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Sample records for aeromechanical stability analysis

  1. Aeromechanical stability analysis of a multirotor vehicle model representing a hybrid heavy lift airship (HHLA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatesan, C.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1984-01-01

    Hybrid Heavy Lift Airship (HHLA) is a proposed candidate vehicle aimed at providing heavy lift capability at low cost. This vehicle consists of a buoyant envelope attached to a supporting structure to which four rotor systems, taken from existing helicopters are attached. Nonlinear equations of motion capable of modelling the dynamics of this coupled multi-rotor/support frame/vehicle system have been developed. Using these equations of motion the aeroelastic and aeromechanical stability analysis is performed aimed at identifying potential instabilities which could occur for this type of vehicle. The coupling between various blade, supporting structure and rigid body modes is identified. Furthermore, the effects of changes in buoyancy ratio (Buoyant lift/total weight) on the dynamic characteristics of the vehicle are studied. The dynamic effects found are of considerable importance for the design of such vehicles. The analytical model developed is also useful for studying the aeromechanical stability of single rotor and tandem rotor coupled rotor/fuselage systems.

  2. Application of GRASP (General Rotorcraft Aeromechanical Stability Program) to nonlinear analysis of a cantilever beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinnant, Howard E.; Hodges, Dewey H.

    1987-01-01

    The General Rotorcraft Aeromechanical Stability Program (GRASP) was developed to analyse the steady-state and linearized dynamic behavior of rotorcraft in hovering and axial flight conditions. Because of the nature of problems GRASP was created to solve, the geometrically nonlinear behavior of beams is one area in which the program must perform well in order to be of any value. Numerical results obtained from GRASP are compared to both static and dynamic experimental data obtained for a cantilever beam undergoing large displacements and rotations caused by deformations. The correlation is excellent in all cases.

  3. Influence of various unsteady aerodynamic models on the aeromechanical stability of a helicopter in ground resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, P. P.; Venkatesan, C.

    1985-01-01

    The aeromechanical stability of a helicopter in ground resonance was analyzed, by incorporating five different aerodynamic models in the coupled rotor/fuselage analysis. The sensitivity of the results to changes in aerodynamic modelling was carefully examined. The theoretical results were compared with experimental data and useful conclusions are drawn regarding the role of aerodynamic modeling on this aeromechanical stability problem. The aerodynamic model which provided the best all around correlation with the experimental data was identified.

  4. Aeromechanics Analysis of a Compound Helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeo, Hyeonsoo; Johnson, Wayne

    2006-01-01

    A design and aeromechanics investigation was conducted for a 100,000-lb compound helicopter with a single main rotor, which is to cruise at 250 knots at 4000 ft/95 deg F condition. Performance, stability, and control analyses were conducted with the comprehensive rotorcraft analysis CAMRAD II. Wind tunnel test measurements of the performance of the H-34 and UH-1D rotors at high advance ratio were compared with calculations to assess the accuracy of the analysis for the design of a high speed helicopter. In general, good correlation was obtained with the increase of drag coefficients in the reverse flow region. An assessment of various design parameters (disk loading, blade loading, wing loading) on the performance of the compound helicopter was made. Performance optimization was conducted to find the optimum twist, collective, tip speed, and taper using the comprehensive analysis. Blade twist was an important parameter on the aircraft performance and most of the benefit of slowing the rotor occurred at the initial 20 to 30% reduction of rotor tip speed. No stability issues were observed with the current design and the control derivatives did not change much with speed, but did exhibit significant coupling.

  5. Rotorcraft aeromechanical stability-methodology assessment. Phase 2: Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bousman, William G.

    1990-01-01

    Helicopter rotor aeroelastic and aeromechanical stability predictions for four data sets were made using industry and government stability analyses and compared with data at a workshop held at Ames Research Center, August 2-3, 1988. The present report contains the workshop comparisons.

  6. Aeromechanical stability of a hingeless rotor in hover and forward flight: Analysis and wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeager, W. T., Jr.; Hamouda, M. N. H.; Mantay, W. R.

    1983-01-01

    A research effort of analysis and testing was conducted to investigate the ground resonance phenomenon of a soft in-plane hingeless rotor. Experimental data were obtained using a 9 ft. (2.74 m) diameter model rotor in hover and forward flight. Eight model rotor configurations were investigated. Configuration parameters included pitch flap coupling, blade sweep and droop, and precone of the blade feathering axis. An analysis based on a comprehensive analytical model of rotorcraft aerodynamics and dynamics was used. The moving block was used to experimentally determine the regressing lead lag mode damping. Good agreement was obtained between the analysis and test. Both analysis and experiment indicated ground resonance instability in hover. An outline of the analysis, a description of the experimental model and procedures, and comparison of the analytical and experimental data are presented.

  7. Milestones in Rotorcraft Aeromechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wayne

    2011-01-01

    The subject of this paper is milestones in rotorcraft aeromechanics. Aeromechanics covers much of what the engineer needs: performance, loads, vibration, stability, flight dynamics, noise. These topics cover many of the key performance attributes, and many of the often-encountered problems in rotorcraft designs. A milestone is a critical achievement, a turning point, an event marking a significant change or stage in development. The milestones identified and discussed include the beginnings of aeromechanics with autogyro analysis, ground resonance, aeromechanics books, unsteady aerodynamics and airloads, nonuniform inflow and wakes, beams and dynamics, comprehensive analysis, computational fluid dynamics, and rotor airloads tests. The focus on milestones limits the scope of the history, but allows the author to acknowledge his choices for key steps in the development of the science and engineering of rotorcraft.

  8. Aeromechanics Analysis of a Boundary Layer Ingesting Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakhle, Milind A.; Reddy, T. S. R.; Herrick, Gregory P.; Shabbir, Aamir; Florea, Razvan V.

    2013-01-01

    Boundary layer ingesting propulsion systems have the potential to significantly reduce fuel burn but these systems must overcome the challe nges related to aeromechanics-fan flutter stability and forced response dynamic stresses. High-fidelity computational analysis of the fan a eromechanics is integral to the ongoing effort to design a boundary layer ingesting inlet and fan for fabrication and wind-tunnel test. A t hree-dimensional, time-accurate, Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes computational fluid dynamics code is used to study aerothermodynamic and a eromechanical behavior of the fan in response to both clean and distorted inflows. The computational aeromechanics analyses performed in th is study show an intermediate design iteration of the fan to be flutter-free at the design conditions analyzed with both clean and distorte d in-flows. Dynamic stresses from forced response have been calculated for the design rotational speed. Additional work is ongoing to expan d the analyses to off-design conditions, and for on-resonance conditions.

  9. General Rotorcraft Aeromechanical Stability Program (GRASP): Theory manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, Dewey H.; Hopkins, A. Stewart; Kunz, Donald L.; Hinnant, Howard E.

    1990-01-01

    The general rotorcraft aeromechanical stability program (GRASP) was developed to calculate aeroelastic stability for rotorcraft in hovering flight, vertical flight, and ground contact conditions. GRASP is described in terms of its capabilities and its philosophy of modeling. The equations of motion that govern the physical system are described, as well as the analytical approximations used to derive them. The equations include the kinematical equation, the element equations, and the constraint equations. In addition, the solution procedures used by GRASP are described. GRASP is capable of treating the nonlinear static and linearized dynamic behavior of structures represented by arbitrary collections of rigid-body and beam elements. These elements may be connected in an arbitrary fashion, and are permitted to have large relative motions. The main limitation of this analysis is that periodic coefficient effects are not treated, restricting rotorcraft flight conditions to hover, axial flight, and ground contact. Instead of following the methods employed in other rotorcraft programs. GRASP is designed to be a hybrid of the finite-element method and the multibody methods used in spacecraft analysis. GRASP differs from traditional finite-element programs by allowing multiple levels of substructure in which the substructures can move and/or rotate relative to others with no small-angle approximations. This capability facilitates the modeling of rotorcraft structures, including the rotating/nonrotating interface and the details of the blade/root kinematics for various types. GRASP differs from traditional multibody programs by considering aeroelastic effects, including inflow dynamics (simple unsteady aerodynamics) and nonlinear aerodynamic coefficients.

  10. The aeromechanical stability of soft-inplane tiltrotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Anna Kathleen Tyler

    A soft-inplane tiltrotor can be subject to the aeromechanical instabilities of ground and air resonance in addition to whirl flutter. While whirl flutter has been studied by many researchers, air and ground resonance in a tiltrotor has not been explored thoroughly. This dissertation investigates the aeromechanical instabilities of air and ground resonance in a tiltrotor and to assess some passive methods for improving the stability of a soft-inplane tiltrotor. This research is broken into two parts, addressing the semi-span model and the full-span model. In the first chapters, a semi-span analytical model consisting of a rigid blade rotor coupled to a rigid pylon and an elastic wing is developed and validated. The Boeing Model 222 which was wind-tunnel tested in 1972 is used to validate the current analytical model. This aircraft is used as the baseline for the analytical investigation of ground resonance and air resonance in hover, air resonance in transition, and air resonance and whirl flutter in airplane configuration. Neither ground resonance nor air resonance in hover are predicted for the Model 222 though air resonance in transition and cruise as well as whirl flutter at high speeds are predicted. Aeroelastic couplings in the rotor blades and wing are shown to affect the air resonance stability in cruise and transition and to be useful in augmenting the inherent stability of the aircraft. Wing vertical bending coupled to wing torsion and rotor low frequency lag coupled to blade torsion were helpful for air resonance. However, the rotor coupling was quite detrimental to whirl flutter stability and the wing coupling was unable to stabilize all the air resonance regions completely. The second part of the thesis expands the semi-span model to full-span: fuselage pitch and roll motion, anti-symmetric wing motion, and the second rotor motion are added. The full-span model determined that fuselage motion can couple with rotor low frequency lag to exhibit air

  11. General Rotorcraft Aeromechanical Stability Program (GRASP) version 1.03: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, A. Stewart; Kunz, Donald L.

    1988-01-01

    The Rotorcraft Dynamics Division, Aeroflightdynamics Directorate, U.S. Army Aviation Research and Technology Activity has developed the General Rotorcraft Aeromechanical Stability Program (GRASP) to perform calculations that will assess the stability of rotorcraft in hovering flight and ground contact conditions. The program is designed to be state-of-the-art, hybrid, finite-element/multibody code that can be applied to all existing and future helicopter configurations. While GRASP was specifically designed to solve rotorcraft stability problems, its innovative structure and formulation allow for application to a wide range of structures. This manual describes the preparation of the input file required by Version 1.03 of GRASP, the procedures used to invoke GRASP on the NASA Ames Research Center CRAY X-MP 48 computer, and the interpretation of the output produced by GRASP. The parameters used by the input file are defined, and summaries of the input file and the job control language are included.

  12. Effects of Inlet Distortion on Aeromechanical Stability of a Forward-Swept High-Speed Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrick, Gregory P.

    2011-01-01

    Concerns regarding noise, propulsive efficiency, and fuel burn are inspiring aircraft designs wherein the propulsive turbomachines are partially (or fully) embedded within the airframe; such designs present serious concerns with regard to aerodynamic and aeromechanic performance of the compression system in response to inlet distortion. Separately, a forward-swept high-speed fan was developed to address noise concerns of modern podded turbofans; however this fan encounters aeroelastic instability (flutter) as it approaches stall. A three-dimensional, unsteady, Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics code is applied to analyze and corroborate fan performance with clean inlet flow. This code, already validated in its application to assess aerodynamic damping of vibrating blades at various flow conditions, is modified and then applied in a computational study to preliminarily assess the effects of inlet distortion on aeroelastic stability of the fan. Computational engineering application and implementation issues are discussed, followed by an investigation into the aeroelastic behavior of the fan with clean and distorted inlets.

  13. Aeromechanical stability augmentation of helicopters using enhanced active constrained layer damping treatment on rotor flex beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badre Alam, Askari

    This thesis presents a study conducted to explore the feasibility of employing Enhanced Active Constrained Layer (EACL) damping treatment in helicopter rotor systems to alleviate aeromechanical instability. The central idea is to apply the EACL treatment on the flexbeams of soft in-plane bearingless main rotors (BMRs) and increase the damping of the first lag mode. In this research, it is explored whether EACL damping treatment can provide sufficient damping in rotor system without exceeding the physical design limits of actuators. To study the feasibility of the EACL damping treatment, a finite element based mathematical model of a rotor with EACL damping treatment on flexbeam is developed. A bench top experiment is conducted to verify the mathematical model. It is shown that the experimental results correlate well with the analytical results. A derivative controller, with control voltage based on the flexbeam tip transverse velocity, is used in this investigation. A filter is developed to remove 1/rev component of the feedback signal. An optimization study is conducted to understand the influence of EACL design parameters on the performance of the damping treatment. A study is conducted to analyze delamination of EACL damping treatment. In this study, a new finite element model is developed that is capable of accurately predicting both, the performance and interlaminar stresses in EACL damping treatment. A new configuration of PCL damping treatment is developed by tapering the constraining layer at the free ends. As compared to a conventional PCL, this configuration has significantly lower interlaminar stresses and similar damping performance. A study is conducted to compare ACL with purely active configuration. It was shown that in ACL configuration, the interlaminar stresses are an-order-of-magnitude lower than the purely active configuration for similar damping levels. A new ACL configuration is designed by changing the poling direction of the PZT constraining

  14. Aeromechanical stability augmentation using semi-active friction-based lead-lag damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Sandeep

    2005-11-01

    ground resonance problem. In view of the inherent nonlinearity in the system due to friction phenomena, multiblade transformation from rotating frame to nonrotating frame is not useful. Stability analysis of the system is performed in the rotating frame to gain an understanding of the dynamic characteristics of rotor system with attached semi-active friction based lag dampers. This investigation is extended to the ground resonance stability analysis of a comprehensive UH-60 model within the framework of finite element based multibody dynamics formulations. Simulations are conducted to study the performance of several integrated lag dampers ranging from passive to semi-active ones with varying levels of selectivity. Stability analysis is performed for a nominal range of rotor speeds using Prony's method.

  15. Aeromechanical stability of helicopters with a bearingless main rotor. Part 1: Equations of motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    Equations of motion for a coupled rotor-body system were derived for the purpose of studying air and ground resonance characteristics of helicopters that have bearingless main rotors. For the fuselage, only four rigid body degrees of freedom are considered; longitudinal and lateral translations, pitch, and roll. The rotor is assumed to consist of three or more rigid blades. Each blade is joined to the hub by means of a flexible beam segment (flexbeam or strap). Pitch change is accomplished by twisting the flexbeam with the pitch-control system, the characteristics of which are variable. Thus, the analysis is capable of implicitly treating aeroelastic couplings generated by the flexbeam elastic deflections, the pitch-control system, and the angular offsets of the blade and flexbeam. The linearized equations are written in the nonrotating system retaining only the cyclic rotor modes; thus, they comprise a system of homogeneous ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients. All contributions to the linearized perturbation equations from inertia, gravity, quasi-steady aerodynamics, and the flexbeam equilibrium deflections are retained exactly.

  16. Interfacing comprehensive rotorcraft analysis with advanced aeromechanics and vortex wake models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haiying

    This dissertation describes three aspects of the comprehensive rotorcraft analysis. First, a physics-based methodology for the modeling of hydraulic devices within multibody-based comprehensive models of rotorcraft systems is developed. This newly proposed approach can predict the fully nonlinear behavior of hydraulic devices, and pressure levels in the hydraulic chambers are coupled with the dynamic response of the system. The proposed hydraulic device models are implemented in a multibody code and calibrated by comparing their predictions with test bench measurements for the UH-60 helicopter lead-lag damper. Predicted peak damping forces were found to be in good agreement with measurements, while the model did not predict the entire time history of damper force to the same level of accuracy. The proposed model evaluates relevant hydraulic quantities such as chamber pressures, orifice flow rates, and pressure relief valve displacements. This model could be used to design lead-lag dampers with desirable force and damping characteristics. The second part of this research is in the area of computational aeroelasticity, in which an interface between computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and computational structural dynamics (CSD) is established. This interface enables data exchange between CFD and CSD with the goal of achieving accurate airloads predictions. In this work, a loose coupling approach based on the delta-airloads method is developed in a finite-element method based multibody dynamics formulation, DYMORE. To validate this aerodynamic interface, a CFD code, OVERFLOW-2, is loosely coupled with a CSD program, DYMORE, to compute the airloads of different flight conditions for Sikorsky UH-60 aircraft. This loose coupling approach has good convergence characteristics. The predicted airloads are found to be in good agreement with the experimental data, although not for all flight conditions. In addition, the tight coupling interface between the CFD program, OVERFLOW

  17. Integrated Aeromechanics with Three-Dimensional Solid-Multibody Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datta, Anubhav; Johnson, Wayne

    2014-01-01

    A full three-dimensional finite element-multibody structural dynamic solver is coupled to a three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solver for the prediction of integrated aeromechanical stresses and strains on a rotor blade in forward flight. The objective is to lay the foundations of all major pieces of an integrated three-dimensional rotor dynamic analysis - from model construction to aeromechanical solution to stress/strain calculation. The primary focus is on the aeromechanical solution. Two types of three-dimensional CFD/CSD interfaces are constructed for this purpose with an emphasis on resolving errors from geometry mis-match so that initial-stage approximate structural geometries can also be effectively analyzed. A three-dimensional structural model is constructed as an approximation to a UH-60A-like fully articulated rotor. The aerodynamic model is identical to the UH-60A rotor. For preliminary validation measurements from a UH-60A high speed flight is used where CFD coupling is essential to capture the advancing side tip transonic effects. The key conclusion is that an integrated aeromechanical analysis is indeed possible with three-dimensional structural dynamics but requires a careful description of its geometry and discretization of its parts.

  18. Active Stabilization of Aeromechanical Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-05

    The authors thank Drs. Chen and Haupt and Profesor Rau- 500 mbar height). In the latter case they guide the polar front tenberl for their comments. We...any the subtropical region and the cold easterly from the polar scientific evidence at all has been presented connecm.g rotating region, and thus...although the analyisi applies to which is chiftacterued by oiscillistions in areai-averaged mass mjal compression systemsh as Weil. flow and pressure

  19. Further Results of Soft-Inplane Tiltrotor Aeromechanics Investigation Using Two Multibody Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masarati, Pierangelo; Quaranta, Giuseppe; Piatak, David J.; Singleton, Jeffrey D.

    2004-01-01

    This investigation focuses on the development of multibody analytical models to predict the dynamic response, aeroelastic stability, and blade loading of a soft-inplane tiltrotor wind-tunnel model. Comprehensive rotorcraft-based multibody analyses enable modeling of the rotor system to a high level of detail such that complex mechanics and nonlinear effects associated with control system geometry and joint deadband may be considered. The influence of these and other nonlinear effects on the aeromechanical behavior of the tiltrotor model are examined. A parametric study of the design parameters which may have influence on the aeromechanics of the soft-inplane rotor system are also included in this investigation.

  20. Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Rotary Wing Project: Aeromechanics Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The following presentation will cover the topic of Aeromechanics. This includes, the organization of the SRW project, as well as, the Aeromechanic task areas and corresponding facilities including ARC, GRC, and LARC. This presentation will also be covering Aeromechanics highlights like rotorcraft icing, Apache Active Twist Rotor and many more. Furthermore, near-term plans will also be discussed.

  1. Aeromechanics of Highly Maneuverable Bats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    naturally flying bats, and implemented these techniques in two settings, flight corridors and wind tunnels . The flight corridor allows highly natural...data analysis approach based on collation PIV samples from numerous flights. In the wind tunnel , investigators can control bat speed to a great degree...straight and turning configurations, and to fly in the low-speed wind tunnels at the Harvard University-Concord Field Station and in the Division of

  2. Design optimization and uncertainty quantification for aeromechanics forced response of a turbomachinery blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modgil, Girish A.

    Gas turbine engines for aerospace applications have evolved dramatically over the last 50 years through the constant pursuit for better specific fuel consumption, higher thrust-to-weight ratio, lower noise and emissions all while maintaining reliability and affordability. An important step in enabling these improvements is a forced response aeromechanics analysis involving structural dynamics and aerodynamics of the turbine. It is well documented that forced response vibration is a very critical problem in aircraft engine design, causing High Cycle Fatigue (HCF). Pushing the envelope on engine design has led to increased forced response problems and subsequently an increased risk of HCF failure. Forced response analysis is used to assess design feasibility of turbine blades for HCF using a material limit boundary set by the Goodman Diagram envelope that combines the effects of steady and vibratory stresses. Forced response analysis is computationally expensive, time consuming and requires multi-domain experts to finalize a result. As a consequence, high-fidelity aeromechanics analysis is performed deterministically and is usually done at the end of the blade design process when it is very costly to make significant changes to geometry or aerodynamic design. To address uncertainties in the system (engine operating point, temperature distribution, mistuning, etc.) and variability in material properties, designers apply conservative safety factors in the traditional deterministic approach, which leads to bulky designs. Moreover, using a deterministic approach does not provide a calculated risk of HCF failure. This thesis describes a process that begins with the optimal aerodynamic design of a turbomachinery blade developed using surrogate models of high-fidelity analyses. The resulting optimal blade undergoes probabilistic evaluation to generate aeromechanics results that provide a calculated likelihood of failure from HCF. An existing Rolls-Royce High Work Single

  3. Comprehensive rotorcraft analysis methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Wendell B.; Austin, Edward E.

    1988-01-01

    The development and application of comprehensive rotorcraft analysis methods in the field of rotorcraft technology are described. These large scale analyses and the resulting computer programs are intended to treat the complex aeromechanical phenomena that describe the behavior of rotorcraft. They may be used to predict rotor aerodynamics, acoustic, performance, stability and control, handling qualities, loads and vibrations, structures, dynamics, and aeroelastic stability characteristics for a variety of applications including research, preliminary and detail design, and evaluation and treatment of field problems. The principal comprehensive methods developed or under development in recent years and generally available to the rotorcraft community because of US Army Aviation Research and Technology Activity (ARTA) sponsorship of all or part of the software systems are the Rotorcraft Flight Simulation (C81), Dynamic System Coupler (DYSCO), Coupled Rotor/Airframe Vibration Analysis Program (SIMVIB), Comprehensive Analytical Model of Rotorcraft Aerodynamics and Dynamics (CAMRAD), General Rotorcraft Aeromechanical Stability Program (GRASP), and Second Generation Comprehensive Helicopter Analysis System (2GCHAS).

  4. An Assessment of the State-of-the-art in Multidisciplinary Aeromechanical Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datta, Anubhav; Johnson, Wayne

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a survey of the current state-of-the-art in multidisciplinary aeromechanical analyses which integrate advanced Computational Structural Dynamics (CSD) and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methods. The application areas to be surveyed include fixed wing aircraft, turbomachinery, and rotary wing aircraft. The objective of the authors in the present paper, together with a companion paper on requirements, is to lay out a path for a High Performance Computing (HPC) based next generation comprehensive rotorcraft analysis. From this survey of the key technologies in other application areas it is possible to identify the critical technology gaps that stem from unique rotorcraft requirements.

  5. A Closed-Loop Optimal Neural-Network Controller to Optimize Rotorcraft Aeromechanical Behaviour. Volume 1; Theory and Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leyland, Jane Anne

    2001-01-01

    Given the predicted growth in air transportation, the potential exists for significant market niches for rotary wing subsonic vehicles. Technological advances which optimise rotorcraft aeromechanical behaviour can contribute significantly to both their commercial and military development, acceptance, and sales. Examples of the optimisation of rotorcraft aeromechanical behaviour which are of interest include the minimisation of vibration and/or loads. The reduction of rotorcraft vibration and loads is an important means to extend the useful life of the vehicle and to improve its ride quality. Although vibration reduction can be accomplished by using passive dampers and/or tuned masses, active closed-loop control has the potential to reduce vibration and loads throughout a.wider flight regime whilst requiring less additional weight to the aircraft man that obtained by using passive methads. It is ernphasised that the analysis described herein is applicable to all those rotorcraft aeromechanical behaviour optimisation problems for which the relationship between the harmonic control vector and the measurement vector can be adequately described by a neural-network model.

  6. Rotorcraft aeroelastic stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormiston, Robert A.; Warmbrodt, William G.; Hodges, Dewey H.; Peters, David A.

    1988-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental developments in the aeroelastic and aeromechanical stability of helicopters and tilt-rotor aircraft are addressed. Included are the underlying nonlinear structural mechanics of slender rotating beams, necessary for accurate modeling of elastic cantilever rotor blades, and the development of dynamic inflow, an unsteady aerodynamic theory for low-frequency aeroelastic stability applications. Analytical treatment of isolated rotor stability in hover and forward flight, coupled rotor-fuselage stability in hover and forward flight, and analysis of tilt-rotor dynamic stability are considered. Results of parametric investigations of system behavior are presented, and correlation between theoretical results and experimental data from small and large scale wind tunnel and flight testing are discussed.

  7. General Rotorcraft Aeromechanical Stability Program (GRASP) - Theory Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    fixed a priori. This feature not only requires a great deal of flexibility in assembling the system equations of motion, but also requires that data be...of reference may be used to model the discrete motions of the substructure. This can often lead to significant simplifications in the equations of...These equations are generated in- ternally by GRASP at the element level, and automatically assembled by the constraints, which combine the

  8. Helicopter aeroelastic stability and response - Current topics and future trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, Peretz P.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents several current topics in rotary wing aeroelasticity and concludes by attempting to anticipate future trends and developments. These topics are: (1) the role of geometric nonlinearities; (2) structural modeling, and aeroelastic analysis of composite rotor blades; (3) aeroelastic stability and response in forward flight; (4) modeling of coupled rotor/fuselage aeromechanical problems and their active control; and (5) the coupled rotor-fuselage vibration problem and its alleviation by higher harmonic control. Selected results illustrating the fundamental aspects of these topics are presented. Future developments are briefly discussed.

  9. Automated RSO Stability Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, T.

    2016-09-01

    A methodology for assessing the attitude stability of a Resident Space Object (RSO) using visual magnitude data is presented and then scaled to run in an automated fashion across the entire satellite catalog. Results obtained by applying the methodology to the Commercial Space Operations Center (COMSpOC) catalog are presented and summarized, identifying objects that have changed stability. We also examine the timeline for detecting the transition from stable to unstable attitude

  10. Local slope stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattendorf, I.; Hergarten, St.; Neugebauer, H. J.

    Mass movements under the influence of gravity occur as result of diverse disturbing and destabilizing processes, for example of climatic or anthropological origin. The stability of slopes is mainly determined by the geometry of the land-surface and designated slip-horizon. Further contributions are supplied by the pore water pressure, cohesion and friction. All relevant factors have to be integrated in a slope stability model, either by measurements and estimations (like phenomenological laws) or derived from physical equations. As result of stability calculations, it's suitable to introduce an expectation value, the factor-of-safety, for the slip-risk. Here, we present a model based on coupled physical equations to simulate hardly measurable phenomenons, like lateral forces and fluid flow. For the displacements of the soil-matrix we use a modified poroelasticity-equation with a Biot-coupling (Biot 1941) for the water pressure. Latter is described by a generalized Boussinesq equation for saturated-unsaturated porous media (Blendinger 1998). One aim of the calculations is to improve the knowledge about stability-distributions and their temporal variations. This requires the introduction of a local factor-of-safety which is the main difference to common stability models with global stability estimations. The reduction of immediate danger is still the emergent task of the most slope and landslide investigations, but this model is also useful with respect to understand the governing processes of landform evolution.

  11. A Higher Harmonic Optimal Controller to Optimise Rotorcraft Aeromechanical Behaviour

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leyland, Jane Anne

    1996-01-01

    Three methods to optimize rotorcraft aeromechanical behavior for those cases where the rotorcraft plant can be adequately represented by a linear model system matrix were identified and implemented in a stand-alone code. These methods determine the optimal control vector which minimizes the vibration metric subject to constraints at discrete time points, and differ from the commonly used non-optimal constraint penalty methods such as those employed by conventional controllers in that the constraints are handled as actual constraints to an optimization problem rather than as just additional terms in the performance index. The first method is to use a Non-linear Programming algorithm to solve the problem directly. The second method is to solve the full set of non-linear equations which define the necessary conditions for optimality. The third method is to solve each of the possible reduced sets of equations defining the necessary conditions for optimality when the constraints are pre-selected to be either active or inactive, and then to simply select the best solution. The effects of maneuvers and aeroelasticity on the systems matrix are modelled by using a pseudo-random pseudo-row-dependency scheme to define the systems matrix. Cases run to date indicate that the first method of solution is reliable, robust, and easiest to use, and that it was superior to the conventional controllers which were considered.

  12. A Tribute to Professor Rene H. Miller - A Pioneer in Aeromechanics and Rotary Wing Flight Transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, Peretz P.; Johnson, Wayne; Scully, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    Rene H. Miller (May 19, 1916 January 28, 2003), Emeritus H. N. Slater Professor of Flight Transportation, was one of the most influential pioneers in rotary wing aeromechanics as well as a visionary whose dream was the development of a tilt-rotor based short haul air transportation system. This paper pays a long overdue tribute to his memory and to his extraordinary contributions.

  13. Slope Stability Analysis Using GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouajaj, Ahmed; Bahi, Lahcen; Ouadif, Latifa; Awa, Mohamed

    2016-10-01

    An analysis of slope stability using Geographic Information System (GIS) is presented in this paper. The methodology is based on the calculation of the safety factor in 2D and 3D using ArcGis. Hovland's Method in 3D and 2D were used in the stability analysis of the slope located at the 34 kilometer point (K.P.34) on the highway in the North of Morocco connecting Tangier to Ksar Sghir. Results shows that the safety factors obtained in 3D are always higher than those obtained in 2D and the slope becomes unstable when the water table level is less than 1 m.

  14. A comparison of theory and experiment for coupled rotor-body stability of a hingeless rotor model in hover under simulated vacuum conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bousman, William G.

    1988-01-01

    Two cases were selected for correlation from an experiment that examined the aeromechanical stability of a small-scale model rotor that used tantalum rods instead of blades to simulate vacuum conditions. The first case involved body roll freedom only while the second case included body pitch and roll degrees of freedom together. Analyses from Hughes Helicopters and the U.S. Army Aeromechanics Laboratory were compared with the data and the correlations ranged from poor to good.

  15. Stability analysis of ecomorphodynamic equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bärenbold, F.; Crouzy, B.; Perona, P.

    2016-02-01

    In order to shed light on the influence of riverbed vegetation on river morphodynamics, we perform a linear stability analysis on a minimal model of vegetation dynamics coupled with classical one- and two-dimensional Saint-Venant-Exner equations of morphodynamics. Vegetation is modeled as a density field of rigid, nonsubmerged cylinders and affects flow via a roughness change. Furthermore, vegetation is assumed to develop following a logistic dependence and may be uprooted by flow. First, we perform the stability analysis of the reduced one-dimensional framework. As a result of the competitive interaction between vegetation growth and removal through uprooting, we find a domain in the parameter space where originally straight rivers are unstable toward periodic longitudinal patterns. For realistic values of the sediment transport parameter, the dominant longitudinal wavelength is determined by the parameters of the vegetation model. Bed topography is found to adjust to the spatial pattern fixed by vegetation. Subsequently, the stability analysis is repeated for the two-dimensional framework, where the system may evolve toward alternate or multiple bars. On a fixed bed, we find instability toward alternate bars due to flow-vegetation interaction, but no multiple bars. Both alternate and multiple bars are present on a movable, vegetated bed. Finally, we find that the addition of vegetation to a previously unvegetated riverbed favors instability toward alternate bars and thus the development of a single course rather than braiding.

  16. MAP Stability, Design and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ericsson -Jackson, A.J.; Andrews, S. F.; ODonnell, J. R., Jr.; Markley, F. L.

    1998-01-01

    The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) is a follow-on to the Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) instrument on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) spacecraft. The design and analysis of the MAP attitude control system (ACS) have been refined since work previously reported. The full spacecraft and instrument flexible model was developed in NASTRAN, and the resulting flexible modes were plotted and reduced with the Modal Significance Analysis Package (MSAP). The reduced-order model was used to perform the linear stability analysis for each control mode, the results of which are presented in this paper. Although MAP is going to a relatively disturbance-free Lissajous orbit around the Earth-Sun L2 Lagrange point, a detailed disturbance-torque analysis is required because there are only a small number of opportunities for momentum unloading each year. Environmental torques, including solar pressure at L2, and aerodynamic and gravity gradient during phasing-loop orbits, were calculated and simulated. A simple model of fuel slosh was derived to model its effect on the motion of the spacecraft. In addition, a thruster mode linear impulse controller was developed to meet the accuracy requirements of the phasing loop burns. A dynamic attitude error limiter was added to improve the performance of the ACS during large attitude slews. The result of this analysis is a stable ACS subsystem that meets all of the mission's requirements.

  17. MAP stability, design, and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ericsson-Jackson, A. J.; Andrews, S. F.; O'Donnell, J. R., Jr.; Markley, F. L.

    1998-01-01

    The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) is a follow-on to the Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) instrument on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) spacecraft. The design and analysis of the MAP attitude control system (ACS) have been refined since work previously reported. The full spacecraft and instrument flexible model was developed in NASTRAN, and the resulting flexible modes were plotted and reduced with the Modal Significance Analysis Package (MSAP). The reduced-order model was used to perform the linear stability analysis for each control mode, the results of which are presented in this paper. Although MAP is going to a relatively disturbance-free Lissajous orbit around the Earth-Sun L(2) Lagrange point, a detailed disturbance-torque analysis is required because there are only a small number of opportunities for momentum unloading each year. Environmental torques, including solar pressure at L(2), aerodynamic and gravity gradient during phasing-loop orbits, were calculated and simulated. Thruster plume impingement torques that could affect the performance of the thruster modes were estimated and simulated, and a simple model of fuel slosh was derived to model its effect on the motion of the spacecraft. In addition, a thruster mode linear impulse controller was developed to meet the accuracy requirements of the phasing loop burns. A dynamic attitude error limiter was added to improve the performance of the ACS during large attitude slews. The result of this analysis is a stable ACS subsystem that meets all of the mission's requirements.

  18. Stability Analysis of ISS Medications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wotring, V. E.

    2014-01-01

    the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) to measure the amount of intact active ingredient, identify degradation products and measure their amounts. Some analyses were conducted by an independent analytical laboratory, but certain (Schedule) medications could not be shipped to their facility and were analyzed at JSC. RESULTS Nine medications were analyzed with respect to active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and degradant amounts. Results were compared to the USP requirements for API and degradants/impurities content for every FDA-approved medication. One medication met USP requirements at 5 months after its expiration date. Four of the nine (44% of those tested) medications tested met USP requirements up to 8 months post-expiration. Another 3 medications (33% of those tested) met USP guidelines 2-3 months before expiration. One medication, a compound classed by the FDA as a dietary supplement and sometimes used as a sleep aid, failed to meet USP requirements at 11 months post-expiration. CONCLUSION Analysis of each medication at a single time point provides limited information on the stability of a medication stored in particular conditions; it is not possible to predict how long a medication may be safe and effective from these data. Notwithstanding, five of the nine medications tested (56%) met USP requirements for API and degradants/impurities at least 5 months past expiration dates. The single compound that failed to meet USP requirements is not regulated as strictly as prescription medications are during manufacture; it is unknown if this medication would have met the requirements prior to flight. Notably, it was the furthest beyond its expiration date. Only more comprehensive analysis of flight-aged samples compared to appropriate ground controls will permit determination of spaceflight effects on medication stability.

  19. Process Improvement Through Tool Integration in Aero-Mechanical Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Clark

    2010-01-01

    Emerging capabilities in commercial design tools promise to significantly improve the multi-disciplinary and inter-disciplinary design and analysis coverage for aerospace mechanical engineers. This paper explores the analysis process for two example problems of a wing and flap mechanical drive system and an aircraft landing gear door panel. The examples begin with the design solid models and include various analysis disciplines such as structural stress and aerodynamic loads. Analytical methods include CFD, multi-body dynamics with flexible bodies and structural analysis. Elements of analysis data management, data visualization and collaboration are also included.

  20. Selected topics on the active control of helicopter aeromechanical and vibration problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, Peretz P.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes in a concise manner three selected topics on the active control of helicopter aeromechanical and vibration problems. The three topics are as follows: (1) the active control of helicopter air-resonance using an LQG/LTR approach; (2) simulation of higher harmonic control (HHC) applied to a four bladed hingeless helicopter rotor in forward flight; and (3) vibration suppression in forward flight on a hingeless helicopter rotor using an actively controlled, partial span, trailing edge flap, which is mounted on the blade. Only a few selected illustrative results are presented. The results obtained clearly indicate that the partial span, actively controlled flap has considerable potential for vibration reduction in helicopter rotors.

  1. Aeromechanics and Aeroacoustics Predictions of the Boeing-SMART Rotor Using Coupled-CFD/CSD Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bain, Jeremy; Sim, Ben W.; Sankar, Lakshmi; Brentner, Ken

    2010-01-01

    This paper will highlight helicopter aeromechanics and aeroacoustics prediction capabilities developed by Georgia Institute of Technology, the Pennsylvania State University, and Northern Arizona University under the Helicopter Quieting Program (HQP) sponsored by the Tactical Technology Office of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). First initiated in 2004, the goal of the HQP was to develop high fidelity, state-of-the-art computational tools for designing advanced helicopter rotors with reduced acoustic perceptibility and enhanced performance. A critical step towards achieving this objective is the development of rotorcraft prediction codes capable of assessing a wide range of helicopter configurations and operations for future rotorcraft designs. This includes novel next-generation rotor systems that incorporate innovative passive and/or active elements to meet future challenging military performance and survivability goals.

  2. Turbine Engine Research Center (TERC) Data System Enhancement and Test Article Evaluation. Delivery Order 0002: TERC Aeromechanical Characterization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    aspects: (1) aerodynamic performance as measured in terms of changes in peak efficiency and stall margin, and (2) aeromechanical response associated...characterize the part-speed stall flutter response of a single stage unshrouded axial- flow fan. These sensors are distributed around the circumference...and closed clearances are analyzed for the case where the fan is back-pressured into the stall flutter zone. The experimental data is analyzed using

  3. An experimental investigation of turbomachine blade row aeromechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiereisen, John Michael

    This research was directed at understanding two major issues in turbomachine unsteady aerodynamics: (1) two-dimensional modeling of the unsteady aerodynamic excitation to a blade row within the constraints of linearized theory, and (2) the resulting unsteady aerodynamic loading of a blade row utilizing linearized theory analysis. These objectives were pursued by means of a series of experiments in the Purdue Annular Cascade Research Facility. This facility experimentally reproduces the fundamental unsteady flow phenomena inherent in axial flow turbomachines. The unsteady periodic flow field generated by rotating rows of perforated plates and airfoil cascades was measured with a two-component hot-wire anemometer and an unsteady total pressure probe and characterized in terms of the two-dimensional unsteady velocity and unsteady static pressure perturbations. The resulting unsteady periodic chordwise surface pressure distributions on a downstream stator row were measured with miniature high-frequency response pressure transducers mounted within the stator airfoils. Thus the unsteady aerodynamic excitation and resulting unsteady aerodynamic response were quantitatively ascertained. The periodic unsteady flow perturbations were analyzed as superpositions of harmonic vortical and potential flow perturbations, with each of these fundamental perturbations modeled as a spatial flow nonuniformity which is temporally steady in an appropriately rotating reference frame. The unsteady velocity associated with an harmonic vortical perturbation was shown to be parallel to the mean velocity vector in the rotating relative reference frame. The unsteady potential perturbations were shown to either propagate or decay axially depending upon flow conditions, with the propagation or decay determined by the mean relative Mach number in the rotating reference frame. Unsteady flow fields generated by rotating rows of perforated plates were found to be almost purely vortical perturbations

  4. Stability analysis of free piston Stirling engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bégot, Sylvie; Layes, Guillaume; Lanzetta, François; Nika, Philippe

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents a stability analysis of a free piston Stirling engine. The model and the detailed calculation of pressures losses are exposed. Stability of the machine is studied by the observation of the eigenvalues of the model matrix. Model validation based on the comparison with NASA experimental results is described. The influence of operational and construction parameters on performance and stability issues is exposed. The results show that most parameters that are beneficial for machine power seem to induce irregular mechanical characteristics with load, suggesting that self-sustained oscillations could be difficult to maintain and control.

  5. Stability analysis of zigzag boron nitride nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, Hari Mohan Late, Ravikiran; Saxena, Shailendra K.; Kumar, Rajesh; Sagdeo, Pankaj R.; Jaiswal, Neeraj K.; Srivastava, Pankaj

    2015-05-15

    We have explored the structural stability of bare and hydrogenated zigzag boron nitride nanoribbons (ZBNNRs). In order to investigate the structural stability, we calculate the cohesive energy for bare, one-edge and both edges H-terminated ZBNNRs with different widths. It is found that the ZBNNRs with width Nz=8 are energetically more favorable than the lower-width counterparts (Nz<8). Bare ZBNNRs have been found energetically most stable as compared to the edge terminated ribbons. Our analysis reveals that the structural stability is a function of ribbon-width and it is not affected significantly by the type of edge-passivation (one-edge or both-edges)

  6. Stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betti, R.; McCrory, R. L.; Verdon, C. P.

    1993-08-01

    The linear stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts is carried out for a semi-infinite uniform medium. For a laser accelerated target, it is shown that a properly selected modulation of the laser intensity can lead to the dynamic stabilization or growth-rate reduction of a large portion of the unstable spectrum. The theory is in qualitative agreement with the numerical results obtained by using the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code ORCHID.

  7. Stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Betti, R.; McCrory, R.L.; Verdon, C.P. )

    1993-11-08

    The linear stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts is carried out for a semi-infinite uniform medium. For a laser accelerated target, it is shown that a properly selected modulation of the laser intensity can lead to the dynamic stabilization or growth-rate reduction of a large portion of the unstable spectrum. The theory is in qualitative agreement with the numerical results obtained by using the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code ORCHID.

  8. Stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betti, R.; McCrory, R. L.; Verdon, C. P.

    1993-11-01

    The linear stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts is carried out for a semi-infinite uniform medium. For a laser accelerated target, it is shown that a properly selected modulation of the laser intensity can lead to the dynamic stabilization or growth-rate reduction of a large portion of the unstable spectrum. The theory is in qualitative agreement with the numerical results obtained by using the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code orchid.

  9. Stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Betti, R.; McCrory, R.L.; Verdon, C.P.

    1993-08-01

    The linear stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts, is carried out for a semi-infinite uniform medium. For a laser accelerated target, it is shown that a properly selected modulation of the laser intensity can lead to the dynamic stabilization or growth-rate reduction of a large portion of the unstable spectrum. The theory is in qualitative agreement with the numerical results obtained by using the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code ORCHID.

  10. Developments in Cylindrical Shell Stability Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Today high-performance computing systems and new analytical and numerical techniques enable engineers to explore the use of advanced materials for shell design. This paper reviews some of the historical developments of shell buckling analysis and design. The paper concludes by identifying key research directions for reliable and robust methods development in shell stability analysis and design.

  11. Aeromechanical Evaluation of Smart-Twisting Active Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Joon W.; Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.; Hoffman, Frauke; van der Wall, Berend G.; Kim, Do-Hyung; Jung, Sung N.; You, Young H.; Tanabe, Yasutada; Bailly, Joelle; Lienard, Caroline; Delrieux, Yves

    2014-01-01

    An investigation of Smart-Twisting Active Rotor (STAR) was made to assess potential benefits of the current active twist rotor concept for performance improvement, vibration reduction, and noise alleviation. The STAR rotor is a 40% Mach-scaled, Bo105 rotor with an articulated flap-lag hinge at 3.5%R and no pre-cone. The 0-5 per rev active twist harmonic inputs were applied for various flight conditions including hover, descent, moderate to high speed level flights, and slowed rotor high advance ratio. For the analysis, the STAR partners used multiple codes including CAMRAD II, S4, HOST, rFlow3D, elsA, and their associated software. At the high thrust level in hover, the 0 per rev active twist with 80% amplitude increased figure of merit (FM) by 0.01-0.02 relative to the baseline. In descent, the largest BVI noise reduction was on the order of 2 to 5 dB at the 3 per rev active twist. In the high speed case (mu = 0.35), the 2 per rev actuation was found to be the most effective in achieving a power reduction as well as a vibration reduction. At the 2 per rev active twist, total power was reduced by 0.65% at the 60 deg active twist phase, and vibration was reduced by 47.6% at the 45 deg active twist phase. The use of the 2 per rev active twist appears effective for vibration reduction. In the high advance ratio case (mu = 0.70), the 0 per rev actuation appeared to have negligible impact on performance improvement. In summary, computational simulations successfully demonstrated that the current active twist concept provided a significant reduction of the maximum BVI noise in descent, a significant reduction of the vibration in the high speed case, a small improvement on rotor performance in hover, and a negligible impact on rotor performance in forward flight.

  12. Advanced stability analysis for laminar flow control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orszag, S. A.

    1981-01-01

    Five classes of problems are addressed: (1) the extension of the SALLY stability analysis code to the full eighth order compressible stability equations for three dimensional boundary layer; (2) a comparison of methods for prediction of transition using SALLY for incompressible flows; (3) a study of instability and transition in rotating disk flows in which the effects of Coriolis forces and streamline curvature are included; (4) a new linear three dimensional instability mechanism that predicts Reynolds numbers for transition to turbulence in planar shear flows in good agreement with experiment; and (5) a study of the stability of finite amplitude disturbances in axisymmetric pipe flow showing the stability of this flow to all nonlinear axisymmetric disturbances.

  13. Liapunov stability analysis of spinning flexible spacecraft.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbera, F. J.; Likins, P.

    1973-01-01

    The attitude stability of a class of spinning flexible spacecraft in a force-free environment is analyzed. The spacecraft is modeled as a rigid core having attached to it a flexible appendage idealized as a collection of elastically interconnected particles. Liapunov stability theorems are employed with the Hamiltonian of the system, constrained through the angular momentum integral so as to admit complete damping, used as a testing function. The Hamiltonian is written in terms of modal coordinates as interpreted by the hybrid coordinate formulation, thus allowing truncation to a level amenable to literal stability analysis. Testing functions are constructed for a spacecraft with an arbitrary (discretized) appendage, and closed form stability criteria are generated for the first mode of a restricted appendage model lying in a plane which contains the center of mass and is orthogonal to the spin axis. The criteria are (except for idealized cases on the stability boundary line in the parameter space) both necessary and sufficient for stability for any spacecraft characterized by the planar appendage model, such as a spacecraft containing solar panels and/or radial booms.

  14. Stability analysis of cylinders with circular cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Almroth, B. O.; Brogan, F. A.; Marlowe, M. B.

    1973-01-01

    The stability of axially compressed cylinders with circular cutouts is analyzed numerically. An extension of the finite-difference method is used which removes the requirement that displacement components be defined in the directions of the grid lines. The results of this nonlinear analysis are found to be in good agreement with earlier experimental results.

  15. Stock market stability: Diffusion entropy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shouwei; Zhuang, Yangyang; He, Jianmin

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we propose a method to analyze the stock market stability based on diffusion entropy, and conduct an empirical analysis of Dow Jones Industrial Average. Empirical results show that this method can reflect the volatility and extreme cases of the stock market.

  16. Identification, regression and validation of an image processing degradation model to assess the effects of aeromechanical turbulence due to installation aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miccoli, M.; Usai, A.; Tafuto, A.; Albertoni, A.; Togna, F.

    2016-10-01

    The propagation environment around airborne platforms may significantly degrade the performance of Electro-Optical (EO) self-protection systems installed onboard. To ensure the sufficient level of protection, it is necessary to understand that are the best sensors/effectors installation positions to guarantee that the aeromechanical turbulence, generated by the engine exhausts and the rotor downwash, does not interfere with the imaging systems normal operations. Since the radiation-propagation-in-turbulence is a hardly predictable process, it was proposed a high-level approach in which, instead of studying the medium under turbulence, the turbulence effects on the imaging systems processing are assessed by means of an equivalent statistical model representation, allowing a definition of a Turbulence index to classify different level of turbulence intensities. Hence, a general measurement methodology for the degradation of the imaging systems performance in turbulence conditions was developed. The analysis of the performance degradation started by evaluating the effects of turbulences with a given index on the image processing chain (i.e., thresholding, blob analysis). The processing in turbulence (PIT) index is then derived by combining the effects of the given turbulence on the different image processing primitive functions. By evaluating the corresponding PIT index for a sufficient number of testing directions, it is possible to map the performance degradation around the aircraft installation for a generic imaging system, and to identify the best installation position for sensors/effectors composing the EO self-protection suite.

  17. Computational stability analysis of dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikishkov, Yuri Gennadievich

    2000-10-01

    Due to increased available computer power, the analysis of nonlinear flexible multi-body systems, fixed-wing aircraft and rotary-wing vehicles is relying on increasingly complex, large scale models. An important aspect of the dynamic response of flexible multi-body systems is the potential presence of instabilities. Stability analysis is typically performed on simplified models with the smallest number of degrees of freedom required to capture the physical phenomena that cause the instability. The system stability boundaries are then evaluated using the characteristic exponent method or Floquet theory for systems with constant or periodic coefficients, respectively. As the number of degrees of freedom used to represent the system increases, these methods become increasingly cumbersome, and quickly unmanageable. In this work, a novel approach is proposed, the Implicit Floquet Analysis, which evaluates the largest eigenvalues of the transition matrix using the Arnoldi algorithm, without the explicit computation of this matrix. This method is far more computationally efficient than the classical approach and is ideally suited for systems involving a large number of degrees of freedom. The proposed approach is conveniently implemented as a postprocessing step to any existing simulation tool. The application of the method to a geometrically nonlinear multi-body dynamics code is presented. This work also focuses on the implementation of trimming algorithms and the development of tools for the graphical representation of numerical simulations and stability information for multi-body systems.

  18. Stability Analysis of Flow Past a Wingtip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edstrand, Adam; Schmid, Peter; Taira, Kunihiko; Cattafesta, Louis

    2015-11-01

    Trailing vortices are commonly associated with diminished aircraft performance by increasing induced drag and producing a wake hazard on following aircraft. Previously, stability analyses have been performed on the Batchelor vortex (Heaton et al., 2009), which models a far field axisymmetric vortex, and airfoil wakes (Woodley & Peake, 1997). Both analyses have shown various instabilities present in these far field vortex-wake flows. This complicates the design of control devices by excluding consideration of near field interactions between the wake and vortex shed from the wing. In this study, we perform temporal and spatial bi-global stability analyses on the near field wake of the flow field behind a NACA0012 wing computed from direct numerical simulation at a chord Reynolds number of 1000. The results identify multiple instabilities including a vortex instability, wake instability, and mixed instability that includes interaction between the wake and vortex. As these modes exhibit wave packets, we perform a wave packet analysis (Obrist & Schmid, 2010), which enables the prediction of spatial mode structures at low computational cost. Furthermore, a bi-global parabolized stability analysis is performed, highlighting disparities between the parallel and parabolized analysis. ONR Grant N00014010824 and NSF PIRE Grant OISE-0968313.

  19. Stability analysis of White Oak Dam

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-11

    White Oak Dam is located in the White Oak Creek watershed which provides the primary surface drainage for Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A stability analysis was made on the dam by Syed Ahmed in January 1994 which included an evaluation of the liquefaction potential of the embankment and foundation. This report evaluates the stability of the dam and includes comments on the report prepared by Ahmed. Slope stability analyses were performed on the dam and included cases for sudden drawdown, steady seepage, partial pool and earthquake. Results of the stability analyses indicate that the dam is stable and failure of the structure would not occur for the cases considered. The report prepared by Ahmed leads to the same conclusions as stated above. Review of the report finds that it is complete, well documented and conservative in its selection of soil parameters. The evaluation of the liquefaction potential is also complete and this report is in agreement with the findings that the dam and foundation are not susceptible to liquefaction.

  20. Stability analysis of an autocatalytic protein model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Julian

    2016-05-01

    A self-regulatory genetic circuit, where a protein acts as a positive regulator of its own production, is known to be the simplest biological network with a positive feedback loop. Although at least three components—DNA, RNA, and the protein—are required to form such a circuit, stability analysis of the fixed points of this self-regulatory circuit has been performed only after reducing the system to a two-component system, either by assuming a fast equilibration of the DNA component or by removing the RNA component. Here, stability of the fixed points of the three-component positive feedback loop is analyzed by obtaining eigenvalues of the full three-dimensional Hessian matrix. In addition to rigorously identifying the stable fixed points and saddle points, detailed information about the system can be obtained, such as the existence of complex eigenvalues near a fixed point.

  1. Stability analysis of micropipette aspiration of neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Derganc, J; Bozic, B; Svetina, S; Zeks, B

    2000-01-01

    During micropipette aspiration, neutrophil leukocytes exhibit a liquid-drop behavior, i.e., if a neutrophil is aspirated by a pressure larger than a certain threshold pressure, it flows continuously into the pipette. The point of the largest aspiration pressure at which the neutrophil can still be held in a stable equilibrium is called the critical point of aspiration. Here, we present a theoretical analysis of the equilibrium behavior and stability of a neutrophil during micropipette aspiration with the aim to rigorously characterize the critical point. We take the energy minimization approach, in which the critical point is well defined as the point of the stability breakdown. We use the basic liquid-drop model of neutrophil rheology extended by considering also the neutrophil elastic area expansivity. Our analysis predicts that the behavior at large pipette radii or small elastic area expansivity is close to the one predicted by the basic liquid-drop model, where the critical point is attained slightly before the projection length reaches the pipette radius. The effect of elastic area expansivity is qualitatively different at smaller pipette radii, where our analysis predicts that the critical point is attained at the projection lengths that may significantly exceed the pipette radius. PMID:10866944

  2. Stability analysis for laminar flow control, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benney, D. J.; Orszag, S. A.

    1977-01-01

    The basic equations for the stability analysis of flow over three dimensional swept wings are developed and numerical methods for their solution are surveyed. The equations for nonlinear stability analysis of three dimensional disturbances in compressible, three dimensional, nonparallel flows are given. Efficient and accurate numerical methods for the solution of the equations of stability theory were surveyed and analyzed.

  3. Truck Roll Stability Data Collection and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, SS

    2001-07-02

    The principal objective of this project was to collect and analyze vehicle and highway data that are relevant to the problem of truck rollover crashes, and in particular to the subset of rollover crashes that are caused by the driver error of entering a curve at a speed too great to allow safe completion of the turn. The data are of two sorts--vehicle dynamic performance data, and highway geometry data as revealed by vehicle behavior in normal driving. Vehicle dynamic performance data are relevant because the roll stability of a tractor trailer depends both on inherent physical characteristics of the vehicle and on the weight and distribution of the particular cargo that is being carried. Highway geometric data are relevant because the set of crashes of primary interest to this study are caused by lateral acceleration demand in a curve that exceeds the instantaneous roll stability of the vehicle. An analysis of data quality requires an evaluation of the equipment used to collect the data because the reliability and accuracy of both the equipment and the data could profoundly affect the safety of the driver and other highway users. Therefore, a concomitant objective was an evaluation of the performance of the set of data-collection equipment on the truck and trailer. The objective concerning evaluation of the equipment was accomplished, but the results were not entirely positive. Significant engineering apparently remains to be done before a reliable system can be fielded. Problems were identified with the trailer to tractor fiber optic connector used for this test. In an over-the-road environment, the communication between the trailer instrumentation and the tractor must be dependable. In addition, the computer in the truck must be able to withstand the rigors of the road. The major objective--data collection and analysis--was also accomplished. Using data collected by instruments on the truck, a ''bad-curve'' database can be generated. Using this database

  4. Bounded Linear Stability Margin Analysis of Nonlinear Hybrid Adaptive Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Boskovic, Jovan D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a bounded linear stability analysis for a hybrid adaptive control that blends both direct and indirect adaptive control. Stability and convergence of nonlinear adaptive control are analyzed using an approximate linear equivalent system. A stability margin analysis shows that a large adaptive gain can lead to a reduced phase margin. This method can enable metrics-driven adaptive control whereby the adaptive gain is adjusted to meet stability margin requirements.

  5. Survey of Army/NASA rotorcraft aeroelastic stability research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormiston, Robert A.; Warmbrodt, William G.; Hodges, Dewey H.; Peters, David A.

    1988-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental developments in the aeroelastic and aeromechanical stability of helicopters and tilt-rotor aircraft are addressed. Included are the underlying nonlinear structural mechanics of slender rotating beams, necessary for accurate modeling of elastic cantilever rotor blades, and the development of dynamic inflow, an unsteady aerodynamic theory for low frequency aeroelastic stability applications. Analytical treatment of isolated rotor stability in hover and forward flight, coupled rotor-fuselage stability are considered. Results of parametric investigations of system behavior are presented, and correlations between theoretical results and experimental data from small- and large-scale wind tunnel and flight testing are discussed.

  6. Power System Transient Stability Analysis through a Homotopy Analysis Method

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shaobu; Du, Pengwei; Zhou, Ning

    2014-04-01

    As an important function of energy management systems (EMSs), online contingency analysis plays an important role in providing power system security warnings of instability. At present, N-1 contingency analysis still relies on time-consuming numerical integration. To save computational cost, the paper proposes a quasi-analytical method to evaluate transient stability through time domain periodic solutions’ frequency sensitivities against initial values. First, dynamic systems described in classical models are modified into damping free systems whose solutions are either periodic or expanded (non-convergent). Second, because the sensitivities experience sharp changes when periodic solutions vanish and turn into expanded solutions, transient stability is assessed using the sensitivity. Third, homotopy analysis is introduced to extract frequency information and evaluate the sensitivities only from initial values so that time consuming numerical integration is avoided. Finally, a simple case is presented to demonstrate application of the proposed method, and simulation results show that the proposed method is promising.

  7. Global stability analysis of electrified jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivero-Rodriguez, Javier; Pérez-Saborid, Miguel

    2014-11-01

    Electrospinning is a common process used to produce micro and nano polymeric fibers. In this technique, the whipping mode of a very thin electrified jet generated in an electrospray device is nhanced in order to increase its elongation. In this work, we use a theoretical Eulerian model that describes the kinematics and dynamics of the midline of the jet, its radius and convective velocity. The model equations result from balances of mass, linear and angular momentum applied to any differential slice of the jet together with constitutive laws for viscous forces and moments, as well as appropriate expressions for capillary and electrical forces. As a first step towards computing the complete nonlinear, transient dynamics of the electrified jet, we have performed a global stability analysis of the forementioned equations and compared the results with experimental data obtained by Guillaume et al. [2011] and Guerrero-Millán et al. [2014]. The support of the Ministry of Science and Innovation of Spain (Project DPI 2010-20450-C03-02) is acknowledged.

  8. Stability of fundamental couplings: A global analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, C. J. A. P.; Pinho, A. M. M.

    2017-01-01

    Astrophysical tests of the stability of fundamental couplings are becoming an increasingly important probe of new physics. Motivated by the recent availability of new and stronger constraints we update previous works testing the consistency of measurements of the fine-structure constant α and the proton-to-electron mass ratio μ =mp/me (mostly obtained in the optical/ultraviolet) with combined measurements of α , μ and the proton gyromagnetic ratio gp (mostly in the radio band). We carry out a global analysis of all available data, including the 293 archival measurements of Webb et al. and 66 more recent dedicated measurements, and constraining both time and spatial variations. While nominally the full data sets show a slight statistical preference for variations of α and μ (at up to two standard deviations), we also find several inconsistencies between different subsets, likely due to hidden systematics and implying that these statistical preferences need to be taken with caution. The statistical evidence for a spatial dipole in the values of α is found at the 2.3 sigma level. Forthcoming studies with facilities such as ALMA and ESPRESSO should clarify these issues.

  9. Milling Stability Analysis Based on Chebyshev Segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HUANG, Jianwei; LI, He; HAN, Ping; Wen, Bangchun

    2016-09-01

    Chebyshev segmentation method was used to discretize the time period contained in delay differential equation, then the Newton second-order difference quotient method was used to calculate the cutter motion vector at each time endpoint, and the Floquet theory was used to determine the stability of the milling system after getting the transfer matrix of milling system. Using the above methods, a two degree of freedom milling system stability issues were investigated, and system stability lobe diagrams were got. The results showed that the proposed methods have the following advantages. Firstly, with the same calculation accuracy, the points needed to represent the time period are less by the Chebyshev Segmentation than those of the average segmentation, and the computational efficiency of the Chebyshev Segmentation is higher. Secondly, if the time period is divided into the same parts, the stability lobe diagrams got by Chebyshev segmentation method are more accurate than those of the average segmentation.

  10. Stability analysis of large electric power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Elwood, D.M.

    1993-01-01

    Modern electric power systems are large and complicated, and, in many regions of the world, the generation and transmission systems are operating near their limits. Ensuring the reliable operation of the power system requires engineers to study the response of the system to various disturbances. The responses to large disturbances are examined by numerically solving the nonlinear differential-algebraic equations describing the power system. The response to small disturbances is typically studied via eigenanalysis. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) recently developed the Extended Transient/Mid-term Stability Program (ETMSP) to study large disturbance stability and the Small Signal Stability Program Package (SSSP) to study small signal stability. The primary objectives of the work described in this report were to (1) explore ways of speeding up ETMSP, especially on mid-term voltage stability problems, (2) explore ways of speeding up the Multi-Area Small-Signal Stability program (MASS), one of the codes in SSSP, and (3) explore ways of increasing the size of problem that can be solved by the Cray version of MASS.

  11. Stability Analysis for HIFiRE Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Chang, Chau-Lyan; White, Jeffery A.; Kimmel, Roger; Adamczak, David; Borg, Matthew; Stanfield, Scott; Smith, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    The HIFiRE-1 flight experiment provided a valuable database pertaining to boundary layer transition over a 7-degree half-angle, circular cone model from supersonic to hypersonic Mach numbers, and a range of Reynolds numbers and angles of attack. This paper reports selected findings from the ongoing computational analysis of the measured in-flight transition behavior. Transition during the ascent phase at nearly zero degree angle of attack is dominated by second mode instabilities except in the vicinity of the cone meridian where a roughness element was placed midway along the length of the cone. The growth of first mode instabilities is found to be weak at all trajectory points analyzed from the ascent phase. For times less than approximately 18.5 seconds into the flight, the peak amplification ratio for second mode disturbances is sufficiently small because of the lower Mach numbers at earlier times, so that the transition behavior inferred from the measurements is attributed to an unknown physical mechanism, potentially related to step discontinuities in surface height near the locations of a change in the surface material. Based on the time histories of temperature and/or heat flux at transducer locations within the aft portion of the cone, the onset of transition correlated with a linear N-factor, based on parabolized stability equations, of approximately 13.5. Due to the large angles of attack during the re-entry phase, crossflow instability may play a significant role in transition. Computations also indicate the presence of pronounced crossflow separation over a significant portion of the trajectory segment that is relevant to transition analysis. The transition behavior during this re-entry segment of HIFiRE-1 flight shares some common features with the predicted transition front along the elliptic cone shaped HIFiRE-5 flight article, which was designed to provide hypersonic transition data for a fully 3D geometric configuration. To compare and contrast the

  12. Stability analysis of automobile driver steering control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    In steering an automobile, the driver must basically control the direction of the car's trajectory (heading angle) and the lateral deviation of the car relative to a delineated pathway. A previously published linear control model of driver steering behavior which is analyzed from a stability point of view is considered. A simple approximate expression for a stability parameter, phase margin, is derived in terms of various driver and vehicle control parameters, and boundaries for stability are discussed. A field test study is reviewed that includes the measurement of driver steering control parameters. Phase margins derived for a range of vehicle characteristics are found to be generally consistent with known adaptive properties of the human operator. The implications of these results are discussed in terms of driver adaptive behavior.

  13. A comparison of theory and experiment for coupled rotor-body stability of a hingeless rotor model in hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bousman, William G.

    1988-01-01

    Three cases were selected for correlation from an experiment that examined the aeromechanical stability of a small-scale model of a hingeless rotor and fuselage in hover. The first case examined the stability of a configuration with 0 degree blade pitch so that coupling between dynamic modes was minimized. The second case was identical to the first except the blade pitch was set to 9 degrees which provides flap-lag coupling of the rotor modes. The third case had 9 degrees of blade pitch and also included negative pitch-lag coupling, and therefore was the most highly coupled configuration. Analytical calculations were made by Bell Helicopter Textron, Boeing Vertol, Hughes Helicopters, Sikorsky Aircraft, the U.S. Army Aeromechanics Laboratory, and NASA Ames Research Center and compared to some or all of the experimental cases. Overall, the correlation ranged from very poor-to-poor to good.

  14. Assessment of Stability of Craniofacial Implants by Resonant Frequency Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ivanjac, Filip; Konstantinović, Vitomir S; Lazić, Vojkan; Dordević, Igor; Ihde, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    Implant stability is a principal precondition for the success of implant therapy. Extraoral implants (EO) are mainly used for anchoring of maxillofacial epithesis. However, assessment of implant stability is mostly based on principles derived from oral implants. The aim of this study was to investigate clinical stability of EO craniofacial disk implants (single, double, and triple) by resonance frequency analysis at different stages of the bone's healing. Twenty patients with orbital (11), nasal (5), and auricular (4) defects with 50 EO implants placed for epithesis anchorage were included. Implant stability was measured 3 times; after implant placement, at 3 months and at least after 6 months. A significant increase in implant stability values was noted between all of the measurements, except for triple-disk implants between third and sixth months, and screw implants between 0 and third months. Disk implants showed lower implant stability quotient (ISQ) values compared with screw implants. Triple-disk implants showed better stability compared with single and double-disk implants. Based on resonance frequency analysis values, disk implants could be safely loaded when their ISQ values are 38 (single disks), 47 (double disks), and 48 (triple disks). According to resonance frequency analysis, disk implant stability increased over time, which showed good osseointegration and increasing mineralization. Although EO screw implants showed higher ISQ values than disk implants, disk-type implants can be safely loaded even if lower values of stability are measured.

  15. White Oak Dam stability analysis. Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, S.B.

    1994-01-01

    A parametric study was conducted to evaluate the stability of the White Oak Dam (WOD) embankment and foundation. Slope stability analyses were performed for the upper and lower bound soil properties at three sections of the dam using the PCSTABL4 computer program. Minimum safety factors were calculated for the applicable seismic and static loading conditions. Liquefaction potential of the dam embankment and foundation solid during the seismic event was assessed by using simplified procedures. The WOD is classified as a low hazard facility and the Evaluation Basis Earthquake (EBE) is defined as an earthquake with a magnitude of m{sub b} = 5.6 and a Peak Ground Accelerator (PGA) of 0.13 g. This event is approximately equivalent to a Modified Mercalli Intensity of VI-VIII. The EBE is used to perform the seismic evaluation for slope stability and liquefaction potential. Results of the stability analyses and the liquefaction assessment lead to the conclusion that the White Oak Dam is safe and stable for the static and the seismic events defined in this study. Ogden Environmental, at the request of MMES, has checked and verified the calculations for the critical loading conditions and performed a peer review of this report. Ogden has determined that the WOD is stable under the defined static and seismic loading conditions and the embankment materials are in general not susceptible to liquefaction.

  16. Analysis of the stabilized supralinear network‡

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadian, Yashar; Rubin, Daniel B.; Miller, Kenneth D.

    2014-01-01

    We study a rate-model neural network composed of excitatory and inhibitory neurons in which neuronal input-output functions are power laws with a power greater than 1, as observed in primary visual cortex. This supralinear input-output function leads to supralinear summation of network responses to multiple inputs for weak inputs. We show that for stronger inputs, which would drive the excitatory subnetwork to instability, the network will dynamically stabilize provided feedback inhibition is sufficiently strong. For a wide range of network and stimulus parameters, this dynamic stabilization yields a transition from supralinear to sublinear summation of network responses to multiple inputs. We compare this to the dynamic stabilization in the “balanced network”, which yields only linear behavior. We more exhaustively analyze the 2-dimensional case of 1 excitatory and 1 inhibitory population. We show that in this case dynamic stabilization will occur whenever the determinant of the weight matrix is positive and the inhibitory time constant is sufficiently small, and analyze the conditions for “supersaturation”, or decrease of firing rates with increasing stimulus contrast (which represents increasing input firing rates). In work to be presented elsewhere, we have found that this transition from supralinear to sublinear summation can explain a wide variety of nonlinearities in cerebral cortical processing. PMID:23663149

  17. Stability analysis in tachyonic potential chameleon cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Farajollahi, H.; Salehi, A.; Tayebi, F.; Ravanpak, A. E-mail: a.salehi@guilan.ac.ir E-mail: aravanpak@guilan.ac.ir

    2011-05-01

    We study general properties of attractors for tachyonic potential chameleon scalar-field model which possess cosmological scaling solutions. An analytic formulation is given to obtain fixed points with a discussion on their stability. The model predicts a dynamical equation of state parameter with phantom crossing behavior for an accelerating universe. We constrain the parameters of the model by best fitting with the recent data-sets from supernovae and simulated data points for redshift drift experiment generated by Monte Carlo simulations.

  18. The Data from Aeromechanics Test and Analytics - Management and Analysis Package (DATAMAP). Volume II. Systems Manual.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    transfers the current date into the system output label, DEFCOM (in common block /DEFLT/), and exits. If the partition name is not found, the user is...particular data record is indicated by ITMDA. /DEFLT/ Default user input matrix and general system label DEFCOM - General system label. The current date

  19. Sensitivity analysis of hydrodynamic stability operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, Peter J.; Henningson, Dan S.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Malik, Mujeeb R.

    1992-01-01

    The eigenvalue sensitivity for hydrodynamic stability operators is investigated. Classical matrix perturbation techniques as well as the concept of epsilon-pseudoeigenvalues are applied to show that parts of the spectrum are highly sensitive to small perturbations. Applications are drawn from incompressible plane Couette, trailing line vortex flow and compressible Blasius boundary layer flow. Parametric studies indicate a monotonically increasing effect of the Reynolds number on the sensitivity. The phenomenon of eigenvalue sensitivity is due to the non-normality of the operators and their discrete matrix analogs and may be associated with large transient growth of the corresponding initial value problem.

  20. An Experimental Study on the Effects of Base Motion on the Aeromechanic Performance of Floating Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosravi, Morteza; Sarkar, Partha; Hu, Hui

    2016-09-01

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the effects of the wave-induced base motions experienced by floating wind turbines sited in offshore wind farms on their aeromechanic performance and wake characteristics, in comparison with those of a bottom- fixed wind turbine. The experimental study was performed in a large-scale atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) wind tunnel with a scaled wind turbine model placed in a turbulent boundary layer flow with similar mean and turbulence characteristics as those over a typical offshore wind farm. During the experiments, a scaled wind turbine model was mounted on a translational and rotational stage, which can generate translation and/or rotation motions to simulate the dynamic wave-induced motions (i.e., surge, pitch and heave motions) experienced by floating wind turbines in offshore wind farms. In addition to measuring dynamic wind loadings (both forces and moments)acting on the model turbine, a high-resolution Particle Image Velocity (PIV) system was also used to conduct detailed flow field measurements to characterize the turbine wakes with the turbine base in motion. The detailed flow field measurements were correlated with the dynamic wind load data to elucidate underlying physics for higher total power yield and better durability of floating offshore wind turbines.

  1. Dynamic wind-tunnel tests of an aeromechanical gust-alleviation system using several different combinations of control surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, E. C.; Doggett, R. V., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Some experimental results are presented from wind tunnel studies of a dynamic model equipped with an aeromechanical gust alleviation system for reducing the normal acceleration response of light airplanes. The gust alleviation system consists of two auxiliary aerodynamic surfaces that deflect the wing flaps through mechanical linkages when a gust is encountered to maintain nearly constant airplane lift. The gust alleviation system was implemented on a 1/6-scale, rod mounted, free flying model that is geometrically and dynamically representative of small, four place, high wing, single engine, light airplanes. The effects of flaps with different spans, two size of auxiliary aerodynamic surfaces, plain and double hinged flaps, and a flap elevator interconnection were studied. The model test results are presented in terms of predicted root mean square response of the full scale airplane to atmospheric turbulence. The results show that the gust alleviation system reduces the root mean square normal acceleration response by 30 percent in comparison with the response in the flaps locked condition. Small reductions in pitch-rate response were also obtained. It is believed that substantially larger reductions in normal acceleration can be achieved by reducing the rather high levels of mechanical friction which were extant in the alleviation system of the present model.

  2. Solar Dynamic Power System Stability Analysis and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Momoh, James A.; Wang, Yanchun

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this research is to conduct dynamic analysis, control design, and control performance test of solar power system. Solar power system consists of generation system and distribution network system. A bench mark system is used in this research, which includes a generator with excitation system and governor, an ac/dc converter, six DDCU's and forty-eight loads. A detailed model is used for modeling generator. Excitation system is represented by a third order model. DDCU is represented by a seventh order system. The load is modeled by the combination of constant power and constant impedance. Eigen-analysis and eigen-sensitivity analysis are used for system dynamic analysis. The effects of excitation system, governor, ac/dc converter control, and the type of load on system stability are discussed. In order to improve system transient stability, nonlinear ac/dc converter control is introduced. The direct linearization method is used for control design. The dynamic analysis results show that these controls affect system stability in different ways. The parameter coordination of controllers are recommended based on the dynamic analysis. It is concluded from the present studies that system stability is improved by the coordination of control parameters and the nonlinear ac/dc converter control stabilize system oscillation caused by the load change and system fault efficiently.

  3. Stability analysis of ultrasound thick-shell contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaozhen; Chahine, Georges L.; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung

    2012-01-01

    The stability of thick shell encapsulated bubbles is studied analytically. 3-D small perturbations are introduced to the spherical oscillations of a contrast agent bubble in response to a sinusoidal acoustic field with different amplitudes of excitation. The equations of the perturbation amplitudes are derived using asymptotic expansions and linear stability analysis is then applied to the resulting differential equations. The stability of the encapsulated microbubbles to nonspherical small perturbations is examined by solving an eigenvalue problem. The approach then identifies the fastest growing perturbations which could lead to the breakup of the encapsulated microbubble or contrast agent. PMID:22280568

  4. Analysis of emulsion stability in acrylic dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Suresh

    2012-02-01

    Emulsions either micro or nano permit transport or solubilization of hydrophobic substances within a water-based phase. Different methods have been introduced at laboratory and industrial scales: mechanical stirring, high-pressure homogenization, or ultrasonics. In digital imaging, toners may be formed by aggregating a colorant with a latex polymer formed by batch or semi-continuous emulsion polymerization. Latex emulsions are prepared by making a monomer emulsion with monomer like Beta-carboxy ethyl acrylate (β-CEA) and stirring at high speed with an anionic surfactant like branched sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonates , aqueous solution until an emulsion is formed. Initiator for emulsion polymerization is 2-2'- azobis isobutyramide dehydrate with chain transfer agent are used to make the latex. If the latex emulsion is unstable, the resulting latexes produce a toner with larger particle size, broader particle size distribution with relatively higher latex sedimentation, and broader molecular weight distribution. Oswald ripening and coalescence cause droplet size to increase and can result in destabilization of emulsions. Shear thinning and elasticity of emulsions are applied to determine emulsion stability.

  5. Kinematic analysis of rope skipper's stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ab Ghani, Nor Atikah; Rambely, Azmin Sham

    2014-06-01

    There are various kinds of jumping that can be done while performing rope skipping activity. This activity was always associated with injury. But, if the rope skipper can perform the activity in a right way, it is believed that the injury might be reduced. The main purpose of this paper is to observe the stability of rope skipper from a biomechanics perspective, which are the centre of mass, angle at the ankle, knee and hip joints and also the trajectory for the ipsilateral leg between the two types of skip which is one leg and two legs. Six healthy, physically active subject, two males and four females (age: 8.00±1.25 years, weight: 17.90±6.85 kg and height: 1.22±0.08 m) participated in this study. Kinematic data of repeated five cycles of rope skipping activity was captured by using Vicon Nexus system. Based on the data collected, skipping with two legs shows more stable behavior during preparation, flight and landing phases. It is concluded that landing on the balls of the feet, lowering the trajectory positions of the feet from the ground as well as flexion of each joint which would reduce the injury while landing.

  6. Nonlinear stability analysis of Darcy's flow with viscous heating.

    PubMed

    Celli, Michele; Alves, Leonardo S de B; Barletta, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    The nonlinear stability of a rectangular porous channel saturated by a fluid is here investigated. The aspect ratio of the channel is assumed to be variable. The channel walls are considered impermeable and adiabatic except for the horizontal top which is assumed to be isothermal. The viscous dissipation is acting inside the channel as internal heat generator. A basic throughflow is imposed, and the nonlinear convective stability is investigated by means of the generalized integral transform technique. The neutral stability curve is compared with the one obtained by the linear stability analysis already present in the literature. The growth rate analysis of different unstable modes is performed. The Nusselt number is investigated for several supercritical configurations in order to better understand how the system behaves when conditions far away from neutral stability are considered. The patterns of the neutrally stable convective cells are also reported. Nonlinear simulations support the results obtained by means of the linear stability analysis, confirming that viscous dissipation alone is indeed capable of inducing mixed convection. Low Gebhart or high Péclet numbers lead to a transient overheating of the originally motionless fluid before it settles in its convective steady state.

  7. Stability Analysis and Stabilization of Nonlinear Systems via Locally Defined Density Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masubuchi, Izumi

    This paper considers local stability analysis of nonlinear systems with deriving a positively invariant set based on the Rantzer's stability theory by using density functions. We define a notion of locally defined density functions around an equilibrium that give monotonously increasing positive measures near the equilibrium of a nonlinear system. Under certain assumptions, it is shown that some level set of a locally defined density function is a positively invariant set where almost all of the system trajectories converge to the equilibrium. We also mention an SOS (sum-of-squares) formulation for synthesis of a nonlinear gain via locally defined density functions.

  8. Stability Analysis for a Multi-Camera Photogrammetric System

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Ayman; Detchev, Ivan; Kwak, Eunju

    2014-01-01

    Consumer-grade digital cameras suffer from geometrical instability that may cause problems when used in photogrammetric applications. This paper provides a comprehensive review of this issue of interior orientation parameter variation over time, it explains the common ways used for coping with the issue, and describes the existing methods for performing stability analysis for a single camera. The paper then points out the lack of coverage of stability analysis for multi-camera systems, suggests a modification of the collinearity model to be used for the calibration of an entire photogrammetric system, and proposes three methods for system stability analysis. The proposed methods explore the impact of the changes in interior orientation and relative orientation/mounting parameters on the reconstruction process. Rather than relying on ground truth in real datasets to check the system calibration stability, the proposed methods are simulation-based. Experiment results are shown, where a multi-camera photogrammetric system was calibrated three times, and stability analysis was performed on the system calibration parameters from the three sessions. The proposed simulation-based methods provided results that were compatible with a real-data based approach for evaluating the impact of changes in the system calibration parameters on the three-dimensional reconstruction. PMID:25196012

  9. Pyrosequencing Based Microbial Community Analysis of Stabilized Mine Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. E.; Lee, B. T.; Son, A.

    2015-12-01

    Heavy metals leached from exhausted mines have been causing severe environmental problems in nearby soils and groundwater. Environmental mitigation was performed based on the heavy metal stabilization using Calcite and steel slag in Korea. Since the soil stabilization only temporarily immobilizes the contaminants to soil matrix, the potential risk of re-leaching heavy metal still exists. Therefore the follow-up management of stabilized soils and the corresponding evaluation methods are required to avoid the consequent contamination from the stabilized soils. In this study, microbial community analysis using pyrosequencing was performed for assessing the potential leaching of the stabilized soils. As a result of rarefaction curve and Chao1 and Shannon indices, the stabilized soil has shown lower richness and diversity as compared to non-contaminated negative control. At the phyla level, as the degree of contamination increases, most of phyla decreased with only exception of increased proteobacteria. Among proteobacteria, gamma-proteobacteria increased against the heavy metal contamination. At the species level, Methylobacter tundripaludum of gamma-proteobacteria showed the highest relative portion of microbial community, indicating that methanotrophs may play an important role in either solubilization or immobilization of heavy metals in stabilized soils.

  10. Stability analysis of an encapsulated microbubble against gas diffusion.

    PubMed

    Katiyar, Amit; Sarkar, Kausik

    2010-03-01

    Linear stability analysis is performed for a mathematical model of diffusion of gases from an encapsulated microbubble. It is an Epstein-Plesset model modified to account for encapsulation elasticity and finite gas permeability. Although bubbles, containing gases other than air, are considered, the final stable bubble, if any, contains only air, and stability is achieved only when the surrounding medium is saturated or oversaturated with air. In absence of encapsulation elasticity, only a neutral stability is achieved for zero surface tension, the other solution being unstable. For an elastic encapsulation, different equilibrium solutions are obtained depending on the saturation level and whether the surface tension is smaller or higher than the elasticity. For an elastic encapsulation, elasticity can stabilize the bubble. However, imposing a non-negativity condition on the effective surface tension (consisting of reference surface tension and the elastic stress) leads to an equilibrium radius which is only neutrally stable. If the encapsulation can support a net compressive stress, it achieves actual stability. The linear stability results are consistent with our recent numerical findings. Physical mechanisms for the stability or instability of various equilibriums are provided.

  11. Clarifications of the BCU method for transient stability analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Llamas, A.; De La Ree Lopez, J.; Mili, L.; Phadke, A.G.; Thorp, J.S.

    1995-02-01

    Energy function methods have been studied for many years, and have been applied to practical power system stability analysis problems of multi-machine power systems. Recent developments in real-time power system monitoring suggest that dynamic events can be monitored at the power system control centers, and naturally the energy function methods were tried as real-time stability prediction tools. However, a number of instances were uncovered, where the energy function methods which use the Potential Energy Boundary Surface as an approximation of the stability boundary produced unreliable results. In particular, during several transient stability studies, the Boundary Controlling Unstable (BCU) Equilibrium Point method seemed to predict stable swings, whereas in reality the swings turned out to be unstable. This paper presents these counter-examples, and suggests an explanation as to why these methods produce a wrong result. It is hoped that this paper will lead to further researches and improvements in the theory of energy function based methods of stability analysis. In the mean time, alternative methods for the real-time stability prediction problems are under investigation.

  12. Advances in Computational Stability Analysis of Composite Aerospace Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Degenhardt, R.; Araujo, F. C. de

    2010-09-30

    European aircraft industry demands for reduced development and operating costs. Structural weight reduction by exploitation of structural reserves in composite aerospace structures contributes to this aim, however, it requires accurate and experimentally validated stability analysis of real structures under realistic loading conditions. This paper presents different advances from the area of computational stability analysis of composite aerospace structures which contribute to that field. For stringer stiffened panels main results of the finished EU project COCOMAT are given. It investigated the exploitation of reserves in primary fibre composite fuselage structures through an accurate and reliable simulation of postbuckling and collapse. For unstiffened cylindrical composite shells a proposal for a new design method is presented.

  13. Analysis of Human Body Bipedal Stability for Neuromotor Disabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baritz, Mihaela; Cristea, Luciana; Rogozea, Liliana; Cotoros, Diana; Repanovici, Angela

    2009-04-01

    The analysis of different biomechanical aspects of balance and equilibrium is presented in the first part of the paper. We analyzed the posture, balance and stability of human body for a normal person and for a person with loco-motor or neuro-motor disabilities (in the second part). In the third part of the paper we presented the methodology and the experimental setup used to record the human body behavior in postural stability for persons with neuro-motors disabilities. The results and the conclusions are presented in the final part of the paper and also in the future work meant to establish the computer analysis for rehabilitation neuromotor disabilities.

  14. Stability analysis of the pulmonary liquid bilayer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpern, David; Grotberg, James

    2010-11-01

    The lung consists of liquid-lined compliant airways that convey air to and from the alveoli where gas exchange takes place. Because the airways are coated with a bilayer consisting of a mucus layer on top of a periciliary fluid layer, a surface tension instability can generate flows within the bilayer and induce the formation of liquid plugs that block the passage of air. This is a problem for example with premature neonates whose lungs do not produce sufficient quantities of surfactant and suffer from respiratory distress syndrome. To study this instability a system of coupled nonlinear evolution equations are derived using lubrication theory for the thicknesses of the two liquid layers which are assumed to be Newtonian. A normal mode analysis is used to investigate the initial growth of the disturbances, and reveals how the grow rate is affected by the ratio of viscosities λ, film thicknesses η and surface tensions δ of the two layers which can change by disease. Numerical solutions of the evolution equations show that there is a critical bilayer thickness ɛc above which closure occurs, and that a more viscous and thicker layer compared to the periciliary layer closes more slowly. However, ɛcis weakly dependent on λ, η and δ. We also examine the potential impact of wall shear stress and normal stress on cell damage. This work is funded by NIH HL85156.

  15. Stability Analysis of a Uniformly Heated Channel with Supercritical Water

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega Gomez, T.; Class, A.; Schulenberg, T.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.

    2006-07-01

    The thermal-hydraulic stability of a uniformly heated channel at supercritical water pressure has been investigated to help understand the system instability phenomena which may occur in Supercritical Water Nuclear Reactors (SCWR). We have extended the modeling approach often used for Boiling Water Nuclear Reactor (BWR) stability analysis to supercritical pressure operation conditions. We have shown that Ledinegg excursive instabilities and pressure-drop oscillations (PDO) will not occur in supercritical water systems. The linear stability characteristics of a typical uniformly heated channel were computed by evaluating the eigenvalues of the model. An analysis of non-linear instability phenomena was also performed in the time domain and the dynamic bifurcations were evaluated. (authors)

  16. Non-parallel linear stability analysis of unconfined vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrada, Miguel A.; Pérez-Saborid, Miguel; Barrero, Antonio

    2002-11-01

    A non-parallel, linear, stability analysis of a family of unconfined swirling jets is carried out by using parabolized stability equations (PSE). The basic solution of this vortex-jet core, which is obtained using the quasi-cylindrical approximation of the Navier-Stokes equations (Pérez-saborid et al. JFM 2002), shows the conditions under which the vortex evolution proceeds smoothly, reaching eventually an asymptotic self-similar behaviour as described in the literature (Fernández-Feria et al. JFM 1995), or breaks in a non-slender solution (vortex breakdown). Results of the stability analysis show that, for non-symmetric perturbations, all basic solutions are convectively unstable. On the other hand, we have found that vortices which break downstream become also convectively unstable for axi-symmetric perturbation just before the breakdown. The absence of absolute instabilities suggests the catastrophic nature of the vortex breakdown process.

  17. Qualitative and quantitative stability analysis of penta-rhythmic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwabedal, Justus T. C.; Knapper, Drake E.; Shilnikov, Andrey L.

    2016-12-01

    Inhibitory circuits of relaxation oscillators are often-used models for dynamics of biological networks. We present a qualitative and quantitative stability analysis of such a circuit constituted by three generic oscillators (of a Fitzhugh-Nagumo type) as its nodes coupled reciprocally. Depending on inhibitory strengths, and parameters of individual oscillators, the circuit exhibits polyrhythmicity of up to five simultaneously stable rhythms. With methods of bifurcation analysis and phase reduction, we investigate qualitative changes in stability of these circuit rhythms for a wide range of parameters. Furthermore, we quantify robustness of the rhythms maintained under random perturbations by monitoring phase diffusion in the circuit. Our findings allow us to describe how circuit dynamics relate to dynamics of individual nodes. We also find that quantitative and qualitative stability properties of polyrhythmicity do not always align.

  18. Stability investigations of airfoil flow by global analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morzynski, Marek; Thiele, Frank

    1992-01-01

    As the result of global, non-parallel flow stability analysis the single value of the disturbance growth-rate and respective frequency is obtained. This complex value characterizes the stability of the whole flow configuration and is not referred to any particular flow pattern. The global analysis assures that all the flow elements (wake, boundary and shear layer) are taken into account. The physical phenomena connected with the wake instability are properly reproduced by the global analysis. This enhances the investigations of instability of any 2-D flows, including ones in which the boundary layer instability effects are known to be of dominating importance. Assuming fully 2-D disturbance form, the global linear stability problem is formulated. The system of partial differential equations is solved for the eigenvalues and eigenvectors. The equations, written in the pure stream function formulation, are discretized via FDM using a curvilinear coordinate system. The complex eigenvalues and corresponding eigenvectors are evaluated by an iterative method. The investigations performed for various Reynolds numbers emphasize that the wake instability develops into the Karman vortex street. This phenomenon is shown to be connected with the first mode obtained from the non-parallel flow stability analysis. The higher modes are reflecting different physical phenomena as for example Tollmien-Schlichting waves, originating in the boundary layer and having the tendency to emerge as instabilities for the growing Reynolds number. The investigations are carried out for a circular cylinder, oblong ellipsis and airfoil. It is shown that the onset of the wake instability, the waves in the boundary layer, the shear layer instability are different solutions of the same eigenvalue problem, formulated using the non-parallel theory. The analysis offers large potential possibilities as the generalization of methods used till now for the stability analysis.

  19. High beta and second stability region transport and stability analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, M.H.; Phillips, M.W.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes MHD equilibrium and stability studies carried out at Northrop Grumman`s Advanced Technology and Development Center during the period March 1 to December 31, 1995. Significant progress is reported in both ideal and resistive MHD modeling of TFTR plasmas. Specifically, attention is concentrated on analysis of Advanced Tokamak experiments at TFTR involving plasmas in which the q-profiles were non-monotonic.

  20. Bank stability analysis for fluvial erosion and mass failure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The central objective of this study was to highlight the differences in magnitude between mechanical and fluvial streambank erosional strength with the purpose of developing a more comprehensive bank stability analysis. Mechanical erosion and ultimately failure signifies the general movement or coll...

  1. Stability analysis of dissolution-driven convection in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emami-Meybodi, Hamid

    2017-01-01

    We study the stability of dissolution-driven convection in the presence of a capillary transition zone and hydrodynamic dispersion in a saturated anisotropic porous medium, where the solute concentration is assumed to decay via a first-order chemical reaction. While the reaction enhances stability by consuming the solute, porous media anisotropy, hydrodynamic dispersion, and capillary transition zone destabilize the diffusive boundary layer that is unstably formed in a gravitational field. We perform linear stability analysis, based on the quasi-steady-state approximation, to assess critical times, critical wavenumbers, and neutral stability curves as a function of anisotropy ratio, dispersivity ratio, dispersion strength, material parameter, Bond number, Damköhler number, and Rayleigh number. The results show that the diffusive boundary layer becomes unstable in anisotropic porous media where both the capillary transition zone and dispersion are considered, even if the geochemical reaction is significantly large. Using direct numerical simulations, based on the finite difference method, we study the nonlinear dynamics of the system by examining dissolution flux, interaction of convective fingers, and flow topology. The results of nonlinear simulations confirm the predictions from the linear stability analysis and reveal that the fingering pattern is significantly influenced by combined effects of reaction, anisotropy, dispersion, and capillarity. Finally, we draw conclusions on implications of our results on carbon dioxide sequestration in deep saline aquifers.

  2. Elementary Applications of a Rotorcraft Dynamic Stability Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.

    1976-01-01

    A number of applications of a rotorcraft aeroelastic analysis are presented to verify that the analysis encompasses the classical solutions of rotor dynamics, and to examine the influence of certain features of the model. Results are given for the following topics: flapping frequency response to pitch control; forward flight flapping stability; pitch/flap flutter and divergence; ground resonance instability; and the flight dynamics of several representative helicopters.

  3. Aeroelastic stability analysis of a Darrieus wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Popelka, D.

    1982-02-01

    An aeroelastic stability analysis has been developed for predicting flutter instabilities on vertical axis wind turbines. The analytical model and mathematical formulation of the problem are described as well as the physical mechanism that creates flutter in Darrieus turbines. Theoretical results are compared with measured experimental data from flutter tests of the Sandia 2 Meter turbine. Based on this comparison, the analysis appears to be an adequate design evaluation tool.

  4. Fluid Dynamic and Stability Analysis of a Thin Liquid Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMaster, Matthew S.

    1992-01-01

    Interest in thin sheet flows has recently been renewed due to their potential application in space radiators. Theoretical and experimental studies of the fluid dynamics and stability of thin liquid sheet flows have been carried out in this thesis. A computer program was developed to determine the cross-sectional shape of the edge cylinder given the cross-sectional area of the edge cylinder. A stability analysis was performed on a non-planer liquid sheet. A study was conducted to determine the effects of air resistance on the sheet.

  5. Stability Analysis of the Slowed-Rotor Compound Helicopter Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Floros, Matthew W.; Johnson, Wayne

    2007-01-01

    The stability and control of rotors at high advance ratio are considered. Teetering, articulated, gimbaled, and rigid hub types are considered for a compound helicopter (rotor and fixed wing). Stability predictions obtained using an analytical rigid flapping blade analysis, a rigid blade CAMRAD II model, and an elastic blade CAMRAD II model are compared. For the flapping blade analysis, the teetering rotor is the most stable, showing no instabilities up to an advance ratio of 3 and a Lock number of 18. A notional elastic blade model of a teetering rotor is unstable at an advance ratio of 1.5, independent of pitch frequency. Analysis of the trim controls and blade flapping shows that for small positive collective pitch, trim can be maintained without excessive control input or flapping angles.

  6. Stability Analysis of the Slowed-Rotor Compound Helicopter Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wayne; Floros, Matthew W.

    2004-01-01

    The stability and control of rotors at high advance ratio are considered. Teetering, articulated, gimbaled, and rigid hub types are considered for a compound helicopter (rotor and fixed wing). Stability predictions obtained using an analytical rigid flapping blade analysis, a rigid blade CAMRAD II model, and an elastic blade CAMRAD II model are compared. For the flapping blade analysis, the teetering rotor is the most stable, 5howing no instabilities up to an advance ratio of 3 and a Lock number of 18. With an elastic blade model, the teetering rotor is unstable at an advance ratio of 1.5. Analysis of the trim controls and blade flapping shows that for small positive collective pitch, trim can be maintained without excessive control input or flapping angles.

  7. Slope Stability Analysis of Mountain Pine Beetle Impacted Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogenschuetz, N. M.; Bearup, L. A.; Maxwell, R. M.; Santi, P. M.

    2015-12-01

    The mountain pine beetle (MPB), Dendroctonus ponderosae, has caused significant tree mortality within North America. Specifically, the MPB affects ponderosa pine and lodgepole pine forests within the Rocky Mountains with approximately 3.4 million acres of forest impacted over the past 20 years. The full impacts of such unprecedented tree mortality on hydrology and slope stability is not well understood. This work studies the affects of MPB infestation on slope instability. A large-scale statistical analysis of MPB and slope stability is combined with a more in-depth analysis of the factors that contribute to slope stability. These factors include: slope aspect, slope angle, root decay, regrowth and hydrologic properties, such as water table depth and soil moisture. Preliminary results show that MPB may affect a greater number of north- and east-facing slopes. This is in accordance with more water availability and a higher MPB impacted tree density on north-facing slopes which, in turn, could potentially increase the probability of slope failure. Root strength is predicted to decrease as the roots stop transpiring 3-4 years proceeding infestation. However, this effect on the hillslope is likely being counterbalanced by the regrowth of grasses, forbs, shrubs, and trees. In addition, the increase in water table height from the lack of transpiring trees is adding a driving force to the slopes. The combination of all these factors will be used in order to assess the effects of MPB tree mortality on slope stability.

  8. Preliminary hazards analysis of thermal scrap stabilization system. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, W.S.

    1994-08-23

    This preliminary analysis examined the HA-21I glovebox and its supporting systems for potential process hazards. Upon further analysis, the thermal stabilization system has been installed in gloveboxes HC-21A and HC-21C. The use of HC-21C and HC-21A simplified the initial safety analysis. In addition, these gloveboxes were cleaner and required less modification for operation than glovebox HA-21I. While this document refers to glovebox HA-21I for the hazards analysis performed, glovebox HC-21C is sufficiently similar that the following analysis is also valid for HC-21C. This hazards analysis document is being re-released as revision 1 to include the updated flowsheet document (Appendix C) and the updated design basis (Appendix D). The revised Process Flow Schematic has also been included (Appendix E). This Current revision incorporates the recommendations provided from the original hazards analysis as well. The System Design Description (SDD) has also been appended (Appendix H) to document the bases for Safety Classification of thermal stabilization equipment.

  9. Stability analysis of fixed points via chaos control.

    PubMed

    Locher, M.; Johnson, G. A.; Hunt, E. R.

    1997-12-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in the application of chaos control techniques to the stability analysis of two-dimensional dynamical systems. We demonstrate how the system's response to one or multiple feedback controllers can be utilized to calculate the characteristic multipliers associated with an unstable periodic orbit. The experimental results, obtained for a single and two coupled diode resonators, agree well with the presented theory. (c) 1997 American Institute of Physics.

  10. Math model for analysis of domain patterns stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Áč, Vladimír; Miller, M.

    2006-02-01

    The paper deals with modelling of hysteresis properties of ferromagnetic materials. The simple mathematic model for analysis of domain patterns stability is presented. The domain system is described by using electrical equivalence of magnetic circuits. The results of model properties indicate the opportunity for studying the exchange coupling forces and the coercivity field distribution of elementary hysteresis structure fragments on the ferromagnetic behavior. The opportunity for studying the dynamic processes is shown.

  11. Theoretical Innovations in Combustion Stability Research: Integrated Analysis and Computation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-14

    presentation [2] has been made at a national conference of this subject. b.2-Thermomechanics of reactive gases Transient, spatially...Integrated Analysis and Computation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9550-10-C-0088 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) David Kassoy...KISS and JPL personnel. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Combustion, Thermomechanics, Turbulent Reacting Flow, Supercritical Gases , Rocket Engine Stability 16

  12. Stability Analysis of a Spinning and Precessing Viscoelastic Rotor Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, S.; Nandi, A.; Neogy, S.

    2013-10-01

    The present work deals with stability analysis of a spinning and precessing gyroscopic systems, where the spin axis and precession axis intersect at right angle. The nutation speed is zero, the spin and precession speeds are considered to be uniform and the precession axis is located at one end of the shaft. The properties of the shaft material correspond to a four element type linear viscoelastic model. The shaft disk system is assumed to be axially and torsionally stiff. For analysis, a simple rotor has been considered with the rigid disk placed on a massless viscoelastic shaft at specified locations from one end of the shaft. The governing parametric equations for such a rotor are derived in the simultaneously spinning and precessing frame. A stability analysis is performed considering both two- and four-degree of freedom models. The stability borderlines are computed considering spin and precession speeds as parameters. It is shown that though viscoelastic material may appear attractive for its large material damping, for gyroscopic systems it may lead to unstable vibrations.

  13. Pressure potential and stability analysis in an acoustical noncontact transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Liu, C. J.; Zhang, W. J.

    2017-01-01

    Near field acoustic traveling wave is one of the most popular principles in noncontact manipulations and transportations. The stability behavior is a key factor in the industrial applications of acoustical noncontact transportation. We present here an in-depth analysis of the transportation stability of a planar object levitated in near field acoustic traveling waves. To more accurately describe the pressure distributions on the radiation surface, a 3D nonlinear traveling wave model is presented. A closed form solution is derived based on the pressure potential to quantitatively calculate the restoring forces and moments under small disturbances. The physical explanations of the effects of fluid inertia and the effects of non-uniform pressure distributions are provided in detail. It is found that a vibration rail with tapered cross section provides more stable transportation than a rail with rectangular cross section. The present study sheds light on the issue of quantitative evaluation of stability in acoustic traveling waves and proposes three main factors that influence the stability: (a) vibration shape, (b) pressure distribution and (c) restoring force/moment. It helps to provide a better understanding of the physics behind the near field acoustic transportation and provide useful design and optimization tools for industrial applications.

  14. Real-time Stability Analysis for Disruption Avoidance in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasser, Alexander; Kolemen, Egemen; Glasser, Alan

    2015-11-01

    ITER is intended to operate at plasma parameters approaching the frontier of achievable stability limits. And yet, plasma disruptions at ITER must be kept to a bare minimum to avoid damage to its plasma-facing structures. These competing goals necessitate real-time plasma stability analysis and feedback control at ITER. This work aims to develop a mechanism for real-time analysis of a large and virulent class of disruptions driven by the rapid growth of ideal MHD unstable modes in tokamak equilibria. Such modes will be identified by a parallelized, low-latency implementation of A.H. Glasser's well-tested DCON (Direct Criterion of Newcomb) code, which measures the energetics of modes in the bulk plasma fluid, as well as M.S. Chance's VACUUM code, which measures the same in the vacuum between the plasma and tokamak chamber wall. Parallelization of these codes is intended to achieve a time-savings of 40x, thereby reducing latency to a timescale of order 100ms and making the codes viable for ideal MHD stability control at ITER. The hardware used to achieve this parallelization will be an Intel Xeon Phi server with 77 cores (308 threads). Supported by the US DOE under DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  15. Linear stability analysis for hydrothermal alteration of kimberlitic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyev, Andrey; Belyaeva, Ekaterina

    2016-06-01

    The influx of groundwater into hot kimberlite deposits results in the reaction of water with olivine-rich rocks. The products of the reaction are serpentine and release of latent heat. The rise of temperature due to the heat release increases the rate of the reaction. Under certain conditions, this self-speeding up of the reaction can result in instabilities associated with a significantly higher final serpentinization in slightly warmer regions of the kimberlite deposit. We conduct linear stability analysis of serpentinization in an isolated volume of porous kimberlitic rocks saturated with water and an inert gas. There is a counteracting interplay between the heat release tending to destabilize the uniform distribution of parameters and the heat conduction tending to stabilize it by smoothing out temperature perturbations. We determine the critical spatial scale separating the parameters where one phenomenon dominates over another. The perturbations of longer-than-critical length grow, whereas the perturbations of shorter-than-critical length fade. The analytical results of the linear stability analysis are supported by direct numerical simulations using a full nonlinear model.

  16. A Consistent Orbital Stability Analysis for the GJ 581 System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joiner, David A.; Sul, Cesar; Dragomir, Diana; Kane, Stephen R.; Kress, Monika E.

    2014-06-01

    We apply a combination of N-body modeling techniques and automated data fitting with Monte Carlo Markov Chain uncertainty analysis of Keplerian orbital models to RV data to determine long-term stability of the planetary system GJ 581. We find that while there are stability concerns with the four-planet model as published by Forveille et al., when uncertainties in the system are accounted for, particularly stellar jitter, the hypothesis that the four-planet model is gravitationally unstable is not statistically significant. Additionally, the system including proposed planet g by Vogt et al. also shows some stability concerns when eccentricities are allowed to float in the orbital fit, yet when uncertainties are included in the analysis, the system including planet g also cannot be proven to be unstable. We present revised reduced χ2 values for Keplerian astrocentric orbital fits assuming four-planet and five-planet models for GJ 581 under the condition that best fits must be stable, and we find no distinguishable difference by including planet g in the model. Additionally, we present revised orbital element estimates for each, assuming uncertainties due to stellar jitter under the constraint of the system being gravitationally stable.

  17. Linear stability analysis of the Noh expanding-shock solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, M.; Velikovich, A. L.; Giuliani, J. L.; Taylor, B. D.; Zalesak, S. T.; Iwamoto, Y.

    2015-11-01

    The self-similar one-dimensional (1D) solution of the Noh problem has been used for verification of every code designed to model implosions, explosions and shock waves. The long experience of successful verification of two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) hydrocodes against the 1D Noh solution is an implicit confirmation of its hydrodynamic stability. Still, as far as we know, stability analysis of the Noh solution has never been done. Here, such analysis is reported for spherical and cylindrical geometry assuming small-amplitude perturbations. In either case stability of the Noh solution has been demonstrated, all initial perturbations exhibiting a power-law, oscillatory or monotonic, decay with time. The dispersion equation determining the complex eigenvalues of the problem, i. e. the power indices characteristic of this decay, has been derived. Its numerical solution is presented, and the particular and limiting cases when the eigenvalues can be calculated analytically are outlined. Explicit formulas for the eigenfunction profiles corresponding to these eigenvalues are presented. The opportunities of using these new exact solutions for verification of hydrocodes in 2D and 3D are discussed. Work supported by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science and by the US DOE/NNSA.

  18. Stability and modal analysis of shock/boundary layer interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Joseph W.; Larsson, Johan; Bernardini, Matteo; Pirozzoli, Sergio

    2017-02-01

    The dynamics of oblique shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interactions is analyzed by mining a large-eddy simulation (LES) database for various strengths of the incoming shock. The flow dynamics is first analyzed by means of dynamic mode decomposition (DMD), which highlights the simultaneous occurrence of two types of flow modes, namely a low-frequency type associated with breathing motion of the separation bubble, accompanied by flapping motion of the reflected shock, and a high-frequency type associated with the propagation of instability waves past the interaction zone. Global linear stability analysis performed on the mean LES flow fields yields a single unstable zero-frequency mode, plus a variety of marginally stable low-frequency modes whose stability margin decreases with the strength of the interaction. The least stable linear modes are grouped into two classes, one of which bears striking resemblance to the breathing mode recovered from DMD and another class associated with revolving motion within the separation bubble. The results of the modal and linear stability analysis support the notion that low-frequency dynamics is intrinsic to the interaction zone, but some continuous forcing from the upstream boundary layer may be required to keep the system near a limit cycle. This can be modeled as a weakly damped oscillator with forcing, as in the early empirical model by Plotkin (AIAA J 13:1036-1040, 1975).

  19. Flight stability analysis under changes in insect morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noest, Robert; Wang, Z. Jane

    2015-11-01

    Insect have an amazing ability to control their flight, being able to perform both fast aerial maneuvers and stable hovering. The insect's neural system has developed various mechanism by which it can control these flying feats, but we expect that insect morphology is equally important in facilitating the aerial control. We perform a computational study using a quasi-steady instantaneous flapping flight model which allows us to freely adapt the insect's morphological parameters. We picked a fruit fly as the basis for the body shape and wing motion, and study the effect of changes to the morphology for a range of wing stroke amplitudes. In each case we determine the periodic flight mode, with the period equal to a single wing beat, and do a Floquet stability analysis of the flight. To interpret our results we will compare the changed morphology to related insects. We discuss the implications of the insects location on the stability diagram.

  20. Aeroelastic stability analysis of flexible overexpanded rocket nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekka, N.; Sellam, M.; Chpoun, A.

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a new aeroelastic stability model taking into account the viscous effects for a supersonic nozzle flow in overexpanded regimes. This model is inspired by the Pekkari model which was developed initially for perfect fluid flow. The new model called the "Modified Pekkari Model" (MPM) considers a more realistic wall pressure profile for the case of a free shock separation inside the supersonic nozzle using the free interaction theory of Chapman. To reach this objective, a code for structure computation coupled with aerodynamic excitation effects is developed that allows the analysis of aeroelastic stability for the overexpanded nozzles. The main results are presented in a comparative manner using existing models (Pekkari model and its extended version) and the modified Pekkari model developed in this work.

  1. Huygens' inspired multi-pendulum setups: Experiments and stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoogeboom, F. N.; Pogromsky, A. Y.; Nijmeijer, H.

    2016-11-01

    This paper examines synchronization of a set of metronomes placed on a lightweight foam platform. Two configurations of the set of metronomes are considered: a row setup containing one-dimensional coupling and a cross setup containing two-dimensional coupling. Depending on the configuration and coupling between the metronomes, i.e., the platform parameters, in- and/or anti-phase synchronized behavior is observed in the experiments. To explain this behavior, mathematical models of a metronome and experimental setups have been derived and used in a local stability analysis. It is numerically and experimentally demonstrated that varying the coupling parameters for both configurations has a significant influence on the stability of the synchronized solutions.

  2. Aero-Mechanical Design Methodology for Subsonic Civil Transport High-Lift Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanDam, C. P.; Shaw, S. G.; VanderKam, J. C.; Brodeur, R. R.; Rudolph, P. K. C.; Kinney, D.

    2000-01-01

    In today's highly competitive and economically driven commercial aviation market, the trend is to make aircraft systems simpler and to shorten their design cycle which reduces recurring, non-recurring and operating costs. One such system is the high-lift system. A methodology has been developed which merges aerodynamic data with kinematic analysis of the trailing-edge flap mechanism with minimum mechanism definition required. This methodology provides quick and accurate aerodynamic performance prediction for a given flap deployment mechanism early on in the high-lift system preliminary design stage. Sample analysis results for four different deployment mechanisms are presented as well as descriptions of the aerodynamic and mechanism data required for evaluation. Extensions to interactive design capabilities are also discussed.

  3. Analysis of temporal stability of autostereoscopic 3D displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubiño, Manuel; Salas, Carlos; Pozo, Antonio M.; Castro, J. J.; Pérez-Ocón, Francisco

    2013-11-01

    An analysis has been made of the stability of the images generated by electronic autostereoscopic 3D displays, studying the time course of the photometric and colorimetric parameters. The measurements were made on the basis of the procedure recommended in the European guideline EN 61747-6 for the characterization of electronic liquid-crystal displays (LCD). The study uses 3 different models of autostereoscopic 3D displays of different sizes and numbers of pixels, taking the measurements with a spectroradiometer (model PR-670 SpectraScan of PhotoResearch). For each of the displays, the time course is shown for the tristimulus values and the chromaticity coordinates in the XYZ CIE 1931 system and values from the time periods required to reach stable values of these parameters are presented. For the analysis of how the procedure recommended in the guideline EN 61747-6 for 2D displays influenced the results, and for the adaption of the procedure to the characterization of 3D displays, the experimental conditions of the standard procedure were varied, making the stability analysis in the two ocular channels (RE and LE) of the 3D mode and comparing the results with those corresponding to the 2D. The results of our study show that the stabilization time of a autostereoscopic 3D display with parallax barrier technology depends on the tristimulus value analysed (X, Y, Z) as well as on the presentation mode (2D, 3D); furthermore, it was found that whether the 3D mode is used depends on the ocular channel evaluated (RE, LE).

  4. Control sensitivity indices for stability analysis of HVdc systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nayak, O.B.; Gole, A.M.; Chapman, D.G.; Davies, J.B.

    1995-10-01

    This paper presents a new concept called the ``Control Sensitivity Index`` of CSI, for the stability analysis of HVdc converters connected to weak ac systems. The CSI for a particular control mode can be defined as the ratio of incremental changes in the two system variables that are most relevant to that control mode. The index provides valuable information on the stability of the system and, unlike other approaches, aids in the design of the controller. It also plays an important role in defining non-linear gains for the controller. This paper offers a generalized formulation of CSI and demonstrates its application through an analysis of the CSI for three modes of HVdc control. The conclusions drawn from the analysis are confirmed by a detailed electromagnetic transients simulation of the ac/dc system. The paper concludes that the CSI can be used to improve the controller design and, for an inverter in a weak ac system, the conventional voltage control mode is more stable than the conventional {gamma} control mode.

  5. Thermal Stability Analysis for Superconducting Coupling Coil in MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hong; Wang, Li; Pan, Heng; Guo, XingLong; Green, M.A.

    2010-06-28

    The superconducting coupling coil to be used in the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) with inner radius of 750 mm, length of 285 mm and thickness of 110.4 mm will be cooled by a pair of 1.5 W at 4.2 K cryo-coolers. When the coupling coil is powered to 210 A, it will produce about 7.3 T peak magnetic field at the conductor and it will have a stored energy of 13 MJ. A key issue for safe operation of the coupling coil is the thermal stability of the coil during a charge and discharge. The magnet and its cooling system are designed for a rapid discharge where the magnet is to be discharged in 5400 seconds. The numerical simulation for the thermal stability of the MICE coupling coil has been done using ANSYS. The analysis results show that the superconducting coupling coil has a good stability and can be charged and discharged safely.

  6. A Coupled Aeroelastic Model for Launch Vehicle Stability Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, Jeb S.

    2010-01-01

    A technique for incorporating distributed aerodynamic normal forces and aeroelastic coupling effects into a stability analysis model of a launch vehicle is presented. The formulation augments the linear state-space launch vehicle plant dynamics that are compactly derived as a system of coupled linear differential equations representing small angular and translational perturbations of the rigid body, nozzle, and sloshing propellant coupled with normal vibration of a set of orthogonal modes. The interaction of generalized forces due to aeroelastic coupling and thrust can be expressed as a set of augmenting non-diagonal stiffness and damping matrices in modal coordinates with no penalty on system order. While the eigenvalues of the structural response in the presence of thrust and aeroelastic forcing can be predicted at a given flight condition independent of the remaining degrees of freedom, the coupled model provides confidence in closed-loop stability in the presence of rigid-body, slosh, and actuator dynamics. Simulation results are presented that characterize the coupled dynamic response of the Ares I launch vehicle and the impact of aeroelasticity on control system stability margins.

  7. Stability analysis of direct-detection cooperative optical beam tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marola, Giovanni; Santerini, Daniele; Prati, Giancarlo

    1989-05-01

    The system under consideration is a cooperative spatial tracking system between two stations for laser beam communications, using a quadrant photodetector at each station. After determining the equilibrium points of the cooperative system for the case of periodical relative motion, the authors concentrate on the stability of the transient behavior around the equilibrium points for the case of uniform angular relative motion. This case corresponds to an assumption that the steady-state motion is slow with respect to transient phenomena, and is applicable to currently foreseen intersatellite and deep-space optical communications. The analysis is aimed at determining the combined effect of the basic system parameters, such as propagation delay time, tracking loop gains, DC servomotors time constant, and point-ahead velocity error, on the stability and the transient behavior of the overall tracking system. The stability conditions and the transient response around the steady-state trajectory provide a tool for evaluating the consistency of the design parameters for a given propagation delay.

  8. Stability analysis for extended models of gap solitary waves

    PubMed

    Schollmann; Mayer

    2000-05-01

    A numerical linear stability analysis has been carried out for stationary spatially localized solutions of several systems of coupled nonlinear partial differential equations (PDE's) with two and more complex variables. These coupled PDE's have recently been discussed in the literature, mostly in the context of physical systems with a frequency gap in the dispersion relation of their linear excitations, and they are extensions of the Mills-Trullinger gap soliton model. Translational and oscillatory instabilities are identified, and their associated growth rates are computed as functions of certain parameters characterizing the solitary waves.

  9. Stability analysis of restricted non-static axial symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Sharif, M.; Bhatti, M. Zaeem Ul Haq E-mail: mzaeem.math@gmail.com

    2013-11-01

    This paper aims to investigate the instability of very restricted class of non-static axially symmetric spacetime with anisotropic matter configuration. The perturbation scheme is established for the Einstein field equations and conservation laws. The instability range in the Newtonian and post-Newtonian regions are explored by constructing the collapse equation in this scenario. It is found that the adiabatic index plays an important role in the stability analysis which depends upon the physical parameters i.e., energy density and anisotropic pressure of the fluid distribution.

  10. Arms Transfers: A System Dynamics Analysis Focusing on Regional Stability.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    73 IS OSOLET E . .. JILASSIIE]L.. SECURITY C14 A :PIrATInN (.S TWIM 04rc.- .- l° AFIT/GOR/OS/83D-8 ARMS TRANSFERS: A SYSTEM DYNA’ICS ALYSIS FOCUSING...regional stability. 5. Provide guidance and instructions on how to use and alter the model for specific policy analysis. Scot e This research is...a system, and that not all societal groups are the same. Durkheim insisted that his theory of anowia must be interpreted frorr a contingency point of

  11. A comparison of theory and experiment for aeroelastic stability of a hingeless rotor model in hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharpe, David L.

    1988-01-01

    Theoretical predictions of aeroelastic stability are compared with experimental, isolated, hingeless-rotor data. The six cases selected represent a torsionally soft rotor having either a stiff or soft pitch-control system in combination with zero precone and droop, 5 degree precone, or -5 degree droop. Analyses from Bell Helicopter Textron, Boeing Vertol, Hughes Helicopters, Sikorsky Aircraft, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and the U.S. Army Aeromechanics Laboratory were compared with the experimental data. The correlation ranged from poor to fair.

  12. Landslide stability analysis on basis of LIDAR data extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hui; Fernandez-Steeger, Tomas M.; Dong, Mei; Azzam, Rafig

    2010-05-01

    Currently, existing contradictory between remediation and acquisition from natural resource induces a series of divergences. With regard to open pit mining, legal regulation requires human to fill back the open pit area with water or recreate new landscape by other materials; on the other hand, human can not help excavating the mining area due to the shortage of power resource. However, to engineering geologists, one coincident problem which takes place not only in filling but also in mining operation should be paid more attention to, i.e. the slope stability analysis within these areas. There are a number of construction activities during remediation or mining process which can directly or indirectly cause slope failure. Lives can be endangered since local failure either while or after remediation; for mining process, slope failure in a bench, which carries a main haul road or is adjacent to human activity area, would be significant catastrophe to the whole mining program. The stability of an individual bench or slope is controlled by several factors, which are geological condition, morphology, climate, excavation techniques and transportation approach. The task which takes the longest time is to collect the morphological data. Consequently, it is one of the most dangerous tasks due to the time consuming in mining field. LIDAR scanning for morphological data collecting can help to skip this obstacle since advantages of LIDAR techniques as follows: • Dynamic range available on the market: from 3 m to beyond 1 km, • Ruggedly designed for demanding field applications, • Compact, easily hand-carried and deployed by a single operator. In 2009, scanning campaigns for 2 open pit quarry have been carried out. The aim for these LIDAR detections is to construct a detailed 3D quarry model and analyze the bench stability to support the filling planning. The 3D quarry surface was built up by using PolyWorks 10.1 on basis of LIDAR data. LIDAR data refining takes an

  13. Local stability analysis of an endoreversible Carnot refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jizhou; Miao, Guiling; Nie, Wenjie

    2010-08-01

    A local stability analysis of an endoreversible Carnot refrigerator, working at the maximum objective function of the product of the cooling rate R and the coefficient of performance ɛ, is presented. The endoreversible Carnot refrigerator consists of a reversible Carnot refrigerator that exchanges heat with the heat reservoirs TH through the thermal conductance α and with the cold reservoirs TL through the thermal conductance β. In addition, the working fluid has the same heat capacity C in the two isothermal branches of the cycle. By linearization and stability analysis, we find that the relaxation times are a function of α, β, the heat capacity C and τ=TL /TH; that the endoreversible Carnot refrigerator is stable for every value of α, β, C and τ that after a perturbation, the system state exponentially decays to the steady state with either of two different relaxation times; that both relaxation times are proportional to α/2C and that one of them is a monotonically increasing function τ and the other is almost independent of τ. Finally, the phase portraits for the trajectories after a small perturbation over the steady-state values of internal temperatures are presented.

  14. Stability Analysis of Flow Induced by the Traveling Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin

    2003-01-01

    Re-circulating flow in molten metal columns can be conveniently induced by the axisymmetric traveling magnetic field. A number of applications can benefit from this technique, such as mixing under microgravity environment, or crysta1 growth from metallic melts. For small magnetic field excitations, the flow is laminar and stationary. As the imposed field increases, a more complex flow will set up in the cylindrical column. Conditions for stable laminar flow are of importance for practical applications. In this work, a linear stability analysis is performed in order to determine the onset of the bifurcation in the system. Here the analysis is restricted to the axisymmetric modes and the low-frequency regime.

  15. Stability Analysis of Flow Induced by the Traveling Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin

    2003-01-01

    Re-circulating flow in molten metal columns can be conveniently induced by the axisymmetric traveling magnetic field. A number of applications can benefit from this technique, such as mixing under microgravity environment, or.crysta1 growth from metallic melts. For small magnetic field excitations, the flow is laminar and stationary. As the imposed field increases, a more complex flow will set up in the cylindrical column. Conditions for stable laminar flow are of importance for practical applications. In this work, a linear stability analysis is performed in order to determine the onset of the bifurcation in the system. Here the analysis is restricted to the axisymmetric modes and the low-frequency regime.

  16. Stability analysis of offshore wind farm and marine current farm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shawon, Mohammad Hasanuzzaman

    -trend for large electric energy production using offshore wind generators and marine current generators, respectively. Thus DFIG based offshore wind farm can be an economic solution to stabilize squirrel cage induction generator based marine current farm without installing any addition FACTS devices. This thesis first focuses on the stabilization of fixed speed IG based marine current farm using SDBR. Also stabilization of DFIG based variable speed wind farm utilizing SDBR is studied in this work. Finally a co-operative control strategy is proposed where DFIG is controlled in such a way that it can even provide necessary reactive power demand of induction generator, so that additional cost of FACTS devices can be avoided. In that way, the DFIGs of the offshore wind farm (OWF) will actively compensate the reactive power demand of adjacent IGs of the marine current farm (MCF) during grid fault. Detailed modeling and control scheme for the proposed system are demonstrated considering some realistic scenarios. The power system small signal stability analysis is also carried out by eigenvalue analysis for marine current generator topology, wind turbine generator topology and integrated topology. The relation between the modes and state variables are discussed in light of modal and sensitivity analyses. The results of theoretical analyses are verified by MATLAB/SIMULINK and laboratory standard power system simulator PSCAD/EMTDC.

  17. Wellbore stability analysis in carbonate reservoir considering anisotropic behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, José; Guevara, Nestor; Coelho, Lucia; Baud, Patrick

    2010-05-01

    Carbonate reservoirs represent a major part of the world oil and gas reserves. In particular, recent discoveries in the pre-salt offshore Brazil place big challenges to exploration and production under high temperatures and pressures (HTHP). During production, the extraction of hydrocarbons reduces pore pressure and thus causes an increase in the effective stress and mechanical compaction in the reservoir. The compactive deformation and failure may be spatially extensive or localized to the vicinity of the wellbore, but in either case the consequences can be economically severe involving surface subsidence, well failure and various production problems. The analysis of wellbore stability and more generally of deformation and failure in carbonate environments hinges upon a relevant constitutive modeling of carbonate rocks over a wide range of porosities, in particular, observed microstructure of samples suggests anisotropic behaviour. In this study, we performed a wellbore stability analysis for a lateral wellbore junction in three dimensions. The complex geometry for the wellbore junction was modeled with tetrahedral finite elements considering a rate independent elastic-plastic isotropic material that presented linear behavior during elastic strain and associated flow rule. A finite element model simulating drilling and production phases were done for field conditions from a deep water reservoir in Campos basin, offshore Brazil. In this context, several scenarios were studied considering true 3D orientation for both in situ stresses and geometry of the wellbore junction itself. We discussed the impact of constitutive modeling, considering anisotropic ductile damage and pressure sensitiveness on the wellbore stability. Parameter values for the analysis were based based on experimental data on two micritic porous carbonates. Series of conventional triaxial experiments were performed at room temperature in dry and wet conditions on samples of Comiso and Tavel

  18. General stability analysis of composite sandwich plates under thermal load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, Shaher A.

    In structures subjected to high temperature change such as high-speed aircraft the panels are stressed more significantly under thermal loading than mechanical loading. This can produce instability within the structure; therefore, the thermal loading may become the primary factor in the design of the structure. For example, buckling and facesheet wrinkling are two major failure modes of the composite sandwich plates subjected to various loadings. The goal of this dissertation is to study the stability analysis of composite sandwich plates due to buckling and wrinkling subjected to thermal loading. The primary objective is to find out the critical failure mode and the associated critical temperature change causing it. For thermal buckling and wrinkling analysis, the critical temperature change Delta Tcr, is of more interest than the critical thermal load. In this study, two different approaches of the stability problem of the composite sandwich plate subjected to thermally induced load are developed. In the first approach, the wrinkling analysis and buckling analysis are performed separately to evaluate their associated critical wrinkling and buckling temperature changes. For the face-wrinkling problem, two different models, the linear decaying Hoff model and exponential decaying Chen model are employed. The global buckling analysis is based on the energy method. The second approach is based on the unified theory of Benson and Mayers. In such an approach, the critical temperature change for both the global buckling and face wrinkling can be evaluated simultaneously. A potential energy based variation principle has been applied to formulate the problem. The Lagrange multipliers are used to satisfy the face-core continuity conditions. The buckling and wrinkling can be analyzed and calculated simultaneously. Therefore, the critical wrinkling temperature and the critical buckling temperature are found in a single analysis. The critical buckling and wrinkling stresses

  19. Analysis of Faint Glints from Stabilized GEO Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, D.; Kervin, P.

    2013-09-01

    Ground-based telescopes routinely acquire temporal brightness measurements of satellites in geo-stationary and geo-synchronous orbit that provide valuable characterization information. For instance, GEO satellites that are not stabilized tend to rotate, and produce brightnesses that vary in time with frequencies corresponding to rotation rates. Temporal brightness patterns can also be exploited to characterize stabilized GEO satellites. For example, many operational GEO satellites have solar panels that glint when they reflect sunlight towards an observer in a mirror-like fashion. These well-known solar panel glints can be remarkably bright, often exceeding several stellar magnitudes in amplitude. Measured brightnesses and times of these glints can be exploited to estimate the size, segmentation, and alignment of the solar array, valuable information about the satellite's power generation and consumption capabilities. However, satellites can produce other glints in addition to those originating from solar panels. These glints can be much fainter, with amplitudes as small as 0.2 magnitudes. Several observations of GEO satellites show several such glints occurring during the span of a single night. Furthermore, many of these recur from night to night when observed from a single ground-based site, but with subtle, incremental changes in both peak times and brightnesses. These fainter glints must originate from reflective elements mounted on the satellite's main bus, solar panel structure, or other peripheral structures that might be stationary or moving with respect to the main bus. Our analysis indicates that such glints can be exploited for GEO satellite characterization.

  20. Core Stability in Athletes: A Critical Analysis of Current Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Wirth, Klaus; Hartmann, Hagen; Mickel, Christoph; Szilvas, Elena; Keiner, Michael; Sander, Andre

    2017-03-01

    Over the last two decades, exercise of the core muscles has gained major interest in professional sports. Research has focused on injury prevention and increasing athletic performance. We analyzed the guidelines for so-called functional strength training for back pain prevention and found that programs were similar to those for back pain rehabilitation; even the arguments were identical. Surprisingly, most exercise specifications have neither been tested for their effectiveness nor compared with the load specifications normally used for strength training. Analysis of the scientific literature on core stability exercises shows that adaptations in the central nervous system (voluntary activation of trunk muscles) have been used to justify exercise guidelines. Adaptations of morphological structures, important for the stability of the trunk and therefore the athlete's health, have not been adequately addressed in experimental studies or in reviews. In this article, we explain why the guidelines created for back pain rehabilitation are insufficient for strength training in professional athletes. We critically analyze common concepts such as 'selective activation' and training on unstable surfaces.

  1. Soap Bubble Elasticity: Analysis and Correlation with Foam Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakashev, S. I.; Tsekov, R.; Manev, E. D.; Nguyen, A. V.

    2010-05-01

    A correlation between the elastic modulus of soap bubble and the foam stability was found. A model system was chosen: a soap bubble stabilized by simple nonionic surfactant tetraethylene glycol octyl ether (C8E4) and 10^-5 M NaCl. The Elastic moduli were determined by periodical expansion and shrinking of foam bubbles with frequency of 0.1 Hz and volumetric amplitude of 2 mm 3. The film tension was monitored via commercial profile analysis tensiometer (Sinterface Technologies, GmbH). The elastic moduli of foam bubbles versus surfactant concentration in the range of 2x10^-3 - 10^-2 M were obtained. In addition, the theory of Lucassen and van den Tempel for the elastic modulus of single liquid/air interface at given frequency was exploited as well. The bulk diffusion coefficient of the surfactant molecules is unknown parameter through the adsorption frequency in this theory. Hence, a fitting procedure (with one free parameter) was conducted matching experimental and theoretical data. The value of the bulk diffusion coefficient of C8E4 obtained was 5.1x10^-11 m^2/s, which is an order of magnitude lower value than what is expected for. The foam was generated by shaking method and left to decay. A correlation between the elastic modulus and foam life time upon surfactant concentration was found.

  2. Bifurcation analysis of aircraft pitching motions near the stability boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, W. H.; Tobak, M.

    1984-01-01

    Bifuraction theory is used to analyze the nonlinear dynamic stability characteristics of an aircraft subject to single degree of freedom pitching-motion perturbations about a large mean angle of attack. The requisite aerodynamic information in the equations of motion is represented in a form equivalent to the response to finite-amplitude pitching oscillations about the mean angle of attack. This information is deduced from the case of infinitesimal-amplitude oscillations. The bifurcation theory analysis reveals that when the mean angle of attack is increased beyond a critical value at which the aerodynamic damping vanishes, new solutions representing finite-amplitude periodic motions bifurcate from the previously stable steady motion. The sign of a simple criterion, cast in terms of aerodynamic properties, determines whether the bifurcating solutions are stable (supercritical) or unstable (subcritical). For flat-plate airfoils flying at supersonic/hypersonic speed, the bifurcation is subcritical, implying either that exchanges of stability between steady and periodic motion are accompanied by hysteresis phenomena, or that potentially large aperiodic departures from steady motion may develop.

  3. Absolute Stability Analysis of a Phase Plane Controlled Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jang, Jiann-Woei; Plummer, Michael; Bedrossian, Nazareth; Hall, Charles; Jackson, Mark; Spanos, Pol

    2010-01-01

    Many aerospace attitude control systems utilize phase plane control schemes that include nonlinear elements such as dead zone and ideal relay. To evaluate phase plane control robustness, stability margin prediction methods must be developed. Absolute stability is extended to predict stability margins and to define an abort condition. A constrained optimization approach is also used to design flex filters for roll control. The design goal is to optimize vehicle tracking performance while maintaining adequate stability margins. Absolute stability is shown to provide satisfactory stability constraints for the optimization.

  4. Exploring stability of entropy analysis for signal with different trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yin; Li, Jin; Wang, Jun

    2017-03-01

    Considering the effects of environment disturbances and instrument systems, the actual detecting signals always are carrying different trends, which result in that it is difficult to accurately catch signals complexity. So choosing steady and effective analysis methods is very important. In this paper, we applied entropy measures-the base-scale entropy and approximate entropy to analyze signal complexity, and studied the effect of trends on the ideal signal and the heart rate variability (HRV) signals, that is, linear, periodic, and power-law trends which are likely to occur in actual signals. The results show that approximate entropy is unsteady when we embed different trends into the signals, so it is not suitable to analyze signal with trends. However, the base-scale entropy has preferable stability and accuracy for signal with different trends. So the base-scale entropy is an effective method to analyze the actual signals.

  5. CFD Based Computations of Flexible Helicopter Blades for Stability Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.

    2011-01-01

    As a collaborative effort among government aerospace research laboratories an advanced version of a widely used computational fluid dynamics code, OVERFLOW, was recently released. This latest version includes additions to model flexible rotating multiple blades. In this paper, the OVERFLOW code is applied to improve the accuracy of airload computations from the linear lifting line theory that uses displacements from beam model. Data transfers required at every revolution are managed through a Unix based script that runs jobs on large super-cluster computers. Results are demonstrated for the 4-bladed UH-60A helicopter. Deviations of computed data from flight data are evaluated. Fourier analysis post-processing that is suitable for aeroelastic stability computations are performed.

  6. Stability analysis of three species food chain with competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abadi, Savitri, D.

    2015-03-01

    We study a food chain system that consists of 1 prey and 2 predators populations. The prey population grows logistically while the predators apply different Holling functional responses. The first predator preys on the prey following Holling type II functional response and the second predator preys on both the prey and the first predator following Holling type II and III functional responses, respectively. The study starts with the stability analysis of critical points of the systems. Then, by using normal form and centre manifold method the information about other nontrivial solutions due to bifurcation including possible limit cycles appearance is obtained. The results are confirmed by numerical simulation using MatCont and biological interpretation of the results are also presented.

  7. Symplectic maps for the n-body problem - Stability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisdom, Jack; Holman, Matthew

    1992-01-01

    The stability of new symplectic n-body maps is examined from the point of view of nonlinear dynamics. The resonances responsible for the principal artifacts are identified. These are resonances between the stepsize and the difference of mean motions between pairs of planets. For larger stepsizes resonant perturbations are evident in the variation of the energy of the system corresponding to these stepsize resonances. It is shown that the principal instability of the method can be predicted and corresponds to the overlap of the stepsize resonances. It is noted that the analysis suggests that other artifacts will occur. For example, the overlap of a stepsize resonance with a resonance of the actual system may also give a region of chaotic behavior that is an artifact. It is pointed out that the fact that the principal artifacts corresponds to a particular set of stepsize resonances suggests that it may be possible to perturbatively remove the effect when the stepsize resonances are nonoverlapping.

  8. Stability Analysis of the Planetary System Orbiting Upsilon Andromedae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Rivera, Eugenio J.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We present results of long-term numerical orbital integrations designed to test the stability of the three-planet system orbiting Upsilon Andromedae and short-term integrations to test whether mutual perturbations among the planets can be used to determine planetary masses. Our initial conditions are based on the latest fits to the radial velocity data obtained by the planet-search group at Lick Observatory. The new fits result in significantly more stable systems than did the initially announced planetary parameters. An analytic analysis of the star and the two outer planets shows that this subsystem is Hill stable up to five. Our integrations involving all three planets show that the system is stable for at least 100 Myr for up to four. In our simulations, we still see a secular resonance between the outer two planets and in some cases large oscillations in the eccentricity of the inner planet.

  9. Space Shuttle Main Engine real time stability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, F. Y.

    1993-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) is a reusable, high performance, liquid rocket engine with variable thrust. The engine control system continuously monitors the engine parameters and issues propellant valve control signals in accordance with the thrust and mixture ratio commands. A real time engine simulation lab was installed at MSFC to verify flight software and to perform engine dynamic analysis. A real time engine model was developed on the AD100 computer system. This model provides sufficient fidelity on the dynamics of major engine components and yet simplified enough to be executed in real time. The hardware-in-the-loop type simulation and analysis becomes necessary as NASA is continuously improving the SSME technology, some with significant changes in the dynamics of the engine. The many issues of interfaces between new components and the engine can be better understood and be resolved prior to the firing of the engine. In this paper, the SSME real time simulation Lab at the MSFC, the SSME real time model, SSME engine and control system stability analysis, both in real time and non-real time is presented.

  10. Linear stability analysis of Clarke-Riley diffusion flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Lendinez, Daniel; Coenen, Wilfried; Sanchez, Antonio L.

    2016-11-01

    The buoyancy-driven laminar flow associated with the Burke-Schumann diffusion flame developing from the edge of a semi-infinite horizontal fuel surface burning in a quiescent oxidizing atmosphere displays a self-similar structure, first described by Clarke and Riley (Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 74:415-431). Their analysis was performed for unity reactant Lewis numbers, with the viscosity and thermal conductivity taken to be linearly proportional to the temperature. Our work extends this seminal work by considering fuels with non-unity Lewis numbers and gas mixtures with a realistic power-law dependence of the different transport properties. The problem is formulated in terms of chemistry-free, Shvab-Zel'dovich, linear combinations of the temperature and reactant mass fractions, not changed directly by the reactions, as conserved scalars. The resulting self-similar base-flow solution is used in a linear stability analysis to determine the critical value of the boundary-layer thickness-measured by the local Grashof number-at which the flow becomes unstable, leading to the development of Görtler-like streamwise vortices. The analysis provides the dependence of the critical Grashof number on the relevant flame parameters.

  11. [Analysis of the stability and adaptability of near infrared spectra qualitative analysis model].

    PubMed

    Cao, Wu; Li, Wei-jun; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Li-ping

    2014-06-01

    The stability and adaptability of model of near infrared spectra qualitative analysis were studied. Method of separate modeling can significantly improve the stability and adaptability of model; but its ability of improving adaptability of model is limited. Method of joint modeling can not only improve the adaptability of the model, but also the stability of model, at the same time, compared to separate modeling, the method can shorten the modeling time, reduce the modeling workload; extend the term of validity of model, and improve the modeling efficiency. The experiment of model adaptability shows that, the correct recognition rate of separate modeling method is relatively low, which can not meet the requirements of application, and joint modeling method can reach the correct recognition rate of 90%, and significantly enhances the recognition effect. The experiment of model stability shows that, the identification results of model by joint modeling are better than the model by separate modeling, and has good application value.

  12. Stability analysis of a nonlinear vehicle model in plane motion using the concept of Lyapunov exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadri, Sobhan; Wu, Christine

    2013-06-01

    For the first time, this paper investigates the application of the concept of Lyapunov exponents to the stability analysis of the nonlinear vehicle model in plane motion with two degrees of freedom. The nonlinearity of the model comes from the third-order polynomial expression between the lateral forces on the tyres and the tyre slip angles. Comprehensive studies on both system and structural stability analyses of the vehicle model are presented. The system stability analysis includes the stability, lateral stability region, and effects of driving conditions on the lateral stability region of the vehicle model in the state space. In the structural stability analysis, the ranges of driving conditions in which the stability of the vehicle model is guaranteed are given. Moreover, through examples, the largest Lyapunov exponent is suggested as an indicator of the convergence rate in which the disturbed vehicle model returns to its stable fixed point.

  13. Stability and failure analysis of steering tie-rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, GongFeng; Zhang, YiLiang; Xu, XueDong; Ding, DaWei

    2008-11-01

    A new car in operation of only 8,000 km, because of malfunction, resulting in lost control and rammed into the edge of the road, and then the basic vehicle scrapped. According to the investigation of the site, it was found that the tie-rod of the car had been broken. For the subjective analysis of the accident and identifying the true causes of rupture of the tierod, a series of studies, from the angle of theory to experiment on the bended broken tie-rod, were conducted. The mechanical model was established; the stability of the defective tie-rod was simulated based on ANSYS software. Meanwhile, the process of the accident was simulated considering the effect of destabilization of different vehicle speed and direction of the impact. Simultaneously, macro graphic test, chemical composition analysis, microstructure analysis and SEM analysis of the fracture were implemented. The results showed that: 1) the toughness of the tie-rod is at a normal level, but there is some previous flaws. One quarter of the fracture surface has been cracked before the accident. However, there is no relationship between the flaw and this incident. The direct cause is the dynamic instability leading to the large deformation of impact loading. 2) The declining safety factor of the tie-rod greatly due to the previous flaws; the result of numerical simulation shows that previous flaw is the vital factor of structure instability, on the basis of the comparison of critical loads of the accident tie-rod and normal. The critical load can decrease by 51.3% when the initial defect increases 19.54% on the cross-sectional area, which meets the Theory of Koiter.

  14. Stability analysis of a bilayer contained within a cylindrical tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yuanyuan

    Airways in the lung are coated with a liquid bilayer consisting of a serous layer adjacent to a more viscous mucus layer which is contiguous with the air core. An instability due to surface tension at the interfaces may lead to the formation of a liquid plug that blocks the passage of air. This is known as airway closure. A stability analysis is carried out for the case when a Newtonian and immiscible liquid bilayer coats a compliant tube in the presence of an insoluble surfactant monolayer at the mucus-gas interface. A surface active material such as surfactant lowers the surface tension and also generates a surface stress at the interface, both of which are stabilizing, while the wall compliance may accelerate the formation of the liquid bridge. A system of nonlinear coupled equations for the deflections of the interfaces and the surfactant concentration is derived by using an extended lubrication theory analysis. A linear stability study using normal modes is conducted by linearizing the nonlinear evolution equations. A linear eigenvalue problem for the perturbation amplitudes is obtained. Non-trivial solutions are obtained provided the determinant of a linear system is singular. A fourth order polynomial for the growth rate of the disturbances is derived, whose coefficients depend on the wavenumber of the perturbation, the wall characteristics, the Marangoni number, the thickness of the bilayer, the aspect thickness ratio, the viscosity ratio of two liquid layers, and the surface tension ratio. Both stabilizing and destabilizing effects of various system parameters are investigated. A classical lubrication theory model is also derived for cases where a bilayer coats a rigid tube with insoluble surfactant along the liquid-gas interface, and a bilayer coating in a compliant tube with a clean liquid-gas interface. Results serve as a validation of the extended lubrication theory model. The accuracy of the extended lubrication theory model as the bilayer thickness

  15. Linear modal stability analysis of bowed-strings.

    PubMed

    Debut, V; Antunes, J; Inácio, O

    2017-03-01

    Linearised models are often invoked as a starting point to study complex dynamical systems. Besides their attractive mathematical simplicity, they have a central role for determining the stability properties of static or dynamical states, and can often shed light on the influence of the control parameters on the system dynamical behaviour. While the bowed string dynamics has been thoroughly studied from a number of points of view, mainly by time-domain computer simulations, this paper proposes to explore its dynamical behaviour adopting a linear framework, linearising the friction force near an equilibrium state in steady sliding conditions, and using a modal representation of the string dynamics. Starting from the simplest idealisation of the friction force given by Coulomb's law with a velocity-dependent friction coefficient, the linearised modal equations of the bowed string are presented, and the dynamical changes of the system as a function of the bowing parameters are studied using linear stability analysis. From the computed complex eigenvalues and eigenvectors, several plots of the evolution of the modal frequencies, damping values, and modeshapes with the bowing parameters are produced, as well as stability charts for each system mode. By systematically exploring the influence of the parameters, this approach appears as a preliminary numerical characterisation of the bifurcations of the bowed string dynamics, with the advantage of being very simple compared to sophisticated numerical approaches which demand the regularisation of the nonlinear interaction force. To fix the idea about the potential of the proposed approach, the classic one-degree-of-freedom friction-excited oscillator is first considered, and then the case of the bowed string. Even if the actual stick-slip behaviour is rather far from the linear description adopted here, the results show that essential musical features of bowed string vibrations can be interpreted from this simple approach

  16. A parabolized stability analysis of a trailing vortex wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edstrand, Adam; Schmid, Peter; Taira, Kunihiko; Cattafesta, Louis

    2016-11-01

    To aid in understanding how best to control a trailing vortex, we perform a parabolized stability analysis on a flow past a wing at a chord-based Reynolds number of 1000. At the upstream position, the wake instability branch dominates, with only a single vortex instability present in the spectrum. With downstream progression, the growth rate of the wake instability decays, but remains unstable 10 chords downstream. With the wake mode being unstable so far downstream, these results imply that the excitation of the wake instability, despite the varying base flow, will continue to see growth and potentially disrupt the trailing vortex. Conversely, the vortex instability in its formative region rapidly decays to the stable half-plane, then at 11 chords downstream becomes unstable again. We hypothesized the renewed instability growth far downstream is developing as a result of vortex instabilities, however the excitation of these instabilities proves to be challenging in the vortex far field. From these results, control near the two-dimensional wake behind the airfoil may better interfere with the trailing vortex formation; however, to determine the optimal disturbances, an adjoint analysis is required and is included in the future work of the project. ONR Grants N00014-10-1-0832 and N00014-15-1-2403.

  17. Linear Stability Analysis of an Acoustically Vaporized Droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Junaid; Qamar, Adnan; Samtaney, Ravi

    2015-11-01

    Acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) is a phase transition phenomena of a superheat liquid (Dodecafluoropentane, C5F12) droplet to a gaseous bubble, instigated by a high-intensity acoustic pulse. This approach was first studied in imaging applications, and applicable in several therapeutic areas such as gas embolotherapy, thrombus dissolution, and drug delivery. High-speed imaging and theoretical modeling of ADV has elucidated several physical aspects, ranging from bubble nucleation to its subsequent growth. Surface instabilities are known to exist and considered responsible for evolving bubble shapes (non-spherical growth, bubble splitting and bubble droplet encapsulation). We present a linear stability analysis of the dynamically evolving interfaces of an acoustically vaporized micro-droplet (liquid A) in an infinite pool of a second liquid (liquid B). We propose a thermal ADV model for the base state. The linear analysis utilizes spherical harmonics (Ynm, of degree m and order n) and under various physical assumptions results in a time-dependent ODE of the perturbed interface amplitudes (one at the vapor/liquid A interface and the other at the liquid A/liquid B interface). The perturbation amplitudes are found to grow exponentially and do not depend on m. Supported by KAUST Baseline Research Funds.

  18. Efficient randomized methods for stability analysis of fluids systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Scott; Rowley, Clarence

    2016-11-01

    We show that probabilistic algorithms that have recently been developed for the approximation of large matrices can be utilized to numerically evaluate the properties of linear operators in fluids systems. In particular, we present an algorithm that is well suited for optimal transient growth (i.e., nonmodal stability) analysis. For non-normal systems, such analysis can be important for analyzing local regions of convective instability, and in identifying high-amplitude transients that can trigger nonlinear instabilities. Our proposed algorithms are easy to wrap around pre-existing timesteppers for linearized forward and adjoint equations, are highly parallelizable, and come with known error bounds. Furthermore, they allow for efficient computation of optimal growth modes for numerous time horizons simultaneously. We compare the proposed algorithm to both direct matrix-forming and Krylov subspace approaches on a number of test problems. We will additionally discuss the potential for randomized methods to assist more broadly in the speed-up of algorithms for analyzing both fluids data and operators. Supported by AFOSR Grant FA9550-14-1-0289.

  19. Structure and Stability of Steady Protostellar Accretion Flows - Part Two - Linear Stability Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balluch, M.

    1991-03-01

    Recent developments concerning spherically symmetric (1D-) numerical models of protostellar evolution show that steady protostellar accretion flows (resp. their shockfronts) may be unstable at least in the very early (Tscharnuter 1987a) and late stages (Balluch 1988) of accretion. A global, linear stability analysis of the structure of steady protostellar accretion flows with a shock discontinuity (Balluch 1990) is therefore presented to investigate such flows by different methods. Thereby three characteristic wave types, the radiation-, radiation diffusion- and acoustic modes were found. In the `ideal case' of a perfect gas law and constant opacity, the shockfront appears to be oscillatory unstable due to critical cooling as long as the mass flux rate is larger than a critical one of Mṡcrit = 10-6 Msun yr-1. In the `real case' with more realistic constitutive relations, an additional vibrational instability occurs due to the κ-mechanism in the outer layers of the core. This is shown to be the case in the whole range of core masses between 0.01 and 1 Msun, mass flow rates between 10-3 and 10-7 Msun yr-1 and different outer boundary conditions (corresponding to different states of the surrounding interstellar cloud). Analysing the first, outer protostellar cores before they get dynamically unstable due to H2-dissociation in their interiors, similar instabilities as mentioned above were found. Now the unstable κ-behaviour is due to dust instead of the deep ionisation zone as in the case of second, inner cores. According to the linear analysis, the instabilities should first appear in the velocity and the radiation flux in the settling zone. In the case of first, outer cores, these variations should be accompanied by an oscillation of the radiation flux in the region upstream from the shock up to r = 1014 cm. Sooner or later, the shockfront should oscillate in both cases too. These results are finally compared with the characteristics of the accretion shock

  20. In situ vitrification: application analysis for stabilization of transuranic waste

    SciTech Connect

    Oma, K.H.; Farnsworth, R.K.; Rusin, J.M.

    1982-09-01

    The in situ vitrification process builds upon the electric melter technology previously developed for high-level waste immobilization. In situ vitrification converts buried wastes and contaminated soil to an extremely durable glass and crystalline waste form by melting the materials, in place, using joule heating. Once the waste materials have been solidified, the high integrity waste form should not cause future ground subsidence. Environmental transport of the waste due to water or wind erosion, and plant or animal intrusion, is minimized. Environmental studies are currently being conducted to determine whether additional stabilization is required for certain in-ground transuranic waste sites. An applications analysis has been performed to identify several in situ vitrification process limitations which may exist at transuranic waste sites. Based on the process limit analysis, in situ vitrification is well suited for solidification of most in-ground transuranic wastes. The process is best suited for liquid disposal sites. A site-specific performance analysis, based on safety, health, environmental, and economic assessments, will be required to determine for which sites in situ vitrification is an acceptable disposal technique. Process economics of in situ vitrification compare favorably with other in-situ solidification processes and are an order of magnitude less than the costs for exhumation and disposal in a repository. Leachability of the vitrified product compares closely with that of Pyrex glass and is significantly better than granite, marble, or bottle glass. Total release to the environment from a vitrified waste site is estimated to be less than 10/sup -5/ parts per year. 32 figures, 30 tables.

  1. Order-2 Stability Analysis of Particle Swarm Optimization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qunfeng

    2015-01-01

    Several stability analyses and stable regions of particle swarm optimization (PSO) have been proposed before. The assumption of stagnation and different definitions of stability are adopted in these analyses. In this paper, the order-2 stability of PSO is analyzed based on a weak stagnation assumption. A new definition of stability is proposed and an order-2 stable region is obtained. Several existing stable analyses for canonical PSO are compared, especially their definitions of stability and the corresponding stable regions. It is shown that the classical stagnation assumption is too strict and not necessary. Moreover, among all these definitions of stability, it is shown that our definition requires the weakest conditions, and additional conditions bring no benefit. Finally, numerical experiments are reported to show that the obtained stable region is meaningful. A new parameter combination of PSO is also shown to be good, even better than some known best parameter combinations.

  2. A Closed-Loop Optimal Neural-Network Controller to Optimize Rotorcraft Aeromechanical Behaviour. Volume 2; Output from Two Sample Cases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leyland, Jane Anne

    2001-01-01

    A closed-loop optimal neural-network controller technique was developed to optimize rotorcraft aeromechanical behaviour. This technique utilities a neural-network scheme to provide a general non-linear model of the rotorcraft. A modem constrained optimisation method is used to determine and update the constants in the neural-network plant model as well as to determine the optimal control vector. Current data is read, weighted, and added to a sliding data window. When the specified maximum number of data sets allowed in the data window is exceeded, the oldest data set is and the remaining data sets are re-weighted. This procedure provides at least four additional degrees-of-freedom in addition to the size and geometry of the neural-network itself with which to optimize the overall operation of the controller. These additional degrees-of-freedom are: 1. the maximum length of the sliding data window, 2. the frequency of neural-network updates, 3. the weighting of the individual data sets within the sliding window, and 4. the maximum number of optimisation iterations used for the neural-network updates.

  3. Implications of stability analysis for heat transfer at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, B.; Yiqiang Zhang; Ning Lu

    1993-03-01

    An analytical solution has been obtained to the stability problem for an infinite horizontal layer of gas with Its humidity constrained to 100%. Latent heat transfer makes convective heat transfer much more Important for this moist gas than for a dry gas. The critical Rayleigh number for the onset of convective flow in the moist gas, with a lower no-flow boundary at 97{degrees}C and an upper no-flow boundary at 27{degrees}C, is 0.18, much less than the value of 4m{sup 2} for a dry gas. Although the heat source at Yucca Mountain will be finite in extent, the solution for an infinite horizontal layer still gives a useful criterion for the qualitative importance of convective heat transfer. The critical Rayleigh number of 0.18 corresponds to a permeability of 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}12} m{sup 2} if other parameters ate given values measured at Yucca Mountain. This value falls roughly in the middle of the range of measured permeabilities. The analysis also gives a time constant for the onset of convection, which at twice the critical Rayleigh number is 1000 yr. Thus convection will probably make an important contribution, to host transfer at Yucca Mountain if the rock permeability falls in the upper portion of the range of measurements to date, but only at times after a few hundred or thousand years.

  4. BLSTA: A boundary layer code for stability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wie, Yong-Sun

    1992-01-01

    A computer program is developed to solve the compressible, laminar boundary-layer equations for two-dimensional flow, axisymmetric flow, and quasi-three-dimensional flows including the flow along the plane of symmetry, flow along the leading-edge attachment line, and swept-wing flows with a conical flow approximation. The finite-difference numerical procedure used to solve the governing equations is second-order accurate. The flow over a wide range of speed, from subsonic to hypersonic speed with perfect gas assumption, can be calculated. Various wall boundary conditions, such as wall suction or blowing and hot or cold walls, can be applied. The results indicate that this boundary-layer code gives velocity and temperature profiles which are accurate, smooth, and continuous through the first and second normal derivatives. The code presented herein can be coupled with a stability analysis code and used to predict the onset of the boundary-layer transition which enables the assessment of the laminar flow control techniques. A user's manual is also included.

  5. Crack stability analysis of low alloy steel primary coolant pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.; Kameyama, M.; Urabe, Y.

    1997-04-01

    At present, cast duplex stainless steel has been used for the primary coolant piping of PWRs in Japan and joints of dissimilar material have been applied for welding to reactor vessels and steam generators. For the primary coolant piping of the next APWR plants, application of low alloy steel that results in designing main loops with the same material is being studied. It means that there is no need to weld low alloy steel with stainless steel and that makes it possible to reduce the welding length. Attenuation of Ultra Sonic Wave Intensity is lower for low alloy steel than for stainless steel and they have advantageous inspection characteristics. In addition to that, the thermal expansion rate is smaller for low alloy steel than for stainless steel. In consideration of the above features of low alloy steel, the overall reliability of primary coolant piping is expected to be improved. Therefore, for the evaluation of crack stability of low alloy steel piping to be applied for primary loops, elastic-plastic future mechanics analysis was performed by means of a three-dimensioned FEM. The evaluation results for the low alloy steel pipings show that cracks will not grow into unstable fractures under maximum design load conditions, even when such a circumferential crack is assumed to be 6 times the size of the wall thickness.

  6. Gyrokinetic linear stability analysis of NSTX L-mode plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ke; Ren, Yang

    2016-10-01

    NSTX offered unique opportunities in studying transport and turbulence with low aspect ratio, strong plasma shaping and strong E ×B shear. NSTX L-mode plasmas have some favorable properties to facilitate the study of the relation between microturbulence and thermal transport: easier to obtain stationary profiles; easier to maintain MHD quiescence; no complications from edge transport barrier. Studies of NSTX RF/NBI-heated L-mode plasmas have provided new insight into the role of ion and electron-scale turbulence in driving anomalous transport. Here we present linear stability analysis of some NSTX L-mode plasmas with GS2 gyrokinetic code. GS2 is an initial value gyrokinetic code which, in its linear mode, finds the fastest growing mode for a given pair of poloidal and radial wavenumbers. The linear simulations used local Miller equilibria and plasma parameters derived from measured experimental profiles with electromagnetic effects, electron and ion collisions and carbon impurity. The work is supported by DOE, China Scholarship Council, the Natural Science Foundation of China (61402138) and the Natural Science Foundation of Heilongjiang Province (E201452).

  7. Stability analysis of lower dimensional gravastars in noncommutative geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Ayan; Hansraj, Sudan

    2016-11-01

    The Bañados et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett 69:1849, 1992), black hole solution is revamped from the Einstein field equations in (2 + 1)-dimensional anti-de Sitter spacetime, in a context of noncommutative geometry (Phys. Rev. D 87:084014, 2013). In this article, we explore the exact gravastar solutions in three-dimensional anti-de Sitter space given in the same geometry. As a first step we derive BTZ solution assuming the source of energy density as point-like structures in favor of smeared objects, where the particle mass M, is diffused throughout a region of linear size √{α } and is described by a Gaussian function of finite width rather than a Dirac delta function. We matched our interior solution to an exterior BTZ spacetime at a junction interface situated outside the event horizon. Furthermore, a stability analysis is carried out for the specific case when χ < 0. 214 under radial perturbations about the static equilibrium solutions. To give theoretical support we are also trying to explore their physical properties and characteristics.

  8. Aeroelastic Stability of Rotor Blades Using Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chopra, I.; Sivaneri, N.

    1982-01-01

    The flutter stability of flap bending, lead-lag bending, and torsion of helicopter rotor blades in hover is investigated using a finite element formulation based on Hamilton's principle. The blade is divided into a number of finite elements. Quasi-steady strip theory is used to evaluate the aerodynamic loads. The nonlinear equations of motion are solved for steady-state blade deflections through an iterative procedure. The equations of motion are linearized assuming blade motion to be a small perturbation about the steady deflected shape. The normal mode method based on the coupled rotating natural modes is used to reduce the number of equations in the flutter analysis. First the formulation is applied to single-load-path blades (articulated and hingeless blades). Numerical results show very good agreement with existing results obtained using the modal approach. The second part of the application concerns multiple-load-path blades, i.e. bearingless blades. Numerical results are presented for several analytical models of the bearingless blade. Results are also obtained using an equivalent beam approach wherein a bearingless blade is modelled as a single beam with equivalent properties. Results show the equivalent beam model.

  9. PPM mixtures of formaldehyde in gas cylinders: Stability and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, K.C.; Miller, S.B.; Patterson, L.M.

    1999-07-01

    Scott Specialty Gases has been successful in producing stable calibration gases of formaldehyde at low concentration. Critical to this success has been the development of a treatment process for high pressure aluminum cylinders. Formaldehyde cylinders having concentrations of 20ppm and 4ppm were found to show only small decline in concentrations over a period of approximately 12 months. Since no NIST traceable formaldehyde standards (or Standard Reference Material) are available, all Scott's formaldehyde cylinders were originally certified by traditional impinger method. This method involves an extremely tedious purification procedure for 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (2,4-DNPH). A modified version of the impinger method has been developed and does not require extensive reagent purification for formaldehyde analysis. Extremely low formaldehyde blanks have been obtained with the modified method. The HPLC conditions in the original method were used for chromatographic separations. The modified method results in a lower analytical uncertainty for the formaldehyde standard mixtures. Consequently, it is possible to discern small differences between analytical results that are important for stability study.

  10. Lidov-Kozai Mechanism in Hydrodynamical Disks: Linear Stability Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanazzi, J. J.; Lai, Dong

    2017-01-01

    Recent SPH simulations by Martin et al. (2014) suggest a circumstellar gaseous disk may exhibit coherent eccentricity-inclination oscillations due to the tidal forcing of an inclined binary companion, in a manner that resembles Lidov-Kozai oscillations in hierarchical triple systems. We carry out linear stability analysis for the eccentricity growth of circumstellar disks in binaries, including the effects of gas pressure and viscosity and secular (orbital-averaged) tidal force from the inclined companion. We find that the growth of disk eccentricity depends on the dimensionless ratio (S) between c_s^2 (the disk sound speed squared) and the tidal torque acting on the disk (per unit mass) from the companion. For S ≪ 1, the standard Lidov-Kozai result is recovered for a thin disk annulus: eccentricity excitation occurs when the mutual inclination I between the disk and binary lies between 39° and 141°. As S increases, the inclination window for eccentricity growth generally becomes narrower. For S ≳ a few, eccentricity growth is suppressed for all inclination angles. Surprisingly, we find that for S ˜ 1 and certain disk density/pressure profiles, eccentricity excitation can occur even when I is much less than 39°.

  11. Practical stability analysis of fractional-order impulsive control systems.

    PubMed

    Stamova, Ivanka; Henderson, Johnny

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we obtain sufficient conditions for practical stability of a nonlinear system of differential equations of fractional order subject to impulse effects. Our results provide a design method of impulsive control law which practically stabilizes the impulse free fractional-order system.

  12. The Stability of Radiatively Cooling Jets I. Linear Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardee, Philip E.; Stone, James M.

    1997-01-01

    The results of a spatial stability analysis of a two-dimensional slab jet, in which optically thin radiative cooling is dynamically important, are presented. We study both magnetized and unmagnetized jets at external Mach numbers of 5 and 20. We model the cooling rate by using two different cooling curves: one appropriate to interstellar gas, and the other to photoionized gas of reduced metallicity. Thus, our results will be applicable to both protostellar (Herbig-Haro) jets and optical jets from active galactic nuclei. We present analytical solutions to the dispersion relations in useful limits and solve the dispersion relations numerically over a broad range of perturbation frequencies. We find that the growth rates and wavelengths of the unstable Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) modes are significantly different from the adiabatic limit, and that the form of the cooling function strongly affects the results. In particular, if the cooling curve is a steep function of temperature in the neighborhood of the equilibrium state, then the growth of K-H modes is reduced relative to the adiabatic jet. On the other hand, if the cooling curve is a shallow function of temperature, then the growth of K-H modes can be enhanced relative to the adiabatic jet by the increase in cooling relative to heating in overdense regions. Inclusion of a dynamically important magnetic field does not strongly modify the important differences between an adiabatic jet and a cooling jet, provided the jet is highly supermagnetosonic and not magnetic pressure-dominated. In the latter case, the unstable modes behave more like the transmagnetosonic magnetic pressure-dominated adiabatic limit. We also plot fluid displacement surfaces associated with the various waves in a cooling jet in order to predict the structures that might arise in the nonlinear regime. This analysis predicts that low-frequency surface waves and the lowest order body modes will be the most effective at producing observable features in

  13. The Data from Aeromechanics Test and Analytics -- Management and Analysis Package (DATAMAP). Volume I. User’s Manual.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    ANUAI 1RMNT 1 E pZ J1 a U~C) LEVEL FLIGHT AT 129 KNT’ L Ln D T( LYEL AVEPOGE. BLADE I- F1L PI P ~L- U LL COUNTER 615 GROSS WT 8U00 SIP MODEL hP~ 0C1 X...360084 GROSS WT SHIP MODEL LONG CG SHIP ID -- - - - - - -CONTOUR LEVEL VALUES IN- - - - - - - - A -1.2 E.4 B --. 8 F.8 C -.0 1.2 BHTUSARTL DATAMAP...Correlation is actually calculated and labeled on output as auto-covariance, which is the auto-correlation of a time- history with the mean level reset to zero

  14. ASTROP2 users manual: A program for aeroelastic stability analysis of propfans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, G. V.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1991-01-01

    A user's manual is presented for the aeroelastic stability and response of propulsion systems computer program called ASTROP2. The ASTROP2 code preforms aeroelastic stability analysis of rotating propfan blades. This analysis uses a two-dimensional, unsteady cascade aerodynamics model and a three-dimensional, normal-mode structural model. Analytical stability results from this code are compared with published experimental results of a rotating composite advanced turboprop model and of nonrotating metallic wing model.

  15. Consensus and Stability Analysis of Networked Multiagent Predictive Control Systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guo-Ping

    2016-03-17

    This paper is concerned with the consensus and stability problem of multiagent control systems via networks with communication delays and data loss. A networked multiagent predictive control scheme is proposed to achieve output consensus and also compensate for the communication delays and data loss actively. The necessary and sufficient conditions of achieving both consensus and stability of the closed-loop networked multiagent control systems are derived. An important result that is obtained is that the consensus and stability of closed-loop networked multiagent predictive control systems are not related to the communication delays and data loss. An example illustrates the performance of the networked multiagent predictive control scheme.

  16. Aeromechanics of the Spider Cricket Jump: How to Jump 60+ Times Your Body Length and Still Land on Your Feet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Emily; Deshler, Nicolas; Gorman, David; Neves, Catarina; Mittal, Rajat

    2015-11-01

    Flapping, gliding, running, crawling and swimming have all been studied extensively in the past and have served as a source of inspiration for engineering designs. In the current project, we explore a mode of locomotion that straddles ground and air: jumping. The subject of our study is among the most proficient of long-jumpers in Nature: the spider cricket of the family Rhaphidophoridae, which can jump more than 60 times its body length. Despite jumping this immense distance, these crickets usually land on their feet, indicating an ability to control their posture during ``flight.'' We employ high-speed videogrammetry, to examine the jumps and to track the crickets' posture and appendage orientation throughout their jumps. Simple aerodynamic models are developed to predict the aerodynamic forces and moment on the crickets during `flight`. The analysis shows that these wingless insects employ carefully controlled and coordinated positioning of the limbs during flight so as to increase jump distance and to stabilize body posture during flight. The principles distilled from this study could serve as an inspiration for small jumping robots that can traverse complex terrains.

  17. Kinetic analysis of enhanced thermal stability of an alkaline protease with engineered twin disulfide bridges and calcium-dependent stability.

    PubMed

    Ikegaya, Kazuo; Sugio, Shigetoshi; Murakami, Kohji; Yamanouchi, Kouichi

    2003-01-20

    The thermal stability of a cysteine-free alkaline protease (Alp) secreted by the eukaryote Aspergillus oryzae was improved both by the introduction of engineered twin disulfide bridges (Cys-69/Cys-101 and Cys-169/Cys-200), newly constructed as part of this study, and by the addition of calcium ions. We performed an extensive kinetic analysis of the increased thermal stability of the mutants as well as the role of calcium dependence. The thermodynamic activation parameters for irreversible thermal inactivation, the activation free energy (deltaG), the activation enthalpy (deltaH), and the activation entropy (deltaS) were determined from absolute reaction rate theory. The values of deltaH and deltaS were significantly and concomitantly increased as a result of introducing the twin disulfide bridges, for which the increase in the value of deltaH outweighed that of deltaS, resulting in significant increases in the value of deltaG. The enhancement of the thermal stability obtained by introducing the twin disulfide bridges is an example of the so-called low-temperature stabilization of enzymes. The stabilizing effect of calcium ions on wild-type Alp is similar to the results we obtained by introducing the engineered twin disulfide bridges.

  18. Kinematic Analysis of a Posterior-stabilized Knee Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhi-Xin; Wen, Liang; Qu, Tie-Bing; Hou, Li-Li; Xiang, Dong; Bin, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Background: The goal of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is to restore knee kinematics. Knee prosthesis design plays a very important role in successful restoration. Here, kinematics models of normal and prosthetic knees were created and validated using previously published data. Methods: Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans of a healthy, anticorrosive female cadaver were used to establish a model of the entire lower limbs, including the femur, tibia, patella, fibula, distal femur cartilage, and medial and lateral menisci, as well as the anterior cruciate, posterior cruciate, medial collateral, and lateral collateral ligaments. The data from the three-dimensional models of the normal knee joint and a posterior-stabilized (PS) knee prosthesis were imported into finite element analysis software to create the final kinematic model of the TKA prosthesis, which was then validated by comparison with a previous study. The displacement of the medial/lateral femur and the internal rotation angle of the tibia were analyzed during 0–135° flexion. Results: Both the output data trends and the measured values derived from the normal knee's kinematics model were very close to the results reported in a previous in vivo study, suggesting that this model can be used for further analyses. The PS knee prosthesis underwent an abnormal forward displacement compared with the normal knee and has insufficient, or insufficiently aggressive, “rollback” compared with the lateral femur of the normal knee. In addition, a certain degree of reverse rotation occurs during flexion of the PS knee prosthesis. Conclusions: There were still several differences between the kinematics of the PS knee prosthesis and a normal knee, suggesting room for improving the design of the PS knee prosthesis. The abnormal kinematics during early flexion shows that the design of the articular surface played a vital role in improving the kinematics of the PS knee prosthesis. PMID:25591565

  19. APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT: CHEMFIX TECHNOLOGIES, INC. - SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In support of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program, this report evaluates the Chemfix Technologies, Inc. (Chemfix), solidification/stabilization technology for on-site treatment of hazardous waste. The Chemfix ...

  20. Stability analysis of a variable-speed wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Bir, G.S.; Wright, A.D.; Butterfield, C.P.

    1996-10-01

    This paper examines the elastomechanical stability of a four-bladed wind turbine over a specific rotor speed range. Stability modes, frequencies, and dampings are extracted using a specialized modal processor developed at NREL that post-processes the response data generated by the ADAMS simulation code. The processor can analyze a turbine with an arbitrary number of rotor blades and offers a novel capability of isolating stability modes that become locked at a single frequency. Results indicate that over a certain rotor speed range, the tower lateral mode and the rotor regressive in-plane mode coalesce, resulting in a self-excited instability. Additional results show the effect of tower and nacelle parameters on the stability boundaries.

  1. Vaccine stability study design and analysis to support product licensure.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Timothy L

    2009-11-01

    Stability evaluation supporting vaccine licensure includes studies of bulk intermediates as well as final container product. Long-term and accelerated studies are performed to support shelf life and to determine release limits for the vaccine. Vaccine shelf life is best determined utilizing a formal statistical evaluation outlined in the ICH guidelines, while minimum release is calculated to help assure adequate potency through handling and storage of the vaccine. In addition to supporting release potency determination, accelerated stability studies may be used to support a strategy to recalculate product expiry after an unintended temperature excursion such as a cold storage unit failure or mishandling during transport. Appropriate statistical evaluation of vaccine stability data promotes strategic stability study design, in order to reduce the uncertainty associated with the determination of the degradation rate, and the associated risk to the customer.

  2. Closed-Loop System Analysis Using Lyapunov Stability Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    Sarachik, P.E., "Stability of Circuits with Randomly Time-Varying Parameters", IEEE Transactions on Circuit Theory, pp. 260-270, May 1959. 19. Bhatia...Rinehart, and Winston, 1970. 33. Chen, C., and Desoer , C., "Simplified Conditions for Controllability and Observability of Linear Time- Invari-ant...Dynamical Systems", Circuits Systems and Signal Processing, pp. 171-202, 1982. v 100. Mitchell, R.R., "Sample Stability of Second-Order S Stochastic

  3. Analysis of Faint Glints from Stabilized GEO Satellites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    INTRODUCTION Ground-based optical and radar sites routinely acquire resolved images of satellites, yielding a great deal of knowledge about orbiting...BRF) requires knowledge of the stabilization scheme used to maintain the attitude of the satellite’s main bus [13]. Modern 3-axis stabilized...Spacecraft Attitude Determination and Control”, Astrophysics and Space Sciences Library, Vol. 73., D. Reidel Publishing Co., Boston, MA, 1978. 14. Africano

  4. Nonlinear analysis for image stabilization in IR imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhan-lei; Lu, Jin; Luo, Yong-hong; Zhang, Mei-sheng

    2009-07-01

    In order to acquire stabilization image for IR imaging system, an image stabilization system is required. Linear method is often used in current research on the system and a simple PID controller can meet the demands of common users. In fact, image stabilization system is a structure with nonlinear characters such as structural errors, friction and disturbances. In up-grade IR imaging system, although conventional PID controller is optimally designed, it cannot meet the demands of higher accuracy and fast responding speed when disturbances are present. To get high-quality stabilization image, nonlinear characters should be rejected. The friction and gear clearance are key factors and play an important role in the image stabilization system. The friction induces static error of system. When the system runs at low speed, stick-slip and creeping induced by friction not only decrease resolution and repeating accuracy, but also increase the tracking error and the steady state error. The accuracy of the system is also limited by gear clearance, and selfexcited vibration is brought on by serious clearance. In this paper, effects of different nonlinear on image stabilization precision are analyzed, including friction and gear clearance. After analyzing the characters and influence principle of the friction and gear clearance, a friction model is established with MATLAB Simulink toolbox, which is composed of static friction, Coulomb friction and viscous friction, and the gear clearance non-linearity model is built, providing theoretical basis for the future engineering practice.

  5. Dynamic remedial action scheme using online transient stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Arun

    Economic pressure and environmental factors have forced the modern power systems to operate closer to their stability limits. However, maintaining transient stability is a fundamental requirement for the operation of interconnected power systems. In North America, power systems are planned and operated to withstand the loss of any single or multiple elements without violating North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) system performance criteria. For a contingency resulting in the loss of multiple elements (Category C), emergency transient stability controls may be necessary to stabilize the power system. Emergency control is designed to sense abnormal conditions and subsequently take pre-determined remedial actions to prevent instability. Commonly known as either Remedial Action Schemes (RAS) or as Special/System Protection Schemes (SPS), these emergency control approaches have been extensively adopted by utilities. RAS are designed to address specific problems, e.g. to increase power transfer, to provide reactive support, to address generator instability, to limit thermal overloads, etc. Possible remedial actions include generator tripping, load shedding, capacitor and reactor switching, static VAR control, etc. Among various RAS types, generation shedding is the most effective and widely used emergency control means for maintaining system stability. In this dissertation, an optimal power flow (OPF)-based generation-shedding RAS is proposed. This scheme uses online transient stability calculation and generator cost function to determine appropriate remedial actions. For transient stability calculation, SIngle Machine Equivalent (SIME) technique is used, which reduces the multimachine power system model to a One-Machine Infinite Bus (OMIB) equivalent and identifies critical machines. Unlike conventional RAS, which are designed using offline simulations, online stability calculations make the proposed RAS dynamic and adapting to any power system

  6. Stability analysis and trend study of a balloon tethered in a wind, with experimental comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redd, L. T.; Bland, S. R.; Bennett, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    A stability analysis and trend study for a balloon tethered in a steady wind are presented. The linearized, stability-derivative type analysis includes balloon aerodynamics, buoyancy, mass (including apparent mass), and static forces resulting from the tether cable. The analysis has been applied to a balloon 7.64 m in length, and the results are compared with those from tow tests of this balloon. This comparison shows that the analysis gives reasonable predictions for the damping, frequencies, modes of motion, and stability boundaries exhibited by the balloon. A trend study for the 7.64-m balloon was made to illustrate how the stability boundaries are affected by changes in individual stability parameters. The trends indicated in this study may also be applicable to many other tethered-balloon systems.

  7. Liner stability analysis of the two-dimensional Taylor-Green vortices in a stratified flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Shota; Hirota, Makoto; Hattori, Yuji

    2015-11-01

    The linear stability of the two-dimensional Taylor-Green vortices in a stratified fluid is studied by modal stability analysis and short-wavelength stability analysis. By modal stability analysis it is found that the growth rate of the most unstable mode depends on the horizontal Froude number Fh and the stratification effects on the growth rate change as Fh becomes small or stratification becomes strong. There are three regions of Fh where the stratification effects are different: the stabilizing region where the elliptic instability is dominant at large Fh, the region where the growth rate has maximum, the slightly destabilizing region where the zigzag instability is dominant at small Fh. In order to reveal the mechanism of the behavior of the growth rate in the second region, we investigate the local stability of the flow near the vortex center and the flow near the boundaries between vortices by short-wavelength analysis. As a result, it is found that the competition between stabilizing elliptic instability near the vortex center and destabilizing hyperbolic instability near the boundaries occurs in the weakly stratified region. The relation between modal stability and the competition of short-wavelength stabilities will be discussed.

  8. Spatio-temporal Linear Stability Analysis of Multiple Reacting Wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunnumpuram Sebastian, Jacob; Emerson, Benjamin; Lieuwen, Tim

    2016-11-01

    Hydrodynamic stability of reacting shear flows plays a key role in controlling a variety of combustor behaviors, such as combustion instability, mixing and entrainment, and blowoff. A significant literature exists on the hydrodynamics of single bluff body flows, but not the multi-bluff body flows that are found in applications. The objective of this work was to compare the spatio-temporal stability of multiple reacting wakes and single reacting wakes, within the framework of linear stability theory. Spatio-temporal stability analyses are conducted on model velocity and density profiles, with key parameters being the density ratio across the flame, bluff body spacing, dimensionless shear, and asymmetry parameters (if the two wakes are dissimilar). The introduction of the additional bluff body can exert both a stabilizing and destabilizing effect on the combined two-wake system, depending on the spatial separation between the bluff bodies. Furthermore, while the most rapidly amplified mode of the single wake mode is the sinuous (asymmetric) one, in the two wake system, the most rapidly amplified mode can be either sinuous or varicose (symmetric), also depending on spatial separation.

  9. Perturbed Stability Analysis of External Ideal MHD Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comer, K. J.; Callen, J. D.; Hegna, C. C.; Garstka, G. D.; Turnbull, A. D.; Garofalo, A. M.; Cowley, S. C.

    2002-11-01

    Traditionally, numerical parameter scans are performed to study the effects of equilibrium shaping and profiles on long wavelength ideal MHD instabilities. Previously, we introduced a new perturbative technique to more efficiently explore these dependencies: changes in delta-W due to small equilibrium variations are found using a perturbation of the energy principle rather than with an eigenvalue-solver instability code. With this approach, the stability properties of similar equilibria can be efficiently explored without generating complete numerical results for every set of parameters (which is time-intensive for accurate representations of several configurations). Here, we apply this approach to toroidal geometry using GATO (an ideal MHD stability code) and experimental equilibria. In particular, we explore ideal MHD stability of external kink modes in the spherical tokamak Pegasus and resistive wall modes in DIII-D.

  10. Strength Analysis of Coconut Fiber Stabilized Earth for Farm Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enokela, O. S.; P. O, Alada

    2012-07-01

    Investigation of the strength characteristic of soil from alluvial deposit of River Benue in makurdi stabilized with coconut fiber as a stabilizer was carried as local building material for farm structure. Processed coconut fibers were mixed with the soil at four different mix ratios of 1% fiber, 2% fiber, 3% fiber and 4% fiber by percentage weight with 0% fiber as control. Compaction test and compressive strength were carried out on the various stabilizing ratio. From the compaction test, the correlation between the maximum dry density and optimum moisture content is a second order polynomial with a coefficient of 63% obtained at1.91kg/m3and 20.0% respectively while the compressive strength test shows an optimum failure load of 8.62N/mm2 at 2%fibre:100% soil mix ratio at 2.16 maximum dry density.

  11. Stability analysis of the Euler discretization for SIR epidemic model

    SciTech Connect

    Suryanto, Agus

    2014-06-19

    In this paper we consider a discrete SIR epidemic model obtained by the Euler method. For that discrete model, existence of disease free equilibrium and endemic equilibrium is established. Sufficient conditions on the local asymptotical stability of both disease free equilibrium and endemic equilibrium are also derived. It is found that the local asymptotical stability of the existing equilibrium is achieved only for a small time step size h. If h is further increased and passes the critical value, then both equilibriums will lose their stability. Our numerical simulations show that a complex dynamical behavior such as bifurcation or chaos phenomenon will appear for relatively large h. Both analytical and numerical results show that the discrete SIR model has a richer dynamical behavior than its continuous counterpart.

  12. Stability analysis of Turing patterns generated by the Schnakenberg model.

    PubMed

    Iron, David; Wei, Juncheng; Winter, Matthias

    2004-10-01

    We consider the following Schnakenberg model on the interval (-1,1): [formula see text] where D1 > 0, D2 > 0, B > 0. We rigorously show that the stability of symmetric N-peaked steady-states can be reduced to computing two matrices in terms of the diffusion coefficients D1, D2 and the number N of peaks. These matrices and their spectra are calculated explicitly and sharp conditions for linear stability are derived. The results are verified by some numerical simulations.

  13. Stability Analysis of Legged Locomotion Models by Symmetry-Factored Return Maps

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    Stability Analysis of Legged Locomotion Models by Symmetry-Factored Return Maps Richard Altendorfer, Daniel E. Koditschek Dept. of Electrical...University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA September 8, 2003 Abstract We present a new stability analysis for hybrid legged locomotion systems based on the...symmetric” fac- torization of return maps. We apply this analysis to 2 and 3 degree of freedom (DOF) models of the Spring Loaded Inverted Pendulum

  14. Advanced techniques for the analysis of crisis stability, deterrence, and latency

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-12-01

    Studies on crisis stability, deterrence, and latency are presented in chronological order, which also reflects their logical order of development, captures the main features of stability analysis; relates first strike, crisis, and arms control stability as seen from US and Russian perspective; and addresses questions such as whether uncertainty in damage preference or defense deployment can be destabilizing. It illustrates the problems with alternative metrics, latency and reconstitution, and deep unilateral and proportional force reductions.

  15. An experimental study on the aeromechanics and wake characteristics of a novel twin-rotor wind turbine in a turbulent boundary layer flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenyu; Tian, Wei; Ozbay, Ahmet; Sharma, Anupam; Hu, Hui

    2016-09-01

    The aeromechanic performance and wake characteristics of a novel twin-rotor wind turbine (TRWT) design, which has an extra set of smaller, auxiliary rotor blades appended in front of the main rotor, was evaluated experimentally, in comparison with those of a conventional single-rotor wind turbine (SRWT) design. The comparative study was performed in a large-scale wind tunnel with scaled TRWT and SRWT models mounted in the same incoming turbulent boundary layer flow. In addition to quantifying power outputs and the dynamic wind loadings acting on the model turbines, the wake characteristics behind the model turbines were also measured by using a particle image velocimetry system and a Cobra anemometry probe. The measurement results reveal that, while the TRWT design is capable of harnessing more wind energy from the same incoming airflow by reducing the roots losses incurred in the region near the roots of the main rotor blades, it also cause much greater dynamic wind loadings acting on the TRWT model and higher velocity deficits in the near wake behind the TRWT model, in comparison with those of the SRWT case. Due to the existence of the auxiliary rotor, more complex vortex structures were found to be generated in the wake behind the TRWT model, which greatly enhanced the turbulent mixing in the turbine wake, and caused a much faster recovery of the velocity deficits in the turbine far wake. As a result, the TRWT design was also found to enable the same downstream turbine to generate more power when sited in the wake behind the TRWT model than that in the SRWT wake, i.e., by mitigating wake losses in typical wind farm settings.

  16. A Quasi-Steady Flexible Launch Vehicle Stability Analysis Using Steady CFD with Unsteady Aerodynamic Enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    Launch vehicles frequently experience a reduced stability margin through the transonic Mach number range. This reduced stability margin is caused by an undamping of the aerodynamics in one of the lower frequency flexible or rigid body modes. Analysis of the behavior of a flexible vehicle is routinely performed with quasi-steady aerodynamic lineloads derived from steady rigid computational fluid dynamics (CFD). However, a quasi-steady aeroelastic stability analysis can be unconservative at the critical Mach numbers where experiment or unsteady computational aeroelastic (CAE) analysis show a reduced or even negative aerodynamic damping. This paper will present a method of enhancing the quasi-steady aeroelastic stability analysis of a launch vehicle with unsteady aerodynamics. The enhanced formulation uses unsteady CFD to compute the response of selected lower frequency modes. The response is contained in a time history of the vehicle lineloads. A proper orthogonal decomposition of the unsteady aerodynamic lineload response is used to reduce the scale of data volume and system identification is used to derive the aerodynamic stiffness, damping and mass matrices. The results of the enhanced quasi-static aeroelastic stability analysis are compared with the damping and frequency computed from unsteady CAE analysis and from a quasi-steady analysis. The results show that incorporating unsteady aerodynamics in this way brings the enhanced quasi-steady aeroelastic stability analysis into close agreement with the unsteady CAE analysis.

  17. Dynamical behavior and Jacobi stability analysis of wound strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lake, Matthew J.; Harko, Tiberiu

    2016-06-01

    We numerically solve the equations of motion (EOM) for two models of circular cosmic string loops with windings in a simply connected internal space. Since the windings cannot be topologically stabilized, stability must be achieved (if at all) dynamically. As toy models for realistic compactifications, we consider windings on a small section of mathbb {R}^2, which is valid as an approximation to any simply connected internal manifold if the winding radius is sufficiently small, and windings on an S^2 of constant radius mathcal {R}. We then use Kosambi-Cartan-Chern (KCC) theory to analyze the Jacobi stability of the string equations and determine bounds on the physical parameters that ensure dynamical stability of the windings. We find that, for the same initial conditions, the curvature and topology of the internal space have nontrivial effects on the microscopic behavior of the string in the higher dimensions, but that the macroscopic behavior is remarkably insensitive to the details of the motion in the compact space. This suggests that higher-dimensional signatures may be extremely difficult to detect in the effective (3+1)-dimensional dynamics of strings compactified on an internal space, even if configurations with nontrivial windings persist over long time periods.

  18. Quiet Clean Short-haul Experimental Engine (QCSEE). Aerodynamic and aeromechanical performance of a 50.8 cm (20 inch) diameter 1.34 PR variable pitch fan with core flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giffin, R. G.; Mcfalls, R. A.; Beacher, B. F.

    1977-01-01

    The fan aerodynamic and aeromechanical performance tests of the quiet clean short haul experimental engine under the wing fan and inlet with a simulated core flow are described. Overall forward mode fan performance is presented at each rotor pitch angle setting with conventional flow pressure ratio efficiency fan maps, distinguishing the performance characteristics of the fan bypass and fan core regions. Effects of off design bypass ratio, hybrid inlet geometry, and tip radial inlet distortion on fan performance are determined. The nonaxisymmetric bypass OGV and pylon configuration is assessed relative to both total pressure loss and induced circumferential flow distortion. Reverse mode performance, obtained by resetting the rotor blades through both the stall pitch and flat pitch directions, is discussed in terms of the conventional flow pressure ratio relationship and its implications upon achievable reverse thrust. Core performance in reverse mode operation is presented in terms of overall recovery levels and radial profiles existing at the simulated core inlet plane. Observations of the starting phenomena associated with the initiation of stable rotor flow during acceleration in the reverse mode are briefly discussed. Aeromechanical response characteristics of the fan blades are presented as a separate appendix, along with a description of the vehicle instrumentation and method of data reduction.

  19. F-111 natural laminar flow glove flight test data analysis and boundary layer stability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runyan, L. J.; Navran, B. H.; Rozendaal, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    An analysis of 34 selected flight test data cases from a NASA flight program incorporating a natural laminar flow airfoil into partial wing gloves on the F-111 TACT airplane is given. This analysis determined the measured location of transition from laminar to turbulent flow. The report also contains the results of a boundary layer stability analysis of 25 of the selected cases in which the crossflow (C-F) and Tollmien-Schlichting (T-S) disturbance amplification factors are correlated with the measured transition location. The chord Reynolds numbers for these cases ranges from about 23 million to 29 million, the Mach numbers ranged from 0.80 to 0.85, and the glove leading-edge sweep angles ranged from 9 deg to 25 deg. Results indicate that the maximum extent of laminar flow varies from 56% chord to 9-deg sweep on the upper surface, and from 51% chord at 16-deg sweep to 6% chord at 25-deg sweep on the lower. The results of the boundary layer stability analysis indicate that when both C-F and T-S disturbances are amplified, an interaction takes place which reduces the maximum amplification factor of either type of disturbance that can be tolerated without causing transition.

  20. Does Premarital Cohabitation Predict Subsequent Marital Stability and Marital Quality? A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jose, Anita; O'Leary, K. Daniel; Moyer, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Cohabitation with a romantic partner has become common in recent decades. This meta-analysis examined the link between premarital cohabitation and marital stability (k = 16) and marital quality (k = 12). Cohabitation had a significant negative association with both marital stability and marital quality. The negative predictive effect on marital…

  1. Stability and Change in Work Values: A Meta-Analysis of Longitudinal Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jin, Jing; Rounds, James

    2012-01-01

    A meta-analysis of longitudinal studies was conducted to investigate stability and change in work values across the life span. Both rank-order stability and mean-level change were investigated using an integrative classification for intrinsic, extrinsic, social and status work values (Ross, Schwartz, & Surkis, 1999). Results of rank-order…

  2. Analysis of a Stabilized CNLF Method with Fast Slow Wave Splittings for Flow Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Nan; Tran, Hoang A.

    2015-04-01

    In this work, we study Crank-Nicolson leap-frog (CNLF) methods with fast-slow wave splittings for Navier-Stokes equations (NSE) with a rotation/Coriolis force term, which is a simplification of geophysical flows. We propose a new stabilized CNLF method where the added stabilization completely removes the method's CFL time step condition. A comprehensive stability and error analysis is given. We also prove that for Oseen equations with the rotation term, the unstable mode (for which u(n+1) + u(n-1) equivalent to 0) of CNLF is asymptotically stable. Numerical results are provided to verify the stability and the convergence of the methods.

  3. Advanced techniques for the analysis of crisis stability, deterrence, and latency

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The principal results of studies on crisis stability, deterrence, and latency are presented in their order of development. They capture the main features of stability analysis; relate first strike, crisis, and arms control stability as seen from US and Russian perspective; and address whether different metrics, uncertain damage preferences, or the deployment of defenses can be destabilizing. The report explores differences between unilateral and proportional force reductions in the region of deep reductions where concern shifts from stability to latency.

  4. Thermal stability analysis of the fine structure of solar prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demoulin, Pascal; Malherbe, Jean-Marie; Schmieder, Brigitte; Raadu, Mickael A.

    1986-01-01

    The linear thermal stability of a 2D periodic structure (alternatively hot and cold) in a uniform magnetic field is analyzed. The energy equation includes wave heating (assumed proportional to density), radiative cooling and both conduction parallel and orthogonal to magnetic lines. The equilibrium is perturbed at constant gas pressure. With parallel conduction only, it is found to be unstable when the length scale 1// is greater than 45 Mn. In that case, orthogonal conduction becomes important and stabilizes the structure when the length scale is smaller than 5 km. On the other hand, when the length scale is greater than 5 km, the thermal equilibrium is unstable, and the corresponding time scale is about 10,000 s: this result may be compared to observations showing that the lifetime of the fine structure of solar prominences is about one hour; consequently, our computations suggest that the size of the unresolved threads could be of the order of 10 km only.

  5. Linear MHD Stability Analysis of the SSPX Spheromak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayakumar, R.; Cohen, B. I.; Hooper, E. B.; Lodestro, L. L.; McLean, H. S.; Pearlstein, L. D.; Wood, R.; Turnbull, A. D.; Sovinec, C.

    2007-11-01

    Good correlation between the toroidal mode numbers of measured magnetic fluctuations in high temperature SSPX plasmas and presence of low-order rational surfaces in the reconstructed q profiles, suggests that the quality of magnetic surfaces in SSPX is sufficiently good for applying standard linear MHD stability analyses. Previously we have reported on benchmarking the code NIMROD against GATO, with good agreement in growth rates for ideal-MHD internal kinks and an external kinks with no current on open field lines (for equilibria imported from the code Corsica). Recent stability analyses also show that presence of low order rational surfaces causes internal modes to become unstable. We will report on the progress in applying these tools for assessing beta limits in SSPX, using NIMROD analyses including current on open field lines and for comparison with experiments.

  6. Stability analysis of f( R)-AdS black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Taeyoon; Myung, Yun Soo; Son, Edwin J.

    2011-10-01

    We study the stability of the f( R)-AdS (Schwarzschild-AdS) black hole obtained from f( R) gravity. In order to resolve the difficulty of solving fourth-order linearized equations, we transform f( R) gravity into scalar-tensor theory by introducing two auxiliary scalars. In this case, the linearized curvature scalar becomes a dynamical scalaron, showing that all linearized equations are second order. Using the positivity of gravitational potentials and S-deformed technique allows us to guarantee the stability of f( R)-AdS black hole if the scalaron mass squared satisfies the Breitenlohner-Freedman bound. This is confirmed by computing quasinormal frequencies of the scalaron for the f( R)-AdS black hole.

  7. Flow structure and stability analysis for back-step flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihaiescu, Adrian; Wesfreid, Jose Eduardo

    2005-11-01

    The structure and stability of the flow over a backward-facing step are studied using direct numerical simulation. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulations are conducted at a Reynolds number between 50 and 600. The reattachment length and velocity profiles are in agreement with the experimental and numerical results reported by J.-F. Beaudoin et al.(2003). The Rayleigh discriminant and the Gortler number are calculated for the stability study. Present results identify the same regions of instability as previously found by the two-dimensional simulations of Beaudoin et al., but the values of both Rayleigh discriminant and Gortler number are significantly different. Two Eckman structures close to the lateral walls, followed inside the flow domain by two Gortler structures, located downstream the step are identified. It is shown that other Gortler structures appear when a spanwise periodic perturbation of the inflow velocity is imposed. However, these longitudinal structures depend on the inflow conditions.

  8. Fundamental analysis of dynamic stability in superconductive power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mitani, Y.; Tsuji, K.; Murakami, Y. . Faculty of Engineering)

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports on applications of superconductivity to power systems which have possible advantages in economy, reliability and stability. On the other side, superconductive power systems have risks of including insufficient damping due to the effect of inductance-capacitance (LC) resonance. This may cause subsynchronous resonance oscillations (SSR) represented by self-excited oscillation and torsional oscillation of rotor-turbine shafts. The main subject of this paper is to analyze numerically SSR and electro-mechanical power swing in a model power system with superconductive power apparatus. A stabilizing control scheme which uses the stored energy in the field winding circuit of superconductive generator, is applied to some instabilities and its effectiveness is confirmed in a digital simulation study.

  9. Thermal Stability Analysis for a Heliocentric Gravitational Radiation Detection Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folkner, W.; McElroy, P.; Miyake, R.; Bender, P.; Stebbins, R.; Supper, W.

    1994-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission is designed for detailed studies of low-frequency gravitational radiation. The mission is currently a candidate for ESA's post-Horizon 2000 program. Thermal noise affects the measurement in at least two ways. Thermal variation of the length of the optical cavity to which the lasers are stabilized introduces phase variations in the interferometer signal, which have to be corrected for by using data from the two arms separately.

  10. Preliminary Experimental Analysis of Soil Stabilizers for Contamination Control

    SciTech Connect

    Lagos, L.; Varona, J.; Zidan, A.; Gudavalli, R.; Wu, Kuang-His

    2006-07-01

    A major focus of Department of Energy's (DOE's) environmental management mission at the Hanford site involves characterizing and remediating contaminated soil and groundwater; stabilizing contaminated soil; remediating disposal sites; decontaminating and decommissioning structures, and demolishing former plutonium production process buildings, nuclear reactors, and separation plants; maintaining inactive waste sites; transitioning facilities into the surveillance and maintenance program; and mitigating effects to biological and cultural resources from site development and environmental cleanup and restoration activities. For example, a total of 470,914 metric tons of contaminated soil from 100 Areas remediation activities were disposed at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) during 2004. The Applied Research Center (ARC) at Florida International University (FIU) is supporting the Hanford's site remediation program by analyzing the effectiveness of several soil stabilizers (fixatives) for contamination control during excavation activities. The study is focusing on determining the effects of varying soil conditions, temperature, humidity and wind velocity on the effectiveness of the candidate stabilizers. The test matrix consists of a soil penetration-depth study, wind tunnel experiments for determination of threshold velocity, and temperature and moisture-controlled drying/curing experiments. These three set of experiments are designed to verify performance metrics, as well as provide insight into what fundamental forces are altered by the use of the stabilizer. This paper only presents the preliminary results obtained during wind tunnel experiments using dry Hanford soil samples (with 2.7% moisture by weight). These dry soil samples were exposed to varying wind speeds from 2.22 m/sec to 8.88 m/sec. Furthermore, airborne particulate data was collected for the dry Hanford soil experiments using an aerosol analyzer instrument. (authors)

  11. Local stability analysis for a planar shock wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salas, M. D.

    1984-01-01

    A procedure to study the local stability of planar shock waves is presented. The procedure is applied to a Rankine-Hugoniot shock in a divergent/convergent nozzle, to an isentropic shock in a divergent/convergent nozzle, and to Rankine-Hugoniot shocks attached to wedges and cones. It is shown that for each case, the equation governing the shock motion is equivalent to the damped harmonic oscillator equation.

  12. The Stability of Social Desirability: A Latent Change Analysis.

    PubMed

    Haberecht, Katja; Schnuerer, Inga; Gaertner, Beate; John, Ulrich; Freyer-Adam, Jennis

    2015-08-01

    Social desirability has been shown to be stable in samples with higher school education. However, little is known about the stability of social desirability in more heterogeneous samples differing in school education. This study aimed to investigate the stability of social desirability and which factors predict interindividual differences in intraindividual change. As part of a randomized controlled trial, 1,243 job seekers with unhealthy alcohol use were systematically recruited at three job agencies. A total of 1,094 individuals (87.8%) participated in at least one of two follow-ups (6 and 15 months after baseline) and constitute this study's sample. The Social Desirability Scale-17 was applied. Two latent change models were conducted: Model 1 tested for interindividual differences in intraindividual change of social desirability between both follow-ups; Model 2 included possible predictors (age, sex, education, current employment status) of interindividual differences in intraindividual change. Model 1 revealed a significant decrease of social desirability over time. Model 2 revealed school education to be the only significant predictor of change. These findings indicate that stability of social desirability may depend on school education. It may not be as stable in individuals with higher school education as in individuals with lower education.

  13. Analysis of the stability and sensitivity of jets in crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, Marc; Mahesh, Krishnan

    2016-11-01

    Jets in crossflow (transverse jets) are a canonical fluid flow in which a jet of fluid is injected normal to a crossflow. A high-fidelity, unstructured, incompressible, DNS solver is shown (Iyer & Mahesh 2016) to reproduce the complex shear layer instability seen in low-speed jets in crossflow experiments. Vertical velocity spectra taken along the shear layer show good agreement between simulation and experiment. An analogy to countercurrent mixing layers has been proposed to explain the transition from absolute to convective stability with increasing jet to crossflow ratios. Global linear stability and adjoint sensitivity techniques are developed within the unstructured DNS solver in an effort to further understand the stability and sensitivity of jets in crossflow. An Arnoldi iterative approach is used to solve for the most unstable eigenvalues and their associated eigenmodes for the direct and adjoint formulations. Frequencies from the direct and adjoint modal analyses show good agreement with simulation and experiment. Development, validation, and results for the transverse jet will be presented. Supported by AFOSR.

  14. Experimental stability analysis of different water-based nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedele, Laura; Colla, Laura; Bobbo, Sergio; Barison, Simona; Agresti, Filippo

    2011-12-01

    In the recent years, great interest has been devoted to the unique properties of nanofluids. The dispersion process and the nanoparticle suspension stability have been found to be critical points in the development of these new fluids. For this reason, an experimental study on the stability of water-based dispersions containing different nanoparticles, i.e. single wall carbon nanohorns (SWCNHs), titanium dioxide (TiO2) and copper oxide (CuO), has been developed in this study. The aim of this study is to provide stable nanofluids for selecting suitable fluids with enhanced thermal characteristics. Different dispersion techniques were considered in this study, including sonication, ball milling and high-pressure homogenization. Both the dispersion process and the use of some dispersants were investigated as a function of the nanoparticle concentration. The high-pressure homogenization was found to be the best method, and the addition of n-dodecyl sulphate and polyethylene glycol as dispersants, respectively in SWCNHs-water and TiO2-water nanofluids, improved the nanofluid stability.

  15. Stability analysis of a simple rheonomic nonholonomic constrained system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chang; Liu, Shi-Xing; Mei, Feng-Xing

    2016-12-01

    It is a difficult problem to study the stability of the rheonomic and nonholonomic mechanical systems. Especially it is difficult to construct the Lyapunov function directly from the differential equation. But the gradient system is exactly suitable to study the stability of a dynamical system with the aid of the Lyapunov function. The stability of the solution for a simple rheonomic nonholonomic constrained system is studied in this paper. Firstly, the differential equations of motion of the system are established. Secondly, a problem in which the generalized forces are exerted on the system such that the solution is stable is proposed. Finally, the stable solutions of the rheonomic nonholonomic system can be constructed by using the gradient systems. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11272050, 11202090, 11472124, 11572034, and 11572145), the Science and Technology Research Project of Liaoning Province, China (Grant No. L2013005), China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2014M560203), and the Doctor Start-up Fund in Liaoning Province of China (Grant No. 20141050).

  16. Stability analysis of underground mining openings with complex geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cała, Marek; Stopkowicz, Agnieszka; Kowalski, Michał; Blajer, Mateusz; Cyran, Katarzyna; D'obyrn, Kajetan

    2016-03-01

    Stability of mining openings requires consideration of a number of factors, such as: geological structure, the geometry of the underground mining workings, mechanical properties of the rock mass, changes in stress caused by the influence of neighbouring workings. Long-term prediction and estimation of workings state can be analysed with the use of numerical methods. Application of 3D numerical modelling in stability estimation of workings with complex geometry was described with the example of Crystal Caves in Wieliczka Salt Mine. Preservation of the Crystal Caves reserve is particularly important in view of their unique character and the protection of adjacent galleries which are a part of tourist attraction included in UNESCO list. A detailed 3D model of Crystal Caves and neighbouring workings was built. Application of FLAC3D modelling techniques enabled indication of the areas which are in danger of stability loss. Moreover, the area in which protective actions should be taken as well as recommendations concerning the convergence monitoring were proposed.

  17. APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT: SITE PROGRAM DEMONSTRATION TEST SOLIDITECH, INC. SOLIDIFICATION/ STABILIZATION PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Applications Analysis Report evaluates the Soliditech, Inc., solidification/ stabilization process for the on-site treatment of waste materials. The Soliditech process mixes and chemically treats waste material with Urrichem (a proprietary reagent), additives, pozzolanic mat...

  18. SILICATE TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION'S SOLIDIFICATION/ STABILIZATION TECHNOLOGY FOR ORGANIC AND INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN SOILS - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Applications Analysis Report evaluates the solidification/stabilization treatment process of Silicate Technology Corporation (STC) for the on-site treatment of hazardous waste. The STC immobilization technology utilizes a proprietary product (FMS Silicate) to chemically stab...

  19. Non-parametric estimation and component analysis of phenotypic stability in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    PubMed

    Yaghotipoor, Anita; Farshadfar, E

    2007-08-15

    In order to determine phenotypic stability and contribution of yield components in the phenotypic stability of grain yield 21 genotypes of chickpea were evaluated in a randomized complete block design with three replications under rainfed and irrigated conditions in college of Agriculture, Razi University of Kermanshah, Iran, across 4 years. Non-parametric combined analysis of variance showed high significant differences for genotypes and genotype-environment interaction indicating the presence of genetic variation and possibility of selection for stable genotypes. The genotype number 8 (Filip92-9c) with minimum Si(2) and Si(2) of yield stability and grain yield in one parameter also revealed that genotype Filip92-9c was the most desirable variety for both yield and yield stability. Component analysis using Ci-value displayed that number of shrub per unit area has the most contribution on the grain yield phenotypic stability.

  20. Analysis of a Major Electric Grid -- Stability and Adaptive Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alanzi, Sultan

    system conditions. This dissertation introduces a combination of quadrilateral and mho characteristics to create a distance relay with a mushroom shape in R-X diagrams. This new relay offers larger protective reach with a lower limitation on loadability. When major disturbances occur, the power balance between load and generation might be disturbed causing the generators to lose synchronism (to be out-of-step) with each other. Out-of-step protection against power swings is essential to provide supervising signals for distance relays to mitigate the effects of the disturbance. A new R-X criterion is proposed to identify out-of-step conditions for large and complex power systems, such as KEG. A proposed Adaptive Out-of-Step Relay (AOSR) will monitor power system conditions and adjust the relay reach accordingly for better power swing classification. When unstable swings are detected, controllable tripping signals are initiated and system separation will create small subsystems or islands of the power system. These smaller systems will be created to achieve a balance of load and available generation. The electric power system chosen to study and to illustrate the criteria for the proposed adaptive relays was that of the country of Kuwait. The small oil-rich country of Kuwait has been dealing with an electric energy crisis that started summer 2006. With a dry dessert climate and intensely hot summers, the 3.6 million residents of Kuwait depend on continuously operated A/C units for living. This is the major reason why the peak load in a summer month reaches almost 11,000 MW while the peak load in a winter month does not exceed 5,000 MW. The Kuwait Electric Grid (KEG) is modelled and analyzed using Power Analytics' software known as PaladinRTM DesignBase(TM). Performance studies produce data to examine distance and out-of-step protection. Power Flow (PF), Short Circuit Analysis (SCA), and Transient Stability Analysis (TSA) are used to verify the model of KEG. These studies

  1. Fuzzy Current-Mode Control and Stability Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    2000-01-01

    In this paper a current-mode control (CMC) methodology is developed for a buck converter by using a fuzzy logic controller. Conventional CMC methodologies are based on lead-lag compensation with voltage and inductor current feedback. In this paper the converter lead-lag compensation will be substituted with a fuzzy controller. A small-signal model of the fuzzy controller will also be developed in order to examine the stability properties of this buck converter control system. The paper develops an analytical approach, introducing fuzzy control into the area of CMC.

  2. Stability Analysis for Constrained Principal Axis Slew Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seywald, Hans; Lim, Kyong B.; Anthony, Tobin C.

    1996-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of reorienting a rigid spacecraft from arbitrary initial conditions to prescribed final conditions with zero angular velocity. The control law analyzed is based on quaternion feedback and leaves the user to choose two gains as functions of position, angular rate, and time. For arbitrary initial states, conditions on the controller gains are identified that guarantee global asymptotic stability. For the special case of rest-to-rest reorientations, the control law reduces to earlier results involving a principal axis rotation. The paper also addresses slew rate constraints, both, in terms of the two and infinity norms.

  3. Qualitative analysis of the stability of a continuous vermicomposting system.

    PubMed

    Hu, Enzhu; Liu, Hong

    2012-12-01

    A mathematical model was established to describe ecological relationships in a continuous vermicomposting system. The distributions of organic matter, microbes and earthworms on non-dimensional specific growth rates were simulated. The range of specific growth rates were visualized utilizing three-dimensional reconstruction technology. The stability of a vermicomposting system was not influenced by the initial concentrations of microbes and earthworms, only their species. The coordinates of the stable point depended on the dilution rate and initial amount of organic matter. The method described could be help for establishing a stable continuous vermicomposting system.

  4. Stability analysis of traffic flow with extended CACC control models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ya-Zhou, Zheng; Rong-Jun, Cheng; Siu-Ming, Lo; Hong-Xia, Ge

    2016-06-01

    To further investigate car-following behaviors in the cooperative adaptive cruise control (CACC) strategy, a comprehensive control system which can handle three traffic conditions to guarantee driving efficiency and safety is designed by using three CACC models. In this control system, some vital comprehensive information, such as multiple preceding cars’ speed differences and headway, variable safety distance (VSD) and time-delay effect on the traffic current and the jamming transition have been investigated via analytical or numerical methods. Local and string stability criterion for the velocity control (VC) model and gap control (GC) model are derived via linear stability theory. Numerical simulations are conducted to study the performance of the simulated traffic flow. The simulation results show that the VC model and GC model can improve driving efficiency and suppress traffic congestion. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 71571107 and 11302110). The Scientific Research Fund of Zhejiang Province, China (Grant Nos. LY15A020007, LY15E080013, and LY16G010003). The Natural Science Foundation of Ningbo City (Grant Nos. 2014A610030 and 2015A610299), the Fund from the Government of the Hong Kong Administrative Region, China (Grant No. CityU11209614), and the K C Wong Magna Fund in Ningbo University, China.

  5. Reflectance stability analysis of Spectralon diffuse calibration panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruegge, Carol J.; Stiegman, Albert E.; Coulter, Daniel R.; Hale, Robert R.; Diner, David J.; Springsteen, Arthur W.

    1991-01-01

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) plans to use deployable diffuse reflectance panels to provide periodic radiometric calibrations of its nine cameras while in-flight. Near-Lambertian reflectance characteristics are desirable to facilitate flat-field camera intercomparisons. Also required is panel spatial and spectral uniformity, and stability with time. Spectralon, a commercially available polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) compound, has been baselined in the MISR design. To assess the suitability of this material, a series of degradation tests were planned and implemented. These included UV vacuum exposure and proton bombardment tests which simulated the exposure levels to be encountered during the mission life. Proton levels are now considered too low to be of concern, but UV vacuum tests demonstrate sensitivity to material contamination. Material investigations have concluded that hydrocarbons are present in the bulk of the material, and that plastic packaging materials can introduce additional surface-layer contamination. It is found however, that these unwanted elements can be eliminated through vacuum pumping at elevated temperatures. Exposure to a UV source, while in vacuum, is again planned for a set of targets which have been vacuum baked. This will assess the stability of the pure PTFE form.

  6. A stability analysis of AVE-4 severe weather soundings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    The stability and vertical structure of an average severe storm sounding, consisting of both thermodynamic and wind vertical profiles, were investigated to determine if they could be distinguished from an average lag sounding taken 3 to 6 hours prior to severe weather occurrence. The term average is defined here to indicate the arithmetic mean of a parameter, as a function of altitude, determined from a large number of available observations taken either close to severe weather occurrence, or else more than 3 hours before it occurs. The investigative computations were also done to help determine if a severe storm forecast or index could possibly be used or developed. These mean vertical profiles of thermodynamic and wind parameters as a function of severity of the weather, determined from manually digitized radar (MDR) categories are presented. Profile differences and stability index differences are presented along with the development of the Johnson Lag Index (JLI) which is determined entirely upon environmental vertical parameter differences between conditions 3 hours prior to severe weather, and severe weather itself.

  7. Stability Analysis of a Model for Foreign Body Fibrotic Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Ibraguimov, A.; Owens, L.; Su, J.; Tang, L.

    2012-01-01

    Implanted medical devices often trigger immunological and inflammatory reactions from surrounding tissues. The foreign body-mediated tissue responses may result in varying degrees of fibrotic tissue formation. There is an intensive research interest in the area of wound healing modeling, and quantitative methods are proposed to systematically study the behavior of this complex system of multiple cells, proteins, and enzymes. This paper introduces a kinetics-based model for analyzing reactions of various cells/proteins and biochemical processes as well as their transient behavior during the implant healing in 2-dimensional space. In particular, we provide a detailed modeling study of different roles of macrophages (MΦ) and their effects on fibrotic reactions. The main mathematical result indicates that the stability of the inflamed steady state depends primarily on the reaction dynamics of the system. However, if the said equilibrium is unstable by its reaction-only system, the spatial diffusion and chemotactic effects can help to stabilize when the model is dominated by classical and regulatory macrophages over the inflammatory macrophages. The mathematical proof and counter examples are given for these conclusions. PMID:23193430

  8. A Complete 2D Stability Analysis of Fast MHD Shocks in an Ideal Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trakhinin, Yuri

    An algorithm of numerical testing of the uniform Lopatinski condition for linearized stability problems for 1-shocks is suggested. The algorithm is used for finding the domains of uniform stability, neutral stability, and instability of planar fast MHD shocks. A complete stability analysis of fast MHD shock waves is first carried out in two space dimensions for the case of an ideal gas. Main results are given for the adiabatic constant γ=5/3 (mono-atomic gas), that is most natural for the MHD model. The cases γ=7/5 (two-atomic gas) and γ>5/3 are briefly discussed. Not only the domains of instability and linear (in the usual sense) stability, but also the domains of uniform stability, for which a corresponding linearized stability problem satisfies the uniform Lopatinski condition, are numerically found for different given angles of inclination of the magnetic field behind the shock to the planar shock front. As is known, uniform linearized stability implies the nonlinear stability, that is local existence of discontinuous shock front solutions of a quasilinear system of hyperbolic conservation laws.

  9. Kinetic Analysis of Haloacetonitrile Stability in Drinking Waters.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yun; Reckhow, David A

    2015-09-15

    Haloacetonitriles (HANs) are an important class of drinking water disinfection byproducts (DBPs) that are reactive and can undergo considerable transformation on time scales relevant to system distribution (i.e., from a few hours to a week or more). The stability of seven mono-, di-, and trihaloacetonitriles was examined under a variety of conditions including different pH levels and disinfectant doses that are typical of drinking water distribution systems. Results indicated that hydroxide, hypochlorite, and their protonated forms could react with HANs via nucleophilic attack on the nitrile carbon, forming the corresponding haloacetamides (HAMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs) as major reaction intermediates and end products. Other stable intermediate products, such as the N-chloro-haloacetamides (N-chloro-HAMs), may form during the course of HAN chlorination. A scheme of pathways for the HAN reactions was proposed, and the rate constants for individual reactions were estimated. Under slightly basic conditions, hydroxide and hypochlorite are primary reactants and their associated second-order reaction rate constants were estimated to be 6 to 9 orders of magnitude higher than those of their protonated conjugates (i.e., neutral water and hypochlorous acid), which are much weaker but more predominant nucleophiles at neutral and acidic pHs. Developed using the estimated reaction rate constants, the linear free energy relationships (LFERs) summarized the nucleophilic nature of HAN reactions and demonstrated an activating effect of the electron withdrawing halogens on nitrile reactivity, leading to decreasing HAN stability with increasing degree of halogenation of the substituents, while subsequent shift from chlorine to bromine atoms has a contrary stabilizing effect on HANs. The chemical kinetic model together with the reaction rate constants that were determined in this work can be used for quantitative predictions of HAN concentrations depending on pH and free chlorine

  10. Analysis of cavern stability at the Bryan Mound SPR site.

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, Brian L.; Sobolik, Steven Ronald

    2009-04-01

    This report presents computational analyses that simulate the structural response of caverns at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Bryan Mound site. The cavern field comprises 20 caverns. Five caverns (1, 2, 4, and 5; 3 was later plugged and abandoned) were acquired from industry and have unusual shapes and a history dating back to 1946. The other 16 caverns (101-116) were leached according to SPR standards in the mid-1980s and have tall cylindrical shapes. The history of the caverns and their shapes are simulated in a 3-D geomechanics model of the site that predicts deformations, strains, and stresses. Future leaching scenarios due to oil drawdowns using fresh water are also simulated by increasing the volume of the caverns. Cavern pressures are varied in the model to capture operational practices in the field. The results of the finite element model are interpreted to provide information on the current and future status of subsidence, well integrity, and cavern stability. The most significant result in this report is relevant to caverns 1, 2, and 5. The caverns have non-cylindrical shapes and have potential regions where the surrounding salt may be damaged during workover procedures. During a workover the normal cavern operating pressure is lowered to service a well. At this point the wellhead pressures are atmospheric. When the workover is complete, the cavern is repressurized. The resulting elastic stresses are sufficient to cause tension and large deviatoric stresses at several locations. With time, these stresses relax to a compressive state due to salt creep. However, the potential for salt damage and fracturing exists. The analyses predict tensile stresses at locations with sharp-edges in the wall geometry, or in the case of cavern 5, in the neck region between the upper and lower lobes of the cavern. The effects do not appear to be large-scale, however, so the only major impact is the potential for stress-induced salt falls in cavern 5, potentially leading to

  11. Slope stability analysis for Valles Marineris, Mars: a numerical analysis of controlling conditions and failure types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosta, G.; Castellanza, R.; De Blasio, F.; Utili, S.

    2012-04-01

    Valles Marineris (VM hereafter) in the equatorial area of Mars exhibits several gravitative failures often involving the whole 6-8 km thickness of the valley walls. The failures have resulted in a series of long-runout landslides up to several hundred cubic kilometres in volume (Quantin et al., 2004), and the formation of sub-circular alcoves perched on the top. Several questions arise as to forces at play in the stability of the walls of VM, the geometrical shape of the alcoves and the shape and long-runout of the landslides (see for example Lucas et al., 2011). In this work, we concentrate on the stability analysis of the walls of VM with two precise questions in mind starting from past studies (Bigot-Cormier and Montgomery, 2006; Neuffer and Schultz, 2006, Schultz, 2002). The first concerns the properties of the materials that give origin to instability. We performed several finite element and discrete element calculations tailored to slope stability analysis based on the genuine shape of the walls of VM taken from the MOLA topographic data. We considered stratified and differently altered/degraded materials to define the range of physical mechanical properties required for failure to occur and to explain the discrete distribution of failures along the VM valley flanks. A second question addressed in this work is the geometrical shape of the sub-circular alcoves. Normally, these shapes are commonplace for slopes made of uniform and isotropic properties, and are also observed in subaqueous environment. We performed calculations taking into consideration the progressive failure in the slope showing the final results in terms of surface failure geometry. Bigot-Cormier, F., Montgomery, D.R. (2007) Valles Marineris landslides: Evidence for a strength limit to Martian relief? Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 260, 1-2, 15, 179-186 Lucas, A., Mangeney, A., Mège, D., and Bouchut, F., 2011. Influence of the scar geometry on landslide dynamics and deposits

  12. Algebraic geometrization of the Kuramoto model: Equilibria and stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Dhagash; Daleo, Noah S.; Dörfler, Florian; Hauenstein, Jonathan D.

    2015-05-01

    Finding equilibria of the finite size Kuramoto model amounts to solving a nonlinear system of equations, which is an important yet challenging problem. We translate this into an algebraic geometry problem and use numerical methods to find all of the equilibria for various choices of coupling constants K, natural frequencies, and on different graphs. We note that for even modest sizes (N ˜ 10-20), the number of equilibria is already more than 100 000. We analyze the stability of each computed equilibrium as well as the configuration of angles. Our exploration of the equilibrium landscape leads to unexpected and possibly surprising results including non-monotonicity in the number of equilibria, a predictable pattern in the indices of equilibria, counter-examples to conjectures, multi-stable equilibrium landscapes, scenarios with only unstable equilibria, and multiple distinct extrema in the stable equilibrium distribution as a function of the number of cycles in the graph.

  13. Stability analysis for drugs with multiple active ingredients.

    PubMed

    Chow, Shein-Chung; Shao, Jun

    2007-03-30

    For every drug product on the market, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requires that an expiration dating period (shelf-life) must be indicated on the immediate container label. For determination of the expiration dating period of a drug product, regulatory requirements and statistical methodology are provided in the FDA and ICH Guidelines. However, this guideline is developed for drug products with a single active ingredient. There are many drug products consisting of multiple active ingredients, especially for most traditional Chinese medicine. In this article, we propose a statistical method for determining the shelf-life of a drug product with multiple active ingredients following similar idea as suggested by the FDA and assuming that these active ingredients are linear combinations of some factors. Stability data observed from a traditional Chinese medicine were analysed to illustrate the proposed method.

  14. Von Neumann stability analysis of the u- p reproducing kernel formulation for saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Sheng-Wei; Siriaksorn, Thanakorn; Lin, Shih-Po

    2017-02-01

    This paper introduces the von Neumann method to investigate the temporal stability of the displacement-pressure (u{-}p) reproducing kernel formulation for saturated porous media. Both dynamic and quasi-static formulations are considered and the critical time steps are derived. The effect of lumped and consistent matrices on temporal stability is analyzed under explicit temporal discretization. It is shown that lumped matrices have better temporal stability than consistent matrices. The study also shows that nodal support size greatly affects the critical time step size of the formulations. For consistent matrices, larger support size results in smaller critical time step size; however, opposite relation occurs if lumped scheme is used. The numerical study shows that stabilization parameter of the stabilized nodal integration methods reduces the critical time step size. Transient analyses are performed to verify the results from von Neumann analysis.

  15. Analysis of stability of a planar solid-liquid interface in a dilute binary alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laxmanan, V.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reconsiders the question of stability of a planar solid-liquid interface in an undercooled alloy melt without making the restrictive assumption of no heat flow in the solid (i.e., Gs = 0). The results of this analysis indicate that, provided the thermal gradient on the solid side of the interface, Gs, is positive, stability can be achieved in an undercooled alloy melt for growth rates R greater than Ra (where Ra is the absolute stability limit of Mullins and Sekerka, 1964). Thus, the absolute stability criterion for steady-state planar growth in an undercooled alloy melt is the same as derived earlier by Mullins and Sekerka for directional solidification. Relaxing the restrictive assumption of Gs = 0 also reveals that there is a regime of stability for low growth rates and low supercoolings.

  16. The beauty of simple adaptive control and new developments in nonlinear systems stability analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Barkana, Itzhak

    2014-12-10

    Although various adaptive control techniques have been around for a long time and in spite of successful proofs of stability and even successful demonstrations of performance, the eventual use of adaptive control methodologies in practical real world systems has met a rather strong resistance from practitioners and has remained limited. Apparently, it is difficult to guarantee or even understand the conditions that can guarantee stable operations of adaptive control systems under realistic operational environments. Besides, it is difficult to measure the robustness of adaptive control system stability and allow it to be compared with the common and widely used measure of phase margin and gain margin that is utilized by present, mainly LTI, controllers. Furthermore, customary stability analysis methods seem to imply that the mere stability of adaptive systems may be adversely affected by any tiny deviation from the pretty idealistic and assumably required stability conditions. This paper first revisits the fundamental qualities of customary direct adaptive control methodologies, in particular the classical Model Reference Adaptive Control, and shows that some of their basic drawbacks have been addressed and eliminated within the so-called Simple Adaptive Control methodology. Moreover, recent developments in the stability analysis methods of nonlinear systems show that prior conditions that were customarily assumed to be needed for stability are only apparent and can be eliminated. As a result, sufficient conditions that guarantee stability are clearly stated and lead to similarly clear proofs of stability. As many real-world applications show, once robust stability of the adaptive systems can be guaranteed, the added value of using Add-On Adaptive Control along with classical Control design techniques is pushing the desired performance beyond any previous limits.

  17. The beauty of simple adaptive control and new developments in nonlinear systems stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkana, Itzhak

    2014-12-01

    Although various adaptive control techniques have been around for a long time and in spite of successful proofs of stability and even successful demonstrations of performance, the eventual use of adaptive control methodologies in practical real world systems has met a rather strong resistance from practitioners and has remained limited. Apparently, it is difficult to guarantee or even understand the conditions that can guarantee stable operations of adaptive control systems under realistic operational environments. Besides, it is difficult to measure the robustness of adaptive control system stability and allow it to be compared with the common and widely used measure of phase margin and gain margin that is utilized by present, mainly LTI, controllers. Furthermore, customary stability analysis methods seem to imply that the mere stability of adaptive systems may be adversely affected by any tiny deviation from the pretty idealistic and assumably required stability conditions. This paper first revisits the fundamental qualities of customary direct adaptive control methodologies, in particular the classical Model Reference Adaptive Control, and shows that some of their basic drawbacks have been addressed and eliminated within the so-called Simple Adaptive Control methodology. Moreover, recent developments in the stability analysis methods of nonlinear systems show that prior conditions that were customarily assumed to be needed for stability are only apparent and can be eliminated. As a result, sufficient conditions that guarantee stability are clearly stated and lead to similarly clear proofs of stability. As many real-world applications show, once robust stability of the adaptive systems can be guaranteed, the added value of using Add-On Adaptive Control along with classical Control design techniques is pushing the desired performance beyond any previous limits.

  18. Flexible Launch Vehicle Stability Analysis Using Steady and Unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    Launch vehicles frequently experience a reduced stability margin through the transonic Mach number range. This reduced stability margin can be caused by the aerodynamic undamping one of the lower-frequency flexible or rigid body modes. Analysis of the behavior of a flexible vehicle is routinely performed with quasi-steady aerodynamic line loads derived from steady rigid aerodynamics. However, a quasi-steady aeroelastic stability analysis can be unconservative at the critical Mach numbers, where experiment or unsteady computational aeroelastic analysis show a reduced or even negative aerodynamic damping.Amethod of enhancing the quasi-steady aeroelastic stability analysis of a launch vehicle with unsteady aerodynamics is developed that uses unsteady computational fluid dynamics to compute the response of selected lower-frequency modes. The response is contained in a time history of the vehicle line loads. A proper orthogonal decomposition of the unsteady aerodynamic line-load response is used to reduce the scale of data volume and system identification is used to derive the aerodynamic stiffness, damping, and mass matrices. The results are compared with the damping and frequency computed from unsteady computational aeroelasticity and from a quasi-steady analysis. The results show that incorporating unsteady aerodynamics in this way brings the enhanced quasi-steady aeroelastic stability analysis into close agreement with the unsteady computational aeroelastic results.

  19. Analysis of cavern stability at the West Hackberry SPR site.

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, Brian L.; Sobolik, Steven Ronald

    2009-05-01

    This report presents computational analyses that simulate the structural response of caverns at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) West Hackberry site. The cavern field comprises 22 caverns. Five caverns (6, 7, 8, 9, 11) were acquired from industry and have unusual shapes and a history dating back to 1946. The other 17 caverns (101-117) were leached according to SPR standards in the mid-1980s and have tall cylindrical shapes. The history of the caverns and their shapes are simulated in a three-dimensional geomechanics model of the site that predicts deformations, strains, and stresses. Future leaching scenarios corresponding to oil drawdowns using fresh water are also simulated by increasing the volume of the caverns. Cavern pressures are varied in the model to capture operational practices in the field. The results of the finite element model are interpreted to provide information on the current and future status of subsidence, well integrity, and cavern stability. The most significant results in this report are relevant to Cavern 6. The cavern is shaped like a bowl with a large ceiling span and is in close proximity to Cavern 9. The analyses predict tensile stresses at the edge of the ceiling during repressuization of Cavern 6 following workover conditions. During a workover the cavern is at low pressure to service a well. The wellhead pressures are atmospheric. When the workover is complete, the cavern is repressurized. The resulting elastic stresses are sufficient to cause tension around the edge of the large ceiling span. With time, these stresses relax to a compressive state because of salt creep. However, the potential for salt fracture and propagation exists, particularly towards Cavern 9. With only 200 ft of salt between the caverns, the operational consequences must be examined if the two caverns become connected. A critical time may be during a workover of Cavern 9 in part because of the operational vulnerabilities, but also because dilatant damage is

  20. Langley Stability and Transition Analysis Code (LASTRAC) Version 1.2 User Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2004-01-01

    LASTRAC is a general-purposed, physics-based transition prediction code released by NASA for Laminar Flow Control studies and transition research. The design and development of the LASTRAC code is aimed at providing an engineering tool that is easy to use and yet capable of dealing with a broad range of transition related issues. It was written from scratch based on the state-of-the-art numerical methods for stability analysis and modern software technologies. At low fidelity, it allows users to perform linear stability analysis and N-factor transition correlation for a broad range of flow regimes and configurations by using either the linear stability theory or linear parabolized stability equations method. At high fidelity, users may use nonlinear PSE to track finite-amplitude disturbances until the skin friction rise. This document describes the governing equations, numerical methods, code development, detailed description of input/output parameters, and case studies for the current release of LASTRAC.

  1. [Trait stability and test site representativeness of sugarcane varieties based on GGE-biplot analysis].

    PubMed

    Luo, Jun; Zhang, Hua; Deng, Zu-Hu; Que, You-Xiong

    2012-05-01

    Arithmetic mean method is commonly used to evaluate the yield stability and adaptability of sugarcane varieties, and variance analysis is applied to estimate the errors in regional trials. However, it is difficult to accurately evaluate the differences of the varieties due to the discrepancies across test sites and years. In this paper, GGE-biplot method was adopted to analyze the data from the regional trials with seven sugarcane varieties at five sites from 2008 to 2009, aimed to objectively evaluate the yield stability and adaptability of sugarcane varieties in China. Among the test sugarcane varieties, Funong No. 30 had higher cane yield and better yield stability, Yuegan No. 18 had higher sugar content and better trait stability, Funong No. 28 and Yunzhe 99-91 had high sucrose content and trait stability, while Yuegan No. 16 had the highest cane yield and sugar content but ordinary stability. In the test sites, Zhangzhou City in Fujian Province and Suixi City in Guangdong Province had the best representativeness and discrimination. This study showed that GGE-biplot analysis provided a simple and effective method to analyze the high yield and stability of sugarcane varieties in regional trials, and supplied the basis for the approval and extension of new sugarcane varieties.

  2. Synchronous machine steady-state stability analysis using an artificial neural network

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.R.; Hsu, Y.Y. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1991-03-01

    A new type of artificial neural network is proposed for the steady-state stability analysis of a synchronous generator. In the developed artificial neutral network, those system variables which play an important role in steady-state stability such as generator outputs and power system stabilizer parameters are employed as the inputs. The output of the neural net provides the information on steady-state stability. Once the connection weights of the neural network have been learned using a set of training data derived off-line, the neural net can be applied to analyze the steady-state stability of the system time. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed neural net, steady-state stability analysis is performed on a synchronous generator connected to a large power system. It is found that the proposed neural net requires much less training time than the multilayer feedforward network with backpropagation-momentum learning algorithm. It is also concluded from the test results that correct stability assessment can be achieved by the neural network.

  3. Aeroelastic stability analysis of the AD-1 manned oblique-wing aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutkowski, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    The AD-1 manned flight test program was conducted to evaluate the stability, control and handling characteristics of oblique wing aircraft. The results of the aeroelastic stability analysis are presented for both the wing alone and the wing with ailerons. A comparison was made between the results obtained using the traditional k-method of flutter analysis and the results using the PK or British method of flutter analysis. Studies were performed using the latest version of the NASTRAN computer code as well as the PASS/FLUT program.

  4. Stability analysis of an interactive system of wave equation and heat equation with memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiong

    2014-10-01

    This paper is devoted to the stability analysis of an interaction system comprised of a wave equation and a heat equation with memory, where the hereditary heat conduction is due to Gurtin-Pipkin law or Coleman-Gurtin law. First, we show the strong asymptotic stability of solutions to this system. Then, the exponential stability of the interaction system is obtained when the hereditary heat conduction is of Gurtin-Pipkin type. Further, we show the lack of uniform decay of the interaction system when the heat conduction law is of Coleman-Gurtin type.

  5. Stability and bifurcation analysis of a generalized scalar delay differential equation.

    PubMed

    Bhalekar, Sachin

    2016-08-01

    This paper deals with the stability and bifurcation analysis of a general form of equation D(α)x(t)=g(x(t),x(t-τ)) involving the derivative of order α ∈ (0, 1] and a constant delay τ ≥ 0. The stability of equilibrium points is presented in terms of the stability regions and critical surfaces. We provide a necessary condition to exist chaos in the system also. A wide range of delay differential equations involving a constant delay can be analyzed using the results proposed in this paper. The illustrative examples are provided to explain the theory.

  6. Mechanochemical Approaches to Pharmaceutical Cocrystal Formation and Stability Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shan-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Solid-state mechanochemical grinding is important for promoting cocrystal formation, particularly in the design of new solids in the pharmaceutical industry. Pharmaceutical cocrystals are defined as crystalline materials comprising an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and one or more appropriate coformers in a definite stoichiometric ratio, formed via non-covalent interactions. Recently, both the US FDA (2013) and the EU EMA (2015) provided a Guidance for Industry and a Reflection Paper, respectively, emphasizing that cocrystals are a new type of substance with potential applications in the pharmaceutical industry. This paper contains a brief and systematic overview of pharmaceutical cocrystals prepared by four grinding processes: neat grinding, solvent-assisted grinding, thermal stress after neat grinding, and polymer-assisted grinding. The paper also highlights some examples of pharmaceutical cocrystals prepared by the above grinding approaches, and discusses the stability of cocrystals prepared by mechanical grinding. Also, an overview of cocrystals that are commercially available or undergoing clinical trials is given. A novel methodology for real-time and in situ monitoring of mechanochemical grinding reactions using various analytical techniques is addressed and can be expected to be applied in the near future.

  7. Flow cytometric data analysis of circulating progenitor cell stability.

    PubMed

    Mahar, Ernestine A; Mou, Liping; Hayek, Salim S; Quyyumi, Arshed A; Waller, Edmund K

    2017-02-01

    A recent publication by Mekonnen et al. demonstrated that among women with non-obstructive coronary artery disease, higher levels of circulating progenitor cells in the blood (CPC), were associated with impaired coronary flow reserve [1]. We performed a quality control assessment of the stability of circulating blood progenitor cells in blood samples stored at 4 °C, to determine the time period during which blood samples can be analyzed and yield consistent data for progenitor cell content. Healthy volunteers (n=6) were recruited and underwent phlebotomy, and blood was stored in EDTA tubes at 4 °C. Flow cytometry was performed to quantitate progenitor cell subsets at 0-4 h, 24 h, and 48 h post phlebotomy. All processed samples were fixed with 1% Paraformaldehyde and 1,000,000 total data events were collected. We found no significant differences in PC data for both CD34+ (P=0.68 for one-way ANOVA) and CD34+/CD133+ (P=0.74 for one-way ANOVA).

  8. Stability analysis of multiple-robot control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, John T.; Kreutz, Kenneth

    1989-01-01

    In a space telerobotic service scenario, cooperative motion and force control of multiple robot arms are of fundamental importance. Three paradigms to study this problem are proposed. They are distinguished by the set of variables used for control design. They are joint torques, arm tip force vectors, and an accelerated generalized coordinate set. Control issues related to each case are discussed. The latter two choices require complete model information, which presents practical modeling, computational, and robustness problems. Therefore, focus is on the joint torque control case to develop relatively model independent motion and internal force control laws. The rigid body assumption allows the motion and force control problems to be independently addressed. By using an energy motivated Lyapunov function, a simple proportional derivative plus gravity compensation type of motion control law is always shown to be stabilizing. The asymptotic convergence of the tracing error to zero requires the use of a generalized coordinate with the contact constraints taken into account. If a non-generalized coordinate is used, only convergence to a steady state manifold can be concluded. For the force control, both feedforward and feedback schemes are analyzed. The feedback control, if proper care has been taken, exhibits better robustness and transient performance.

  9. C-Mod MHD stability analysis with LHCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Fatima; Bhattacharjee, A.; Delgado, L.; Scott, S.; Wilson, J. R.; Wallace, G. M.; Shiraiwa, S.; Mumgaard, R. T.

    2016-10-01

    In lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) experiments on the Alcator C-Mod, sawtooth activity could be suppressed as the safety factor q on axis is raised above unity. However, in some of these experiments, after applying LHCD, the onset of MHD mode activity caused the current drive efficiency to significantly drop. Here, we study the stability of these experiments by performing MHD simulations using the NIMROD code starting with experimental EFIT equilibria. First, consistent with the LHCD experiment with no signature of MHD activity, MHD mode activity was also absent in the simulations. Second, for experiments with MHD mode activity, we find that a core n=1 reconnecting mode with dominate poloidal modes of m=2,3 is unstable. This mode is a resistive current-driven mode as its growth rate scales with a negative power of the Lundquist number in the simulations. In addition, with further enhanced reversed-shear q profile in the simulations, a core double tearing mode is found to be unstable. This work is supported by U.S. DOE cooperative agreement DE-FC02-99ER54512 using the Alcator C-Mod tokamak, a DOE Office of Science user facility.

  10. Stability analysis of a backfilled room-and-pillar mine

    SciTech Connect

    Tesarik, D.R.; Seymour, J.B.; Yanske, T.R.; McKibbin, R.W.

    1995-12-31

    Displacement and stress changes in cemented backfill and ore pillars at the Buick Mine, near Boss, MO, were monitored by engineers from the US Bureau of Mines and The Doe Run Co., St. Louis, MO. A test area in this room-and-pillar mine was backfilled to provide support when remnant ore pillars were mined. Objectives of this research were to evaluate the effect of backfill on mine stability, observe backfill conditions during pillar removal, and calibrate a numerical model to be used to design other areas of the mine. Relative vertical displacements in the backfill were measured with embedment strain gauges and vertical extensometers. Other types of instruments used were earth pressure cells (to identify loading trends in the backfill), borehole extensometers (to measure relative displacement changes in the mine roof and support pillars), and biaxial stressmeters (to measure stress changes in several support pillars and abutments). Two- and three-dimensional numeric codes were used to model the study area. With information from these codes and the installed instruments, two failed pillars were identified and rock mass properties were estimated.

  11. Linear stability analysis of flows in a grooved channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Alireza; Floryan, Jerzy Maciej

    2015-11-01

    It is known that longitudinal grooves which are parallel to the flow direction may either stabilize or destabilize the travelling wave instability in a pressure-gradient-driven channel flow depending on the groove wave number. These waves reduce to the classical Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) waves in the smooth channel limit. It is shown that another class of travelling wave instability exists if grooves with sufficiently high amplitude and proper wavelengths are used. It is demonstrated that the new instability is driven by inviscid mechanisms, with the disturbance motion having the form of a wave propagating in the streamwise direction with the phase speed approximately four times larger than the TS wave speed and with its streamwise wavelength being approximately twice the spanwise groove wavelength. The instability motion is concentrated mostly in the middle of the channel and has a primarily planar character, i.e. the dominant velocity components are parallel to the walls. A significant reduction of the corresponding critical Reynolds number can be achieved by increasing the groove amplitude. This mode reduces to the highly attenuated Squire mode in the smooth channel limit. This work has been carried out with support from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada.

  12. Small-angle stability analysis of a linear control system for a high power communication satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omalley, T. A.

    1972-01-01

    A small angle stability analysis is presented for one particular configuration of a high power communication satellite having a linear control system. Both the central body and the solar array are treated as rigid bodies. The control system studied consists of three-axis control of the central body and one-axis control of the solar array rotation relative to the central body. The results yield preliminary indications of the relation of stability to satellite inertias and control gains.

  13. Stability analysis of delayed neural networks via a new integral inequality.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Wang, Juan; Wang, Jun

    2017-04-01

    This paper focuses on stability analysis for neural networks systems with time-varying delays. A more general auxiliary function-based integral inequality is established and some improved delay-dependent stability conditions formulated in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) are derived by employing a suitable Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional (LKF) and the novel integral inequality. Three well-known application examples are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness and improvements of the proposed method.

  14. The Stability of IQ in People with Low Intellectual Ability: An Analysis of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Simon

    2008-01-01

    A meta-analysis of the stability of low IQ (IQ less than 80) was performed on IQ tests that have been commonly used--tests that were derived by D. Wechsler (1949, 1955, 1974, 1981, 1991, 1997) and those based on the Binet scales (L. M. Terman, 1960; L. M. Terman & Merrill, 1972). Weighted-mean stability coefficients of 0.77 and 0.78 were found…

  15. Automation of the verneuil technique on the basis of a stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodin, V. A.; Brener, E. A.; Tatarchenko, V. A.; Gusev, V. I.; Tsigler, I. N.

    1981-04-01

    This paper presents a stability analysis for the crystallization of large-size crystals grown by Verneuil techniques with variable powder feed rate. The laws of powder feed regulation are found, ensuring automatic maintenance of constant cross section of the growing crystal. Experimental verification of the results of the theoretical analysis is obtained.

  16. Design Analysis Report for 244-AR Interim Stabilization Exhaust Ventilation Ducting

    SciTech Connect

    RUTHERFORD, J.

    2002-11-21

    This report documents the design analysis performed for the exhaust ducting associated with the 244-AR Interim Stabilization Project. The exhaust ducting connects portable exhausters PORO5 and PORO6 to the existing east dog house of the 291-AR filter vault and the vessel ventilation system. This analysis examines loads on the ductwork and ductwork supports.

  17. Factor Loading Estimation Error and Stability Using Exploratory Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sass, Daniel A.

    2010-01-01

    Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) is commonly employed to evaluate the factor structure of measures with dichotomously scored items. Generally, only the estimated factor loadings are provided with no reference to significance tests, confidence intervals, and/or estimated factor loading standard errors. This simulation study assessed factor loading…

  18. Design and Analysis of the ITER Vertical Stability Coils

    SciTech Connect

    Peter H. Titus, et. al.

    2012-09-06

    The ITER vertical stability (VS) coils have been developed through the preliminary design phase by Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). Final design, prototyping and construction will be carried out by the Chinese Participant Team contributing lab, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (ASIPP). The VS coils are a part of the in-vessel coil systems which include edge localized mode (ELM) coils as well as the VS coils. An overview of the ELM coils is provided in another paper at this conference. 15 The VS design employs four turns of stainless steel jacketed mineral insulated copper (SSMIC) conductors The mineral insulation is Magnesium Oxide (MgO). Joule and nuclear heat is removed by water flowing at 3 m/s through the hollow copper conductor. A key element in the design is that slightly elevated temperatures in the conductor and its support spine during operation impose compressive stresses that mitigate fatigue damage. Away from joints, and break-outs, conductor thermal stresses are low because of the axisymmetry of the winding (there are no corner bends as in the ELM coils).The 120 degree segment joint, and break-out or terminal regions are designed with similar but imperfect constraint compared with the ring coil portion of the VS. The support for the break-out region is made from a high strength copper alloy, CuCrZr. This is needed to conduct nuclear heat to the actively cooled conductor and to the vessel wall. The support "spine" for the ring coil portion of the VS is 316 stainless steel, held to the vessel with preloaded 718 bolts. Lorentz loads resulting from normal operating loads, disruption loads and loads from disruption currents in the support spine shared with vessel, are applied to the VS coil. The transmission of the Lorentz and thermal expansion loads from the "spine" to the vessel rails is via friction augmented with a restraining "lip" to ensure the coil frictional slip is minimal and acceptable. Stresses in the coil

  19. Slope Stability Analysis In Seismic Areas Of The Northern Apennines (Italy)

    SciTech Connect

    Lo Presti, D.; Fontana, T.; Marchetti, D.

    2008-07-08

    Several research works have been published on the slope stability in the northern Tuscany (central Italy) and particularly in the seismic areas of Garfagnana and Lunigiana (Lucca and Massa-Carrara districts), aimed at analysing the slope stability under static and dynamic conditions and mapping the landslide hazard. In addition, in situ and laboratory investigations are available for the study area, thanks to the activities undertaken by the Tuscany Seismic Survey. Based on such a huge information the co-seismic stability of few ideal slope profiles have been analysed by means of Limit equilibrium method LEM - (pseudo-static) and Newmark sliding block analysis (pseudo-dynamic). The analysis--results gave indications about the most appropriate seismic coefficient to be used in pseudo-static analysis after establishing allowable permanent displacement. Such indications are commented in the light of the Italian and European prescriptions for seismic stability analysis with pseudo-static approach. The stability conditions, obtained from the previous analyses, could be used to define microzonation criteria for the study area.

  20. Frequency domain stability analysis of nonlinear active disturbance rejection control system.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Qi, Xiaohui; Xia, Yuanqing; Pu, Fan; Chang, Kai

    2015-05-01

    This paper applies three methods (i.e., root locus analysis, describing function method and extended circle criterion) to approach the frequency domain stability analysis of the fast tool servo system using nonlinear active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) algorithm. Root locus qualitative analysis shows that limit cycle is generated because the gain of the nonlinear function used in ADRC varies with its input. The parameters in the nonlinear function are adjustable to suppress limit cycle. In the process of root locus analysis, the nonlinear function is transformed based on the concept of equivalent gain. Then, frequency domain description of the nonlinear function via describing function is presented and limit cycle quantitative analysis including estimating prediction error is presented, which virtually and theoretically demonstrates that the describing function method cannot guarantee enough precision in this case. Furthermore, absolute stability analysis based on extended circle criterion is investigated as a complement.

  1. Stability Analysis of Absorption Chiller-Heaters by Applying Transfer Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Tatsuo; Miyake, Satoshi; Oka, Masahiro; Mori, Kiyoyuki

    A transfer function approach is found to be a practical method for ensuring stable operation of absorption chiller-heaters. The transfer function model is based on a solution-circuit of the machine, which dominates the stability of the operation. This model includes a solution pump, a generator with an overflow weir, and a float valve. We found that the solution-circuit system is designed with the cascade control, which makes the system stable. In this construction, the float valve actuates a primary control loop, and the overflow weir actuates a secondary loop. The effects of the characteristic of the solution pump and the overflow weir are estimated by the degree of the stabilities, which are the gain margin and the phase margin. We found that the characteristic of the solution pump strongly effects the stability by enhancing the effect of the cascade control and improving the stability. So it is essential for a better stability analysis model. According to these results, the established model is useful for quantitatively predicting the stabilities of a chiller-heater in operation, and simultaneously reducing its size and improving the stability of operation. We conclude that the methodology based on transfer function can provide compact and reliable absorption chiller-heaters.

  2. Combined effect of tissue stabilization and protein extraction methods on phosphoprotein analysis.

    PubMed

    Kofanova, Olga A; Fack, Fred; Niclou, Simone P; Betsou, Fay

    2013-06-01

    Preanalytical conditions applied during sample collection and processing can affect the detection or quantification of unstable phosphoprotein biomarkers. We evaluated the consequences of tissue stabilization and protein extraction methods on phosphoprotein analysis. The effects of stabilization techniques (heat stabilization, snap-freezing) and time on the levels of phosphoproteins, including phospho-Akt, p-ERK 1/2, p-IkBα, p-JNK, and p38 MAPK, were evaluated using a BioPlex phosphoprotein assay. Additionally, two different protein extraction protocols, using different extraction buffers (8 M urea buffer, or Bio-Rad buffer without urea) were tested. For snap-frozen samples, protein extraction yields were comparable with the two buffer systems. For heat-stabilized samples, total protein yields were significantly lower following extraction in non-urea buffer. However, the concentrations of specific phosphoproteins were significantly higher in heat-stabilized samples than in the corresponding snap-frozen samples, indicating that this tissue processing method better preserved phosphoproteins. Significant differences were found between the measured phosphoprotein levels in heat-stabilized and snap-frozen tissue, suggesting that alterations occur very rapidly after tissue excision. Our results suggest that heat stabilization can be used as a tissue processing method for subsequent phosphoprotein analyses, but also suggest that the BioPlex phosphoprotein assay could be used as a possible quality control method to assess tissue sample integrity.

  3. Analysis of Ejection Seat Stability Using Easy Program. Volume I.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    2,4 STROKE, VS, TIME, YRANGE =-.5,.5 PI DEI, VS, TIME, YRANGE = 0,60 DISPLAY2 P1 , CE, VS, TIME, YRANGE = -20,20 P1 , DE2, VS, TIME, YRANGE = -15,15...The TITLE command may be changed before each analysis. Once 54 defined, the title remains in effect until a new title is entered. Exam - ples of these...body (survival kit ) AE Airplane AG Atmospheric properties AM Aeromedical AP Aerodynamic plate AS Seat aerodynamics CE Crewperson CS Airplane control

  4. Ultraviolet stability and contamination analysis of Spectralon diffuse reflectance material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stiegman, Albert E.; Bruegge, Carol J.; Springsteen, Arthur W.

    1993-01-01

    A detailed chemical analysis was carried out on Spectralon, a highly Lambertian, diffuse reflectance material. Results of this investigation unambiguously identified the presence of an organic (hydrocarbon) impurity intrinsic to the commercial material. This impurity could be removed by a vacuum bake-out procedure and was identified as the cause of optical changes (degradation) that occur in the material when exposed to UV light. It was found that when this impurity was removed, the Spectralon material was photochemically stable and maintained its reflectance properties even after extensive solar UV exposure.

  5. Stability analysis via the concept of Lyapunov exponents: a case study in optimal controlled biped standing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yuming; Wu, Christine Qiong

    2012-12-01

    Balancing control is important for biped standing. In spite of large efforts, it is very difficult to design balancing control strategies satisfying three requirements simultaneously: maintaining postural stability, improving energy efficiency and satisfying the constraints between the biped feet and the ground. In this article, a proportional-derivative (PD) controller is proposed for a standing biped, which is simplified as a two-link inverted pendulum with one additional rigid foot-link. The genetic algorithm (GA) is used to search for the control gain meeting all three requirements. The stability analysis of such a deterministic biped control system is carried out using the concept of Lyapunov exponents (LEs), based on which, the system stability, where the disturbance comes from the initial states, and the structural stability, where the disturbance comes from the PD gains, are examined quantitively in terms of stability region. This article contributes to the biped balancing control, more significantly, the method shown in the studied case of biped provides a general framework of systematic stability analysis for certain deterministic nonlinear dynamical systems.

  6. Analysis of stability boundaries of satellite's equilibrium attitude in a circular orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    An asymmetric satellite equipped with control momentum gyroscopes (CMGs) with the center of mass of the system moving uniformly in a circular orbit was considered. The stability of a relative equilibrium attitude of the satellite was analyzed using Lyapunov's direct method. The Lyapunov function V is a positive definite integral of the total energy of the perturbed motion of the system. The asymptotic stability analysis of the stationary motion of the conservative system was based on the Barbashin-Krasovskii theorem on the nonexistence of integer trajectories of the set dot V, which was obtained using the differential equations of motion of the satellite with CMGs. By analyzing the sign definiteness of the quadratic part of V, it was found earlier by V.V. Sazonov that the stability region is described by four strict inequalities. The asymptotic stability at the stability boundary was analyzed by sequentially turning these inequalities into equalities with terms of orders higher than the second taken into account in V. The sign definiteness analysis of the inhomogeneous function V at the stability boundary involved a huge amount of computations related to the multiplication, expansion, substitution, and factorization of symbolic expressions. The computations were performed by applying a computer algebra system on a personal computer.

  7. A MIMO periodic ARX identification algorithm for the Floquet stability analysis of wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riva, R.; Cacciola, S.; Bottasso, C. L.

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents a new stability analysis approach applicable to wind turbines. At first, a reduced order periodic model is identified from response time histories, and then stability is assessed using Floquet theory. The innovation of the proposed approach is in the ability of the algorithm to simultaneously consider multiple response time histories, for example in the form of measurements recorded both on the rotor and in the stand still system. As each different measurement carries a different informational content on the system, the simultaneous use of all available signals improves the quality and robustness of the analysis.

  8. Classical linear-control analysis applied to business-cycle dynamics and stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingrove, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    Linear control analysis is applied as an aid in understanding the fluctuations of business cycles in the past, and to examine monetary policies that might improve stabilization. The analysis shows how different policies change the frequency and damping of the economic system dynamics, and how they modify the amplitude of the fluctuations that are caused by random disturbances. Examples are used to show how policy feedbacks and policy lags can be incorporated, and how different monetary strategies for stabilization can be analytically compared. Representative numerical results are used to illustrate the main points.

  9. Stagnation-point flow and heat transfer over an exponentially shrinking sheet: A stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Nurul Syuhada; Arifin, Norihan Md.; Bachok, Norfifah; Mahiddin, Norhasimah

    2016-06-01

    Numerical solutions for the stagnation-point flow and heat transfer over an exponentially shrinking sheet have been investigated. The governing boundary layer equations are transformed into an ordinary differential equation using a non-similar transformation. By using the bvp4c solver in MATLAB, the results of the equations can be solved numerically. Numerical results indicate that in certain parameter, the non-unique solutions for the velocity and the temperature do exist. A linear stability analysis shows that only one solution is linearly stable otherwise is unstable. Then, the stability analysis is performed to identify which solution is stable between the two non-unique solutions.

  10. The analysis of thermal stability of detonation nanodiamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremov, V. P.; Zakatilova, E. I.

    2016-11-01

    The detonation nanodiamond is a new perspective material. Ammunition recycling with use of high explosives and obtaining nanodiamond as the result of the detonation synthesis have given a new motivation for searching of their application areas. In this work nanodiamond powder has been investigated by the method of synchronous thermal analysis. Experiments have been carried out at atmospheric pressure in the environment of argon. Nanodiamond powder has been heated in the closed corundum crucible at the temperature range of 30-1500 °C. The heating rates were varied from 2 K/min to 20 K/min. After the heat treatment, the samples have been studied by the x-ray diffraction and the electron microscopy. As one of the results of this work, it has been found that the detonation nanodiamond has not started the transition into graphite at the temperature below 800 °C.

  11. ABDOMINAL MUSCLE ACTIVATION INCREASES LUMBAR SPINAL STABILITY: ANALYSIS OF CONTRIBUTIONS OF DIFFERENT MUSCLE GROUPS

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, Ian A.F.; Gardner-Morse, Mack G.; Henry, Sharon M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Antagonistic activation of abdominal muscles and raised intra-abdominal pressure are associated with both spinal unloading and spinal stabilization. Rehabilitation regimens have been proposed to improve spinal stability via selective recruitment of certain trunk muscle groups. This biomechanical study used an analytical model to address whether lumbar spinal stability is increased by selective activation of abdominal muscles. Methods The biomechanical model included anatomically realistic three-layers of curved abdominal musculature connected by fascia, rectus abdominis and 77 symmetrical pairs of dorsal muscles. The muscle activations were calculated with the model loaded with either flexion, extension, lateral bending or axial rotation moments up to 60 Nm, along with intra-abdominal pressure up to 5 or 10 kPa (37.5 or 75 mm Hg) and partial bodyweight. After solving for muscle forces, a buckling analysis quantified spinal stability. Subsequently, different patterns of muscle activation were studied by forcing activation of selected abdominal muscles to at least 10% or 20% of maximum. Findings The spinal stability increased by an average factor of 1.8 with doubling of intra-abdominal pressure. Forced activation of obliques or transversus abdominis muscles to at least 10% of maximum increased stability slightly for efforts other than flexion, but forcing at least 20% activation generally did not produce further increase in stability. Forced activation of rectus abdominis did not increase stability. Interpretation Based on predictions from an analytical spinal buckling model, the degree of stability was not substantially influenced by selective forcing of muscle activation. This casts doubt on the supposed mechanism of action of specific abdominal muscle exercise regimens that have been proposed for low back pain rehabilitation. PMID:21571410

  12. Theoretical study of vapor-liquid homogeneous nucleation using stability analysis of a macroscopic phase.

    PubMed

    Carreón-Calderón, Bernardo

    2012-10-14

    Stability analysis is generally used to verify that the solution to phase equilibrium calculations corresponds to a stable state (minimum of the free energy). In this work, tangent plane distance analysis for stability of macroscopic mixtures is also used for analyzing the nucleation process, reconciling thus this analysis with classical nucleation theories. In the context of the revised nucleation theory, the driving force and the nucleation work are expressed as a function of the Lagrange multiplier corresponding to the mole fraction constraint from the minimization problem of stability analysis. Using a van der Waals fluid applied to a ternary mixture, Lagrange multiplier properties are illustrated. In particular, it is shown how the Lagrange multiplier value is equal to one on the binodal and spinodal curves at the same time as the driving force of nucleation vanishes on these curves. Finally, it is shown that, on the spinodal curve, the nucleation work from the revised and generalized nucleation theories are characterized by two different local minima from stability analysis, irrespective of any interfacial tension models.

  13. Nonlinear global stability analysis of compressor stall phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Razavi, H.

    1985-01-01

    Compressor stall phenomena are analyzed from the point of view of nonlinear control theory, based on bifurcation-catastrophe techniques. This new approach appears promising and offers insight into such well-known compressor instability problems as surge and rotating stall and suggests strategies for recovery. Three interlocking dynamic nonlinear state space models are developed. It is shown that the problem of rotating stall can be viewed as an induced bifurcation of solution of the unstalled model. Hysteresis effects are shown to exist in the stall/recovery process. Surge cycles are observed for some critical parameter values. The oscillatory behavior is seen to be due to development of limit cycles, generated by Hopf bifurcation of solutions. More specifically, it is observed that at certain critical values of parameters, a family of stable limit cycles with growning and then diminishing amplitudes is generated, then giving rise to an unstable family of limit cycles. This unstable family in turn bifurcates into other unstable families. To further illustrate the utility of the methodology, some partial computation of domains is carried out, and parameter sensitivity analysis is performed.

  14. GraTeLPy: graph-theoretic linear stability analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A biochemical mechanism with mass action kinetics can be represented as a directed bipartite graph (bipartite digraph), and modeled by a system of differential equations. If the differential equations (DE) model can give rise to some instability such as multistability or Turing instability, then the bipartite digraph contains a structure referred to as a critical fragment. In some cases the existence of a critical fragment indicates that the DE model can display oscillations for some parameter values. We have implemented a graph-theoretic method that identifies the critical fragments of the bipartite digraph of a biochemical mechanism. Results GraTeLPy lists all critical fragments of the bipartite digraph of a given biochemical mechanism, thus enabling a preliminary analysis on the potential of a biochemical mechanism for some instability based on its topological structure. The correctness of the implementation is supported by multiple examples. The code is implemented in Python, relies on open software, and is available under the GNU General Public License. Conclusions GraTeLPy can be used by researchers to test large biochemical mechanisms with mass action kinetics for their capacity for multistability, oscillations and Turing instability. PMID:24572152

  15. Fundamental Aeronautics Program. Subsonic Rotary Wing Project: SRW Aeromechanics Overview/UH-60 Airloads Wind Tunnel Test Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: a) Advance the understanding of phenomena in aerodynamics, dynamics, and active control of rotorcraft. b) Develop and validate first-principles tools. c) Acquire data for tool validation from small and large-scale testing of existing and novel rotorcraft configurations. Recent Accomplishments include: (CFD) - Made significant improvements in structured and unstructured rotorcraft CFD methods (OVERFLOW and FUN3D). (Icing) - a) Continued development of high-fidelity icing analysis tools. b) Completed test of oscillating airfoil in Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). c) Developed plans and began detailed preparations for subscale rotor test in IRT.

  16. Stability analysis of memristor-based fractional-order neural networks with different memductance functions.

    PubMed

    Rakkiyappan, R; Velmurugan, G; Cao, Jinde

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, the problem of the existence, uniqueness and uniform stability of memristor-based fractional-order neural networks (MFNNs) with two different types of memductance functions is extensively investigated. Moreover, we formulate the complex-valued memristor-based fractional-order neural networks (CVMFNNs) with two different types of memductance functions and analyze the existence, uniqueness and uniform stability of such networks. By using Banach contraction principle and analysis technique, some sufficient conditions are obtained to ensure the existence, uniqueness and uniform stability of the considered MFNNs and CVMFNNs with two different types of memductance functions. The analysis results establish from the theory of fractional-order differential equations with discontinuous right-hand sides. Finally, four numerical examples are presented to show the effectiveness of our theoretical results.

  17. Linear Stability Analysis of a Collisionless Distribution Function for the Force-Free Harris Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Fiona; Neukirch, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    A discussion is presented of the first linear stability analysis of the collisionless distribution function recently found by Harrison and Neukirch for the force-free Harris sheet (Physical Review Letters 102, 135003, 2009). Macroscopic instabilities are considered, and the perturbations are assumed to be two-dimensional only. The stability analysis is based on the technique of integration over unperturbed orbits. Similarly to the Harris sheet case (Nuovo Cimento, 23:115, 1962), this is only possible by using approximations to the exact orbits, which are unknown. Furthermore, the approximations for the Harris sheet case cannot be used for the force-free Harris sheet, and so new techniques have to be developed in order to make analytical progress. In addition to the full problem, the long wavelength limit is considered, and the results of the two cases are compared. The dependence of the stability on various equilibrium parameters is investigated.

  18. The stability analysis of magnetohydrodynamic equilibria - Comparing the thermodynamic approach with the energy principle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinkmann, R. P.

    1989-01-01

    This paper is a contribution to the stability analysis of current-carrying plasmas, i.e., plasma systems that are forced by external mchanisms to carry a nonrelaxing electrical current. Under restriction to translationally invariant configurations, the thermodynamic stability criterion for a multicomponent plasma is rederived within the framework of nonideal MHD. The chosen dynamics neglects scalar resistivity, but allows for other types of dissipation effects both in Ohm's law and in the equation of motion. In the second section of the paper, the thermodynamic stability criterion is compared with the ideal MHD based energy principle of Bernstein et al. With the help of Schwarz's inequality, it is shown that the former criterion is always more 'pessimistic' than the latter, i.e., that thermodynamic stability implies stability according to the MHD principle, but not vice versa. This reuslt confirms the physical plausible idea that dissipational effects tend to weaken the stability properties of current-carrying plasma equilibria by breaking the constraints of ideal MHD and allowing for possibly destabilizing effects such as magnetic field line reconfiguration.

  19. Stability analysis of predator-prey model on the case of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulistyowati, Rita; Kurniadi, Rizal; Srigutomo, Wahyu

    2015-09-01

    A preliminary study has been performed on the analysis of the stability of predator-prey models in the case of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions which initiated by Koren-Feingold. The model consists of two coupled non- linear differential equations describing the development of a population of cloud drop concentration and cloud depth for precipitation. Stability analysis of the models was conducted to understand the stability behavior of systems interactions. In this paper, the analysis focused on the model without delay. The first step was done by determining the equilibrium point of the model equations which yielded 1 non-trivial equilibrium point and 4 trivial equilibrium point. Nontrivial equilibrium point (0,0) associated with the steady state or the absence of precipitation while the non-trivial equilibrium point shows the oscillation behavior in the formation of precipitation. The next step is linearizing the equation around the equilibrium point and calculating of eigenvalues of Jacobian matrix. Evaluation of the eigen values of characteristic equation determined the type of stability. There are saddle node, star point, unstable node, stable node and center. The results of numerical computations was simulated in the form of phase portrait to support the theoretical calculation. Phase portraits show the characteristic of populations growth of cloud depth and drop cloud. In the next research, this analysis will compared to delay model to determine the effect of time delay on the equilibrium point of the system.

  20. Stability analysis of predator-prey model on the case of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulistyowati, Rita; Kurniadi, Rizal; Srigutomo, Wahyu

    2015-09-01

    A preliminary study has been performed on the analysis of the stability of predator-prey models in the case of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions which initiated by Koren-Feingold. The model consists of two coupled non-linear differential equations describing the development of a population of cloud drop concentration and cloud depth for precipitation. Stability analysis of the models was conducted to understand the stability behavior of systems interactions. In this paper, the analysis focused on the model without delay. The first step was done by determining the equilibrium point of the model equations which yielded 1 non-trivial equilibrium point and 4 trivial equilibrium point. Nontrivial equilibrium point (0,0) associated with the steady state or the absence of precipitation while the non-trivial equilibrium point shows the oscillation behavior in the formation of precipitation. The next step is linearizing the equation around the equilibrium point and calculating of eigenvalues of Jacobian matrix. Evaluation of the eigen values of characteristic equation determined the type of stability. There are saddle node, star point, unstable node, stable node and center. The results of numerical computations was simulated in the form of phase portrait to support the theoretical calculation. Phase portraits show the characteristic of populations growth of cloud depth and drop cloud. In the next research, this analysis will compared to delay model to determine the effect of time delay on the equilibrium point of the system.

  1. Dynamic Stability Analysis of Linear Time-varying Systems via an Extended Modal Identification Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhisai; Liu, Li; Zhou, Sida; Naets, Frank; Heylen, Ward; Desmet, Wim

    2017-03-01

    The problem of linear time-varying(LTV) system modal analysis is considered based on time-dependent state space representations, as classical modal analysis of linear time-invariant systems and current LTV system modal analysis under the "frozen-time" assumption are not able to determine the dynamic stability of LTV systems. Time-dependent state space representations of LTV systems are first introduced, and the corresponding modal analysis theories are subsequently presented via a stability-preserving state transformation. The time-varying modes of LTV systems are extended in terms of uniqueness, and are further interpreted to determine the system's stability. An extended modal identification is proposed to estimate the time-varying modes, consisting of the estimation of the state transition matrix via a subspace-based method and the extraction of the time-varying modes by the QR decomposition. The proposed approach is numerically validated by three numerical cases, and is experimentally validated by a coupled moving-mass simply supported beam experimental case. The proposed approach is capable of accurately estimating the time-varying modes, and provides a new way to determine the dynamic stability of LTV systems by using the estimated time-varying modes.

  2. Determination of Myoglobin Stability by Circular Dichroism Spectroscopy: Classic and Modern Data Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehl, Andrew F.; Crawford, Mary A.; Zhang, Lei

    2009-01-01

    Few laboratory procedures describe the use of circular dichroism (CD) at the undergraduate level. To increase the number of laboratory exercises using CD, a thermal denaturation study of myoglobin using CD is described to assess protein stability. Values obtained from a more classic linear data analysis approach are consistent with data analyzed…

  3. An experimental investigation of hingeless helicopter rotor-body stability in hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bousman, W. G.

    1978-01-01

    Model tests of a 1.62 m diameter rotor were performed to investigate the aeromechanical stability of coupled rotor-body systems in hover. Experimental measurements were made of modal frequencies and damping over a wide range of rotor speeds. Good data were obtained for the frequencies of the rotor lead-lag regressing mode. The quality of the damping measurements of the body modes was poor due to nonlinear damping in the gimbal ball bearings. Simulated vacuum testing was performed using substitute blades of tantalum that reduced the effective lock number to 0.2% of the model scale value while keeping the blade inertia constant. The experimental data were compared with theoretical predictions, and the correlation was in general very good.

  4. A simplified nonlinear stability analysis of an imperfect rectangular two-bar frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioannidis, George I.; Raftoyiannis, Ioannis G.

    2005-01-01

    A simplified nonlinear stability analysis for moderately large rotations and small strains is performed on a rectangular two-bar frame subjected to a concentrated eccentrically applied joint load. Such a simplification consisting of adopting linear kinematic relations leads to very reliable results for the initial postbuckling path in the vicinity of the critical point of the above imperfect frame. The existence of an asymmetric bifurcation point is thoroughly discussed and a direct evaluation of the bifurcational load is readily obtained. Using this technique the effect of imperfection sensitivity is also addressed. A qualitative analysis associated with the physical phenomenon yields a substantial reduction of the computational work. The efficiency and reliability of this approximate nonlinear stability analysis proposed herein is illustrated by means of several examples for which a lot of numerical results based on a more accurate nonlinear analysis are available.

  5. FLUT - A program for aeroelastic stability analysis. [of aircraft structures in subsonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, E. H.

    1977-01-01

    A computer program (FLUT) that can be used to evaluate the aeroelastic stability of aircraft structures in subsonic flow is described. The algorithm synthesizes data from a structural vibration analysis with an unsteady aerodynamics analysis and then performs a complex eigenvalue analysis to assess the system stability. The theoretical basis of the program is discussed with special emphasis placed on some innovative techniques which improve the efficiency of the analysis. User information needed to efficiently and successfully utilize the program is provided. In addition to identifying the required input, the flow of the program execution and some possible sources of difficulty are included. The use of the program is demonstrated with a listing of the input and output for a simple example.

  6. Stability analysis of magnetized neutron stars - a semi-analytic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbrik, Marlene; Kokkotas, Kostas D.

    2017-04-01

    We implement a semi-analytic approach for stability analysis, addressing the ongoing uncertainty about stability and structure of neutron star magnetic fields. Applying the energy variational principle, a model system is displaced from its equilibrium state. The related energy density variation is set up analytically, whereas its volume integration is carried out numerically. This facilitates the consideration of more realistic neutron star characteristics within the model compared to analytical treatments. At the same time, our method retains the possibility to yield general information about neutron star magnetic field and composition structures that are likely to be stable. In contrast to numerical studies, classes of parametrized systems can be studied at once, finally constraining realistic configurations for interior neutron star magnetic fields. We apply the stability analysis scheme on polytropic and non-barotropic neutron stars with toroidal, poloidal and mixed fields testing their stability in a Newtonian framework. Furthermore, we provide the analytical scheme for dropping the Cowling approximation in an axisymmetric system and investigate its impact. Our results confirm the instability of simple magnetized neutron star models as well as a stabilization tendency in the case of mixed fields and stratification. These findings agree with analytical studies whose spectrum of model systems we extend by lifting former simplifications.

  7. Robust Stability Analysis of the Space Launch System Control Design: A Singular Value Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pei, Jing; Newsome, Jerry R.

    2015-01-01

    Classical stability analysis consists of breaking the feedback loops one at a time and determining separately how much gain or phase variations would destabilize the stable nominal feedback system. For typical launch vehicle control design, classical control techniques are generally employed. In addition to stability margins, frequency domain Monte Carlo methods are used to evaluate the robustness of the design. However, such techniques were developed for Single-Input-Single-Output (SISO) systems and do not take into consideration the off-diagonal terms in the transfer function matrix of Multi-Input-Multi-Output (MIMO) systems. Robust stability analysis techniques such as H(sub infinity) and mu are applicable to MIMO systems but have not been adopted as standard practices within the launch vehicle controls community. This paper took advantage of a simple singular-value-based MIMO stability margin evaluation method based on work done by Mukhopadhyay and Newsom and applied it to the SLS high-fidelity dynamics model. The method computes a simultaneous multi-loop gain and phase margin that could be related back to classical margins. The results presented in this paper suggest that for the SLS system, traditional SISO stability margins are similar to the MIMO margins. This additional level of verification provides confidence in the robustness of the control design.

  8. Experimental transition and boundary-layer stability analysis for a slotted swept laminar flow control airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, William D.; Harris, Charles D.; Brooks, Cuyler W., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    A swept, supercritical laminar flow control (LFC) airfoil designated NASA SCLFC(1)-0513F was tested at subsonic and transonic speeds in the NASA Langley eight-foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel. This paper examines Tollmien-Schlichting and crossflow disturbance amplification for this airfoil using the linear stability method. The design methodology using linear stability analysis is evaluated and the results of the incompressible and compressible methods are compared. Experimental data on the swept, supercritical LFC airfoil and reference wind tunnel and flight results are used to correlate and evaluate the N-factor method for transition prediction over a speed range M(infinity) from zero to one.

  9. Analysis of a stability valve system for extending the dynamic range of a supersonic inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, J. A., Jr.; Dustin, M. O.

    1975-01-01

    A stability valve system designed for a full-scale, flight, supersonic, mixed-compression inlet was modeled dynamically by using analog computer techniques. The system uses poppet valves mounted in the inlet cowl to bypass airflow and augments the inlet shock position control system by preventing unstarts caused by high-frequency perturbations. The model was used as a design aid to investigate the effects of varying both the physical configurations of the valve and the flight and wind tunnel conditions. Results of the analysis indicate that the stability valve will provide a bandpass operation of 1 hertz to 17 hertz.

  10. Analytical modeling of the input admittance of an electric drive for stability analysis purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girinon, S.; Baumann, C.; Piquet, H.; Roux, N.

    2009-07-01

    Embedded electric HVDC distribution network are facing difficult issues on quality and stability concerns. In order to help to resolve those problems, this paper proposes to develop an analytical model of an electric drive. This self-contained model includes an inverter, its regulation loops and the PMSM. After comparing the model with its equivalent (abc) full model, the study focuses on frequency analysis. The association with an input filter helps in expressing stability of the whole assembly by means of Routh-Hurtwitz criterion.

  11. Enumeration and stability analysis of simple periodic orbits in β-Fermi Pasta Ulam lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Sonone, Rupali L. Jain, Sudhir R.

    2014-04-24

    We study the well-known one-dimensional problem of N particles with a nonlinear interaction. The special case of quadratic and quartic interaction potential among nearest neighbours is the β-Fermi-Pasta-Ulam model. We enumerate and classify the simple periodic orbits for this system and find the stability zones, employing Floquet theory. Such stability analysis is crucial to understand the transition of FPU lattice from recurrences to globally chaotic behavior, energy transport in lower dimensional system, dynamics of optical lattices and also its impact on shape parameter of bio-polymers such as DNA and RNA.

  12. Stability analysis of position and force control problems for robot arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, John T.; Murphy, Steve

    1990-01-01

    A stability analysis for robot manipulators under the influence of external forces is presented. Several control objectives are considered: rejecting the external force as a source of disturbance, complying to the external force as a generalized mass-spring-damper system, and actively controlling the external force when a dynamic model for the environment is available. An explanation of instability is given for the case in which the environment has flexibility and the gains are inappropriately chosen. When the environment is stiff in the force control subspace, robust stability can be achieved via the integral force feedback.

  13. Stability Analysis of Asynchronous States in Neuronal Networks with Conductance-Based Inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibold, Christian

    2004-11-01

    Oscillations in networks of inhibitory interneurons have been reported at various sites of the brain and are thought to play a fundamental role in neuronal processing. This Letter provides a self-contained analytical framework that allows numerically efficient calculations of the population activity of a network of conductance-based integrate-and-fire neurons that are coupled through inhibitory synapses. Based on a normalization equation this Letter introduces a novel stability criterion for a network state of asynchronous activity and discusses its perturbations. The analysis shows that, although often neglected, the reversal potential of synaptic inhibition has a strong influence on the stability as well as the frequency of network oscillations.

  14. On the thermal stability of a radiating plasma subject to nonlocal thermal conduction. I - Linear analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chun, E.; Rosner, R.

    1993-01-01

    We study the linear stability of an optically thin uniform radiating plasma subject to nonlocal heat transport. We derive the dispersion relation appropriate to this problem, and the marginal wavenumbers for instability. Our analysis indicates that nonlocal heat transport acts to reduce the stabilizing influence of thermal conduction, and that there are critical values for the electron mean free path such that the plasma is always unstable. Our results may be applied to a number of astrophysical plasmas, one such example being the halos of clusters of galaxies.

  15. Stability and Control Analysis of the F-15B Quiet SpikeTM Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McWherter, Shaun C.; Moua, Cheng M.; Gera, Joseph; Cox, Timothy H.

    2009-01-01

    The primary purpose of the Quiet Spike(TradeMark) flight research program was to analyze the aerodynamic, structural, and mechanical proof-of-concept of a large multi-stage telescoping nose spike installed on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Dryden Flight Research Center (Edwards, California) F-15B airplane. This report describes the preflight stability and control analysis performed to assess the effect of the spike on the stability, controllability, and handling qualities of the airplane; and to develop an envelope expansion approach to maintain safety of flight. The overall flight test objective was to collect flight data to validate the spike structural dynamics and loads model up to Mach 1.8. Other objectives included validating the mechanical feasibility of a morphing fuselage at operational conditions and determining the near-field shock wave characterization. The two main issues relevant to the stability and control objectives were the effects of the spike-influenced aerodynamics on the F-15B airplane flight dynamics, and the air data and angle-of-attack sensors. The analysis covered the sensitivity of the stability margins, and the handling qualities due to aerodynamic variation and the maneuvering limitations of the F-15B Quiet Spike configuration. The results of the analysis and the implications for the flight test program are also presented.

  16. Using tightly-coupled CFD/CSD simulation for rotorcraft stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaki, Afifa Adel

    Dynamic stall deeply affects the response of helicopter rotor blades, making its modeling accuracy very important. Two commonly used dynamic stall models were implemented in a comprehensive code, validated, and contrasted to provide improved analysis accuracy and versatility. Next, computational fluid dynamics and computational structural dynamics loose coupling methodologies are reviewed, and a general tight coupling approach was implemented and tested. The tightly coupled computational fluid dynamics and computational structural dynamics methodology is then used to assess the stability characteristics of complex rotorcraft problems. An aeroelastic analysis of rotors must include an assessment of potential instabilities and the determination of damping ratios for all modes of interest. If the governing equations of motion of a system can be formulated as linear, ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients, classical stability evaluation methodologies based on the characteristic exponents of the system can rapidly and accurately provide the system's stability characteristics. For systems described by linear, ordinary differential equations with periodic coefficients, Floquet's theory is the preferred approach. While these methods provide excellent results for simplified linear models with a moderate number of degrees of freedom, they become quickly unwieldy as the number of degrees of freedom increases. Therefore, to accurately analyze rotorcraft aeroelastic periodic systems, a fully nonlinear, coupled simulation tool is used to determine the response of the system to perturbations about an equilibrium configuration and determine the presence of instabilities and damping ratios. The stability analysis is undertaken using an algorithm based on a Partial Floquet approach that has been successfully applied with computational structural dynamics tools on rotors and wind turbines. The stability analysis approach is computationally inexpensive and consists

  17. A global strategy for the stability analysis of friction induced vibration problem with parameter variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, H. Q.; Massa, F.; Tison, T.; Lallemand, B.

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a numerical strategy to reanalyze the modified frequency stability analysis of friction induced vibration problem. The stability analysis of a mechanical system relies on several coupling steps, namely a non-linear static analysis followed by linear and complex eigenvalue problems. We thus propose a numerical strategy to perform more rapidly multiple complex eigenvalue analyses. This strategy couples three methods namely, Fuzzy Logic Controllers to manage frictional contact problem, homotopy developments and projection techniques to reanalyze the projection matrices and component mode synthesis to calculate the modified eigensolutions. A numerical application is performed to highlight the efficiency of the strategy and a discussion is proposed in terms of precision and computational time.

  18. Stability analysis of the high temperature thermal pebble bed nuclear reactor concept

    SciTech Connect

    Vondy, D.R.

    1981-02-01

    A study was made of the stability of the high temperature gas-cooled pebble bed core against xenon-driven oscillation. This generic study indicated that a core as large as 3000 MW(t) could be stable. Several aspects present a challenge to analysis including the void space above the pebble bed, the effects of possible control rod configurations, and the temperature feedback contribution. Special methods of analysis were developed in this effort. Of considerable utility was the scheme of including an azimuthal buckling loss term in the neturon balance equations admitting direct solution of the first azimuthal harmonic for a core having azimuthal symmetry. This technique allows the linear stability analysis to be done solving two-dimensional (RZ) problems instead of three-dimensional problems. A scheme for removing the fundamental source contribution was also implemented to allow direct iteration toward the dominant harmonic solution, treating up to three dimensions with diffusion theory.

  19. Design of Launch Vehicle Flight Control Systems Using Ascent Vehicle Stability Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jang, Jiann-Woei; Alaniz, Abran; Hall, Robert; Bedossian, Nazareth; Hall, Charles; Jackson, Mark

    2011-01-01

    A launch vehicle represents a complicated flex-body structural environment for flight control system design. The Ascent-vehicle Stability Analysis Tool (ASAT) is developed to address the complicity in design and analysis of a launch vehicle. The design objective for the flight control system of a launch vehicle is to best follow guidance commands while robustly maintaining system stability. A constrained optimization approach takes the advantage of modern computational control techniques to simultaneously design multiple control systems in compliance with required design specs. "Tower Clearance" and "Load Relief" designs have been achieved for liftoff and max dynamic pressure flight regions, respectively, in the presence of large wind disturbances. The robustness of the flight control system designs has been verified in the frequency domain Monte Carlo analysis using ASAT.

  20. Global ideal magnetohydrodynamic stability analysis for the configurational space of Wendelstein 7-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nührenberg, Carolin

    1996-06-01

    A survey of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability properties of three-dimensional (3-D) MHD configurations representing the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) stellarator experiment [ G. Grieger et al., Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, 1990 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1991), Vol. 3, p. 525] was performed with the Code for the Analysis for the Stability of 3-D Equilibria (CAS3D) [C. Schwab, Phys. Fluids B 5, 3195 (1993)] . This study confirms and elaborates previous indications on the structural characteristics of global MHD modes in stellarators. In particular these characteristics pertain to the compressibility of these modes, the equivalence of the decoupled stability problems for the modes with different parities, and the separability of global from fine-scale perturbations within the same mode family. As to the W7-X stellarator experiment, the envisaged configurational class—providing the intended experimental flexibility—appears to offer scenarios of safely stable operation.

  1. Real-Time Stability Margin Measurements for X-38 Robustness Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosworth, John T.; Stachowiak, Susan J.

    2005-01-01

    A method has been developed for real-time stability margin measurement calculations. The method relies on a tailored-forced excitation targeted to a specific frequency range. Computation of the frequency response is matched to the specific frequencies contained in the excitation. A recursive Fourier transformation is used to make the method compatible with real-time calculation. The method was incorporated into the X-38 nonlinear simulation and applied to an X-38 robustness test. X-38 stability margins were calculated for different variations in aerodynamic and mass properties over the vehicle flight trajectory. The new method showed results comparable to more traditional stability analysis techniques, and at the same time, this new method provided coverage that is more complete and increased efficiency.

  2. Computational analysis of a stability robustness margin for structured real-parameter perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wedell, Evan; Chuang, C.-H.; Wie, Bong

    1989-01-01

    An efficient computational method is presented for stability robustness analysis with structured real-parameter perturbations. A generic model of a class of uncertain dynamical systems is used as an example. The parameter uncertainty is characterized by a real scalar, epsilon. Multilinearity of the closed-loop characteristic polynomial is exploited to permit application of the mapping theorem to calculate the stability robustness margin. It is found that sensitive geometry of the stability boundary in the epsilon, omega-plane renders problematic the calculation of the minimum epsilon as a function of omega. This difficulty is avoided by calculating the minimum distance to the image of the uncertainty domain over omega as a function of epsilon. It is also shown that a certain class of uncertain dynamical systems has the required multilinearity property and are thus amenable to the proposed technique.

  3. Stability analysis of position and force control problems for robot arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, John T.; Murphy, Steve

    1990-01-01

    Stability issues involving the control of a robot arm under the influence of external forces are discussed. Several different scenarios are considered: position control with the external force as an unmodeled disturbance, compliant control for a bounded external force in some subspace, and compliant control for a force due to the interaction with an environment whose dynamical behavior can be modeled. In each of these cases, a stability analysis using the Lyapunov method is presented. An explanation of instability is put forth for the case in which the environment has flexibility and the gains are inappropriately chosen. When the environment is stiff in the force control subspace, robust stability can be achieved with the integral force feedback.

  4. Bounded Linear Stability Analysis - A Time Delay Margin Estimation Approach for Adaptive Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Ishihara, Abraham K.; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje Srinlvas; Bakhtiari-Nejad, Maryam

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a method for estimating time delay margin for model-reference adaptive control of systems with almost linear structured uncertainty. The bounded linear stability analysis method seeks to represent the conventional model-reference adaptive law by a locally bounded linear approximation within a small time window using the comparison lemma. The locally bounded linear approximation of the combined adaptive system is cast in a form of an input-time-delay differential equation over a small time window. The time delay margin of this system represents a local stability measure and is computed analytically by a matrix measure method, which provides a simple analytical technique for estimating an upper bound of time delay margin. Based on simulation results for a scalar model-reference adaptive control system, both the bounded linear stability method and the matrix measure method are seen to provide a reasonably accurate and yet not too conservative time delay margin estimation.

  5. Stability analysis of nonlinear systems by multiple time scaling. [using perturbation methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morino, L.

    1974-01-01

    The asymptotic solution for the transient analysis of a general nonlinear system in the neighborhood of the stability boundary was obtained by using the multiple-time-scaling asymptotic-expansion method. The nonlinearities are assumed to be of algebraic nature. Terms of order epsilon to the 3rd power (where epsilon is the order of amplitude of the unknown) are included in the solution. The solution indicates that there is always a limit cycle which is stable (unstable) and exists above (below) the stability boundary if the nonlinear terms are stabilizing (destabilizing). Extension of the solution to include fifth order nonlinear terms is also presented. Comparisons with harmonic balance and with multiple-time-scaling solution of panel flutter equations are also included.

  6. Boundary-Layer Stability Analysis of the Mean Flows Obtained Using Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liao, Wei; Malik, Mujeeb R.; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Li, Fei; Nielsen, Eric J.; Buning, Pieter G.; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2012-01-01

    Boundary-layer stability analyses of mean flows extracted from unstructured-grid Navier- Stokes solutions have been performed. A procedure has been developed to extract mean flow profiles from the FUN3D unstructured-grid solutions. Extensive code-to-code validations have been performed by comparing the extracted mean ows as well as the corresponding stability characteristics to the predictions based on structured-grid solutions. Comparisons are made on a range of problems from a simple at plate to a full aircraft configuration-a modified Gulfstream-III with a natural laminar flow glove. The future aim of the project is to extend the adjoint-based design capability in FUN3D to include natural laminar flow and laminar flow control by integrating it with boundary-layer stability analysis codes, such as LASTRAC.

  7. Transverse beam stability measurement and analysis for the SNS accumulator ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zaipeng; Deibele, Craig; Schulte, Michael J.; Hu, Yu-Hen

    2015-07-01

    A field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based transverse feedback damper system was implemented in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring with the intention to stabilize the electron-proton (e-p) instability in the frequency range of 1-300 MHz. The transverse feedback damper could also be used as a diagnostic tool by measuring the beam transfer function (BTF). An analysis of the BTF measurements provides the stability diagram for the production beam at SNS. This paper describes the feedback damper system and its setup as the BTF diagnostic tool. Experimental BTF results are presented and beam stability is analyzed by use of the BTF measurements for the SNS accumulator ring.

  8. Game Theoretical Analysis on Cooperation Stability and Incentive Effectiveness in Community Networks.

    PubMed

    Song, Kaida; Wang, Rui; Liu, Yi; Qian, Depei; Zhang, Han; Cai, Jihong

    2015-01-01

    Community networks, the distinguishing feature of which is membership admittance, appear on P2P networks, social networks, and conventional Web networks. Joining the network costs money, time or network bandwidth, but the individuals get access to special resources owned by the community in return. The prosperity and stability of the community are determined by both the policy of admittance and the attraction of the privileges gained by joining. However, some misbehaving users can get the dedicated resources with some illicit and low-cost approaches, which introduce instability into the community, a phenomenon that will destroy the membership policy. In this paper, we analyze on the stability using game theory on such a phenomenon. We propose a game-theoretical model of stability analysis in community networks and provide conditions for a stable community. We then extend the model to analyze the effectiveness of different incentive policies, which could be used when the community cannot maintain its members in certain situations. Then we verify those models through a simulation. Finally, we discuss several ways to promote community network's stability by adjusting the network's properties and give some proposal on the designs of these types of networks from the points of game theory and stability.

  9. Game Theoretical Analysis on Cooperation Stability and Incentive Effectiveness in Community Networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi; Qian, Depei; Zhang, Han; Cai, Jihong

    2015-01-01

    Community networks, the distinguishing feature of which is membership admittance, appear on P2P networks, social networks, and conventional Web networks. Joining the network costs money, time or network bandwidth, but the individuals get access to special resources owned by the community in return. The prosperity and stability of the community are determined by both the policy of admittance and the attraction of the privileges gained by joining. However, some misbehaving users can get the dedicated resources with some illicit and low-cost approaches, which introduce instability into the community, a phenomenon that will destroy the membership policy. In this paper, we analyze on the stability using game theory on such a phenomenon. We propose a game-theoretical model of stability analysis in community networks and provide conditions for a stable community. We then extend the model to analyze the effectiveness of different incentive policies, which could be used when the community cannot maintain its members in certain situations. Then we verify those models through a simulation. Finally, we discuss several ways to promote community network’s stability by adjusting the network’s properties and give some proposal on the designs of these types of networks from the points of game theory and stability. PMID:26551649

  10. Robust stability analysis of a class of neural networks with discrete time delays.

    PubMed

    Faydasicok, Ozlem; Arik, Sabri

    2012-05-01

    This paper studies the existence, uniqueness and global asymptotic stability of the equilibrium point for the class of neural networks with discrete constant time delays under parameter uncertainties. The class of the neural network considered in this paper employs the activation functions which are assumed to be continuous and slope-bounded but not required to be bounded or differentiable. We conduct a stability analysis by exploiting the stability theory of Lyapunov functionals and the theory of Homomorphic mapping to derive some easily verifiable sufficient conditions for existence, uniqueness and global asymptotic stability of the equilibrium point. The conditions obtained mainly establish some time-independent relationships between the network parameters of the neural network. We make a detailed comparison between our results and the previously published corresponding results. This comparison proves that our results are new and improve and generalize the results derived in the past literature. We also give some illustrative numerical examples to show the effectiveness and applicability of our proposed stability results.

  11. Verification of the stability lobes of Inconel 718 milling by recurrence plot applications and composite multiscale entropy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzysztof, Kecik; Borowiec, Marek; Rafał, Rusinek

    2016-01-01

    Correctness verification of the stability lobe diagrams of milling process determined by commercial software CutPro 9 is the aim of this work. The analysis is performed for nickel superalloy Inconel 718 which is widely used in aviation industry. A methodology of stability analysis which bases on advanced nonlinear methods such as recurrence plot, recurrence quantifications analysis and composite multiscale entropy analysis are applied to the experimental data. Additionally, a new criterion for the determination of the unstable areas is proposed.

  12. Quantitation of protein–protein interactions by thermal stability shift analysis

    PubMed Central

    Layton, Curtis J; Hellinga, Homme W

    2011-01-01

    Thermal stability shift analysis is a powerful method for examining binding interactions in proteins. We demonstrate that under certain circumstances, protein–protein interactions can be quantitated by monitoring shifts in thermal stability using thermodynamic models and data analysis methods presented in this work. This method relies on the determination of protein stabilities from thermal unfolding experiments using fluorescent dyes such as SYPRO Orange that report on protein denaturation. Data collection is rapid and straightforward using readily available real-time polymerase chain reaction instrumentation. We present an approach for the analysis of the unfolding transitions corresponding to each partner to extract the affinity of the interaction between the proteins. This method does not require the construction of a titration series that brackets the dissociation constant. In thermal shift experiments, protein stability data are obtained at different temperatures according to the affinity- and concentration-dependent shifts in unfolding transition midpoints. Treatment of the temperature dependence of affinity is, therefore, intrinsic to this method and is developed in this study. We used the interaction between maltose-binding protein (MBP) and a thermostable synthetic ankyrin repeat protein (Off7) as an experimental test case because their unfolding transitions overlap minimally. We found that MBP is significantly stabilized by Off7. High experimental throughput is enabled by sample parallelization, and the ability to extract quantitative binding information at a single partner concentration. In a single experiment, we were able to quantify the affinities of a series of alanine mutants, covering a wide range of affinities (∼ 100 nM to ∼ 100 μM). PMID:21674662

  13. A Six Degree of Freedom Trajectory Analysis of Spin-Stabilized Projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkritzapis, Dimitrios N.; Panagiotopoulos, Elias E.; Margaris, Dionissios P.; Papanikas, Dimitrios G.

    2007-12-01

    A full six degrees of freedom (6-DOF) flight dynamics model is proposed for the accurate prediction of short and long-range trajectories of high and low spin-stabilized projectiles via atmospheric flight to final impact point. The projectile is assumed to be both rigid (non-flexible), and rotationally symmetric about its spin axis launched at low and high pitch angles. The projectile maneuvering motion depends on the most significant force and moment variations in addition to gravity and Magnus Effect. The computational flight analysis takes into consideration the Mach number and total angle of attack effects by means of the variable aerodynamic coefficients. For the purposes of the present work, linear interpolation has been applied from the tabulated database of McCoy's book. The aforementioned variable flight model is compared with a trajectory atmospheric motion based on appropriate constant mean values of the aerodynamic projectile coefficients. Static stability, also called gyroscopic stability, is examined as a necessary condition for stable flight motion in order to locate the initial spinning projectile rotation. Static stability examination takes into account the overturning moment variations with Mach number flight motion. The developed method gives satisfactory results compared with published data of verified experiments and computational codes on atmospheric dynamics model analysis.

  14. Applications of differential scanning calorimetry for thermal stability analysis of proteins: qualification of DSC.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jie; Arthur, Kelly; Chemmalil, Letha; Muzammil, Salman; Gabrielson, John; Jiang, Yijia

    2012-03-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) has been used to characterize protein thermal stability, overall conformation, and domain folding integrity by the biopharmaceutical industry. Recently, there have been increased requests from regulatory agencies for the qualification of characterization methods including DSC. Understanding the method precision can help determine what differences between samples are significant and also establish the acceptance criteria for comparability and other characterization studies. In this study, we identify the parameters for the qualification of DSC for thermal stability analysis of proteins. We use these parameters to assess the precision and sensitivity of DSC and demonstrate that DSC is suitable for protein thermal stability analysis for these purposes. Several molecules from different structural families were studied. The experiments and data analyses were performed by different analysts using different instruments at different sites. The results show that the (apparent) thermal transition midpoint (T(m)) values obtained for the same protein by same and different instruments and/or analysts are quite reproducible, and the profile similarity values obtained for the same protein from the same instrument are also high. DSC is an appropriate method for assessing protein thermal stability and conformational changes.

  15. Intra-operative evaluation of cementless hip implant stability: a prototype device based on vibration analysis.

    PubMed

    Lannocca, Maurizio; Varini, Elena; Cappello, Angelo; Cristofolini, Luca; Bialoblocka, Ewa

    2007-10-01

    Cementless implants are mechanically stabilized during surgery by a press-fitting procedure. Good initial stability is crucial to avoid stem loosening and bone cracking, therefore, the surgeon must achieve optimal press-fitting. A possible approach to solve this problem and assist the surgeon in achieving the optimal compromise, involves the use of vibration analysis. The present study aimed to design and test a prototype device able to evaluate the primary mechanical stability of a cementless prosthesis, based on vibration analysis. In particular, the goal was to discriminate between stable and quasi-stable implants; thus the stem-bone system was assumed to be linear in both cases. For that reason, it was decided to study the frequency responses of the system, instead of the harmonic distortion. The prototype developed consists of a piezoelectric exciter connected to the stem and an accelerometer attached to the femur. Preliminary tests were performed on four composite femurs implanted with a conventional stem. The results showed that the input signal was repeatable and the output could be recorded accurately. The most sensitive parameter to stability was the shift in resonance frequency of the stem-bone system, which was highly correlated with residual micromotion on all four specimens.

  16. Stability analysis of implicit time discretizations for the Compton-scattering Fokker-Planck equation

    SciTech Connect

    Densmore, Jeffery D; Warsa, James S; Lowrie, Robert B; Morel, Jim E

    2008-01-01

    The Fokker-Planck equation is a widely used approximation for modeling the Compton scattering of photons in high energy density applications. In this paper, we perform a stability analysis of three implicit time discretizations for the Compton-Scattering Fokker-Planck equation. Specifically, we examine (i) a Semi-Implicit (SI) scheme that employs backward-Euler differencing but evaluates temperature-dependent coefficients at their beginning-of-time-step values, (ii) a Fully Implicit (FI) discretization that instead evaluates temperature-dependent coefficients at their end-of-time-step values, and (iii) a Linearized Implicit (LI) scheme, which is developed by linearizing the temperature dependence of the FI discretization within each time step. Our stability analysis shows that the FI and LI schemes are unconditionally stable and cannot generate oscillatory solutions regardless of time-step size, whereas the SI discretization can suffer from instabilities and nonphysical oscillations for sufficiently large time steps. With the results of this analysis, we present time-step limits for the SI scheme that prevent undesirable behavior. We test the validity of our stability analysis and time-step limits with a set of numerical examples.

  17. Characterization and stability analysis of zinc oxide nanoencapsulated conjugated linoleic acid.

    PubMed

    Choy, Jin-Ho; Shin, Jiwon; Lim, Seung-Yong; Oh, Jae-Min; Oh, Mi-Hwa; Oh, Sangsuk

    2010-08-01

    Nanoencapsulation technology has a diverse range of applications, including drug-delivery systems (DDS) and cosmetic and chemical carriers, because it can deliver various bio- and organic-molecules and improve their stabilities. Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) has health benefits, including being an anticancer agent, but it decreases flavor due to volatiles from oxidation. To improve the stability of CLA for food applications, nanoencapsulated CLA was synthesized for use in zinc basic salt (ZBS) and characterized by powder X-ray diffractometry, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), elemental CHN analysis, inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analysis, UV/VIS spectroscopy, and FTIR spectroscopy. The thermal stability of nanoencapsulated CLA at 180 degrees C, a temperature similar to that used in cooking, was analyzed by gas chromatography. The gallery height of nanoencapsulated CLA was determined to be approximately 26 A through powder X-ray diffractometry; therefore, the CLA molecules were closely packed with zig-zag form between the intracrystalline spaces of nano particles. Elemental CHN analysis and ICP data determined the chemical composition of nanoencapsulated CLA to be Zn(4.86)(OH)(8.78)(CLA)(0.94). By TGA, it was determined about 45% (wt/wt) of weight loss corresponded to CLA, which is good agreement with the 42.13% (wt/wt) determined from high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and elemental CHN analysis. UV/VIS spectroscopy and Fourier-transformed infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy showed encapsulated CLA maintained a conjugated diene structure, supporting the presence of CLA. Nanoencapsulation improved the thermal stability of CLA by about 25%, compared to pristine CLA. Practical Application: This system can be used for protection of encapsulated negatively-charged food ingredients from thermal processing.

  18. A Meta-Analysis of Core Stability Exercise versus General Exercise for Chronic Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue-Qiang; Zheng, Jie-Jiao; Yu, Zhuo-Wei; Bi, Xia; Lou, Shu-Jie; Liu, Jing; Cai, Bin; Hua, Ying-Hui; Wu, Mark; Wei, Mao-Ling; Shen, Hai-Min; Chen, Yi; Pan, Yu-Jian; Xu, Guo-Hui; Chen, Pei-Jie

    2012-01-01

    Objective To review the effects of core stability exercise or general exercise for patients with chronic low back pain (LBP). Summary of Background Data Exercise therapy appears to be effective at decreasing pain and improving function for patients with chronic LBP in practice guidelines. Core stability exercise is becoming increasingly popular for LBP. However, it is currently unknown whether core stability exercise produces more beneficial effects than general exercise in patients with chronic LBP. Methods Published articles from 1970 to October 2011 were identified using electronic searches. For this meta-analysis, two reviewers independently selected relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating core stability exercise versus general exercise for the treatment of patients with chronic LBP. Data were extracted independently by the same two individuals who selected the studies. Results From the 28 potentially relevant trials, a total of 5 trials involving 414 participants were included in the current analysis. The pooling revealed that core stability exercise was better than general exercise for reducing pain [mean difference (−1.29); 95% confidence interval (−2.47, −0.11); P = 0.003] and disability [mean difference (−7.14); 95% confidence interval (−11.64, −2.65); P = 0.002] at the time of the short-term follow-up. However, no significant differences were observed between core stability exercise and general exercise in reducing pain at 6 months [mean difference (−0.50); 95% confidence interval (−1.36, 0.36); P = 0.26] and 12 months [mean difference (−0.32); 95% confidence interval (−0.87, 0.23); P = 0.25]. Conclusions Compared to general exercise, core stability exercise is more effective in decreasing pain and may improve physical function in patients with chronic LBP in the short term. However, no significant long-term differences in pain severity were observed between patients who engaged in core stability

  19. Boundary layer stability analysis of a natural laminar flow glove on the F-111 TACT airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runyan, L. J.; Steers, L. L.

    1980-01-01

    A natural laminar flow airfoil has been developed as a part of the aircraft energy efficiency program. A NASA flight program incorporating this airfoil into partial wing gloves on the F-111 TACT airplane was scheduled to start in May, 1980. In support of this research effort, an extensive boundary layer stability analysis of the partial glove has been conducted. The results of that analysis show the expected effects of wing leading-edge sweep angle, Reynolds number, and compressibility on boundary layer stability and transition. These results indicate that it should be possible to attain on the order of 60% laminar flow on the upper surface and 50% laminar flow on the lower surface for sweep angles of at least 20 deg, chord Reynolds numbers of 25 x 10 to the 6th and Mach numbers from 0.81 to 0.85.

  20. Laser safety and hazard analysis for the temperature stabilized BSLT ARES laser system.

    SciTech Connect

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2003-08-01

    A laser safety and hazard analysis was performed for the temperature stabilized Big Sky Laser Technology (BSLT) laser central to the ARES system based on the 2000 version of the American National Standards Institute's (ANSI) Standard Z136.1, for Safe Use of Lasers and the 2000 version of the ANSI Standard Z136.6, for Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors. As a result of temperature stabilization of the BSLT laser the operating parameters of the laser had changed requiring a hazard analysis based on the new operating conditions. The ARES laser system is a Van/Truck based mobile platform, which is used to perform laser interaction experiments and tests at various national test sites.

  1. The Least Squares Stochastic Finite Element Method in Structural Stability Analysis of Steel Skeletal Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiński, M.; Szafran, J.

    2015-05-01

    The main purpose of this work is to verify the influence of the weighting procedure in the Least Squares Method on the probabilistic moments resulting from the stability analysis of steel skeletal structures. We discuss this issue also in the context of the geometrical nonlinearity appearing in the Stochastic Finite Element Method equations for the stability analysis and preservation of the Gaussian probability density function employed to model the Young modulus of a structural steel in this problem. The weighting procedure itself (with both triangular and Dirac-type) shows rather marginal influence on all probabilistic coefficients under consideration. This hybrid stochastic computational technique consisting of the FEM and computer algebra systems (ROBOT and MAPLE packages) may be used for analogous nonlinear analyses in structural reliability assessment.

  2. A Signal Transmission Technique for Stability Analysis of Multivariable Non-Linear Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Mark; Zimpfer, Doug; Adams, Neil; Lindsey, K. L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Among the difficulties associated with multivariable, non-linear control systems is the problem of assessing closed-loop stability. Of particular interest is the class of non-linear systems controlled with on/off actuators, such as spacecraft thrusters or electrical relays. With such systems, standard describing function techniques are typically too conservative, and time-domain simulation analysis is prohibitively extensive, This paper presents an open-loop analysis technique for this class of non-linear systems. The technique is centered around an innovative use of multivariable signal transmission theory to quantify the plant response to worst case control commands. The technique has been applied to assess stability of thruster controlled flexible space structures. Examples are provided for Space Shuttle attitude control with attached flexible payloads.

  3. The Development of a Handbook for Astrobee F Performance and Stability Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    An astrobee F performance and stability analysis is presented, for use by the NASA Sounding Rocket Division. The performance analysis provides information regarding altitude, mach number, dynamic pressure, and velocity as functions of time since launch. It is found that payload weight has the greatest effect on performance, and performance prediction accuracy was calculated to remain within 1%. In addition, to assure sufficient flight stability, a predicted rigid-body static margin of at least 8% of the total vehicle length is required. Finally, fin cant angle predictions are given in order to achieve a 2.5 cycle per second burnout roll rate, based on obtaining 75% of the steady roll rate. It is noted that this method can be used by flight performance engineers to create a similar handbook for any sounding rocket series.

  4. Analysis of the particle stability in a new designed ultrasonic levitation device.

    PubMed

    Baer, Sebastian; Andrade, Marco A B; Esen, Cemal; Adamowski, Julio Cezar; Schweiger, Gustav; Ostendorf, Andreas

    2011-10-01

    The use of acoustic levitation in the fields of analytical chemistry and in the containerless processing of materials requires a good stability of the levitated particle. However, spontaneous oscillations and rotation of the levitated particle have been reported in literature, which can reduce the applicability of the acoustic levitation technique. Aiming to reduce the particle oscillations, this paper presents the analysis of the particle stability in a new acoustic levitator device. The new acoustic levitator consists of a piezoelectric transducer with a concave radiating surface and a concave reflector. The analysis is conducted by determining numerically the axial and lateral forces that act on the levitated object and by measuring the oscillations of a sphere particle by a laser Doppler vibrometer. It is shown that the new levitator design allows to increase the lateral forces and reduce significantly the lateral oscillations of the levitated object.

  5. Stability Analysis of the Buck-Boost Type Solar Array Regulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jeong-Hwan; Yoon, Seok-Teak; Park, Hee-Sung; Park, Sung-Woo; Koo, Ja-Chun; Jang, Jin-Baek; Lee, Sang-Kon

    2014-08-01

    The SAR (Solar Array Regulator) is different from a general DC-DC Converter. The input of the SAR is connected to the solar array and the output is connected to the battery. So, the output voltage of the SAR is constant and the input voltage of the SAR is variable. And the solar array current which is the SAR input current is variable according to the solar array voltage. Therefore, the SAR is influenced by the electrical characteristic of the solar array. For these reasons, a small signal model for a general DC-DC converter cannot be applied to the SAR for the stability analysis. In this paper, the small signal model of the BUCK-BOOST type SAR (BBSAR) is introduced and its transfer functions are induced. Using small signal transfer functions, the stability analysis is performed and its results are compared to the simulation result.

  6. Stability analysis of agegraphic dark energy in Brans-Dicke cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farajollahi, H.; Sadeghi, J.; Pourali, M.; Salehi, A.

    2012-05-01

    Stability analysis of agegraphic dark energy in Brans-Dicke theory is presented in this paper. We constrain the model parameters with the observational data and thus the results become broadly consistent with those expected from experiment. Stability analysis of the model without best fitting shows that universe may begin from an unstable state passing a saddle point and finally become stable in future. However, with the best fitted model, There is no saddle intermediate state. The agegraphic dark energy in the model by itself exhibits a phantom behavior. However, contribution of cold dark matter on the effective energy density modifies the state of the universe from phantom phase to quintessence one. The statefinder diagnosis also indicates that the universe leaves an unstable state in the past, passes the LCDM state and finally approaches the sable state in future.

  7. Linearization of digital derived rate algorithm for use in linear stability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, R. E.; Porada, T. W.

    1985-01-01

    The digital derived rate (DDR) algorithm is used to calculate the rate of rotation of the Centaur upper-stage rocket. The DDR is highly nonlinear algorithm, and classical linear stability analysis of the spacecraft cannot be performed without linearization. The performance of this rate algorithm is characterized by a gain and phase curve that drop off at the same frequency. This characteristic is desirable for many applications. A linearization technique for the DDR algorithm is investigated. The linearization method is described. Examples of the results of the linearization technique are illustrated, and the effects of linearization are described. A linear digital filter may be used as a substitute for performing classical linear stability analyses, while the DDR itself may be used in time response analysis.

  8. 3D linearized stability analysis of various forms of Burnett equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wenwen; Chen, Weifang; Liu, Hualin; Agarwal, Ramesh K.

    2014-12-01

    Burnett equations were originally derived in 1935 by Burnett by employing the Chapman-Enskog expansion to Classical Boltzmann equation to second order in Knudsen number Kn. Since then several variants of these equations have been proposed in the literature; these variants have differing physical and numerical properties. In this paper, we consider three such variants which are known in the literature as `the Original Burnett (OB) equations', the Conventional Burnett (CB) equations' and the recently formulated by the authors `the Simplified Conventional (SCB) equations.' One of the most important issues in obtaining numerical solutions of the Burnett equations is their stability under small perturbations. In this paper, we perform the linearized stability (known as the Bobylev Stability) analysis of three-dimensional Burnett equations for all the three variants (OB, CB, and SCB) for the first time in the literature on this subject. By introducing small perturbations in the steady state flow field, the trajectory curve and the variation in attenuation coefficient with wave frequency of the characteristic equation are obtained for all the three variants of Burnett equations to determine their stability. The results show that the Simplified Conventional Burnett (SCB) equations are unconditionally stable under small wavelength perturbations. However, the Original Burnett (OB) and the Conventional Burnett (CB) equations are unstable when the Knudsen number becomes greater than a critical value and the stability condition worsens in 3D when compared to the stability condition for 1-D and 2-D equations. The critical Knudsen number for 3-D OB and CB equations is 0.061 and 0.287 respectively.

  9. The stability of calibration standards for ICP/AES analysis: Six-month study

    SciTech Connect

    Huff, E.A.; Huff, D.R.

    1992-05-01

    The stability of instrument calibration standards for Inductively Coupled Plasma/Atomic Emission Spectrometric (ICP/AES) analysis was studied over a six-month period. Data were obtained as functions of analyte concentration, acid type, and acidity. The impact of acid concentration on signal-to-background ratios (S/B) was also assessed. The results show that analytes maintain their integrity over extended periods with appropriate inorganic acid preservatives. Thus, frequent standard preparations become unnecessary to obtain valid analytical data.

  10. User’s Guide: Modified Slope Stability Package with Kansas City Analysis (DGSLOPE).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    MODIFIED SLOPE STABILITY PACKAGE WITH KANSAS CITY ANALYSIS (DGSLOPE) by Robert L. Hall, Michael E. Pace Automatic Data Processing Center U. S. Army Engineer...endorsement or approval of the use of such commercial products. J W’ Unclassified SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE (16.., Dots gntenod) EPAGE AD...report 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR~s) S. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(S) Robert L. Hall Michael E. Pace S. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND

  11. Analysis of of Injection-Velocity Effects on Rocket Motor Dynamics and Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurrell, Herbert G.

    1959-01-01

    A concept of combustion time lag that includes dependency on injection velocity is introduced. The concept is used in the formulation of chamber transfer functions and in an analysis of low-frequency combustion instability. Theoretical frequency responses and stability boundaries are compared with those obtained when the injection-velocity effect on the time lag to be an important consideration, in the theory of chamber dynamics and combustion instability

  12. Stability and Robustness Analysis Tools for Marine Robot Localization and Mapping Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    propeller, and shaft, and sometimes rivets and welds). DIDSON provides a range and bearing measurement associated with each pixel of each image... Springer - Verlag, 1990, pp. 167-193. [22] M. Csorba, Simultaneous Localisation and Map Building, PhD Thesis, University of Oxford, 1997. [23] G... Springer -Verlag, 2003, pp. 361-371. [39] E. Malis, “Stability Analysis of Invariant Visual Servoing and Robutness to Parametric Uncertainties,” A

  13. Stability analysis of stagnation-point flow over a stretching/shrinking sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awaludin, I. S.; Weidman, P. D.; Ishak, Anuar

    2016-04-01

    The stagnation point flow over a linearly stretching or shrinking sheet is considered in the present study. The transformed ordinary differential equations are solved numerically. Dual solutions are possible for the shrinking case, while the solution is unique for the stretching case. For the shrinking case, a linear temporal stability analysis is performed to determine which one of the solution is stable and thus physically reliable.

  14. Stability analysis of thermo-acoustic nonlinear eigenproblems in annular combustors. Part II. Uncertainty quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magri, Luca; Bauerheim, Michael; Nicoud, Franck; Juniper, Matthew P.

    2016-11-01

    Monte Carlo and Active Subspace Identification methods are combined with first- and second-order adjoint sensitivities to perform (forward) uncertainty quantification analysis of the thermo-acoustic stability of two annular combustor configurations. This method is applied to evaluate the risk factor, i.e., the probability for the system to be unstable. It is shown that the adjoint approach reduces the number of nonlinear-eigenproblem calculations by as much as the Monte Carlo samples.

  15. Modal Voltage Stability Analysis of Multi-infeed HVDC System Considering its Control Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guohong; Minakawa, Tamotsu; Hayashi, Toshiyuki

    This work presents a method for investigating the voltage stability of multi-infeed HVDC systems, which is based on the eigenvalue decomposition technique known as modal analysis. In this method, the eigenvalue of linearized steady-state system power-voltage equations are computed to evaluate the long-term voltage stability. The contributions of this work to modal analysis method are control systems of HVDC system, such as an Automatic Power Regulator (APR) and an Automatic (DC) Current Regulator (ACR) on its rectifier side and a changeover between an Automatic (DC) Voltage Regulator (AVR) and an Automatic extinction advance angle Regulator (AγR) modes on its inverter side, were taken into account, and the formularization for modal analysis considering not only these control systems of HVDC system but also generator and load characteristics was fulfilled and presented in this paper. The application results from an AC/DC model power system with dual HVDC systems verified the efficiency of the proposed method and quantitatively illustrated the influence of control systems of HVDC system on AC/DC system long-term voltage stability.

  16. Towards understanding the stabilization process in vermicomposting using PARAFAC analysis of fluorescence spectra.

    PubMed

    Lv, Baoyi; Xing, Meiyan; Zhao, Chunhui; Yang, Jian; Xiang, Liang

    2014-12-01

    In this study, fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) combined with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) was employed to trace the behavior of water extractable organic matter and assess the stabilization process during vermicomposting of sewage sludge and cattle dung. Experiments using different mixing ratios of sewage sludge and cattle dung were conducted using Eisenia fetida. The results showed that vermicomposting reduced the DOC, DOC/DON ratio and ammonia, while increased the nitrate content. A three-component model containing two humic-like materials (components 1 and 2) and a protein-like material (component 3) was successfully developed using PARAFAC analysis. Moreover, the initial waste composition had a significant effect on the distribution of each component and the addition of cattle dung improved the stability of sewage sludge in vermicomposting. The PARAFAC results also indicated that protein-like materials were degraded and humic acid-like compounds were evolved during vermicomposting. Pearson correlation analysis showed that components 2 and 3 are more suitable to assess vermicompost maturity than component 1. In all, EEM-PARAFAC can be used to track organic transformation and assess biological stability during the vermicomposting process.

  17. Run time scanner data analysis for HVM lithography process monitoring and stability control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Woong Jae; Kim, Young Ki; Tristan, John; Kim, Jeong Soo; Subramany, Lokesh; Li, Chen; Riggs, Brent; Ramanathan, Vidya; Karur-Shanmugam, Ram; Hoo, George; Gao, Jie; Golotsvan, Anna; Huang, Kevin; Pierson, Bill; Robinson, John

    2014-04-01

    There are various data mining and analysis tools in use by high-volume semiconductor manufacturers throughout the industry that seek to provide robust monitoring and analysis capabilities for the purpose of maintaining a stable lithography process. These tools exist in both online and offline formats and draw upon data from various sources for monitoring and analysis. This paper explores several possible use cases of run-time scanner data to provide advanced overlay and imaging analysis for scanner lithography signatures. Here we demonstrate several use-cases for analyzing and stabilizing lithography processes. Applications include high order wafer alignment simulations in which an optimal alignment strategy is determined by dynamic wafer selection, reporting statistics data and analysis of the lot report and the sub-recipe as a sort of non-standard lot report, visualization of key lithography process parameters, and scanner fleet management (SFM)

  18. Low frequency azimuthal stability of the ionization region of the Hall thruster discharge. II. Global analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Escobar, D.; Ahedo, E.

    2015-10-15

    The linear stability of the Hall thruster discharge is analysed against axial-azimuthal perturbations in the low frequency range using a time-dependent 2D code of the discharge. This azimuthal stability analysis is spatially global, as opposed to the more common local stability analyses, already afforded previously (D. Escobar and E. Ahedo, Phys. Plasmas 21(4), 043505 (2014)). The study covers both axial and axial-azimuthal oscillations, known as breathing mode and spoke, respectively. The influence on the spoke instability of different operation parameters such as discharge voltage, mass flow, and thruster size is assessed by means of different parametric variations and compared against experimental results. Additionally, simplified models are used to unveil and characterize the mechanisms driving the spoke. The results indicate that the spoke is linked to azimuthal oscillations of the ionization process and to the Bohm condition in the transition to the anode sheath. Finally, results obtained from local and global stability analyses are compared in order to explain the discrepancies between both methods.

  19. Analytical model and stability analysis of the leading edge spar of a passively morphing ornithopter wing.

    PubMed

    Wissa, Aimy; Calogero, Joseph; Wereley, Norman; Hubbard, James E; Frecker, Mary

    2015-10-26

    This paper presents the stability analysis of the leading edge spar of a flapping wing unmanned air vehicle with a compliant spine inserted in it. The compliant spine is a mechanism that was designed to be flexible during the upstroke and stiff during the downstroke. Inserting a variable stiffness mechanism into the leading edge spar affects its structural stability. The model for the spar-spine system was formulated in terms of the well-known Mathieu's equation, in which the compliant spine was modeled as a torsional spring with a sinusoidal stiffness function. Experimental data was used to validate the model and results show agreement within 11%. The structural stability of the leading edge spar-spine system was determined analytically and graphically using a phase plane plot and Strutt diagrams. Lastly, a torsional viscous damper was added to the leading edge spar-spine model to investigate the effect of damping on stability. Results show that for the un-damped case, the leading edge spar-spine response was stable and bounded; however, there were areas of instability that appear for a range of spine upstroke and downstroke stiffnesses. Results also show that there exist a damping ratio between 0.2 and 0.5, for which the leading edge spar-spine system was stable for all values of spine upstroke and downstroke stiffnesses.

  20. Frequency spectrum analysis for spectrum stabilization in airborne gamma-ray spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Guoqiang; Tan, Chengjun; Ge, Liangquan; Zhang, Qingxian; Gu, Yi

    2014-02-01

    Abnormal multi-crystal spectral drifts often can be observed when power on the airborne gamma-ray spectrometer. Currently, these spectral drifts of each crystal are generally eliminated through manual adjustment, which is time-consuming and labor-ineffective. To realize this quick automatic spectrum stabilization of multi-crystal, a frequency spectrum analysis method for natural gamma-ray background spectrum is put forward in this paper to replace traditional spectrum stabilization method used characteristic peak. Based on the polynomial fitting of high harmonics in frequency spectrum and gamma-ray spectral drift, it calculates overall spectral drift of natural gamma-ray spectrum and adjusts the gain of spectrometer by this spectral drift value, thus completing quick spectrum stabilization in the power on stage of spectrometer. This method requires no manual intervention and can obtain the overall spectral drift value automatically under no time-domain pre-processing to the natural gamma-ray spectra. The spectral drift value calculated by this method has an absolute error less than five channels (1024 resolution) and a relative error smaller than 0.80%, which can satisfy the quick automatic spectrum stabilization requirement when power on the airborne gamma-ray spectrometer instead of manual operation.

  1. Measurement of Primary and Secondary Stability of Dental Implants by Resonance Frequency Analysis Method in Mandible

    PubMed Central

    Shokri, Mehran; Daraeighadikolaei, Arash

    2013-01-01

    Background. There is no doubt that the success of the dental implants depends on the stability. The aim of this work was to measure the stability of dental implants prior to loading the implants, using a resonance frequency analysis (RFA) by Osstell mentor device. Methods. Ten healthy and nonsmoker patients over 40 years of age with at least six months of complete or partial edentulous mouth received screw-type dental implants by a 1-stage procedure. RFA measurements were obtained at surgery and 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, and 11 weeks after the implant surgery. Results. Among fifteen implants, the lowest mean stability measurement was for the 4th week after surgery in all bone types. At placement, the mean ISQ obtained with the magnetic device was 77.2 with 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.49, and then it decreased until the 4th week to 72.13 (95% CI = 2.88), and at the last measurement, the mean implant stability significantly (P value <0.05) increased and recorded higher values to 75.6 (95% CI = 1.88), at the 11th week. Conclusions. The results may be indicative of a period of time when loading might be disadvantageous prior to the 4th week following implant placement. These suggestions need to be further assessed through future studies. PMID:23737790

  2. Conjugation of α-amylase with dextran for enhanced stability: process details, kinetics and structural analysis.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Swati B; Singhal, Rekha S

    2012-11-06

    The influence of enzyme polysaccharide interaction on enzyme stability and activity was elucidated by covalently binding dextran to a model enzyme, α-amylase. The conjugation process was optimized with respect to concentration of oxidizing agent, pH of enzyme solution, ratio of dextran to enzyme concentration, temperature and time of conjugate formation, and was found to affect the stability of α-amylase. α-Amylase conjugated under optimized conditions showed 5% loss of activity but with enhanced thermal and pH stability. Lower inactivation rate constant of conjugated α-amylase within the temperature range of 60-80 °C implied its better stability. Activation energy for denaturation of α-amylase increased by 8.81 kJ/mol on conjugation with dextran. Analysis of secondary structure of α-amylase after covalent binding with dextran showed helix to turn conversion without loss of functional properties of α-amylase. Covalent bonding was found to be mandatory for the formation of conjugate.

  3. Adaptability and stability analysis of the juice yield of yellow passion fruit varieties.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, E J; Freitas, J P X; Jesus, O N

    2014-08-26

    This study analyzed the genotype x environment interaction (GE) for the juice productivity (JuProd) of 12 yellow passion fruit varieties (Passiflora edulis Sims. f. flavicarpa Deg.) using additive main effects and multiplicative interaction (AMMI) model and auxiliary parameters. The experiments were conducted in eight environments of Bahia State, Brazil, using a randomized block design with three replications. Analysis of variance showed significant effects (P ≤ 0.01) for environments, genotypes, and GE interaction. The first two interaction principal component axes (IPCAs) explained 81.00% of the sum of squares of the GE interaction. The AMMI1 and AMMI2 models showed that varieties 09 and 11 were the most stable. Other parameters, namely, the AMMI stability value (ASV), yield stability (YSI), sustainability, and stability index (StI), indicated that other varieties were more stable. These varying results were certainly a consequence of methodological differences. In contrast, the ranking of varieties for each of the stability parameters showed significant positive correlations (P ≤ 0.05) between IPCA1 x (ASV, YSI), JuProd x (StI, YSI), YSI x ASV, and StI x YSI. Cluster analysis based on the genotypic profile of the effects of the GE interaction identified three groups that correlated with the distribution of varieties in the AMMI1 biplot. However, the classification of stable genotypes was limited because the association with the productivity was not included in the analysis. Variety 08 showed the most stable and productive behavior, ranking above average in half of the environments, and it should be recommended for use.

  4. Ant Colony Optimization Analysis on Overall Stability of High Arch Dam Basis of Field Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoli; Chen, Hong-Xin; Kim, Jinxie

    2014-01-01

    A dam ant colony optimization (D-ACO) analysis of the overall stability of high arch dams on complicated foundations is presented in this paper. A modified ant colony optimization (ACO) model is proposed for obtaining dam concrete and rock mechanical parameters. A typical dam parameter feedback problem is proposed for nonlinear back-analysis numerical model based on field monitoring deformation and ACO. The basic principle of the proposed model is the establishment of the objective function of optimizing real concrete and rock mechanical parameter. The feedback analysis is then implemented with a modified ant colony algorithm. The algorithm performance is satisfactory, and the accuracy is verified. The m groups of feedback parameters, used to run a nonlinear FEM code, and the displacement and stress distribution are discussed. A feedback analysis of the deformation of the Lijiaxia arch dam and based on the modified ant colony optimization method is also conducted. By considering various material parameters obtained using different analysis methods, comparative analyses were conducted on dam displacements, stress distribution characteristics, and overall dam stability. The comparison results show that the proposal model can effectively solve for feedback multiple parameters of dam concrete and rock material and basically satisfy assessment requirements for geotechnical structural engineering discipline. PMID:25025089

  5. Ant colony optimization analysis on overall stability of high arch dam basis of field monitoring.

    PubMed

    Lin, Peng; Liu, Xiaoli; Chen, Hong-Xin; Kim, Jinxie

    2014-01-01

    A dam ant colony optimization (D-ACO) analysis of the overall stability of high arch dams on complicated foundations is presented in this paper. A modified ant colony optimization (ACO) model is proposed for obtaining dam concrete and rock mechanical parameters. A typical dam parameter feedback problem is proposed for nonlinear back-analysis numerical model based on field monitoring deformation and ACO. The basic principle of the proposed model is the establishment of the objective function of optimizing real concrete and rock mechanical parameter. The feedback analysis is then implemented with a modified ant colony algorithm. The algorithm performance is satisfactory, and the accuracy is verified. The m groups of feedback parameters, used to run a nonlinear FEM code, and the displacement and stress distribution are discussed. A feedback analysis of the deformation of the Lijiaxia arch dam and based on the modified ant colony optimization method is also conducted. By considering various material parameters obtained using different analysis methods, comparative analyses were conducted on dam displacements, stress distribution characteristics, and overall dam stability. The comparison results show that the proposal model can effectively solve for feedback multiple parameters of dam concrete and rock material and basically satisfy assessment requirements for geotechnical structural engineering discipline.

  6. Biplot analysis of phenotypic stability in upland cotton genotypes in Mato Grosso.

    PubMed

    Farias, F J C; Carvalho, L P; Silva Filho, J L; Teodoro, P E

    2016-05-20

    Seed cotton yield is a trait governed by multiple genes that cause changes in the performance of genotypes depending on the cultivation environment. Breeding programs examine the genotype x environment interaction (GE) using precise statistical methods, such as AMMI (additive main effects and multiplicative interaction) and GGE biplot (genotype main effects + genotype x environment interaction). The AMMI method combines the analysis of variance and principal components, to adjust the main effects (genotypes and environments) and the effects of GE interaction, respectively. The GGE biplot groups the genotype additive effect together with the multiplicative effect of the GE interaction, and submits both of these to the principal components analysis. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between the AMMI and GGE biplot methods and select cotton genotypes that simultaneously showed high productivity of seed cotton and stability in Mato Grosso environments. Trials were conducted with cotton cultivars in eight environments across Mato Grosso State in the 2008/2009 crop season. The experiment used a randomized block design with 16 genotypes and four replicates per genotype x environment combination. Data for seeds cotton productivity were analyzed by AMMI and GGE biplot methods. Both methods were concordant in the discrimination of environments and genotypes for phenotypic stability. The genotypes BRS ARAÇÁ and LD 05 CV had high seed cotton productivity and phenotypic stability, and could be grown in all environments across Mato Grosso State.

  7. A linear stability analysis for nonlinear, grey, thermal radiative transfer problems

    SciTech Connect

    Wollaber, Allan B.; Larsen, Edward W.

    2011-02-20

    We present a new linear stability analysis of three time discretizations and Monte Carlo interpretations of the nonlinear, grey thermal radiative transfer (TRT) equations: the widely used 'Implicit Monte Carlo' (IMC) equations, the Carter Forest (CF) equations, and the Ahrens-Larsen or 'Semi-Analog Monte Carlo' (SMC) equations. Using a spatial Fourier analysis of the 1-D Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) equations that are linearized about an equilibrium solution, we show that the IMC equations are unconditionally stable (undamped perturbations do not exist) if {alpha}, the IMC time-discretization parameter, satisfies 0.5 < {alpha} {<=} 1. This is consistent with conventional wisdom. However, we also show that for sufficiently large time steps, unphysical damped oscillations can exist that correspond to the lowest-frequency Fourier modes. After numerically confirming this result, we develop a method to assess the stability of any time discretization of the 0-D, nonlinear, grey, thermal radiative transfer problem. Subsequent analyses of the CF and SMC methods then demonstrate that the CF method is unconditionally stable and monotonic, but the SMC method is conditionally stable and permits unphysical oscillatory solutions that can prevent it from reaching equilibrium. This stability theory provides new conditions on the time step to guarantee monotonicity of the IMC solution, although they are likely too conservative to be used in practice. Theoretical predictions are tested and confirmed with numerical experiments.

  8. Reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks by stability-based network component analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Xuan, Jianhua; Wang, Chen; Shajahan, Ayesha N; Riggins, Rebecca B; Clarke, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Reliable inference of transcription regulatory networks is a challenging task in computational biology. Network component analysis (NCA) has become a powerful scheme to uncover regulatory networks behind complex biological processes. However, the performance of NCA is impaired by the high rate of false connections in binding information. In this paper, we integrate stability analysis with NCA to form a novel scheme, namely stability-based NCA (sNCA), for regulatory network identification. The method mainly addresses the inconsistency between gene expression data and binding motif information. Small perturbations are introduced to prior regulatory network, and the distance among multiple estimated transcript factor (TF) activities is computed to reflect the stability for each TF's binding network. For target gene identification, multivariate regression and t-statistic are used to calculate the significance for each TF-gene connection. Simulation studies are conducted and the experimental results show that sNCA can achieve an improved and robust performance in TF identification as compared to NCA. The approach for target gene identification is also demonstrated to be suitable for identifying true connections between TFs and their target genes. Furthermore, we have successfully applied sNCA to breast cancer data to uncover the role of TFs in regulating endocrine resistance in breast cancer.

  9. Nonlinear simulation and linear stability analysis of viscous fingering instability of viscoelastic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokri, H.; Kayhani, M. H.; Norouzi, M.

    2017-03-01

    In this study, the viscous fingering instability of miscible displacement involving a viscoelastic fluid is investigated using both linear stability analysis and computational fluid dynamics for the first time. The Oldroyd-B model is used as the constitutive equation of a viscoelastic fluid. Here, it is assumed that one of the displacing fluids or the displaced one is viscoelastic. In linear stability analysis, the quasi-steady state approximation and six order shooting method are used to predict the growth rate of the disturbance in the flow. It is shown that the flow is more stabilized when the elasticity (Weissenberg number) of the displaced or displacing viscoelastic fluid is increased. In the nonlinear simulation, using the spectral method based on Hartley transforms and the fourth-order Adams-Bashforth technique, the effect of the viscoelastic fluid on this instability has been studied. Evaluation of concentration contours, mixing length, sweep efficiency, and transversely average concentration show that the elasticity has a significant effect on the fingering instability and the flow becomes more stable by increasing the Weissenberg number.

  10. Stability analysis in a ROADM-based multi-channel quasi-ring optical network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Jimmy; Wang, Zheng; Pan, Yan; Kilper, Daniel C.; Pavel, Lacra

    2015-01-01

    Future networks require dynamic physical layer capabilities to enable rapid and on-demand reconfiguration, while ensuring stability. This paper addresses stability analysis of a ROADM-based quasi-ring optical network. A ROADM-based quasi-ring is the simplest configuration in which channel power excursions can self-propagate indefinitely and be unstable. This network configuration is composed of two reconfigurable optical add-drop multiplexers (ROADMs) each equipped with a constant gain optical amplifier and a wavelength selective switch. Over the amplified spans, two sets of lightpaths (added/dropped by opposite ROADMs) are transmitted in mirror image of each other and form an overlapping ring. Sufficient stability conditions for the quasi-ring as well as an L2 bound for the channel power excursions are derived based on Lyapunov analysis and the small gain theorem. These conditions are functions of the amplifier gain coupling quantified by its Lipschitz constant. Numerical results that verify and compare the theoretical results are provided. The platform used is Bell Lab's A Transparent Optical Mesh (ATOM) simulator, set up for dynamic network loading and input channel disturbance scenarios.

  11. Dynamical investigation and parameter stability region analysis of a flywheel energy storage system in charging mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei-Ya; Li, Yong-Li; Chang, Xiao-Yong; Wang, Nan

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, the dynamic behavior analysis of the electromechanical coupling characteristics of a flywheel energy storage system (FESS) with a permanent magnet (PM) brushless direct-current (DC) motor (BLDCM) is studied. The Hopf bifurcation theory and nonlinear methods are used to investigate the generation process and mechanism of the coupled dynamic behavior for the average current controlled FESS in the charging mode. First, the universal nonlinear dynamic model of the FESS based on the BLDCM is derived. Then, for a 0.01 kWh/1.6 kW FESS platform in the Key Laboratory of the Smart Grid at Tianjin University, the phase trajectory of the FESS from a stable state towards chaos is presented using numerical and stroboscopic methods, and all dynamic behaviors of the system in this process are captured. The characteristics of the low-frequency oscillation and the mechanism of the Hopf bifurcation are investigated based on the Routh stability criterion and nonlinear dynamic theory. It is shown that the Hopf bifurcation is directly due to the loss of control over the inductor current, which is caused by the system control parameters exceeding certain ranges. This coupling nonlinear process of the FESS affects the stability of the motor running and the efficiency of energy transfer. In this paper, we investigate into the effects of control parameter change on the stability and the stability regions of these parameters based on the averaged-model approach. Furthermore, the effect of the quantization error in the digital control system is considered to modify the stability regions of the control parameters. Finally, these theoretical results are verified through platform experiments.

  12. Asymmetrical booster ascent guidance and control system design study. Volume 4: Sampled data stability analysis program (SADSAP) user's guide. [space shuttle development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    A users guide to the Sampled Data Stability Analysis Program (SADSAP) is provided. This program is a general purpose sampled data Stability Analysis Program capable of providing frequency response on root locus data.

  13. The stability of IQ in people with low intellectual ability: an analysis of the literature.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, Simon

    2008-04-01

    A meta-analysis of the stability of low IQ (IQ < 80) was performed on IQ tests that have been commonly used--tests that were derived by D. Wechsler (1949, 1955, 1974, 1981, 1991, 1997) and those based on the Binet scales (L. M. Terman, 1960; L. M. Terman & Merrill, 1972). Weighted-mean stability coefficients of .77 and .78 were found for Verbal IQ (V IQ) and Performance IQ (P IQ) on the Wechsler tests and .82 for Full-Scale IQ (FS IQ) on both Wechsler and Binet tests, for a mean test-retest interval of 2.8 years. Although the majority of FS IQs changed by less than 6 points, 14% changed by 10 points or more. The author suggests that the results of IQ assessment should be treated with more caution than previously thought.

  14. Dissipativity and stability analysis of fractional-order complex-valued neural networks with time delay.

    PubMed

    Velmurugan, G; Rakkiyappan, R; Vembarasan, V; Cao, Jinde; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2017-02-01

    As we know, the notion of dissipativity is an important dynamical property of neural networks. Thus, the analysis of dissipativity of neural networks with time delay is becoming more and more important in the research field. In this paper, the authors establish a class of fractional-order complex-valued neural networks (FCVNNs) with time delay, and intensively study the problem of dissipativity, as well as global asymptotic stability of the considered FCVNNs with time delay. Based on the fractional Halanay inequality and suitable Lyapunov functions, some new sufficient conditions are obtained that guarantee the dissipativity of FCVNNs with time delay. Moreover, some sufficient conditions are derived in order to ensure the global asymptotic stability of the addressed FCVNNs with time delay. Finally, two numerical simulations are posed to ensure that the attention of our main results are valuable.

  15. On the use of stability regions in the numerical analysis of initial value problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenferink, H. W. J.; Spijker, M. N.

    1991-07-01

    This paper deals with the stability analysis of one-step methods in the numerical solution of initial (-boundary) value problems for linear, ordinary, and partial differential equations. Restrictions on the stepsize are derived which guarantee the rate of error growth in these methods to be of moderate size. These restrictions are related to the stability region of the method and to numerical ranges of matrices stemming from the differential equation under consideration. The errors in the one-step methods are measured in arbitrary norms (not necessarily generated by an inner product). The theory is illustrated in the numerical solution of the heat equation and some other differential equations, where the error growth is measured in the maximum norm.

  16. Stability analysis of self-similar behaviors in perfect fluid gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsuda, Eiji; Tomimatsu, Akira

    2006-06-15

    Stability of self-similar solutions for gravitational collapse is an important problem to be investigated from the perspectives of their nature as an attractor, critical phenomena, and instability of a naked singularity. In this paper we study spherically symmetric non-self-similar perturbations of matter and metrics in spherically symmetric self-similar backgrounds. The collapsing matter is assumed to be a perfect fluid with the equation of state P={alpha}{rho}. We construct a single wave equation governing the perturbations, which makes their time evolution in arbitrary self-similar backgrounds analytically tractable. Further we propose an analytical application of this master wave equation to the stability problem by means of the normal mode analysis for the perturbations having the time dependence given by exp(i{omega}log vertical t vertical bar), and present some sufficient conditions for the absence of nonoscillatory unstable normal modes with purely imaginary {omega}.

  17. 24-42 month stability of internal blood standards for glycated hemoglobin analysis.

    PubMed

    Duck, S C; Lee, M; D'Alessio, D

    1990-01-01

    The stability of fresh and out-of-date Blood Bank standards for quality control of glycated hemoglobin testing was extensively documented. Eight blood standards were prepared as aliquots of washed erythrocytes, stored at -70 degrees C, and assayed in duplicate repeatedly for 24 to 42 months. Significant differences over time were noted only occasionally, and exhibited no consistent trend. Ambient room temperature, 'season of the year', and various mini-column lot numbers had no consistent effect on any blood standard values. In conclusion, washed erythrocytes from controls and patients with IDDM can be stored for future analysis for at least 24 months at -70 degrees C. Out-of-date blood from the Blood Bank can be used with equal stability for at least 18 months.

  18. Unsaturated slope stability analysis with steady infiltration or evaporation using elasto-plastic finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, D. V.; Lu, N.

    2005-03-01

    The paper presents results of unsaturated slope stability analyses using elasto-plastic finite elements in conjunction with a novel analytical formulation for the suction stress above the water table. The suction stress formula requires four parameters, three for the soil type and one for the steady infiltration (or evaporation) due to environmental effects. The suction stress approach enables the analysis to proceed in the context of classical effective stress, while maintaining the advantages of a general non-linear finite element approach in which no advance assumptions need to be made about the shape or location of the critical failure surface. The results show the extent to which suctions above the water table can increase the factor of safety of a slope for a variety of different soil types and infiltration rates. All stability analyses that include the effects of suction stresses are contrasted with more traditional approaches in which water pressures above the water table are ignored. Copyright

  19. The Three-Dimensional (3D) Numerical Stability Analysis of Hyttemalmen Open-Pit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cała, Marek; Kowalski, Michał; Stopkowicz, Agnieszka

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this paper was to perform the 3D numerical calculations allowing slope stability analysis of Hyttemalmen open pit (location Kirkenes, Finnmark Province, Norway). After a ramp rock slide, which took place in December 2010, as well as some other small-scale rock slope stability problems, it proved necessary to perform a serious stability analyses. The Hyttemalmen open pit was designed with a depth up to 100 m, a bench height of 24 m and a ramp width of 10 m. The rock formation in the iron mining district of Kirkenes is called the Bjornevaten Group. This is the most structurally complicated area connected with tectonic process such as folding, faults and metamorphosis. The Bjornevaten Group is a volcano-sedimentary sequence. Rock slope stability depends on the mechanical properties of the rock, hydro-geological conditions, slope topography, joint set systems and seismic activity. However, rock slope stability is mainly connected with joint sets. Joints, or general discontinuities, are regarded as weak planes within rock which have strength reducing consequences with regard to rock strength. Discontinuities within the rock mass lead to very low tensile strength. Several simulations were performed utilising the RocLab (2007) software to estimate the gneiss cohesion for slopes of different height. The RocLab code is dedicated to estimate rock mass strength using the Hoek-Brown failure criterion. Utilising both the GSI index and the Hoek-Brown strength criterion the equivalent Mohr-Coulomb parameters (cohesion and angle of internal friction) can be calculated. The results of 3D numerical calculations (with FLA3D code) show that it is necessary to redesign the slope-bench system in the Hyttemalmen open pit. Changing slope inclination for lower stages is recommended. The minimum factor of safety should be equal 1.3. At the final planned stage of excavation, the factor of safety drops to 1.06 with failure surface ranging through all of the slopes. In the case

  20. Sensitivity analysis and calibration of a coupled hydrological/slope stability model (TRIGRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieher, Thomas; Rutzinger, Martin; Perzl, Frank; Meißl, Gertraud

    2014-05-01

    Shallow landslides potentially endanger human living in mountain regions worldwide. In order to prevent impacts of such gravitational mass movements it is necessary to fully understand the processes involved. Shallow landslides are usually understood as gravitational mass movements of the translational, slope-parallel type comprising of a mixture of earth and debris with a maximum depth of 1-2 m. Depending on the degree of saturation the initial sliding can turn into a flow-like movement. Numerous approaches for modelling shallow landslide susceptibility with different degrees of complexity exist. Regardless of the modelling approach it is crucial to provide sufficient field data, mainly on regolith characteristics. As for the TRIGRS (Transient Rainfall Infiltration and Grid-Based Regional Slope-Stability) model, numerous hydraulic and geotechnical parameters have to be known area-wide. Hence, as spatial interpolation of these input parameters is generally problematic in terms of accuracy, calibrating the model accordingly is a crucial step before conducting any simulations. This study presents a sensitivity analysis and the calibration of the coupled hydrological/slope stability model TRIGRS for a study area in Vorarlberg (Austria). The results of the sensitivity analysis show that in case of the stability model cohesion is the driving parameter while for the hydrological model it is the initial depth of the water table and the saturated hydraulic conductivity. The calibration of the stability model was carried out using a landslide inventory assuming completely saturated conditions. The use of geotechnical parameters extracted from literature for mapped soil types generally lead to unlikely stable conditions. In order to simulate mapped landslide initial areas correctly values for soil cohesion had to be adapted. However, the calibration of the stability model generally supports the assumption of saturated conditions. In absence of meteorological or hydrological

  1. Genotypic stability and adaptability in tropical maize based on AMMI and GGE biplot analysis.

    PubMed

    Balestre, M; Von Pinho, R G; Souza, J C; Oliveira, R L

    2009-11-03

    We evaluated the phenotypic and genotypic stability and adaptability of hybrids using the additive main effect and multiplicative interaction (AMMI) and genotype x genotype-environment interaction (GGE) biplot models. Starting with 10 single-cross hybrids, a complete diallel was done, resulting in 45 double-cross hybrids that were appraised in 15 locations in Southeast, Center-West and Northeast Brazil. In most cases, when the effects were considered as random (only G effects or G and GE simultaneously) in AMMI and GGE analysis, the distances between predicted values and observed values were smaller than for AMMI and GGE biplot phenotypic means; the best linear unbiased predictors of G and GE generally showed more accurate predictions in AMMI and GGE analysis. We found the GGE biplot method to be superior to the AMMI 1 graph, due to more retention of GE and G + GE in the graph analysis. However, based on cross-validation results, the GGE biplot was less accurate than the AMMI 1 graph, inferring that the quantity of GE or G + GE retained in the graph analysis alone is not a good parameter for choice of stabilities and adaptabilities when comparing AMMI and GGE analyses.

  2. ASTROP2 Users Manual: A Program for Aeroelastic Stability Analysis of Propfans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.; Lucero, John M.

    1996-01-01

    This manual describes the input data required for using the second version of the ASTROP2 (Aeroelastic STability and Response Of Propulsion systems - 2 dimensional analysis) computer code. In ASTROP2, version 2.0, the program is divided into two modules: 2DSTRIP, which calculates the structural dynamic information; and 2DASTROP, which calculates the unsteady aerodynamic force coefficients from which the aeroelastic stability can be determined. In the original version of ASTROP2, these two aspects were performed in a single program. The improvements to version 2.0 include an option to account for counter rotation, improved numerical integration, accommodation for non-uniform inflow distribution, and an iterative scheme to flutter frequency convergence. ASTROP2 can be used for flutter analysis of multi-bladed structures such as those found in compressors, turbines, counter rotating propellers or propfans. The analysis combines a two-dimensional, unsteady cascade aerodynamics model and a three dimensional, normal mode structural model using strip theory. The flutter analysis is formulated in the frequency domain resulting in an eigenvalue determinant. The flutter frequency and damping can be inferred from the eigenvalues.

  3. Babel, or the ecological stability discussions: an inventory and analysis of terminology and a guide for avoiding confusion.

    PubMed

    Grimm, V; Wissel, Christian

    1997-02-01

     We present an inventory and analysis of discussions of ecological stability, considering 163 definitions of 70 different stability concepts. Our aim is to derive a strategy that can help to dispel the existing "confusion of tongues" on the subject of "stability" and prevent its future recurrence. The strategy consists of three questions that should be kept in mind when communicating about stability properties. These three questions should overcome the three main sources of confusion in terminology. Firstly, which stability properties are being addressed in the stability statement? Our analysis shows that the general term "stability" is so ambiguous as to be useless.It can be replaced by the stability properties "staying essentially unchanged" (constancy), "returning to the reference state (or dynamic) after a temporary disturbance" (resilience), and "persistence through time of an ecological system" (persistence). Second, to what ecological situation does the statement refer? An ecological situation is defined by a set of features that, taken as a whole, determine the domain of validity of a stability statement. The six most important features form the "ecological checklist", which serves to classify ecological situations and thereby provides a system of coordinates for communication. The six points are: variable of interest, level of description, reference state, disturbance, spatial scale and temporal scale. Thirdly, is the statement anchored in the situation in question, or is there unacceptable generalisation by inferring "stability" of the whole system from a certain stability property in a certain ecological ecological situation? This question separates the scientifically valuable content of a statement from the desire for general statements which is often projected through stability statements.

  4. Existence and uniform stability analysis of fractional-order complex-valued neural networks with time delays.

    PubMed

    Rakkiyappan, R; Cao, Jinde; Velmurugan, G

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of existence and uniform stability analysis of fractional-order complex-valued neural networks with constant time delays. Complex-valued recurrent neural networks is an extension of real-valued recurrent neural networks that includes complex-valued states, connection weights, or activation functions. This paper explains sufficient condition for the existence and uniform stability analysis of such networks. Three numerical simulations are delineated to substantiate the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  5. The role of Soil Water Retention Curve in slope stability analysis in unsaturated and heterogeneous soils.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antinoro, Chiara; Arnone, Elisa; Noto, Leonardo V.

    2015-04-01

    The mechanisms of rainwater infiltration causing slope instability had been analyzed and reviewed in many scientific works. Rainwater infiltration into unsaturated soil increases the degree of saturation, hence affecting the shear strength properties and thus the probability of slope failure. It has been widely proved that the shear strength properties change with the soil water suction in unsaturated soils; therefore, the accuracy to predict the relationship between soil water content and soil water suction, parameterized by the soil-water characteristic curve, has significant effects on the slope stability analysis. The aim of this study is to investigate how the characterization of SWRC of differently structured unsaturated soils affects the slope stability on a simple infinite slope. In particular, the unimodal and bimodal distributions of the soil pore size were compared. Samples of 40 soils, highly different in terms of structure and texture, were collected and used to calibrate two bimodal SWRCs, i.e. Ross and Smettem (1993) and Dexter et al., (2008). The traditional unimodal van Genuchten (1980) model was also applied for comparison. Slope stability analysis was conducted in terms of Factor of Safety (FS) by applying the infinite slope model for unsaturated soils. In the used formulation, the contribution of the suction effect is tuned by a parameter 'chi' in a rate proportional to the saturation conditions. Different parameterizations of this term were also compared and analyzed. Results indicated that all three SWRC models showed good overall performance in fitting the sperimental SWRCs. Both the RS and DE models described adequately the water retention data for soils with a bimodal behavior confirmed from the analysis of pore size distribution, but the best performance was obtained by DE model confirmed. In terms of FS, the tree models showed very similar results as soil moisture approached to the saturated condition; however, within the residual zone

  6. Quantitative analysis of the ion-dependent folding stability of DNA triplexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gengsheng; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2011-12-01

    A DNA triplex is formed through binding of a third strand to the major groove of a duplex. Due to the high charge density of a DNA triplex, metal ions are critical for its stability. We recently developed the tightly bound ion (TBI) model for ion-nucleic acids interactions. The model accounts for the potential correlation and fluctuations of the ion distribution. We now apply the TBI model to analyze the ion dependence of the thermodynamic stability for DNA triplexes. We focus on two experimentally studied systems: a 24-base DNA triplex and a pair of interacting 14-base triplexes. Our theoretical calculations for the number of bound ions indicate that the TBI model provides improved predictions for the number of bound ions than the classical Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation. The improvement is more significant for a triplex, which has a higher charge density than a duplex. This is possibly due to the higher ion concentration around the triplex and hence a stronger ion correlation effect for a triplex. In addition, our analysis for the free energy landscape for a pair of 14-mer triplexes immersed in an ionic solution shows that divalent ions could induce an attractive force between the triplexes. Furthermore, we investigate how the protonated cytosines in the triplexes affect the stability of the triplex helices.

  7. Stability analysis of optofluidic transport on solid-core waveguiding structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Allen H. J.; Erickson, David

    2008-01-01

    Optofluidic transport involves the use of electromagnetic energy to transport nanoparticles through the exploitation of scattering, adsorption and gradient (polarization) based forces. This paper presents a new approach to stability analysis for a system of broad applicability to such transport, namely the optical trapping of dielectric particles in the evanescent field of low index (polymer) and high index (silicon) solid-core waveguide structures integrated with microfluidics. Three-dimensional finite element based simulations are used to determine the electromagnetic and hydrodynamic field variables for the system of interest. The net force acting on particles is determined through evaluation of the full Maxwell and flow shear stress tensors, and a trapping stability number is obtained by comparing the work required to remove a particle from the waveguide with available random thermal energy. These forces are correlated to controllable experimental parameters such as particle size, fluid velocity, and channel height, and a series of trapping stability diagrams is produced which detail the conditions under which optofluidic transport is possible.

  8. High-finesse fiber Fabry-Perot cavities: stabilization and mode matching analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego, J.; Ghosh, S.; Alavi, S. K.; Alt, W.; Martinez-Dorantes, M.; Meschede, D.; Ratschbacher, L.

    2016-03-01

    Fiber Fabry-Perot cavities, formed by micro-machined mirrors on the end-facets of optical fibers, are used in an increasing number of technical and scientific applications, where they typically require precise stabilization of their optical resonances. Here, we study two different approaches to construct fiber Fabry-Perot resonators and stabilize their length for experiments in cavity quantum electrodynamics with neutral atoms. A piezo-mechanically actuated cavity with feedback based on the Pound-Drever-Hall locking technique is compared to a novel rigid cavity design that makes use of the high passive stability of a monolithic cavity spacer and employs thermal self-locking and external temperature tuning. Furthermore, we present a general analysis of the mode matching problem in fiber Fabry-Perot cavities, which explains the asymmetry in their reflective line shapes and has important implications for the optimal alignment of the fiber resonators. Finally, we discuss the issue of fiber-generated background photons. We expect that our results contribute toward the integration of high-finesse fiber Fabry-Perot cavities into compact and robust quantum-enabled devices in the future.

  9. The stability analysis of rolling motion of hypersonic vehicles and its validations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, YouDa; Zhao, ZhongLiang; Tian, Hao; Zhang, XianFeng

    2014-12-01

    The stability of the rolling motion of near space hypersonic vehicles with rudder control is studied using method of qualitative analysis of nonlinear differential equations, and the stability criteria of the deflected rolling motions are improved. The outcomes can serve as the basis for further study regarding the influence of pitching and lateral motion on the stability of rolling motion. To validate the theoretical results, numerical simulations were done for the rolling motion of two hypersonic vehicles with typical configurations. Also, wind tunnel experiments for four aircraft models with typical configurations have been done. The results show that: 1) there exist two dynamic patterns of the rolling motion under statically stable condition. The first one is point attractor, for which the motion of aircraft returns to the original state. The second is periodic attractor, for which the aircraft rolls periodically. 2) Under statically unstable condition, there exist three dynamic patterns of rolling motion, namely, the point attractor, periodic attractor around deflected state of rolling motion, and double periodic attractors or chaotic attractors.

  10. Stability analysis of a thermocapillary spreading film with slip-model.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Naveen

    2014-11-01

    Thin liquid films spreading on a solid substrate due to thermocapillary stresses are susceptible to rivulet instability at the advancing solid-liquid-vapor contact line. The unstable front is related to the presence of a capillary ridge at the contact line. In this work, the dynamics and stability of thermocapillary-driven films are analyzed using a detailed slip-model to alleviate the stress singularity at the moving contact line. The slip-model is well suited to model partially wetting fluids due to the possibility of defining the contact angle explicitly. The effect of motion of the contact line on the dynamic contact angle and subsequently on the dynamics and stability of the film is explored. The apparent contact angle is a result of the static contact angle and motion of the contact line. It is shown that one can obtain exactly the same base profile with and without taking into account the effect of motion on the contact angle with suitable change of parameters but the linear stability of the two profiles is different. Further the transient growth is found to be somewhat different but small for both configurations. Analysis of the ε -pseudospectra indicates a highly non-normal system for the case of dynamic contact angle.

  11. Rapid RNA-ligand interaction analysis through high-information content conformational and stability landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, Nathan J.; Inglese, James; Ferré-D'Amaré, Adrian R.

    2015-12-01

    The structure and biological properties of RNAs are a function of changing cellular conditions, but comprehensive, simultaneous investigation of the effect of multiple interacting environmental variables is not easily achieved. We have developed an efficient, high-throughput method to characterize RNA structure and thermodynamic stability as a function of multiplexed solution conditions using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). In a single FRET experiment using conventional quantitative PCR instrumentation, 19,400 conditions of MgCl2, ligand and temperature are analysed to generate detailed empirical conformational and stability landscapes of the cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) riboswitch. The method allows rapid comparison of RNA structure modulation by cognate and non-cognate ligands. Landscape analysis reveals that kanamycin B stabilizes a non-native, idiosyncratic conformation of the riboswitch that inhibits c-di-GMP binding. This demonstrates that allosteric control of folding, rather than direct competition with cognate effectors, is a viable approach for pharmacologically targeting riboswitches and other structured RNA molecules.

  12. Rapid RNA-ligand interaction analysis through high-information content conformational and stability landscapes

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, Nathan J.; Inglese, James; Ferré-D’Amaré, Adrian R.

    2015-12-07

    The structure and biological properties of RNAs are a function of changing cellular conditions, but comprehensive, simultaneous investigation of the effect of multiple interacting environmental variables is not easily achieved. We have developed an efficient, high-throughput method to characterize RNA structure and thermodynamic stability as a function of multiplexed solution conditions using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). In a single FRET experiment using conventional quantitative PCR instrumentation, 19,400 conditions of MgCl2, ligand and temperature are analysed to generate detailed empirical conformational and stability landscapes of the cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) riboswitch. This method allows rapid comparison of RNA structure modulation by cognate and non-cognate ligands. Landscape analysis reveals that kanamycin B stabilizes a non-native, idiosyncratic conformation of the riboswitch that inhibits c-di-GMP binding. Our research demonstrates that allosteric control of folding, rather than direct competition with cognate effectors, is a viable approach for pharmacologically targeting riboswitches and other structured RNA molecules.

  13. Parametric analysis of a predator-prey system stabilized by a top predator.

    PubMed

    Morozov, Andrew Y; Li, Bai-Lian

    2006-08-01

    We present a complete parametric analysis of a predator-prey system influenced by a top predator. We study ecosystems with abundant nutrient supply for the prey where the prey multiplication can be considered as proportional to its density. The main questions we examine are the following: (1) Can the top predator stabilize such a system at low densities of prey? (2) What possible dynamic behaviors can occur? (3) Under which conditions can the top predation result in the system stabilization? We use a system of two nonlinear ordinary differential equations with the density of the top predator as a parameter. The model is investigated with methods of qualitative theory of ODEs and the theory of bifurcations. The existence of 12 qualitatively different types of dynamics and complex structure of the parametric space are demonstrated. Our studies of phase portraits and parametric diagrams show that a top predator can be an important factor leading to stabilization of the predator-prey system with abundant nutrient supply. Although the model here is applied to the plankton communities with fish (or carnivorous zooplankton) as the top trophic level, the general form of the equations allows applications of our results to other ecological systems.

  14. Stability analysis of the rimming flow inside a uniformly heated rotating horizontal cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumawat, Tara Chand; Tiwari, Naveen

    2017-03-01

    The stability analysis is presented for a thin viscous liquid film flowing inside a uniformly heated horizontal cylinder that is rotating about its axis. The free surface evolution equation for the liquid-gas interface is obtained by simplifying the Navier-Stokes and energy equations within the lubrication approximation. Various dimensionless numbers are obtained that quantify the effect of gravity, viscous drag, inertia, surface tension, and thermocapillary stress. The film thickness evolution equation is solved numerically to obtain two-dimensional, steady state solutions neglecting axial variations. A liquid pool forms at the bottom of the cylinder when gravity dominates other forces. This liquid pool is shifted in the direction of rotation when inertia or viscous drag is increased. Small axial perturbations are then imposed to the steady solutions to study their stability behavior. It is found that the inertia and capillary pressure destabilize whereas the gravity and thermocapillary stress stabilize the rimming flow. The influence of Marangoni number is reported by computing the stable and unstable parametric regions. Thicker films are shown to be more susceptible to become unstable.

  15. Quantitative analysis of the ion-dependent folding stability of DNA triplexes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gengsheng; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2011-12-01

    A DNA triplex is formed through binding of a third strand to the major groove of a duplex. Due to the high charge density of a DNA triplex, metal ions are critical for its stability. We recently developed the tightly bound ion (TBI) model for ion-nucleic acids interactions. The model accounts for the potential correlation and fluctuations of the ion distribution. We now apply the TBI model to analyze the ion dependence of the thermodynamic stability for DNA triplexes. We focus on two experimentally studied systems: a 24-base DNA triplex and a pair of interacting 14-base triplexes. Our theoretical calculations for the number of bound ions indicate that the TBI model provides improved predictions for the number of bound ions than the classical Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation. The improvement is more significant for a triplex, which has a higher charge density than a duplex. This is possibly due to the higher ion concentration around the triplex and hence a stronger ion correlation effect for a triplex. In addition, our analysis for the free energy landscape for a pair of 14-mer triplexes immersed in an ionic solution shows that divalent ions could induce an attractive force between the triplexes. Furthermore, we investigate how the protonated cytosines in the triplexes affect the stability of the triplex helices.

  16. Improved methodologies for the calculation of critical eigenvalues in small signal stability analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Angelidis, G.; Semlyen, A.

    1996-08-01

    This paper presents improved and new methodologies for the calculation of critical eigenvalues in the small signal stability analysis of large electric power systems. They augment the robustness and efficiency of existing methods and provide new alternatives. The procedures are implementations of Newton`s method, inverse power and Rayleigh quotient iterations, equipped with implicit deflation, and restarted Arnoldi with a locking mechanism and either shift-invert or semi-complex Cayley preconditioning. The various algorithms are compared and evaluated regarding convergence, performance and applicability.

  17. Efficient calculation of critical eigenvalue clusters in the small signal stability analysis of large power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Angelidis, G.; Semlyen, A.

    1995-02-01

    The paper presents a methodology for the calculation of a selected set of eigenvalues, considered critical in the small signal stability analysis of power systems. It analyzes several alternatives for refining a preliminary rough solution obtained by subspace interactions. These alternatives range from constant-matrix iterative refinement to Newton`s method. Due to an adaptive solution strategy, the overall algorithm is very robust. Newton`s method is much faster than existing approaches. The performance of these methods is demonstrated on several test systems.

  18. Stability analysis and numerical simulation of 1 prey - 2 predator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savitri, D.; Abadi

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we study an ecological system that consists of 1 prey and 2 predators populations. The prey population grows logistically while Holling type II functional response is applied for both predators . The first predator preys on the prey and the second predator preys on the first one. The study starts with the stability analysis of critical points of the systems. Then, by using normal form and centre manifold method the information about other nontrivial solutions due to bifurcation including possible limit cycles appearance is obtained. The results are confirmed by numerical simulation using MatCont and biological interpretation of the results is also presented.

  19. Optimal Stabilization of Social Welfare under Small Variation of Operating Condition with Bifurcation Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanda, Sandip; De, Abhinandan

    2016-12-01

    A social welfare optimization technique has been proposed in this paper with a developed state space based model and bifurcation analysis to offer substantial stability margin even in most inadvertent states of power system networks. The restoration of the power market dynamic price equilibrium has been negotiated in this paper, by forming Jacobian of the sensitivity matrix to regulate the state variables for the standardization of the quality of solution in worst possible contingencies of the network and even with co-option of intermittent renewable energy sources. The model has been tested in IEEE 30 bus system and illustrious particle swarm optimization has assisted the fusion of the proposed model and methodology.

  20. X-ray source assembly having enhanced output stability, and fluid stream analysis applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Radley, Ian; Bievenue, Thomas J.; Burdett Jr., John H.; Gallagher, Brian W.; Shakshober, Stuart M.; Chen, Zewu; Moore, Michael D.

    2007-04-24

    An x-ray source assembly (2700) and method of operation are provided having enhanced output stability. The assembly includes an anode (2125) having a source spot upon which electrons (2120) impinge and a control system (2715/2720) for controlling position of the anode source spot relative to an output structure. The control system can maintain the anode source spot location relative to the output structure (2710) notwithstanding a change in one or more operating conditions of the x-ray source assembly. One aspect of the disclosed invention is most amenable to the analysis of sulfur in petroleum-based fuels.

  1. Electrical transient stability and underfrequency load shedding analysis for a large pump station

    SciTech Connect

    Shilling, S.R.

    1995-12-31

    Electrical transients from faults, loss of generation, and load swings can disrupt pump station operations. Isolated stations with no utility tie and those with weak utility ties are especially at risk. Relative to this problem, the following four main issues are addressed: (1) Analyze the methods that use high-speed underfrequency load shedding to maintain system stability and preserve station operations. (2) Analyze combustion gas turbine generator and diesel generator transient responses, as they pertain to the Electrical Engineer. (3) Discuss system component modeling and the use of low voltage circuit switching devices to shed loads. (4) Compare two computer analysis program outputs for underfrequency load shedding responses.

  2. Electrical transient stability and underfrequency load shedding analysis for a large pump station

    SciTech Connect

    Shilling, S.R.

    1997-01-01

    Electrical transients from faults, loss of generation, and load swings can disrupt pump station operations. Isolated stations with no utility tie, and those with weak utility ties, are especially at risk. Relative to this problem, the following four main issues are addressed: (1) analyze the methods that use high-speed underfrequency load shedding to maintain system stability and preserve station operations; (2) analyze combustion gas turbine generator and diesel generator transient responses, as they pertain to the electrical engineer; (3) discuss system component modeling and the use of low voltage circuit switching devices to shed loads; (4) compare two computer analysis program outputs for underfrequency load shedding responses.

  3. CFD analysis of sludge accumulation and hydraulic performance of a waste stabilization pond.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Andres; Sanchez, Esteban; Durazno, Galo; Vesvikar, Mehul; Nopens, Ingmar

    2012-01-01

    Sludge management in waste stabilization ponds (WSPs) is essential for safeguarding the system performance. Sludge accumulation patterns in WSPs are strongly influenced by the pond hydrodynamics. CFD modeling was applied to study the relation between velocity profiles and sludge deposition during 10 years of operation of the Ucubamba WSP in Cuenca (Ecuador). One tracer experiment was performed and three sludge accumulation scenarios based on bathymetric surveys were simulated. A residence time distribution (RTD) analysis illustrated the decrease of residence times due to sludge deposition. Sludge accumulation rates were calculated. The influence of flow pattern on the sludge deposition was studied, enabling better planning of future pond operation and desludging.

  4. Analysis of a passive heat sink for temperature stabilization of high-power LED bulbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balvís, Eduardo; Bendaña, Ricardo; Michinel, Humberto; Fernández de Córdoba, Pedro; Paredes, Angel

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we present a numerical analysis and experimental measurements of the temperature stabilization of high-power LED chips that we have obtained by employing an aluminum passive heat sink, designed to be used in a compact light bulb configuration. We demonstrate that our system keeps the temperature of the LED chip well-below 70° C yielding long-term operation of the device. Our simulations have been performed for a low-cost device ready to install in public streetlights. The experimental measurements performed in different configurations show a nice agreement with the numerical calculations.

  5. Modal analysis for Liapunov stability of rotating elastic bodies. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colin, A. D.

    1973-01-01

    This study consisted of four parallel efforts: (1) modal analyses of elastic continua for Liapunov stability analysis of flexible spacecraft; (2) development of general purpose simulation equations for arbitrary spacecraft; (3) evaluation of alternative mathematical models for elastic components of spacecraft; and (4) examination of the influence of vehicle flexibility on spacecraft attitude control system performance. A complete record is given of achievements under tasks (1) and (3), in the form of technical appendices, and a summary description of progress under tasks two and four.

  6. Dynamic Characteristics and Stability Analysis of Space Shuttle Main Engine Oxygen Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunter, Edgar J.; Branagan, Lyle

    1991-01-01

    The dynamic characteristics of the Space Shuttle high pressure oxygen pump are presented. Experimental data is presented to show the vibration spectrum and response under actual engine operation and also in spin pit testing for balancing. The oxygen pump appears to be operating near a second critical speed and is sensitive to self excited aerodynamic cross coupling forces in the turbine and pump. An analysis is presented to show the improvement in pump stability by the application of turbulent flow seals, preburner seals, and pump shaft cross sectional modifications.

  7. X-ray source assembly having enhanced output stability, and fluid stream analysis applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Radley, Ian; Bievenue, Thomas J.; Burdett, John H.; Gallagher, Brian W.; Shakshober, Stuart M.; Chen, Zewu; Moore, Michael D.

    2008-06-08

    An x-ray source assembly and method of operation are provided having enhanced output stability. The assembly includes an anode having a source spot upon which electrons impinge and a control system for controlling position of the anode source spot relative to an output structure. The control system can maintain the anode source spot location relative to the output structure notwithstanding a change in one or more operating conditions of the x-ray source assembly. One aspect of the disclosed invention is most amenable to the analysis of sulfur in petroleum-based fuels.

  8. Stability analysis for acoustic wave propagation in tilted TI media by finite differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, Peter M.; Duveneck, Eric

    2011-05-01

    Several papers in recent years have reported instabilities in P-wave modelling, based on an acoustic approximation, for inhomogeneous transversely isotropic media with tilted symmetry axis (TTI media). In particular, instabilities tend to occur if the axis of symmetry varies rapidly in combination with strong contrasts of medium parameters, which is typically the case at the foot of a steeply dipping salt flank. In a recent paper, we have proposed and demonstrated a P-wave modelling approach for TTI media, based on rotated stress and strain tensors, in which the wave equations reduce to a coupled set of two second-order partial differential equations for two scalar stress components: a normal component along the variable axis of symmetry and a lateral component of stress in the plane perpendicular to that axis. Spatially constant density is assumed in this approach. A numerical discretization scheme was proposed which uses discrete second-derivative operators for the non-mixed second-order derivatives in the wave equations, and combined first-derivative operators for the mixed second-order derivatives. This paper provides a complete and rigorous stability analysis, assuming a uniformly sampled grid. Although the spatial discretization operator for the TTI acoustic wave equation is not self-adjoint, this operator still defines a complete basis of eigenfunctions of the solution space, provided that the solution space is somewhat restricted at locations where the medium is elliptically anisotropic. First, a stability analysis is given for a discretization scheme, which is purely based on first-derivative operators. It is shown that the coefficients of the central difference operators should satisfy certain conditions. In view of numerical artefacts, such a discretization scheme is not attractive, and the non-mixed second-order derivatives of the wave equation are discretized directly by second-derivative operators. It is shown that this modification preserves

  9. Long-term actuarial survivorship analysis of an interspinous stabilization system.

    PubMed

    Sénégas, Jacques; Vital, Jean-Marc; Pointillart, Vincent; Mangione, Paolo

    2007-08-01

    In 1986, an interspinous dynamic stabilization system (the prototype of the current Wallis implant) was designed to stiffen unstable operated degenerate lumbar segments with a hard interspinous blocker to limit extension and a tension band around the spinous processes to secure the implant and limit flexion. Restoring physiological mechanical conditions to the treated level(s) while preserving some intervertebral mobility was intended to treat low-back pain related to degenerative instability without increasing stress forces in the adjacent segments. The procedure was easily reversible. If low back pain persisted or recurred, the device was removed and stability was achieved using fusion. The intermediate-term results were promising, but the long-term safety and efficacy of this dynamic interspinous stabilization device has not been previously documented. We retrospectively reviewed the hospital files of all the patients (n = 241) who had this dynamic stabilization system implanted between 1987 and 1995, contacting as many as possible to determine the actuarial survivorship of the system. In this manner, 142 of the 241 patients (58.9%) were contacted by telephone. The endpoints used for the survivorship analysis were 'any subsequent lumbar operation' and 'implant removal'. At 14 years follow-up, values of actuarial survivorship with 95% confidence interval were 75.9 +/- 8.3 and 81.3 +/- 6.8% for the endpoints 'any subsequent lumbar operation' and 'implant removal', respectively. There was no difference in survivorship of multiple-level implants with respect to single-level devices. Although the conclusions of the present study must be tempered by the 41% attrition rate, these findings support the long-term safety of this system, and possibly long-term protective action against adjacent-level degeneration by motion preservation. Outcomes at least equivalent to those of fusion were observed without the primary drawbacks of fusion.

  10. Spatio-temporal linear stability analysis of stratified planar wakes: Velocity and density asymmetry effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emerson, Benjamin; Jagtap, Swapnil; Quinlan, J. Mathew; Renfro, Michael W.; Cetegen, Baki M.; Lieuwen, Tim

    2016-04-01

    This paper explores the hydrodynamic stability of bluff body wakes with non-uniform mean density, asymmetric mean density, and velocity profiles. This work is motivated by experiments [S. Tuttle et al., "Lean blow off behavior of asymmetrically-fueled bluff body-stabilized flames," Combust. Flame 160, 1677 (2013)], which investigated reacting wakes with equivalence ratio stratification and, hence, asymmetry in the base flow density profiles. They showed that highly stratified cases exhibited strong, narrowband oscillations, suggestive of global hydrodynamic instability. In this paper, we present a local hydrodynamic stability analysis for non-uniform density wakes that includes base flow asymmetry. The results show that increasing the degree of base density asymmetry generally has a destabilizing effect and that increasing base velocity asymmetry tends to be stabilizing. Furthermore, we show that increasing base density asymmetry slightly decreases the absolute frequency and that increasing the base velocity asymmetry slightly increases the absolute frequency. In addition, we show that increasing the degree of base density asymmetry distorts the most absolutely unstable hydrodynamic mode from its nominally sinuous structure. This distorted mode exhibits higher amplitude pressure and velocity oscillations near the interface with the smaller density jump than near the one with the bigger density jump. This would then be anticipated to lead to strongly non-symmetric amplitudes of flame flapping, with much stronger flame flapping on the side with lower density ratio. These predictions are shown to be consistent with experimental data. These comparisons support the analytical predictions that increased base density asymmetry are destabilizing and that hydrodynamic velocity fluctuation amplitudes should be greatest at the flame with the lowest density jump.

  11. Fractal time series analysis of postural stability in elderly and control subjects

    PubMed Central

    Amoud, Hassan; Abadi, Mohamed; Hewson, David J; Michel-Pellegrino, Valérie; Doussot, Michel; Duchêne, Jacques

    2007-01-01

    Background The study of balance using stabilogram analysis is of particular interest in the study of falls. Although simple statistical parameters derived from the stabilogram have been shown to predict risk of falls, such measures offer little insight into the underlying control mechanisms responsible for degradation in balance. In contrast, fractal and non-linear time-series analysis of stabilograms, such as estimations of the Hurst exponent (H), may provide information related to the underlying motor control strategies governing postural stability. In order to be adapted for a home-based follow-up of balance, such methods need to be robust, regardless of the experimental protocol, while producing time-series that are as short as possible. The present study compares two methods of calculating H: Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) and Stabilogram Diffusion Analysis (SDA) for elderly and control subjects, as well as evaluating the effect of recording duration. Methods Centre of pressure signals were obtained from 90 young adult subjects and 10 elderly subjects. Data were sampled at 100 Hz for 30 s, including stepping onto and off the force plate. Estimations of H were made using sliding windows of 10, 5, and 2.5 s durations, with windows slid forward in 1-s increments. Multivariate analysis of variance was used to test for the effect of time, age and estimation method on the Hurst exponent, while the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was used as a measure of reliability. Results Both SDA and DFA methods were able to identify differences in postural stability between control and elderly subjects for time series as short as 5 s, with ICC values as high as 0.75 for DFA. Conclusion Both methods would be well-suited to non-invasive longitudinal assessment of balance. In addition, reliable estimations of H were obtained from time series as short as 5 s. PMID:17470303

  12. Linear stability analysis for travelling waves of second order in time PDE's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanislavova, Milena; Stefanov, Atanas

    2012-09-01

    We study travelling waves φc of second order in time PDE's u_{tt}+{ L} u+N(u)=0 . The linear stability analysis for these models is reduced to the question of the stability of quadratic pencils in the form \\lambda^2Id+2c\\lambda \\partial_x+{ H}_c , where { H}_c=c^2 \\partial_{xx}+{ L}+N'(\\varphi_c) . If { H}_c is a self-adjoint operator, with a simple negative eigenvalue and a simple eigenvalue at zero, then we completely characterize the linear stability of φc. More precisely, we introduce an explicitly computable index \\omega^*({ H}_c)\\in (0, \\infty] , so that the wave φc is stable if and only if |c|\\geq \\omega^*({ H}_c) . The results are applicable both in the periodic case and in the whole line case. The method of proof involves a delicate analysis of a function { G} , associated with { H} , whose positive zeros are exactly the positive (unstable) eigenvalues of the pencil \\lambda^2Id+2c\\lambda \\partial_x+{ H} . We would like to emphasize that the function { G} is not the Evans function for the problem, but rather a new object that we define herein, which fits the situation rather well. As an application, we consider three classical models—the ‘good’ Boussinesq equation, the Klein-Gordon-Zakharov (KGZ) system and the fourth order beam equation. In the whole line case, for the Boussinesq case and the KGZ system (and as a direct application of the main results), we compute explicitly the set of speeds which give rise to linearly stable travelling waves (and for all powers of p in the case of Boussinesq). This result is new for the KGZ system, while it generalizes the results of Alexander et al (2012, personal communication) and Alexander and Sachs (1995 Nonlinear World 2 471-507), which apply to the case p = 2. For the beam equation, we provide an implicit formula (depending only on the function \\|\\varphi_c'\\|_{L^2}) , which works for all p and for both the periodic and the whole line cases. Our results complement (and exactly match

  13. Stability and sensitivity analysis of experimental data for passive control of a turbulent wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siconolfi, Lorenzo; Camarri, Simone; Trip, Renzo; Fransson, Jens H. M.

    2016-11-01

    When the linear stability analysis is applied to the mean flow field past a bluff body, a quasi-marginally stable mode is identified, with a frequency very close to the real vortex shedding one. A formally consistent approach to justify this kind of analysis is based on a triple decomposition of the flow variables. With this formalism, the adjoint-based sensitivity analysis can be extended to investigate passive controls of high-Reynolds-number wakes (e.g.). The objective of the present work is to predict the effect of a small control cylinder on the vortex shedding frequency in a turbulent wake with an analysis which solely relies on PIV measurements available for the considered flow. The key ingredient of the numerical analysis is an ad-hoc tuned model for the mean flow field, built using an original procedure which includes all the experimental information available on the flow. This analysis is here applied to the wake flow past a thick porous plate at Reynolds numbers in the range between Re = 6 . 7 ×103 and Re= 5 . 3 ×104 . It is shown that the derived control map agrees reasonably well with the equivalent map obtained experimentally.

  14. Stability analysis of non-inertial thin film flow over a heterogeneously heated porous substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumawat, Tara Chand; Tiwari, Naveen

    2016-02-01

    The dynamics and linear stability of a gravity drive thin film flowing over non-uniformly heated porous substrate are studied. A governing equation for the evolution of film-thickness is derived within the lubrication approximation. Darcy-Brinkman equation is used to model flow in the porous medium along with a tangential stress-jump condition at the interface of the porous layer and the fluid film. A temperature profile is imposed at the solid wall to model an embedded heater beneath the porous layer. At the upstream edge of the heater, an opposing thermocapillary stress at the liquid-air interface leads to the formation of a thermocapillary ridge. The ridge becomes unstable beyond a critical Marangoni number leading to the formation of rivulets that are periodic in the spanwise direction. Increase in the values of parameters such as Darcy number, stress jump coefficient, and porosity is shown to have stabilizing effect on the film dynamics. The critical Marangoni number is shown to increase monotonically with Darcy number for various values of porosity. At large values of stress-jump coefficient, a non-monotonic variation in critical Marangoni number versus Darcy number is shown. A correlation is developed numerically for the ratio of critical Marangoni number at large Darcy number to that for a non-porous substrate as a function of porosity and thickness of the porous substrate. A transient growth analysis is carried out followed by non-linear stability analysis. The non-modal growth is found to be negligible thus indicating that the eigenvalues are physically determinant.

  15. A statistical analysis to assess the maturity and stability of six composts.

    PubMed

    Komilis, Dimitrios P; Tziouvaras, Ioannis S

    2009-05-01

    Despite the long-time application of organic waste derived composts to crops, there is still no universally accepted index to assess compost maturity and stability. The research presented in this article investigated the suitability of seven types of seeds for use in germination bioassays to assess the maturity and phytotoxicity of six composts. The composts used in the study were derived from cow manure, sea weeds, olive pulp, poultry manure and municipal solid waste. The seeds used in the germination bioassays were radish, pepper, spinach, tomato, cress, cucumber and lettuce. Data were analyzed with an analysis of variance at two levels and with pair-wise comparisons. The analysis revealed that composts rendered as phytotoxic to one type of seed could enhance the growth of another type of seed. Therefore, germination indices, which ranged from 0% to 262%, were highly dependent on the type of seed used in the germination bioassay. The poultry manure compost was highly phytotoxic to all seeds. At the 99% confidence level, the type of seed and the interaction between the seeds and the composts were found to significantly affect germination. In addition, the stability of composts was assessed by their microbial respiration, which ranged from approximately 4 to 16g O(2)/kg organic matter and from 2.6 to approximately 11g CO(2)-C/kg C, after seven days. Initial average oxygen uptake rates were all less than approximately 0.35g O(2)/kg organic matter/h for all six composts. A high statistically significant correlation coefficient was calculated between the cumulative carbon dioxide production, over a 7-day period, and the radish seed germination index. It appears that a germination bioassay with radish can be a valid test to assess both compost stability and compost phytotoxicity.

  16. Weakly nonlinear stability analysis of non-isothermal Poiseuille flow in a vertical channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandelwal, Manish K.; Bera, P.

    2015-06-01

    A weakly nonlinear stability theory in terms of Landau equation is developed to analyze the nonlinear saturation of stably stratified non-isothermal Poiseuille flow in a vertical channel. The results are presented with respect to fluids: mercury, gases, liquids, and heavy oils. The weakly nonlinear stability results predict only the supercritical instability, in agreement with the published result [Y. C. Chen and J. N. Chung, "A direct numerical simulation of K and H-type flow transition in heated vertical channel," Comput. Fluids 32, 795-822 (2003)] based on direct numerical simulation. Apart from this, the influence of nonlinear interaction among different superimposed waves on the heat transfer rate, real part of wavespeed, and friction coefficient on the wall is also investigated. A substantial enhancement (reduction) in heat transfer rate (friction coefficient) is found for liquids and heavy oils from the basic state beyond the critical Rayleigh number. The amplitude analysis indicates that the equilibrium amplitude decreases on increasing the value of Reynolds number. However, in the case of mercury, influence of nonlinear interaction on the variation of equilibrium amplitude, heat transfer rate, wavespeed, as well as friction coefficient is complex and subtle. The analysis of the nonlinear energy spectra for the disturbance also supports the supercritical instability at and beyond the critical point. Finally, the effect of superimposed waves on the pattern of secondary flow, based on linear stability theory, is also studied. It has been found that the impact of nonlinear interaction of waves on the pattern of secondary flow for mercury is weak compared to gases, which is the consequence of negligible modification in the buoyant production of disturbance kinetic energy of the mercury.

  17. Bubbles breaking the wall: Two-dimensional stress and stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksen, Jon Alm; Marks, Benjy; Sandnes, Bjørnar; Toussaint, Renaud

    2015-05-01

    Submerged granular material exhibits a wide range of behavior when the saturating fluid is slowly displaced by a gas phase. In confined systems, the moving interface between the invading gas and the fluid/grain mixture can cause beads to jam, and induce intermittency in the dynamics. Here, we study the stability of layers of saturated jammed beads around stuck air bubbles, and the deformation mechanism leading to air channel formations in these layers. We describe a two-dimensional extension of a previous model of the effective stress in the jammed packing. The effect of the tangential stress component on the yield stress is discussed, in particular how arching effects may impact the yield threshold. We further develop a linear stability analysis, to study undulations which develop under certain experimental conditions at the air-liquid interface. The linear analysis gives estimates for the most unstable wavelengths for the initial growth of the perturbations. The estimates correspond well with peak to peak length measurements of the experimentally observed undulations.

  18. Stability Analysis of Natural Convection in Vertical Cavities with Lateral Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahata, Hideo

    1999-02-01

    Thermal convection of air in two-dimensional vertical cavities is considered under the boundary conditions of the left and right vertical walls kept at different temperatures and the top and bottom horizontal walls subject to thermal insulation. Linear stability analysis of thermal convection is made with the aid of the Galerkin method in which the field variables are expanded in terms of Chebyshev polynomials and linear growth rates of steady states are computed using the QR algorithm.The results of the stability analysis for air with the Prandtl number 0.71 over the range of the cavity aspect ratio A from 1 to 10 show that with increase of the temperature difference between the two vertical walls the oscillatory motion first generated by the instability of steady convection is in the form of the Tollmien-Schlichting or the internal gravity waves according as A > 3.65 or A < 3.41 while for 3.41 < A < 3.65 the internal gravity waves are first generated after the preceding spatial flow transition of the hydraulic jump.

  19. Analysis and test evaluation of the dynamic response and stability of three advanced turboprop models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, P. N.; Arseneaux, P. J.; Smith, A. F.; Turnberg, J. E.; Brooks, B. M.

    1985-01-01

    Results of dynamic response and stability wind tunnel tests of three 62.2 cm (24.5 in) diameter models of the Prop-Fan, advanced turboprop, are presented. Measurements of dynamic response were made with the rotors mounted on an isolated nacelle, with varying tilt for nonuniform inflow. One model was also tested using a semi-span wing and fuselage configuration for response to realistic aircraft inflow. Stability tests were performed using tunnel turbulence or a nitrogen jet for excitation. Measurements are compared with predictions made using beam analysis methods for the model with straight blades, and finite element analysis methods for the models with swept blades. Correlations between measured and predicted rotating blade natural frequencies for all the models are very good. The IP dynamic response of the straight blade model is reasonably well predicted. The IP response of the swept blades is underpredicted and the wing induced response of the straight blade is overpredicted. Two models did not flutter, as predicted. One swept blade model encountered an instability at a higher RPM than predicted, showing predictions to be conservative.

  20. A stabilized complementarity formulation for nonlinear analysis of 3D bimodular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Zhang, H. W.; Wu, J.; Yan, B.

    2016-06-01

    Bi-modulus materials with different mechanical responses in tension and compression are often found in civil, composite, and biological engineering. Numerical analysis of bimodular materials is strongly nonlinear and convergence is usually a problem for traditional iterative schemes. This paper aims to develop a stabilized computational method for nonlinear analysis of 3D bimodular materials. Based on the parametric variational principle, a unified constitutive equation of 3D bimodular materials is proposed, which allows the eight principal stress states to be indicated by three parametric variables introduced in the principal stress directions. The original problem is transformed into a standard linear complementarity problem (LCP) by the parametric virtual work principle and a quadratic programming algorithm is developed by solving the LCP with the classic Lemke's algorithm. Update of elasticity and stiffness matrices is avoided and, thus, the proposed algorithm shows an excellent convergence behavior compared with traditional iterative schemes. Numerical examples show that the proposed method is valid and can accurately analyze mechanical responses of 3D bimodular materials. Also, stability of the algorithm is greatly improved.

  1. Linear stability analysis of axisymmetric flow over a sudden expansion in an annular pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beladi, Behnaz; Kuhlmann, Hendrik Christoph

    2016-11-01

    A global temporal linear stability analysis is performed of the fully-developed axisymmetric incompressible Newtonian flow in an annular pipe with a sudden radially-inward expansion. The geometry is characterized by the radial expansion ratio (radial step height to the outlet gap width) and the outlet radius ratio (inner-to-outer radius). Stability boundaries have been calculated with finite volumes for an outlet radius ratio of 0 . 1 and expansion ratios from 0 . 25 to 0 . 75 . For expansion ratios less than 0 . 55 the most dangerous mode has an azimuthal wave number m = 3 , whereas m = 2 for larger expansion ratios. An a posteriori analysis of the kinetic energy transferred between the basic state and the critical mode allows to check the energy conservation and to identify the physical instability mechanism. For all expansion ratios considered the basic flow arises as an annular jet between two separation zones which are located immediately after the step. The jet gradually widens downstream before reattaching to the cylinders. The deceleration of the flow associated with the widening of the jet is found to be the primary source of energy for the critical modes.

  2. Nonlinear stability analysis of a two-layer thin liquid film: dewetting and autophobic behavior.

    PubMed

    Fisher, L S; Golovin, A A

    2005-11-15

    The nonlinear stability analysis of a liquid film composed of two superposed thin layers of immiscible liquids resting on a solid substrate is performed. It is shown that the coupling of van der Waals interactions in the two layers can lead to an autophobic behavior in the form of spinodal decomposition of two planar liquid layers into a system of localized drops divided by almost planar wetting layers. The results of the weakly nonlinear analysis near the instability threshold are confirmed by the numerical solution of a system of two strongly nonlinear evolution equations for the liquid-liquid and liquid-gas interfaces. The kinetics of the drop coarsening at late stages is studied and is found to be close to that reported for a one-layer film. It is also shown that gravity effects can become significant even for very thin two-layer films.

  3. DIAGNOSIS, ANALYSIS, AND RESOLUTION OF THERMAL STABILITY ISSUES WITH HOM COUPLERS ON PROTOTYPE CEBAF SRF CAVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Reece; Edward Daly; G. Davis; William Hicks; Timothy Rothgeb; H. Phillips; Joseph Preble; Haipeng Wang; Genfa Wu

    2008-02-12

    During initial testing of the prototype cavities incorporated into the developmental cryomodule Renascence severe thermal stability issues were encountered during CW operation. Additional diagnostic instrumentation was added. This enabled identification of an unanticipated thermal impedance between the HOM coupler probe feedthrough assembly and the cavity beamtube. Subsequent detailed FE analysis successfully modeled the situation and indicated the need for alternate cooling path for the couplers on those cavities. HOM damping was measured to be adequate employing only two of the four HOM couplers. The two pickup probes on the couplers at the input power coupler side of each cavity were removed, the remaining HOM probe feedthroughs were heat stationed to two-phase helium supply piping, and a novel heat sink was added to station both the inner and outer conductors of the remaining HOM rf cables. The characterization measurements, analysis, modifications, and resulting performance are presented.

  4. ESF SOUTH PORTAL BOX-CUT/HIGHWALL STABILITY ANALYSIS (SCPB:N/A)

    SciTech Connect

    Saeed Bonabian

    1996-03-28

    The main purpose and objective of this analysis is to design a Box-Cut at the ESF South Portal to accommodate the Tunnel Boring Machine's (TBM) exit at the conclusion of the ESF Main Loop construction. The stability of the Highwall and the sidewalls at the Box-Cut are assessed using analytical methods by numerical modeling techniques. A ground reinforcement system for the South Ramp Box-Cut slopes will be recommended. This report summarizes the results of the analyses and provides the details of the recommended ground reinforcement system for the Box-Cut slopes at the South Portal. The reinforcement design details are then incorporated into design output documents for implementation in the field. Method of excavation for the Box-Cut is also discussed and a recommendation is provided in this analysis.

  5. Mean square delay dependent-probability-distribution stability analysis of neutral type stochastic neural networks.

    PubMed

    Muralisankar, S; Manivannan, A; Balasubramaniam, P

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this manuscript is to investigate the mean square delay dependent-probability-distribution stability analysis of neutral type stochastic neural networks with time-delays. The time-delays are assumed to be interval time-varying and randomly occurring. Based on the new Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional and stochastic analysis approach, a novel sufficient condition is obtained in the form of linear matrix inequality such that the delayed stochastic neural networks are globally robustly asymptotically stable in the mean-square sense for all admissible uncertainties. Finally, the derived theoretical results are validated through numerical examples in which maximum allowable upper bounds are calculated for different lower bounds of time-delay.

  6. Performance analysis of a GPS Interferometric attitude determination system for a gravity gradient stabilized spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, John C.

    1995-05-01

    The performance of an unaided attitude determination system based on GPS interferometry is examined using linear covariance analysis. The modelled system includes four GPS antennae onboard a gravity gradient stabilized spacecraft, specifically the Air Force's RADCAL satellite. The principal error sources are identified and modelled. The optimal system's sensitivities to these error sources are examined through an error budget and by varying system parameters. The effects of two satellite selection algorithms, Geometric and Attitude Dilution of Precision (GDOP and ADOP, respectively) are examined. The attitude performance of two optimal-suboptimal filters is also presented. Based on this analysis, the limiting factors in attitude accuracy are the knowledge of the relative antenna locations, the electrical path lengths from the antennae to the receiver, and the multipath environment. The performance of the system is found to be fairly insensitive to torque errors, orbital inclination, and the two satellite geometry figures-of-merit tested.

  7. A method for analysis of stability of flows in ribbed annuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, H. V.; Floryan, J. M.

    2016-06-01

    A spectrally-accurate algorithm for the linear stability analysis of pressure-gradient-driven flows in corrugated annuli is presented. The algorithm is suitable to analyze three-dimensional disturbances in the form of spiral traveling waves as well as in the form of streamwise vortices. A separate algorithm for the analysis of axisymmetric disturbances is presented. The discretization method relies on Fourier expansions in the streamwise and circumferential directions and on Chebyshev expansions in the radial direction. The Immersed Boundary Conditions (IBC) method is used to enforce the physical boundary conditions at the corrugated walls. Numerous tests confirm the spectral accuracy of the results. The performance of the algorithm is consistent with the theoretical predictions.

  8. Prediction and analysis of structure, stability and unfolding of thermolysin-like proteases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vriend, Gert; Eijsink, Vincent

    1993-08-01

    Bacillus neutral proteases (NPs) form a group of well-characterized homologous enzymes, that exhibit large differences in thermostability. The three-dimensional (3D) structures of several of these enzymes have been modelled on the basis of the crystal structures of the NPs of B. thermoproteolyticus (thermolysin) and B. cercus. Several new techniques have been developed to improve the model-building procedures. Also a model-building by mutagenesis' strategy was used, in which mutants were designed just to shed light on parts of the structures that were particularly hard to model. The NP models have been used for the prediction of site-directed mutations aimed at improving the thermostability of the enzymes. Predictions were made using several novel computational techniques, such as position-specific rotamer searching, packing quality analysis and property-profile database searches. Many stabilizing mutations were predicted and produced: improvement of hydrogen bonding, exclusion of buried water molecules, capping helices, improvement of hydrophobic interactions and entropic stabilization have been applied successfully. At elevated temperatures NPs are irreversibly inactivated as a result of autolysis. It has been shown that this denaturation process is independent of the protease activity and concentration and that the inactivation follows first-order kinetics. From this it has been conjectured that local unfolding of (surface) loops, which renders the protein susceptible to autolysis, is the rate-limiting step. Despite the particular nature of the thermal denaturation process, normal rules for protein stability can be applied to NPs. However, rather than stabilizing the whole protein against global unfolding, only a small region has to be protected against local unfolding. In contrast to proteins in general, mutational effects in proteases are not additive and their magnitude is strongly dependent on the location of the mutation. Mutations that alter the stability

  9. Stability Analysis of Discrete-Time Neural Networks With Time-Varying Delay via an Extended Reciprocally Convex Matrix Inequality.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuan-Ke; He, Yong; Jiang, Lin; Wang, Qing-Guo; Wu, Min

    2017-02-17

    This paper is concerned with the stability analysis of discrete-time neural networks with a time-varying delay. Assessment of the effect of time delays on system stability requires suitable delay-dependent stability criteria. This paper aims to develop new stability criteria for reduction of conservatism without much increase of computational burden. An extended reciprocally convex matrix inequality is developed to replace the popular reciprocally convex combination lemma (RCCL). It has potential to reduce the conservatism of the RCCL-based criteria without introducing any extra decision variable due to its advantage of reduced estimation gap using the same decision variables. Moreover, a delay-product-type term is introduced for the first time into the Lyapunov function candidate such that a delay-variation-dependent stability criterion with the bounds of delay change rate is established. Finally, the advantages of the proposed criteria are demonstrated through two numerical examples.

  10. Stability analysis of a natural circulation lead-cooled fast reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qiyue

    This dissertation is aimed at nuclear-coupled thermal hydraulics stability analysis of a natural circulation lead cooled fast reactor design. The stability concerns arise from the fact that natural circulation operation makes the system susceptible to flow instabilities similar to those observed in boiling water reactors. In order to capture the regional effects, modal expansion method which incorporates higher azimuthal modes is used to model the neutronics part of the system. A reduced order model is used in this work for the thermal-hydraulics. Consistent with the number of heat exchangers (HXs), the reactor core is divided into four equal quadrants. Each quadrant has its corresponding external segments such as riser, plenum, pipes and HX forming an equivalent 1-D closed loop. The local pressure loss along the loop is represented by a lumped friction factor. The heat transfer process in the HX is represented by a model for the coolant temperature at the core inlet that depends on the coolant temperature at the core outlet and the coolant velocity. Additionally, time lag effects are incorporated into this HX model due to the finite coolant speed. A conventional model is used for the fuel pin heat conduction to couple the neutronics and thermal-hydraulics. The feedback mechanisms include Doppler, axial/radial thermal expansion and coolant density effects. These effects are represented by a linear variation of the macroscopic cross sections with the fuel temperature. The weighted residual method is used to convert the governing PDEs to ODEs. Retaining the first and second modes, leads to six ODEs for neutronics, and five ODEs for the thermal-hydraulics in each quadrant. Three models are developed. These are: 1) natural circulation model with a closed coolant flow path but without coupled neutronics, 2) forced circulation model with constant external pressure drop across the heated channels but without coupled neutronics, 3) coupled system including neutronics with

  11. Performance & stability analysis of a three lobe journal bearing with varying parameters: Experiments and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Nabarun; Chakraborti, Prasun; Saha, Ankuran; Biswas, Srijit

    2016-07-01

    3-lobe Hydrodynamic oil journal bearings are widely used in heavy industries as a part of different rotating machinery due to their high level of performances. 3-lobe hydrodynamic oil journal bearing allows the transmission of large amounts of loads at a mean speed of rotation. In this present work, an attempt has been made to investigate the pressure domain and subsequent effects in a 3 lobe journal bearing under different static loads in a stable operating speed. Analytical calculations were carried out with codes generated using Matlab software. Experiments were performed in Journal Bearing test rig incorporating 3-lobe under different loads with stable operating speed of 1000 RPM. It has been observed that an increase in load resulted rise in pressure profile, maximum pressure angle and temperature. A further attempt has been made to see the effect of eccentricity ratio and dynamic viscosity considering no change in the RPM. It has also been observed that dynamic viscosity has a significant effect on the stable operating speed. With the reduction in static load, the stability of operating speed attained at higher values.

  12. Quantum chemical analysis of reaction paths in chorismate mutase: Conformational effects and electrostatic stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szefczyk, Borys; Claeyssens, Frederik; Mulholland, Adrian J.; Sokalski, W. Andrzej

    We have performed a detailed, quantum chemical, decomposition analysis of the physical nature of key interactions in the model enzyme chorismate mutase (CM), for several active conformations produced by high level combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) modeling. In opposition to our previous study, interactions between selected residues in the active site of CM were analysed along the whole reaction path, for several paths. The interaction energy is calculated up to Møller-Plesset second order level of theory and decomposed into physically meaningful components (electrostatic, exchange, delocalization, and electron correlation). This analysis shows, that the dominant interaction is differential stabilization by Arg90: this residue significantly stabilizes the transition state (TS) relative to the substrate in all the paths studied. Interactions in the active site of CM are dominated by the electrostatic component, whereas other components, for example electron correlation, are constant during reaction. Electrostatic effects alone are found to be responsible for lowering the barrier for reaction at the active site. Analysis of four reaction paths derived from QM/MM modeling shows that differences in the height of the barrier are due to differences in the electrostatic interactions of several weakly interacting residues. The influence of conformational effects, such as hydroxyl group rotation in the chorismate/TS, and the distance between Arg90 and the reacting chorismate, have also been analysed. The results show that specific conformations provide better activation barrier lowering. Even small changes in the conformation, like rotation of the hydroxyl group in chorismate (substrate), can significantly alter the activation barrier.0

  13. Multiplexed analysis of genes using nucleic acid-stabilized silver-nanocluster quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Enkin, Natalie; Wang, Fuan; Sharon, Etery; Albada, H Bauke; Willner, Itamar

    2014-11-25

    Luminescent nucleic acid-stabilized Ag nanoclusters (Ag NCs) are applied for the optical detection of DNA and for the multiplexed analysis of genes. Two different sensing modules including Ag NCs as luminescence labels are described. One sensing module involves the assembly of a three-component sensing module composed of a nucleic acid-stabilized Ag NC and a quencher-modified nucleic acid hybridized with a nucleic acid scaffold that is complementary to the target DNA. The luminescence of the Ag NCs is quenched in the sensing module nanostructure. The strand displacement of the scaffold by the target DNA separates the nucleic acid-functionalized Ag NCs, leading to the turned-on luminescence of the NCs and to the optical readout of the sensing process. By implementing two different-sized Ag NC-modified sensing modules, the parallel multiplexed analysis of two genes (the Werner Syndrome gene and the HIV, human immunodeficiency, gene), using 615 and 560 nm luminescent Ag NCs, is demonstrated. The second sensing module includes the nucleic acid functionalized Ag NCs and the quencher-modified nucleic acid hybridized with a hairpin DNA scaffold. The luminescence of the Ag NCs is quenched in the sensing module. Opening of the hairpin by the target DNA triggers the luminescence of the Ag NCs, due to the spatial separation of the Ag NCs/quencher units. The system is applied for the optical detection of the BRAC1 gene. In addition, by implementing two-sized Ag NCs, the multiplexed analysis of two genes by the hairpin sensing module approach is demonstrated.

  14. A qualitative content analysis of global health engagements in Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute's stability operations lessons learned and information management system.

    PubMed

    Nang, Roberto N; Monahan, Felicia; Diehl, Glendon B; French, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Many institutions collect reports in databases to make important lessons-learned available to their members. The Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences collaborated with the Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute to conduct a descriptive and qualitative analysis of global health engagements (GHEs) contained in the Stability Operations Lessons Learned and Information Management System (SOLLIMS). This study used a summative qualitative content analysis approach involving six steps: (1) a comprehensive search; (2) two-stage reading and screening process to identify first-hand, health-related records; (3) qualitative and quantitative data analysis using MAXQDA, a software program; (4) a word cloud to illustrate word frequencies and interrelationships; (5) coding of individual themes and validation of the coding scheme; and (6) identification of relationships in the data and overarching lessons-learned. The individual codes with the most number of text segments coded included: planning, personnel, interorganizational coordination, communication/information sharing, and resources/supplies. When compared to the Department of Defense's (DoD's) evolving GHE principles and capabilities, the SOLLIMS coding scheme appeared to align well with the list of GHE capabilities developed by the Department of Defense Global Health Working Group. The results of this study will inform practitioners of global health and encourage additional qualitative analysis of other lessons-learned databases.

  15. Implementation of a Single-Stage-To-Orbit (SSTO) model for stability and control analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingalls, Stephen A.

    1995-01-01

    Three NASA centers: Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), Langley Research Center (LaRC), and Johnson Space Center (JSC) are currently involved in studying a family of single-stage- and two-stage-to-orbit (SSTO/TSTO) vehicles to serve as the next generation space transportation system (STS). A rocketed winged-body is the current focus. The configuration (WB001) is a vertically-launched, horizontally-landing system with circular cross-section. Preliminary aerodynamic data was generated by LaRC and is a combination of wind-tunnel data, empirical methods, and Aerodynamic Preliminary Analysis System-(APAS) generated values. JSC's efforts involve descent trajectory design, stability analysis, and flight control system synthesis. Analysis of WB001's static stability indicates instability in 'tuck' (C(sub mu) less than 0: Mach = 0.30, alpha greater than 3.25 deg; Mach = 0.60, alpha greater than 8.04), an unstable dihedral effects (C(sub l(beta)) greater than 0: Mach = 30,alpha less than 12 deg.; Mach = 0.60, alpha less than 10.00 deg.), and, most significantly, an unstable weathercock stability derivative, C(sub n(beta)), at all angles of attack and subsonic Mach numbers. Longitudinal trim solutions for Mach = 0.30 and 0.60 indicate flight path angle possibilities ranging from around 12 (M = 0.30) to slightly over 20 degrees at Mach = 0.60. Trim angles of attack increase from 6.24 at Mach 0.60 and 10,000 feet to 17.7 deg. at Mach 0.30, sea-level. Lateral trim was attempted for a design cross-wind of 25.0 knots. The current vehicle aerodynamic and geometric characteristics will only yield a lateral trim solution at impractical tip-fin deflections (approximately equal to 43 deg.) and bank angles (21 deg.). A study of the lateral control surfaces, tip-fin controllers for WB001, indicate increased surface area would help address these instabilities, particularly the deficiency in C(sub n(beta)), but obviously at the expense of increased vehicle weight. Growth factors of

  16. Stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in buffer containing cobalt chloride for Western blot analysis.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Sathyanarayanan; Dunn, Jeff F

    2011-09-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) is a widely studied protein with significant biomedical impact. Care is needed to stabilize HIF-1α protein during sample preparation for Western blot analysis due to its rapid degradation in the presence of oxygen. Enzyme inhibitor cocktails can be complex and expensive. We present a protease inhibitor-free buffer, containing cobalt chloride, which is effective at stabilizing HIF-1α, while being inexpensive, straightforward, and convenient, and has potential for widespread application.

  17. Stability Analysis of Attractor Neural Network Model of Inferior Temporal Cortex —Relationship between Attractor Stability and Learning Order—

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomoyuki Kimoto,; Tatsuya Uezu,; Masato Okada,

    2010-06-01

    Miyashita found that the long-term memory of visual stimuli is stored in the monkey’s inferior temporal cortex and that the temporal correlation in terms of the learning order of visual stimuli is converted into spatial correlation in terms of the firing rate patterns of the neuron group. To explain Miyashita’s findings, Griniasty et al. [Neural Comput. 5 (1993) 1] and Amit et al. [J. Neurosci. 14 (1994) 6435] proposed the attractor neural network model, and the Amit model has been examined only for the stable state acquired by storing memory patterns in a fixed sequence. In the real world, however, the learning order has statistical continuity but it also has randomness, and the stability of the state changes depending on the statistical properties of learning order when memory patterns are stored randomly. In addition, it is preferable for the stable state to become an appropriate attractor that reflects the relationship between memory patterns by the statistical properties of the learning order. In this study, we examined the dependence of the stable state on the statistical properties of the learning order without modifying the Amit model. The stable state was found to change from the correlated attractor to the Hopfield or Mp attractor, which is the mixed state with all memory patterns when the rate of random learning increases. Furthermore, we found that if the statistical properties of the learning order change, the stable state can change to an appropriate attractor reflecting the relationship between memory patterns.

  18. Longitudinal data analysis in support of functional stability concepts for leachate management at closed municipal landfills.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Robert D; Morris, Jeremy W F; Prucha, Christopher P; Caldwell, Michael D; Staley, Bryan F

    2014-09-01

    Landfill functional stability provides a target that supports no environmental threat at the relevant point of exposure in the absence of active control systems. With respect to leachate management, this study investigates "gateway" indicators for functional stability in terms of the predictability of leachate characteristics, and thus potential threat to water quality posed by leachate emissions. Historical studies conducted on changes in municipal solid waste (MSW) leachate concentrations over time (longitudinal analysis) have concentrated on indicator compounds, primarily chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD). However, validation of these studies using an expanded database and larger constituent sets has not been performed. This study evaluated leachate data using a mixed-effects regression model to determine the extent to which leachate constituent degradation can be predicted based on waste age or operational practices. The final dataset analyzed consisted of a total of 1402 samples from 101 MSW landfills. Results from the study indicated that all leachate constituents exhibit a decreasing trend with time in the post-closure period, with 16 of the 25 target analytes and aggregate classes exhibiting a statistically significant trend consistent with well-studied indicators such as BOD. Decreasing trends in BOD concentration after landfill closure can thus be considered representative of trends for many leachate constituents of concern.

  19. Complete mode-set stability analysis of magnetically insulated ion diode equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Slutz, S.A.; Lemke, R.W.

    1993-12-31

    We present the first analysis of the stability of magnetically insulated ion diodes that is fully relativistic and includes electromagnetic perturbations both parallel and perpendicular to the applied magnetic field. Applying this formalism to a simple diode equilibrium model that neglects velocity shear and density gradients, we find a fast growing mode that has all of the important attributes of the low frequency mode observed in numerical simulations of magnetically insulated ion diodes, which may be a major cause of ion divergence. We identify this mode as a modified two-stream instability. Previous stability analyses indicate a variety of unstable modes, but none of these exhibit the same behavior as the low frequency mode observed in the simulations. In addition, we analyze a realistic diode equilibrium model that includes velocity shear and an electron density profile consistent with that observed in the numerical simulations. We find that the diocotron instability is reduced, but not fully quenched by the extension of the electron sheath to the anode. However, the inclusion of perturbations parallel to the applied magnetic field with a wavelength smaller than the diode height does eliminate growth of this instability. This may explain why the diocotron mode has been observed experimentally with proton sources, but not with LiF, since the turn on of LiF is not uniform.

  20. Longitudinal stability analysis of a suborbital re-entry demonstrator for a deployable capsule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacovazzo, Michele; Carandente, Valerio; Savino, Raffaele; Zuppardi, Gennaro

    2015-01-01

    In the field of atmospheric re-entry technology several research and industrial projects are based on the design of deployable, umbrella-like Thermal Protection Systems (TPSs) and aero-brakes. These systems are made of flexible, high temperature resistant fabrics, folded at launch and deployed in space for de-orbit and re-entry operations. This technology is very promising for low cost research and industrial applications, but requires to be validated by experimental flight tests. The University of Naples "Federico II" is currently working on the development of different down-scaled technological demonstrators for this kind of capsule to be launched by different classes of sounding rockets. In the present work an aerodynamic longitudinal stability analysis for a possible, suborbital re-entry demonstrator, has been performed in continuum and rarefied regimes. The longitudinal stability behavior of the capsule, along the entire re-entry path, has been investigated in the whole range of angle of attack and, in particular, around the nominal and the reverse equilibrium re-entry attitudes (i.e. around 0° and 180°, respectively) to implement a proper re-entry strategy able not to compromise the effectiveness of the flying system.

  1. Linear stability analysis of immiscible two-phase flow in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riaz, Amir

    2005-11-01

    Linear stability analysis of immiscible displacements is carried out for both viscously and gravitationally unstable two-phase flows in porous media with very large adverse viscosity ratios. Capillary dispersion is the proper dissipative mechanism in this case which sets both the preferred length scale and the band width of the spectrum of unstable length scales. The growth rate, the most dangerous and the cutoff wavenumbers, all scale linearly with the capillary number. We show that the instability is governed by fluid properties across the shock rather than those across the full Buckley--Leverett profile. The shock total mobility ratio provides a sufficient condition for the onset of instability; however, it is not an appropriate criterion for predicting the magnitude of the growth rate, particularly for large viscosity ratios. The details of the relative permeability functions are observed to have a significant influence on the stability characteristics. For neutrally buoyant flows the maximum growth rate scales linearly with the viscosity ratio while the most dangerous and the cutoff wavenumbers scale with the square root of the viscosity ratio.

  2. A Stability Analysis for a Hydrodynamic Three-Wave Journal Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ene, Nicoleta M.; Dimofte, Florin; Keith, Theo G., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    The influence of the wave amplitude and oil supply pressure on the dynamic behavior of a hydrodynamic three-wave journal bearing is presented. Both, a transient and a small perturbation technique, were used to predict the threshold to fractional frequency whirl (FFW). In addition, the behavior of the rotor after FFW appeared was determined from the transient analysis. The turbulent effects were also included in the computations. Bearings having a diameter of 30 mm, a length of 27.5 mm, and a clearance of 35 microns were analyzed. Numerical results were compared to experimental results obtained at the NASA GRC. Numerical and experimental results showed that the above-mentioned wave bearing with a wave amplitude ratio of 0.305 operates stably at rotational speeds up to 60,000 rpm, regardless of the oil supply pressure. For smaller wave amplitude ratios, a threshold of stability was found. It was observed that the threshold of stability for lower wave amplitude strongly depends on the oil supply pressure and on the wave amplitude. When the FFW occurs, the journal center maintains its trajectory inside the bearing clearance and therefore the rotor can be run safely without damaging the bearing surfaces.

  3. Gas uptake and thermal stability analysis of boron nitride and carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Mengyu

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) exist in many forms and can have critical pore diameters on the angstrom length scale, making them suitable for molecular capture. By combining the porous structure of CNTs with the chemical stability of carbide and/or nitride materials, one can create a more robust, nanoporous material for gas capture in high temperature conditions. Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are more chemically and thermally robust than pure CNTs, and were synthesized using CNTs as a structural precursor. However, this reaction mechanism was found to be unfavorable to produce high-yield and purity BNNTs. Adsorption tests using gases of interest (N2, He) were performed on commercial CNTs and BNNTs to determine their porosity and gas uptake abilities. Their thermal stability and oxidation resistance when heated up to 1773 K in air was also studied using differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis. While the CNTs began to oxidize between 450 °C and 750 °C, depending on the nanotube diameter, the BNNTs remained stable up until 1000 °C.

  4. Title: Chimeras in small, globally coupled networks: Experiments and stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Joseph D.; Bansal, Kanika; Murphy, Thomas E.; Roy, Rajarshi

    Since the initial observation of chimera states, there has been much discussion of the conditions under which these states emerge. The emphasis thus far has mainly been to analyze large networks of coupled oscillators; however, recent studies have begun to focus on the opposite limit: what is the smallest system of coupled oscillators in which chimeras can exist? We experimentally observe chimeras and other partially synchronous patterns in a network of four globally-coupled chaotic opto-electronic oscillators. By examining the equations of motion, we demonstrate that symmetries in the network topology allow a variety of synchronous states to exist, including cluster synchronous states and a chimera state. Using the group theoretical approach recently developed for analyzing cluster synchronization, we show how to derive the variational equations for these synchronous patterns and calculate their linear stability. The stability analysis gives good agreement with our experimental results. Both experiments and simulations suggest that these chimera states often appear in regions of multistability between global, cluster, and desynchronized states.

  5. Incompressible boundary-layer stability analysis of LFC experimental data for sub-critical Mach numbers. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, S. A.

    1986-01-01

    An incompressible boundary-layer stability analysis of Laminar Flow Control (LFC) experimental data was completed and the results are presented. This analysis was undertaken for three reasons: to study laminar boundary-layer stability on a modern swept LFC airfoil; to calculate incompressible design limits of linear stability theory as applied to a modern airfoil at high subsonic speeds; and to verify the use of linear stability theory as a design tool. The experimental data were taken from the slotted LFC experiment recently completed in the NASA Langley 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel. Linear stability theory was applied and the results were compared with transition data to arrive at correlated n-factors. Results of the analysis showed that for the configuration and cases studied, Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) amplification was the dominating disturbance influencing transition. For these cases, incompressible linear stability theory correlated with an n-factor for TS waves of approximately 10 at transition. The n-factor method correlated rather consistently to this value despite a number of non-ideal conditions which indicates the method is useful as a design tool for advanced laminar flow airfoils.

  6. Diagnostic Stability of ICD/DSM First Episode Psychosis Diagnoses: Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fusar-Poli, Paolo; Cappucciati, Marco; Rutigliano, Grazia; Heslin, Margaret; Stahl, Daniel; Brittenden, Zera; Caverzasi, Edgardo; McGuire, Philip; Carpenter, William T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Validity of current International Classification of Disease/Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (ICD/DSM) first episode psychosis diagnoses is essential in clinical practice, research, training and public health. Method: We provide a meta-analytical estimate of prospective diagnostic stability and instability in ICD-10 or DSM-IV first episode diagnoses of functional psychoses. Independent extraction by multiple observers. Random effect meta-analysis conducted with the “metaprop,” “metaninf,” “metafunnel,” “metabias,” and “metareg” packages of STATA13.1. Moderators were tested with meta-regression analyses. Heterogeneity was assessed with the I 2 index. Sensitivity analyses tested robustness of results. Publication biases were assessed with funnel plots and Egger’s test. Findings: 42 studies and 45 samples were included, for a total of 14 484 first episode patients and an average follow-up of 4.5 years. Prospective diagnostic stability ranked: schizophrenia 0.90 (95% CI 0.85–0.95), affective spectrum psychoses 0.84 (95% CI 0.79–0.89), schizoaffective disorder 0.72 (95% CI 0.61–0.73), substance-induced psychotic disorder 0.66 (95% CI 0.51–0.81), delusional disorder 0.59 (95% CI 0.47–0.71), acute and transient psychotic disorder/brief psychotic disorder 0.56 (95% CI 0.62–0.60), psychosis not otherwise specified 0.36 (95% CI 0.27–0.45, schizophreniform disorder 0.29 (95% CI 0.22–0.38). Diagnostic stability within schizophrenia spectrum psychoses was 0.93 (95% CI 0.89–0.97); changes to affective spectrum psychoses were 0.05 (95% CI 0.01–0.08). About 0.10 (95% CI 0.05–0.15) of affective spectrum psychoses changed to schizophrenia spectrum psychosis. Across the other psychotic diagnoses there was high diagnostic instability, mostly to schizophrenia. Interpretation: There is meta-analytical evidence for high prospective diagnostic stability in schizophrenia spectrum and affective spectrum psychoses

  7. Temporal stability analysis of surface soil water content on two karst hillslopes in southwest China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng; Chen, Hong Song; Fu, Zhiyong; Wang, Kelin

    2016-12-01

    Knowledge of the temporal variability of soil water content (SWC) at the hillslope scale is essential for guiding rehabilitation strategies and for optimizing water resource management in the karst region of southwest China. This study aimed to use temporal stability analysis to upscale point-scale measurements to represent mean areal SWC on two typical karst hillslopes. Based on a grid sampling scheme (10 m × 10 m) applied to two 90 m × 120 m plots located on two hillslops, the SWC at a depth of 0-16 cm was measured 11-12 times across 259 sampling points, using time domain reflectometry (TDR) from April 2011 to October 2012. Soil texture, bulk density (BD), saturated hydraulic conductivity (K s ), organic carbon (SOC), rock fragment content (RFC), and site elevation (SE) were also measured at these locations. Results showed the hillslope with more shrub cover was wetter than the hillslope with mixed grass-shrub cover. This difference was related to the differences in soil texture, soil hydraulic permeability, and topography. Through a comparison of values obtained with the Spearman correlation coefficient (r s ), standard deviation of mean relative difference (SDRD), and mean absolute bias error (MABE), we inferred that there is a higher degree of temporal stability for SWC in wet conditions than in drier conditions on the two hillslopes. Based on the values of the index of temporal stability (ITS), which combine the mean relative difference (MRD) and SDRD, the two locations were determined to be representative of mean SWC on both hillslopes. Moreover, these locations captured changes in mean SWC (NSCE = 0.69, and 0.65, and RMSE = 1.96, and 1.96 %, respectively). This demonstrates the feasibility of using the temporal stability of SWC to acquire mean SWC on karst hillslopes of southwestern China. The indirect method, which estimates mean SWC by considering the offset between the mean and the measurement value at a time-stable location, predicted mean SWC (NSCE

  8. Stability analysis of the interface between two weak viscoelastic liquids under periodic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Gonzalez, Sergio; Fernandez-Feria, Ramon

    2017-01-01

    We consider the motion and the linear hydrodynamic instabilities of two immiscible viscoelastic liquids above a horizontal solid surface induced by the periodic oscillations of the horizontal plate along its plane. A planar interface, parallel to the oscillating plate, separates the lower layer from the other viscoelastic fluid that extends vertically to infinity. The two-dimensional motion of these fluids is studied together with the conditions under which the flow becomes unstable, deforming the planar interface and promoting the mixing of both liquids. The study extends the previous work by Isakova et al. ["A model for the linear stability of the interface between aqueous humor and vitreous substitutes after vitreoretinal surgery," Phys. Fluids 26, 124101 (2014)] by considering non-Newtonian fluids, particularly liquids with weak viscoelasticity (neglecting normal stress differences), which may model more accurately the physical behavior of the aqueous humor and, especially, the vitreous humour substitute in the vitreous chamber of the eye after vitrectomy. A novel approach to the quasi-steady stability analysis of unsteady flows of Maxwell liquids is developed in the present paper. We focus on the effect of the small Deborah numbers on the motion and on the hydrodynamic instability of the two fluids as the other non-dimensional parameters are varied within the range of interest for the biofluiddynamics of the eye. The special case in which the lower layer modelling the aqueous humor is a Newtonian liquid and the upper vitreous substitute is a Maxwell liquid is considered with detail. We find that, even for a very small Deborah number of the vitreous substitute, the dynamics and the hydrodynamic stability of the two fluids can be qualitatively very different to the Newtonian case, especially as the viscosity ratio is varied, showing that weak viscoelasticity may change dramatically the dynamics of the eye. An exhaustive characterization of the influence of the

  9. Stability analysis of MHD viscous flow and heat transfer over a permeable shrinking surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafidzuddin, Mohd Ezad Hafidz; Nazar, Roslinda

    2015-10-01

    In this study, a problem of steady laminar magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) viscous boundary layer flow and heat transfer over a permeable shrinking surface is considered. The governing nonlinear partial differential equations are transformed into a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations using a similarity transformation. The transformed ordinary differential equations are then solved numerically using the bvp4c function in MATLAB software. Dual solutions are found for a certain range of the suction parameter. A stability analysis has been performed to determine which solution is stable and physically realizable. The effects of the suction parameter, the Hartmann number and the Prandtl number on the skin friction and heat transfer coefficients as well as the velocity and temperature profiles are presented and discussed in detail.

  10. Stability and vibration analysis of a complex flexible rotor bearing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, C.; Sinou, J.-J.; Thouverez, F.

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents the non-linear dynamic analysis of a flexible rotor having unbalanced and supported by ball bearings. The rolling element bearings are modeled as two degree of freedom elements where the kinematics of the rolling elements are taken into account, as well as the internal clearance and the Hertz contact non-linearity. In order to calculate the periodic response of this non-linear system, the harmonic balance method is used. This method is implemented with an exact condensation strategy to reduce the computational time. Moreover, the stability of the non-linear system is analyzed in the frequency-domain by a method based on a perturbation applied to the known harmonic solution in the time domain.

  11. Stability analysis of large space structure control systems with delayed input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, A. S. S. R.; Bainum, P. M.

    1988-01-01

    Large space structural systems, due to their inherent flexibility and low mass to area ratio, are represented by large dimensional mathematical models. For implementation of the control laws for such systems a finite amount of time is required to evaluate the control signals; and this time delay may cause instability in the closed loop control system that was previously designed without taking the input delay into consideration. The stability analysis of a simple harmonic oscillator representing the equation of a single mode as a function of delay time is analyzed analytically and verified numerically. The effect of inherent damping on the delay is also analyzed. The control problem with delayed input is also formulated in the discrete time domain.

  12. Stability analysis of large space structure control systems with delayed input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, A. S. S. R.; Bainum, Peter M.

    1988-01-01

    Large space structural systems, due to their inherent flexibility and low mass to area ratio, are represented by large dimensional mathematical models. For implementation of the control laws for such systems a finite amount of time is required to evaluate the control signals; and this time delay may cause instability in the closed loop control system that was previously designed without taking the input delay into consideration. The stability analysis of a simple harmonic oscillator representing the equation of a single mode as a function of delay time is treated analytically and verified numerically. The effect of inherent damping on the delay is also analyzed. The control problem with delayed input is also formulated in the discrete time domain.

  13. Experimental analysis of mechanical response of stabilized occipitocervical junction by 3D mark tracking technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germaneau, A.; Doumalin, P.; Dupré, J. C.; Brèque, C.; Brémand, F.; D'Houtaud, S.; Rigoard, P.

    2010-06-01

    This study is about a biomechanical comparison of some stabilization solutions for the occipitocervical junction. Four kinds of occipito-cervical fixations are analysed in this work: lateral plates fixed by two kinds of screws, lateral plates fixed by hooks and median plate. To study mechanical rigidity of each one, tests have been performed on human skulls by applying loadings and by studying mechanical response of fixations and bone. For this experimental analysis, a specific setup has been developed to impose a load corresponding to the flexion-extension physiological movements. 3D mark tracking technique is employed to measure 3D displacement fields on the bone and on the fixations. Observations of displacement evolution on the bone according to the fixation show different rigidities given by each solution.

  14. A reservation protocol for satellite packet communication - A performance analysis and stability considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasaka, S.; Ishibashi, Y.

    1984-08-01

    The dynamic behavior of a reservation system with a slotted ALOHA reservation channel is analyzed in this paper. It is assumed that each user handles one message at a time and that each message consists of a group of packets with a general probability distribution for group size. An approximate Markovian model of the system is developed on the assumption that the state transition can occur only at the beginning of each frame. The model is analyzed by an approximate analytical technique called equilibrium point analysis. The throughput and average mega delay characteristics are obtained, and the system stability behavior is demonstrated. A procedure is also given to get the optimum set of system parameters under constraints that the system is stable.

  15. Biomechanical analysis for handle stability during maximum push and pull exertions.

    PubMed

    Seo, Na Jin; Armstrong, Thomas J

    2009-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of handle stability on maximum push/pull force. It was hypothesised that people apply force in directions deviated from the pure push/pull direction to generate a moment that assists producing greater push/pull force when the handle position is fixed (stable) compared to when it is not fixed (unstable). Eight healthy subjects performed maximum push and pull exertions on a stable and an unstable handle in a seated posture, while maximum push/pull force, vertical force and lateral force were recorded. For the unstable handle, vertical and lateral forces were not different from zero during push and pull. For the stable handle, subjects intuitively applied significant downward force during push and significant upward force during pull exertions. As predicted from biomechanical analysis, this downward and upward force was found to be significantly associated with increased push and pull force, respectively, for the stable handle compared to the unstable handle.

  16. Stability analysis for a delay differential equations model of a hydraulic turbine speed governor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halanay, Andrei; Safta, Carmen A.; Dragoi, Constantin; Piraianu, Vlad F.

    2017-01-01

    The paper aims to study the dynamic behavior of a speed governor for a hydraulic turbine using a mathematical model. The nonlinear mathematical model proposed consists in a system of delay differential equations (DDE) to be compared with already established mathematical models of ordinary differential equations (ODE). A new kind of nonlinearity is introduced as a time delay. The delays can characterize different running conditions of the speed governor. For example, it is considered that spool displacement of hydraulic amplifier might be blocked due to oil impurities in the oil supply system and so the hydraulic amplifier has a time delay in comparison to the time control. Numerical simulations are presented in a comparative manner. A stability analysis of the hydraulic control system is performed, too. Conclusions of the dynamic behavior using the DDE model of a hydraulic turbine speed governor are useful in modeling and controlling hydropower plants.

  17. Unsteady aerodynamic flow field analysis of the space shuttle configuration. Part 4: 747/orbiter aeroelastic stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reding, J. P.; Ericsson, L. E.

    1976-01-01

    A quasi-steady analysis of the aeroelastic stability of the lateral (antisymmetric) modes of the 747/orbiter vehicle was accomplished. The interference effect of the orbiter wake on the 747 tail furnishes an aerodynamic undamping contribution to the elastic modes. Likewise, the upstream influence of the 747 tail and aft fuselage on the orbiter beaver-tail rail fairing also is undamping. Fortunately these undamping effects cannot overpower the large damping contribution of the 747 tail and the modes are damped for the configurations analyzed. However, significant interference effects of the orbiter on the 747 tail have been observed in the pitch plane. The high response of the 747 vertical tail in the orbiter wave was also considered. Wind tunnel data points to flapping of the OMS pod wakes as the source of the wake resonance phenomenon.

  18. Evaluating network analysis and agent based modeling for investigating the stability of commercial air carrier schedules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, Sheila Ruth

    For a number of years, the United States Federal Government has been formulating the Next Generation Air Transportation System plans for National Airspace System improvement. These improvements attempt to address air transportation holistically, but often address individual improvements in one arena such as ground or in-flight equipment. In fact, air transportation system designers have had only limited success using traditional Operations Research and parametric modeling approaches in their analyses of innovative operations. They need a systemic methodology for modeling of safety-critical infrastructure that is comprehensive, objective, and sufficiently concrete, yet simple enough to be deployed with reasonable investment. The methodology must also be amenable to quantitative analysis so issues of system safety and stability can be rigorously addressed. The literature suggests that both agent-based models and network analysis techniques may be useful for complex system development and analysis. The purpose of this research is to evaluate these two techniques as applied to analysis of commercial air carrier schedule (route) stability in daily operations, an important component of air transportation. Airline-like routing strategies are used to educe essential elements of applying the method. Two main models are developed, one investigating the network properties of the route structure, the other an Agent-based approach. The two methods are used to predict system properties at a macro-level. These findings are compared to observed route network performance measured by adherence to a schedule to provide validation of the results. Those interested in complex system modeling are provided some indication as to when either or both of the techniques would be applicable. For aviation policy makers, the results point to a toolset capable of providing insight into the system behavior during the formative phases of development and transformation with relatively low investment

  19. Offshore wellbore stability analysis based on fully coupled poro-thermo-elastic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wenke; Deng, Jingen; Yu, Baohua; Liu, Wei; Tan, Qiang

    2017-03-01

    Drilling-induced tensile fractures are usually caused when the weight of mud is too high, and the effective tangential stress becomes tensile. It is thus hard to explain why tensile fractures are distributed along the lower part of a hole in an offshore exploration well when the mud weight is low. According to analysis, the reason could be the thermal effect, which cannot be ignored because of the drilling fluid and the cooling action of sea water during circulation. A heat transfer model is set up to obtain the temperature distribution of the wellbore and its formation by the finite difference method. Then, fully coupled poro-thermo-elastic theory is used to study the pore pressure and effective stress around the wellbore. By comparing it with both poroelastic and elastic models, it is indicated that the poroelastic effect is dominant at the beginning of circulation and inhibits tensile fractures from forming; then, the thermal effect becomes more important and decreases the effective tangential stress with the passing of time, so the drilling fluid and the cooling effect of sea water can cause tensile fractures to happen. Meanwhile, tensile fractures are shallow and not likely to lead to mud leakage with lower mud weight, which agrees with the actual drilling process. On the other hand, the fluid cooling effect could increase the strength of the rock and reduce the likelihood of shear failure, which would be beneficial for wellbore stability. So, the thermal effect cannot be neglected in offshore wellbore stability analysis, and mud weight and borehole exposure time should be controlled in the case of mud loss.

  20. Analysis of colour stability of selected provisional prosthetic materials: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Koczorowski, Ryszard; Linkowska-Swidzińska, Kamila; Gedrange, Tomasz; Swidziński, Teodor

    2009-08-01

    Prosthetic restorative materials (that are) used for temporary fixed dentures tend to exhibit variable discolouration over several weeks of use. The aim of this study was to perform a spectrophotometric analysis of the influence of selected discolouring factors on the colour stability of provisional prosthetic materials in vitro. In the study, the following prosthetic materials for short-term use in the oral cavity were evaluated: Luxatemp, Structur 2S.C., Protemp II, Zhermacryl STC and Dentalon Plus. Samples of these materials were immersed in coffee, tea and dark fruit juice for 60 h at different pH values. Colour was evaluated by determining the monochromatic coefficients of light reflected by the samples, using a spectrophotometric method. Results received in artificial light (illuminant A) were compared with those obtained in daylight (illuminant D65). Changes in colour and its parameters according to the CIE L*a*b* system were analysed. The analysis (of the colour and colour parameters) of the tested materials in two types of light showed that Structur displayed the greatest tendency to discolouration and that the least tendency to discolouration was exhibited by Dentalon Plus. The fact that colour parameters obtained in two types of light were not identical suggests that changes in the colour of the same material may be perceived differently, depending on the illuminant. Provisional prosthetic materials show variable colour stability under different conditions in the oral cavity. The colour of prosthetic materials may be perceived differently, depending on the illuminant and the effect of the environment in which they are used.

  1. Longitudinal data analysis in support of functional stability concepts for leachate management at closed municipal landfills

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, Robert D.; Morris, Jeremy W.F.; Prucha, Christopher P.; Caldwell, Michael D.; Staley, Bryan F.

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Longitudinal data analysis using a mixed-effects regression model. • Dataset consisted of a total of 1402 samples from 101 closed municipal landfills. • Target analytes and classes generally showed predictable degradation trends. • Validates historical studies focused on macro organic indicators such as BOD. • BOD can serve as “gateway” indicator for planning leachate management. - Abstract: Landfill functional stability provides a target that supports no environmental threat at the relevant point of exposure in the absence of active control systems. With respect to leachate management, this study investigates “gateway” indicators for functional stability in terms of the predictability of leachate characteristics, and thus potential threat to water quality posed by leachate emissions. Historical studies conducted on changes in municipal solid waste (MSW) leachate concentrations over time (longitudinal analysis) have concentrated on indicator compounds, primarily chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD). However, validation of these studies using an expanded database and larger constituent sets has not been performed. This study evaluated leachate data using a mixed-effects regression model to determine the extent to which leachate constituent degradation can be predicted based on waste age or operational practices. The final dataset analyzed consisted of a total of 1402 samples from 101 MSW landfills. Results from the study indicated that all leachate constituents exhibit a decreasing trend with time in the post-closure period, with 16 of the 25 target analytes and aggregate classes exhibiting a statistically significant trend consistent with well-studied indicators such as BOD. Decreasing trends in BOD concentration after landfill closure can thus be considered representative of trends for many leachate constituents of concern.

  2. A multiloop generalization of the circle criterion for stability margin analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safonov, M. G.; Athans, M.

    1979-01-01

    In order to provide a theoretical tool suited for characterizing the stability margins of multiloop feedback systems, multiloop input-output stability results generalizing the circle stability criterion are considered. Generalized conic sectors with 'centers' and 'radii' determined by linear dynamical operators are employed to specify the stability margins as a frequency dependent convex set of modeling errors (including nonlinearities, gain variations and phase variations) which the system must be able to tolerate in each feedback loop without instability. The resulting stability criterion gives sufficient conditions for closed loop stability in the presence of frequency dependent modeling errors, even when the modeling errors occur simultaneously in all loops. The stability conditions yield an easily interpreted scalar measure of the amount by which a multiloop system exceeds, or falls short of, its stability margin specifications.

  3. Stability and performance analysis of a jump linear control system subject to digital upsets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui; Sun, Hui; Ma, Zhen-Yang

    2015-04-01

    This paper focuses on the methodology analysis for the stability and the corresponding tracking performance of a closed-loop digital jump linear control system with a stochastic switching signal. The method is applied to a flight control system. A distributed recoverable platform is implemented on the flight control system and subject to independent digital upsets. The upset processes are used to stimulate electromagnetic environments. Specifically, the paper presents the scenarios that the upset process is directly injected into the distributed flight control system, which is modeled by independent Markov upset processes and independent and identically distributed (IID) processes. A theoretical performance analysis and simulation modelling are both presented in detail for a more complete independent digital upset injection. The specific examples are proposed to verify the methodology of tracking performance analysis. The general analyses for different configurations are also proposed. Comparisons among different configurations are conducted to demonstrate the availability and the characteristics of the design. Project supported by the Young Scientists Fund of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61403395), the Natural Science Foundation of Tianjin, China (Grant No. 13JCYBJC39000), the Scientific Research Foundation for the Returned Overseas Chinese Scholars, State Education Ministry, China, the Tianjin Key Laboratory of Civil Aircraft Airworthiness and Maintenance in Civil Aviation of China (Grant No. 104003020106), and the Fund for Scholars of Civil Aviation University of China (Grant No. 2012QD21x).

  4. Kinetic analysis of the hydrolysis of methyl parathion using citrate-stabilized 10 nm gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Nita, Rafaela; Trammell, Scott A; Ellis, Gregory A; Moore, Martin H; Soto, Carissa M; Leary, Dagmar H; Fontana, Jake; Talebzadeh, Somayeh F; Knight, D Andrew

    2016-02-01

    "Ligand-free" citrate-stabilized 10 nm gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) promote the hydrolysis of the thiophosphate ester methyl parathion (MeP) on the surface of gold as a function of pH and two temperature values. At 50 °C, the active surface gold atoms show catalytic turnover ∼4 times after 8 h and little turnover of gold surface atoms at 25 °C with only 40% of the total atoms being active. From Michaelis-Menten analysis, k(cat) increases between pH 8 and 9 and decreases above pH 9. A global analysis of the spectral changes confirmed the stoichiometric reaction at 25 °C and the catalytic reaction at 50 °C and mass spectrometry confirmed the identity of p-nitrophenolate (PNP) product. Additional decomposition pathways involving oxidation and hydrolysis independent of the formation of PNP were also seen at 50 °C for both catalyzed and un-catalyzed reactions. This work represents the first kinetic analysis of ligand-free AuNP catalyzed hydrolysis of a thiophosphate ester.

  5. Stability analysis of unstructured finite volume methods for linear shallow water flows using pseudospectra and singular value decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beljadid, Abdelaziz; Mohammadian, Abdolmajid; Qiblawey, Hazim

    2016-10-01

    The discretization of the shallow water system on unstructured grids can lead to spurious modes which usually can affect accuracy and/or cause stability problems. This paper introduces a new approach for stability analysis of unstructured linear finite volume schemes for linear shallow water equations with the Coriolis Effect using spectra, pseudospectra, and singular value decomposition. The discrete operator of the scheme is the principal parameter used in the analysis. It is shown that unstructured grids have a large influence on operator normality. In some cases the eigenvectors of the operator can be far from orthogonal, which leads to amplification of solutions and/or stability problems. Large amplifications of the solution can be observed, even for discrete operators which respect the condition of asymptotic stability, and in some cases even for Lax-Richtmyer stable methods. The pseudospectra are shown to be efficient for the verification of stability of finite volume methods for linear shallow water equations. In some cases, the singular value decomposition is employed for further analysis in order to provide more information about the existence of unstable modes. The results of the analysis can be helpful in choosing the type of mesh, the appropriate placements of the variables of the system on the grid, and the suitable discretization method which is stable for a wide range of modes.

  6. Biomechanical evaluation of oversized drilling technique on primary implant stability measured by insertion torque and resonance frequency analysis

    PubMed Central

    Santamaría-Arrieta, Gorka; Brizuela-Velasco, Aritza; Fernández-González, Felipe J.; Chávarri-Prado, David; Chento-Valiente, Yelko; Solaberrieta, Eneko; Diéguez-Pereira, Markel; Yurrebaso-Asúa, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Background This study evaluated the influence of implant site preparation depth on primary stability measured by insertion torque and resonance frequency analysis (RFA). Material and Methods Thirty-two implant sites were prepared in eight veal rib blocks. Sixteen sites were prepared using the conventional drilling sequence recommended by the manufacturer to a working depth of 10mm. The remaining 16 sites were prepared using an oversize drilling technique (overpreparation) to a working depth of 12mm. Bone density was determined using cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT). The implants were placed and primary stability was measured by two methods: insertion torque (Ncm), and RFA (implant stability quotient [ISQ]). Results The highest torque values were achieved by the conventional drilling technique (10mm). The ANOVA test confirmed that there was a significant correlation between torque and drilling depth (p<0.05). However, no statistically significant differences were obtained between ISQ values at 10 or 12 mm drilling depths (p>0.05) at either measurement direction (cortical and medullar). No statistical relation between torque and ISQ values was identified, or between bone density and primary stability (p >0.05). Conclusions Vertical overpreparation of the implant bed will obtain lower insertion torque values, but does not produce statistically significant differences in ISQ values. Key words:Implant stability quotient, overdrilling, primary stability, resonance frequency analysis, torque. PMID:27398182

  7. An analysis of lateral stability in power-off flight with charts for use in design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Charles H

    1937-01-01

    The aerodynamic and mass factors governing lateral stability are discussed and formulas are given for their estimation. Relatively simple relationships between the governing factors and the resulting stability characteristics are presented. A series of charts is included with which approximate stability characteristics may be rapidly estimated. The effects of the various governing factors upon the stability characteristics are discussed in detail. It is pointed out that much additional research is necessary both to correlate stability characteristics with riding, flying, and handling qualities and to provide suitable data for accurate estimates of those characteristics of an airplane while it is in the design stage.

  8. Direct numerical simulation and global stability analysis of three-dimensional instabilities in a lid-driven cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chicheportiche, Jérèmie; Merle, Xavier; Gloerfelt, Xavier; Robinet, Jean-Christophe

    2008-07-01

    The first bifurcation in a lid-driven cavity characterized by three-dimensional Taylor-Görtler-Like instabilities is investigated for a cubical cavity with spanwise periodic boundary conditions at Re=1000. The modes predicted by a global linear stability analysis are compared to the results of a direct numerical simulation. The amplification rate, and the shape of the three-dimensional perturbation fields from the direct numerical simulation are in very good agreement with the characteristics of the steady S1 mode from the stability analysis, showing that this mode dominates the other unstable unsteady modes. To cite this article: J. Chicheportiche et al., C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  9. Orbital stability analysis and chaotic dynamics of exoplanets in multi-stellar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satyal, Suman

    -aperiodic orbits. The stability of the system is defined in terms of its lifetime and maximum eccentricity during the integration period then a regime is established for the known and injected planet's orbital parameters. The de-stabilizing resonances due to the outer planet extend by 1.36 AU towards the star, nonetheless, existence of two Earth-mass planets seems plausible. The radial velocity (RV) curves generated for the test planets reveals a weak RV signal that cannot be measured by currently available instruments. A theory has been developed by extrapolating the radio emission processes in the Jupiter-Io system, which could reveal the presence of exomoons around the giant exoplanets. Based on this theory, maximum distance, radius and masses of exoplanets and exomoons are calculated that could be detected by the available radio telescopes. Observation time at the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) radio telescope has been proposed to detect exomoon in five different stellar systems. Subjects of my future studies include analysis of the data from LOFAR, search for the additional transiting planets in Kepler 47 circumbinary system and observation at the Subaru telescope to verify the predicted planets in GJ 832 system by the method of direct imaging.

  10. The effect of implant design of linked total elbow arthroplasty on stability and stress: a finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Willing, Ryan; King, Graham J W; Johnson, James A

    2014-01-01

    Several linked total elbow arthroplasty designs exist, which function similar to a loose hinge joint. Constraint behaviour is an important design consideration, as it affects joint stability, or how much secondary [e.g. varus-valgus (VV)] motion is permitted. Implant durability is also a concern, as bearing failures have been reported. This finite element analysis investigates the constraint characteristics and ultra high molecular weight polyethylene bearing stresses of three linked elbow design concepts [cylindrical (CY), hourglass (HG) and concave cylinder (CC)]. The bearing of the CY design was subjected to elevated Von Mises stresses (2.1-5.4 times higher than the HG and CC designs) due to edge loading. The HG design maintained low stresses, but was unable to provide consistent VV stability. The CC design also maintained low stresses while providing consistent VV stability. These results suggest that CC designs may provide better stability characteristics and durability in vivo, compared to the other two designs.

  11. A hybrid method for quasi-three-dimensional slope stability analysis in a municipal solid waste landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, L.; Batlle, F.

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: > A quasi-three-dimensional slope stability analysis method was proposed. > The proposed method is a good engineering tool for 3D slope stability analysis. > Factor of safety from 3D analysis is higher than from 2D analysis. > 3D analysis results are more sensitive to cohesion than 2D analysis. - Abstract: Limited space for accommodating the ever increasing mounds of municipal solid waste (MSW) demands the capacity of MSW landfill be maximized by building landfills to greater heights with steeper slopes. This situation has raised concerns regarding the stability of high MSW landfills. A hybrid method for quasi-three-dimensional slope stability analysis based on the finite element stress analysis was applied in a case study at a MSW landfill in north-east Spain. Potential slides can be assumed to be located within the waste mass due to the lack of weak foundation soils and geosynthetic membranes at the landfill base. The only triggering factor of deep-seated slope failure is the higher leachate level and the relatively high and steep slope in the front. The valley-shaped geometry and layered construction procedure at the site make three-dimensional slope stability analyses necessary for this landfill. In the finite element stress analysis, variations of leachate level during construction and continuous settlement of the landfill were taken into account. The 'equivalent' three-dimensional factor of safety (FoS) was computed from the individual result of the two-dimensional analysis for a series of evenly spaced cross sections within the potential sliding body. Results indicate that the hybrid method for quasi-three-dimensional slope stability analysis adopted in this paper is capable of locating roughly the spatial position of the potential sliding mass. This easy to manipulate method can serve as an engineering tool in the preliminary estimate of the FoS as well as the approximate position and extent of the potential sliding mass. The result that Fo

  12. A New Method for System Reliability Analysis of Tailings Dam Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Tang, H.; Xiong, C.; Ni, W.

    2012-12-01

    For the purpose of stability evaluation, a tailings dam can be considered as an artificial slope made of special soil materials which mainly come from mine tailings. As a particular engineering project, a tailings dam generally has experienced multi-loop hydraulic sediments as well as a long-term consolidation in the process of construction. The characteristics of sediment and consolidation result in a unique distribution of the soil layers with significant uncertainties, which come from both nature development and various human activities, and thus cause the discrete and the variability of the physical-mechanical properties dramatically greater than the natural geo-materials. Therefore, the location of critical slip surface (CSS) of the dam usually presents a notable drift. So, it means that the reliability evaluation task for a tailings dam is a system reliability problem indeed. Unfortunately, the previous research of reliability of tailings dam was mainly confined to the limit equilibrium method (LEM), which has three obvious drawbacks. First, it just focused on the variability along the slip surface rather than the whole space of the dam. Second, a fixed CSS, instead of variable one, was concerned in most cases. Third, the shape of the CSS was usually simplified to a circular. The present paper tried to construct a new reliability analysis model combined with several advanced techniques involving finite difference method (FDM), Monte Carlo simulation (MCS), support vector machine (SVM) and particle swarm optimization (PSO). The new framework was consisted of four modules. The first one is the limit equilibrium finite difference mode, which employed the FLAC3D code to generate stress fields and then used PSO algorithm to search the location of CSS and corresponding minimum factor of safety (FOS). The most value of this module was that each realization of stress field would lead to a particular CSS and its FOS. In other words, the consideration of the drift of

  13. Glass Stability and Kinetic Analysis of Iron-Metalloid Bulk Metallic Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhaweesuk, Charuayporn

    Multicomponent Fe-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) with a combination of excellent properties such as good soft magnetic properties, high strength, high hardness, and high corrosion resistance have attracted increasing attention both from a basic science research standpoint and due to their industrial application potential. However, many of the elemental additions which lead to the easiest glass formation are expensive. The identification of alloys composed of abundant and inexpensive elements that still retain excellent properties would promote applications for engineering and industry. In short, the development of the Fe-based BMG without any glass-forming metal elements and with high glass forming ability is desired. This study shows that the thermal stability of the Fe-based alloys can be improved beyond a simple rule of mixtures prediction by utilizing a well-balance multi-metalloid approach. The kinetics aspect of glass-forming ability is studied experimentally for Fe-B-Si-P alloys. The systematic variation in alloy composition gives access to differences in phase selection and the final dimensions of glass formation. Two alloys, representing the best glass-forming composition and the poorest glass-forming composition, were studied in terms of their stability to crystallization, solidification microstructure evolution and thermal history. The utility of the wedge-casting technique is developed to examine bulk glass-forming alloys by combining multiple temperature profiles of the quenching melt with a measurement-based kinetic analysis of the phase selection competition and critical cooling rate conditions. Based upon direct thermal measurement, microstructural analysis and kinetic modeling, it was found that both representative alloys show a board spectrum of solidification microstructures which include a critical cooling rate range. The kinetic competition in the formation of certain phases can enhance or detract from the final dimension of bulk glass

  14. Characterizing Feedback Control Mechanisms in Nonlinear Microbial Models of Soil Organic Matter Decomposition by Stability Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiou, K.; Tang, J.; Riley, W. J.; Torn, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition is regulated by biotic and abiotic processes. Feedback interactions between such processes may act to dampen oscillatory responses to perturbations from equilibrium. Indeed, although biological oscillations have been observed in small-scale laboratory incubations, the overlying behavior at the plot-scale exhibits a relatively stable response to disturbances in input rates and temperature. Recent studies have demonstrated the ability of microbial models to capture nonlinear feedbacks in SOM decomposition that linear Century-type models are unable to reproduce, such as soil priming in response to increased carbon input. However, these microbial models often exhibit strong oscillatory behavior that is deemed unrealistic. The inherently nonlinear dynamics of SOM decomposition have important implications for global climate-carbon and carbon-concentration feedbacks. It is therefore imperative to represent these dynamics in Earth System Models (ESMs) by introducing sub-models that accurately represent microbial and abiotic processes. In the present study we explore, both analytically and numerically, four microbe-enabled model structures of varying levels of complexity. The most complex model combines microbial physiology, a non-linear mineral sorption isotherm, and enzyme dynamics. Based on detailed stability analysis of the nonlinear dynamics, we calculate the system modes as functions of model parameters. This dependence provides insight into the source of state oscillations. We find that feedback mechanisms that emerge from careful representation of enzyme and mineral interactions, with parameter values in a prescribed range, are critical for both maintaining system stability and capturing realistic responses to disturbances. Corroborating and expanding upon the results of recent studies, we explain the emergence of oscillatory responses and discuss the appropriate microbe-enabled model structure for inclusion in ESMs.

  15. Rapid Analysis of Glibenclamide Using an Environmentally Benign Stability-Indicating RP-HPLC Method

    PubMed Central

    Haq, Nazrul; Alanazi, Fars Kaed; Alsarra, Ibrahim Abdullah; Shakeel, Faiyaz

    2014-01-01

    An environmentally benign RP-HPLC approach for rapid analysis of glibenclamide in pure form, developed nanoemulsion and commercial tablets was developed and validated in present investigation. The green chromatographic identification was performed on Lichrosphere 250 X 4.0 mm RP C8 column having a 5 μm packing as a stationary phase using a combination of ethanol: methanol (50:50 % v/v) as a mobile phase, at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min with UV detection at 245 nm. The proposed method was validated for linearity, selectivity, accuracy, precision, robustness, sensitivity and specificity as per international conference on harmonization (ICH) guidelines. The utility of proposed method was verified by assay of glibenclamide in developed nanoemulsion and commercial tablets. The proposed method was found to be satisfactory in terms of selectivity, precision, accuracy, robustness, sensitivity and specificity. The content of glibenclamide in developed nanoemulsion and commercial tablets was found to be 100.50 % and 99.15 % respectively. The proposed method successfully resoled glibenclamide peak in the presence of its all type of degradation products which indicated stability-indicating property of the proposed method. These results indicated that the green chromatographic method could be successfully employed for routine analysis of glibenclamide in pure drug and various commercial formulations. PMID:25276186

  16. Implementation of Bounding Surface Model into ABAQUS and Its Application to Wellbore Stability Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.; Al-Muntasheri, G.; Abousleiman, Y. N.

    2014-12-01

    The critical state concept based bounding surface model is one of the most widely used elastoplastic constitutive models for geomaterials, attributed mainly to its essential feature of allowing plastic deformation to occur for stress points within the bounding surface and thus the capability to represent the realistic non-recoverable behaviour of soils and rocks observed under the cyclic loading. This paper develops an implicit integration algorithm for the bounding surface model, using the standard return mapping approach (elastic predictor-plastic corrector), to obtain the updated stresses for the given strain increments. The formulation of the constitutive integration requires the derivation of a supplementary differential equation to describe the evolution of a key variable, i.e., the ratio between the image stress and the current stress quantities. It is essentially an extension of the integration scheme presented in an earlier work used for the simple bounding surface version of modified Cam Clay associated with a substantially simplified hardening rule. The integration algorithm for the bounding surface model is implemented into the finite element analysis commercial program, ABAQUS, through the material interface of UMAT (user defined material subroutine), and then used for the analysis of wellbore stability problem. The predictions from the ABAQUS simulations are generally in excellent agreement with the available analytical solutions, thus demonstrating the accuracy and robustness of the proposed integration scheme.

  17. Thermal stress analysis of an Am/Cm stabilization bushing melter

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, C.; Hardy, B.J.

    1996-12-31

    Decades of nuclear material production at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has resulted in the generation of large quantities of the isotopes Am{sup 243} and Cm{sup 244}. Currently, the Am and Cm isotopes are stored as a nitric acid solution in a tank. The Am and Cm isotopes have great commercial value but must be transferred to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for processing. The nitric acid solution contains other isotopes and is intensely radioactive, which makes storage a problem and precludes shipment in the liquid form. In order to stabilize the material for onsite storage and to permit transport the material from SRS to ORNL, it has been proposed that the Am and Cm be separated from other isotopes in the solution and vitrified. The vitrification process in the Platinum-Rhodium alloy vessel generates a wide spectrum of temperature distributions. The melter is partially supported by a suspension system and confined by the flexible insulation. The combination of the fluctuation of temperature distribution and variable boundary conditions, induces stresses and strains in the melter. The thermal stress analysis is carried out with the finite element code ABAQUS. This analysis is closely associated with the design, manufacture and testing of the melter. The results were compared with the test data.

  18. Rapid Analysis of Glibenclamide Using an Environmentally Benign Stability-Indicating RP-HPLC Method.

    PubMed

    Haq, Nazrul; Alanazi, Fars Kaed; Alsarra, Ibrahim Abdullah; Shakeel, Faiyaz

    2014-01-01

    An environmentally benign RP-HPLC approach for rapid analysis of glibenclamide in pure form, developed nanoemulsion and commercial tablets was developed and validated in present investigation. The green chromatographic identification was performed on Lichrosphere 250 X 4.0 mm RP C8 column having a 5 μm packing as a stationary phase using a combination of ethanol: methanol (50:50 % v/v) as a mobile phase, at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min with UV detection at 245 nm. The proposed method was validated for linearity, selectivity, accuracy, precision, robustness, sensitivity and specificity as per international conference on harmonization (ICH) guidelines. The utility of proposed method was verified by assay of glibenclamide in developed nanoemulsion and commercial tablets. The proposed method was found to be satisfactory in terms of selectivity, precision, accuracy, robustness, sensitivity and specificity. The content of glibenclamide in developed nanoemulsion and commercial tablets was found to be 100.50 % and 99.15 % respectively. The proposed method successfully resoled glibenclamide peak in the presence of its all type of degradation products which indicated stability-indicating property of the proposed method. These results indicated that the green chromatographic method could be successfully employed for routine analysis of glibenclamide in pure drug and various commercial formulations.

  19. Estimation of upper limit of pore pressure by fault stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zijian; Deng, Jingen; Yu, Baohua; Zhang, Yanan; Chen, Zhuo

    2016-06-01

    Generally, the pore pressure for a pre-drill well is predicted using empirical parameters, which are regressed from the drilled well's data. However, for areas with large geological differences, empirical parameters which are obtained using traditional methods may fail because intense tectonic movement would result in huge differences between the pre-drill well and drilled well. Firstly, in order to overcome this problem, the method of fault stability analysis is introduced. Analysis indicates that when abnormal overpressure exceeds a certain value, the fault ruptures and the overpressured fluid escapes, so that there is an upper limit of pore pressure (ULPP) for the stable fault. Secondly, the influences of fault angle, formation Poisson ratio and modulus of elasticity on the ULPP are discussed further. The results show that the ULPP of a fault with angle of 65.2° is the minimum, and the critical angle increases with the increase of internal friction coefficient. For reverse faults and strike faults, the influences of Poisson ratio and modulus of elasticity are small, but for normal faults these are significant. Finally, three kinds of ULPP for these different faults are proposed, respectively. The application of this method in the Xihu Sag in the East China Sea has proved that reference to ULPP can verify and correct regressed empirical parameters, so as to improve pore pressure prediction accuracy.

  20. Linearized blade row compression component model. Stability and frequency response analysis of a J85-3 compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tesch, W. A.; Moszee, R. H.; Steenken, W. G.

    1976-01-01

    NASA developed stability and frequency response analysis techniques were applied to a dynamic blade row compression component stability model to provide a more economic approach to surge line and frequency response determination than that provided by time-dependent methods. This blade row model was linearized and the Jacobian matrix was formed. The clean-inlet-flow stability characteristics of the compressors of two J85-13 engines were predicted by applying the alternate Routh-Hurwitz stability criterion to the Jacobian matrix. The predicted surge line agreed with the clean-inlet-flow surge line predicted by the time-dependent method to a high degree except for one engine at 94% corrected speed. No satisfactory explanation of this discrepancy was found. The frequency response of the linearized system was determined by evaluating its Laplace transfer function. The results of the linearized-frequency-response analysis agree with the time-dependent results when the time-dependent inlet total-pressure and exit-flow function amplitude boundary conditions are less than 1 percent and 3 percent, respectively. The stability analysis technique was extended to a two-sector parallel compressor model with and without interstage crossflow and predictions were carried out for total-pressure distortion extents of 180 deg, 90 deg, 60 deg, and 30 deg.

  1. Stability of dried blood spots for HIV-1 drug resistance analysis.

    PubMed

    Hearps, Anna C; Ryan, Claire E; Morris, Lisa M; Plate, Megan M; Greengrass, Vicki; Crowe, Suzanne M

    2010-03-01

    The wide scale application of dried blood spots (DBS) as a collection tool for low-cost HIV drug resistance testing requires a greater understanding of the accuracy of DBS for genotype analysis and the stability of DBS under various environmental conditions. Analysis of a 50microl DBS via a single amplicon, nested PCR-based in-house assay (the Burnet genotyping assay) showed an average nucleotide concordance of 98.9% with plasma samples, although only 65% of nucleotide mixtures detected in plasma were also detected within DBS. The analysis of three DBS resulted in the detection of a greater number of nucleotide mixtures (72 and 109 mixtures detected within one and three DBS, respectively, n=10). Two DBS extraction protocols (silica particle; NucliSENS, bioMerieux and spin column extraction; High Pure, Roche) were assessed and found to be equivalent (79% and 84% recovery success respectively, n=19). FTA Elute paper (Whatman) was an inferior DBS collection medium compared to Whatman 903 paper. DBS appeared relatively tolerant to multiple freeze/thaw cycles, with 79% of DBS subjected to ten freeze/thaw cycles successfully amplified compared to 93% of DBS defrosted once (n=14). High temperature (37 degrees C) and high humidity (>90%) substantially impaired DBS recovery within two weeks of storage (38%, n=8), whilst storage at -20 degrees C or 4 degrees C adequately preserved DBS for this period (100% recovery, n=8). Therefore, whilst DBS are suitable for HIV drug resistance surveillance, the use of multiple DBS may be required to ensure accurate detection of minor HIV quasispecies and short-term storage of samples at either 4 degrees C or -20 degrees C is recommended.

  2. A new technique for marginal linear stability analysis of thermal convection using propagator matrix method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Zhong, S.

    2011-12-01

    Critical Rayleigh number, Ra_c, is the Rayleigh number at the onset of thermal convection. Classic linear analysis provides a way to solve for Ra_c, but this method is mostly used for incompressible fluid with uniform properties. Here we report a new technique for linear stability analysis using propagator matrix method. This new technique can solve for Ra_c for both incompressible and compressible fluids, with depth dependent viscosity, thermal expansion and thermal diffusivity. This technique determines Ra_c for fundamental mode as well as higher modes. We found that results from this new technique agree well with those from the classic analysis for incompressible fluid with uniform properties. We have compared results of Ra_c from the new method with that of finite element code Citcom( Leng and Zhong, 2008 ). For incompressible fluid, they agree with each other very well, including fundamental and higher modes. For compressible fluid, the agreement is not as good, but relative difference remains less than a couple of percent, especially for fundamental mode at small dissipation number Di (e.g., less than 1). Our results show that Ra_c for compressible fluid are similar to that of incompressible fluid, but are significantly different from that of Jarvis & Mckenzie (1981). Given that much higher Rayleigh number is needed in compressible fluid to generate a given heat flux, our results from the new method have implications for the Nusselt-Rayleigh number relation for compressible thermal convection.

  3. Stability of Molasse: TLS for structural analysis in the valley of Gotteron-Fribourg, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Hammouda, Mariam; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Derron, Marc Henri; Bouaziz, Samir; Mazotti, Benoit

    2016-04-01

    The marine molasses of Fribourg (Switzerland) is an area where the cliff collapses and rockfalls are quite frequent and difficult to predict due to this particular lithology, a poorly consolidated greywacke. Because of some recent rockfall events, the situation became critical especially in the valley of Gotteron where a big block has slightly moved down and might destroy a house in case of rupture. The cliff made of jointed sandstone and thin layers of clay and siltstone presents many fractures, joints and massive cross bedding surfaces which increases the possibility of slab failure. This paper presents a detailed structural analysis of the cliff and the identification of the potential failure mechanisms. The methodology is about combining field observation and terrestrial LiDAR scanning point cloud in order to assess the stability of potential slope instabilities of molasses. Three LiDAR scans were done i) to extract discontinuity families depending to the dip and the dip direction of joints and ii) to run kinematic tests in order to identify responsible sets for each potential failure mechanisms. Raw point clouds were processed using IMAlign module of Polyworks and CloudCompare software. The structural analysis based on COLTOP 3D (Jaboyedoff et al. 2007) allowed the identification of four discontinuity sets that were not measured in the field. Two different failure mechanisms have been identified as critical: i) planar sliding which is the main responsible mechanism of the present fallen block and ii) wedge sliding. The planar sliding is defined by the discontinuity sets J1 and J5 with a direction parallel to the slope and with a steep dip angle. The wedges, defined by couples of discontinuity sets, contribute to increase cracks' opening and to the detachment of slabs. The use of TLS combined with field survey provides us a first interpretation of instabilities and a very promising structural analysis.

  4. Stability analysis of group decision-making under weighted scoring rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Fan; Zhao, Yong; Chen, Yang

    2016-12-01

    The result of group decision-making is always unstable, influenced by some uncertain factors. It is necessary to measure and analyse the stability of the result. A measurement based on the inclined angle of two vectors is proposed in this paper, in order to measure the stabilities of the results of weighted scoring rules. The concepts of stability degree and stability angle are given, whose geometric interpretations are displayed in the case of three candidates. Then an extended measurement called the relative stability degree is discussed to analyse the comparability of stability measurements for different numbers of candidates. Furthermore, this measurement and its extension are used to aid the decision-making of new project development in a software company.

  5. A multiloop generalization of the circle criterion for stability margin analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safonov, M. G.; Athans, M.

    1981-01-01

    In order to provide a theoretical tool well suited for use in characterizing the stability margins (e.g., gain and phase margins) of multiloop feedback systems, multiloop input-output stability results generalizing the circle stability criterion are considered. Generalized conic sectors with 'centers' and 'radii' determined by linear dynamical operators are employed to enable an engineer to specify the stability margins which he desires as a frequency-dependent convex set of modeling errors (including nonlinearities, gain variations, and phase variations) which the system must be able to tolerate in each feedback loop without instability. The resulting stability criterion gives sufficient conditions for closed-loop stability in the presence of such frequency-dependent modeling errors, even when the modeling errors occur simultaneously in all loops.

  6. Stability Analysis of Uncertain Switched Delay Systems: A Time-Varying Lyapunov Function Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ganji; Luo, Shixian; Chen, Wu-Hua

    Exponential stability for switched systems with uncertain parameters and time-varying delay is considered in this paper. The parametric uncertainties are assumed to be time-varying and norm-bounded. By introducing a novel piecewise time-varying Lyapunov function and using Razumikhin techniques, some linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) stability criteria are derived to guarantee the exponential stability of the switched delay systems. A numerical example is presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  7. Stability analysis of switched positive linear systems with stable and unstable subsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ji-Shi; Wang, Yan-Wu; Xiao, Jiang-Wen; Shen, Yan-Jun

    2014-12-01

    This paper addresses the stability problem of switched positive linear systems with stable and unstable subsystems. Based on a multiple linear copositive Lyapunov function, and by using the average dwell time approach, some sufficient stability criteria of global uniform exponential stability are established in both the continuous-time and the discrete-time cases, respectively. Finally, some numerical examples are given to show the effectiveness of the proposed results.

  8. Geometrical analysis of the LiCN vibrational dynamics: a stability geometrical indicator.

    PubMed

    Vergel, A; Benito, R M; Losada, J C; Borondo, F

    2014-02-01

    The vibrational dynamics of the LiNC/LiCN molecular system is examined making use of the Riemannian geometry. Stability and chaoticity are analyzed, in this context, by means of the Jacobi-Levi-Civita equations, derived from the Jacobi metric, and its solutions. A dynamical indicator, called stability geometrical indicator, is introduced in order to ascertain the dynamical characteristics of stability and chaos in the molecule under study.

  9. Gait Analysis of Conventional Total Knee Arthroplasty and Bicruciate Stabilized Total Knee Arthroplasty Using a Triaxial Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Hidetomo; Aizawa, Toshiaki; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Shimada, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    One component of conventional total knee arthroplasty is removal of the anterior cruciate ligament, and the knee after total knee arthroplasty has been said to be a knee with anterior cruciate ligament dysfunction. Bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty is believed to reproduce anterior cruciate ligament function in the implant and provide anterior stability. Conventional total knee arthroplasty was performed on the right knee and bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty was performed on the left knee in the same patient, and a triaxial accelerometer was fitted to both knees after surgery. Gait analysis was then performed and is reported here. The subject was a 78-year-old woman who underwent conventional total knee arthroplasty on her right knee and bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty on her left knee. On the femoral side with bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty, compared to conventional total knee arthroplasty, there was little acceleration in the x-axis direction (anteroposterior direction) in the early swing phase. Bicruciate stabilized total knee arthroplasty may be able to replace anterior cruciate ligament function due to the structure of the implant and proper anteroposterior positioning. PMID:27648328

  10. Stability analysis of fractional-order Hopfield neural networks with time delays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hu; Yu, Yongguang; Wen, Guoguang

    2014-07-01

    This paper investigates the stability for fractional-order Hopfield neural networks with time delays. Firstly, the fractional-order Hopfield neural networks with hub structure and time delays are studied. Some sufficient conditions for stability of the systems are obtained. Next, two fractional-order Hopfield neural networks with different ring structures and time delays are developed. By studying the developed neural networks, the corresponding sufficient conditions for stability of the systems are also derived. It is shown that the stability conditions are independent of time delays. Finally, numerical simulations are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results obtained in this paper.

  11. Analysis of Conical Wire Array Z-Pinch Stability with a Center Wire

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, D.; Presura, R.; Wright, S.; Plechaty, C.; Neff, S.; Wanex, L.; Ampleford, D. J.

    2009-01-21

    Adding a center wire on the axis of a conical wire array produces conditions suitable for studying shear flow stabilization of the Z-pinch. The conical wire array produces and axial plasma flow while the center wire introduces a radial variation of the axial velocity. Experiments of this array configuration were preformed on the 1 MA Zebra Z-pinch generator and showed stabilization of the kink instability when a center wire was present. Comparison with equivalent cylindrical wire arrays indicates that the shear flow stabilization plays a role in the stabilization of the kink instability.

  12. Stability analysis of switched stochastic neural networks with time-varying delays.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaotai; Tang, Yang; Zhang, Wenbing

    2014-03-01

    This paper is concerned with the global exponential stability of switched stochastic neural networks with time-varying delays. Firstly, the stability of switched stochastic delayed neural networks with stable subsystems is investigated by utilizing the mathematical induction method, the piecewise Lyapunov function and the average dwell time approach. Secondly, by utilizing the extended comparison principle from impulsive systems, the stability of stochastic switched delayed neural networks with both stable and unstable subsystems is analyzed and several easy to verify conditions are derived to ensure the exponential mean square stability of switched delayed neural networks with stochastic disturbances. The effectiveness of the proposed results is illustrated by two simulation examples.

  13. Towards Stability Analysis of Jump Linear Systems with State-Dependent and Stochastic Switching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tejada, Arturo; Gonzalez, Oscar R.; Gray, W. Steven

    2004-01-01

    This paper analyzes the stability of hierarchical jump linear systems where the supervisor is driven by a Markovian stochastic process and by the values of the supervised jump linear system s states. The stability framework for this class of systems is developed over infinite and finite time horizons. The framework is then used to derive sufficient stability conditions for a specific class of hybrid jump linear systems with performance supervision. New sufficient stochastic stability conditions for discrete-time jump linear systems are also presented.

  14. Analysis and testing of stability augmentation systems. [for supersonic transport aircraft wing and B-52 aircraft control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sevart, F. D.; Patel, S. M.; Wattman, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    Testing and evaluation of stability augmentation systems for aircraft flight control were conducted. The flutter suppression system analysis of a scale supersonic transport wing model is described. Mechanization of the flutter suppression system is reported. The ride control synthesis for the B-52 aeroelastic model is discussed. Model analyses were conducted using equations of motion generated from generalized mass and stiffness data.

  15. Stability analysis of the experimental and the simulated flow past miniature vortex generators in a Blasius boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camarri, Simone; Siconolfi, Lorenzo; Fransson, Jens H. M.

    2014-11-01

    It is shown in the literature that Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) waves can be damped and transition delayed if properly shaped modulations of the streamwise velocity (streaks) are generated inside a Blasius boundary layer. In velocity streaks are generated experimentally by installing miniature vortex generators (MVGs) on the plate wall so as to obtain a significant streak amplitude where the uncontrolled flow would be convectively unstable. When TS waves are excited upstream with respect to the MVGs, they undergo an amplification in the near wake past the MVGs and, if the streaks amplitude is sufficiently high, they decay further downstream, delaying transition. In order to investigate this behavior, representative experimental cases among those documented in are selected and simulated by DNS, and local bi-global stability analysis is applied both to the experimental and to the DNS flow fields. As a result, stability curves for the BL with MVGs are computed and compared to that of an uncontrolled Blasius BL. It is shown that available experimental results agree with the computed stability curves and results from the stability analysis are used to investigate the involved stabilization mechanisms. PRACE is acknowledged for awarding us access to resource FERMI based in Italy at CINECA.

  16. Analytical development of disturbed matrix eigenvalue problem applied to mixed convection stability analysis in Darcy media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamed, Haikel Ben; Bennacer, Rachid

    2008-08-01

    This work consists in evaluating algebraically and numerically the influence of a disturbance on the spectral values of a diagonalizable matrix. Thus, two approaches will be possible; to use the theorem of disturbances of a matrix depending on a parameter, due to Lidskii and primarily based on the structure of Jordan of the no disturbed matrix. The second approach consists in factorizing the matrix system, and then carrying out a numerical calculation of the roots of the disturbances matrix characteristic polynomial. This problem can be a standard model in the equations of the continuous media mechanics. During this work, we chose to use the second approach and in order to illustrate the application, we choose the Rayleigh-Bénard problem in Darcy media, disturbed by a filtering through flow. The matrix form of the problem is calculated starting from a linear stability analysis by a finite elements method. We show that it is possible to break up the general phenomenon into other elementary ones described respectively by a disturbed matrix and a disturbance. A good agreement between the two methods was seen. To cite this article: H.B. Hamed, R. Bennacer, C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  17. Thermal stability analysis under embankment with asphalt pavement and cement pavement in permafrost regions.

    PubMed

    Junwei, Zhang; Jinping, Li; Xiaojuan, Quan

    2013-01-01

    The permafrost degradation is the fundamental cause generating embankment diseases and pavement diseases in permafrost region while the permafrost degradation is related with temperature. Based on the field monitoring results of ground temperature along G214 Highway in high temperature permafrost regions, both the ground temperatures in superficial layer and the annual average temperatures under the embankment were discussed, respectively, for concrete pavements and asphalt pavements. The maximum depth of temperature field under the embankment for concrete pavements and asphalt pavements was also studied by using the finite element method. The results of numerical analysis indicate that there were remarkable seasonal differences of the ground temperatures in superficial layer between asphalt pavement and concrete pavement. The maximum influencing depth of temperature field under the permafrost embankment for every pavement was under the depth of 8 m. The thawed cores under both embankments have close relation with the maximum thawed depth, the embankment height, and the service time. The effective measurements will be proposed to keep the thermal stabilities of highway embankment by the results.

  18. Stability analysis of an F/A-18 E/F cable mount m odel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Nancy; Farmer, Moses

    1994-01-01

    A full-span F/A-18 E/F cable mounted wind tunnel model is part of a flutter clearance program at the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. Parametric analysis of this model using GRUMCBL software was conducted to assess stability for wind tunnel tests. Two configurations of the F/A-18 E/F were examined. The parameters examined were pulley-cable friction, mach number, dynamic pressure, cable geometry, center of gravity location, cable tension, snubbing the model, drag, and test medium. For the nominal cable geometry (Cable Geometry 1), Configuration One was unstable for cases with higher pulley-cable friction coefficients. A new cable geometry (Cable Geometry 3) was determined in which Configuration One was stable for all cases evaluated. Configuration Two with the nominal center of gravity position was found to be unstable for cases with higher pulley-cable friction coefficients; however, the model was stable when the center of gravity moved forward 1/2. The model was tested using the cable mount system during the initial wind tunnel entry and was stable as predicted.

  19. Linear stability analysis in the numerical solution of initial value problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dorsselaer, J. L. M.; Kraaijevanger, J. F. B. M.; Spijker, M. N.

    This article addresses the general problem of establishing upper bounds for the norms of the nth powers of square matrices. The focus is on upper bounds that grow only moderately (or stay constant) where n, or the order of the matrices, increases. The so-called resolvant condition, occuring in the famous Kreiss matrix theorem, is a classical tool for deriving such bounds.Recently the classical upper bounds known to be valid under Kreiss's resolvant condition have been improved. Moreover, generalizations of this resolvant condition have been considered so as to widen the range of applications. The main purpose of this article is to review and extend some of these new developments.The upper bounds for the powers of matrices discussed in this article are intimately connected with the stability analysis of numerical processes for solving initial(-boundary) value problems in ordinary and partial linear differential equations. The article highlights this connection.The article concludes with numerical illustrations in the solution of a simple initial-boundary value problem for a partial differential equation.

  20. Thermal Stability Analysis under Embankment with Asphalt Pavement and Cement Pavement in Permafrost Regions

    PubMed Central

    Jinping, Li; Xiaojuan, Quan

    2013-01-01

    The permafrost degradation is the fundamental cause generating embankment diseases and pavement diseases in permafrost region while the permafrost degradation is related with temperature. Based on the field monitoring results of ground temperature along G214 Highway in high temperature permafrost regions, both the ground temperatures in superficial layer and the annual average temperatures under the embankment were discussed, respectively, for concrete pavements and asphalt pavements. The maximum depth of temperature field under the embankment for concrete pavements and asphalt pavements was also studied by using the finite element method. The results of numerical analysis indicate that there were remarkable seasonal differences of the ground temperatures in superficial layer between asphalt pavement and concrete pavement. The maximum influencing depth of temperature field under the permafrost embankment for every pavement was under the depth of 8 m. The thawed cores under both embankments have close relation with the maximum thawed depth, the embankment height, and the service time. The effective measurements will be proposed to keep the thermal stabilities of highway embankment by the results. PMID:24027444

  1. Application of in situ stress estimation methods in wellbore stability analysis under isotropic and anisotropic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholami, Raoof; Rasouli, Vamegh; Aadnoy, Bernt; Mohammadi, Ramin

    2015-08-01

    Estimation of in situ stresses is a key step in many petroleum engineering applications, ranging from wellbore stability to sanding analysis and hydraulic fracturing design. Direct techniques conventionally used to determine in situ stresses are indeed very time consuming and expensive. These measurements would also be restricted as to the depth of acquisition, and generalization of the results to entire rock masses may not yield representative results. In this paper, applications of three indirect methods-Zoback’s polygon, shear moduli, and poroelastic-are studied to assess their applicability in providing reliable stress estimation under isotropic and anisotropic conditions. Determination of elastic, strength, and in situ stress parameters according to the assumption of each method for one of the vertical wells drilled in south Iran indicated that the shear moduli method is an appropriate approach for prediction of maximum horizontal stress within an interval where sufficient field data including leak-off tests are acquired. However, the poroelastic method seems to be a better method in prediction of in situ stresses under anisotropic conditions. This might be due to the presence of excessive shale formations in subsurface layers, causing structural or intrinsic anisotropy-based methods such as poroelastic equations to deliver more accurate results. However, making general conclusions based on studying a single vertical wellbore may not be sufficient, and therefore further studies are required.

  2. Dynamic Stability Analysis of Blunt Body Entry Vehicles Using Time-Lagged Aftbody Pitching Moments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazemba, Cole D.; Braun, Robert D.; Schoenenberger, Mark; Clark, Ian G.

    2013-01-01

    This analysis defines an analytic model for the pitching motion of blunt bodies during atmospheric entry. The proposed model is independent of the pitch damping sum coefficient present in the standard formulation of the equations of motion describing pitch oscillations of a decelerating blunt body, instead using the principle of a time-lagged aftbody moment as the forcing function for oscillation divergence. Four parameters, all with intuitive physical relevance, are introduced to fully define the aftbody moment and the associated time delay. It is shown that the dynamic oscillation responses typical to blunt bodies can be produced using hysteresis of the aftbody moment in place of the pitch damping coefficient. The approach used in this investigation is shown to be useful in understanding the governing physical mechanisms for blunt body dynamic stability and in guiding vehicle and mission design requirements. A validation case study using simulated ballistic range test data is conducted. From this, parameter identification is carried out through the use of a least squares optimizing routine. Results show good agreement with the limited existing literature for the parameters identified, suggesting that the model proposed could be validated by an experimental ballistic range test series. The trajectories produced by the identified parameters were found to match closely those from the MER ballistic range tests for a wide array of initial conditions and can be identified with a reasonable number of ballistic range shots and computational effort.

  3. Density driven convection with dissolution in porous media: experiment, simulation and linear stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xuhui; Yang, Xiaofan; Guo, Zhaoli

    2016-11-01

    Geological storage of the CO2 in subsurface saline aquifers is a promising way to reduce CO2 emissions. During this process, CO2 first dissolves into pure brine. Then the acidic and denser mixture falls down under the gravity and reacts with the rock. In the present work, a microfluidic experiment is conducted to investigate the density-driven convection with dissolution in porous media. Moreover, the linear stability analysis and numerical simulations are further performed to investigate the interfacial instability. The results demonstrate that front instability can be triggered by the density contrast between the two miscible fluids, leading to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. While this type of instability can be suppressed by the surface reaction between the fluid and solid phases, which prevents the transport of the denser fluid to the deeper region at the beginning. Over the long term, it is found that the interfacial instability can be influenced by the evolution of the porosity due to the dissolution, which will drive the transport of denser fluid further down. Our investigation shows that the transport of the reactive fluid in porous media depends on the competition among the density contrast, the chemical reaction rate and the evolution of the porosity/permeability.

  4. Stability analysis of unbounded uniform dense granular shear flow based on a viscoplastic constitutive law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen-Yau; Lai, Jeng-You; Young, D. L.

    2010-11-01

    Asymptotic and transient stability analyses of unbounded uniform granular shear flow at high solids volume fractions were carried out in the paper, based on a model composed of the viscoplastic constitutive law [P. Jop, Y. Forterre, and O. Pouliquen, Nature (London) 441, 727 (2006)] and the dilatancy law [O. Pouliquen et al., J. Stat. Mech.: Theory Exp. (2006) P07020]. We refer to this model as the VPDL (meaning of the "viscoplastic and dilatancy laws") thereinafter. In this model, dense granular flows were treated as a viscoplastic fluid with a Drucker-Prager-like yielding criterion. We compared our results to those obtained using the frictional-kinetic model (FKM) [M. Alam and P. R. Nott, J. Fluid Mech. 343, 267 (1997)]. Our main result is that unbounded uniform dense granular shear flows are always asymptotically stable at large time based on the VPDL model, at least for two-dimensional perturbations. This is valid for disturbances of layering modes (i.e., the perturbations whose wavenumber vectors are aligned along the transverse coordinate) as well as for nonlayering modes (the streamwise component of the wavenumber vector is nonzero). By contrast, layering modes can be unstable based on the FKM constitutive laws. Interestingly, in the framework of the VPDL, the analysis shows that significant transient growth may occur owing to the non-normality of the linear system, although disturbances eventually decay at large time.

  5. Stability Analysis of Roughness Array Wake in a High-Speed Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan; Li, Fei; Edwards, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Computations are performed to examine the effects of both an isolated and spanwise periodic array of trip elements on a high-speed laminar boundary layer, so as to identify the potential physical mechanisms underlying an earlier transition to turbulence as a result of the trip(s). In the context of a 0.333 scale model of the Hyper-X forebody configuration, the time accurate solution for an array of ramp shaped trips asymptotes to a stationary field at large times, indicating the likely absence of a strong absolute instability in the mildly separated flow due to the trips. A prominent feature of the wake flow behind the trip array corresponds to streamwise streaks that are further amplified in passing through the compression corner. Stability analysis of the streaks using a spatial, 2D eigenvalue approach reveals the potential for a strong convective instability that might explain the earlier onset of turbulence within the array wake. The dominant modes of streak instability are primarily sustained by the spanwise gradients associated with the streaks and lead to integrated logarithmic amplification factors (N factors) approaching 7 over the first ramp of the scaled Hyper-X forebody, and substantially higher over the second ramp. Additional computations are presented to shed further light on the effects of both trip geometry and the presence of a compression corner on the evolution of the streaks.

  6. Beam dynamics and stability analysis of an intense beam in a continuously twisted quadrupole focusing channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, A.; Sing Babu, P.; Pandit, V. S.

    2016-11-01

    This paper describes the dynamics of a space-charge-dominated beam through a continuously twisted quadrupole magnet using ten independent first-order differential equations of the beam matrix elements under the assumption of linear space-charge force. Various beam optical properties of the magnet and the evolution of the emittance that results from the coupling between the two transverse planes are studied. The perturbed equations of motion around the matched beam envelopes have been derived and utilized to analyze the stability properties of the intense beam transport by calculating the eigenvalues of the transfer map over one lattice period. Detailed analysis shows the presence of instability due to parametric resonances in a twisted quadrupole channel which generally does not appear in the FODO quadrupole channel. A 2D particle-in-cell simulation code has been developed and utilized to verify the analytical results and to examine the behavior of the intense beam with Gaussian (GA) distribution in the twisted quadrupole channel.

  7. Stability and convergence analysis of the quasi-dynamics method for the initial pebble packing

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Ji, W.

    2012-07-01

    The simulation for the pebble flow recirculation within Pebble Bed Reactors (PBRs) requires an efficient algorithm to generate an initial overlap-free pebble configuration within the reactor core. In the previous work, a dynamics-based approach, the Quasi-Dynamics Method (QDM), has been proposed to generate densely distributed pebbles in PBRs with cylindrical and annular core geometries. However, the stability and the efficiency of the QDM were not fully addressed. In this work, the algorithm is reformulated with two control parameters and the impact of these parameters on the algorithm performance is investigated. Firstly, the theoretical analysis for a 1-D packing system is conducted and the range of the parameter in which the algorithm is convergent is estimated. Then, this estimation is verified numerically for a 3-D packing system. Finally, the algorithm is applied to modeling the PBR fuel loading configuration and the convergence performance at different packing fractions is presented. Results show that the QDM is efficient in packing pebbles within the realistic range of the packing fraction in PBRs, and it is capable in handling cylindrical geometry with packing fractions up to 63.5%. (authors)

  8. Longitudinal vibration and stability analysis of carbon nanotubes conveying viscous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oveissi, Soheil; Toghraie, Davood; Eftekhari, Seyyed Ali

    2016-09-01

    Nowadays, carbon nanotubes (CNT) play an important role in practical applications in fluidic devices. To this end, researchers have studied various aspects of vibration analysis of a behavior of CNT conveying fluid. In this paper, based on nonlocal elasticity theory, single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) is simulated. To investigate and analyze the effect of internal fluid flow on the longitudinal vibration and stability of SWCNT, the equation of motion for longitudinal vibration is obtained by using Navier-Stokes equations. In the governing equation of motion, the interaction of fluid-structure, dynamic and fluid flow velocity along the axial coordinate of the nanotube and the nano-scale effect of the structure are considered. To solve the nonlocal longitudinal vibration equation, the approximate Galerkin method is employed and appropriate simply supported boundary conditions are applied. The results show that the axial vibrations of the nanotubesstrongly depend on the small-size effect. In addition, the fluid flowing in nanotube causes a decrease in the natural frequency of the system. It is obvious that the system natural frequencies reach zero at lower critical flow velocities as the wave number increases. Moreover, the critical flow velocity decreases as the nonlocal parameter increases.

  9. Thermal stability and folding kinetics analysis of intrinsically disordered protein, securin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chia-Ching; Chu, Hsueh-Liang; Ho, Li-Ping

    2014-03-01

    Lacking a stable tertiary structure, intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) possess particular functions in cell regulation, signaling, and controlling pathways. The study of their unique structure features, thermal stabilities, and folding kinetics is intriguing. In this study, an identified IDP, securin, was used as a model protein. By using a quasi-static five-step (on-path) folding process, the function of securin was restored and analyzed by isothermal titration calorimetry. Fluorescence spectroscopy and particle size analysis indicated that securin possessed a compact hydrophobic core and particle size. The glass transition of securin was characterized using differential scanning microcalorimetry. Furthermore, the folding/unfolding rates (kobs) of securin were undetectable, implying that the folding/unfolding rate is very fast and that the conformation of securin is sensitive to solvent environment change. Therefore, securin may fold properly under specific physiological conditions. In summary, the thermal glass transition behavior and undetectable kobs of folding/unfolding reactions may be two of the indices of IDP. This study was supported in part by grants NSC 97-2112-M-009-009-YM3 and NSC 100-2112-M-009-004-MY3, Taiwan, R.O.C.

  10. Stability analysis and simulations of coupled bulk-surface reaction–diffusion systems

    PubMed Central

    Madzvamuse, Anotida; Chung, Andy H. W.; Venkataraman, Chandrasekhar

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we formulate new models for coupled systems of bulk-surface reaction–diffusion equations on stationary volumes. The bulk reaction–diffusion equations are coupled to the surface reaction–diffusion equations through linear Robin-type boundary conditions. We then state and prove the necessary conditions for diffusion-driven instability for the coupled system. Owing to the nature of the coupling between bulk and surface dynamics, we are able to decouple the stability analysis of the bulk and surface dynamics. Under a suitable choice of model parameter values, the bulk reaction–diffusion system can induce patterning on the surface independent of whether the surface reaction–diffusion system produces or not, patterning. On the other hand, the surface reaction–diffusion system cannot generate patterns everywhere in the bulk in the absence of patterning from the bulk reaction–diffusion system. For this case, patterns can be induced only in regions close to the surface membrane. Various numerical experiments are presented to support our theoretical findings. Our most revealing numerical result is that, Robin-type boundary conditions seem to introduce a boundary layer coupling the bulk and surface dynamics. PMID:25792948

  11. Effects of dual tasks and dual-task training on postural stability: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ghai, Shashank; Ghai, Ishan; Effenberg, Alfred O

    2017-01-01

    The use of dual-task training paradigm to enhance postural stability in patients with balance impairments is an emerging area of interest. The differential effects of dual tasks and dual-task training on postural stability still remain unclear. A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted to analyze the effects of dual task and training application on static and dynamic postural stability among various population groups. Systematic identification of published literature was performed adhering to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis (PRISMA) guidelines, from inception until June 2016, on the online databases Scopus, PEDro, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and SportDiscus. Experimental studies analyzing the effects of dual task and dual-task training on postural stability were extracted, critically appraised using PEDro scale, and then summarized according to modified PEDro level of evidence. Of 1,284 records, 42 studies involving 1,480 participants met the review’s inclusion criteria. Of the studies evaluating the effects of dual-task training on postural stability, 87.5% of the studies reported significant enhancements, whereas 30% of the studies evaluating acute effects of dual tasks on posture reported significant enhancements, 50% reported significant decrements, and 20% reported no effects. Meta-analysis of the pooled studies revealed moderate but significant enhancements of dual-task training in elderly participants (95% CI: 1.16–2.10) and in patients suffering from chronic stroke (−0.22 to 0.86). The adverse effects of complexity of dual tasks on postural stability were also revealed among patients with multiple sclerosis (−0.74 to 0.05). The review also discusses the significance of verbalization in a dual-task setting for increasing cognitive–motor interference. Clinical implications are discussed with respect to practical applications in rehabilitation settings. PMID:28356727

  12. Species richness and the temporal stability of biomass production: A new analysis of recent biodiversity experiments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, we investigate how species richness affects temporal stability of biomass production by analyzing 27 recent biodiversity experiments conducted in grassland and freshwater algal communities. We find that, in grasslands, increasing species richness stabilizes whole-community biomass pro...

  13. Stability evaluation and correction of a pulsed neutron generator prompt gamma activation analysis system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Source output stability is important for accurate measurement in prompt gamma neutron activation. This is especially true when measuring low-concentration elements such as in vivo nitrogen (~2.5% of body weight). We evaluated the stability of the compact DT neutron generator within an in vivo nitrog...

  14. Species richness and the temporal stability of biomass production: a new analysis of recent biodiversity experiments.

    PubMed

    Gross, Kevin; Cardinale, Bradley J; Fox, Jeremy W; Gonzalez, Andrew; Loreau, Michel; Polley, H Wayne; Reich, Peter B; van Ruijven, Jasper

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between biological diversity and ecological stability has fascinated ecologists for decades. Determining the generality of this relationship, and discovering the mechanisms that underlie it, are vitally important for ecosystem management. Here, we investigate how species richness affects the temporal stability of biomass production by reanalyzing 27 recent biodiversity experiments conducted with primary producers. We find that, in grasslands, increasing species richness stabilizes whole-community biomass but destabilizes the dynamics of constituent populations. Community biomass is stabilized because species richness impacts mean biomass more strongly than its variance. In algal communities, species richness has a minimal effect on community stability because richness affects the mean and variance of biomass nearly equally. Using a new measure of synchrony among species, we find that for both grasslands and algae, temporal correlations in species biomass are lower when species are grown together in polyculture than when grown alone in monoculture. These results suggest that interspecific interactions tend to stabilize community biomass in diverse communities. Contrary to prevailing theory, we found no evidence that species' responses to environmental variation in monoculture predicted the strength of diversity's stabilizing effect. Together, these results deepen our understanding of when and why increasing species richness stabilizes community biomass.

  15. Analysis of slope stability, Wilmington to Lindenkohl Canyons, US mid-Atlantic margin

    SciTech Connect

    Almagor, G.; Bennett, R.H.; Lambert, D.N.; Forde, E.B.; Shephard, L.E.

    1984-01-01

    The continental slope gradient in the study area averages 7 to 8/sup 0/. Many valleys, canyons, and occasionally large sediment slumped masses occur. Moderate to steep slopes (19 to 27/sup 0/) as well as very steep to precipitous slopes (> 27/sup 0/) are abundant and occupy about 7% of the investigated area. The surficial sediments are predominantly terrigenous silty clays of medium to high plasticity (I/sub p/ = 10 to 35% w/sub L/ = 30 to 70%), but contain varying quantities of sands. Angles of internal friction are anti phi/sub d/ = 27 to 32/sup 0/, anti phi/sub cu/ = 30 to 33/sup 0/, and phi/sub cu/ = 14 to 17/sup 0/. The sediments are normally to slightly overconsolidated, but some unconsolidated sediments also were identified. c/sub u//anti p/sub 0/ values range from 0.12 to 0.78. An analysis of force equilibrium within the sediments reveals that (a) the gentle slopes in the study area are mostly stable; (b) that the stability of some steep slopes (19 to 27/sup 0/) is marginal; and (c) that on precipitous slopes (> 27/sup 0/) only a thin veneer of sediments can exist. Observations of these slopes during steep dives support these results. The analysis shows that additional accumulation of sediments and small shocks caused by earthquakes or internal waves can cause the slopes to fail. Collapse resulting from liquefaction in the uppermost slope along the canyons and valley axes, where fine sands and silt accumulate, also is likely. 22 references, 9 figures, 2 tables.

  16. Analysis of feature stability for laser-based determination of tissue thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, Floris; Schweikard, Achim; Stüber, Patrick; Bruder, Ralf; Wagner, Benjamin; Wissel, Tobias

    2015-03-01

    Localisation of the cranium is necessary for accurate stereotactic radiotherapy of malign lesions in the brain. This is achieved by immobilizing the patient's head (typically by using thermoplastic masks, bite blocks or combinations thereof) and x-ray imaging to determine the actual position of the patient with respect to the treatment device. In previous work we have developed a novel method for marker-less and non-invasive tracking of the skull using a combination of laser-based surface triangulation and the analysis of backscattered feature patterns of a tightly collimated NIR laser beam scanned over the patient's forehead. An HDR camera is coupled into the beam path of the laser scanning system to acquire one image per projected laser point. We have demonstrated that this setup is capable of accurately determining the tissue thickness for each triangulation point and consequently allows detecting the surface of the cranial bone with sub-millimetre accuracy. Typical clinical settings (treatment times of 15-90 min) require feature stability over time, since the determination of tissue thickness is achieved by machine learning methods trained on initial feature scans. We have collected initial scans of the forehead as well as long-term backscatter data (20 images per seconds over 30 min) from five subjects and extracted the relevant tissue features from the image streams. Based on the knowledge of the relationship between the tissue feature values and the tissue thickness, the analysis of the long-term data showed that the noise level is low enough to allow robust discrimination of tissue thicknesses of 0.5 mm.

  17. Cold gas in cluster cores: global stability analysis and non-linear simulations of thermal instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Prakriti Pal; Sharma, Prateek

    2016-04-01

    We perform global linear stability analysis and idealized numerical simulations in global thermal balance to understand the condensation of cold gas from hot/virial atmospheres (coronae), in particular the intracluster medium (ICM). We pay particular attention to geometry (e.g. spherical versus plane-parallel) and the nature of the gravitational potential. Global linear analysis gives a similar value for the fastest growing thermal instability modes in spherical and Cartesian geometries. Simulations and observations suggest that cooling in haloes critically depends on the ratio of the cooling time to the free-fall time (tcool/tff). Extended cold gas condenses out of the ICM only if this ratio is smaller than a threshold value close to 10. Previous works highlighted the difference between the nature of cold gas condensation in spherical and plane-parallel atmospheres; namely, cold gas condensation appeared easier in spherical atmospheres. This apparent difference due to geometry arises because the previous plane-parallel simulations focused on in situ condensation of multiphase gas but spherical simulations studied condensation anywhere in the box. Unlike previous claims, our non-linear simulations show that there are only minor differences in cold gas condensation, either in situ or anywhere, for different geometries. The amount of cold gas depends on the shape of tcool/tff; gas has more time to condense if gravitational acceleration decreases towards the centre. In our idealized plane-parallel simulations with heating balancing cooling in each layer, there can be significant mass/energy/momentum transfer across layers that can trigger condensation and drive tcool/tff far beyond the critical value close to 10.

  18. Stability analysis of the Gravito-Electrostatic Sheath-based solar plasma equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, P. K.; Goutam, H. P.; Lal, M.; Dwivedi, C. B.

    2016-08-01

    We present approximate solutions of non-local linear perturbational analysis for discussing the stability properties of the Gravito-Electrostatic Sheath (GES)-based solar plasma equilibrium, which is indeed non-uniform on both the bounded and unbounded scales. The relevant physical variables undergoing perturbations are the self-solar gravity, electrostatic potential and plasma flow along with plasma population density. We methodologically derive linear dispersion relation for the GES fluctuations, and solve it numerically to identify and characterize the existent possible natural normal modes. Three distinct natural normal modes are identified and named as the GES-oscillator mode, GES-wave mode and usual (classical) p-mode. In the solar wind plasma, only the p-mode survives. These modes are found to be linearly unstable in wide-range of the Jeans-normalized wavenumber, k. The local plane-wave approximation marginally limits the validity or reliability of the obtained results in certain radial- and k-domains only. The phase and group velocities, time periods of these fluctuation modes are investigated. It is interesting to note that, the oscillation time periods of these modes are 3-10 min, which match exactly with those of the observed helio-seismic waves and solar surface oscillations. The proposed GES model provides a novel physical view of the waves and oscillations of the Sun from a new perspective of plasma-wall interaction physics. Due to simplified nature of the considered GES equilibrium, it is a neonatal stage to highlight its applicability in the real Sun. The proposed GES model and subsequent fluctuation analysis need further improvements to make it more realistic.

  19. Thermosolutal Marangoni effects on the inclined flow of a binary liquid with variable density. I. Linear stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascal, J. P.; D'Alessio, S. J. D.

    2016-12-01

    We consider the stability of a binary liquid film flowing down a heated incline. A theoretical model is implemented which captures the Soret effect and the dependence of surface tension on both temperature and solutal concentration. The model also allows for variation in the density of the liquid mixture with thermal and solutal differences. A linear stability analysis is performed with asymptotic and numerical results being obtained. The coupling of the effect of a variable density with the thermosolutal-Marangoni instability and the Soret effect is investigated. Good agreement with previous results for the constant density case is found.

  20. COSAL: A black-box compressible stability analysis code for transition prediction in three-dimensional boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, M. R.

    1982-01-01

    A fast computer code COSAL for transition prediction in three dimensional boundary layers using compressible stability analysis is described. The compressible stability eigenvalue problem is solved using a finite difference method, and the code is a black box in the sense that no guess of the eigenvalue is required from the user. Several optimization procedures were incorporated into COSAL to calculate integrated growth rates (N factor) for transition correlation for swept and tapered laminar flow control wings using the well known e to the Nth power method. A user's guide to the program is provided.