechanical performances have been prepared. The flexible thioether bridge contributes to the robustness of the as-formed aerogels, and the property can be tuned on the basis of the distinct combinations of alkoxy groups with the density of the aerogels almost unchanged. To the best of our knowledge, the lowest density among the ambient pressure dried aerogels is obtained. Further, potential application of the aerogels for oil/water separation and acoustic materials has also been presented.

  5. Incorporation of graphene nanosheets into cellulose aerogels: enhanced mechanical, thermal, and oil adsorption properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Caichao; Li, Jian

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, novel graphene/cellulose (GC) aerogels were prepared based on a green NaOH/PEG solution. Scanning electron microscope observation indicates that the three-dimensional network skeleton structure of cellulose aerogels is tightly covered by the compact sheet structure. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy analyses demonstrate that the graphene nanosheets have been successfully synthesized and embedded in the cellulose aerogels. The incorporation of graphene nanosheets gives rise to the significant improvement in the specific surface area and pore volume, thermal stability, mechanical strength, and oil adsorption efficiency of GC aerogels. Therefore, the green hybrid GC aerogels have more advantages over the pure cellulose aerogels in treating oil-containing wastewater or oil spills under the harsh environment.

  6. Growth and Stability of Nanocrystalline Metal Domains within Nanoporous Carbon Nanotube Aerogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Yeon Joo

    This thesis focuses on how to grow and stabilize nanocrystalline metal domains within nanoporous carbon nanotube aerogels. It describes the growth of isolated metal nanocrystals within carbon nanotube aerogel networks and the growth of nanocrystalline metals within 2D and 3D carbon nanotube aerogel networks. It also discusses electrochemical stability for generating electricity from fuel cells and thermal stability for reinforcing structural materials. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  7. Structural and Acidic Properties of Niobia-Silica and Niobia-Alumina Aerogels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-06

    objective is to develop a comparative set of samples of known structure for chemical characterization . Bulk oxide aerogels of niobia, alumina, and silica ...objective is to develop a comparative set of samples of known structure for chemical characterization . Bulk oxide aerogels of niobia, alumina, and silica were...properties and the developed structures caused by the thermal treatment or increased concentration of niobia on the silica and alumina aerogel

  8. Structural properties and adsorption capacity of holocellulose aerogels synthesized from an alkali hydroxide-urea solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Gu-Joong; Kim, Dae-Young; Hwang, Jae-Hyun; Kang, Joo-Hyon

    2014-05-01

    A tulip tree was used to synthesize a holocellulose aerogel from an aqueous alkali hydroxide-urea solution with the substitution of an organic solvent followed by freeze-drying. For comparison, the synthesized holocellulose aerogels were divided into two groups according to the source of the hydrogel, an upper suspended layer and a bottom concentrated layer of the centrifuged solution of cellulose and NaOH/urea solvents. We investigated the effects of the temperature of the pre-cooled NaOH/urea solution ( i.e., dissolution temperature) on the pore structure and the adsorption capacity of the holocellulose aerogel. A nano-fibrillar network structure of the holocellulose aerogel was observed, with little morphological difference in pore structure for different dissolution temperatures. Both micropores and mesopores were observed in the holocellulose aerogel. The specific surface area of the holocellulose aerogel was generally greater at lower dissolution temperatures. In a series of adsorption tests using methylene blue, the holocellulose aerogel showed the greatest adsorption capacity at the lowest dissolution temperature tested (-2°C). However, the dissolution temperature generally had little effect on the adsorption capacity. The holocellulose aerogel produced from the upper suspended layer of the centrifuged hydrogel solution showed a greater porosity and adsorption capacity than the one produced from the bottom concentrated layer. Overall, the aerogel made by utilizing a delignified tulip tree display a high surface area and a high adsorption property, indicating its possible application in eco-friendly adsorption materials.

  9. Structure of plasmonic aerogel and the breakdown of the effective medium approximation.

    PubMed

    Grogan, Michael D W; Heck, Susannah C; Hood, Katie M; Maier, Stefan A; Birks, Tim A

    2011-02-01

    A method for making aerogel doped with gold nanoparticles (GNPs) produces a composite material with a well-defined localized surface plasmon resonance peak at 520 nm. The width of the extinction feature indicates the GNPs are well dispersed in the aerogel, making it suited to optical study. A simple effective medium approximation cannot explain the peak extinction wavelengths. The plasmonic field extends on a scale where aerogel cannot be considered isotropic, so a new model is required: a 5 nm glass coating on the GNPs models the extinction spectrum of the composite material, with air (aerogel), methanol (alcogel), or toluene filling the pores.

  10. Slow dynamics of nanocomposite polymer aerogels as revealed by X-ray photocorrelation spectroscopy (XPCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Hernández, Rebeca E-mail: aurora.nogales@csic.es; Mijangos, Carmen; Nogales, Aurora E-mail: aurora.nogales@csic.es; Ezquerra, Tiberio A.; Sprung, Michael

    2014-01-14

    We report on a novel slow dynamics of polymer xerogels, aerogels, and nanocomposite aerogels with iron oxide nanoparticles, as revealed by X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. The polymer aerogel and its nanocomposite aerogels, which are porous in nature, exhibit hyper-diffusive dynamics at room temperature. In contrast, non-porous polymer xerogels exhibit an absence of this peculiar dynamics. This slow dynamical process has been assigned to a relaxation of the characteristic porous structure of these materials and not to the presence of nanoparticles.

  11. Nanoporous Cu-C composites based on carbon-nanotube aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Charnvanichborikarn, S.; Shin, S. J.; Worsley, M. A.; Tran, I. C.; Willey, T. M.; van Buuren, T.; Felter, T. E.; Colvin, J. D.; Kucheyev, S. O.

    2013-11-22

    Current synthesis methods of nanoporous Cu–C composites offer limited control of the material composition, structure, and properties, particularly for large Cu loadings of ≳20 wt%. Here, we describe two related approaches to realize novel nanoporous Cu–C composites based on the templating of recently developed carbon-nanotube aerogels (CNT-CAs). Our first approach involves the trapping of Cu nanoparticles while CNT-CAs undergo gelation. This method yields nanofoams with relatively high densities of ≳65 mg cm-3 for Cu loadings of ≳10 wt%. Our second approach overcomes this limitation by filling the pores of undoped CNT-CA monoliths with an aqueous solution of CuSO4 followed by (i) freeze-drying to remove water and (ii) thermal decomposition of CuSO4. With this approach, we demonstrate Cu–C composites with a C matrix density of -25 mg cm-3 and Cu loadings of up to 70 wt%. These versatile methods could be extended to fabricate other nanoporous metal–carbon composite materials geared for specific applications.

  12. Carbon XANES Data from Six Aerogel Picokeystones Cut from the Top and Bottom Sides of the Stardust Comet Sample Tray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirick, S.; Flynn, G. J.; Frank, D.; Sandford, S. A.; Zolensky, M. E.; Tsou, P.; Peltzer, C.; Jacobsen, C.

    2009-01-01

    Great care and a large effort was made to minimize the amount of organic matter contained within the flight aerogel used to collect Comet 81P/Wild 2 samples. Even so, by the very nature of the production process and silica aerogel s affinity for volatile organics keeping silica aerogel free from organics is a monumental task. Silica aerogel from three production batches was flown on the Stardust sample return mission. All 3 types had layered densities varying from 5mg/ml to 50 mg/ml where the densest aerogel was farthest away from the collection area. A 2 step gelation process was used to make the flight aerogel and organics used in this process were tetraethylorthosilicate, ethanol and acetonitrile. Both ammonium hydroxide and nitric acid were also used in the aerogel production process. The flight aerogel was baked at JPL at 300 C for 72 hours, most of the baking was done at atmosphere but twice a day the oven was pumped to 10 torr for hour [1]. After the aerogel was baked it was stored in a nitrogen purged cabinet until flight time. One aerogel cell was located in the SRC away from any sample collection area as a witness to possible contamination from out gassing of the space craft, re-entry gases and any other organic encounter. This aerogel was aerogel used in the interstellar collection sample tray and is the least dense of the 3 batches of aerogel flown. Organics found in the witness tile include organics containing Si-CH3 bonds, amines and PAHS. Besides organic contamination, hot spots of calcium were reported in the flight aerogel. Carbonates have been detected in comet 81P/Wild2 samples . During preflight analyses, no technique was used to analyze for carbonates in aerogel. To determine if the carbonates found in 81P/Wild2 samples were from the comet, it is necessary to analyze the flight aerogel for carbonate as well as for organics.

  13. Automated cassette-to-cassette substrate handling system

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, Joseph Arthur; Boyer, Jeremy James; Mack, Joseph; DeChellis, Michael; Koo, Michael

    2014-03-18

    An automated cassette-to-cassette substrate handling system includes a cassette storage module for storing a plurality of substrates in cassettes before and after processing. A substrate carrier storage module stores a plurality of substrate carriers. A substrate carrier loading/unloading module loads substrates from the cassette storage module onto the plurality of substrate carriers and unloads substrates from the plurality of substrate carriers to the cassette storage module. A transport mechanism transports the plurality of substrates between the cassette storage module and the plurality of substrate carriers and transports the plurality of substrate carriers between the substrate carrier loading/unloading module and a processing chamber. A vision system recognizes recesses in the plurality of substrate carriers corresponding to empty substrate positions in the substrate carrier. A processor receives data from the vision system and instructs the transport mechanism to transport substrates to positions on the substrate carrier in response to the received data.

  14. Aerogel as a Soft Acoustic Metamaterial for Airborne Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guild, Matthew D.; García-Chocano, Victor M.; Sánchez-Dehesa, José; Martin, Theodore P.; Calvo, David C.; Orris, Gregory J.

    2016-03-01

    Soft acoustic metamaterials utilizing mesoporous structures have been proposed recently as a means for tuning the overall effective properties of the metamaterial and providing better coupling to the surrounding air. In this paper, the use of silica aerogel is examined theoretically and experimentally as part of a compact soft acoustic metamaterial structure, which enables a wide range of exotic effective macroscopic properties to be demonstrated, including negative density, density near zero, and nonresonant broadband slow-sound propagation. Experimental data are obtained on the effective density and sound speed using an air-filled acoustic impedance tube for flexural metamaterial elements, which have been investigated previously only indirectly due to the large contrast in acoustic impedance compared to that of air. Experimental results are presented for silica aerogel arranged in parallel with either one or two acoustic ports and are in very good agreement with the theoretical model.

  15. Heat-insulating aerogel composites for a hydrothermal reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedenin, A. D.; Vityaz', P. A.; Galinovskii, A. L.; Ivanova, I. S.; Mazalov, Yu. A.; Pustovgar, A. P.; Sudnik, L. V.

    2016-12-01

    The SiO2-TiO2 aerogel composites used in the heat insulation of a hydrothermal reactor and the method of their fabrication using a liquid glass technology are analyzed. The process of fabrication of the composite material includes the following stages: the ion exchange of sodium liquid glass with the formation of silica hydrosol; the concentration of hydrosol; the formation of hydrogel and its maturing; the formation of alcogel of an SiO2-TiO2 composite material; surface modification; subcritical drying of alcogel with the formation of SiO2-TiO2 composite ambigel; and its heat treatment, granulation, and classification. The influence of infrared absorber (titanium dioxide) and the temperature of heat treatment of an SiO2-TiO2 aerogel composite material on its structural and thermal characteristics is studied.

  16. From 1D to 3D - macroscopic nanowire aerogel monoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wei; Rechberger, Felix; Niederberger, Markus

    2016-07-01

    Here we present a strategy to assemble one-dimensional nanostructures into a three-dimensional architecture with macroscopic size. With the assistance of centrifugation, we successfully gel ultrathin W18O49 nanowires with diameters of 1 to 2 nm and aspect ratios larger than 100 into 3D networks, which are transformed into monolithic aerogels by supercritical drying.Here we present a strategy to assemble one-dimensional nanostructures into a three-dimensional architecture with macroscopic size. With the assistance of centrifugation, we successfully gel ultrathin W18O49 nanowires with diameters of 1 to 2 nm and aspect ratios larger than 100 into 3D networks, which are transformed into monolithic aerogels by supercritical drying. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, SEM and TEM images, and digital photographs. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr04429h

  17. Ultralight nanofibre-assembled cellular aerogels with superelasticity and multifunctionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Yang; Yu, Jianyong; Tang, Xiaomin; Ge, Jianlong; Ding, Bin

    2014-12-01

    Three-dimensional nanofibrous aerogels (NFAs) that are both highly compressible and resilient would have broad technological implications for areas ranging from electrical devices and bioengineering to damping materials; however, creating such NFAs has proven extremely challenging. Here we report a novel strategy to create fibrous, isotropically bonded elastic reconstructed (FIBER) NFAs with a hierarchical cellular structure and superelasticity by combining electrospun nanofibres and the fibrous freeze-shaping technique. Our approach causes the intrinsically lamellar deposited electrospun nanofibres to assemble into elastic bulk aerogels with tunable densities and desirable shapes on a large scale. The resulting FIBER NFAs exhibit densities of >0.12 mg cm-3, rapid recovery from deformation, efficient energy absorption and multifunctionality in terms of the combination of thermal insulation, sound absorption, emulsion separation and elasticity-responsive electric conduction. The successful synthesis of such fascinating materials may provide new insights into the design and development of multifunctional NFAs for various applications.

  18. Electrochemical behavior of carbon aerogels derived from different precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Pekala, R.W.; Alviso, C.T.; Nielson, J.K.; Tran, T.D.; Reynolds, G.M.; Dresshaus, M.S.

    1995-04-01

    The ability to tailor the structure and properties of porous carbons has led to their increased use as electrodes in energy storage devices. Our research focuses on the synthesis and characterization of carbon aerogels for use in electrochemical double layer capacitors. Carbon aerogels are formed from the sol-gel polymerization of (1) resorcinol-formaldehyde or (2) phenolic-furfural, followed by supercritical drying from carbon dioxide, and subsequent pyrolysis in an inert atmosphere. These materials can be produced as monoliths, composites, thin films, powders, or microspheres. In all cases, the areogels have an open-cell structure with an ultrafine pore size (<100 nm), high surface area (400-1 100 m{sup 2}/g), and a solid matrix composed of interconnected particles, fibers, or platelets with characteristic dimensions of 10 nm. This paper examines the effects of the carbon precursor and processing conditions on electrochemical performance in aqueous and organic electrolytes.

  19. High Resolution, Single-Step Patterning of Silica Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertino, M. F.; Hund, J. F.; Sosa, J.; Zhang, G.; Sotiriou-Leventis, C.; Leventis, N.; Tokuhiro, A. T.; Terry, J.

    2003-01-01

    Three-dimensional metallic structures are fabricated with high spatial resolution in silica aerogels. In our method, silica hydrogels are prepared with a standard base-catalyzed route, and exchanged with an aqueous solution typically containing Ag' ions (1 M) and 2-propanol (0.2 M). The metal ions are reduced photolytically with a table-top ultraviolet lamp, or radiolytically, with a focused X-ray beam. We fabricated dots and lines as small as 30 x 70 km, protruding for several mm into the bulk of the materials. The hydrogels are eventually supercritically dried to yield aerogels, without any measurable change in the shape and spatial resolution of the lithographed structures. Transmission electron microscopy shows that illuminated regions are composed of Ag clusters with a size of several pm, separated by thin layers of silica.

  20. Surface Plasmon Resonance Evaluation of Colloidal Metal Aerogel Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Sibille, Laurent; Cronise, Raymond J.; Noever, David A.

    1997-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance imaging has in the past been applied to the characterization of thin films. In this study we apply the surface plasmon technique not to determine macroscopic spatial variations but rather to determine average microscopic information. Specifically, we deduce the dielectric properties of the surrounding gel matrix and information concerning the dynamics of the gelation process from the visible absorption characteristics of colloidal metal nanoparticles contained in aerogel pores. We have fabricated aerogels containing gold and silver nanoparticles. Because the dielectric constant of the metal particles is linked to that of the host matrix at the surface plasmon resonance, any change 'in the dielectric constant of the material surrounding the metal nanoparticles results in a shift in the surface plasmon wavelength. During gelation the surface plasmon resonance shifts to the red as the average or effective dielectric constant of the matrix increases. Conversely, formation of an aerogel or xerogel through supercritical extraction or evaporation of the solvent produces a blue shift in the resonance indicating a decrease in the dielectric constant of the matrix. From the magnitude of this shift we deduce the average fraction of air and of silica in contact with the metal particles. The surface area of metal available for catalytic gas reaction may thus be determined.

  1. Effect of Aerogel Anisotropy in Superfluid 3He-A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, A. M.; Li, J. I. A.; Pollanen, J.; Collett, C. A.; Gannon, W. J.; Halperin, W. P.

    2014-03-01

    Two theories have been advanced to describe the effects of anisotropic impurity introduced by stretched silica aerogel on the orientation of the orbital angular momentum l& circ; in superfluid 3He-A. These theories disagree on whether the anisotropy will orient l& circ; perpendicular[2] or parallel[3] to the strain axis. In order to examine this question we have produced and characterized a homogeneous aerogel sample with uniaxial anisotropy introduced during growth, corresponding to stretching of the aerogel. These samples have been shown to stabilize two new chiral states;[4] the higher temperature state being the subject of the present study. Using pulsed NMR we have performed experiments on 3He-A imbibed in this sample in two orientations: strain parallel and perpendicular to the applied magnetic field. From the NMR frequency shifts as a function of tip angle and temperature, we find that the angular momentum l& circ; is oriented along the strain axis, providing evidence for the theory advanced by Sauls. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation, DMR-1103625.

  2. Properties of a silica aerogel Cerenkov radiator used in a cosmic ray telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantin, M.; Engelmann, J. J.; Koch, L.; Masse, P.; Lund, N.; Byrnak, B.

    1975-01-01

    A silica aerogel Cerenkov radiator with a refractive index of 1.06 has been flown in a balloon borne cosmic ray telescope. Clear separation of the elements in the iron group was achieved even at high energies. No detectable scintillation component was found. Some optical properties of the silica aerogel used in this flight are presented.

  3. Characterisation of biodegradable pectin aerogels and their potential use as drug carriers.

    PubMed

    Veronovski, Anja; Tkalec, Gabrijela; Knez, Željko; Novak, Zoran

    2014-11-26

    The purpose of this work was to prepare stable citrus (CF) and apple (AF) pectin aerogels for potential pharmaceutical applications. Different shapes of low ester pectin aerogels were prepared by two fundamental methods of ionic cross-linking. Pectins' spherical and multi-membrane gels were first formed by the diffusion method using 0.2M CaCl2 solution as an ionic cross-linker. The highest specific surface area (593 m(2)/g) that had so far been reported for pectin aerogels was achieved using this method. Monolithic pectin gels were formed by the internal setting method. Pectin gels were further converted into aerogels by supercritical drying using CO2. As surface area/volume is one of the key parameters in controlling drug release, multi-membrane pectin aerogels were further used as drug delivery carriers. Theophylline and nicotinic acid were used as model drugs for the dissolution study. CF aerogels showed more controlled release behaviour than AF pectin aerogels. Moreover a higher release rate (100%) was observed with CF aerogels.

  4. Three-dimensional textural and compositional analysis of particle tracks and fragmentation history in aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebel, D. S.; Greenberg, M.; Rivers, M. L.; Newville, M.

    2009-11-01

    We report analyses of aerogel tracks using (1 synchrotron X-ray computed microtomography (XRCMT), (2) laser confocal scanning microscopy (LCSM), and (3) synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SRXRF) of particles and their paths resulting from simulated hypervelocity impacts (1-2), and a single ~1 mm aerogel track from the Stardust cometary sample collector (1-3). Large aerogel pieces can be imaged sequentially, resulting in high spatial resolution images spanning many tomographic fields of view (‘lambda-tomography’). We report calculations of energy deposited, and tests on aromatic hydrocarbons showing no alteration in tomography experiments. Imaging at resolutions from ~17 to ~1 micron/pixel edge (XRCMT) and to <100 nm/ pixel edge (LCSM) illustrates track geometry and interaction of particles with aerogel, including rifling, particle fragmentation, and final particle location. We present a 3-D deconvolution method using an estimated point-spread function for aerogel, allowing basic corrections of LCSM data for axial distortion. LCSM allows rapid, comprehensive, non-destructive, high information return analysis of tracks in aerogel keystones, prior to destructive grain extraction. SRXRF with LCSM allows spatial correlation of grain size, chemical, and mineralogical data. If optical methods are precluded in future aerogel capture missions, XRCMT is a viable 3D imaging technique. Combinations of these methods allow for complete, nondestructive, quantitative 3-D analysis of captured materials at high spatial resolution. This data is fundamental to understanding the hypervelocity particle-aerogel interaction histories of Stardust grains.

  5. Three-dimensional textural and compositional analysis of particle tracks and fragmentation history in aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    Ebel, Denton S.; Greenberg, Michael; Rivers, Mark L.; Newville, Matthew

    2010-05-04

    We report analyses of aerogel tracks using (1) synchrotron X-ray computed microtomography (XRCMT), (2) laser confocal scanning microscopy (LCSM), and (3) synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SRXRF) of particles and their paths resulting from simulated hypervelocity impacts (1-2), and a single {approx}1 mm aerogel track from the Stardust cometary sample collector (1-3). Large aerogel pieces can be imaged sequentially, resulting in high spatial resolution images spanning many tomographic fields of view ('lambda-tomography'). We report calculations of energy deposited, and tests on aromatic hydrocarbons showing no alteration in tomography experiments. Imaging at resolutions from -17 to -1 micron/pixel edge (XRCMT) and to <100 nm/pixel edge (LCSM) illustrates track geometry and interaction of particles with aerogel, including rifling, particle fragmentation, and final particle location. We present a 3-D deconvolution method using an estimated point-spread function for aerogel, allowing basic corrections of LCSM data for axial distortion. LCSM allows rapid, comprehensive, non-destructive, high information return analysis of tracks in aerogel keystones, prior to destructive grain extraction. SRXRF with LCSM allows spatial correlation of grain size, chemical, and mineralogical data. If optical methods are precluded in future aerogel capture missions, XRCMT is a viable 3D imaging technique. Combinations of these methods allow for complete, nondestructive, quantitative 3-D analysis of captured materials at high spatial resolution. This data is fundamental to understanding the hypervelocity particle-aerogel interaction histories of Stardust grains.

  6. Preparation and characterization of silica aerogels from diatomite via ambient pressure drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Baomin; Ma, Hainan; Song, Kai

    2014-07-01

    The silica aerogels were successfully fabricated under ambient pressure from diatomite. The influence of different dilution ratios of diatomite filtrate on physical properties of aerogels were studied. The microstructure, surface functional groups, thermal stability, morphology and mechanical properties of silica aerogels based on diatomite were investigated by BET adsorption, FT-IR, DTA-TG, FESEM, TEM, and nanoindentation methods. The results indicate that the filtrate diluted with distilled water in a proportion of 1: 2 could give silica aerogels in the largest size with highest transparency. The obtained aerogels with density of 0.122-0.203 g/m3 and specific surface area of 655.5-790.7 m2/g are crack free amorphous solids and exhibited a sponge-like structure. Moreover, the peak pore size resided at 9 nm. The initial aerogels were hydrophobic, when being heat-treated around 400°C, the aerogels were transformed into hydrophilic ones. The obtained aerogel has good mechanical properties.

  7. Optofluidic waveguides written in hydrophobic silica aerogels with a femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalizay, B.; Morova, Y.; Ozbakir, Y.; Jonas, A.; Erkey, C.; Kiraz, A.; Akturk, S.

    2015-02-01

    We present a new method to form liquid-core optofluidic waveguides inside hydrophobic silica aerogels. Due to their unique material properties, aerogels are very attractive for a wide variety of applications; however, it is very challenging to process them with traditional methods such as milling, drilling, or cutting because of their fragile structure. Therefore, there is a need to develop alternative processes for formation of complex structures within the aerogels without damaging the material. In our study, we used focused femtosecond laser pulses for high-precision ablation of hydrophobic silica aerogels. During the ablation, we directed the laser beam with a galvo-mirror system and, subsequently, focused the beam through a scanning lens on the surface of bulk aerogel which was placed on a three-axis translation stage. We succeeded in obtaining high-quality linear microchannels inside aerogel monoliths by synchronizing the motion of the galvo-mirror scanner and the translation stage. Upon ablation, we created multimode liquid-core optical waveguides by filling the empty channels inside low-refractive index aerogel blocks with highrefractive index ethylene glycol. In order to demonstrate light guiding and measure optical attenuation of these waveguides, we coupled light into the waveguides with an optical fiber and measured the intensity of transmitted light as a function of the propagation distance inside the channel. The measured propagation losses of 9.9 dB/cm demonstrate the potential of aerogel-based waveguides for efficient routing of light in optofluidic lightwave circuits.

  8. Starch-based aerogels: airy materials from amylose-sodium palmitate inclusion complexes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aerogels are a class of interesting low density porous materials prepared by replacing the water phase contained within a hydrogel with a gas phase while maintaining the three dimensional network structure of the gel. The investigation of starch and hydrocolloid-based aerogels has received attentio...

  9. Aerogel detector with a Fresnel lens focalization: a test of the concept

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, O.; Paic, G.; Alfaro, R.

    2008-07-02

    We present a threshold aerogel detector that uses only the unscattered light in the aerogel, focused on a photomultiplier using a Fresnel lens. The results with n = 1.03 and 3'' photomultiplier are presented. The possibility to use 1.5'' PMT is discussed.

  10. pH-controllable synthesis of unique nanostructured tungsten oxide aerogel and its sensitive glucose biosensor.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiang-Qiang; Xu, Maowen; Bao, Shu-Juan; Li, Chang Ming

    2015-03-20

    This work presents a controllable synthesis of nanowire-networked tungsten oxide aerogels, which was performed by varying the pH in a polyethyleneimine (PEI)-assisted hydrothermal process. An enzyme-tungsten oxide aerogel co-modified electrode shows high activity and selectivity toward glucose oxidation, thus holding great promise for applications in bioelectronics.

  11. Preparation, characterization, and activity of a peptide-cellulosic aerogel protease sensor from cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nanocellulosic aerogels (NA) provide a lightweight biocompatible material with structural properties of both high porosity and specific surface area for biosensor design. We report here the preparation, characterization, and activity of a peptide-nanocellulose aerogel (PA) made from unprocessed cot...

  12. Highly Porous, Rigid-Rod Polyamide Aerogels with Superior Mechanical Properties and Unusually High Thermal Conductivity.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jarrod C; Nguyen, Baochau N; McCorkle, Linda; Scheiman, Daniel; Griffin, Justin S; Steiner, Stephen A; Meador, Mary Ann B

    2017-01-18

    We report here the fabrication of polyamide aerogels composed of poly-p-phenylene-terephthalamide, the same backbone chemistry as DuPont's Kevlar. The all-para-substituted polymers gel without the use of cross-linker and maintain their shape during processing-an improvement over the meta-substituted cross-linked polyamide aerogels reported previously. Solutions containing calcium chloride (CaCl2) and para-phenylenediamine (pPDA) in N-methylpyrrolidinone (NMP) at low temperature are reacted with terephthaloyl chloride (TPC). Polymerization proceeds over the course of 5 min resulting in gelation. Removal of the reaction solvent via solvent exchange followed by extraction with supercritical carbon dioxide provides aerogels with densities ranging from 0.1 to 0.3 g/cm(3), depending on the concentration of calcium chloride, the formulated number of repeat units, n, and the concentration of polymer in the reaction mixture. These variables were assessed in a statistical experimental study to understand their effects on the properties of the aerogels. Aerogels made using at least 30 wt % CaCl2 had the best strength when compared to aerogels of similar density. Furthermore, aerogels made using 30 wt % CaCl2 exhibited the lowest shrinkage when aged at elevated temperatures. Notably, whereas most aerogel materials are highly insulating (thermal conductivities of 10-30 mW/m K), the polyamide aerogels produced here exhibit remarkably high thermal conductivities (50-80 mW/(m K)) at the same densities as other inorganic and polymer aerogels. These high thermal conductivities are attributed to efficient phonon transport by the rigid-rod polymer backbone. In conjunction with their low cost, ease of fabrication with respect to other polymer aerogels, low densities, and high mass-normalized strength and stiffness properties, these aerogels are uniquely valuable for applications such as lightweighting in consumer electronics, automobiles, and aerospace where weight reduction is

  13. Porous silica aerogel/honeycomb ceramic composites fabricated by an ultrasound stimulation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sun-Wook; Song, In-Hyuck; Park, Young-Jo; Yun, Hui-suk; Hwang, Ki-Young; Rhee, Young-Woo

    2012-06-01

    The synthesis behavior of nanoporous hydrophobic silica aerogel in honeycomb-type ceramics was observed using TEOS and MTES. Silica aerogel in the honeycomb ceramic structure was synthesized under ultrasound stimulation. The synthesized aerogel/honeycomb ceramic composites were dried under supercritical CO2 drying conditions. The values for the line shrinkage of the wet gels during supercritical CO2 drying declined from 19% to 4% with an increase in the H2O/TEOS molar ratio from 8 to 24. Low shrinkage was a key factor in increasing the interface compatibility with the aerogel/honeycomb ceramic composites. The optimum condition of silica aerogel in the honeycomb-type ceramic structure had a TEOS:MTES: H2O:glycerol ratio equal to 1:1.2:24:0.05 (mol%).

  14. Computer modeling of organic aerogels: Final report of 93-SR-062

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, E.A.; Calef, D.; Ladd, A.J.C.

    1994-06-10

    Goal of the work was to develop computer models of organic aerogel structures, and to study transport process within these materials. During the course of the research understanding of the structure of all aerogels including acid and neutral-catalyzed silica aerogel was developed. The modeling of transport focused on fluid flow in aerogels. We successfully modified a novel state-of-the-art lattice Boltzmann code to simulate flow at low Knudsen number, and developed a simple molecular dynamics code for gas flow at extremely high Knudsen number (low density). These flow-modeling techniques can be used to study aerogel applications for technology transfer; in addition, these techniques can be used to study flow through other porous materials.

  15. Tailoring of Boehmite-Derived Aluminosilicate Aerogel Structure and Properties: Influence of Ti Addition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.; Guo, Haiquan; Sheets, Erik J.; Miller, Derek R.; Newlin, Katy N.

    2010-01-01

    Aluminosilicate aerogels offer potential for extremely low thermal conductivities at temperatures greater than 900 C, beyond where silica aerogels reach their upper temperature limits. Aerogels have been synthesized at various Al:Si ratios, including mullite compositions, using Boehmite (AlOOH) as the Al source, and tetraethoxy orthosilicate as the Si precursor. The Boehmite-derived aerogels are found to form by a self-assembly process of AlOOH crystallites, with Si-O groups on the surface of an alumina skeleton. Morphology, surface area and pore size varies with the crystallite size of the starting Boehmite powder, as well as with synthesis parameters. Ternary systems, including Al-Si-Ti aerogels incorporating a soluble Ti precursor, are possible with careful control of pH. The addition of Ti influences sol viscosity, gelation time pore structure and pore size distribution, as well as phase formation on heat treatment.

  16. Aerogel microspheres from natural cellulose nanofibrils and their application as cell culture scaffold.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hongli; Sharma, Sudhir; Liu, Wenying; Mu, Wei; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Xiaodan; Deng, Yulin

    2014-07-14

    We demonstrated that ultralight pure natural aerogel microspheres can be fabricated using cellulose nanofibrials (CNF) directly. Experimentally, the CNF aqueous gel droplets, produced by spraying and atomizing through a steel nozzle, were collected into liquid nitrogen for instant freezing followed by freeze-drying. The aerogel microspheres are highly porous with bulk density as low as 0.0018 g cm(-3). The pore size of the cellulose aeogel microspheres ranges from nano- to macrometers. The unique ultralight and high porous structure ensured high moisture (~90 g g(-1)) and water uptake capacity (~100 g g(-1)) of the aerogel microspheres. Covalent cross-linking between the native nanofibrils and cross-linkers made the aerogel microspheres very stable even in a harsh environment. The present study also confirmed this kind of aerogel microspheres from native cellulose fibers can be used as cell culture scaffold.

  17. Strong, Thermally Superinsulating Biopolymer-Silica Aerogel Hybrids by Cogelation of Silicic Acid with Pectin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shanyu; Malfait, Wim J; Demilecamps, Arnaud; Zhang, Yucheng; Brunner, Samuel; Huber, Lukas; Tingaut, Philippe; Rigacci, Arnaud; Budtova, Tatiana; Koebel, Matthias M

    2015-11-23

    Silica aerogels are excellent thermal insulators, but their brittle nature has prevented widespread application. To overcome these mechanical limitations, silica-biopolymer hybrids are a promising alternative. A one-pot process to monolithic, superinsulating pectin-silica hybrid aerogels is presented. Their structural and physical properties can be tuned by adjusting the gelation pH and pectin concentration. Hybrid aerogels made at pH 1.5 exhibit minimal dust release and vastly improved mechanical properties while remaining excellent thermal insulators. The change in the mechanical properties is directly linked to the observed "neck-free" nanoscale network structure with thicker struts. Such a design is superior to "neck-limited", classical inorganic aerogels. This new class of materials opens up new perspectives for novel silica-biopolymer nanocomposite aerogels.

  18. Carbon nanotube-bonded graphene hybrid aerogels and their application to water purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byeongho; Lee, Sangil; Lee, Minwoo; Jeong, Dae Hong; Baek, Youngbin; Yoon, Jeyong; Kim, Yong Hyup

    2015-04-01

    We present carbon nanotube (CNT)-bonded graphene hybrid aerogels that are prepared by growing CNTs on a graphene aerogel surface with nickel catalyst. The presence of bonded CNTs in the graphene aerogel results in vastly improved mechanical and electrical properties. A significant increase in specific surface area is also realized. The presence of the CNTs transforms the hybrid aerogels into a mesoporous material. The viscoelasticity of the hybrid aerogels is found to be invariant with respect to temperature over a range of between -150 °C and 450 °C. These characteristics along with the improved properties make the hybrid aerogels an entirely different class of material with applications in the fields of biotechnology and electrochemistry. The mesoporous nature of the material along with its high specific surface area also makes the hybrid aerogel attractive for application in water treatment. Both anionic and cationic dyes can be effectively removed from water by the hybrid aerogel. A number of organics and oils can be selectively separated from water by the hybrid aerogel. The hybrid aerogel is easy to handle and separate from water due to its magnetic nature, and can readily be recycled and reused.We present carbon nanotube (CNT)-bonded graphene hybrid aerogels that are prepared by growing CNTs on a graphene aerogel surface with nickel catalyst. The presence of bonded CNTs in the graphene aerogel results in vastly improved mechanical and electrical properties. A significant increase in specific surface area is also realized. The presence of the CNTs transforms the hybrid aerogels into a mesoporous material. The viscoelasticity of the hybrid aerogels is found to be invariant with respect to temperature over a range of between -150 °C and 450 °C. These characteristics along with the improved properties make the hybrid aerogels an entirely different class of material with applications in the fields of biotechnology and electrochemistry. The mesoporous nature

  19. Carbon Nanofiber Incorporated Silica Based Aerogels with Di-Isocyanate Cross-Linking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vivod, Stephanie L.; Meador, Mary Ann B.; Capadona, Lynn A.; Sullivan, Roy M.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Clark, Nicholas; McCorkle, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Lightweight materials with excellent thermal insulating properties are highly sought after for a variety of aerospace and aeronautic applications. (1) Silica based aerogels with their high surface area and low relative densities are ideal for applications in extreme environments such as insulators for the Mars Rover battery. (2) However, the fragile nature of aerogel monoliths prevents their widespread use in more down to earth applications. We have shown that the fragile aerogel network can be cross-linked with a di-isocyanate via amine decorated surfaces to form a conformal coating. (3) This coating reinforces the neck regions between secondary silica particles and significantly strengthens the aerogels with only a small effect on density or porosity. Scheme 1 depicts the cross-linking reaction with the di-isocyanate and exhibits the stages that result in polymer cross-linked aerogel monoliths.

  20. Aerogels from unaltered bacterial cellulose: application of scCO2 drying for the preparation of shaped, ultra-lightweight cellulosic aerogels.

    PubMed

    Liebner, Falk; Haimer, Emmerich; Wendland, Martin; Neouze, Marie-Alexandra; Schlufter, Kerstin; Miethe, Peter; Heinze, Thomas; Potthast, Antje; Rosenau, Thomas

    2010-04-08

    Bacterial cellulose produced by the gram-negative bacterium Gluconacetobacter xylinum was found to be an excellent native starting material for preparing shaped ultra-lightweight cellulose aerogels. The procedure comprises thorough washing and sterilization of the aquogel, quantitative solvent exchange and subsequent drying with supercritical carbon dioxide at 40 degrees C and 100 bar. The average density of the obtained dry cellulose aerogels is only about 8 mg x cm(-3) which is comparable to the most lightweight silica aerogels and distinctly lower than all values for cellulosic aerogels obtained from plant cellulose so far. SEM, ESEM and nitrogen adsorption experiments at 77 K reveal an open-porous network structure that consists of a comparatively high percentage of large mesopores and smaller macropores.

  1. Biocompatibility of surfactant-templated polyurea-nanoencapsulated macroporous silica aerogels with plasma platelets and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wei; Venkitachalam, Subramaniam M; Jarrett, Ellen; Staggs, Sarah; Leventis, Nicholas; Lu, Hongbing; Rubenstein, David A

    2010-03-15

    The recently synthesized polyurea-nanoencapsulated surfactant-templated aerogels (X-aerogels) are porous materials with significantly improved mechanical strengths. Surface-wise they resemble polyurethane, a common biocompatible material, but their biocompatibility has never been investigated. As lightweight and strong materials, if X-aerogels also have acceptable biocompatibility, they may be used in many implantable devices. The goal of this study was to investigate their biocompatibility toward platelets, blood plasma, and vascular endothelial cells, in terms of cell activation and inflammatory responses. Platelets were incubated with X-aerogel and platelet activation was measured through CD62P and phosphatidylserine expression. Platelet aggregation was also measured. Contact with X-aerogel did not induce platelet activation or impair aggregation. To determine X-aerogel-induced inflammation, plasma anaphylatoxin C3a level was measured after incubation with X-aerogel. Results showed that X-aerogel induced no changes in plasma C3a levels. SEM and SDS-PAGE were used to examine cellular/protein deposition on X-aerogel samples after plasma incubation. No structural change or organic deposition was detected. Furthermore, X-aerogel samples did not induce any significant changes in vascular endothelial cell culture parameters after 5 days of incubation. These observations suggest that X-aerogels have a suitable biocompatibility toward platelets, plasma, and vascular endothelial cells, and they have potential for use in blood implantable devices.

  2. Synthesis, Processing, and Characterization of Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Cross-Linked Silica, Organic Polyimide, and Inorganic Aluminosilicate Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Baochau N.; Guo, Haiquan N.; McCorkle, Linda S.

    2014-01-01

    As aerospace applications become ever more demanding, novel insulation materials with lower thermal conductivity, lighter weight and higher use temperature are required to fit the aerospace application needs. Having nanopores and high porosity, aerogels are superior thermal insulators, among other things. The use of silica aerogels in general is quite restricted due to their inherent fragility, hygroscopic nature, and poor mechanical properties, especially in extereme aerospace environments. Our research goal is to develop aerogels with better mechanical and environmental stability for a variety of aeronautic and space applications including space suit insulation for planetary surface missions, insulation for inflatable structures for habitats, inflatable aerodynamic decelerators for entry, descent and landing (EDL) operations, and cryotank insulation for advance space propulsion systems. Different type of aerogels including organic-inorganic polymer reinforced (hybrid) silica-based aerogels, polyimide aerogels and inorganic aluminosilicate aerogels have been developed and examined.

  3. Near Room Temperature, Fast-Response, and Highly Sensitive Triethylamine Sensor Assembled with Au-Loaded ZnO/SnO₂ Core-Shell Nanorods on Flat Alumina Substrates.

    PubMed

    Ju, Dian-Xing; Xu, Hong-Yan; Qiu, Zhi-Wen; Zhang, Zi-Chao; Xu, Qi; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Jie-Qiang; Cao, Bing-Qiang

    2015-09-02

    Chemiresistive gas sensors with low power consumption, fast response, and reliable fabrication process for a specific target gas have been now created for many applications. They require both sensitive nanomaterials and an efficient substrate chip for heating and electrical addressing. Herein, a near room working temperature and fast response triethylamine (TEA) gas sensor has been fabricated successfully by designing gold (Au)-loaded ZnO/SnO2 core-shell nanorods. ZnO nanorods grew directly on Al2O3 flat electrodes with a cost-effective hydrothermal process. By employing pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and DC-sputtering methods, the construction of Au nanoparticle-loaded ZnO/SnO2 core/shell nanorod heterostructure is highly controllable and reproducible. In comparison with pristine ZnO, SnO2, and Au-loaded ZnO, SnO2 sensors, Au-ZnO/SnO2 nanorod sensors exhibit a remarkably high and fast response to TEA gas at working temperatures as low as 40 °C. The enhanced sensing property of the Au-ZnO/SnO2 sensor is also discussed with the semiconductor depletion layer model introduced by Au-SnO2 Schottky contact and ZnO/SnO2 N-N heterojunction.

  4. Thermal Performance Of Space Suit Elements With Aerogel Insulation For Moon And Mars Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Henry H.; Orndoff, Evelyne S.; Trevino, Luis A.

    2006-01-01

    Flexible fiber-reinforced aerogel composites were studied for use as insulation materials of a future space suit for Moon and Mars exploration. High flexibility and good thermal insulation properties of fiber-reinforced silica aerogel composites at both high and low vacuum conditions make it a promising insulation candidate for the space suit application. This paper first presents the results of a durability (mechanical cycling) study of these aerogels composites in the context of retaining their thermal performance. The study shows that some of these Aerogels materials retained most of their insulation performance after up to 250,000 cycles of mechanical flex cycling. This paper also examines the problem of integrating these flexible aerogel composites into the current space suit elements. Thermal conductivity evaluations are proposed for different types of aerogels space suit elements to identify the lay-up concept that may have the best overall thermal performance for both Moon and Mars environments. Potential solutions in mitigating the silica dusting issue related to the application of these aerogels materials for the space suit elements are also discussed.

  5. Transparent Ethylene-Bridged Polymethylsiloxane Aerogels and Xerogels with Improved Bending Flexibility.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Taiyo; Kanamori, Kazuyoshi; Maeno, Ayaka; Kaji, Hironori; Nakanishi, Kazuki

    2016-12-20

    Transparent, monolithic aerogels with nanosized colloidal skeletons have been obtained from a single precursor of 1,2-bis(methyldiethoxysilyl)ethane (BMDEE) by adopting a liquid surfactant and a two-step process involving strong-acid, followed by strong-base, sol-gel reactions. This precursor BMDEE forms the ethylene-bridged polymethylsiloxane (EBPMS, O2/2(CH3)Si-CH2CH2-Si(CH3)O2/2) network, in which each silicon has one methyl, two bridging oxygens, and one bridging ethylene, exhibiting an analogous structure to that of the previously reported polymethylsilsesquioxane (PMSQ, CH3SiO3/2) aerogels having one methyl and three bridging oxygen atoms. Obtained aerogels consist of fine colloidal skeletons and show high visible-light transparency and a flexible deformation behavior against compression without collapse. Similar to the PMSQ aerogels, a careful tuning of synthetic conditions can produce low-density (0.19 g cm(-3)) and highly transparent (76% at 550 nm, corresponding to 10 mm thick samples) xerogels via ambient pressure drying by solvent evaporation due to their high strength and resilience against compression. Moreover, EBPMS aerogels exhibit higher bending strength and bending strain at break against the three-point bending mode compared to PMSQ aerogels. This improved bendability is presumably derived from the introduced ethylene-bridging parts, suggesting the potential for realizing transparent and bendable aerogels in such polysiloxane materials with organic linking units.

  6. Heat insulation performance, mechanics and hydrophobic modification of cellulose-SiO2 composite aerogels.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jianjun; Lu, Lingbin; Guo, Wantao; Zhang, Jingying; Cao, Yang

    2013-10-15

    Cellulose-SiO2 composite hydrogel was prepared by combining the NaOH/thiourea/H2O solvent system and the immersion method with controlling the hydrolysis-fasculation rate of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS). The hydrophobic composite aerogels were obtained through the freeze-drying technology and the cold plasma modification technology. Composite SiO2 could obviously reduce the thermal conductivity of cellulose aerogel. The thermal conductivity could be as low as 0.026 W/(mK). The thermal insulation mechanism of the aerogel material was discussed. Composite SiO2 reduced hydrophilicity of cellulose aerogel, but environmental humidity had a significant influence on heat insulation performance. After hydrophobic modification using CCl4 as plasma was conducted, the surface of composite aerogel was changed from hydrophilic to hydrophobic and water contact angle was as high as 132°. The modified composite aerogel still kept good heat insulation performance. This work provided a foundation for the possibility of applying cellulose-SiO2 composite aerogel in the insulating material field.

  7. Effect of Bulky Substituents in the Polymer Backbone on the Properties of Polyimide Aerogels.

    PubMed

    Viggiano, Rocco P; Williams, Jarrod C; Schiraldi, David A; Meador, Mary Ann B

    2017-03-08

    With unique advantages over inorganic aerogels including higher strengths and compressive moduli, greater toughness, and the ability to be fabricated as a flexible thin film, polymer aerogels have the potential to supplant inorganic aerogels in numerous applications. Among polymer aerogels, polyimide aerogels possess a high degree of high thermal stability as well as outstanding mechanical properties. However, while the onset of thermal decomposition for these materials is typically very high (greater than 500 °C), the polyimide aerogels undergo dramatic thermally induced shrinkage at temperatures well below their glass transition (Tg) or decomposition temperature, which limits their use. In this study, we show that shrinkage is reduced when a bulky moiety is incorporated in the polymer backbone. Twenty different formulations of polyimide aerogels were synthesized from 3,3,'4,4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride (BPDA) and 4,4'-oxidianiline (ODA) or a combination of ODA and 9,9'-bis(4-aminophenyl)fluorene (BAPF) and cross-linked with 1,3,5-benzenetricarbonyl trichloride (BTC) in a statistically designed study. The polymer concentration, n-value, and molar concentration of ODA and BAPF were varied to demonstrate the effect of these variables on certain properties. Samples containing BAPF showed a reduction in shrinkage by as much as 50% after aging at elevated temperatures for 500 h compared to those made with ODA alone.

  8. Preparation of Three-Dimensional Chitosan-Graphene Oxide Aerogel for Residue Oil Removal.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoqing; Qu, Lijun; Zhu, Shifeng; Tian, Mingwei; Zhang, Xiansheng; Sun, Kaikai; Tang, Xiaoning

    2016-08-01

    Graphene oxide has been used as an adsorbent in wastewater treatment. However, the hydrophily and dispersibility in aqueous solution limit its practical application in environmental protection. In this paper, a novel, environmentally friendly adsorbent, chitosan and chitosan-graphene oxide aerogels with a diverse shape, large specific surface area, and unique porous structure were prepared by a freeze-drying method. The structure of the adsorbents was investigated using scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction (XRD); the specific surface area and swelling capability were also characterized. In addition, removal of diesel oil from seawater by chitosan aerogel (CSAG) and chitosan-graphene oxide aerogel (AGGO-1 and AGGO-2) was studied and batch adsorption experiments were carried out as a function of different adsorbent dosages (0-6 g), contact time (0-120 minutes), pH (3-9), and initial concentrations of oil residue (3-30 g/L) to determine the optimum condition for the adsorption of residue oil from seawater. The results showed that the chitosan-graphene oxide aerogels were more effective to remove diesel oil from seawater compared with pure chitosan aerogel. A removal efficiency ≥ 95% of the chitosan-graphene oxide aerogels could be achieved easily at the initial concentrations of 20 g/L, which indicated that the chitosan-graphene oxide aerogels can be used to treat the industrial oil leakage or effluent in the natural water.

  9. Deformation Studies and Elasticity Measurements of Hydrophobic Silica Aerogels using Double Exposure Holographic Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikode, Prashant; Sabale, Sandip; Chavan, Sugam

    2017-01-01

    Holographic interferometry is mainly used for the non-destructive testing of various materials and metals in industry, engineering and technological fields. This technique may used to study the elastic properties of materials. We have used the double exposure holographic interferometry (DEHI) to study the surface deformation and elastic constant such as Young's modulus of mechanically stressed aerogel samples. Efforts have been made in the past to use non-destructive techniques like sound velocity measurements through aerogels. Hydrophobic Silica aerogels were prepared by the sol-gel process followed by supercritical methanol drying. The molar ratio of tetramethoxysilane: methyltrimethoxysilane: H2O constant at 1.2:0.8:6 while the methanol / tetramethoxysilane molar ratio (M) was varied systematically from 14 to 20 to obtain hydrophobic silica aerogels. After applying the weights on the sample in grams, double exposure holograms of aerogel samples have been successfully recorded. Double exposure causes localization of interference fringes on the aerogel surface and these fringes are used to determine the surface deformation and elastic modulus of the aerogels and they are in good agreement with the experiments performed by using four point bending. University Grants Commission for Minor Research Project and Department of Science and Technology for FIST Program.

  10. Preparation and characterization of hydrophobic silica aerogel sphere products by co-precursor method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Huijun; Liang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Junxia; Wang, Minmin; Yang, Shiyuan

    2015-10-01

    In the present paper, silica aerogel balls were prepared using methyltriethoxysilane (MTES) and tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) co-precursor with different MTES/TEOS molar ratio (I) by two-step acid-base catalyzed sol-gel process and molding technology followed by the carbon dioxide supercritical drying. The physical properties of various silica aerogels whose I varied from 0 to 1.0 were studied by BET and SEM. Approving aerogel ball was obtained by using acetone as exchanging solvent at I of 0.8. Better properties are less crack, little shrinking percentage (17%), low apparent density (0.103 g/cm3), large surface area (996.35 m2/g) and high pore volume (3.32 cm3/g). Characterized by contact angle measurements and thermal stability, the characterizations of aerogel spheres were strongly affected by the MTES/TEOS molar ratio. Hydrophobic property increased with the increase in I value, and silica aerogels at I = 0.8 and 1.0 have a superhydrophobic characterization with the highest contact angle (152°). The TG-DTA analysis shows that the silica aerogel spheres transform hydrophobic to hydrophilic at around 450 °C, which is due to oxidation of Si-CH3 to Si-OH groups. The surface chemical modification was confirmed by FT-IR spectrums, which demonstrated that Si-CH3 groups be beneficial to molding of silica aerogels.

  11. Carbon nanotube spaced graphene aerogels with enhanced capacitance in aqueous and ionic liquid electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Qingguo; Tang, Jie; Lin, Yuexian; Li, Jing; Qin, Faxiang; Yuan, Jinshi; Qin, Lu-Chang

    2015-03-01

    Carbon nanotube spaced graphene aerogels have been prepared by a hydrothermal method and used for supercapacitor applications. The specific surface area and specific capacitance can be controlled by tuning the amount of added carbon nanotubes. The as-prepared composite aerogels retain the advantage of aerogel structure in providing macropores to ensure electrodes fast wetted by the electrolyte ions and also possess additional mesopores created by the carbon nanotube spacers for more ion adsorption. Benefited from that, the composite aerogels exhibit significantly enhanced supercapacitor properties in both aqueous and ionic liquid electrolyte. Compared with graphene aerogels, the composite aerogels show a 37% larger specific capacitance of 245.5 F g-1 at a current density of 2.5 A g-1 and high rate capability of 197.0 F g-1 at a high current density of 80 A g-1 in aqueous electrolyte. Moreover, the composite aerogels deliver a 33% larger specific capacitance of 183.3 F g-1 at 0.5 A g-1 and a high energy density of 80 Wh kg-1 when using an ionic liquid (EMIMBF4) as the electrolyte.

  12. Copper Nanowire Based Aerogel with Tunable Pore Structure and Its Application as Flexible Pressure Sensor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaojuan; Wang, Ranran; Nie, Pu; Cheng, Yin; Lu, Xiaoyu; Shi, Liangjing; Sun, Jing

    2017-04-11

    Aerogel is a kind of material with high porosity and low density. However, the research on metal-based aerogel with good conductivity is quite limited, which hinders its usage in electronic devices, such as flexible pressure sensors. In this work, we successfully fabricate copper nanowire (CuNW) based aerogel through a one-pot method, and the dynamics for the assembly of CuNWs into hydrogel is intensively investigated. The "bubble controlled assembly" mechanism is put forward for the first time, according to which tunable pore structures and densities (4.3 mg cm-3~7.5 mg cm-3) of the nanowire aerogel is achieved. Subsequently, ultralight flexible pressure sensors with tunable sensitivities (0.02 kPa-1 to 0.7 kPa-1) are fabricated from the Cu NWs aerogels, and the negative correlation behavior of the sensitivity to the density of the aerogel sensors is disclosed systematically. This work provides a versatile strategy for the fabrication of nanowire based aerogels, which greatly broadens their application potential.

  13. Hierarchical Nafion enhanced carbon aerogels for sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Bo; Ding, Ailing; Liu, Yuqing; Diao, Jianglin; Razal, Joselito; Lau, King Tong; Shepherd, Roderick; Li, Changming; Chen, Jun

    2016-02-01

    This work describes the fabrication of hierarchical 3D Nafion enhanced carbon aerogels (NECAGs) for sensing applications via a fast freeze drying method. Graphene oxide, multiwalled carbon nanotubes and Nafion were mixed and extruded into liquid nitrogen followed by the removal of ice crystals by freeze drying. The addition of Nafion enhanced the mechanical strength of NECAGs and effective control of the cellular morphology and pore size was achieved. The resultant NECAGs demonstrated high strength, low density, and high specific surface area and can achieve a modulus of 20 kPa, an electrical conductivity of 140 S m-1, and a specific capacity of 136.8 F g-1 after reduction. Therefore, NECAG monoliths performed well as a gas sensor and as a biosensor with high sensitivity and selectivity. The remarkable sensitivity of 8.52 × 103 μA mM-1 cm-2 was obtained in dopamine (DA) detection, which is two orders of magnitude better than the literature reported values using graphene aerogel electrodes made from a porous Ni template. These outstanding properties make the NECAG a promising electrode candidate for a wide range of applications. Further in-depth investigations are being undertaken to probe the structure-property relationship of NECAG monoliths prepared under various conditions.This work describes the fabrication of hierarchical 3D Nafion enhanced carbon aerogels (NECAGs) for sensing applications via a fast freeze drying method. Graphene oxide, multiwalled carbon nanotubes and Nafion were mixed and extruded into liquid nitrogen followed by the removal of ice crystals by freeze drying. The addition of Nafion enhanced the mechanical strength of NECAGs and effective control of the cellular morphology and pore size was achieved. The resultant NECAGs demonstrated high strength, low density, and high specific surface area and can achieve a modulus of 20 kPa, an electrical conductivity of 140 S m-1, and a specific capacity of 136.8 F g-1 after reduction. Therefore, NECAG

  14. Chalcogenide aerogels as sorbents for radioactive iodine

    SciTech Connect

    Subrahmanyam, Kota S.; Sarma, Debajit; Malliakas, Christos; Polychronopoulou, Kyriaki; Riley, Brian J.; Pierce, David A.; Chun, Jaehun; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

    2015-04-14

    Iodine (129I) is one of the radionuclides released in nuclear fuel reprocessing and poses risk to public safety due to its involvement in human metabolic processes. In order to prevent the leaching of hazardous radioactive iodine into the environment, its effective capture and sequestration is pivotal. In the context of finding a suitable matrix for capturing radioactive iodine the chalcogels, NiMoS4, CoMoS4, Sb4Sn4S12, Zn2Sn2S6, and CoSx (x = 4-5) were explored as iodine sorbents. All the chalcogels showed high uptake, reaching up to 225 mass% (2.25 g/g) of the final mass owing to strong chemical and physical iodine-chalcogen interactions. Analysis of the iodine-loaded specimens revealed that the iodine chemically reacted with Sb4Sn4S12, Zn2Sn2S6, and CoSx to form metal complexes SbI3, SnI4, and, KI respectively. The NiMoS4 and CoMoS4 chalcogels did not appear to undergo a chemical reaction with iodine since iodide complexes were not observed with these samples. Once heated, the iodine-loaded chalcogels released iodine in the temperature range of 75 °C to 220 °C, depending on the nature of iodine speciation. In the case of Sb4Sn4S12 and Zn2Sn2S6 iodine release was observed around 150 °C in the form of SnI4 and SbI3, respectively. The NiMoS4, CoMoS4, and CoSx released iodine at ~75 °C, which is consistent with physisorbed iodine. Preliminary investigations on consolidation of iodine-loaded Zn2Sn2S6 with Sb2S3 as a glass forming additive showed the content of iodine in consolidated glass ingots at around 25 mass%.

  15. Process for making solid-state radiation-emitting composition

    DOEpatents

    Ashley, Carol S.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Reed, Scott; Walko, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    The invention provides a process for loading an aerogel substrate with tritium and the resultant compositions. According to the process, an aerogel substrate is hydrolyzed so that surface OH groups are formed. The hydrolyzed aerogel is then subjected to tritium exchange employing, for example, a tritium-containing gas, whereby tritium atoms replace H atoms of surface OH groups. OH and/or CH groups of residual alcohol present in the aerogel may also undergo tritium exchange.

  16. Process for making solid-state radiation-emitting composition

    DOEpatents

    Ashley, C.S.; Brinker, C.J.; Reed, S.; Walko, R.J.

    1993-08-31

    The invention provides a process for loading an aerogel substrate with tritium and the resultant compositions. According to the process, an aerogel substrate is hydrolyzed so that surface OH groups are formed. The hydrolyzed aerogel is then subjected to tritium exchange employing, for example, a tritium-containing gas, whereby tritium atoms replace H atoms of surface OH groups. OH and/or CH groups of residual alcohol present in the aerogel may also undergo tritium exchange.

  17. Polyvinyl alcohol-cellulose nanofibrils-graphene oxide hybrid organic aerogels.

    PubMed

    Javadi, Alireza; Zheng, Qifeng; Payen, Francois; Javadi, Abdolreza; Altin, Yasin; Cai, Zhiyong; Sabo, Ronald; Gong, Shaoqin

    2013-07-10

    Hybrid organic aerogels consisting of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs), and graphene oxide nanosheets (GONSs) were prepared using an environmentally friendly freeze-drying process. The material properties of these fabricated aerogels were measured and analyzed using various characterization techniques including compression testing, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric (TGA) analysis, Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) surface area analysis, and contact angle measurements. These environmentally friendly, biobased hybrid organic aerogels exhibited a series of desirable properties including a high specific compressive strength and compressive failure strain, ultralow density and thermal conductivity, good thermal stability, and moisture resistance, making them potentially useful for a broad range of applications including thermal insulation.

  18. Accurate bulk density determination of irregularly shaped translucent and opaque aerogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkov, M. P.; Jones, S. M.

    2016-05-01

    We present a volumetric method for accurate determination of bulk density of aerogels, calculated from extrapolated weight of the dry pure solid and volume estimates based on the Archimedes' principle of volume displacement, using packed 100 μm-sized monodispersed glass spheres as a "quasi-fluid" media. Hard particle packing theory is invoked to demonstrate the reproducibility of the apparent density of the quasi-fluid. Accuracy rivaling that of the refractive index method is demonstrated for both translucent and opaque aerogels with different absorptive properties, as well as for aerogels with regular and irregular shapes.

  19. Pairing states of superfluid {sup 3}He in uniaxially anisotropic aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    Aoyama, Kazushi; Ikeda, Ryusuke

    2006-02-01

    Stable pairing states of superfluid {sup 3}He in aerogel are examined in the case with a global uniaxial anisotropy which may be created by applying a uniaxial stress to the aerogel. Due to such a global anisotropy, the stability region of an Anderson-Brinkman-Morel (ABM) pairing state becomes wider. In a uniaxially stretched aerogel, the pure polar pairing state with a horizontal line node is predicted to occur, as a three-dimensional superfluid phase, over a measurable width just below the superfluid transition at T{sub c}(P). A possible relevance of the present results to the case with no global anisotropy is also discussed.

  20. Method of low pressure and/or evaporative drying of aerogel

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Steven T.; Kaschmitter, James L.; Pekala, Richard W.

    1995-01-01

    A process whereby Resorcinol/Formaldehyde (RF) aerogel having a density of about 0.4-1.2 g/cc can be manufactured using a simple air drying procedure. This process is inherently simpler, quicker, and less expensive than the more conventional supercritical or subcritical CO.sub.2 extraction procedures. RF aerogels can be used as produced, such as in insulation applications, or pyrolyzed to form carbon aerogels with a density of about 0.9 g/cc for use in applications such as batteries, supercapacitors, etc.

  1. Method of low pressure and/or evaporative drying of aerogel

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, S.T.; Kaschmitter, J.L.; Pekala, R.W.

    1995-05-30

    A process is described whereby Resorcinol/Formaldehyde (RF) aerogel having a density of about 0.4--1.2 g/cc can be manufactured using a simple air drying procedure. This process is inherently simpler, quicker, and less expensive than the more conventional supercritical or subcritical CO{sub 2} extraction procedures. RF aerogels can be used as produced, such as in insulation applications, or pyrolyzed to form carbon aerogels with a density of about 0.9 g/cc for use in applications such as batteries, supercapacitors, etc.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of polyurethane ionomers, blends and urethane-urea aerogel hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mingzhe

    polyurethane ionomers synthesized in this work were combined with, sulfonated polystyrene, and poly(ethylene-co-acrylic or methacrylic acid) polymers, their partially neutralized ionomers, and thermoplastic polyurethanes. It was found that polyurethane anionomers synthesized by the new method were miscible with these polymers through the composition range. Several series of these blends were studied using mid- and far-infrared spectroscopy to investigate molecular interactions that lead to the miscibility. Isocyanate-containing molecules were reacted with chitosan silica aerogels. It was discovered that -NCO groups of the diisocyanate HMDI reacted selectively with amine groups in the presence of large excesses of -OH groups from alcohol, silica, and water. This study leads to the possibility of attaching nanoscale aerogel particles to substrates, to one another, and to additional molecules of interest.

  3. Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination I: Identification of tracks in aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphal, Andrew J.; Anderson, David; Butterworth, Anna L.; Frank, David R.; Lettieri, Robert; Marchant, William; von Korff, Joshua; Zevin, Daniel; Ardizzone, Augusto; Campanile, Antonella; Capraro, Michael; Courtney, Kevin; Criswell, Mitchell N.; Crumpler, Dixon; Cwik, Robert; Gray, Fred Jacob; Hudson, Bruce; Imada, Guy; Karr, Joel; Wah, Lily Lau Wan; Mazzucato, Michele; Motta, Pier Giorgio; Rigamonti, Carlo; Spencer, Ronald C.; Woodrough, Stephens B.; Santoni, Irene Cimmino; Sperry, Gerry; Terry, Jean-Noel; Wordsworth, Naomi; Yahnke, Tom; Allen, Carlton; Ansari, Asna; Bajt, SašA.; Bastien, Ron K.; Bassim, Nabil; Bechtel, Hans A.; Borg, Janet; Brenker, Frank E.; Bridges, John; Brownlee, Donald E.; Burchell, Mark; Burghammer, Manfred; Changela, Hitesh; Cloetens, Peter; Davis, Andrew M.; Doll, Ryan; Floss, Christine; Flynn, George; Gainsforth, Zack; Grün, Eberhard; Heck, Philipp R.; Hillier, Jon K.; Hoppe, Peter; Huth, Joachim; Hvide, Brit; Kearsley, Anton; King, Ashley J.; Lai, Barry; Leitner, Jan; Lemelle, Laurence; Leroux, Hugues; Leonard, Ariel; Nittler, Larry R.; Ogliore, Ryan; Ong, Wei Ja; Postberg, Frank; Price, Mark C.; Sandford, Scott A.; Tresseras, Juan-Angel Sans; Schmitz, Sylvia; Schoonjans, Tom; Silversmit, Geert; Simionovici, Alexandre S.; Solé, Vicente A.; Srama, Ralf; Stephan, Thomas; Sterken, Veerle J.; Stodolna, Julien; Stroud, Rhonda M.; Sutton, Steven; Trieloff, Mario; Tsou, Peter; Tsuchiyama, Akira; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Vekemans, Bart; Vincze, Laszlo; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2014-09-01

    Here, we report the identification of 69 tracks in approximately 250 cm2 of aerogel collectors of the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector. We identified these tracks through Stardust@home, a distributed internet-based virtual microscope and search engine, in which > 30,000 amateur scientists collectively performed >9 × 107 searches on approximately 106 fields of view. Using calibration images, we measured individual detection efficiency, and found that the individual detection efficiency for tracks > 2.5 μm in diameter was >0.6, and was >0.75 for tracks >3 μm in diameter. Because most fields of view were searched >30 times, these results could be combined to yield a theoretical detection efficiency near unity. The initial expectation was that interstellar dust would be captured at very high speed. The actual tracks discovered in the Stardust collector, however, were due to low-speed impacts, and were morphologically strongly distinct from the calibration images. As a result, the detection efficiency of these tracks was lower than detection efficiency of calibrations presented in training, testing, and ongoing calibration. Nevertheless, as calibration images based on low-speed impacts were added later in the project, detection efficiencies for low-speed tracks rose dramatically. We conclude that a massively distributed, calibrated search, with amateur collaborators, is an effective approach to the challenging problem of identification of tracks of hypervelocity projectiles captured in aerogel.

  4. Systematic studies of tannin-formaldehyde aerogels: preparation and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral-Labat, Gisele; Szczurek, Andrzej; Fierro, Vanessa; Pizzi, Antonio; Celzard, Alain

    2013-02-01

    Gelation of tannin-formaldehyde (TF) solutions was systematically investigated by changing pH and concentration of TF resin in water. In this way we constructed the TF phase diagram, from which chemical hydrogels could be described, and also synthesized thermoreversible tannin-based hydrogels. Conditions of non-gelation were also determined. Hydrogels were dried in supercritical CO2, leading to a broad range of TF aerogels. The latter were investigated for volume shrinkage, total porosity, micro-, meso- and macropore volumes, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area, microscopic texture, mechanical and thermal properties. All these properties are discussed in relation to each other, leading to an accurate and self-consistent description of these bioresource-based highly porous materials. The conditions for obtaining the highest BET surface area or mesopore volume were determined and explained in relation to the preparation conditions. The highest BET surface area, 880 m2 g-1, is remarkably high for organic aerogels derived from a natural resource.

  5. Deep Bed Adsorption Testing using Silver-Functionalized Aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    Nick Soelberg; Tony Watson

    2012-06-01

    Nuclear fission results in the production of fission products and activation products, some of which tend to be volatile during used fuel reprocessing and evolve in gaseous species into the reprocessing facility off-gas systems. Analyses have shown that I129, due to its radioactivity, high potential mobility in the environment, and high longevity (half life of 15.7 million years), can require control efficiencies of up to 1,000x or higher to meet regulatory emission limits. Two Aerogel sorption tests that have been performed this fiscal year. The maximum iodine decontamination factor (DF) was measured to be over 10,000, above the 1,000-10,000 target DF range. The mass transfer zone may be as short as 0.5 inches under the sorption conditions of the first test. Only a small fraction of the iodine sorbed on Bed 1 was desorbed during the purge periods. The silver-functionalized Aerogel appears to have potential to be a very effective and efficient iodine sorbent.

  6. The Effect of Radiation on Phaseolus vulgaris growth and Aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boylan, Derek; Durham, Stephanie

    2013-10-01

    Radiation affects human life in disparately subtle and dramatic ways. For instance, nuclear reactions in the Sun produce light and heat that are essential for human existence, while recent research implies that the flux of cosmic ray particles may also have an impact on humans' daily lives. According to the EPA the average American receives 310 mrems of radiation per year, well under a total dose of 50,000 mrems and higher doses that cause symptoms ranging from nausea to death. However, scientists hypothesize that exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation (< 1000 mrems) may produce beneficial effects in organisms. Thus the effect of low doses of alpha, beta, and gamma radiation (12 doses ranging from 0.04 mrems of alpha radiation to 17 mrems of gamma radiation) on Phaseolus vulgaris was tested. The same radiation was also tested on the performance of aerogel, a material used in particle detectors. Aerogel will be used in experiments at the 12 GeV Jefferson Laboratory and has been previously observed to change its optical characteristics after being used in experiments. To determine the level of cosmic ray flux and possible contribution to our experiments a detector was created using scintillator material and 2-inch phototubes. Results from our experiments will be presented. Supported in part by NSF grant 1019521 and 1039446.

  7. The Effect of Radiation on Phaseolus vulgaris and Aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durham, Stephanie; Boylan, Derek

    2013-10-01

    Radiation affects human life in disparately subtle and dramatic ways. For instance, nuclear reactions in the Sun produce light and heat that are essential for human existence, while recent research implies that the flux of cosmic ray particles may also have an impact on humans' daily lives. According to the EPA the average American receives 310 mrems of radiation per year, well under a total dose of 50,000 mrems and higher doses that cause symptoms ranging from nausea to death. However, scientists hypothesize that exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation (< 1000 mrems) may produce beneficial effects in organisms. Thus the effect of low doses of alpha, beta, and gamma radiation (12 doses ranging from 0.04 mrems of alpha radiation to 17 mrems of gamma radiation) on Phaseolus vulgaris was tested. The same radiation was also tested on the performance of aerogel, a material used in particle detectors. Aerogel will be used in experiments at the 12 GeV Jefferson Laboratory and has been previously observed to change its optical characteristics after being used in experiments. To determine the level of cosmic ray flux and possible contribution to our experiments a detector was created using scintillator material and 2-inch phototubes. Results from our experiments will be presented. Supported in part by NSF grant 1019521 and 1039446.

  8. Aerogel and xerogel composites for use as carbon anodes

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.; Tillotson, Thomas M.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.

    2010-10-12

    A method for forming a reinforced rigid anode monolith and fuel and product of such method. The method includes providing a solution of organic aerogel or xerogel precursors including at least one of a phenolic resin, phenol (hydroxybenzene), resorcinol(1,3-dihydroxybenzene), or catechol(1,2-dihydroxybenzene); at least one aldehyde compound selected from the group consisting of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and furfuraldehyde; and an alkali carbonate or phosphoric acid catalyst; adding internal reinforcement materials comprising carbon to said precursor solution to form a precursor mixture; gelling said precursor mixture to form a composite gel; drying said composite gel; and pyrolyzing said composite gel to form a wettable aerogel/carbon composite or a wettable xerogel/carbon composite, wherein said composites comprise chars and said internal reinforcement materials, and wherein said composite is suitable for use as an anode with the chars being fuel capable of being combusted in a molten salt electrochemical fuel cell in the range from 500 C to 800 C to produce electrical energy. Additional methods and systems/compositions are also provided.

  9. Strong, conductive, lightweight, neat graphene aerogel fibers with aligned pores.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhen; Zhang, Yuan; Li, Peigang; Gao, Chao

    2012-08-28

    Liquid crystals of anisotropic colloids are of great significance in the preparation of their ordered macroscopic materials, for example, in the cases of carbon nanotubes and graphene. Here, we report a facile and scalable spinning process to prepare neat "core-shell" structured graphene aerogel fibers and three-dimensional cylinders with aligned pores from the flowing liquid crystalline graphene oxide (GO) gels. The uniform alignment of graphene sheets, inheriting the lamellar orders from GO liquid crystals, offers the porous fibers high specific tensile strength (188 kN m kg(-1)) and the porous cylinders high compression modulus (3.3 MPa). The porous graphene fibers have high specific surface area up to 884 m(2) g(-1) due to their interconnected pores and exhibit fine electrical conductivity (2.6 × 10(3) to 4.9 × 10(3) S m(-1)) in the wide temperature range of 5-300 K. The decreasing conductivity with decreasing temperature illustrates a typical semiconducting behavior, and the 3D interconnected network of 2D graphene sheets determines a dual 2D and 3D hopping conduction mechanism. The strong mechanical strength, high porosity, and fine electrical conductivity enable this novel material of ordered graphene aerogels to be greatly useful in versatile catalysts, supercapacitors, flexible batteries and cells, lightweight conductive fibers, and functional textiles.

  10. SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF CARBON AEROGEL NANOCOMPOSITES CONTAINING DOUBLE-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES

    SciTech Connect

    Worsley, M A; Satcher, J H; Baumann, T F

    2008-03-11

    Carbon aerogels (CAs) are novel mesoporous materials with applications such as electrode materials for super capacitors and rechargeable batteries, adsorbents and advanced catalyst supports. To expand the potential application for these unique materials, recent efforts have focused on the design of CA composites with the goal of modifying the structure, conductivity or catalytic activity of the aerogel. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) possess a number of intrinsic properties that make them promising materials in the design of composite materials. In addition, the large aspect ratios (100-1000) of CNTs means that small additions (less than 1 vol%) of CNTs can produce a composite with novel properties. Therefore, the homogeneous incorporation of CNTs into a CA matrix provides a viable route to new carbon-based composites with enhanced thermal, electrical and mechanical properties. One of the main challenges in preparing CNT composites is achieving a good uniform dispersion of nanotubes throughout the matrix. CAs are typically prepared through the sol-gel polymerization of resorcinol with formaldehyde in aqueous solution to produce organic gels that are supercritically dried and subsequently pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere. Therefore, a significant issue in fabricating CA-CNT composites is dispersing the CNTs in the aqueous reaction media. Previous work in the design of CACNT composites have addressed this issue by using organic solvents in the sol-gel reaction to facilitate dispersion of the CNTs. To our knowledge, no data has been published involving the preparation of CA composites containing CNTs dispersed in aqueous media. In this report, we describe a new method for the synthesis of monolithic CA-CNT composites that involves the sol-gel polymerization of resorcinol and formaldehyde in an aqueous solution containing a surfactant-stabilized dispersion of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNT). One of the advantages of this approach is that it allows one to uniformly

  11. Failure behavior of plasma-sprayed HAp coating on commercially pure titanium substrate in simulated body fluid (SBF) under bending load.

    PubMed

    Laonapakul, Teerawat; Rakngarm Nimkerdphol, Achariya; Otsuka, Yuichi; Mutoh, Yoshiharu

    2012-11-01

    Four point bending tests with acoustic emission (AE) monitoring were conducted for evaluating failure behavior of the plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite (HAp) top coat on commercially pure titanium (cp-Ti) plate with and without mixed HAp/Ti bond coat. Effect of immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) on failure behavior of the coated specimen was also investigated by immersing the specimen in SBF. The AE patterns obtained from the bending test of the HAp coating specimens after a week immersion in SBF clearly showed the earlier stage of delamination and spallation of the coating layer compared to those without immersion in SBF. It was also found that the bond coating improved failure resistance of the HAp coating specimen compared to that without the bond coat. Four point bend fatigue tests under ambient and SBF environments were also conducted with AE monitoring during the entire fatigue test for investigating the influence of SBF environment on fatigue failure behavior of the HAp coating specimen with the mixed HAp/Ti bond coat. The specimens tested at a stress amplitude of 120 MPa under both ambient and SBF environments could survive up to 10⁷ cycles without spallation of HAp coating layer. The specimens tested under SBF environment and those tested under ambient environment after immersion in SBF showed shorter fatigue life compared to those tested under ambient environment without SBF immersion. Micro-cracks nucleated in the coating layer in the early stage of fatigue life and then propagated into the cp-Ti substrate in the intermediate stage, which unstably propagated to failure in the final stage. It was found from the XRD analysis that the dissolution of the co-existing phases and the precipitation of the HAp phase were taken place during immersion in SBF. During this process, the co-existing phases disappeared from the coating layer and the HAp phase fully occupied the coating layer. The degradation of bending strength and fatigue life of the HAp coating

  12. Organic carbon aerogels from the sol-gel polymerization of phenolic-furfural mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, Richard W.

    1998-04-28

    The sol-gel polymerization of a phenolic-furfural mixture in dilute solution leads to a highly cross-linked network that can be supercritically dried to form a high surface area foam. These porous materials have cell/pore sizes .ltoreq.1000 .ANG., and although they are dark brown in color, they can be classified as a new type of aerogel. The phenolic-furfural aerogel can be pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere at 1050.degree. C. to produce carbon aerogels. This new aerogel may be used for thermal insulation, chromatographic packing, water filtration, ion-exchange, and carbon electrodes for energy storage devices, such as batteries and double-layer capacitors.

  13. Organic aerogels from the sol-gel polymerization of phenolic-furfural mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, R.W.

    1995-12-19

    The sol-gel polymerization of a phenolic-furfural mixture in dilute solution leads to a highly cross-linked network that can be supercritically dried to form a high surface area foam. These porous materials have cell/pore sizes{<=}1000{angstrom}, and although they are dark brown in color, they can be classified as a new type of aerogel. The phenolic-furfural aerogel can be pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere at 1050 C to produce carbon aerogels. This new aerogel may be used for thermal insulation, chromatographic packing, water filtration, ion-exchange, and carbon electrodes for energy storage devices, such as batteries and double-layer capacitors. 8 figs.

  14. Correction: Cartilage-inspired superelastic ultradurable graphene aerogels prepared by the selective gluing of intersheet joints.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jin-Yong; Yun, Sol; Wie, Jeong Jae; Zhang, Xu; Dresselhaus, Mildred S; Kong, Jing; Park, Ho Seok

    2016-07-14

    Correction for 'Cartilage-inspired superelastic ultradurable graphene aerogels prepared by the selective gluing of intersheet joints' by Jin-Yong Hong, et al., Nanoscale, 2016, DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01986b.

  15. Liquid-solid phase transition of hydrogen and deuterium in silica aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Cleve, E.; Worsley, M. A.; Kucheyev, S. O.

    2014-10-01

    Behavior of hydrogen isotopes confined in disordered low-density nanoporous solids remains essentially unknown. Here, we use relaxation calorimetry to study freezing and melting of H2 and D2 in an ˜85%-porous base-catalyzed silica aerogel. We find that liquid-solid transition temperatures of both isotopes inside the aerogel are depressed. The phase transition takes place over a wide temperature range of ˜4 K and non-trivially depends on the liquid filling fraction, reflecting the broad pore size distribution in the aerogel. Undercooling is observed for both H2 and D2 confined inside the aerogel monolith. Results for H2 and D2 are extrapolated to tritium-containing hydrogens with the quantum law of corresponding states.

  16. Organic aerogels from the sol-gel polymerization of phenolic-furfural mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, R.W.

    1996-09-17

    The sol-gel polymerization of a phenolic-furfural mixture in dilute solution leads to a highly cross-linked network that can be supercritically dried to form a high surface area foam. These porous materials have cell/pore sizes {<=}1,000{angstrom}, and although they are dark brown in color, they can be classified as a new type of aerogel. The phenolic-furfural aerogel can be pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere at 1,050 C to produce carbon aerogels. This new aerogel may be used for thermal insulation, chromatographic packing, water filtration, ion-exchange, and carbon electrodes for energy storage devices, such as batteries and double-layer capacitors. 8 figs.

  17. Organic carbon aerogels from the sol-gel polymerization of phenolic-furfural mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, R.W.

    1998-04-28

    The sol-gel polymerization of a phenolic-furfural mixture in dilute solution leads to a highly cross-linked network that can be supercritically dried to form a high surface area foam. These porous materials have cell/pore sizes {<=}1000 {angstrom}, and although they are dark brown in color, they can be classified as a new type of aerogel. The phenolic-furfural aerogel can be pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere at 1050 C to produce carbon aerogels. This new aerogel may be used for thermal insulation, chromatographic packing, water filtration, ion-exchange, and carbon electrodes for energy storage devices, such as batteries and double-layer capacitors. 8 figs.

  18. Ignition Capsules with Aerogel-Supported Liquid DT Fuel For The National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, D D; Salmonson, J D; Clark, D S; Lindl, J D; Haan, S W; Amendt, P; Wu, K J

    2011-10-25

    For high repetition-rate fusion power plant applications, capsules with aerogel-supported liquid DT fuel can have much reduced fill time compared to {beta}-layering a solid DT fuel layer. The melting point of liquid DT can be lowered once liquid DT is embedded in an aerogel matrix, and the DT vapor density is consequently closer to the desired density for optimal capsule design requirement. We present design for NIF-scale aerogel-filled capsules based on 1-D and 2-D simulations. An optimal configuration is obtained when the outer radius is increased until the clean fuel fraction is within 65-75% at peak velocity. A scan (in ablator and fuel thickness parameter space) is used to optimize the capsule configurations. The optimized aerogel-filled capsule has good low-mode robustness and acceptable high-mode mix.

  19. Coupling between Solid 3He on Aerogel and Superfluid 3He in the Low Temperature Limit

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D. I.; Fisher, S. N.; Guenault, A. M.; Haley, R. P.; Pickett, G. R.; Tsepelin, V.; Whitehead, R. C. V.; Skyba, P.

    2006-09-07

    We have cooled liquid 3He contained in a 98% open aerogel sample surrounded by bulk superfluid 3He-B at zero pressure to below 120 {mu}K. The aerogel sample is placed in a quasiparticle blackbody radiator cooled by a Lancaster-style nuclear cooling stage to {approx}200 {mu}K. We monitor the temperature of the 3He inside the blackbody radiator using a vibrating wire resonator. We find that reducing the magnetic field on the aerogel sample causes substantial cooling of all the superfluid inside the blackbody radiator. We believe this is due to the demagnetization of the solid 3He layers on the aerogel strands. This system has potential for achieving extremely low temperatures in the confined fluid.

  20. Organic aerogels from the sol-gel polymerization of phenolic-furfural mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, Richard W.

    1995-01-01

    The sol-gel polymerization of a phenolic-furfural mixture in dilute solution leads to a highly cross-linked network that can be supercritically dried to form a high surface area foam. These porous materials have cell/pore sizes.ltoreq.1000.ANG., and although they are dark brown in color, they can be classified as a new type of aerogel. The phenolic-furfural aerogel can be pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere at 1050.degree. C. to produce carbon aerogels. This new aerogel may be used for thermal insulation, chromatographic packing, water filtration, ion-exchange, and carbon electrodes for energy storage devices, such as batteries and double-layer capacitors.

  1. Organic aerogels from the sol-gel polymerization of phenolic-furfural mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, Richard W.

    1996-01-01

    The sol-gel polymerization of a phenolic-furfural mixture in dilute solution leads to a highly cross-linked network that can be supercritically dried to form a high surface area foam. These porous materials have cell/pore sizes .ltoreq.1000.ANG., and although they are dark brown in color, they can be classified as a new type of aerogel. The phenolic-furfural aerogel can be pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere at 1050.degree. C. to produce carbon aerogels. This new aerogel may be used for thermal insulation, chromatographic packing, water filtration, ion-exchange, and carbon electrodes for energy storage devices, such as batteries and double-layer capacitors.

  2. Purity and cleanness of aerogel as a cosmic dust capture medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.; Fleming, R. H.; Lindley, P. M.; Craig, A. Y.; Blake, D.

    1994-01-01

    The capability for capturing micrometeoroids intact through laboratory simulations and in space in passive underdense silica aerogel offers a valuable tool for cosmic dust research. The integrity of the sample handling medium can substantially modify the integrity of the sample. Intact capture is a violent hypervelocity event: the integrity of the capturing medium can cause even greater modification of the sample. Doubts of the suitability of silica aerogel as a capture medium were raised at the 20th LPSC, and questions were raised again at the recent workshop on Particle Capture, Recovery, and Velocity Trajectory Measurement Technologies. Assessment of aerogel's volatile components and carbon contents have been made. We report the results of laboratory measurements of the purity and cleanliness of silica aerogel used for several Sample Return Experiments flown on the Get Away Special program.

  3. Correction: Cartilage-inspired superelastic ultradurable graphene aerogels prepared by the selective gluing of intersheet joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Jin-Yong; Yun, Sol; Wie, Jeong Jae; Zhang, Xu; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.; Kong, Jing; Park, Ho Seok

    2016-06-01

    Correction for `Cartilage-inspired superelastic ultradurable graphene aerogels prepared by the selective gluing of intersheet joints' by Jin-Yong Hong, et al., Nanoscale, 2016, DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01986b.

  4. Organic compound alteration during hypervelocity collection of carbonaceous materials in aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, M. K.; Clemett, S. J.; Sandford, S. A.; McKay, D. S.; Zare, R. N.

    2009-03-01

    The NASA Stardust mission brought to Earth micron-size particles from the coma of comet 81P/Wild 2 using aerogel, a porous silica material, as the capture medium. A major challenge in understanding the organic inventory of the returned comet dust is identifying, unambiguously, which organic molecules are indigenous to the cometary particles, which are produced from carbon contamination in the Stardust aerogel, and which are cometary organics that have been modified by heating during the particle capture process. Here it is shown that 1) alteration of cometary organic molecules along impact tracks in aerogel is highly dependent on the original particle morphology, and 2) organic molecules on test-shot terminal particles are mostly preserved. These conclusions are based on two-step laser mass spectrometry (L2MS) examinations of test shots with organic-laden particles (both tracks in aerogel and the terminal particles themselves).

  5. Versatile fabrication of magnetic carbon fiber aerogel applied for bidirectional oil-water separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Zhu, Xiaotao; Ge, Bo; Men, Xuehu; Li, Peilong; Zhang, Zhaozhu

    2015-09-01

    Fabricating functional materials that can solve environmental problems resulting from oil or organic solvent pollution is highly desired. However, expensive materials or complicated procedures and unidirectional oil-water separation hamper their applications. Herein, a magnetic superhydrophobic carbon fiber aerogel with high absorption capacity was developed by one-step pyrolysis of Fe(NO3)3-coated cotton in an argon atmosphere. The obtained aerogel can selectively collect oils from oil-polluted region by a magnet bar owing to its magnetic properties and achieves fast oil-water separation for its superhydrophobicity and superoleophilicity. Furthermore, the aerogel performs recyclable oil absorption capacity even after ten cycles of oil-water separation and bears organic solvent immersion. Importantly, the obtained aerogel turns to superhydrophilic and underwater superoleophobic after thermal treatment, allowing it as a promising and efficient material for bidirectional oil-water separation and organic contaminants removal.

  6. Polymerization under Hypersaline Conditions: A Robust Route to Phenolic Polymer-Derived Carbon Aerogels.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhi-Long; Li, Guan-Cheng; Fechler, Nina; Yang, Ning; Ma, Zhi-Yuan; Wang, Xin; Antonietti, Markus; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2016-11-14

    Polymer-derived carbon aerogels can be obtained by direct polymerization of monomers under hypersaline conditions using inorganic salts. This allows for significantly increased mechanical robustness and avoiding special drying processes. This concept was realized by conducting the polymerization of phenol-formaldehyde (PF) in the presence of ZnCl2 salt. Afterwards, the simultaneous carbonization and foaming process conveniently converts the PF monolith into a foam-like carbon aerogel. ZnCl2 plays a key role, serving as dehydration agent, foaming agent, and porogen. The carbon aerogels thus obtained are of very low density (25 mg cm(-3) ), high specific surface area (1340 m(2)  g(-1) ), and have a large micro- and mesopore volume (0.75 cm(3)  g(-1) ). The carbon aerogels show very promising potential in the separation/extraction of organic pollutants and for energy storage.

  7. Silica aerogel for capturing intact interplanetary dust particles for the Tanpopo experiment.

    PubMed

    Tabata, Makoto; Yano, Hajime; Kawai, Hideyuki; Imai, Eiichi; Kawaguchi, Yuko; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we report the progress in developing a silica-aerogel-based cosmic dust capture panel for use in the Tanpopo experiment on the International Space Station (ISS). Previous studies revealed that ultralow-density silica aerogel tiles, comprising two layers with densities of 0.01 and 0.03 g/cm(3) developed using our production technique, were suitable for achieving the scientific objectives of the astrobiological mission. A special density configuration (i.e., box framing) aerogel with a holder was designed to construct the capture panels. Qualification tests for an engineering model of the capture panel as an instrument aboard the ISS were successful. Sixty box-framing aerogel tiles were manufactured in a contamination-controlled environment.

  8. Drug release from nanoparticles embedded in four different nanofibrillar cellulose aerogels.

    PubMed

    Valo, Hanna; Arola, Suvi; Laaksonen, Päivi; Torkkeli, Mika; Peltonen, Leena; Linder, Markus B; Serimaa, Ritva; Kuga, Shigenori; Hirvonen, Jouni; Laaksonen, Timo

    2013-09-27

    Highly porous nanocellulose aerogels prepared by freeze-drying from various nanofibrillar cellulose (NFC) hydrogels are introduced as nanoparticle reservoirs for oral drug delivery systems. Here we show that beclomethasone dipropionate (BDP) nanoparticles coated with amphiphilic hydrophobin proteins can be well integrated into the NFC aerogels. NFCs from four different origins are introduced and compared to microcrystalline cellulose (MCC). The nanocellulose aerogel scaffolds made from red pepper (RC) and MCC release the drug immediately, while bacterial cellulose (BC), quince seed (QC) and TEMPO-oxidized birch cellulose-based (TC) aerogels show sustained drug release. Since the release of the drug is controlled by the structure and interactions between the nanoparticles and the cellulose matrix, modulation of the matrix formers enable a control of the drug release rate. These nanocomposite structures can be very useful in many pharmaceutical nanoparticle applications and open up new possibilities as carriers for controlled drug delivery.

  9. Liquid–solid phase transition of hydrogen and deuterium in silica aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    Van Cleve, E.; Worsley, M. A.; Kucheyev, S. O.

    2014-10-28

    Behavior of hydrogen isotopes confined in disordered low-density nanoporous solids remains essentially unknown. Here, we use relaxation calorimetry to study freezing and melting of H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} in an ∼85%-porous base-catalyzed silica aerogel. We find that liquid–solid transition temperatures of both isotopes inside the aerogel are depressed. The phase transition takes place over a wide temperature range of ∼4 K and non-trivially depends on the liquid filling fraction, reflecting the broad pore size distribution in the aerogel. Undercooling is observed for both H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} confined inside the aerogel monolith. Results for H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} are extrapolated to tritium-containing hydrogens with the quantum law of corresponding states.

  10. Locating Stardust-like Particles in Aerogel Using X-Ray Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurewicz, A. J. G.; Jones, S. M.; Tsapin, A.; Mih, D. T.; Connolly, H. C., Jr.; Graham, G. A.

    2003-01-01

    Silica aerogel is the material that the spacecraft STARDUST is using to collect interstellar and cometary silicates. Anticipating the return of the samples to earth in January of 2006, MANY individual investigators and, especially, the investigators in NASA's SRLIDAP program are studying means of both in situ analysis of particles, as well as particle extraction. To help individual PI's with extraction of particles from aerogel in their own laboratories, we are exploring the use of standard laboratory x-ray equipment and commercial techniques for precisely locating specific particles in aerogel. We approached the evaluation of commercial x-ray techniques as follows. First, we determined the most appropriate detector for use with aerogel and particulates. Then, we compared and contrasted techniques useful for university laboratories.

  11. Method for producing metal oxide aerogels having densities less than 0. 02 g/cc

    DOEpatents

    Tillotson, T.M.; Poco, J.F.; Hrubesh, L.W.; Thomas, I.M.

    1994-01-04

    A two-step method is described for making transparent aerogels which have a density of less than 0.003 g/cm[sup 3] to those with a density of more than 0.8 g/cm[sup 3], by a sol/gel process and supercritical extraction. Condensed metal oxide intermediate made with purified reagents can be diluted to produce stable aerogels with a density of less than 0.02 g/cm[sup 3]. High temperature, direct supercritical extraction of the liquid phase of the gel produces hydrophobic aerogels which are stable at atmospheric moisture conditions. Monolithic, homogeneous silica aerogels with a density of less than 0.02 to higher than 0.8 g/cm[sup 3], with high thermal insulation capacity, improved mechanical strength and good optical transparency, are described. 7 figures.

  12. Method for producing metal oxide aerogels having densities less than 0.02 g/cc

    DOEpatents

    Tillotson, Thomas M.; Poco, John F.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.; Thomas, Ian M.

    1994-01-01

    A two-step method is described for making transparent aerogels which have a density of less than 0.003 g/cm.sup.3 to those with a density of more than 0.8 g/cm.sup.3, by a sol/gel process and supercritical extraction. Condensed metal oxide intermediate made with purified reagents can be diluted to produce stable aerogels with a density of less than 0.02 g/cm.sup.3. High temperature, direct supercritical extraction of the liquid phase of the gel produces hydrophobic aerogels which are stable at atmospheric moisture conditions. Monolithic, homogeneous silica aerogels with a density of less than 0.02 to higher than 0.8 g/cm.sup.3, with high thermal insulation capacity, improved mechanical strength and good optical transparency, are described.

  13. Three-dimensional multi-recognition flexible wearable sensor via graphene aerogel printing.

    PubMed

    An, Boxing; Ma, Ying; Li, Wenbo; Su, Meng; Li, Fengyu; Song, Yanlin

    2016-09-21

    Multi-response, multi-function and high integration are the critical pursuits of advanced electronic wearable sensors. Graphene aerogel endows a three-dimensional (3D) deformation morphology with excellent flexible wearable electronics of sheeted graphene. Here we report the fabrication of a neat graphene aerogel with micro extrusion printing to electronic sensor devices with a 3D nanostructure. The printed neat graphene patterns have excellent conductivity and the controllable 3D nanostructure of graphene aerogel contributes multi-dimensional deformation responses, which are appropriately suitable for the multi-recognition flexible wearable electric sensor. With complicated movement perception, the printed graphene aerogel sensors run the remarkable gesture language analysis for a deaf-mute communication auxiliary device or gesture manipulation apparatuses.

  14. Behavior of silica aerogel networks as highly porous solid solvent media for lipases in a model transesterification reaction.

    PubMed

    El Rassy, H; Perrard, A; Pierre, A C

    2003-03-03

    Highly porous silica aerogels with differing balances of hydrophobic and hydrophilic functionalities were studied as a new immobilization medium for enzymes. Two types of lipases from Candida rugosa and Burkholderia cepacia were homogeneously dispersed in wet gel precursors before gelation. The materials obtained were compared in a simple model reaction: transesterification of vinyl laurate by 1-octanol. To allow a better comparison of the hydrophobic/hydrophilic action of the solid, very open aerogel networks with traditional organic hydrophobic/hydrophilic liquid solvents, this reaction was studied in mixtures containing different proportions of 2-methyl-2-butanol, isooctane, and water. The results are discussed in relation to the porous and hydrophobic nature of aerogels, characterized by nitrogen adsorption. It was found that silica aerogels can be considered as "solid" solvents for the enzymes, able to provide hydrophobic/hydrophilic characteristics different from those prevailing in the liquid surrounding the aerogels. A simple mechanism of action for these aerogel networks is proposed.

  15. A facile approach for preparation of underwater superoleophobicity cellulose/chitosan composite aerogel for oil/water separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Huili; Wu, Jianning; Wang, Yixi; Wang, Hao; Liu, Zhiyong; Shi, Yulin; Guo, Xuhong

    2016-05-01

    We fabricate cellulose/chitosan (CE/CS) aerogel with stable superhydrophilic ( θ ≈ 0°) and underwater superoleophobic ( θ oil > 150°) through a simple way. During the process of preparation of CE/CS aerogel, chitosan will self-assemble into number micron diameter particles on the surface of aerogel. Furthermore, the hydrogen bonding network structure of cellulose was destroyed and more hydrophilic groups (-OH) were exposed. Rough surface and hydrophilicity make CE/CS aerogel have a property of underwater superoleophobicity. CE/CS aerogel shows underwater superoleophobicity to different oils, and it still have stable superoleophobicity in corrosive solution. The important thing is that CE/CS aerogel can separate free oil/water mixture and surfactant-stabilized emulsions under gravity effectively. The sample is green, low cost, and environmental friendly, which is a promising candidate to be used in oil/water separation.

  16. Identification of minerals and meteoritic materials via Raman techniques after capture in hypervelocity impacts on aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, M J; Mann, J; Creighton, J A; Kearsley, A; Graham, G A; Esposito, A P; Franchi, I A; Westphal, A J; Snead, C

    2004-10-04

    For this study, an extensive suite of mineral particles analogous to components of cosmic dust were tested to determine if their Raman signatures can be recognized after hypervelocity capture in aerogel. The mineral particles were mainly of greater than 20 micrometers in size and were accelerated onto the silica aerogel by light gas gun shots. It was found that all the individual minerals captured in aerogel could be subsequently identified using Raman (or fluorescent) spectra. The beam spot size used for the laser illumination was of the order of 5 micrometers, and in some cases the captured particles were of a similar small size. In some samples fired into aerogel there was observed a shift in the wavenumbers of some of the Raman bands, a result of the trapped particles being at quite high temperatures due to heating by the laser. Temperatures of samples under laser illumination were estimated from the relative intensities of Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman bands, or, in the case of ruby particles, from the wavenumber of fluorescence bands excited by the laser. It was found that the temperature of particles in aerogel varied greatly, dependent upon laser power and the nature of the particle. In the worst case, some particles were shown to have temperatures in the 500-700 C range at a laser power of about 3 mW at the sample. However most of the mineral particles examined at this laser power had temperatures below 200 C. This is sufficiently low a temperature not to damage most materials expected to be found captured in aerogel in space. In addition, selected meteorite samples were examined to obtain Raman signatures of their constituent minerals and were then shot into aerogel. It was possible to find several Raman signatures after capture in aerogel and obtain a Raman map of a whole grain in situ in the aerogel. Finally, a Raman analysis was carried out of a particle captured in aerogel in space and carbonaceous material identified. In general therefore it is

  17. Superior mechanical performance of highly porous, anisotropic nanocellulose-montmorillonite aerogels prepared by freeze casting.

    PubMed

    Donius, Amalie E; Liu, Andong; Berglund, Lars A; Wegst, Ulrike G K

    2014-09-01

    Directionally solidified nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC)-sodium-montmorillonite (MMT) composite aerogels with a honeycomb-like pore structure were compared with non-directionally frozen aerogels with equiaxed pore structure and identical composition and found to have superior functionalities. To explore structure-property correlations, three different aerogel compositions of 3wt% MMT, and 0.4wt%, 0.8wt%, and 1.2wt% NFC, respectively, were tested. Young׳s modulus, compressive strength and toughness were found to increase with increasing NFC content for both architectures. The modulus increased from 25.8kPa to 386kPa for the isotropic and from 2.13MPa to 3.86MPa for the anisotropic aerogels, the compressive yield strength increased from 3.3kPa to 18.0kPa for the isotropic and from 32.3kPa to 52.5kPa for the anisotropic aerogels, and the toughness increased from 6.3kJ/m(3) to 24.1kJ/m(3) for the isotropic and from 22.9kJ/m(3) to 46.2kJ/m(3) for the anisotropic aerogels. The great range of properties, which can be achieved through compositional as well as architectural variations, makes these aerogels highly attractive for a large range of applications, for which either a specific composition, or a particular pore morphology, or both are required. Finally, because NFC is flammable, gasification experiments were performed, which revealed that the inclusion of MMT increased the heat endurance and shape retention functions of the aerogels dramatically up to 800°C while the mechanical properties were retained up to 300°C.

  18. Condensation of Helium in Aerogel and Athermal Dynamics of the Random-Field Ising Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubry, Geoffroy J.; Bonnet, Fabien; Melich, Mathieu; Guyon, Laurent; Spathis, Panayotis; Despetis, Florence; Wolf, Pierre-Etienne

    2014-08-01

    High resolution measurements reveal that condensation isotherms of He4 in high porosity silica aerogel become discontinuous below a critical temperature. We show that this behavior does not correspond to an equilibrium phase transition modified by the disorder induced by the aerogel structure, but to the disorder-driven critical point predicted for the athermal out-of-equilibrium dynamics of the random-field Ising model. Our results evidence the key role of nonequilibrium effects in the phase transitions of disordered systems.

  19. Synthesis of High Surface Area Alumina Aerogels without the Use of Alkoxide Precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, T F; Gash, A E; Chinn, S C; Sawvel, A M; Maxwell, R S; Satcher Jr., J H

    2004-06-25

    Alumina aerogels were prepared through the addition of propylene oxide to aqueous or ethanolic solutions of hydrated aluminum salts, AlCl{sub 3} {center_dot} 6H{sub 2}O or Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} {center_dot} 9H{sub 2}O, followed by drying with supercritical CO{sub 2}. This technique affords low-density (60-130 kg/m{sup 3}), high surface area (600-700 m{sup 2}/g) alumina aerogel monoliths without the use of alkoxide precursors. The dried alumina aerogels were characterized using elemental analysis, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, solid state NMR, acoustic measurements and nitrogen adsorption/desorption analysis. Powder X-ray diffraction and TEM analysis indicated that the aerogel prepared from hydrated AlCl{sub 3} in water or ethanol possessed microstructures containing highly reticulated networks of pseudoboehmite fibers, 2-5 nm in diameter and of varying lengths, while the aerogels prepared from hydrated Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} in ethanol were amorphous with microstructures comprised of interconnected spherical particles with diameters in the 5-15 nm range. The difference in microstructure resulted in each type of aerogel displaying distinct physical and mechanical properties. In particular, the alumina aerogels with the weblike microstructure were far more mechanically robust than those with the colloidal network, based on acoustic measurements. Both types of alumina aerogels can be transformed to {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} through calcination at 800 C without a significant loss in surface area or monolithicity.

  20. Sprayable Aerogel Bead Compositions With High Shear Flow Resistance and High Thermal Insulation Value

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ou, Danny; Trifu, Roxana; Caggiano, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    A sprayable aerogel insulation has been developed that has good mechanical integrity and lower thermal conductivity than incumbent polyurethane spray-on foam insulation, at similar or lower areal densities, to prevent insulation cracking and debonding in an effort to eliminate the generation of inflight debris. This new, lightweight aerogel under bead form can be used as insulation in various thermal management systems that require low mass and volume, such as cryogenic storage tanks, pipelines, space platforms, and launch vehicles.

  1. Monolithic Nickel (II) Oxide Aerogels Using an Organic Epoxide: The Importance of the Counter Ion

    SciTech Connect

    Gash, A E; Satcher, J H; Simpson, R L

    2004-01-13

    The synthesis and characterization of nickel (II) oxide aerogel materials prepared using the epoxide addition method is described. The addition of the organic epoxide propylene oxide to an ethanolic solution of NiCl{sub 2} 6H{sub 2}O resulted in the formation of an opaque light green monolithic gel and subsequent drying with supercritical CO{sub 2} gave a monolithic aerogel material of the same color. This material has been characterized using powder X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, elemental analysis, and nitrogen adsorption/desorption analysis. The results indicate that the nickel (II) oxide aerogel has very low bulk density (98 kg/m{sup 3} ({approx}98 %porous)), high surface area (413 m{sup 2}/g), and has a particulate-type aerogel microstructure made up of very fine spherical particles with an open porous network. By comparison, a precipitate of Ni{sub 3}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}(OH){sub 4} is obtained when the same preparation is attempted with the common Ni(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} 6H{sub 2}O salt as the precursor. The implications of the difference of reactivity of the two different precursors are discussed in the context of the mechanism of gel formation via the epoxide addition method. The synthesis of nickel (II) oxide aerogel, using the epoxide addition method, is especially unique in our experience. It is our first example of the successful preparation of a metal oxide aerogel using a metal divalent metal ion and may have implications for the application of this method to the preparation of aerogels or nanoparticles of other divalent metal oxides. To our knowledge this is the first report of a monolithic pure nickel (II) oxide aerogel materials.

  2. Influence of Boehmite Precursor on Aluminosilicate Aerogel Pore Structure, Phase Stability and Resistance to Densification at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.; Guo, Haiquan; Newlin, Katy N.

    2011-01-01

    Aluminosilicate aerogels are of interest as constituents of thermal insulation systems for use at temperatures higher than those attainable with silica aerogels. It is anticipated that their effectiveness as thermal insulators will be influenced by their morphology, pore size distribution, physical and skeletal densities. The present study focuses on the synthesis of aluminosilicate aerogel from a variety of Boehmite (precursors as the Al source, and tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) as the Si source, and the influence of starting powder on pore structure and thermal stability.

  3. Crosslinking Amine-Modified Silica Aerogels with Epoxies: Mechanically Strong Lightweight Porous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Fabrizio, Eve F.; Ilhan, Faysal; Dass, Amala; Zhang, Guo-Hui; Vassilaras, Plousia; Johnston, J. Chris; Leventis, Nicholas

    2005-01-01

    The mesoporous surfaces of TMOS-derived silica aerogels have been modified with amines by co-polymerization of TMOS with APTES. The amine sites have become anchors for crosslinking the nanoparticles of the skeletal backbone of the aerogel by attachment of di-, tri and tetra-functional epoxies. The resulting conformal coatings increase the density of the native aerogels by a factor of 2-3 but the strength of the resulting materials may increase by more than two orders of magnitude. Processing variables such as amount of APTES used to make the gels, the epoxy type and concentration used for crosslinking, as well as the crosslinking temperature and time were varied according to a multivariable design-of-experiments (DOE) model. It was found that while elastic modulus follows a similar trend with density, maximum strength is attained neither at the maximum density nor at the highest concentration of -NH2 groups, suggesting surface saturation effects. Aerogels crosslinked with the tri-functional epoxide always show improved strength compared with aerogels crosslinked with the other two epoxides under identical conditions. Solid C-13 NMR studies show residual unreacted epoxides, which condense with ne another by heating crosslinked aerogels at 150 C.

  4. Flexible Polyimide Aerogel Cross-linked by Poly(maleic Anhydride-alt-alkylene)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Haiquan; Meador, Mary Ann B.; Wilkewitz, Brittany Marie

    2014-01-01

    Aerogels are potential materials for aerospace applications due to their lower thermal conductivity, lighter weight, and low dielectric constant. However, silica aerogels are restricted due to their inherent fragility, hygroscopic nature, and poor mechanical properties, especially in extreme aerospace environments. In order to fit the needs of aerospace applications, developing new thermal insulation materials that are flexible, and moisture resistant is needed. To this end, we fabricated a series of polyimide aerogels crosslinked with different poly(maleic anhydride-alt-alkylene)s as seen in Scheme 1. The polyimide oligomers were made with 3,3,4,4-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride (BPDA), and different diamines or diamine combinations. The resulting aerogels have low density (0.06 gcm3 to 0.16 gcm3) and high surface area (240-440 m2g). The effect of the different backbone structures on density, shrinkage, porosity, surface area, mechanical properties, moisture resistance and thermal properties will be discussed. These novel polyalkylene-imide aerogels may be potential candidates for applications such as space suit insulation for planetary surface missions, insulation for inflatable structures for habitats, inflatable aerodynamic decelerators for entry, descent and landing (EDL) operations, and cryotank insulation for advance space propulsion systems. Scheme 1. Network of polyimide aerogels crosslinked with deifferent poly(maleic anhydride).

  5. Rapid Extraction of Dust Impact Tracks from Silica Aerogel by Ultrasonic Micro-blades

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, H; Graham, G; Kearsley, A T; Grant, P G; Snead, C J; Bradley, J P

    2005-02-17

    In January 2006, NASA's Stardust Mission will return with its valuable cargo of cometary dust particles, the first brought back to Earth, captured at hypervelocity speeds in silica aerogel collectors. Aerogel, a proven capture medium, is also a candidate for future sample return missions and low-earth orbit (LEO) deployments. Critical to the science return of Stardust and future missions using aerogel is the ability to efficiently extract impacted particles from collector tiles. Researchers will be eager to obtain Stardust samples as quickly as possible, and tools for the rapid extraction of particle impact tracks that require little construction, training, or investment would be an attractive asset. To this end, we have experimented with diamond and steel micro-blades. Applying ultrasonic frequency oscillations to these micro-blades via a piezo-driven holder produces rapid, clean cuts in the aerogel with minimal damage to the surrounding collector tile. With this approach, impact tracks in aerogel fragments with low-roughness cut surfaces have been extracted from aerogel tiles flown on NASA's Orbital Debris Collector Experiment. The smooth surfaces produced during cutting reduce imaging artifacts during analysis by SEM. Some tracks have been dissected to expose the main cavity for eventual isolation of individual impact debris particles and further analysis by techniques such as TEM and nanoSIMS.

  6. Aerogel Cherenkov detector for characterizing the intense flash x-ray source, Cygnus, spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Herrmann, H. W.; McEvoy, A. M.; Young, C. S.; Hamilton, C.; Schwellenbach, D. D.; Malone, R. M.; Kaufman, M. I.; Smith, A. S.

    2016-11-01

    An aerogel Cherenkov detector is proposed to measure the X-ray energy spectrum from the Cygnus—intense flash X-ray source operated at the Nevada National Security Site. An array of aerogels set at a variety of thresholds between 1 and 3 MeV will be adequate to map out the bremsstrahlung X-ray production of the Cygnus, where the maximum energy of the spectrum is normally around 2.5 MeV. In addition to the Cherenkov radiation from aerogels, one possible competing light-production mechanism is optical transition radiation (OTR), which may be significant in aerogels due to the large number of transitions from SiO2 clusters to vacuum voids. To examine whether OTR is a problem, four aerogel samples were tested using a mono-energetic electron beam (varied in the range of 1-3 MeV) at NSTec Los Alamos Operations. It was demonstrated that aerogels can be used as a Cherenkov medium, where the rate of the light production is about two orders magnitude higher when the electron beam energy is above threshold.

  7. Silica-titania composite aerogel photocatalysts by chemical liquid deposition of titania onto nanoporous silica scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Zu, Guoqing; Shen, Jun; Wang, Wenqin; Zou, Liping; Lian, Ya; Zhang, Zhihua

    2015-03-11

    Silica-titania composite aerogels were synthesized by chemical liquid deposition of titania onto nanoporous silica scaffolds. This novel deposition process was based on chemisorption of partially hydrolyzed titanium alkoxides from solution onto silica nanoparticle surfaces and subsequent hydrolysis and condensation to afford titania nanoparticles on the silica surface. The titania is homogeneously distributed in the silica-titania composite aerogels, and the titania content can be effectively controlled by regulating the deposition cycles. The resultant composite aerogel with 15 deposition cycles possessed a high specific surface area (SSA) of 425 m(2)/g, a small particle size of 5-14 nm, and a large pore volume and pore size of 2.41 cm(3)/g and 18.1 nm, respectively, after heat treatment at 600 °C and showed high photocatalytic activity in the photodegradation of methylene blue under UV-light irradiation. Its photocatalytic activity highly depends on the deposition cycles and heat treatment. The combination of small particle size, high SSA, and enhanced crystallinity after heat treatment at 600 °C contributes to the excellent photocatalytic property of the silica-titania composite aerogel. The higher SSAs compared to those of the reported titania aerogels (<200 m(2)/g at 600 °C) at high temperatures combined with the simple method makes the silica-titania aerogels promising candidates as photocatalysts.

  8. A facile methodology for the production of in situ inorganic nanowire hydrogels/aerogels.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sung Mi; Jung, Hyun Young; Fang, Wenjing; Dresselhaus, Mildred S; Kong, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Creating inorganic nanowire hydrogels/aerogels using various materials and inexpensive means remains an outstanding challenge despite their importance for many applications. Here, we present a facile methodology to enable highly porous inorganic nanowire hydrogel/aerogel production on a large scale and at low cost. The hydrogels/aerogels are obtained from in situ hydrothermal synthesis of one-dimensional (1D) nanowires that directly form a cross-linking network during the synthesis process. Such a method not only offers great simplicity but also allows the interconnecting nanowires to have much longer length. The longer length offers aerogels with remarkable porosity and surface area extremely low densities (as low as 2.9 mg/cm(3)), are mechanically robust, and can have superelasticity by tuning the synthesis conditions. The nanowires in the hydrogels/aerogels serve both as structural support and active sites, for example, for catalysis or absorption. In this work, we have found that the as-grown hydrogels can be used directly as water filters to remove pollutants such as heavy metal ions and toxic organic contents. Our studies indicate that this method for nanowire hydrogels/aerogels production is not only economical but greatly augmented their applications in environmental, catalysis, sensing, absorption, energy storage, and beyond.

  9. Oxidation-mediated chitosan as additives for creation of chitosan aerogels with diverse three-dimensional interconnected skeletons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Sizhao; Feng, Jian; Feng, Junzong; Jiang, Yonggang

    2017-02-01

    Naturally occurring polymer-based aerogels have myriad practical utilizations due to environmentally benign and fruitful resources. However, engineering morphology-controllable biomass aerogels still represents a great challenge. Here we present a facile solution to synthesize chitosan aerogels having distinguished textures by reacting oxidized chitosan with formaldehyde and chitosan sol. In more detail, chitosan was chemically oxidized using two types of oxidation agents such as ammonium persulphate (SPD) and sodium periodate (APS) to obtain corresponding oxidized chitosan, subsequently cross-linked with chitosan solution containing formaldehyde to harvest SPD-oxidized chitosan aerogels (SCAs) and APS-SPD-oxidized ones (ASCAs) after aging, solvent exchange and supercritical drying processes. We found that the morphologies of as-prepared chitosan aerogels are strongly dependent upon the oxidation pattern towards chitosan. The structural textures of SCAs and ASCAs appear nanoflake-like and nanofiber-like structures, which may be related to spatial freedom of active groups located in chitosan. Selected area electron diffraction analysis reveals that the crystalline properties of chitosan aerogels generally appear the serious deterioration comparing to raw chitosan owing to their interconnected skeletal structure formation. The occurrence of characteristic groups displays cross-linked chain construction by using chemical state measurements such as FT-IR and XPS. Further, a plausible mechanism for controlling morphology of chitosan aerogels is also established. This new family of method for creation of chitosan aerogels may open up a perspective for biomass aerogels with controllable textures.

  10. Nano-sized Mn-doped activated carbon aerogel as electrode material for electrochemical capacitor: effect of activation conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoon Jae; Park, Hai Woong; Park, Sunyoung; Song, In Kyu

    2012-07-01

    Carbon aerogel (CA) was prepared by a sol-gel polymerization of resorcinol and formaldehyde, and a series of activated carbon aerogels (ACA-KOH-X, X = 0, 0.3, 0.7, 1, and 2) were then prepared by a chemical activation using different amount of potassium hydroxide (X represented weight ratio of KOH with respect to CA). Specific capacitances of activated carbon aerogels were measured by cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge/discharge methods in 6 M KOH electrolyte. Among the samples prepared, ACA-KOH-0.7 showed the highest specific capacitance (149 F/g). In order to combine excellent electrochemical performance of activated carbon aerogel with pseudocapacitive property of manganese oxide, 7 wt% Mn was doped on activated carbon aerogel (Mn/ACA-KOH-0.7) by an incipient wetness impregnation method. For comparison, 7 wt% Mn was also impregnated on carbon aerogel (Mn/ACA-KOH-0) by the same method. It was revealed that 7 wt% Mn-doped activated carbon aerogel (Mn/ACA-KOH-0.7) showed higher specific capacitance than 7 wt% Mn-doped carbon aerogel (Mn/ACA-KOH-0) (178 F/g vs. 98 F/g). The enhanced capacitance of Mn/ACA-KOH-0.7 was attributed to the outstanding electric properties of activated carbon aerogel as well as the faradaic redox reactions of manganese oxide.

  11. Thermal conductivity studies of a polyurea cross-linked silica aerogel-RTV 655 compound for cryogenic propellant tank applications in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabri, F.; Marchetta, J.; Smith, K. M.

    2013-10-01

    Silica-based aerogel is an ideal thermal insulator with a makeup of up to 99% air associated with the highly porous nature of this material. Polyurea cross-linked silica aerogel (PCSA) has superior mechanical properties compared to the native aerogels yet retains the highly porous open pore network and functions as an ideal thermal insulator with added load-bearing capability necessary for some applications. Room temperature vulcanizing rubber-RTV 655—is a space qualified elastomeric thermal insulator and encapsulant with high radiation and temperature tolerance as well as chemical resistance. Storage and transport of cryogenic propellant liquids is an integral part of the success of future space exploratory missions and is an area under constant development. Limitations and shortcomings of current cryogenic tank materials and insulation techniques such as non-uniform insulation layers, self-pressurization, weight and durability issues of the materials used, has motivated the quest for alternative materials. Both RTV 655 and PCSA are promising space qualified materials with unique and tunable microscopic and macroscopic properties making them attractive candidates for this study. In this work, the effect of PCSA geometry and volume concentration on the thermal behavior of RTV 655—PCSA compound material has been investigated at room temperature and at a cryogenic temperature. Macroscopic and microscopic PCSA material was encapsulated at increasing concentrations in an RTV 655 elastomeric matrix. The effect of pulverization on the nanopores of PCSA as a method for creating large quantities of homogeneous PCSA microparticles has also been investigated and is reported. The PCSA volume concentrations ranged between 22% and 75% for both geometries. Thermal conductivity measurements were performed based on the steady state transient plane source method.

  12. IR spectroscopy of water vapor confined in nanoporous silica aerogel.

    PubMed

    Ponomarev, Yu N; Petrova, T M; Solodov, A M; Solodov, A A

    2010-12-06

    The absorption spectrum of the water vapor, confined in the nanoporous silica aerogel, was measured within 5000-5600 cm(-1) with the IFS 125 HR Fourier spectrometer. It has been shown, that tight confinement of the molecules by the nanoporous size leads to the strong lines broadening and shift. For water vapor lines, the HWHM of confined molecules are on the average 23 times larger than those for free molecules. The shift values are in the range from -0.03 cm(-1) to 0.09 cm(-1). Some spectral lines have negative shift. The data on the half-widths and center shifts for some strongest H(2)O lines have been presented.

  13. Noble Metal Immersion Spectroscopy of Silica Alcogels and Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Sibille, Laurent; Cronise, Raymond J.; Noever, David A.

    1998-01-01

    We have fabricated aerogels containing gold and silver nanoparticles for gas catalysis applications. By applying the concept of an average or effective dielectric constant to the heterogeneous interlayer surrounding each particle, we extend the technique of immersion spectroscopy to porous or heterogeneous media. Specifically, we apply the predominant effective medium theories for the determination of the average fractional composition of each component in this inhomogeneous layer. Hence, the surface area of metal available for catalytic gas reaction is determined. The technique is satisfactory for statistically random metal particle distributions but needs further modification for aggregated or surfactant modified systems. Additionally, the kinetics suggest that collective particle interactions in coagulated clusters are perturbed during silica gelation resulting in a change in the aggregate geometry.

  14. Surface Plasmon Resonance Evaluation of Colloidal Metal Aerogel Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Sibille, Laurent; Cronise, Raymond J.; Noever, David A.

    1997-01-01

    We have fabricated aerogels containing gold, silver, and platinum nanoparticles for gas catalysis applications. By applying the concept of an average or effective dielectric constant to the heterogeneous interlayer surrounding each particle, we extend the technique of immersion spectroscopy to porous or heterogeneous media. Specifically, we apply the predominant effective medium theories for the determination of the average fractional composition of each component in this inhomogeneous layer. Hence, the surface area of metal available for catalytic gas reaction is determined. The technique is satisfactory for statistically random metal particle distributions but needs further modification for aggregated or surfactant modified systems. Additionally, the kinetics suggest that collective particle interactions in coagulated clusters are perturbed during silica gelation resulting in a change in the aggregate geometry.

  15. Chitosan bio-based organic-inorganic hybrid aerogel microspheres.

    PubMed

    El Kadib, Abdelkrim; Bousmina, Mosto

    2012-07-02

    Recently, organic-inorganic hybrid materials have attracted tremendous attention thanks to their outstanding properties, their efficiency, versatility and their promising applications in a broad range of areas at the interface of chemistry and biology. This article deals with a new family of surface-reactive organic-inorganic hybrid materials built from chitosan microspheres. The gelation of chitosan (a renewable amino carbohydrate obtained by deacetylation of chitin) by pH inversion affords highly dispersed fibrillar networks shaped as self-standing microspheres. Nanocasting of sol-gel processable monomeric alkoxides inside these natural hydrocolloids and their subsequent CO(2) supercritical drying provide high-surface-area organic-inorganic hybrid materials. Examples including chitosan-SiO(2), chitosan-TiO(2), chitosan-redox-clusters and chitosan-clay-aerogel microspheres are described and discussed on the basis of their textural and structural properties, thermal and chemical stability and their performance in catalysis and adsorption.

  16. Hugoniots of aerogels involving carbon and resorcinol formaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Hrubesh, L H; Ree, F H; Schmidt, R D; Shon, J; Van Thiel, M; Vantine, H C; Viecelli, J A; Young, D A

    1999-06-24

    Recently, a first-order phase transition is predicted in liquid carbon using atomistic simulation and Brenner's bond order potential. There are also experimental data suggesting a possibility for a first-order phase transition. In light of this, a thermochemical equilibrium code (CHEQ) is used to provide guidance to experiments to find a liquid-liquid phase change in carbon foam and carbon-rich aerogel, resorcinol formaldehyde. Isotherms and Hugoniots were computed based on the previous analysis by van Thiel and Ree. The present calculations predict the liquid-liquid-graphite triple point to be at 5000 K and 5.2 GPa and its critical point to be at 6000 K and 8.8 GPa. The present Hugoniot calculations suggest that the liquid-liquid phase transition may be detected by performing a shock experiment with initial density of approximately 0.15 gm/cm{sup 3}.

  17. Multi-scale cellulose based new bio-aerogel composites with thermal super-insulating and tunable mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Seantier, Bastien; Bendahou, Dounia; Bendahou, Abdelkader; Grohens, Yves; Kaddami, Hamid

    2016-03-15

    Bio-composite aerogels based on bleached cellulose fibers (BCF) and cellulose nanoparticles having various morphological and physico-chemical characteristics are prepared by a freeze-drying technique and characterized. The various composite aerogels obtained were compared to a BCF aerogel used as the reference. Severe changes in the material morphology were observed by SEM and AFM due to a variation of the cellulose nanoparticle properties such as the aspect ratio, the crystalline index and the surface charge density. BCF fibers form a 3D network and they are surrounded by the cellulose nanoparticle thin films inducing a significant reduction of the size of the pores in comparison with a neat BCF based aerogel. BET analyses confirm the appearance of a new organization structure with pores of nanometric sizes. As a consequence, a decrease of the thermal conductivities is observed from 28mWm(-1)K(-1) (BCF aerogel) to 23mWm(-1)K(-1) (bio-composite aerogel), which is below the air conductivity (25mWm(-1)K(-1)). This improvement of the insulation properties for composite materials is more pronounced for aerogels based on cellulose nanoparticles having a low crystalline index and high surface charge (NFC-2h). The significant improvement of their insulation properties allows the bio-composite aerogels to enter the super-insulating materials family. The characteristics of cellulose nanoparticles also influence the mechanical properties of the bio-composite aerogels. A significant improvement of the mechanical properties under compression is obtained by self-organization, yielding a multi-scale architecture of the cellulose nanoparticles in the bio-composite aerogels. In this case, the mechanical property is more dependent on the morphology of the composite aerogel rather than the intrinsic characteristics of the cellulose nanoparticles.

  18. Impact of selected solvent systems on the pore and solid structure of cellulose aerogels.

    PubMed

    Pircher, Nicole; Carbajal, Leticia; Schimper, Christian; Bacher, Markus; Rennhofer, Harald; Nedelec, Jean-Marie; Lichtenegger, Helga C; Rosenau, Thomas; Liebner, Falk

    The impact of selected cellulose solvent systems based on the principal constituents tetrabutylammonium fluoride (TBAF), 1-ethyl-3-methyl-1H-imidazolium-acetate, N-methylmorpholine-N-oxide, or calcium thiocyanate octahydrate (CTO) on the properties of cellulose II aerogels prepared from these solvent systems has been investigated as a means towards tailoring cellulose aerogel properties with respect to specific applications. Cotton linters were used as representative plant cellulose. Cellulose was coagulated from solutions with comparable cellulose content, and dried with supercritical carbon dioxide after solvent exchange. The resulting bulk aerogels were comprehensively morphologically and mechanically tested to relate structure and mechanical properties. Different solvent systems caused considerable differences in the properties of the bulk samples, such as internal surface area (nitrogen sorption), morphology, porosity (He pycnometry, thermoporosimetry), and mechanical stability (compression testing). The results of SAXS, WAXS, and solid-state (13)C NMR spectroscopy suggest that this is due to different mechanisms of cellulose self-assembling on the supramolecular and nanostructural level, respectively, as reflected by the broad ranges of cellulose crystallinity, fibril diameter, fractal dimension and skeletal density. Both solid state NMR and WAXS experiments confirmed the sole existence of the cellulose II allomorph for all aerogels, with crystallinity reaching a maximum of 46-50 % for CTO-derived aerogels. Generally, higher fibril diameter, degree of crystallinity, hence increased skeletal density were associated with good preservation of shape and dimension throughout conversion of lyogels to aerogels, and enhanced mechanical stability, but somewhat reduced specific surface area. Amorphous, yet highly rigid aerogels derived from TBAF/DMSO mixtures deviated from this trend, most likely due to their particular homogeneous and nanostructured morphology.

  19. Prediction of Mechanical Properties of Aerogels using a Multifractal Multidimensional Multiscaling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo Schickler, Fritz Andres

    Aerogels, produced by sol-gel technologies, have several applications in sensors, high energy particle physics, catalysis, heat insulation, supercapacitors, heat storage devices, high efficiency windows, among others. These applications take advantage of the outstanding properties these materials present as a result of their structure. However, the low mechanical properties that these materials present as result of the process, limits their commercial applications. In this dissertation, it is investigated the relationship between the processing conditions and mechanical properties of these materials computationally. The prediction of the effective properties for these materials is a daunting task because of their complex structure. Aerogels's structure is not homogeneous nor periodic, but rather amorphous, nanostructured, and highly porous, making the traditional techniques used to study other materials inapplicable. This dissertation presents the prediction of mechanical properties of aerogels calculated by a novel Multifractal Multidimensional Multiscaling Approach (MMMA) developed here. MMMA consists on recursively calculating the effective properties of the material along several scales. Since aerogels and structures produced by sol-gel technologies present a multifractal character, it is shown that MMMA is applicable to predict the effective properties of these materials. The implementation of MMMA requires a fractal characterization of the structure. For this, computational scattering experiments were performed on structures resembling aerogels. The structures resembling aerogels were produced computationally incorporating the chemistry and the physical phenomena involved in the formation process. MMMA was used to predict the mechanical properties of silica aerogels for different processing conditions. Thus, mechanical properties, scattering experiments, and processing conditions were investigated and correlated in this work.

  20. Synchrotron X-Ray Microprobe In-Situ Analysis of Extraterrestrial Particles Collected in Aerogel on the MIR Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, G. J.; Sutton, S. R.; Horz, F.

    2000-01-01

    Using in-situ x-ray fluorescence, we determined the Cr/Fe, Mn/Fe and Ni/Fe of a particle captured in aerogel on MIR are approximately chondritic, indicating an extraterrestrial origin. Impurity of the aerogel precluded determining the Cu and Zn.

  1. Aerogel-Positronium Technology for the Detection of Small Quantities of Organic and/or Toxic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petkov, Mihail P.; Jones, Steven M.

    2010-01-01

    The Ps-aerogel system [Ps is positronium (an electron-positron-hydrogen-like atom)] has been evaluated and optimized as a potential tool for planetary exploration missions. Different configurations of use were assessed, and the results provide a quantitative measure of the expected performance. The aerogel density is first optimized to attain maximum production of Ps that reaches the pores of the aerogel. This has been accomplished, and the optimum aerogel density is .70 mg/cm3. The aerogel is used as a concentrator for target volatile moieties, which accumulate in its open porosity over an extended period of time. For the detection of the accumulated materials, the use of Ps as a probe for the environment at the pore surface, has been proposed. This concept is based on two steps: (1) using aerogel to produce Ps and (2) using the propensity of Ps to interact differently with organic and inorganic matter. The active area of such a detector will comprise aerogel with a certain density, specific surface area, and gas permeability optimized for Ps production and gas diffusion and adsorption. The aerogel is a natural adsorber of organic molecules, which adhere to its internal surface, where their presence is detected by the Ps probe. Initial estimates indicate that, e.g., trace organic molecules in the Martian atmosphere, can be detected at the ppm level, which rivals current methods having significantly higher complexity, volume, mass, and power consumption (e.g. Raman, IR).

  2. Amphiphilic, ultralight, and multifunctional graphene/nanofibrillated cellulose aerogel achieved by cation-induced gelation and chemical reduction.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xuelin; Yu, Wenjin; Xu, Xin; Chen, Feng; Fu, Qiang

    2015-03-07

    Nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) was incorporated to reduced graphene oxide (rGO) for fabrication of multifunctional amphiphilic aerogels. The as-prepared amphiphilic aerogel showed excellent recoverability, superior absorption capacity for both organic solvents and water, and an electrical conductivity sensitive to compressive strain making it highly potential to be used as a pressure-responsive sensor.

  3. The application of carbon aerogel electrodes to desalination {ampersand} waste treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.C., Tran, T.D., Richardson, J.H., Fix, D.V., May, S.C., Thomson, S.L.

    1997-08-01

    An electrically-regenerated electrosorption process known as carbon aerogel capacitive deionization (CDI) has been developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for continuously removing ionic impurities from aqueous streams. A salt solution flows through an unobstructed channel formed by numerous pairs of parallel carbon aerogel electrodes. Each electrode has a very high Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) surface area (2.0-5.4 x 1O{sup 6} ft{sup 2} lb{sup -1} or 400-1100) and very low electrical resistivity (< 40 m{omega} cm). Surface areas of 1.3 x 10{sup 7} ft{sup 2} lb{sup -1} (2600 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}) have been achieved activation. After polarization, anions and cations are removed from the electrolyte by the imposed electric field and electrosorbed onto the carbon aerogel. The solution is thus separated into two streams, concentrate and purified water. Based upon this analysis, it is concluded that carbon aerogel CDI may be an energy-efficient alternative to electrodialysis and reverse osmosis for the desalination of brackish water (< 5000 ppm), provided that cell geometries and aerogel properties are carefully tailored for such applications.

  4. A facile route for 3D aerogels from nanostructured 1D and 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sung Mi; Jung, Hyun Young; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.; Jung, Yung Joon; Kong, Jing

    2012-11-01

    Aerogels have numerous applications due to their high surface area and low densities. However, creating aerogels from a large variety of materials has remained an outstanding challenge. Here, we report a new methodology to enable aerogel production with a wide range of materials. The method is based on the assembly of anisotropic nano-objects (one-dimensional (1D) nanotubes, nanowires, or two-dimensional (2D) nanosheets) into a cross-linking network from their colloidal suspensions at the transition from the semi-dilute to the isotropic concentrated regime. The resultant aerogels have highly porous and ultrafine three-dimensional (3D) networks consisting of 1D (Ag, Si, MnO2, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)) and 2D materials (MoS2, graphene, h-BN) with high surface areas, low densities, and high electrical conductivities. This method opens up a facile route for aerogel production with a wide variety of materials and tremendous opportunities for bio-scaffold, energy storage, thermoelectric, catalysis, and hydrogen storage applications.

  5. Ultrasonic Micro-Blades for the Rapid Extraction of Impact Tracks from Aerogel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishii, H. A.; Graham, G. A.; Kearsley, A. T.; Grant, P. G.; Snead, C. J.; Bradley, J. P.

    2005-01-01

    The science return of NASA's Stardust Mission with its valuable cargo of cometary debris hinges on the ability to efficiently extract particles from silica aerogel collectors. The current method for extracting cosmic dust impact tracks is a mature procedure involving sequential perforation of the aerogel with glass needles on computer controlled micromanipulators. This method is highly successful at removing well-defined aerogel fragments of reasonable optical clarity while causing minimal damage to the surrounding aerogel collector tile. Such a system will be adopted by the JSC Astromaterials Curation Facility in anticipation of Stardust s arrival in early 2006. In addition to Stardust, aerogel is a possible collector for future sample return missions and is used for capture of hypervelocity ejecta in high power laser experiments of interest to LLNL. Researchers will be eager to obtain Stardust samples for study as quickly as possible, and rapid extraction tools requiring little construction, training, or investment would be an attractive asset. To this end, we have experimented with micro-blades for the Stardust impact track extraction process. Our ultimate goal is a rapid extraction system in a clean electron beam environment, such as an SEM or dual-beam FIB, for in situ sample preparation, mounting and analysis.

  6. Selenium sulfide@mesoporous carbon aerogel composite for rechargeable lithium batteries with good electrochemical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhian; Jiang, Shaofeng; Lai, Yanqing; Li, Junming; Song, Junxiao; Li, Jie

    2015-06-01

    Selenium sulfide (SeS2) encapsulated into 3D interconnected mesoporous carbon aerogels (MCA) as a selenium sulfide/carbon composite material was prepared for lithium batteries. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations show the mesoporous structures of the carbon aerogels and the homogeneous distribution of selenium sulfide in the composite. The electrochemical performances of the selenium sulfide@mesoporous carbon aerogel (SeS2@MCA) composite cathode was evaluated using cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It is found that the SeS2@MCA cathode shows a better electrochemical performance than the pristine SeS2 cathode. The SeS2@MCA composite with selenium sulfide content of 49.3 wt.% displays an initial discharge capacity of 1150 mAh g-1 at 50 mA g-1 and a reversible discharge capacity of 601 mAh g-1 after 10 cycles at 500 mA g-1. The better electrochemical performance benefit from the high electron conductivity and 3D interconnected porous structures of the carbon aerogels, which contribute to dispersing SeS2 and trapping polysulfide and polyselenide intermediates within the skeleton structure of the mesoporous carbon aerogels.

  7. Optical properties of monolithic and granular SiO2 aerogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, A.; Linsmeier, J.; Koerner, W.; Scheller, H.; Fricke, Jochen

    1994-09-01

    The optical and thermal properties of aerogels play an important role for their application in transparent insulation (TI) or daylighting systems. In this paper the directional-directional transmission tdd as well as the directional-hemispherical transmission tdh are presented for 20 mm thick aerogel specimens. For optimized monolithic aerogels we obtained solar averaged values of -tdh,sol equals (91 +/- 1/4)% and -tdh,vis equals (84 +/- 2)% in the solar and visible spectral region, respectively. The investigated granular aerogels show a visual transmission of -tdh,vis equals (58 +/- 4)% for waterglass as a precursor and of -tdh,vis equals (78 +/- 4)% for tetramethoxysilane. In order to correlate the structural build-up of the SiO2-network of the aerogels with their light scattering properties angular-dependent light and X-ray scattering measurements are performed. To characterize the visual image transmission the modulation transfer function (MTF) was measured for 20 mm thick monolithic layers. In order to explain the measured data a Monte Carlo based simulation model was developed. The analysis yields that the MTF is mainly effected by surface scattering.

  8. Influence of HF acid catalyst concentration on properties of aerogel low-k thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaikwad, A. S.; Gupta, S. A.; Mahajan, A. M.

    2016-08-01

    The effect of hydrofluoric acid (HF) catalyst concentration in coating solution on chemical, physical and structural properties of silica aerogel thin films was investigated. The aerogel films were synthesized by using a sol-gel spin coating method followed by aging in ethanol and CO2 supercritical drying. The refractive index (RI) is observed to be reduced from 1.32 to 1.13 and porosity percentage increased from 30.21% to 71.64% in accordance with increasing HF concentration. Deposition of silica aerogel was confirmed from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurement. The nanoporous nature of deposited films was confirmed from field effect scanning electron microscopy and observed pore diameter is in the range of 3.33 to 6.69 nm. The nanoporous nature of the film was also validated from atomic force microscopy and root mean square roughness was observed to be increased from 2.31 nm to 3.2 nm with increasing acid catalyst concentration in the coating solution. The calculated dielectric constant from CV measurement of fabricated metal-insulator-semiconductor structure for the silica aerogel formed at 0.8 ml HF concentration is observed to be 1.73. These deposited nanoporous silica aerogel low-k films with lower k value and smaller pore size have application as interlayer dielectric materials to minimize the disadvantages of porous materials.

  9. Clay exfoliation and polymer/clay aerogels by supercritical carbon dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Simona; Mauro, Marco; Daniel, Christophe; Galimberti, Maurizio; Guerra, Gaetano

    2013-01-01

    Supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) treatments of a montmorillonite (MMT) intercalated with ammonium cations bearing two long hydrocarbon tails (organo-modified MMT, OMMT) led to OMMT exfoliation, with loss of the long-range order in the packing of the hydrocarbon tails and maintenance of the long-range order in the clay layers. The intercalated and the derived exfoliated OMMT have been deeply characterized, mainly by X-ray diffraction analyses. Monolithic composite aerogels, with large amounts of both intercalated and exfoliated OMMT and including the nanoporous-crystalline δ form of syndiotactic polystyrene (s-PS), have been prepared, by scCO2 extractions of s-PS-based gels. Also for high OMMT content, the gel and aerogel preparation procedures occur without re-aggregation of the exfoliated clay, which is instead observed for other kinds of polymer processing. Aerogels with the exfoliated OMMT have more even dispersion of the clay layers, higher elastic modulus and larger surface area than aerogels with the intercalated OMMT. Extremely light materials with relevant transport properties could be prepared. Moreover, s-PS-based aerogels with exfoliated OMMT could be helpful for the handling of exfoliated clay minerals. PMID:24790956

  10. Highly Efficient Flame Retardant Polyurethane Foam with Alginate/Clay Aerogel Coating.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Bing; Shen, Peng; Chen, Ming-Jun; Zhao, Hai-Bo; Schiraldi, David A

    2016-11-30

    Highly efficient flame retardant polyurethane foams with alginate/clay aerogel coatings were fabricated using a freeze-drying method. The microstructure and the interaction of the samples were characterized with scanning electron and optical microscopy (SEM) and (OM). The results show that PU foam has a porous structure with pore sizes of several hundred microns, and that of aerogel ranges from 10 to 30 μm. The PU foam matrix and the aerogel coatings have strong interactions, due to the infusion of aerogel into the porous structure of the foam and the tension generated during the freeze-drying process. Both the PU foam and the aerogel exhibit good thermal stabilities, with onset decomposition temperatures above 240 °C. Combustion parameters, including LOI, TTI, HRR, TSR, FIGRA, CO, and CO2, all indicate significantly reduced fire risk. Total heat release of all but one of the samples was maintained, indicating that the flame retardant mechanism is to decrease flame spread rate by forming a heat, oxygen, and smoke barrier, rather than by reducing fuel content. This facile and inexpensive post-treatment of PU foam could expand its fire safe applications.

  11. Di-Isocyanate Crosslinked Aerogels with 1, 6-Bis (Trimethoxysilyl) Hexane Incorporated in Silica Backbone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vivod, Stephanie L.; Meador, Mary Ann B.; Nguyen, Baochau N.; Quade, Derek; Randall, Jason; Perry, Renee

    2008-01-01

    Silica aerogels are desirable materials for many applications that take advantage of their light weight and low thermal conductivity. Addition of a conformal polymer coating which bonds with the amine decorated surface of the silica network improves the strength of the aerogels by as much as 200 times. Even with vast improvement in strength they still tend to undergo brittle failure due to the rigid silica backbone. We hope to increase the flexibility and elastic recovery of the silica based aerogel by altering the silica back-bone by incorporation of more flexible hexane links. To this end, we investigated the use of 1,6-bis(trimethoxysilyl)hexane (BTMSH), a polysilsesquioxane precursor3, as an additional co-reactant to prepare silica gels which were subsequently cross-linked with di-isocyanate. Previously, this approach of adding flexibility by BTMSH incorporation was demonstrated with styrene cross-linked aerogels. In our study, we varied silane concentration, mol % of silicon from BTMSH and di-isocyanate concentration by weight percent to attempt to optimize both the flexibility and the strength of the aerogels.

  12. Fast and Minimal-Solvent Production of Superinsulating Silica Aerogel Granulate.

    PubMed

    Huber, Lukas; Zhao, Shanyu; Malfait, Wim J; Vares, Sirje; Koebel, Matthias M

    2017-04-18

    With their low thermal conductivity (λ), silica aerogels can reduce carbon emissions from heating and cooling demands, but their widespread adoption is limited by the high production cost. A one-pot synthesis for silica aerogel granulate is presented that drastically reduces solvent use, production time, and global warming potential. The inclusion of the hydrophobization agent prior to gelation with a post-gelation activation step, enables a complete production cycle of less than four hours at the lab scale for a solvent use close to the theoretical minimum, and limits the global warming potential. Importantly, the one-pot aerogel granulate retains the exceptional properties associated with silica aerogel, mostly λ=14.4±1.0 mW m(-1) ⋅K(-1) for the pilot scale materials, about half that of standing air (26 mW m(-1) ⋅K(-1) ). The resource-, time-, and cost-effective production will allow silica aerogels to break out of its niche into the mainstream building and industrial insulation markets.

  13. Graphene coating makes carbon nanotube aerogels superelastic and resistant to fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyu Hun; Oh, Youngseok; Islam, M. F.

    2012-09-01

    Lightweight materials that are both highly compressible and resilient under large cyclic strains can be used in a variety of applications. Carbon nanotubes offer a combination of elasticity, mechanical resilience and low density, and these properties have been exploited in nanotube-based foams and aerogels. However, all nanotube-based foams and aerogels developed so far undergo structural collapse or significant plastic deformation with a reduction in compressive strength when they are subjected to cyclic strain. Here, we show that an inelastic aerogel made of single-walled carbon nanotubes can be transformed into a superelastic material by coating it with between one and five layers of graphene nanoplates. The graphene-coated aerogel exhibits no change in mechanical properties after more than 1 × 106 compressive cycles, and its original shape can be recovered quickly after compression release. Moreover, the coating does not affect the structural integrity of the nanotubes or the compressibility and porosity of the nanotube network. The coating also increases Young's modulus and energy storage modulus by a factor of ~6, and the loss modulus by a factor of ~3. We attribute the superelasticity and complete fatigue resistance to the graphene coating strengthening the existing crosslinking points or `nodes' in the aerogel.

  14. Treatment of brackish produced water using carbon aerogel-based capacitive deionization technology.

    PubMed

    Xu, Pei; Drewes, Jörg E; Heil, Dean; Wang, Gary

    2008-05-01

    Capacitive deionization (CDI) with carbon-aerogel electrodes represents a novel process in desalination of brackish water and has merit due to its low fouling/scaling potential, ambient operational conditions, electrostatic regeneration, and low voltage requirements. The objective of this study was to investigate the viability of CDI in treating brackish produced water and recovering iodide from the water. Laboratory- and pilot-scale experiments were conducted to identify ion selectivity, key operational parameters, evaluate desalination performance, and assess the challenges for its practical applications. The performance of the CDI technology (CDT) system tested was consistent throughout the laboratory- and field-scale experiments. Deterioration of the carbon-aerogel electrodes was not observed during testing. The degree of ions adsorbed to the carbon aerogel (in mol/g aerogel) during treatment of brackish water was dependent upon initial ion concentrations in the feed water with the following selectivity I>Br>Ca>alkalinity>Mg>Na>Cl. The preferential sorption of iodide revealed merit to efficiently recover iodide from brackish water even in the presence of dominant co-ions. The research findings derived from this study identified parameters that merit further improvements regarding design and operation, including modification of pore-size distribution of aerogel, development of high capacitance and low-cost electrode materials, reducing the dead volume after regeneration and rinsing, minimizing energy consumption, and maximizing system recovery.

  15. Strain Sensors with Adjustable Sensitivity by Tailoring the Microstructure of Graphene Aerogel/PDMS Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuying; Ladani, Raj B; Zhang, Jin; Ghorbani, Kamran; Zhang, Xuehua; Mouritz, Adrian P; Kinloch, Anthony J; Wang, Chun H

    2016-09-21

    Strain sensors with high elastic limit and high sensitivity are required to meet the rising demand for wearable electronics. Here, we present the fabrication of highly sensitive strain sensors based on nanocomposites consisting of graphene aerogel (GA) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), with the primary focus being to tune the sensitivity of the sensors by tailoring the cellular microstructure through controlling the manufacturing processes. The resultant nanocomposite sensors exhibit a high sensitivity with a gauge factor of up to approximately 61.3. Of significant importance is that the sensitivity of the strain sensors can be readily altered by changing the concentration of the precursor (i.e., an aqueous dispersion of graphene oxide) and the freezing temperature used to process the GA. The results reveal that these two parameters control the cell size and cell-wall thickness of the resultant GA, which may be correlated to the observed variations in the sensitivities of the strain sensors. The higher is the concentration of graphene oxide, then the lower is the sensitivity of the resultant nanocomposite strain sensor. Upon increasing the freezing temperature from -196 to -20 °C, the sensitivity increases and reaches a maximum value of 61.3 at -50 °C and then decreases with a further increase in freezing temperature to -20 °C. Furthermore, the strain sensors offer excellent durability and stability, with their piezoresistivities remaining virtually unchanged even after 10 000 cycles of high-strain loading-unloading. These novel findings pave the way to custom design strain sensors with a desirable piezoresistive behavior.

  16. The control of ice crystal growth and effect on porous structure of konjac glucomannan-based aerogels.

    PubMed

    Ni, Xuewen; Ke, Fan; Xiao, Man; Wu, Kao; Kuang, Ying; Corke, Harold; Jiang, Fatang

    2016-11-01

    Konjac glucomannan (KGM)-based aerogels were prepared using a combination of sol-gel and freeze-drying methods. Preparation conditions were chosen to control ice crystal growth and aerogel structure formation. The ice crystals formed during pre-freezing were observed by low temperature polarizing microscopy, and images of aerogel pores were obtained by scanning electron microscopy. The size of ice crystals were calculated and size distribution maps were drawn, and similarly for aerogel pores. Results showed that ice crystal growth and aerogel pore sizes may be controlled by varying pre-freezing temperatures, KGM concentration and glyceryl monostearate concentration. The impact of pre-freezing temperatures on ice crystal growth was explained as combining ice crystal growth rate with nucleation rate, while the impacts of KGM and glyceryl monostearate concentration on ice crystal growth were interpreted based on their influences on sol network structure.

  17. Few-layer MoS2-anchored graphene aerogel paper for free-standing electrode materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wee Siang Vincent; Peng, Erwin; Loh, Tamie Ai Jia; Huang, Xiaolei; Xue, Jun Min

    2016-04-01

    To reduce the reliance on polymeric binders, conductive additives, and metallic current collectors during the electrode preparation process, as well as to assess the true performance of lithium ion battery (LIB) anodes, a free-standing electrode has to be meticulously designed. Graphene aerogel is a popular scaffolding material that has been widely used with embedded nanoparticles for application in LIB anodes. However, the current graphene aerogel/nanoparticle composite systems still involve decomposition into powder and the addition of additives during electrode preparation because of the thick aerogel structure. To further enhance the capacity of the system, MoS2 was anchored onto a graphene aerogel paper and the composite was used directly as an LIB anode. The resultant additive-free MoS2/graphene aerogel paper composite exhibited long cyclic performance with 101.1% retention after 700 cycles, which demonstrates the importance of free-standing electrodes in enhancing cyclic stability.To reduce the reliance on polymeric binders, conductive additives, and metallic current collectors during the electrode preparation process, as well as to assess the true performance of lithium ion battery (LIB) anodes, a free-standing electrode has to be meticulously designed. Graphene aerogel is a popular scaffolding material that has been widely used with embedded nanoparticles for application in LIB anodes. However, the current graphene aerogel/nanoparticle composite systems still involve decomposition into powder and the addition of additives during electrode preparation because of the thick aerogel structure. To further enhance the capacity of the system, MoS2 was anchored onto a graphene aerogel paper and the composite was used directly as an LIB anode. The resultant additive-free MoS2/graphene aerogel paper composite exhibited long cyclic performance with 101.1% retention after 700 cycles, which demonstrates the importance of free-standing electrodes in enhancing cyclic

  18. Mechanisms of atomic layer deposition on substrates with ultrahigh aspect ratios.

    PubMed

    Kucheyev, S O; Biener, J; Baumann, T F; Wang, Y M; Hamza, A V; Li, Z; Lee, D K; Gordon, R G

    2008-02-05

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) appears to be uniquely suited for coating substrates with ultrahigh aspect ratios (> or similar 10(3)), including nanoporous solids. Here, we study the ALD of Cu and Cu3N on the inner surfaces of low-density nanoporous silica aerogel monoliths. Results show that Cu depth profiles in nanoporous monoliths are limited not only by Knudsen diffusion of heavier precursor molecules into the pores, as currently believed, but also by other processes such as the interaction of precursor and reaction product molecules with pore walls. Similar behavior has also been observed for Fe, Ru, and Pt ALD on aerogels. On the basis of these results, we discuss design rules for ALD precursors specifically geared for coating nanoporous solids.

  19. Flexible, Mechanically Durable Aerogel Composites for Oil Capture and Recovery.

    PubMed

    Karatum, Osman; Steiner, Stephen A; Griffin, Justin S; Shi, Wenbo; Plata, Desiree L

    2016-01-13

    More than 30 years separate the two largest oil spills in North American history (the Ixtoc I and Macondo well blowouts), yet the responses to both disasters were nearly identical in spite of advanced material innovation during the same time period. Novel, mechanically durable sorbents could enable (a) sorbent use in the open ocean, (b) automated deployment to minimize workforce exposure to toxic chemicals, and (c) mechanical recovery of spilled oils. Here, we explore the use of two mechanically durable, low-density (0.1-0.2 g cm(-3)), highly porous (85-99% porosity), hydrophobic (water contact angles >120°), flexible aerogel composite blankets as sorbent materials for automated oil capture and recovery: Cabot Thermal Wrap (TW) and Aspen Aerogels Spaceloft (SL). Uptake of crude oils (Iraq and Sweet Bryan Mound oils) was 8.0 ± 0.1 and 6.5 ± 0.3 g g(-1) for SL and 14.0 ± 0.1 and 12.2 ± 0.1 g g(-1) for TW, respectively, nearly twice as high as similar polyurethane- and polypropylene-based devices. Compound-specific uptake experiments and discrimination against water uptake suggested an adsorption-influenced sorption mechanism. Consistent with that mechanism, chemical extraction oil recoveries were 95 ± 2 (SL) and 90 ± 2% (TW), but this is an undesirable extraction route in decentralized oil cleanup efforts. In contrast, mechanical extraction routes are favorable, and a modest compression force (38 N) yielded 44.7 ± 0.5% initially to 42.0 ± 0.4% over 10 reuse cycles for SL and initially 55.0 ± 0.1% for TW, degrading to 30.0 ± 0.2% by the end of 10 cycles. The mechanical integrity of SL deteriorated substantially (800 ± 200 to 80 ± 30 kPa), whereas TW was more robust (380 ± 80 to 700 ± 100 kPa) over 10 uptake-and-compression extraction cycles.

  20. Aerogel Track Morphology: Measurement, Three Dimensional Reconstruction and Particle Location using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kearsley, A. T.; Ball, A. D.; Wozniakiewicz, P. A.; Graham, G. A.; Burchell, M. J.; Cole, M. J.; Horz, F.; See, T. H.

    2007-01-01

    The Stardust spacecraft returned the first undoubted samples of cometary dust, with many grains embedded in the silica aerogel collector . Although many tracks contain one or more large terminal particles of a wide range of mineral compositions , there is also abundant material along the track walls. To help interpret the full particle size, structure and mass, both experimental simulation of impact by shots and numerical modeling of the impact process have been attempted. However, all approaches require accurate and precise measurement of impact track size parameters such as length, width and volume of specific portions. To make such measurements is not easy, especially if extensive aerogel fracturing and discoloration has occurred. In this paper we describe the application and limitations of laser confocal imagery for determination of aerogel track parameters, and for the location of particle remains.