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Sample records for aeronautical operational control

  1. Air Breathing Propulsion Controls and Diagnostics Research at NASA Glenn Under NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    The Intelligent Control and Autonomy Branch (ICA) at NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio, is leading and participating in various projects in partnership with other organizations within GRC and across NASA, the U.S. aerospace industry, and academia to develop advanced controls and health management technologies that will help meet the goals of the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) Programs. These efforts are primarily under the various projects under the Advanced Air Vehicles Program (AAVP), Airspace Operations and Safety Program (AOSP) and Transformative Aeronautics Concepts Program (TAC). The ICA Branch is focused on advancing the state-of-the-art of aero-engine control and diagnostics technologies to help improve aviation safety, increase efficiency, and enable operation with reduced emissions. This paper describes the various ICA research efforts under the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Programs with a summary of motivation, background, technical approach, and recent accomplishments for each of the research tasks.

  2. Aeronautical mobile satellite service: Air traffic control applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sim, Dave

    1990-01-01

    Canada's history both in aviation and in satellite communications development spans several decades. The introduction of aeronautical mobile satellite communications will serve our requirements for airspace management in areas not served by line-of-sight radio and radar facilities. The ensuing improvements in air safety and operating efficiency are eagerly awaited by the aviation community.

  3. Air Breathing Propulsion Controls and Diagnostics Research at NASA Glenn Under NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    The Intelligent Control and Autonomy Branch (ICA) at NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio, is leading and participating in various projects in partnership with other organizations within GRC and across NASA, the U.S. aerospace industry, and academia to develop advanced controls and health management technologies that will help meet the goals of the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) Programs. These efforts are primarily under the various projects under the Fundamental Aeronautics Program (FAP) and the Aviation Safety Program (ASP). The ICA Branch is focused on advancing the state-of-the-art of aero-engine control and diagnostics technologies to help improve aviation safety, increase efficiency, and enable operation with reduced emissions. This paper describes the various ICA research efforts under the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Programs with a summary of motivation, background, technical approach, and recent accomplishments for each of the research tasks.

  4. 47 CFR 76.616 - Operation near certain aeronautical and marine emergency radio frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Operation near certain aeronautical and marine emergency radio frequencies. 76.616 Section 76.616 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION....616 Operation near certain aeronautical and marine emergency radio frequencies. (a) The...

  5. Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) mission control Gold room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Mission control Gold room is seen here, located at the Dryden Flight Research Center of the Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR). All aspects of a research mission are monitored from one of two of these control rooms at Dryden. The WATR consists of a highly automated complex of computer controlled tracking, telemetry, and communications systems and control room complexes that are capable of supporting any type of mission ranging from system and component testing, to sub-scale and full-scale flight tests of new aircraft and reentry systems. Designated areas are assigned for spin/dive tests, corridors are provided for low, medium, and high-altitude supersonic flight, and special STOL/VSTOL facilities are available at Ames Moffett and Crows Landing. Special use airspace, available at Edwards, covers approximately twelve thousand square miles of mostly desert area. The southern boundary lies to the south of Rogers Dry Lake, the western boundary lies midway between Mojave and Bakersfield, the northern boundary passes just south of Bishop, and the eastern boundary follows about 25 miles west of the Nevada border except in the northern areas where it crosses into Nevada.

  6. Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) mission control Blue room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Mission control Blue Room, seen here, in building 4800 at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, is part of the Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR). All aspects of a research mission are monitored from one of two of these control rooms at Dryden. The WATR consists of a highly automated complex of computer controlled tracking, telemetry, and communications systems and control room complexes that are capable of supporting any type of mission ranging from system and component testing, to sub-scale and full-scale flight tests of new aircraft and reentry systems. Designated areas are assigned for spin/dive tests, corridors are provided for low, medium, and high-altitude supersonic flight, and special STOL/VSTOL facilities are available at Ames Moffett and Crows Landing. Special use airspace, available at Edwards, covers approximately twelve thousand square miles of mostly desert area. The southern boundary lies to the south of Rogers Dry Lake, the western boundary lies midway between Mojave and Bakersfield, the northern boundary passes just south of Bishop, and the eastern boundary follows about 25 miles west of the Nevada border except in the northern areas where it crosses into Nevada.

  7. Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) mission control room monitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This photo shows monitors in a Dryden Flight Research Center mission control room of the Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR). All aspects of a research mission are monitored from one of two of these control rooms at Dryden. The WATR consists of a highly automated complex of computer controlled tracking, telemetry, and communications systems and control room complexes that are capable of supporting any type of mission ranging from system and component testing, to sub-scale and full-scale flight tests of new aircraft and reentry systems. Designated areas are assigned for spin/dive tests, corridors are provided for low, medium, and high-altitude supersonic flight, and special STOL/VSTOL facilities are available at Ames Moffett and Crows Landing. Special use airspace, available at Edwards, covers approximately twelve thousand square miles of mostly desert area. The southern boundary lies to the south of Rogers Dry Lake, the western boundary lies midway between Mojave and Bakersfield, the northern boundary passes just south of Bishop, and the eastern boundary follows about 25 miles west of the Nevada border except in the northern areas where it crosses into Nevada.

  8. 47 CFR 76.616 - Operation near certain aeronautical and marine emergency radio frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... emergency radio frequencies. 76.616 Section 76.616 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Technical Standards § 76.616 Operation near certain aeronautical and marine emergency radio frequencies. (a) The...

  9. 47 CFR 76.616 - Operation near certain aeronautical and marine emergency radio frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... emergency radio frequencies. 76.616 Section 76.616 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Technical Standards § 76.616 Operation near certain aeronautical and marine emergency radio frequencies. (a) The...

  10. 47 CFR 76.616 - Operation near certain aeronautical and marine emergency radio frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... emergency radio frequencies. 76.616 Section 76.616 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Technical Standards § 76.616 Operation near certain aeronautical and marine emergency radio frequencies. (a) The...

  11. 47 CFR 76.616 - Operation near certain aeronautical and marine emergency radio frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... emergency radio frequencies. 76.616 Section 76.616 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Technical Standards § 76.616 Operation near certain aeronautical and marine emergency radio frequencies. (a) The...

  12. 14 CFR 121.535 - Responsibility for operational control: Flag operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...: Flag operations. 121.535 Section 121.535 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Operations § 121.535 Responsibility for operational control: Flag operations. (a) Each certificate...

  13. 14 CFR 121.535 - Responsibility for operational control: Flag operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...: Flag operations. 121.535 Section 121.535 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Operations § 121.535 Responsibility for operational control: Flag operations. (a) Each certificate...

  14. 14 CFR 121.535 - Responsibility for operational control: Flag operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...: Flag operations. 121.535 Section 121.535 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Operations § 121.535 Responsibility for operational control: Flag operations. (a) Each certificate...

  15. 14 CFR 121.535 - Responsibility for operational control: Flag operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...: Flag operations. 121.535 Section 121.535 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Operations § 121.535 Responsibility for operational control: Flag operations. (a) Each certificate...

  16. 14 CFR 121.535 - Responsibility for operational control: Flag operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...: Flag operations. 121.535 Section 121.535 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Operations § 121.535 Responsibility for operational control: Flag operations. (a) Each certificate...

  17. Air Breathing Propulsion Controls and Diagnostics Research at NASA Glenn Under NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    This lecture will provide an overview of the aircraft turbine engine control research at NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Glenn Research Center (GRC). A brief introduction to the engine control problem is first provided with a description of the current state-of-the-art control law structure. A historical aspect of engine control development since the 1940s is then provided with a special emphasis on the contributions of GRC. The traditional engine control problem has been to provide a means to safely transition the engine from one steady-state operating point to another based on the pilot throttle inputs. With the increased emphasis on aircraft safety, enhanced performance and affordability, and the need to reduce the environmental impact of aircraft, there are many new challenges being faced by the designers of aircraft propulsion systems. The Controls and Dynamics Branch (CDB) at GRC is leading and participating in various projects in partnership with other organizations within GRC and across NASA, other government agencies, the U.S. aerospace industry, and academia to develop advanced propulsion controls and diagnostics technologies that will help meet the challenging goals of NASA programs under the Aeronautics Research Mission. The second part of the lecture provides an overview of the various CDB technology development activities in aircraft engine control and diagnostics, both current and some accomplished in the recent past. The motivation for each of the research efforts, the research approach, technical challenges and the key progress to date are summarized. The technologies to be discussed include system level engine control concepts, gas path diagnostics, active component control, and distributed engine control architecture. The lecture will end with a futuristic perspective of how the various current technology developments will lead to an Intelligent and Autonomous Propulsion System requiring none to very minimum pilot interface

  18. Role of optical computers in aeronautical control applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumbick, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The role that optical computers play in aircraft control is determined. The optical computer has the potential high speed capability required, especially for matrix/matrix operations. The optical computer also has the potential for handling nonlinear simulations in real time. They are also more compatible with fiber optic signal transmission. Optics also permit the use of passive sensors to measure process variables. No electrical energy need be supplied to the sensor. Complex interfacing between optical sensors and the optical computer is avoided if the optical sensor outputs can be directly processed by the optical computer.

  19. F-15 Intelligent Flight Control System and Aeronautics Research at NASA Dryden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Nelson A.

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the F-15 Intelligent Flight Control System and Aeronautics including Autonomous Aerial Refueling Demonstrations, X-48B Blended Wing Body, F-15 Quiet Spike, and NF-15 Intelligent Flight Controls.

  20. Intelligent Flight Control System and Aeronautics Research at NASA Dryden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Nelson A.

    2009-01-01

    This video presentation reviews the F-15 Intelligent Flight Control System and contains clips of flight tests and aircraft performance in the areas of target tracking, takeoff and differential stabilators. Video of the APG milestone flight 1g formation is included.

  1. 14 CFR 91.1011 - Operational control responsibilities and delegation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Operational control responsibilities and delegation. 91.1011 Section 91.1011 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Fractional Ownership Operations...

  2. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Nondestructive Evaluation Program for Safe and Reliable Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, Ed

    2005-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Program is presented. As a result of the loss of seven astronauts and the Space Shuttle Columbia on February 1, 2003, NASA has undergone many changes in its organization. NDE is one of the key areas that are recognized by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB) that needed to be strengthened by warranting NDE as a discipline with Independent Technical Authority (iTA). The current NASA NDE system and activities are presented including the latest developments in inspection technologies being applied to the Space Transportation System (STS). The unfolding trends and directions in NDE for the future are discussed as they apply to assuring safe and reliable operations.

  3. Propulsion Controls and Diagnostics Research in Support of NASA Aeronautics and Exploration Mission Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Sanjay

    2011-01-01

    The Controls and Dynamics Branch (CDB) at National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio, is leading and participating in various projects in partnership with other organizations within GRC and across NASA, the U.S. aerospace industry, and academia to develop advanced propulsion controls and diagnostics technologies that will help meet the challenging goals of NASA programs under the Aeronautics Research and Exploration Systems Missions. This paper provides a brief overview of the various CDB tasks in support of the NASA programs. The programmatic structure of the CDB activities is described along with a brief overview of each of the CDB tasks including research objectives, technical challenges, and recent accomplishments. These tasks include active control of propulsion system components, intelligent propulsion diagnostics and control for reliable fault identification and accommodation, distributed engine control, and investigations into unsteady propulsion systems.

  4. Western Aeronautical Test Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakahara, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) is a network of facilities used to support aeronautical research, science missions, exploration system concepts, and space operations. The WATR resides at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center located at Edwards Air Force Base, California. The WATR is a part of NASA's Corporate Management of Aeronautical Facilities and funded by the Strategic Capability Asset Program (SCAP). It is managed by the Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) of the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) to provide the right facility at the right time. NASA is a tenant on Edwards Air Force Base and has an agreement with the Air Force Flight Test Center to use the land and airspace controlled by the Department of Defense (DoD). The topics include: 1) The WATR supports a variety of vehicles; 2) Dryden shares airspace with the AFFTC; 3) Restricted airspace, corridors, and special use areas are available for experimental aircraft; 4) WATR Products and Services; 5) WATR Support Configuration; 6) Telemetry Tracking; 7) Time Space Positioning; 8) Video; 9) Voice Communication; 10) Mobile Operations Facilities; 11) Data Processing; 12) Mission Control Center; 13) Real-Time Data Analysis; and 14) Range Safety.

  5. The Education of Future Aeronautical Engineers: Conceiving, Designing, Implementing and Operating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawley, Edward F.; Brodeur, Doris R.; Soderholm, Diane H.

    2008-04-01

    This paper will outline answers to the two central questions regarding improving engineering education: (1) What is the full set of knowledge, skills, and attitudes that engineering students should possess as they leave the university, and at what level of proficiency? (2) How can we do better at ensuring that students learn these skills? The suggested answers lie within an innovative educational framework, the CDIO (conceive-design-implement-operate) Initiative. This initiative will be described along with the needs it meets, its goals, context, vision and pedagogical foundation. The first question is answered by the CDIO Syllabus and the process for reaching stakeholder consensus on the level of proficiency that students should attain in a given program. The second question is addressed through a best practice framework, which discusses curriculum design, design-implement experiences, teaching and learning, student assessment, program evaluation and faculty competence. Examples are provided of the implementation of best practices within the CDIO program in Aeronautics and Astronautics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

  6. 14 CFR 91.1013 - Operational control briefing and acknowledgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Operational control briefing and... Ownership Operations Operational Control § 91.1013 Operational control briefing and acknowledgment. (a) Upon... control responsibilities, and the owner must review and sign an acknowledgment of these...

  7. 14 CFR 91.1013 - Operational control briefing and acknowledgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Operational control briefing and... Ownership Operations Operational Control § 91.1013 Operational control briefing and acknowledgment. (a) Upon... management services contract, the program manager must brief the fractional owner on the owner's...

  8. The impact of active controls technology on the structural integrity of aeronautical vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, Thomas E.; Austin, Edward; Donley, Shawn; Graham, George; Harris, Terry; Kaynes, Ian; Lee, Ben; Sparrow, James

    1993-01-01

    The findings of an investigation conducted under the auspices of The Technical Cooperation Program (TTCP) to assess the impact of active controls technology on the structural integrity of aeronautical vehicles and to evaluate the present state-of-the-art for predicting loads caused by a flight-control system modification and the resulting change in the fatigue life of the flight vehicle are summarized. Important points concerning structural technology considerations implicit in applying active controls technology in new aircraft are summarized. These points are well founded and based upon information received from within the aerospace industry and government laboratories, acquired by sponsoring workshops which brought together experts from contributing and interacting technical disciplines, and obtained by conducting a case study to independently assess the state of the technology. The paper concludes that communication between technical disciplines is absolutely essential in the design of future high performance aircraft.

  9. Western Aeronautical Test Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakahara, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the work of the Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR). NASA's Western Aeronautical Test Range is a network of facilities used to support aeronautical research, science missions, exploration system concepts, and space operations. The WATR resides at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center located at Edwards Air Force Base, California. The WATR is a part of NASA's Corporate Management of Aeronautical Facilities and funded by the Strategic Capability Asset Program (SCAP). Maps show the general location of the WATR area that is used for aeronautical testing and evaluation. The products, services and facilities of WATR are discussed,

  10. An Open Specification for Space Project Mission Operations Control Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooke, A.; Heuser, W. R.

    1995-01-01

    An 'open specification' for Space Project Mission Operations Control Architectures is under development in the Spacecraft Control Working Group of the American Institute for Aeronautics and Astro- nautics. This architecture identifies 5 basic elements incorporated in the design of similar operations systems: Data, System Management, Control Interface, Decision Support Engine, & Space Messaging Service.

  11. NASA thesaurus aeronautics vocabulary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The controlled vocabulary used by the NASA Scientific and Technical Information effort to index documents in the area of aeronautics is presented. The terms comprise a subset of the 1988 edition of the NASA Thesaurus and its supplements issued through the end of 1990. The Aeronautics Vocabulary contains over 4700 terms presented in a hierarchical display format. In addition to aeronautics per se, the vocabulary covers supporting terminology from areas such as fluid dynamics, propulsion engineering, and test facilities and instrumentation.

  12. Collaborative research on V/STOL control system/cockpit display tradeoffs under the NASA/MOD joint aeronautical program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, J. A.; Nicholas, O. P.

    1992-01-01

    Summarized here are activities that have taken place from 1979 to the present in a collaborative program between NASA Ames Research Center and the Royal Aerospace Establishment (now Defence Research Agency), Bedford on flight control system and cockpit display tradeoffs for low-speed and hover operations of future V/STOL aircraft. This program was created as Task 8A of the Joint Aeronautical Program between NASA in the United States and the Ministry of Defence (Procurement Executive) in the United Kingdom. The program was initiated based on a recognition by both parties of the strengths of the efforts of their counterparts and a desire to participate jointly in future simulation and flight experiments. In the ensuing years, teams of NASA and RAE engineers and pilots have participated in each other's simulation experiments to evaluate control and display concepts and define design requirements for research aircraft. Both organizations possess Harrier airframes that have undergone extensive modification to provide in-flight research capabilities in the subject areas. Both NASA and RAE have profited by exchanges of control/display concepts, design criteria, fabrication techniques, software development and validation, installation details, and ground and flight clearance techniques for their respective aircraft. This collaboration has permitted the two organizations to achieve jointly substantially more during the period than if they had worked independently. The two organizations are now entering the phase of flight research for the collaborative program as currently defined.

  13. 14 CFR 29.695 - Power boost and power-operated control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Power boost and power-operated control system. 29.695 Section 29.695 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Systems § 29.695 Power boost and power-operated control system. (a) If a power boost or...

  14. 14 CFR 27.695 - Power boost and power-operated control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Power boost and power-operated control system. 27.695 Section 27.695 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Systems § 27.695 Power boost and power-operated control system. (a) If a power boost or...

  15. NASA Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology Summer Workshop. Volume 3: Navigation, guidance and control panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    User technology requirements are identified in relation to needed technology advancement for future space missions in the areas of navigation, guidance, and control. Emphasis is placed on: reduction of mission support cost by 50% through autonomous operation, a ten-fold increase in mission output through improved pointing and control, and a hundred-fold increase in human productivity in space through large-scale teleoperator applications.

  16. The historical development and basis of human factors guidelines for automated systems in aeronautical operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciciora, J. A.; Leonard, S. D.; Johnson, N.; Amell, J.

    1984-01-01

    In order to derive general design guidelines for automated systems a study was conducted on the utilization and acceptance of existing automated systems as currently employed in several commercial fields. Four principal study area were investigated by means of structured interviews, and in some cases questionnaires. The study areas were aviation, a both scheduled airline and general commercial aviation; process control and factory applications; office automation; and automation in the power industry. The results of over eighty structured interviews were analyzed and responses categoried as various human factors issues for use by both designers and users of automated equipment. These guidelines address such items as general physical features of automated equipment; personnel orientation, acceptance, and training; and both personnel and system reliability.

  17. NASA aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderton, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    Aeronautical research programs are discussed in relation to research methods and the status of the programs. The energy efficient aircraft, STOL aircraft and general aviation aircraft are considered. Aerodynamic concepts, rotary wing aircraft, aircraft safety, noise reduction, and aircraft configurations are among the topics included.

  18. Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) Mission Control Gold Room During X-29 Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The mission control Gold room is seen here during a research flight of the X-29 at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. All aspects of a research mission are monitored from one of two of these control rooms at Dryden. Dryden and its control rooms are part of the Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR). The WATR consists of a highly automated complex of computer controlled tracking, telemetry, and communications systems and control room complexes that are capable of supporting any type of mission ranging from system and component testing, to sub-scale and full-scale flight tests of new aircraft and reentry systems. Designated areas are assigned for spin/dive tests; corridors are provided for low, medium, and high-altitude supersonic flight; and special STOL/VSTOL facilities are available at Ames Moffett and Crows Landing. Special use airspace, available at Edwards, covers approximately twelve thousand square miles of mostly desert area. The southern boundary lies to the south of Rogers Dry Lake, the western boundary lies midway between Mojave and Bakersfield, the northern boundary passes just south of Bishop, and the eastern boundary follows about 25 miles west of the Nevada border except in the northern areas where it crosses into Nevada. Two X-29 aircraft, featuring one of the most unusual designs in aviation history, flew at the Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California) from 1984 to 1992. The fighter-sized X-29 technology demonstrators explored several concepts and technologies including: the use of advanced composites in aircraft construction; variable-camber wing surfaces; a unique forward- swept wing and its thin supercritical airfoil; strakes; close-coupled canards; and a computerized fly-by-wire flight control system used to maintain control of the otherwise unstable aircraft. Research results showed that the configuration of forward-swept wings, coupled with movable canards, gave

  19. Disease control operations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friend, Milton; Franson, J. Christian

    1987-01-01

    Individual disease outbreaks have killed many thousands of animals on numerous occasions. Tens of thousands of migratory birds have died in single die-offs with as many as 1,000 birds succumbing in 1 day. In mammals, individual disease outbreaks have killed hundreds to thousands of animals with, for example, hemorrhagic disease in white-tailed deer, distemper in raccoon, Errington's disease in muskrat, and sylvatic plague in wild rodents. The ability to successfully combat such explosive situations is highly dependent n the readiness of field personnel to deal with them. Because many disease agents can spread though wildlife populations very fast, advance preparation is essential in preventing infected animals from spreading disease to additional species and locations. Carefully though-out disease contingency plans should be developed as practical working documents for field personnel and updated as necessary. Such well-designed plans can prove invaluable in minimizing wildlife losses and costs associated with disease control activities. Although requirements for disease control operations vary and must be tailored to each situation, all disease contingency planning involved general concepts and basic biological information. This chapter, intended as a practical guide, identifies the major activities and needs of disease control operations, and relates them to disease contingency planning.

  20. Aeronautics in the American Society

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    The trends in aeronautics and aeronautical education are discussed with respect to the roles of industry, government, and the universities. The importance of the aviation industry to the economy of the country is examined. The impact of reduced enrollment of aeronautical engineering students in the universities on the future of the aeronautical industry is stressed. It is stated that the role of the government should be to sponsor and conduct basic research and advanced technology programs for civil and military aviation, and the specification, development, procurement, and operation of military aircraft. Recommendations are made for approaches which may be taken to influence more qualified students to enter the field of aeronautics.

  1. Statistical porcess control in Deep Space Network operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodder, J. A.

    2002-01-01

    This report describes how the Deep Space Mission System (DSMS) Operations Program Office at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (EL) uses Statistical Process Control (SPC) to monitor performance and evaluate initiatives for improving processes on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Deep Space Network (DSN).

  2. [Exploring Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Brandi

    2004-01-01

    This summer I have been working with the N.A.S.A. Project at Cuyahoga Community College (Tri-C) under the title of Exploring Aeronautics Project Leader. The class that I have worked with is comprised of students that will enter the eighth grade in the fall of 2004. The program primarily focuses upon math proficiency and individualized class projects. My duties have encompassed both realms. During the first 2-3 weeks of my internship, I worked at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) researching, organizing, and compiling information for weekly Scholastic Challenges and the Super Scholastic Challenge. I was able to complete an overview of Scholastic Challenge and staff responsibilities regarding the competition; a proposal for an interactive learning system, Quizdom; a schedule for challenge equipment, as well as a schedule listing submission deadlines for the staff. Also included in my tasks, during these first 2-3 weeks, were assisting Tammy Allen and Candice Thomas with the student application review and interview processes for student applicants. For the student and parent orientation, I was assigned publications and other varying tasks to complete before the start of the program. Upon the commencement of the program, I changed location from NASA GRC to Tri-C Metro Campus, where student classes for the Cleveland site are held. During the duration of the program, I work with the instructor for the Exploring Aeronautics class, kkkk, assisting in classroom management, daily attendance, curriculum, project building, and other tasks as needed. These tasks include the conducting of the weekly competition, known as Scholastic Challenge. As a Project Leader, I am also responsible for one subject area of the Scholastic Challenge aspect of the N.A.S.A. Project curriculum. Each week I have to prepare a mission that the participants will take home the following Monday and at least 10 questions that will be included in the pool of questions used for the Scholastic Challenge

  3. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) Integrated Roadmap Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, Jordan; Peterson, Laurie; Carrasquillo, Robyn; Bagdigian, Robert

    2011-01-01

    At present, NASA has considered a number of future human space exploration mission concepts . Yet, detailed mission requirements and vehicle architectures remain mostly undefined, making technology investment strategies difficult to develop and sustain without a top-level roadmap to serve as a guide. This paper documents a roadmap for development of Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) capabilities required to enhance the long-term operation of the International Space Station (ISS) as well as enable beyond-Low Earth Orbit (LEO) human exploration missions. Three generic mission types were defined to serve as a basis for developing a prioritized list of needed capabilities and technologies. Those are 1) a short duration micro gravity mission; 2) a long duration transit microgravity mission; and 3) a long duration surface exploration mission. To organize the effort, ECLSS was categorized into three major functional groups (atmosphere, water, and solid waste management) with each broken down into sub-functions. The ability of existing state-of-the-art (SOA) technologies to meet the functional needs of each of the three mission types was then assessed by NASA subject matter experts. When SOA capabilities were deemed to fall short of meeting the needs of one or more mission types, those gaps were prioritized in terms of whether or not the corresponding capabilities enable or enhance each of the mission types. The result was a list of enabling and enhancing capabilities needs that can be used to guide future ECLSS development, as well as a list of existing hardware that is ready to go for exploration-class missions. A strategy to fulfill those needs over time was then developed in the form of a roadmap. Through execution of this roadmap, the hardware and technologies intended to meet exploration needs will, in many cases, directly benefit the ISS operational capability, benefit the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV), and guide long-term technology

  4. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) Integrated Roadmap Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, Jordan; Peterson, Laurie; Carrasquillo, Robyn; Bagdigian, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Although NASA is currently considering a number of future human space exploration mission concepts, detailed mission requirements and vehicle architectures remain mostly undefined, making technology investment strategies difficult to develop and sustain without a top-level roadmap to serve as a guide. This paper documents the process and results of an effort to define a roadmap for Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) capabilities required to enhance the long-term operation of the International Space Station (ISS) as well as enable beyond-Low Earth Orbit (LEO) human exploration missions. Three generic mission types were defined to serve as a basis for developing a prioritized list of needed capabilities and technologies. Those are 1) a short duration micro-gravity mission; 2) a long duration microgravity mission; and 3) a long duration partial gravity (surface) exploration mission. To organize the effort, a functional decomposition of ECLSS was completed starting with the three primary functions: atmosphere, water, and solid waste management. Each was further decomposed into sub-functions to the point that current state-of-the-art (SOA) technologies could be tied to the sub-function. Each technology was then assessed by NASA subject matter experts as to its ability to meet the functional needs of each of the three mission types. When SOA capabilities were deemed to fall short of meeting the needs of one or more mission types, those gaps were prioritized in terms of whether or not the corresponding capabilities enable or enhance each of the mission types. The result was a list of enabling and enhancing capability needs that can be used to guide future ECLSS development, as well as a list of existing hardware that is ready to go for exploration-class missions. A strategy to fulfill those needs over time was then developed in the form of a roadmap. Through execution of this roadmap, the hardware and technologies intended to meet exploration needs

  5. NASA Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology Summer Workshop. Volume 8: Thermal control panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Technology deficiencies in the area of thermal control for future space missions are identified with emphasis on large space structures and cold controlled environments. Thermal control surfaces, heat pipes, and contamination are considered along with cryogenics, insulation, and design techniques. Major directions forecast for thermal control technology development and space experiments are: (1) extend the useful lifetime of cryogenic systems for space, (2) reduce temperature gradients, and (3) improve temperature stability.

  6. Tropospheric Wind Monitoring During Day-of-Launch Operations for National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Space Shuttle Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Ryan K.; Leach, Richard

    2004-01-01

    The Environments Group at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Marshall Space Flight Center (NASA/MSFC) monitors the winds aloft at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) during the countdown for all Space Shuttle launches. Assessment of tropospheric winds is used to support the ascent phase of launch. Three systems at KSC are used to generate independent tropospheric wind profiles prior to launch; 1) high resolution Jimsphere balloon system, 2) 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP) and 3) low resolution radiosonde system. Data generated by the systems are used to assess spatial and temporal wind variability during launch countdown to ensure wind change observed does not violate wind change criteria constraints.

  7. Aeronautical Engineering: A continuing bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    This bibliography lists 347 reports, articles and other documents introduced into the scientific and technical information system. Documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated compounds, equipment, and systems are included. Research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles are also included.

  8. State of the art survey of technologies applicable to NASA's aeronautics, avionics and controls program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyth, R. K. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    The state of the art survey (SOAS) covers six technology areas including flightpath management, aircraft control system, crew station technology, interface & integration technology, military technology, and fundamental technology. The SOAS included contributions from over 70 individuals in industry, government, and the universities.

  9. Numerical Studies on an Active Flow Circulation Controlled Flap Concept for Aeronautical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharos, Athanasios; Kontis, Konstantinos

    Four different circulation controlled airfoils have been numerically simulated. The baseline airfoil was a 17% thick supercritical airfoil. Different blowing rates have been examined by adjusting the slot height and blowing velocity. A number of turbulence models were employed, these were: Spalart-Allmaras, standard κ ɛ, realizable κ ɛ, SST κ ω and Reynolds stress model. The results from the numerical simulations were compared with experimental data at zero angle of attack. The solutions indicated that at momentum coefficients, Cμ=0.1 or greater, all isotropic turbulence models failed to capture the physics of the circulation control problem. The Reynolds stress model captured successfully the physics at Cμ=0.1. At greater values of momentum coefficient, the Reynolds stress model also failed to predict the experimentally measured lift coefficients because the jet remained attached to the surface of the airfoil. The Spalart-Allmaras model consistently predicted the right trend for lift variation with Cμ in all cases tested.

  10. Multifunctional system for active noise control and damage detection on a typical aeronautical structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecce, Leonardo; Viscardi, Massimo; Zumpano, Giuseppe

    2001-08-01

    The present work relates to the assessment and testing of a multifunctional intelligent system, based upon the use of piezoelectric devices, devoted both to the active noise and vibration control and to damage detection f the structure. In the control application, the piezoelectric devices (in form of patches) play the role of actuators; their induced secondary vibration field has the target to reduce the primary one through a specific control algorithm and system. In the health monitoring application, the piezo devices play both the roles of actuators and sensors. In fact the developed technique is primarily based upon the evaluation and comparison of the structure Frequency Response Functions (FRF) that intrinsically contains all the information regarding the structural properties whose change may be correlated with incipient damages. The aforementioned application were investigated and experimentally assessed with good results with reference to a typical partial fuselage structure (three frames, eight stringers and the skin panels: 1.2 m x 1.7 m). On the noise control application side, a height sensors/height actuators control architecture was then assessed and experimentally tested whose results may be synthesized in a 30 dB vibration level reduction at sensors locations and more than 20 dB of reduction of the associated noise field. In the optic of a multifunctional intelligent system, the aforementioned set of piezo's was decided to be used also for health monitoring application. As a preliminary activity, an extensive monitoring was performed on the integer structure to verify the sensibility of the system and the stability of the defined Damage Index (DI) in respect to environmental factor not related to structural real modification. To verify the sensibility of the technique to reveal and locate a typical shear clip damage, a set of rivets were successively cut in the area surrounding the frame shear clip, and relative FRF's were acquired and relative DI

  11. 14 CFR 27.695 - Power boost and power-operated control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Power boost and power-operated control... Systems § 27.695 Power boost and power-operated control system. (a) If a power boost or power-operated... flight and landing in the event of— (1) Any single failure in the power portion of the system; or (2)...

  12. 14 CFR 27.695 - Power boost and power-operated control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Power boost and power-operated control... Systems § 27.695 Power boost and power-operated control system. (a) If a power boost or power-operated... flight and landing in the event of— (1) Any single failure in the power portion of the system; or (2)...

  13. 14 CFR 27.695 - Power boost and power-operated control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Power boost and power-operated control... Systems § 27.695 Power boost and power-operated control system. (a) If a power boost or power-operated... flight and landing in the event of— (1) Any single failure in the power portion of the system; or (2)...

  14. 14 CFR 29.695 - Power boost and power-operated control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Power boost and power-operated control... Systems § 29.695 Power boost and power-operated control system. (a) If a power boost or power-operated... flight and landing in the event of— (1) Any single failure in the power portion of the system; or (2)...

  15. 14 CFR 29.695 - Power boost and power-operated control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Power boost and power-operated control... Systems § 29.695 Power boost and power-operated control system. (a) If a power boost or power-operated... flight and landing in the event of— (1) Any single failure in the power portion of the system; or (2)...

  16. 14 CFR 29.695 - Power boost and power-operated control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Power boost and power-operated control... Systems § 29.695 Power boost and power-operated control system. (a) If a power boost or power-operated... flight and landing in the event of— (1) Any single failure in the power portion of the system; or (2)...

  17. Analysis of atmospheric flow over a surface protrusion using the turbulence kinetic energy equation with reference to aeronautical operating systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.; Harper, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    Flow over surface obstructions can produce significantly large wind shears such that adverse flying conditions can occur for aeronautical systems (helicopters, STOL vehicles, etc.). Atmospheric flow fields resulting from a semi-elliptical surface obstruction in an otherwise horizontally homogeneous statistically stationary flow are modelled with the boundary-layer/Boussinesq-approximation of the governing equation of fluid mechanics. The turbulence kinetic energy equation is used to determine the dissipative effects of turbulent shear on the mean flow. Iso-lines of turbulence kinetic energy and turbulence intensity are plotted in the plane of the flow and highlight regions of high turbulence intensity in the stagnation zone and sharp gradients in intensity along the transition from adverse to favourable pressure gradient. Discussion of the effects of the disturbed wind field in CTOL and STOL aircraft flight path and obstruction clearance standards is given. The results indicate that closer inspection of these presently recommended standards as influenced by wind over irregular terrains is required.

  18. Autonomic and Apoptotic, Aeronautical and Aerospace Systems, and Controlling Scientific Data Generated Therefrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterritt, Roy (Inventor); Hinchey, Michael G. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A self-managing system that uses autonomy and autonomicity is provided with the self-* property of autopoiesis (self-creation). In the event of an agent in the system self-destructing, autopoiesis auto-generates a replacement. A self-esteem reward scheme is also provided and can be used for autonomic agents, based on their performance and trust. Art agent with greater self-esteem may clone at a greater rate compared to the rate of an agent with lower self-esteem. A self-managing system is provided for a high volume of distributed autonomic/self-managing mobile agents, and autonomic adhesion is used to attract similar agents together or to repel dissimilar agents from an event horizon. An apoptotic system is also provided that accords an "expiry date" to data and digital objects, for example, that are available on the internet, which finds usefulness not only in general but also for controlling the loaning and use of space scientific data.

  19. ACTS broadband aeronautical experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbe, Brian S.; Jedrey, Thomas C.; Estabrook, Polly; Agan, Martin J.

    1993-01-01

    In the last decade, the demand for reliable data, voice, and video satellite communication links between aircraft and ground to improve air traffic control, airline management, and to meet the growing demand for passenger communications has increased significantly. It is expected that in the near future, the spectrum required for aeronautical communication services will grow significantly beyond that currently available at L-band. In anticipation of this, JPL is developing an experimental broadband aeronautical satellite communications system that will utilize NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) as a satellite of opportunity and the technology developed under JPL's ACTS Mobile Terminal (AMT) Task to evaluate the feasibility of using K/Ka-band for these applications. The application of K/Ka-band for aeronautical satellite communications at cruise altitudes is particularly promising for several reasons: (1) the minimal amount of signal attenuation due to rain; (2) the reduced drag due to the smaller K/Ka-band antennas (as compared to the current L-band systems); and (3) the large amount of available bandwidth. The increased bandwidth available at these frequencies is expected to lead to significantly improved passenger communications - including full-duplex compressed video and multiple channel voice. A description of the proposed broadband experimental system will be presented including: (1) applications of K/Ka-band aeronautical satellite technology to U.S. industry; (2) the experiment objectives; (3) the experiment set-up; (4) experimental equipment description; and (5) industrial participation in the experiment and the benefits.

  20. NASA/University Conference on Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The proceedings of a conference on the future of aeronautics are presented. The subjects discussed include the following: (1) aeronautics and the education of the engineer, (2) technical trends in aeronautics, and (3) the role of the university in aeronautics. The technical trends in aeronautics are concerned with aircraft noise control, the effect of the aircraft on the environment, airborne electronics for automated flight, and trends in aircraft design.

  1. School Store Operation and Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barger, Bill J.

    Written to assist the teacher-sponsor responsible for operating a school store, this book offers a system developed specifically for the operation and control of such a store. It also shows ways in which a school store can be used for training students. Chapter 1 discusses a successful school store operated by students and a store record system…

  2. Superadiabatic control of quantum operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandermause, Jonathan; Ramanathan, Chandrasekhar

    2016-05-01

    Adiabatic pulses are used extensively to enable robust control of quantum operations. We introduce an approach to adiabatic control that uses the superadiabatic quality factor as a performance metric to design robust, high-fidelity pulses. This approach permits the systematic design of quantum control schemes to maximize the adiabaticity of a unitary operation in a particular time interval given the available control resources. The interplay between adiabaticity, fidelity, and robustness of the resulting pulses is examined for the case of single-qubit inversion, and superadiabatic pulses are demonstrated to have improved robustness to control errors. A numerical search strategy is developed to find a broader class of adiabatic operations, including multiqubit adiabatic unitaries. We illustrate the utility of this search strategy by designing control waveforms that adiabatically implement a two-qubit entangling gate for a model NMR system.

  3. 14 CFR 27.695 - Power boost and power-operated control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... system. 27.695 Section 27.695 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Systems § 27.695 Power boost and power-operated control system. (a) If a power boost or power-operated control system is used, an alternate system must be immediately available that allows continued...

  4. 14 CFR 29.695 - Power boost and power-operated control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... system. 29.695 Section 29.695 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Systems § 29.695 Power boost and power-operated control system. (a) If a power boost or power-operated control system is used, an alternate system must be immediately available that allows continued...

  5. TDRSS operations control analysis study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The use of an operational Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) and the remaining ground stations for the STDN (GSTDN) was investigated. The operational aspects of TDRSS concepts, GSTDN as a 14-site network, and GSTDN as a 7 site-network were compared and operations control concepts for the configurations developed. Man/machine interface, scheduling system, and hardware/software tradeoff analyses were among the factors considered in the analysis.

  6. Operations and maintenance manual for the LDUA operations control trailer

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.A.

    1996-08-06

    The Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) Operations Control Trailer has completed testing and is ready for operation. This document defines the requirements applicable to the operation and maintenance of the Operations Control Trailer.

  7. NASA Historical Data Book. Volume 6; NASA Space Applications, Aeronautics and Space Research and Technology, Tracking and Data Acquisition/Support Operations, Commercial Programs and

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumerman, Judy A.

    2000-01-01

    This sixth volume of the NASA Historical Data Book is a continuation of those earlier efforts. This fundamental reference tool presents information, much of it statistical, documenting the development of several critical areas of NASA responsibility for the period between 1979 and 1988. This volume includes detailed information on the space applications effort, the development and operation of aeronautics and space research and technology programs, tracking and data acquisition/space operations, commercial programs, facilities and installations, personnel, and finances and procurement during this era. Special thanks are owed to the student research assistants who gathered and input much of the tabular material-a particularly tedious undertaking. There are numerous people at NASA associated with historical study, technical information, and the mechanics of publishing who helped in myriad ways in the preparation of this historical data book.

  8. Fundamental Aeronautics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay

    2009-01-01

    The Overarching Mission of NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) is: To advance U.S. technological leadership in aeronautics in partnership with industry, academia, and other government agencies that conduct aeronautics-related research. ARMD supports the Agency's goal of developing a balanced overall program of science, exploration, and aeronautics, and ARMD's research plans also directly support the National Aeronautics R&D Policy and accompanying Executive Order 131419.

  9. Managing computer-controlled operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plowden, J. B.

    1985-01-01

    A detailed discussion of Launch Processing System Ground Software Production is presented to establish the interrelationships of firing room resource utilization, configuration control, system build operations, and Shuttle data bank management. The production of a test configuration identifier is traced from requirement generation to program development. The challenge of the operational era is to implement fully automated utilities to interface with a resident system build requirements document to eliminate all manual intervention in the system build operations. Automatic update/processing of Shuttle data tapes will enhance operations during multi-flow processing.

  10. NASA's Role in Aeronautics: A Workshop. Volume 6: Aeronautical research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    While each aspect of its aeronautical technology program is important to the current preeminence of the United States in aeronautics, the most essential contributions of NASA derive from its research. Successes and challenges in NASA's efforts to improve civil and military aviation are discussed for the following areas: turbulence, noise, supercritical aerodynamics, computational aerodynamics, fuels, high temperature materials, composite materials, single crystal components, powder metallurgy, and flight controls. Spin offs to engineering and other sciences explored include NASTRAN, lubricants, and composites.

  11. National Aeronautics and Space Administration operations: Remote sensing experiments in the New York Bight, 7-17 April 1975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usry, J. W.; Hall, J. B., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Results are given of remote sensing experiments conducted in the New York Bight between April 7-17, 1975, to evaluate the role of remote sensing technology to aid in monitoring ocean dumping. Remote sensors were flown on the C-54, U-2, and C-130 aircraft while the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration obtained concurrent in situ sea truth data using helicopters and surface platforms. The test site, aircraft platforms, experiments, and supporting sensors are described. The operation of each aircraft are discussed and aircraft flight lines, flight parameters, and data identification parameters are presented in figures and tables.

  12. Remote Operations Control Center (ROCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Undergraduate students Kristina Wines and Dena Renzo at Rensselaer Poloytech Institute (RPI) in Troy, NY, monitor the progress of the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) during the U.S. Microgravity Payload-4 (USMP-4) mission (STS-87), Nov. 19 - Dec.5, 1997). Remote Operations Control Center (ROCC) like this one will become more common during operations with the International Space Station. The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE), flown on three Space Shuttle missions, is yielding new insights into virtually all industrially relevant metal and alloy forming operations. Photo credit: Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

  13. Achieving Aeronautics Leadership: Aeronautics Strategic Enterprise Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Today, more than ever, aggressive leadership is required to ensure that our national investments in aeronautical research, technology, and facilities are shaped into a coordinated, and high-impact, strategy. Under the auspices of the National Science and Technology Council, and in conjunction with the domestic industry, universities, the Department of Defense, and the Federal Aviation Administration - our partners in aeronautics - we propose to provide that leadership, and this document is our plan.

  14. 49 CFR 236.777 - Operator, control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.777 Operator, control. An employee assigned to operate the control machine of a traffic control system....

  15. 49 CFR 236.777 - Operator, control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.777 Operator, control. An employee assigned to operate the control machine of a traffic control system....

  16. 14 CFR 77.35 - Aeronautical studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... physical and electromagnetic radiation effect the proposal may have on the operation of an air navigation... OBJECTS AFFECTING NAVIGABLE AIRSPACE (Eff. until 1-18-11) Aeronautical Studies of Effect of Proposed..., conducts the aeronautical study of the effect of the proposal upon the operation of air...

  17. Aeronautics and Space Report of the President

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The years 1989 to 1990 activities are reported including human space flight, unmanned expendable launch vehicles, space science and applications, space communications operations, space research and technology, and aeronautics research and technology. Contributions made by the 14 participating government organizations are outline. Each organization's aeronautics and/or space activities for the year are presented. The organizations involved include: (1) NASA; (2) Dept. of Defense; (3) Dept. of Commerce; (4) Dept. of Energy; (5) Dept. of the Interior; (6) Dept. of Agriculture; (7) Federal Communications Commission; (8) Dept. of Transportation; (9) Environmental Protection Agency; (10) National Science Foundation; (11) Smithsonian Institution; (12) Dept. of State; (13) Arms Control and Disarmament; and (14) United States Information Agency.

  18. Nomenclature for Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1927-01-01

    This nomenclature for aeronautics was prepared by a Special Conference on Aeronautical Nomenclature by the executive committee of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics at a meeting held on August 19, 1924, at which meeting Dr. Joseph S. Ames was appointed chairman of the conference. The conference was composed of representatives of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics and specially appointed representatives officially designated by the Army Air Service, the Bureau of Aeronautics of the Navy Department, the Bureau of Standards, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the Society of Automotive Engineers, and the Aeronautical Chamber of Commerce. The purpose of the committee in the preparation and publication of this report is to secure uniformity in the official documents of the government and, as far as possible, in technical and other commercial publications

  19. Nomenclature for Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1924-01-01

    This nomenclature for aeronautics was prepared by a special conference on aeronautical nomenclature by the Executive Committee of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics at a meeting held August 11, 1933. This publication supersedes all previous publications of the committee on this subject. The purpose of the committee in the preparation and publication of this report is to secure uniformity in the official documents of the government and, as far as possible, in technical and other commercial publications.

  20. Nomenclature for Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1923-01-01

    This nomenclature for aeronautics was prepared by a special conference on aeronautical nomenclature, composed of representatives of the Army and Navy Air Services, the Air Mail Service, the Bureau of Standards, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, and private life. This report supersedes all previous publications of the committee on this subject. It is published with the intention of securing greater uniformity and accuracy in official documents of the government, and, as far as possible, in technical and other commercial publications. (author)

  1. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography. Supplement 421

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP#2000-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles.

  2. 49 CFR 236.777 - Operator, control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Operator, control. 236.777 Section 236.777..., MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.777 Operator, control. An employee assigned to operate the control machine of a traffic control system....

  3. 49 CFR 236.777 - Operator, control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operator, control. 236.777 Section 236.777..., MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.777 Operator, control. An employee assigned to operate the control machine of a traffic control system....

  4. 49 CFR 236.777 - Operator, control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Operator, control. 236.777 Section 236.777..., MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.777 Operator, control. An employee assigned to operate the control machine of a traffic control system....

  5. Nomenclature for aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1920-01-01

    Report defines the principal terms which have come into use in the development of aeronautics. It was prepared in cooperation with a committee engaged upon a similar undertaking in Great Britain. As a result this nomenclature is in substantial agreement with the one which has been adopted by the aeronautical authorities of Great Britain.

  6. Bibliography of Aeronautics: 1926

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockett, Paul

    1928-01-01

    This Bibliography of Aeronautics for 1926 covers the aeronautical literature published from January 1 to December 31, 1926. The first Bibliography of Aeronautics was published by the Smithsonian Institution as volume 55 of the Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections and covered the material published prior to June 30, 1909. Supplementary volumes of the Bibliography of Aeronautics for the subsequent years have been published by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. The last preceding volume was for the calendar year 1925. As in the previous volumes, citations of the publications of all nations are included in the languages in which these publications originally appeared. The arrangement is dictionary form with author find subject entry, and one alphabetical arrangement. Detail in the matter of subject reference has been omitted on aCC01.mt of the cost of presentation, but an attempt has been made to give sufficient cross reference for research in special lines.

  7. Bibliography of Aeronautics: 1928

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockett, Paul

    1928-01-01

    This Bibliography of Aeronautics for 1928 covers the aeronautical literature published from January 1 to December 31, 1928. The first Bibliography of Aeronautics was published by the Smithsonian Institution as volume 55 of the Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections and covered the material published prior to June 30, 1909. Supplementary volumes of the Bibliography of Aeronautics for the subsequent years have been published by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. The last preceding volume was for the calendar year 1927. As in the previous volumes, citations of the publications of all nations are included in the languages in which these publications originally appeared. The arrangement is in dictionary form with author and subject entry, and one alphabetical arrangement. Detail in the matter of subject reference has been omitted on account of the cost of presentation, but an attempt has been made to give sufficient cross reference for research in special lines.

  8. Bibliography of Aeronautics: 1932

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1935-01-01

    This Bibliography of Aeronautics for 1932 covers the aeronautical literature published from January 1 to December 31, 1932. The first Bibliography of Aeronautics was published by the Smithsonian Institution as volume 55 of the Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections and covered the material published prior to June 30, 1909. Supplementary volumes of the Bibliography of Aeronautics for the subsequent years have been published by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. The last preceding volume was for the calendar year 1931. As in the previous volumes, citations of the publications of all nations are included in the languages in which these publications originally appeared. The arrangement is in dictionary form with author and subject entry and one alphabetical arrangement. Detail in the matter of subject reference has been omitted on account of the cost of presentation, but an attempt has been made to give sufficient cross-reference for research in special lines.

  9. Bibliography of Aeronautics, 1929

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockett, Paul

    1930-01-01

    This Bibliography of Aeronautics for 1929 covers the aeronautical literature published from January 1 to December 31, 1929. The first Bibliography of Aeronautics was published by the Smithsonian Institution as Volume 55 of the Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections and covered the material published prior to June 30, 1909. Supplementary volumes of the Bibliography of Aeronautics for the subsequent years have been published by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. The last preceding volume was for the calendar year 1928. As in the previous volumes, citations of the pUblications of all nations are included in th.e languages in which. these publications originally appeared. The arrangement is in dictionary form with author and subject entry, and one alphabetical arrangement. Detail in the matter of subject reference has been omitted on account of the cost of presentation, but an attempt has been made to give sufficient cross reference for research in special lines.

  10. 3. EAGLE ROCK CONTROL CENTER, OPERATIONS CONTROL. AS SYSTEM BECOMES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. EAGLE ROCK CONTROL CENTER, OPERATIONS CONTROL. AS SYSTEM BECOMES INCREASINGLY AUTOMATED, EAGLE ROCK WILL BECOME MORE AND MORE THE CENTRAL CONTROL SYSTEM OF THE METROPOLITAN WATER DISTRICT. - Eagle Rock Operations Control Center, Pasadena, Los Angeles County, CA

  11. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) Capability Roadmap Development for Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagdigian, Robert M.; Carrasquillo, Robyn L.; Metcalf, Jordan; Peterson, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    NASA is considering a number of future human space exploration mission concepts. Although detailed requirements and vehicle architectures remain mostly undefined, near-term technology investment decisions need to be guided by the anticipated capabilities needed to enable or enhance the mission concepts. This paper describes a roadmap that NASA has formulated to guide the development of Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) capabilities required to enhance the long-term operation of the International Space Station (ISS) and enable beyond-Low Earth Orbit (LEO) human exploration missions. Three generic mission types were defined to serve as a basis for developing a prioritized list of needed capabilities and technologies. Those are 1) a short duration micro gravity mission; 2) a long duration transit microgravity mission; and 3) a long duration surface exploration mission. To organize the effort, ECLSS was categorized into three major functional groups (atmosphere, water, and solid waste management) with each broken down into sub-functions. The ability of existing, flight-proven state-of-the-art (SOA) technologies to meet the functional needs of each of the three mission types was then assessed. When SOA capabilities fell short of meeting the needs, those "gaps" were prioritized in terms of whether or not the corresponding capabilities enable or enhance each of the mission types. The resulting list of enabling and enhancing capability gaps can be used to guide future ECLSS development. A strategy to fulfill those needs over time was then developed in the form of a roadmap. Through execution of this roadmap, the hardware and technologies needed to enable and enhance exploration may be developed in a manner that synergistically benefits the ISS operational capability, supports Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) development, and sustains long-term technology investments for longer duration missions. This paper summarizes NASA s ECLSS capability roadmap

  12. An Operational System for Subject Switching between Controlled Vocabularies: A Computational Linguistics Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silvester, June P.; And Others

    This report describes a new automated process that pioneers full-scale operational use of subject switching by the NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Scientific and Technical Information (STI) Facility. The subject switching process routinely translates machine-readable subject terms from one controlled vocabulary into the…

  13. Aeronautical tubes and pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauclair, N.

    1984-12-01

    The main and subcomponent French suppliers of aircraft tubes and pipes are discussed, and the state of the industry is analyzed. Quality control is essential for tubes with regard to their i.d. and metallurgical compositions. French regulations do not allow welded seam tubes in hydraulic circuits unless no other form is available, and then rustproofed steel must be installed. The actual low level of orders for any run of tubes dictates that the product is only one of several among the manufacturers' line. Automation, both in NDT and quality control, assures that the tubes meet specifications. A total of 10 French companies participate in the industry, serving both civil and military needs, with some companies specializing only in titanium, steel, or aluminum materials. Concerns wishing to enter the market must upgrade their equipment to meet the higher aeronautical specifications and be prepared to furnish tubes and pipes that serve both functional and structural purposes simultaneously. Additionally, pipe-bending machines must also perform to tight specifications. Pipes can range from 0.2 mm exterior diameter to 40 mm, with wall thicknesses from 0.02 mm to 3 mm. A chart containing a list of manufacturers and their respective specifications and characteristics is presented, and a downtrend in production with reduction of personnel is noted.

  14. Nomenclature for Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1939-01-01

    The nomenclature for aeronautics presented in this Report No. 474 is a revision of the last previous report on this subject (i.e., Report no. 240.) This report is published for the purpose of encouraging greater uniformity and precision in the use of terms relating to aeronautics, both in official documents of the Government and in commercial publications. Terms in general use in other branches of engineering have been included only where they have some special significance in aeronautics, or form an integral part of its terminology.

  15. 16. OPERATOR STAND. OPERATOR STOOD BETWEEN RAILINGS AND CONTROLLED DREDGING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. OPERATOR STAND. OPERATOR STOOD BETWEEN RAILINGS AND CONTROLLED DREDGING OPERATIONS USING TWO LEVERS FROM CEILING, THREE LEVELS ON THE FLOOR, AND TWO FLOOR PEDDLES. RIGHT HAND CONTROLLED SHOT GUN SWINGER (BOOM MOVE TO RIGHT WHEN PUSHED FORWARD, LEFT WHEN PULLED BACK, AND, IF LUCKY, STOPPED WHEN IN CENTER POSITION). LEFT HAND CONTROLLED THROTTLE. FLOOR LEVER AND FLOOR PEDDLE ON LEFT CONTROLLED THE BACKING LINE FRICTION. MIDDLE LEVER AND PEDDLE, STUCK IN FLOOR CONTROLLED THE MAIN HOIST FRICTION. LEVER ON RIGHT CONTROLLED THE CYLINDER DRAIN VALVE. - Dredge CINCINNATI, Docked on Ohio River at foot of Lighthill Street, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  16. Mobile-ip Aeronautical Network Simulation Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Tran, Diepchi T.

    2001-01-01

    NASA is interested in applying mobile Internet protocol (mobile-ip) technologies to its space and aeronautics programs. In particular, mobile-ip will play a major role in the Advanced Aeronautic Transportation Technology (AATT), the Weather Information Communication (WINCOMM), and the Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS) aeronautics programs. This report presents the results of a simulation study of mobile-ip for an aeronautical network. The study was performed to determine the performance of the transmission control protocol (TCP) in a mobile-ip environment and to gain an understanding of how long delays, handoffs, and noisy channels affect mobile-ip performance.

  17. Curriculum for modern aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, L.

    1975-01-01

    Methods for improving the university training of aeronautical engineering students are discussed. Specific topics considered are: (1) the kind of students which should be developed through aeronautical engineering education, (2) to what extent should aerospace engineering be prepared for diversity and change, (3) to what extent should theory be emphasized as compared with practical engineering and design, and (4) a suggestion for NASA/Industry/University collaboration.

  18. Aeronautical technologies for the twenty-first century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This study gives an overview of the future technologies in aeronautics. This collaborative effort relies upon the input of numerous experts from around the country. Specific issues covered include subsonic transport aircraft, high-speed civil transport aircraft short-haul aircraft, environmental issues, operational issues, aerodynamics, propulsion, materials and structures, avionics and control, and cognitive engineering. The appendices include bibliography, abbreviations and acronyms, and NASA fiscal year 1992 aeronautics funding (table) and participants. The forward states that over the last decade, foreign aircraft manufacturers have made significant inroads into the global aircraft market, to the detriment of U.S. interests. Recommendations are made to counter that trend.

  19. Canadian aeronautical mobile data trials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedersen, Allister; Pearson, Andrea

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a series of aeronautical mobile data trials conducted on small aircraft (helicopters and fixed wing) utilizing a low-speed store-and-forward mobile data service. The paper outlines the user requirements for aeronautical mobile satellite communications. 'Flight following' and improved wide-area dispatch communications were identified as high priority requirements. A 'proof-of-concept' trial in a Cessna Skymaster aircraft is described. This trial identified certain development work as essential to the introduction of commercial service including antenna development, power supply modifications and doppler software modifications. Other improvements were also proposed. The initial aeronautical mobile data service available for pre-operational (Beta) trials is outlined. Pre-operational field trials commenced in October 1992 and consisted of installations on a Gralen Communications Inc. Cessna 177 and an Aerospatiale Astar 350 series light single engine helicopter. The paper concludes with a discussion of desirable near term mobile data service developments, commercial benefits, current safety benefits and potential future applications for improved safety.

  20. REACTOR CONTROL ROD OPERATING SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Miller, G.

    1961-12-12

    A nuclear reactor control rod mechanism is designed which mechanically moves the control rods into and out of the core under normal conditions but rapidly forces the control rods into the core by catapultic action in the event of an emergency. (AEC)

  1. VTOL controls for shipboard operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrick, V. K.; Gerdes, R. M.

    1983-01-01

    Piloted, moving-base simulations have been performed in the evaluation of several VTOL control system concepts during landings on a destroyer in adverse weather conditions. All the systems incorporated attitude control augmentation; most systems incorporated various types of translational control augmentation implemented either through aircraft attitude or, more directly, through the propulsion system (thrust magnitude and deflection). Only one of the control systems failed to provide satisfactory handling qualities in calm seas. Acceptable handling qualities in sea state 6 seem to require a system with control augmentation in all translational degrees of freedom.

  2. Diaphragms for Aeronautic Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersey, M D

    1924-01-01

    This investigation was carried out at the request of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics and comprises an outline of historical developments and theoretical principles, together with a discussion of expedients for making the most effective use of existing diaphragms actuated by the hydrostatic pressure form an essential element of a great variety instruments for aeronautic and other technical purposes. The various physical data needed as a foundation for rational methods of diaphragm design have not, however, been available hitherto except in the most fragmentary form.

  3. Modeling, fabrication and plasma actuator coupling of flexible pressure sensors for flow separation detection and control in aeronautical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francioso, L.; De Pascali, C.; Pescini, E.; De Giorgi, M. G.; Siciliano, P.

    2016-06-01

    Preventing the flow separation could enhance the performance of propulsion systems and future civil aircraft. To this end, a fast detection of boundary layer separation is mandatory for a sustainable and successful application of active flow control devices, such as plasma actuators. The present work reports on the design, fabrication and functional tests of low-cost capacitive pressure sensors coupled with dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators to detect and then control flow separation. Finite element method (FEM) simulations were used to obtain information on the deflection and the stress distribution in different-shaped floating membranes. The sensor sensitivity as a function of the pressure load was also calculated by experimental tests. The results of the calibration of different capacitive pressure sensors are reported in this work, together with functional tests in a wind tunnel equipped with a curved wall plate on which a DBD plasma actuator was mounted to control the flow separation. The flow behavior was experimentally investigated by particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements. Statistical and spectral analysis, applied to the output signals of the pressure sensor placed downstream of the profile leading edge, demonstrated that the sensor is able to discriminate different ionic wind velocity and turbulence conditions. The sensor sensitivity in the 0–100 Pa range was experimentally measured and it ranged between 0.0030 and 0.0046 pF Pa‑1 for the best devices.

  4. Advanced Civilian Aeronautical Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, Dennis M.

    1996-01-01

    Paper discusses alternatives to currently deployed systems which could provide revolutionary improvements in metrics applicable to civilian aeronautics. Specific missions addressed include subsonic transports, supersonic transports and personal aircraft. These alternative systems and concepts are enabled by recent and envisaged advancements in electronics, communications, computing and Designer Fluid Mechanics in conjunction with a design approach employing extensive synergistic interactions between propulsion, aerodynamics and structures.

  5. Aeronautical facilities assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penaranda, F. E. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    A survey of the free world's aeronautical facilities was undertaken and an evaluation made on where the relative strengths and weaknesses exist. Special emphasis is given to NASA's own capabilities and needs. The types of facilities surveyed are: Wind Tunnels; Airbreathing Propulsion Facilities; and Flight Simulators

  6. ARMD Fundamental Aeronautics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dryer, Jay; DelRosario, Ruben

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation focuses work of the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) with particular interest on the work being done to address the environmental and energy efficiency challenges. Particular interest is on the Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) project, though there is discussion of the rotorcraft and the supersonics environmental challenges.

  7. The JPL telerobot operator control station: Operational experiences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kan, Edwin P.

    1990-01-01

    The Operator Control Station of the JPL/NASA Telerobot Demonstration System provides an efficient man-machine interface for the performance of telerobot tasks. Its hardware and software have been designed with high flexibility. It provides a feedback-rich interactive environment in which the Operator performs teleoperation tasks, robotic tasks, and telerobotic tasks with ease. The to-date operational experiences of this system, particularly related to the Object Designate Process and the Voice Input/Output Process are discussed.

  8. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography. Supplment 385

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-1998-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract.

  9. Operating room management: operative suite considerations, infection control.

    PubMed

    Allo, Maria D; Tedesco, Maureen

    2005-12-01

    An operating room's condition is rarely directly implicated in dis-ease transmission. Even so, to prevent such rare transmissions,hospitals must be thoughtful in designing operating rooms as important adjuncts to infection control. Proper ventilation in and near the operating room is the single most important component in establishing an environment that stops the spread of infection. Other considerations include attention to traffic control, equipment maintenance and storage, and construction materials that enhance the ability to maintain clean rooms. Hospitals can avert potential infectious problems through preventive maintenance and the use of infection control risk assessments (ICRAs) for preemptive consideration of infectious risks before renovations, repairs and new construction. Guidelines should be consulted and incorporated into each operating room's policies and procedures. PMID:16326209

  10. Computer control for remote wind turbine operation

    SciTech Connect

    Manwell, J.F.; Rogers, A.L.; Abdulwahid, U.; Driscoll, J.

    1997-12-31

    Light weight wind turbines located in harsh, remote sites require particularly capable controllers. Based on extensive operation of the original ESI-807 moved to such a location, a much more sophisticated controller than the original one has been developed. This paper describes the design, development and testing of that new controller. The complete control and monitoring system consists of sensor and control inputs, the control computer, control outputs, and additional equipment. The control code was written in Microsoft Visual Basic on a PC type computer. The control code monitors potential faults and allows the turbine to operate in one of eight states: off, start, run, freewheel, low wind shut down, normal wind shutdown, emergency shutdown, and blade parking. The controller also incorporates two {open_quotes}virtual wind turbines,{close_quotes} including a dynamic model of the machine, for code testing. The controller can handle numerous situations for which the original controller was unequipped.

  11. Program of Research in Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A prospectus of the educational and research opportunities available at the Joint Institute for Advancement of Flight Sciences, operated at NASA Langley Research Center in conjunction with George Washington University's School of Engineering and Applied Sciences is presented. Requirements of admission to various degree programs are given as well as the course offerings in the areas of acoustics, aeronautics, environmental modelling, materials science, and structures and dynamics. Research facilities for each field of study are described. Presentations and publications (including dissertations and theses) generated by each program are listed as well as faculty members visting scientists and engineers.

  12. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This bibliography lists 193 reports, journal articles, and other documents introduced in the NASA scientific and technical system in Aug. 1995. Subject coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles

  13. Progress in aeronautical research and technology applicable to civil air transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bower, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Recent progress in the aeronautical research and technology program being conducted by the United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration is discussed. Emphasis is on computational capability, new testing facilities, drag reduction, turbofan and turboprop propulsion, noise, composite materials, active controls, integrated avionics, cockpit displays, flight management, and operating problems. It is shown that this technology is significantly impacting the efficiency of the new civil air transports. The excitement of emerging research promises even greater benefits to future aircraft developments.

  14. Intelligent resources for satellite ground control operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Patricia M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a cooperative approach to the design of intelligent automation and describes the Mission Operations Cooperative Assistant for NASA Goddard flight operations. The cooperative problem solving approach is being explored currently in the context of providing support for human operator teams and also in the definition of future advanced automation in ground control systems.

  15. Handbook on Numerically Controlled Operational Devices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Clifton P.

    This handbook presents an organized set of descriptive information on numerically controlled operational devices. The information is intended for those involved in industry and technical education and to contribute to the knowledge of numerical control technology. It is also intended for supervisors, manufacturers, machine operators, and others…

  16. Reshaping NASA's Aeronautics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Anita D.

    2007-01-01

    We will dedicate ourselves to the mastery and intellectual stewardship of the core competencies of Aeronautics for the Nation in all flight regimes. We will focus our research in areas that are appropriate to NASA's unique capabilities. we will directly address the R&D needs of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NGATS) in partnership with the member agencies of the Joint Planning and development Office (JPDO).

  17. Classical and modern control strategies for the deployment, reconfiguration, and station-keeping of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Benchmark Tetrahedron Constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capo-Lugo, Pedro A.

    Formation flying consists of multiple spacecraft orbiting in a required configuration about a planet or through Space. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Benchmark Tetrahedron Constellation is one of the proposed constellations to be launched in the year 2009 and provides the motivation for this investigation. The problem that will be researched here consists of three stages. The first stage contains the deployment of the satellites; the second stage is the reconfiguration process to transfer the satellites through different specific sizes of the NASA benchmark problem; and, the third stage is the station-keeping procedure for the tetrahedron constellation. Every stage contains different control schemes and transfer procedures to obtain/maintain the proposed tetrahedron constellation. In the first stage, the deployment procedure will depend on a combination of two techniques in which impulsive maneuvers and a digital controller are used to deploy the satellites and to maintain the tetrahedron constellation at the following apogee point. The second stage that corresponds to the reconfiguration procedure shows a different control scheme in which the intelligent control systems are implemented to perform this procedure. In this research work, intelligent systems will eliminate the use of complex mathematical models and will reduce the computational time to perform different maneuvers. Finally, the station-keeping process, which is the third stage of this research problem, will be implemented with a two-level hierarchical control scheme to maintain the separation distance constraints of the NASA Benchmark Tetrahedron Constellation. For this station-keeping procedure, the system of equations defining the dynamics of a pair of satellites is transformed to take in account the perturbation due to the oblateness of the Earth and the disturbances due to solar pressure. The control procedures used in this research will be transformed from a continuous

  18. Payload Operations Control Center (POCC). [spacelab flight operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shipman, D. L.; Noneman, S. R.; Terry, E. S.

    1981-01-01

    The Spacelab payload operations control center (POCC) timeline analysis program which is used to provide POCC activity and resource information as a function of mission time is described. This program is fully automated and interactive, and is equipped with tutorial displays. The tutorial displays are sufficiently detailed for use by a program analyst having no computer experience. The POCC timeline analysis program is designed to operate on the VAX/VMS version V2.1 computer system.

  19. Providing Situational Awareness for Pipeline Control Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butts, Jonathan; Kleinhans, Hugo; Chandia, Rodrigo; Papa, Mauricio; Shenoi, Sujeet

    A SCADA system for a single 3,000-mile-long strand of oil or gas pipeline may employ several thousand field devices to measure process parameters and operate equipment. Because of the vital tasks performed by these sensors and actuators, pipeline operators need accurate and timely information about their status and integrity. This paper describes a realtime scanner that provides situational awareness about SCADA devices and control operations. The scanner, with the assistance of lightweight, distributed sensors, analyzes SCADA network traffic, verifies the operational status and integrity of field devices, and identifies anomalous activity. Experimental results obtained using real pipeline control traffic demonstrate the utility of the scanner in industrial settings.

  20. System considerations, projected requirements and applications for aeronautical mobile satellite communications for air traffic services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, K. D.; Miller, C. M.; Scales, W. C.; Dement, D. K.

    1990-01-01

    The projected application and requirements in the near term (to 1995) and far term (to 2010) for aeronautical mobile services supporting air traffic control operations are addressed. The implications of these requirements on spectrum needs, and the resulting effects on the satellite design and operation are discussed. The U.S. is working with international standards and regulatory organizations to develop the necessary aviation standards, signalling protocols, and implementation methods. In the provision of aeronautical safety services, a number of critical issues were identified, including system reliability and availability, access time, channel restoration time, interoperability, pre-emption techniques, and the system network interfaces. Means for accomplishing these critical services in the aeronautical mobile satellite service (AMSS), and the various activities relating to the future provision of aeronautical safety services are addressed.

  1. NASA's Role in Aeronautics: A Workshop. Volume VI - Aeronautical Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Assembly of Engineering.

    The central task of a 1980 workshop on the role of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in aeronautics was to examine the relationship of NASA's research capabilities to the state of U.S. aviation and to make recommendations about NASA's future role in aeronautics. Following a brief introduction, the Overview Panel on…

  2. Multi-robot operator control unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, D.; Gilbreath, G.; Bruch, M.

    2006-05-01

    Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center, San Diego (SSC San Diego) has developed an unmanned vehicle and sensor operator control interface capable of simultaneously controlling and monitoring multiple sets of heterogeneous systems. The modularity, scalability and flexible user interface of the Multi-robot Operator Control Unit (MOCU) accommodates a wide range of vehicles and sensors in varying mission scenarios. MOCU currently controls all of the SSC San Diego developmental vehicles (land, air, sea, and undersea), including the SPARTAN Advanced Concept Technology Demonstration (ACTD) Unmanned Surface Vehicle (USV), the iRobot PackBot, and the Family of Integrated Rapid Response Equipment (FIRRE) vehicles and sensors. This paper will discuss how software and hardware modularity has allowed SSC San Diego to create a single operator control unit (OCU) with the capability to control a wide variety of unmanned systems.

  3. Developing a global aeronautical satellite system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dement, Donald K.

    1988-01-01

    Arinc, an airline industry-owned and operated company in the United States, has taken steps toward establishing a global aeronautical satellite communications system. Plans call for initiation of a thin-route data operation in 1989, upgrading to establish voice communications via shared spot-beam transponders carried on other satellites, and deploying a worldwide network using dedicated satellites by 1994.

  4. Control Characteristics of Alcohol-Impaired Operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jex, Henry R.; McRuer, Duane T.; Allen, R. Wade; Klein, Richard H.

    1974-01-01

    Although the operation of vehicles like airplanes, cars, and bicycles involves a complex array of perceptual, decision and control activities, most accident statistics clearly show that intoxicated operators are a dominant cause of accidents, and not the difficulty of the task itself. This paper summarizes some recent research on the nature of the impairment of operator control under blood alcohol concentrations (BAC) up to above 0.16 percent. Alcohol toxicity is shown to be quite specific with respect to visual-motor functions involved in control of a vehicle, and experiments with a generalized workload task and special driving simulator show how these are reflected in terms of changes in operator control parameters such as response latency, gains, stability margins, and coherency.

  5. Aeronautical Science Course of Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southbay Union High School District, Redondo Beach, CA.

    This revision of "Aeronautical Science Course of Study for California High Schools," first issued in 1967, is designed by and for the use of teachers of high school aeronautical courses. It differs from other aeronautical instructional materials in its emphasis on inquiry, exploration, and open-ended experimentation. The eleven units may be used…

  6. Operational efficiency subpanel advanced mission control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedland, Peter

    1990-01-01

    Herein, the term mission control will be taken quite broadly to include both ground and space based operations as well as the information infrastructure necessary to support such operations. Three major technology areas related to advanced mission control are examined: (1) Intelligent Assistance for Ground-Based Mission Controllers and Space-Based Crews; (2) Autonomous Onboard Monitoring, Control and Fault Detection Isolation and Reconfiguration; and (3) Dynamic Corporate Memory Acquired, Maintained, and Utilized During the Entire Vehicle Life Cycle. The current state of the art space operations are surveyed both within NASA and externally for each of the three technology areas and major objectives are discussed from a user point of view for technology development. Ongoing NASA and other governmental programs are described. An analysis of major research issues and current holes in the program are provided. Several recommendations are presented for enhancing the technology development and insertion process to create advanced mission control environments.

  7. Operational trade-offs in reservoir control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgakakos, Aris P.

    1993-11-01

    Reservoir operation decisions require constant reevaluation in the face of conflicting objectives, varying hydrologic conditions, and frequent operational policy changes. Optimality is a relative concept very much dependent on the circumstances under which a decision is made. More than anything else, reservoir management authorities need the means to assess the impacts of various operational options. It is their responsibility to define what is desirable after a thorough evaluation of the existing circumstances. This article presents a model designed to generate operational trade-offs common among reservoir systems. The model avoids an all-encompassing problem formulation and distinguishes three operational modes (levels) corresponding to normal, drought, and flood operations. Each level addresses only relevant system elements and uses a static and a dynamic control module to optimize turbine performance within each planning period and temporally. The model is used for planning the operation of the Savannah River System.

  8. GRTS operations monitor/control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohrer, Richard A.

    1994-01-01

    An Operations Monitor/Control System (OMCS) was developed to support remote ground station equipment. The ground station controls a Tracking Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) relocated to provide coverage in the tracking system's zone of exclusion. The relocated satellite significantly improved data recovery for the Gamma Ray Observatory mission. The OMCS implementation, performed in less than 11 months, was mission critical to TDRS drift operations. Extensive use of Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) hardware and software products contributed to implementation success. The OMCS has been operational for over 9 months with no significant problems. This paper will share our experiences in OMCS development and integration.

  9. Adding control to arbitrary unknown quantum operations

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiao-Qi; Ralph, Timothy C.; Kalasuwan, Pruet; Zhang, Mian; Peruzzo, Alberto; Lanyon, Benjamin P.; O'Brien, Jeremy L.

    2011-01-01

    Although quantum computers promise significant advantages, the complexity of quantum algorithms remains a major technological obstacle. We have developed and demonstrated an architecture-independent technique that simplifies adding control qubits to arbitrary quantum operations—a requirement in many quantum algorithms, simulations and metrology. The technique, which is independent of how the operation is done, does not require knowledge of what the operation is, and largely separates the problems of how to implement a quantum operation in the laboratory and how to add a control. Here, we demonstrate an entanglement-based version in a photonic system, realizing a range of different two-qubit gates with high fidelity. PMID:21811242

  10. SPOT4 Operational Control Center (CMP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaouche, G.

    1993-01-01

    CNES(F) is responsible for the development of a new generation of Operational Control Center (CMP) which will operate the new heliosynchronous remote sensing satellite (SPOT4). This Operational Control Center takes large benefit from the experience of the first generation of control center and from the recent advances in computer technology and standards. The CMP is designed for operating two satellites all the same time with a reduced pool of controllers. The architecture of this CMP is simple, robust, and flexible, since it is based on powerful distributed workstations interconnected through an Ethernet LAN. The application software uses modern and formal software engineering methods, in order to improve quality and reliability, and facilitate maintenance. This software is table driven so it can be easily adapted to other operational needs. Operation tasks are automated to the maximum extent, so that it could be possible to operate the CMP automatically with very limited human interference for supervision and decision making. This paper provides an overview of the SPOTS mission and associated ground segment. It also details the CMP, its functions, and its software and hardware architecture.

  11. Operator control of interneural computing machines.

    PubMed

    Shih, Mau-Hsiang; Tsai, Feng-Sheng

    2013-12-01

    A dynamic representation of neural population responses asserts that motor cortex is a flexible pattern generator sending rhythmic, oscillatory signals to generate multiphasic patterns of movement. This raises a question concerning the design and control of new computing machines that mimic the oscillatory patterns and multiphasic patterns seen in neural systems. To address this issue, we design an interneural computing machine (INCM) made of plastic random interneural connections. We develop a mechanical way to measure collective ensemble firing of neurons in INCM. Two sorts of plasticity operators are derived from the measure of synchronous neural activity and the measure of self-sustaining neural activity, respectively. Such plasticity operators conduct activity-dependent operation to modify the network structure of INCM. The activity-dependent operation meets the neurobiological perspective of Hebbian synaptic plasticity and displays the tendency toward circulation breaking aiming to control neural population dynamics. We call such operation operator control of INCM and develop a population analysis of operator control for measuring how well single neurons of INCM can produce rhythmic, oscillatory activity, but at the level of neural ensembles, generate multiphasic patterns of population responses. PMID:24805217

  12. Hydrate Control for Gas Storage Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Savidge

    2008-10-31

    The overall objective of this project was to identify low cost hydrate control options to help mitigate and solve hydrate problems that occur in moderate and high pressure natural gas storage field operations. The study includes data on a number of flow configurations, fluids and control options that are common in natural gas storage field flow lines. The final phase of this work brings together data and experience from the hydrate flow test facility and multiple field and operator sources. It includes a compilation of basic information on operating conditions as well as candidate field separation options. Lastly the work is integrated with the work with the initial work to provide a comprehensive view of gas storage field hydrate control for field operations and storage field personnel.

  13. PNNL’s Building Operations Control Center

    SciTech Connect

    Belew, Shan

    2015-09-29

    PNNL's Building Operations Control Center (BOCC) video provides an overview of the center, its capabilities, and its objectives. The BOCC was relocated to PNNL's new 3820 Systems Engineering Building in 2015. Although a key focus of the BOCC is on monitoring and improving the operations of PNNL buildings, the center's state-of-the-art computational, software and visualization resources also have provided a platform for PNNL buildings-related research projects.

  14. PNNL?s Building Operations Control Center

    ScienceCinema

    Belew, Shan

    2016-06-14

    PNNL's Building Operations Control Center (BOCC) video provides an overview of the center, its capabilities, and its objectives. The BOCC was relocated to PNNL's new 3820 Systems Engineering Building in 2015. Although a key focus of the BOCC is on monitoring and improving the operations of PNNL buildings, the center's state-of-the-art computational, software and visualization resources also have provided a platform for PNNL buildings-related research projects.

  15. Nuclear power plant control room operator control and monitoring tasks

    SciTech Connect

    Bovell, C.R.; Beck, M.G.; Carter, R.J.

    1998-07-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory is conducting a research project the purpose of which is to develop the technical bases for regulatory review criteria for use in evaluating the safety implications of human factors associated with the use of artificial intelligence and expert systems, and with advanced instrumentation and control (I and C) systems in nuclear power plants (NPP). This report documents the results from Task 8 of that project. The primary objectives of the task was to identify the scope and type of control and monitoring tasks now performed by control-room operators. Another purpose was to address the types of controls and safety systems needed to operate the nuclear plant. The final objective of Task 8 was to identify and categorize the type of information and displays/indicators required to monitor the performance of the control and safety systems. This report also discusses state-of-the-art controls and advanced display devices which will be available for use in control-room retrofits and in control room of future plants. The fundamental types of control and monitoring tasks currently conducted by operators can be divided into four classifications: function monitoring tasks, control manipulation tasks, fault diagnostic tasks, and administrative tasks. There are three general types of controls used in today`s NPPs, switches, pushbuttons, and analog controllers. Plant I and C systems include components to achieve a number of safety-related functions: measuring critical plant parameters, controlling critical plant parameters within safety limits, and automatically actuating protective devices if safe limits are exceeded. The types of information monitored by the control-room operators consist of the following parameters: pressure, fluid flow and level, neutron flux, temperature, component status, water chemistry, electrical, and process and area radiation. The basic types of monitoring devices common to nearly all NPP control rooms include: analog meters

  16. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with indexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    This bibliography lists 426 reports, articles and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in August 1984. Reports are cited in the area of Aeronautical Engineering. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing operation and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment and systems.

  17. National Aeronautics and Space Administration FY 2001 Accountability Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is an independent Agency established to plan and manage the future of the Nation's civil aeronautics and space program. This Accountability Report covers Federal Fiscal Year (FY) 2001 (October 1, 2000, through September 30, 2001), with discussion of some subsequent events The Report contains an overview addressing the Agency's critical programs and financial performance and includes highlights of performance organized by goals and objectives of the Enterprises and Crosscutting Processes. The Report also summarizes NASA's stewardship over budget and financial resources, including audited financial statements and footnotes. The financial statements reflect an overall position of offices and activities, including assets and liabilities, as well as results of operations, pursuant to requirements of Federal law (31 U.S.C. 3515(b)). The auditor's opinions on NASA's financial statements, reports on internal controls, and compliance with laws and regulations are included in this Report.

  18. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Fiscal Year 2001 Accountability Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is an independent Agency established to plan and manage the future of the Nation's civil aeronautics and space program. This Accountability Report covers Federal Fiscal Year (FY) 2001 (October 1, 2000, through September 30, 2001), with discussion of some subsequent events. The Report contains an overview addressing the Agency's critical programs and financial performance and includes highlights of performance organized by goals and objectives of the Enterprises and Crosscutting Processes. The Report also summarizes NASA's stewardship over budget and financial resources, including audited financial statements and footnotes. The financial statements reflect an overall position of offices and activities, including assets and liabilities, as well as results of operations, pursuant to requirements of Federal law (31 U.S.C. 3515(b)). The auditor's opinions on NASA's financial statements, reports on internal controls, and compliance with laws and regulations are included in this report.

  19. Operating and Managing a Backup Control Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, Angela L.; Pirani, Joseph L.; Bornas, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Due to the criticality of continuous mission operations, some control centers must plan for alternate locations in the event an emergency shuts down the primary control center. Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas is the Mission Control Center (MCC) for the International Space Station (ISS). Due to Houston s proximity to the Gulf of Mexico, JSC is prone to threats from hurricanes which could cause flooding, wind damage, and electrical outages to the buildings supporting the MCC. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has the capability to be the Backup Control Center for the ISS if the situation is needed. While the MSFC Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) does house the BCC, the prime customer and operator of the ISS is still the JSC flight operations team. To satisfy the customer and maintain continuous mission operations, the BCC has critical infrastructure that hosts ISS ground systems and flight operations equipment that mirrors the prime mission control facility. However, a complete duplicate of Mission Control Center in another remote location is very expensive to recreate. The HOSC has infrastructure and services that MCC utilized for its backup control center to reduce the costs of a somewhat redundant service. While labor talents are equivalent, experiences are not. Certain operations are maintained in a redundant mode, while others are simply maintained as single string with adequate sparing levels of equipment. Personnel at the BCC facility must be trained and certified to an adequate level on primary MCC systems. Negotiations with the customer were done to match requirements with existing capabilities, and to prioritize resources for appropriate level of service. Because some of these systems are shared, an activation of the backup control center will cause a suspension of scheduled HOSC activities that may share resources needed by the BCC. For example, the MCC is monitoring a hurricane in the Gulf of Mexico. As the threat to MCC

  20. Wireless Sensor Applications in Extreme Aeronautical Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William C.; Atkinson, Gary M.

    2013-01-01

    NASA aeronautical programs require rigorous ground and flight testing. Many of the testing environments can be extremely harsh. These environments include cryogenic temperatures and high temperatures (greater than 1500 C). Temperature, pressure, vibration, ionizing radiation, and chemical exposure may all be part of the harsh environment found in testing. This paper presents a survey of research opportunities for universities and industry to develop new wireless sensors that address anticipated structural health monitoring (SHM) and testing needs for aeronautical vehicles. Potential applications of passive wireless sensors for ground testing and high altitude aircraft operations are presented. Some of the challenges and issues of the technology are also presented.

  1. Aeronautical Engineering: 1983 cumulative index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    This bibliography is a cumulative index to the abstracts contained in NASA SP-7037 (158) through NASA SP-7037 (169) of Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography. NASA SP-7037 and its supplements have been compiled through the cooperative efforts of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). This cumulative index includes subject, personal author, corporate source, contract, report number, and accession number indexes.

  2. Stress, performance, and control room operations

    SciTech Connect

    Fontaine, C.W.

    1990-01-01

    The notion of control room operator performance being detrimentally affected by stress has long been the focus of considerable conjecture. It is important to gain a better understanding of the validity of this concern for the development of effective severe-accident management approaches. This paper illustrates the undeniable negative impact of stress on a wide variety of tasks. A computer-controlled simulated work environment was designed in which both male and female operators were closely monitored during the course of the study for both stress level (using the excretion of the urine catecholamines epinephrine and norepinephrine as an index) and job performance. The experimental parameters employed by the study when coupled with the subsequent statistical analyses of the results allow one to make some rather striking comments with respect to how a given operator might respond to a situation that he or she perceives to be psychologically stressful (whether the stress be externally or internally generated). The findings of this study clearly indicated that stress does impact operator performance on tasks similar in nature to those conducted by control room operators and hence should be seriously considered in the development of severe-accident management strategies.

  3. Aeronautics in NACA and NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Initiated in 1915, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics/National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NACA/NASA) aeronautical programs have been the keystone of a sustained U.S. Government, industry, and university research effort which has been a primary factor in the development of our remarkable air transportation systems, the country's largest positive trade balance component, and the world's finest military Air Force. This overview summarizes the flow of events, and the major trends, that have led from the NACA origins to the present NASA Aeronautics program, and indicates some important directions for the years ahead.

  4. 40. DRAW CONTROL PLAN OF OPERATING ROOM, CONTROLS, SIGNALS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. DRAW CONTROL - PLAN OF OPERATING ROOM, CONTROLS, SIGNALS With draw tender's and gateman's instructions Courtesy of John E. Carty, Division Engineer, Boston Department of Public Works, 1929. - Congress Street Bascule Bridge, Spanning Fort Point Channel at Congress Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  5. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. The NASA CASI price code table, addresses of organizations, and document availability information are included before the abstract section. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  6. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-1999-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. The NASA CASI price code table, addresses of organizations, and document availability information are included before the abstract section. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  7. Controlling multisupplier operations by intelligent EDI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskelinen, Juha; Kovanen, Jyrki; Linna, Miika; Mononen, Tero; Sulonen, Reijo

    In modern CIM (Computer Integrated Manufacturing) environment, problems that can affect production should be discovered as soon as possible. This can be very difficult in multisupplier operations where problems outside one organization can remain undetected until they already have effects inside that organization. If Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) is used to control intercompany operations there is a better possibility to detect problems on logistic chain. Because these problems usually have some effects in the flow of EDI messages, they can be detected by controlling this flow. A Forget-Me-Not (FMN) system, which is a programmable message management system that can control the flow of EDI messages and detect exceptional situations is discussed.

  8. Operator interface to the ORIC control system

    SciTech Connect

    Ludemann, C.A.; Casstevens, B.J.

    1983-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC) was built in the early 1960s with a hard-wired manual control system. Presently, it serves as a variable-energy heavy-ion cyclotron with an internal ion source, or as an energy booster for the new 25 MV tandem electrostatic accelerator of the Holifield Heavy Ion Facility. One factor which has kept the cyclotron the productive research tool it is today is the gradual transfer of its control functions to a computer-based system beginning in the 1970s. This particular placement of a computer between an accelerator and its operators afforded some unique challenges and opportunities that would not be encountered today. Historically, the transformation began at a time when computers were just beginning to gain acceptance as reliable operational tools. Veteran operators with tens of years of accelerator experience justifiably expressed skepticism that this improvement would aid them, particularly if they had to re-learn how to operate the machine. The confidence of the operators was gained when they realized that one of the primary principles of ergonomics was being upheld. The computer software and hardware was being designed to serve them and not the computer.

  9. Aeronautics systems technology studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauchspies, J. S.

    1983-01-01

    Data collection and analysis in the areas of air transportation, aircraft manufacturing and sales, airline operations, market projections, internal trade, and energy consumption; legislation and regulations, technology needs; surveys; decision-making; cost analyses; and technology transfer are discussed.

  10. Process for operating equilibrium controlled reactions

    DOEpatents

    Nataraj, Shankar; Carvill, Brian Thomas; Hufton, Jeffrey Raymond; Mayorga, Steven Gerard; Gaffney, Thomas Richard; Brzozowski, Jeffrey Richard

    2001-01-01

    A cyclic process for operating an equilibrium controlled reaction in a plurality of reactors containing an admixture of an adsorbent and a reaction catalyst suitable for performing the desired reaction which is operated in a predetermined timed sequence wherein the heating and cooling requirements in a moving reaction mass transfer zone within each reactor are provided by indirect heat exchange with a fluid capable of phase change at temperatures maintained in each reactor during sorpreaction, depressurization, purging and pressurization steps during each process cycle.

  11. A learning controller for nonrepetitive robotic operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, W. T., III

    1987-01-01

    A practical learning control system is described which is applicable to complex robotic and telerobotic systems involving multiple feedback sensors and multiple command variables. In the controller, the learning algorithm is used to learn to reproduce the nonlinear relationship between the sensor outputs and the system command variables over particular regions of the system state space, rather than learning the actuator commands required to perform a specific task. The learned information is used to predict the command signals required to produce desired changes in the sensor outputs. The desired sensor output changes may result from automatic trajectory planning or may be derived from interactive input from a human operator. The learning controller requires no a priori knowledge of the relationships between the sensor outputs and the command variables. The algorithm is well suited for real time implementation, requiring only fixed point addition and logical operations. The results of learning experiments using a General Electric P-5 manipulator interfaced to a VAX-11/730 computer are presented. These experiments involved interactive operator control, via joysticks, of the position and orientation of an object in the field of view of a video camera mounted on the end of the robot arm.

  12. Fifty Years of Aeronautical Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This booklet contains a detailed review of the aeronautical research conducted at Langley Research Center during the 50 years after its construction in 1917 as the first research laboratory for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. The research is discussed in five parts, by decades: 1917-27, 1928-37, 1938-47, 1948-57, 1958-67.…

  13. Aeronautical engineering. A continuing bibliography with indexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    This bibliography lists 326 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in January 1982. Topics on aeronautical engineering and aerodynamics such as flight control systems, avionics, computer programs, computational fluid dynamics and composite structures are covered.

  14. Quadrocopter Control Design and Flight Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karwoski, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    A limiting factor in control system design and analysis for spacecraft is the inability to physically test new algorithms quickly and cheaply. Test flights of space vehicles are costly and take much preparation. As such, EV41 recently acquired a small research quadrocopter that has the ability to be a test bed for new control systems. This project focused on learning how to operate, fly, and maintain the quadrocopter, as well as developing and testing protocols for its use. In parallel to this effort, developing a model in Simulink facilitated the design and analysis of simple control systems for the quadrocopter. Software provided by the manufacturer enabled testing of the Simulink control system on the vehicle.

  15. 39. View of bridge operators controls in the control house ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. View of bridge operators controls in the control house facing south. Controls on the right are for the south span and on the left for the north span. The large dial indicator towards the top of the picture is a position indicator for the south span. Also present is a marine radio for talking to marine traffic and control ropes for the horn and siren. - Henry Ford Bridge, Spanning Cerritos Channel, Los Angeles-Long Beach Harbor, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  16. [Controlling systems for operating room managers].

    PubMed

    Schüpfer, G; Bauer, M; Scherzinger, B; Schleppers, A

    2005-08-01

    Management means developing, shaping and controlling of complex, productive and social systems. Therefore, operating room managers also need to develop basic skills in financial and managerial accounting as a basis for operative and strategic controlling which is an essential part of their work. A good measurement system should include financial and strategic concepts for market position, innovation performance, productivity, attractiveness, liquidity/cash flow and profitability. Since hospitals need to implement a strategy to reach their business objectives, the performance measurement system has to be individually adapted to the strategy of the hospital. In this respect the navigation system developed by Gälweiler is compared to the "balanced score card" system of Kaplan and Norton. PMID:15959742

  17. Designing an Alternate Mission Operations Control Room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Patty; Reeves, A. Scott

    2014-01-01

    The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) is a multi-project facility that is responsible for 24x7 real-time International Space Station (ISS) payload operations management, integration, and control and has the capability to support small satellite projects and will provide real-time support for SLS launches. The HOSC is a service-oriented/ highly available operations center for ISS payloads-directly supporting science teams across the world responsible for the payloads. The HOSC is required to endure an annual 2-day power outage event for facility preventive maintenance and safety inspection of the core electro-mechanical systems. While complete system shut-downs are against the grain of a highly available sub-system, the entire facility must be powered down for a weekend for environmental and safety purposes. The consequence of this ground system outage is far reaching: any science performed on ISS during this outage weekend is lost. Engineering efforts were focused to maximize the ISS investment by engineering a suitable solution capable of continuing HOSC services while supporting safety requirements. The HOSC Power Outage Contingency (HPOC) System is a physically diversified compliment of systems capable of providing identified real-time services for the duration of a planned power outage condition from an alternate control room. HPOC was designed to maintain ISS payload operations for approximately three continuous days during planned HOSC power outages and support a local Payload Operations Team, International Partners, as well as remote users from the alternate control room located in another building.

  18. NASA Aeronautics Research: An Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. air transportation system is vital to the economic well-being and security of the United States. To support continued U.S. leadership in aviation, Congress and NASA requested that the National Research Council undertake a decadal survey of civil aeronautics research and technology (R&T) priorities that would help NASA fulfill its responsibility to preserve U.S. leadership in aeronautics technology. In 2006, the National Research Council published the Decadal Survey of Civil Aeronautics. That report presented a set of six strategic objectives for the next decade of aeronautics R&T, and it described 51 high-priority R&T challenges--characterized by five common themes--for both NASA and non-NASA researchers. The National Research Council produced the present report, which assesses NASA's Aeronautics Research Program, in response to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Authorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109-155). This report focuses on three sets of questions: 1. How well does NASA's research portfolio implement appropriate recommendations and address relevant high-priority research and technology challenges identified in the Decadal Survey of Civil Aeronautics? If gaps are found, what steps should be taken by the federal government to eliminate them? 2. How well does NASA's aeronautics research portfolio address the aeronautics research requirements of NASA, particularly for robotic and human space exploration? How well does NASA's aeronautics research portfolio address other federal government department/agency non-civil aeronautics research needs? If gaps are found, what steps should be taken by NASA and/or other parts of the federal government to eliminate them? 3. Will the nation have a skilled research workforce and research facilities commensurate with the requirements in (1) and (2) above? What critical improvements in workforce expertise and research facilities, if any, should NASA and the nation make to achieve the goals of NASA

  19. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 405

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This report lists reports, articles and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles.

  20. Aeronautical engineering: A continuing bibliography with indexes (supplement 313)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This bibliography lists 179 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in Jan. 1995. Subject coverage includes: engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles.

  1. Aeronautical engineering: A continuing bibliography with indexes (supplement 284)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This bibliography lists 974 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in Oct. 1992. The coverage includes documents on design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles.

  2. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography With Indexes. Supplement 392

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This report lists reports, articles and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles.

  3. Aeronautical engineering: A continuing bibliography with indexes (supplement 310)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This bibliography lists 29 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in Nov. 1994. Subject coverage includes: engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction,evaluation testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles.

  4. Aeronautical engineering: A continuing bibliography with indexes (supplement 324)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This bibliography lists 149 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in December 1995. Subject coverage includes engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles.

  5. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. SUPPL-422

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This report lists reports, articles and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles.

  6. Aeronautical engineering: A continuing bibliography with indexes (supplement 319)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This report lists 349 reports, articles and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles.

  7. Chapter 8: Plasma operation and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ITER Physics Expert Group on Disruptions, Control, Plasma, and MHD; ITER Physics Expert Group on Energetic Particles, Heating, Current and Drive; ITER Physics Expert Group on Diagnostics; ITER Physics Basis Editors

    1999-12-01

    Wall conditioning of fusion devices involves removal of desorbable hydrogen isotopes and impurities from interior device surfaces to permit reliable plasma operation. Techniques used in present devices include baking, metal film gettering, deposition of thin films of low-Z material, pulse discharge cleaning, glow discharge cleaning, radio frequency discharge cleaning, and in situ limiter and divertor pumping. Although wall conditioning techniques have become increasingly sophisticated, a reactor scale facility will involve significant new challenges, including the development of techniques applicable in the presence of a magnetic field and of methods for efficient removal of tritium incorporated into co-deposited layers on plasma facing components and their support structures. The current status of various approaches is reviewed, and the implications for reactor scale devices are summarized. Creation and magnetic control of shaped and vertically unstable elongated plasmas have been mastered in many present tokamaks. The physics of equilibrium control for reactor scale plasmas will rely on the same principles, but will face additional challenges, exemplified by the ITER/FDR design. The absolute positioning of outermost flux surface and divertor strike points will have to be precise and reliable in view of the high heat fluxes at the separatrix. Long pulses will require minimal control actions, to reduce accumulation of AC losses in superconducting PF and TF coils. To this end, more complex feedback controllers are envisaged, and the experimental validation of the plasma equilibrium response models on which such controllers are designed is encouraging. Present simulation codes provide an adequate platform on which equilibrium response techniques can be validated. Burning plasmas require kinetic control in addition to traditional magnetic shape and position control. Kinetic control refers to measures controlling density, rotation and temperature in the plasma core as

  8. CARMENES instrument control system and operational scheduler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Piquer, Alvaro; Guàrdia, Josep; Colomé, Josep; Ribas, Ignasi; Gesa, Lluis; Morales, Juan Carlos; Pérez-Calpena, Ana; Seifert, Walter; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Amado, Pedro J.; Caballero, José A.; Reiners, Ansgar

    2014-07-01

    The main goal of the CARMENES instrument is to perform high-accuracy measurements of stellar radial velocities (1m/s) with long-term stability. CARMENES will be installed in 2015 at the 3.5 m telescope in the Calar Alto Observatory (Spain) and it will be equipped with two spectrographs covering from the visible to the near-infrared. It will make use of its near-IR capabilities to observe late-type stars, whose peak of the spectral energy distribution falls in the relevant wavelength interval. The technology needed to develop this instrument represents a challenge at all levels. We present two software packages that play a key role in the control layer for an efficient operation of the instrument: the Instrument Control System (ICS) and the Operational Scheduler. The coordination and management of CARMENES is handled by the ICS, which is responsible for carrying out the operations of the different subsystems providing a tool to operate the instrument in an integrated manner from low to high user interaction level. The ICS interacts with the following subsystems: the near-IR and visible channels, composed by the detectors and exposure meters; the calibration units; the environment sensors; the front-end electronics; the acquisition and guiding module; the interfaces with telescope and dome; and, finally, the software subsystems for operational scheduling of tasks, data processing, and data archiving. We describe the ICS software design, which implements the CARMENES operational design and is planned to be integrated in the instrument by the end of 2014. The CARMENES operational scheduler is the second key element in the control layer described in this contribution. It is the main actor in the translation of the survey strategy into a detailed schedule for the achievement of the optimization goals. The scheduler is based on Artificial Intelligence techniques and computes the survey planning by combining the static constraints that are known a priori (i.e., target

  9. From Aeronautics to Space: Lessons in Human Automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connors, Mary M.; Rosekind, Mark R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Civilian air flight continues on a growth curve, as more and more people utilize air travel to meet business and personal travel needs: This consumer-driven demand has resulted in the adoption of new methods to increase air system capacity and to make the air transportation system increasingly more efficient. As a consequence, civilian aviation, as an industry, has assumed a leading role in the use of automated systems, and, by implication, in the understanding of how human openers interact with these systems. Aeronautical automation systems serve a variety of roles. These include controlling aircraft and aiding, advising and monitoring numerous functions in the aircraft/airspace system. Experiences in the use of human/automation systems gathered from aviation are, in many cases, generalizable to other industries having similar requirements for human and non-human intelligent system interaction. However, the human/automation lessons learned from aviation have special relevance to the space application, where many of the same operational demands prevail. The application of aeronautical lessons of human-automated interaction to spaceflight is the subject of this paper. The discussion will address: the progress that has been made through aeronautically-based research and experience in understanding human/automation interaction, ways that this understanding can be applied to the needs of space, and the limits of our present understanding of human/automations systems. Suggestions will be offered related to human-automation research generally, and to the particular needs of the space endeavor.

  10. Operating large controlled thermonuclear fusion research facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudreau, M.P.J.; Tarrh, J.M.; Post, R.S.; Thomas, P.

    1987-10-01

    The MIT Tara Tandem Mirror is a large, state of the art controlled thermonuclear fusion research facility. Over the six years of its design, implementation, and operation, every effort was made to minimize cost and maximize performance by using the best and latest hardware, software, and scientific and operational techniques. After reviewing all major DOE fusion facilities, an independent DOE review committee concluded that the Tara operation was the most automated and efficient of all DOE facilities. This paper includes a review of the key elements of the Tara design, construction, operation, management, physics milestones, and funding that led to this success. We emphasize a chronological description of how the system evolved from the proposal stage to a mature device with an emphasis on the basic philosophies behind the implementation process. This description can serve both as a qualitative and quantitative database for future large experiment planning. It includes actual final costs and manpower spent as well as actual run and maintenance schedules, number of data shots, major system failures, etc. The paper concludes with recommendations for the next generation of facilities. 13 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. 14 CFR 91.1011 - Operational control responsibilities and delegation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Ownership Operations Operational Control § 91.1011 Operational control responsibilities and delegation. (a) Each owner in operational control of a program flight is ultimately responsible for safe operations and... owner and the program manager are jointly and individually responsible for compliance. (b)...

  12. 14 CFR 91.1011 - Operational control responsibilities and delegation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Ownership Operations Operational Control § 91.1011 Operational control responsibilities and delegation. (a) Each owner in operational control of a program flight is ultimately responsible for safe operations and... owner and the program manager are jointly and individually responsible for compliance. (b)...

  13. 14 CFR 91.1011 - Operational control responsibilities and delegation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Ownership Operations Operational Control § 91.1011 Operational control responsibilities and delegation. (a) Each owner in operational control of a program flight is ultimately responsible for safe operations and... owner and the program manager are jointly and individually responsible for compliance. (b)...

  14. 14 CFR 91.1011 - Operational control responsibilities and delegation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Ownership Operations Operational Control § 91.1011 Operational control responsibilities and delegation. (a) Each owner in operational control of a program flight is ultimately responsible for safe operations and... owner and the program manager are jointly and individually responsible for compliance. (b)...

  15. 47 CFR 78.51 - Remote control operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Remote control operation. 78.51 Section 78.51... SERVICE General Operating Requirements § 78.51 Remote control operation. (a) A CARS station may be operated by remote control: Provided, That such operation is conducted in accordance with the...

  16. Lightning in aeronautics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lago, F.

    2014-11-01

    It is generally accepted that a civilian aircraft is struck, on average, once or twice per year. This number tends to indicate that a lightning strike risk is far from being marginal and so requires that aircraft manufacturers have to demonstrate that their aircraft is protected against lightning. The first generation of aircrafts, which were manufactured mainly in aluminium alloy and had electromechanical and pneumatic controls, had a natural immunity to the effects of lightning. Nowadays, aircraft structures are made primarily with composite materials and flight controls are mostly electronic. This aspect of the "more composite and more electric" aircraft demands to aircraft manufacturers to pay a particular attention to the lightning protection and to its certification by testing and/or analysis. It is therefore essential to take this risk into account when designing the aircraft. Nevertheless, it is currently impossible to reproduce the entire lightning phenomenon in testing laboratories and the best way to analyse the lightning protection is to reproduce its effects. In this context, a number of standards and guides are produced by standards committees to help laboratories and aircraft manufacturers to perform realistic tests. Although the environment of a laboratory is quite different from those of a storm cloud, the rules of aircraft design, the know-how of aircraft manufacturers, the existence of international work leading to a better understanding of the lightning phenomenon and standards more precise, permit, today, to consider the risk as properly controlled.

  17. Operating System For Numerically Controlled Milling Machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, R. B.

    1992-01-01

    OPMILL program is operating system for Kearney and Trecker milling machine providing fast easy way to program manufacture of machine parts with IBM-compatible personal computer. Gives machinist "equation plotter" feature, which plots equations that define movements and converts equations to milling-machine-controlling program moving cutter along defined path. System includes tool-manager software handling up to 25 tools and automatically adjusts to account for each tool. Developed on IBM PS/2 computer running DOS 3.3 with 1 MB of random-access memory.

  18. Novelty, stimulus control, and operant variability

    PubMed Central

    Shahan, Timothy A.; Chase, Philip N.

    2002-01-01

    Although behavior analysis has been criticized for failure to account for response novelty, many common behavior-analytic concepts and processes (e.g., selectionism, the operant, reinforcement, and stimulus control) assume variability both in the environment and in behavior. The importance of the relation between variability and novelty, particularly for verbal behavior, is discussed, and concepts used to account for novel behavior are examined. Experimental findings also are reviewed that suggest that variability in behavior can come under discriminative control, and these findings are applied to describe novel instances of behavior that may arise during problem solving. We conclude that variations provided and selected by the terms of the three-term contingency are powerful means for understanding novel behavior. PMID:22478385

  19. The Alaska SAR processor - Operations and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carande, Richard E.

    1989-01-01

    The Alaska SAR (synthetic-aperture radar) Facility (ASF) will be capable of receiving, processing, archiving, and producing a variety of SAR image products from three satellite-borne SARs: E-ERS-1 (ESA), J-ERS-1 (NASDA) and Radarsat (Canada). Crucial to the success of the ASF is the Alaska SAR processor (ASP), which will be capable of processing over 200 100-km x 100-km (Seasat-like) frames per day from the raw SAR data, at a ground resolution of about 30 m x 30 m. The processed imagery is of high geometric and radiometric accuracy, and is geolocated to within 500 m. Special-purpose hardware has been designed to execute a SAR processing algorithm to achieve this performance. This hardware is currently undergoing acceptance testing for delivery to the University of Alaska. Particular attention has been devoted to making the operations semi-automated and to providing a friendly operator interface via a computer workstation. The operations and control of the Alaska SAR processor are described.

  20. 14 CFR 77.35 - Aeronautical studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aeronautical studies. 77.35 Section 77.35 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRSPACE OBJECTS AFFECTING NAVIGABLE AIRSPACE Aeronautical Studies of Effect of Proposed Construction on Navigable Airspace § 77.35 Aeronautical studies....

  1. The Western Aeronautical Test Range of NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, A. L.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of the Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) of NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) is presented in this paper. The three WATR facilities are discussed, and three WATR elements - mission control centerns, communications systems, real-time processing and display systems, and tracking systems -are reviewed. The relationships within the NASA WATR, with respect to the NASA aeronautics program, are also discussed.

  2. NASA's Aeronautics Vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenney, Darrel R.

    2004-01-01

    Six long-term technology focus areas are: 1. Environmentally Friendly, Clean Burning Engines. Focus: Develop innovative technologies to enable intelligent turbine engines that significantly reduce harmful emissions while maintaining high performance and increasing reliability. 2. New Aircraft Energy Sources and Management. Focus: Discover new energy sources and intelligent management techniques directed towards zero emissions and enable new vehicle concepts for public mobility and new science missions. 3. Quiet Aircraft for Community Friendly Service. Focus: Develop and integrate noise reduction technology to enable unrestricted air transportation service to all communities. 4. Aerodynamic Performance for Fuel Efficiency. Focus: Improve aerodynamic efficiency,structures and materials technologies, and design tools and methodologies to reduce fuel burn and minimize environmental impact and enable new vehicle concepts and capabilities for public mobility and new science missions. 5. Aircraft Weight Reduction and Community Access. Focus: Develop ultralight smart materials and structures, aerodynamic concepts, and lightweight subsystems to increase vehicle efficiency, leading to high altitude long endurance vehicles, planetary aircraft, advanced vertical and short takeoff and landing vehicles and beyond. 6. Smart Aircraft and Autonomous Control. Focus: Enable aircraft to fly with reduced or no human intervention, to optimize flight over multiple regimes, and to provide maintenance on demand towards the goal of a feeling, seeing, sensing, sentient air vehicle.

  3. The Aeronautical Laboratory of the Stockholm Technical Institute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malmer, Ivar

    1935-01-01

    This report presents a detailed analysis and history of the construction and operation of the aeronautical laboratory of the Stockholm Technical Institute. Engines and balances are discussed and experimental results are also given.

  4. 47 CFR 97.105 - Control operator duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Control operator duties. 97.105 Section 97.105 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Station Operation Standards § 97.105 Control operator duties. (a) The control operator must...

  5. 47 CFR 97.105 - Control operator duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Control operator duties. 97.105 Section 97.105 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Station Operation Standards § 97.105 Control operator duties. (a) The control operator must...

  6. 47 CFR 97.105 - Control operator duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Control operator duties. 97.105 Section 97.105 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Station Operation Standards § 97.105 Control operator duties. (a) The control operator must...

  7. 47 CFR 97.105 - Control operator duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Control operator duties. 97.105 Section 97.105 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Station Operation Standards § 97.105 Control operator duties. (a) The control operator must...

  8. 47 CFR 97.105 - Control operator duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Control operator duties. 97.105 Section 97.105 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Station Operation Standards § 97.105 Control operator duties. (a) The control operator must...

  9. Compressibility Effects in Aeronautical Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stack, John

    1941-01-01

    Compressible-flow research, while a relatively new field in aeronautics, is very old, dating back almost to the development of the first firearm. Over the last hundred years, researches have been conducted in the ballistics field, but these results have been of practically no use in aeronautical engineering because the phenomena that have been studied have been the more or less steady supersonic condition of flow. Some work that has been done in connection with steam turbines, particularly nozzle studies, has been of value, In general, however, understanding of compressible-flow phenomena has been very incomplete and permitted no real basis for the solution of aeronautical engineering problems in which.the flow is likely to be unsteady because regions of both subsonic and supersonic speeds may occur. In the early phases of the development of the airplane, speeds were so low that the effects of compressibility could be justifiably ignored. During the last war and immediately after, however, propellers exhibited losses in efficiency as the tip speeds approached the speed of sound, and the first experiments of an aeronautical nature were therefore conducted with propellers. Results of these experiments indicated serious losses of efficiency, but aeronautical engineers were not seriously concerned at the time became it was generally possible. to design propellers with quite low tip. speeds. With the development of new engines having increased power and rotational speeds, however, the problems became of increasing importance.

  10. Ensuring US National Aeronautics Test Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    U.S. leadership in aeronautics depends on ready access to technologically advanced, efficient, and affordable aeronautics test capabilities. These systems include major wind tunnels and propulsion test facilities and flight test capabilities. The federal government owns the majority of the major aeronautics test capabilities in the United States, primarily through the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Department of Defense (DoD). However, changes in the Aerospace landscape, primarily the decrease in demand for testing over the last 20 years required an overarching strategy for management of these national assets. Therefore, NASA established the Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) as a two-pronged strategic initiative to: (1) retain and invest in NASA aeronautics test capabilities considered strategically important to the agency and the nation, and (2) establish a strong, high level partnership with the DoD. Test facility utilization is a critical factor for ATP because it relies on user occupancy fees to recover a substantial part of the operations costs for its facilities. Decreasing utilization is an indicator of excess capacity and in some cases low-risk redundancy (i.e., several facilities with basically the same capability and overall low utilization). However, low utilization does not necessarily translate to lack of strategic importance. Some facilities with relatively low utilization are nonetheless vitally important because of the unique nature of the capability and the foreseeable aeronautics testing needs. Unfortunately, since its inception, the customer base for ATP has continued to shrink. Utilization of ATP wind tunnels has declined by more than 50% from the FY 2006 levels. This significant decrease in customer usage is attributable to several factors, including the overall decline in new programs and projects in the aerospace sector; the impact of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) on the design, development, and research

  11. (abstract) Mission Operations and Control Assurance: Flight Operations Quality Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welz, Linda L.; Bruno, Kristin J.; Kazz, Sheri L.; Witkowski, Mona M.

    1993-01-01

    Mission Operations and Command Assurance (MO&CA), a recent addition to flight operations teams at JPL. provides a system level function to instill quality in mission operations. MO&CA's primary goal at JPL is to help improve the operational reliability for projects during flight. MO&CA tasks include early detection and correction of process design and procedural deficiencies within projects. Early detection and correction are essential during development of operational procedures and training of operational teams. MO&CA's effort focuses directly on reducing the probability of radiating incorrect commands to a spacecraft. Over the last seven years at JPL, MO&CA has become a valuable asset to JPL flight projects. JPL flight projects have benefited significantly from MO&CA's efforts to contain risk and prevent rather than rework errors. MO&CA's ability to provide direct transfer of knowledge allows new projects to benefit directly from previous and ongoing experience. Since MO&CA, like Total Quality Management (TQM), focuses on continuous improvement of processes and elimination of rework, we recommend that this effort be continued on NASA flight projects.

  12. Smart Aeronautical Chart Management System Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakdil, M. E.; Celik, R. N.; Kaya, Ö.; Konak, Y. C.; Guney, C.

    2015-10-01

    Civil aviation is developing rapidly, and the number of domestic and international operations is increasing exponentially every year than the previous one. Airline companies with increased air traffic and the number of passengers increase the demand of new aircrafts. An aircraft needs not only fuel but also pilot and aeronautical information (charts, digital navigation information, flight plan, and etc.) to perform flight operation. One of the most important components in aeronautical information is the terminal chart. Authorized institution in every state is responsible to publish their terminal charts for certain periods. Although these charts are produced in accordance with ICAO's Annex 4 and Annex 15, cartographic representation and page layout differs in each state's publication. This situation makes difficult to read them by pilots. In this paper, standard instrument departure (SID) charts are analysed to produce by use of cutting-edge and competitive technologies instead of classical computer-aided drawing and vector based graphic applications that are currently used by main chart producers. The goal is to design efficient and commercial chart management system that is able to produce aeronautical charts with same cartographic representation for all states.

  13. 46 CFR 196.85-1 - Magazine operation and control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Magazine operation and control. 196.85-1 Section 196.85... OPERATIONS Magazine Control § 196.85-1 Magazine operation and control. (a) Keys to magazine spaces and magazine chests shall be kept in the sole control or custody of the Master or one delegated...

  14. 46 CFR 196.85-1 - Magazine operation and control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Magazine operation and control. 196.85-1 Section 196.85... OPERATIONS Magazine Control § 196.85-1 Magazine operation and control. (a) Keys to magazine spaces and magazine chests shall be kept in the sole control or custody of the Master or one delegated...

  15. 46 CFR 196.85-1 - Magazine operation and control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Magazine operation and control. 196.85-1 Section 196.85... OPERATIONS Magazine Control § 196.85-1 Magazine operation and control. (a) Keys to magazine spaces and magazine chests shall be kept in the sole control or custody of the Master or one delegated...

  16. 46 CFR 196.85-1 - Magazine operation and control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Magazine operation and control. 196.85-1 Section 196.85... OPERATIONS Magazine Control § 196.85-1 Magazine operation and control. (a) Keys to magazine spaces and magazine chests shall be kept in the sole control or custody of the Master or one delegated...

  17. Future Aeronautical Communication Infrastructure Technology Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Tricia; Jin, Jenny; Bergerm Jason; Henriksen, Steven

    2008-01-01

    This National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Contractor Report summarizes and documents the work performed to investigate technologies that could support long-term aeronautical mobile communications operating concepts for air traffic management (ATM) in the timeframe of 2020 and beyond, and includes the associated findings and recommendations made by ITT Corporation and NASA Glenn Research Center to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The work was completed as the final phase of a multiyear NASA contract in support of the Future Communication Study (FCS), a cooperative research and development program of the United States FAA, NASA, and EUROCONTROL. This final report focuses on an assessment of final five candidate technologies, and also provides an overview of the entire technology assessment process, including final recommendations.

  18. World-wide aeronautical satellite communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Peter; Smith, Keith

    1988-01-01

    INMARSAT decided to expand the spectrum covered by its new generation of satellites, INMARSAT-2, to include 1 MHz (subsequently increased to 3 MHz) of the spectrum designed for aeronautical use. It began a design study that led to the specifications for the system that is now being implemented. Subsequently, INMARSAT awarded contracts for the design of avionics and high gain antennas to a number of manufactures, while several of the signatories that provide ground equipment for communicating with the INMARSAT satellites are modifying their earth stations to work with the avionic equipment. As a resullt of these activities, a world-wide aeronautical satellite system supporting both voice and data will become operational in 1989.

  19. Advancing Aeronautics: A Decision Framework for Selecting Research Agendas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anton, Philip S.; Ecola, Liisa; Kallimani, James G.; Light, Thomas; Ohlandt, Chad J. R.; Osburg, Jan; Raman, Raj; Grammich, Clifford A.

    2011-01-01

    Publicly funded research has long played a role in the development of aeronautics, ranging from foundational research on airfoils to development of the air-traffic control system. Yet more than a century after the research and development of successful controlled, sustained, heavier-than-air flight vehicles, there are questions over the future of aeronautics research. The field of aeronautics is relatively mature, technological developments within it have become more evolutionary, and funding decisions are sometimes motivated by the continued pursuit of these evolutionary research tracks rather than by larger factors. These developments raise questions over whether public funding of aeronautics research continues to be appropriate or necessary and at what levels. Tightened federal budgets and increasing calls to address other public demands make these questions sharper still. To help it address the questions of appropriate directions for publicly funded aeronautics research, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) asked the RAND Corporation to assess the elements required to develop a strategic view of aeronautics research opportunities; identify candidate aeronautic grand challenges, paradigms, and concepts; outline a framework for evaluating them; and exercise the framework as an example of how to use it. Accordingly, this research seeks to address these questions: What aeronautics research should be supported by the U.S. government? What compelling and desirable benefits drive government-supported research? How should the government--especially NASA--make decisions about which research to support? Advancing aeronautics involves broad policy and decisionmaking challenges. Decisions involve tradeoffs among competing perspectives, uncertainties, and informed judgment.

  20. National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1938-01-01

    NASA was created from the National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics in 1958. This is a photo of the members of the advisory board of NACA in 1938. NACA was the governmental organization charged with the supervision and conduct of scientific laboratory research in aeronautics. Its laboratories located at Langley Field, Virginia, provide new knowledge underlying the continuous improvement in the performance, efficiency, and safety of American aircraft. At this meeting Dr. Joesph S. Ames, President Emeritus of John Hopkins University, was re-elected Chairman, and Dr. Vannevar Bush, President- elect of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, was elected Vice Chairman. Dr. Ames' re-election as chairman was a recognition of his outstanding contributions to the science of aeronautics. He has been the leading scientific member of the Committee for over twenty-three years and chairman for eleven years. Under his visionary leadership the great laboratories of the N.A.C.A. at Langley Field have been developed. Left to Right: Hon. C. M. Hester, Administrator, Civil Aeronautics Authority Captain S. M. Kraus, U.S.N. Brig. General A. W. Robins, Chief, Materiel Division, Army Air Corps. Dr. L.J. Biggs, Director, National Bureau of Standards Dr. E.P. Warner Dr. Orville Wright Dr. Joesph S. Ames, Chairman Dr. C.J. Abbot, Secretary, Smithsonian Institution J.F. Victory, Secretary Rear Adm. A.B. Cook, U.S.N., Chief, Bureau Aeronautics Authority Dr. Vannevar Bush Dr. J.C. Hunsaker Dr. G.W. Lewis, Director of Aeronautical Research. Absent: Col. Charles A. Lindbergh and Maj. Gen. H. 'Hap' Arnold, Chief, Army Air Corps. One Vacany: U.S. Weather Bureau.

  1. Aeronautical engineering: A continuing bibliography with indexes (supplement 294)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This issue of Aeronautical Engineering - A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes lists 590 reports, journal articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspect of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. The bibliographic series is compiled through the cooperative efforts of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Seven indexes are included: subject, personal author, corporate source, foreign technology, contract number, report number, and accession number.

  2. Aeronautics and Space Report of the President

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Nineteen eighty-eight marked the United States' return to space flight with two successful space shuttle launches in September and December, as well as six successful expendable rocket launches. Meanwhile, many other less spectacular but important contributions were made in aeronautics and space by the 14 participating government organizations. Each organization's aeronautics and/or space activities for the year are presented. The organizations involved include: (1) NASA; (2) Department of Defense; (3) Department of Commerce; (4) Department of Energy; (5) Department of the Interior; (6) Department of Agriculture; (7) Federal Communications Commission; (8) Department of Transportation; (9) Environmental Protection Agency; (10) National Science Foundation; (11) Smithsonian Institution; (12) Department of State; (13) Arms Control and Disarmament Agency; and (14) United States Information Agency.

  3. Job Prospects for Aeronautical Engineers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basta, Nicholas

    1985-01-01

    Huge defense budgets and a commercial aircraft comeback are contributing to high demands for aeronautical engineers. Job offers are plentiful and are expected to rise by 41 percent from 1982 to 1995. Federal space programs will provide additional employment opportunities. (DH)

  4. NASA's role in aeronautical research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, M.

    1983-01-01

    Past and current research in the aeronautical field conducted by NASA is reviewed. The first national center for aeronautical research, the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory, was established in 1917 by the then formed National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). Two other research centers established later by NACA (Lewis and Ames) were staffed with research cadres from Langley. These three research centers formed the nucleus of NASA when it was established in 1958. Studies conducted today by NASA's research centers include: a concept for commuter-style aircraft, turbofan engines for military supersonic fighter aircraft, strength and durability of man-made fiber materials, and maneuverability problems in high speed aircraft. In addition, at Ames, research is being conducted on short-haul aviation, and short and vertical takeoff while at Lewis studies concentrate on propulsion system and engines. At Langley the emphasis is on basic research, stressing aircraft structure improvements, stall avoidance and noise abatement. Finally, the importance of NASA's educational program is discussed.

  5. 1997 NASA Academy in Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrisani, Dominick, II

    1998-01-01

    The NASA Academy in Aeronautics at the Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) was a ten-week summer leadership training program conducted for the first time in the summer of 1997. Funding was provided by a contract between DFRC and Purdue University. Mr. Lee Duke of DFRC was the contract monitor, and Professor Dominick Andrisani was the principal investigator. Five student research associates participated in the program. Biographies of the research associates are given in Appendix 1. Dominick Andrisani served as Dean of the NASA Academy in Aeronautics. NASA Academy in Aeronautics is a unique summer institute of higher learning that endeavors to provide insight into all of the elements that make NASA aeronautical research possible. At the same time the Academy assigns the research associate to be mentored by one of NASA!s best researchers so that they can contribute towards an active flight research program. Aeronautical research and development are an investment in the future, and NASA Academy is an investment in aeronautical leaders of the future. The Academy was run by the Indiana Space Grant Consortium at Purdue in strategic partnership with the National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program. Research associates at the Academy were selected with help from the Space Grant Consortium that sponsored the research associate. Research associate stipend and travel to DFRC were paid by the students' Space Grant Consortium. All other student expenses were paid by the Academy. Since the Academy at DFRC had only five students the opportunity for individual growth and attention was unique in the country. About 30% of the working time and most of the social time of the students were be spent as a "group" or "team." This time was devoted to exchange of ideas, on forays into the highest levels of decision making, and in executing aeronautical research. This was done by interviewing leaders throughout the aerospace industry, seminars, working dinners, and informal

  6. Emerging Definition of Next-Generation of Aeronautical Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    Aviation continues to experience rapid growth. In regions such as the United States and Europe air traffic congestion is constraining operations, leading to major new efforts to develop methodologies and infrastructures to enable continued aviation growth through transformational air traffic management systems. Such a transformation requires better communications linking airborne and ground-based elements. Technologies for next-generation communications, the required capacities, frequency spectrum of operation, network interconnectivity, and global interoperability are now receiving increased attention. A number of major planning and development efforts have taken place or are in process now to define the transformed airspace of the future. These activities include government and industry led efforts in the United States and Europe, and by international organizations. This paper will review the features, approaches, and activities of several representative planning and development efforts, and identify the emerging global consensus on requirements of next generation aeronautical communications systems for air traffic control.

  7. 47 CFR 87.91 - Operation of transmitter controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operation of transmitter controls. 87.91 Section 87.91 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AVIATION SERVICES Operating Requirements and Procedures Radio Operator Requirements § 87.91 Operation of transmitter controls. The holder of...

  8. 49 CFR 227.113 - Noise operational controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Noise operational controls. 227.113 Section 227... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION OCCUPATIONAL NOISE EXPOSURE Occupational Noise Exposure for Railroad Operating Employees. § 227.113 Noise operational controls. (a) Railroads may use noise operational...

  9. 49 CFR 227.113 - Noise operational controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Noise operational controls. 227.113 Section 227... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION OCCUPATIONAL NOISE EXPOSURE Occupational Noise Exposure for Railroad Operating Employees. § 227.113 Noise operational controls. (a) Railroads may use noise operational...

  10. 49 CFR 227.113 - Noise operational controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Noise operational controls. 227.113 Section 227... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION OCCUPATIONAL NOISE EXPOSURE Occupational Noise Exposure for Railroad Operating Employees. § 227.113 Noise operational controls. (a) Railroads may use noise operational...

  11. 49 CFR 227.113 - Noise operational controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Noise operational controls. 227.113 Section 227... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION OCCUPATIONAL NOISE EXPOSURE Occupational Noise Exposure for Railroad Operating Employees. § 227.113 Noise operational controls. (a) Railroads may use noise operational...

  12. Operation and maintenance manual for the LDUA operations control trailer (LDUA System 4100)

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.A.

    1996-09-10

    The Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) Operations Control Trailer(OCT) has completed testing and is ready for operation. This document defines the requirements applicable to the operation and maintenance of the OCT.

  13. Operation and control software for APNEA

    SciTech Connect

    McClelland, J.H.; Storm, B.H. Jr.; Ahearn, J.

    1997-11-01

    The human interface software for the Lockheed Martin Specialty Components (LMSC) Active/Passive Neutron Examination & Analysis System (APENA) provides a user friendly operating environment for the movement and analysis of waste drums. It is written in Microsoft Visual C++ on a Windows NT platform. Object oriented and multitasking techniques are used extensively to maximize the capability of the system. A waste drum is placed on a loading platform with a fork lift and then automatically moved into the APNEA chamber in preparation for analysis. A series of measurements is performed, controlled by menu commands to hardware components attached as peripheral devices, in order to create data files for analysis. The analysis routines use the files to identify the pertinent radioactive characteristics of the drum, including the type, location, and quantity of fissionable material. At the completion of the measurement process, the drum is automatically unloaded and the data are archived in preparation for storage as part of the drum`s data signature. 3 figs.

  14. 47 CFR 80.80 - Operating controls for ship stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Operating controls for ship stations. 80.80... SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Operating Requirements and Procedures Station Requirements-Ship Stations § 80.80 Operating controls for ship stations. (a) Each control point must be capable of:...

  15. 47 CFR 80.80 - Operating controls for ship stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Operating controls for ship stations. 80.80... SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Operating Requirements and Procedures Station Requirements-Ship Stations § 80.80 Operating controls for ship stations. (a) Each control point must be capable of:...

  16. 47 CFR 80.80 - Operating controls for ship stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Operating controls for ship stations. 80.80... SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Operating Requirements and Procedures Station Requirements-Ship Stations § 80.80 Operating controls for ship stations. (a) Each control point must be capable of:...

  17. 47 CFR 80.80 - Operating controls for ship stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operating controls for ship stations. 80.80... SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Operating Requirements and Procedures Station Requirements-Ship Stations § 80.80 Operating controls for ship stations. (a) Each control point must be capable of:...

  18. 47 CFR 80.80 - Operating controls for ship stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Operating controls for ship stations. 80.80... SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Operating Requirements and Procedures Station Requirements-Ship Stations § 80.80 Operating controls for ship stations. (a) Each control point must be capable of:...

  19. 47 CFR 97.7 - Control operation required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE General Provisions § 97.7 Control operation required. When transmitting, each amateur station must have a control operator. The control operator must be a person: (a) For whom an amateur...

  20. 47 CFR 97.7 - Control operation required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE General Provisions § 97.7 Control operation required. When transmitting, each amateur station must have a control operator. The control operator must be a person: (a) For whom an amateur...

  1. 47 CFR 97.7 - Control operator required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE General Provisions § 97.7 Control operator required. When transmitting, each amateur station must have a control operator. The control operator must be a person: (a) For whom an amateur...

  2. 47 CFR 97.7 - Control operation required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE General Provisions § 97.7 Control operation required. When transmitting, each amateur station must have a control operator. The control operator must be a person: (a) For whom an amateur...

  3. 47 CFR 97.7 - Control operation required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE General Provisions § 97.7 Control operation required. When transmitting, each amateur station must have a control operator. The control operator must be a person: (a) For whom an amateur...

  4. 46 CFR 196.85-1 - Magazine operation and control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Magazine operation and control. 196.85-1 Section 196.85-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS OPERATIONS Magazine Control § 196.85-1 Magazine operation and control. (a) Keys to magazine spaces...

  5. 14 CFR 61.185 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aeronautical knowledge. 61.185 Section 61... Flight Instructors With a Sport Pilot Rating § 61.185 Aeronautical knowledge. (a) A person who is... aeronautical knowledge areas for a recreational, private, and commercial pilot certificate applicable to...

  6. 14 CFR 61.125 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aeronautical knowledge. 61.125 Section 61... Aeronautical knowledge. (a) General. A person who applies for a commercial pilot certificate must receive and... aeronautical knowledge areas of paragraph (b) of this section that apply to the aircraft category and...

  7. 14 CFR 61.105 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Aeronautical knowledge. 61.105 Section 61.105 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Private Pilots § 61.105 Aeronautical knowledge. (a) General. A person who...

  8. 14 CFR 61.125 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Aeronautical knowledge. 61.125 Section 61.125 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Commercial Pilots § 61.125 Aeronautical knowledge. (a) General. A person...

  9. 14 CFR 61.97 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Aeronautical knowledge. 61.97 Section 61.97 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Recreational Pilots § 61.97 Aeronautical knowledge. (a) General. A person...

  10. Aeronautics. America in Space: The First Decade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderton, David A.

    The major research and developments in aeronautics during the late 1950's and 1960's are reviewed descriptively with a minimum of technical content. Topics covered include aeronautical research, aeronautics in NASA, The National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, the X-15 Research Airplane, variable-sweep wing design, the Supersonic Transport…

  11. 14 CFR 61.97 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Aeronautical knowledge. 61.97 Section 61.97 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Recreational Pilots § 61.97 Aeronautical knowledge. (a) General. A person...

  12. 14 CFR 61.125 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Aeronautical knowledge. 61.125 Section 61.125 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Commercial Pilots § 61.125 Aeronautical knowledge. (a) General. A person...

  13. 14 CFR 61.185 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Aeronautical knowledge. 61.185 Section 61... Flight Instructors With a Sport Pilot Rating § 61.185 Aeronautical knowledge. (a) A person who is... aeronautical knowledge areas for a recreational, private, and commercial pilot certificate applicable to...

  14. 14 CFR 61.185 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Aeronautical knowledge. 61.185 Section 61... Flight Instructors With a Sport Pilot Rating § 61.185 Aeronautical knowledge. (a) A person who is... aeronautical knowledge areas for a recreational, private, and commercial pilot certificate applicable to...

  15. 14 CFR 61.185 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Aeronautical knowledge. 61.185 Section 61... Flight Instructors With a Sport Pilot Rating § 61.185 Aeronautical knowledge. (a) A person who is... aeronautical knowledge areas for a recreational, private, and commercial pilot certificate applicable to...

  16. 14 CFR 61.185 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Aeronautical knowledge. 61.185 Section 61... Flight Instructors With a Sport Pilot Rating § 61.185 Aeronautical knowledge. (a) A person who is... aeronautical knowledge areas for a recreational, private, and commercial pilot certificate applicable to...

  17. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography With Indexes. Supplement 404

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-1999-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  18. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 386

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-1998-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract.

  19. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography With Indexes. Supplement 418

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-2000-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  20. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography With Indexes. Supplement 406

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-1999-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  1. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 389

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-1998-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract.

  2. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 391

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-1999-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract.

  3. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 396

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-1999-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  4. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 413

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-2000-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  5. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography With Indexes. Supplement 398

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. The NASA CASI price code table, addresses of organizations, and document availability information are included before the abstract section. Two indexes - subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  6. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 419

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-2000-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  7. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 420

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-2000-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  8. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 387

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-1998-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract.

  9. NASA's Role in Aeronautics: A Workshop. Volume 1: Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The state of the U.S. aeronautic industry and progressive changes in national priorities as reflected in federal unified budget outlays are reviewed as well as the contribution of NACA and the character and substance of U.S. aeronautical research under NASA. Eight possible roles for the future defined by NASA are examined and the extent to which the agency should carry out these activities is considered. The roles include: (1) national facilities expertise; (2) flight sciences research; (3) generic technology evolution; (4) vehicle class evolution; (5) technology demonstration; (6) prototype development; (7) technology validation; and (8) operations feasibility; How NASA's roles varies in the areas of military aviation, general aviation, transport aircraft aeronautics, rotorcraft aeronautics, engineering education, information dissemination, and cooperation with other organizations and agencies is discussed with regard to research in aerodynamics; structures and materials; propulsion; electronics and avionics; vehicle operations; and human engineering.

  10. Aeronautical engineering. A continuing bibliography with indexes, supplement 127, October 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A bibliography containing 431 abstracts addressing various topics in aeronautical engineering is given. The coverage includes engineering and theoretical aspects of design. construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles.

  11. Operator Finds Control at His Fingertips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goscicki, Edward

    1979-01-01

    Discussed are the advantages associated with the use of computer systems in wastewater treatment facilities. The system parallels plant organization and considers operations, maintenance, and plant management. (CS)

  12. Solar energy and the aeronautics industry. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benedek, L.

    1985-01-01

    An introduction to the physical aspects of solar energy, incidental energy and variations in solar flux is presented, along with an explanation of the physical principles of obtaining solar energy. The history of the application of solar energy to aeronautics, including the Gossamer Penguin and the Solar Challenger is given. Finally, an analysis of the possibilities of using a reaction motor with hybrid propulsion combining solar energy with traditional fuels as well as calculations of the proposed cycle and its mode of operation are given.

  13. Aeronautical Engineering, a special bibliography with indexes, supplement 15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This special bibliography lists 363 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in January 1972. Emphasis is placed on engineering and theoretical aspects for design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment and systems. Also included are entries on research and development in aeronautics and aerodynamics and research and ground support for aeronautical vehicles.

  14. Aeronautical engineering: A continuing bibliography with indexes (supplement 282)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This bibliography lists 623 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in Aug. 1992. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles.

  15. Aeronautical engineering: A continuing bibliography with indexes (supplement 119)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    This bibliography lists 341 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in January 1980. Abstracts on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems are presented. Research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles are also presented.

  16. Aeronautical Engineering: A special bibliography with indexes, supplement 13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This special bibliography lists 283 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in December, 1971. Emphasis is placed on engineering and theoretical aspects for design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines), and associated components, equipment and systems. Also included are entries on research and development in aeronautics and aerodynamics and research and ground support for aeronautical vehicles.

  17. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 397

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This report lists reports, articles and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract.

  18. Mastectomy following preoperative chemotherapy. Strict operative criteria control operative morbidity.

    PubMed

    Broadwater, J R; Edwards, M J; Kuglen, C; Hortobagyi, G N; Ames, F C; Balch, C M

    1991-02-01

    The surgical morbidity associated with aggressive preoperative chemotherapy in 106 patients with advanced primary breast cancer who had chemotherapy followed by mastectomy was examined. These patients were compared with a group of 91 consecutive patients who had mastectomy without preoperative chemotherapy. Strict operative criteria were used to determine the timing of mastectomy following chemotherapy. Wound infection rates were no different in the preoperative chemotherapy group compared to the mastectomy-alone groups (7% versus 4%; p = 0.62). The incidence of wound necrosis was similar (11% versus 6%; p = 0.29). Seroma formation was decreased significantly in the preoperative chemotherapy group compared to the mastectomy-alone group (15% versus 28%; p = 0.04). Intensive preoperative chemotherapy did not delay the reinstitution of postoperative treatment (30% versus 20%; p = 0.27). However, when delay in instituting postoperative chemotherapy was more than 30 days, there was a significant decrease in overall survival rate (p = 0.04). This study provides evidence that intensive preoperative chemotherapy and mastectomy can be performed without increased morbidity. Furthermore it is important to institute systemic chemotherapy within 30 days of mastectomy to achieve maximum survival. PMID:1992938

  19. Progress Toward National Aeronautics Goals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russo, Carlo J.; Sehra, Arun K.

    1999-01-01

    NASA has made definitive progress towards achieving several bold U.S. goals in aeronautics related to air breathing engines. The advanced technologies developed towards these goals span applications from general aviation to large subsonic and supersonic aircraft. The proof of successful technology development is demonstrated through successful technology transfer to U.S. industry and projected fleet impact. Specific examples of progress are discussed that quantifies the achievement towards these goals. In addition, a more detailed vision for NASA aeronautics is defined and key strategic issues are explored which invite international and national debate and involvement especially in reduced environmental impact for subsonic and supersonic aircraft, dramatic new capabilities in general aviation engines, and reduced development cycle time and costs.

  20. 21 CFR 111.117 - What quality control operations are required for equipment, instruments, and controls?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and Process Control System: Requirements for Quality Control § 111.117 What quality control operations are required for equipment, instruments, and controls? Quality control operations for equipment... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What quality control operations are required...

  1. 21 CFR 111.117 - What quality control operations are required for equipment, instruments, and controls?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What quality control operations are required for... and Process Control System: Requirements for Quality Control § 111.117 What quality control operations are required for equipment, instruments, and controls? Quality control operations for...

  2. 21 CFR 111.117 - What quality control operations are required for equipment, instruments, and controls?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What quality control operations are required for... and Process Control System: Requirements for Quality Control § 111.117 What quality control operations are required for equipment, instruments, and controls? Quality control operations for...

  3. NASA/NBS (National Aeronautics and Space Administration/National Bureau of Standards) standard reference model for telerobot control system architecture (NASREM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albus, James S.; Mccain, Harry G.; Lumia, Ronald

    1989-01-01

    The document describes the NASA Standard Reference Model (NASREM) Architecture for the Space Station Telerobot Control System. It defines the functional requirements and high level specifications of the control system for the NASA space Station document for the functional specification, and a guideline for the development of the control system architecture, of the 10C Flight Telerobot Servicer. The NASREM telerobot control system architecture defines a set of standard modules and interfaces which facilitates software design, development, validation, and test, and make possible the integration of telerobotics software from a wide variety of sources. Standard interfaces also provide the software hooks necessary to incrementally upgrade future Flight Telerobot Systems as new capabilities develop in computer science, robotics, and autonomous system control.

  4. Radio-controlled, sound-operated switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, T. D.; Soloman, D. W., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Switch presently provides remote control switching, by radio signals, or pollution sampling devices. Can be used for remote weather station interrogation, firing of pyrotechnics, control of dangerous equipment, or control of device in location where it is impractical to run metallic conductors because of time limitations, distance, or terrain.

  5. 47 CFR 78.51 - Remote control operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Remote control operation. 78.51 Section 78.51 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES CABLE TELEVISION RELAY SERVICE General Operating Requirements § 78.51 Remote control operation. (a) A CARS station may...

  6. 30 CFR 56.6300 - Control of blasting operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control of blasting operations. 56.6300 Section... § 56.6300 Control of blasting operations. (a) Only persons trained and experienced in the handling and use of explosive material shall direct blasting operations and related activities. (b) Trainees...

  7. 30 CFR 57.6300 - Control of blasting operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control of blasting operations. 57.6300 Section... Transportation-Surface and Underground § 57.6300 Control of blasting operations. (a) Only persons trained and experienced in the handling and use of explosive material shall direct blasting operations and...

  8. 47 CFR 74.634 - Remote control operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Remote control operation. 74.634 Section 74.634 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES EXPERIMENTAL RADIO... Stations § 74.634 Remote control operation. (a) A TV auxiliary station may be operated by remote...

  9. 47 CFR 74.634 - Remote control operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Remote control operation. 74.634 Section 74.634 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES EXPERIMENTAL RADIO... Stations § 74.634 Remote control operation. (a) A TV auxiliary station may be operated by remote...

  10. 47 CFR 74.634 - Remote control operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Remote control operation. 74.634 Section 74.634 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES EXPERIMENTAL RADIO... Stations § 74.634 Remote control operation. (a) A TV auxiliary station may be operated by remote...

  11. 47 CFR 74.634 - Remote control operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Remote control operation. 74.634 Section 74.634 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES EXPERIMENTAL RADIO... Stations § 74.634 Remote control operation. (a) A TV auxiliary station may be operated by remote...

  12. Remote Operations and Ground Control Centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Barry S.; Lankford, Kimberly; Pitts, R. Lee

    2004-01-01

    The Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center supports the International Space Station (ISS) through remote interfaces around the world. The POIC was originally designed as a gateway to space for remote facilities; ranging from an individual user to a full-scale multiuser environment. This achievement was accomplished while meeting program requirements and accommodating the injection of modern technology on an ongoing basis to ensure cost effective operations. This paper will discuss the open POIC architecture developed to support similar and dissimilar remote operations centers. It will include technologies, protocols, and compromises which on a day to day basis support ongoing operations. Additional areas covered include centralized management of shared resources and methods utilized to provide highly available and restricted resources to remote users. Finally, the effort of coordinating the actions of participants will be discussed.

  13. Achieving QoS for Aeronautical Telecommunication Networks Over Differentiated Services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, Haowei; Atiquzzaman, Mohammed; Ivanic, William

    2001-01-01

    Aeronautical Telecommunication Network (ATN) has been developed by the International Civil Aviation Organization to integrate Air-Ground and Ground-Ground data communication for aeronautical applications into a single network serving Air Traffic Control and Aeronautical Operational Communications. To carry time critical information required for aeronautical applications, ATN provides different Quality of Services (QoS) to applications. ATN has therefore, been designed as a stand alone network which implies building an expensive separate network for ATN However, the cost of operating ATN can be reduced if it can be run over a public network such as the Internet. Although the current Internet does not provide QoS the next generation Internet is expected to provide QoS to applications. The objective of this paper is to investigate the possibility of providing QoS to ATN applications when it is run over the next generation Internet. Differentiated Services (DiffServ), one of the protocols proposed for the next generation Internet, will allow network service providers to offer different QoS to customers. Our results show that it is possible to provide QoS to ATN applications when they run over a DiffServ backbone.

  14. Achieving QoS for Aeronautical Telecommunication Networks over Differentiated Services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, Haowei; Atiquzzaman, Mohammed; Ivancic, William

    2001-01-01

    Aeronautical Telecommunication Network (ATN) has been developed by the International Civil Aviation Organization to integrate Air-Ground and Ground-Ground data communication for aeronautical applications into a single network serving Air Traffic Control and Aeronautical Operational Communications. To carry time critical information required for aeronautical applications, ATN provides different Quality of Services (QoS) to applications. ATN has therefore, been designed as a standalone network which implies building an expensive separate network for ATN. However, the cost of operating ATN can be reduced if it can be run over a public network such as the Internet. Although the current Internet does not provide QoS, the next generation Internet is expected to provide QoS to applications. The objective of this paper is to investigate the possibility of providing QoS to ATN applications when it is run over the next generation Internet. Differentiated Services (DiffServ), one of the protocols proposed for the next generation Internet, will allow network service providers to offer different QoS to customers. Our results show that it is possible to provide QoS to ATN applications when they run over a DiffServ backbone.

  15. An Overview of the NASA Aeronautics Test Program Strategic Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    U.S. leadership in aeronautics depends on ready access to technologically advanced, efficient, and affordable aeronautics test capabilities. These systems include major wind tunnels and propulsion test facilities and flight test capabilities. The federal government owns the majority of the major aeronautics test capabilities in the United States, primarily through the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Department of Defense (DoD), however an overarching strategy for management of these national assets was needed. Therefore, in Fiscal Year (FY) 2006 NASA established the Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) as a two-pronged strategic initiative to: (1) retain and invest in NASA aeronautics test capabilities considered strategically important to the agency and the nation, and (2) establish a strong, high level partnership with the DoD Test Resources Management Center (TRMC), stewards of the DoD test and evaluation infrastructure. Since then, approximately seventy percent of the ATP budget has been directed to underpin fixed and variable costs of facility operations within its portfolio and the balance towards strategic investments in its test facilities, including maintenance and capability upgrades. Also, a strong guiding coalition was established through the National Partnership for Aeronautics Testing (NPAT), with governance by the senior leadership of NASA s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) and the DoD's TRMC. As part of its strategic planning, ATP has performed or participated in many studies and analyses, including assessments of major NASA and DoD aeronautics test capabilities, test facility condition evaluations and market research. The ATP strategy has also benefitted from unpublished RAND research and analysis by Ant n et al. (2009). Together, these various studies, reports and assessments serve as a foundation for a new, five year strategic plan that will guide ATP through FY 2014. Our vision for the future is a balanced

  16. Elements of an advanced integrated operator control station

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, M.M.; Kreifeldt, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    One of the critical determinants of peformance for any remotely operated maintenance system is the compatibility achieved between elements of the man/machine interface (e.g., master manipulator controller, controls, displays, etc.) and the human operator. In the Remote Control Engineering task of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program, considerable attention has been devoted to optimizing the man/machine interface of the operator control station. This system must be considered an integral element of the overall maintenance work system which includes transporters, manipulators, remote viewing, and other parts. The control station must reflect the integration of the operator team, control/display panels, manipulator master controllers, and remote viewing monitors. Human factors principles and experimentation have been used in the development of an advanced integrated operator control station designed for the advance servomanipulator. Key features of this next-generation design are summarized in this presentation. 7 references, 4 figures.

  17. Elements of an advanced integrated operator control station

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, M.M.; Kreifeldt, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    One of the critical determinants of performance for any remotely operated maintenance system is the compatibility achieved between elements of the man/machine interface (e.g., master manipulator controller, controls, displays) and the human operator. In the remote control engineering task of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program, considerable attention has been devoted to optimizing the man/machine interface of the operator control station. This system must be considered an integral element of the overall maintenance work system which includes transporters, manipulators, remote viewing, and other parts. The control station must reflect the integration of the operator team, control/display panels, manipulator master controllers, and remote viewing monitors. Human factors principles and experimentation have been used in the development of an advanced integrated operator control station designed for the advance servomanipulator. Key features of this next-generation design are summarized in this presentation. 7 references, 4 figures.

  18. A CCIR aeronautical mobile satellite report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davarian, Faramaz; Bishop, Dennis; Rogers, David; Smith, Ernest K.

    1989-08-01

    Propagation effects in the aeronautical mobile-satellite service differ from those in the fixed-satellite service and other mobile-satellite services because: small antennas are used on aircraft, and the aircraft body may affect the performance of the antenna; high aircraft speeds cause large Doppler spreads; aircraft terminals must accommodate a large dynamic range in transmission and reception; and due to their high speeds, banking maneuvers, and three-dimensional operation, aircraft routinely require exceptionally high integrity of communications, making even short-term propagation effects very important. Data and models specifically required to characterize the path impairments are discussed, which include: tropospheric effects, including gaseous attenuation, cloud and rain attenuation, fog attenuation, refraction and scintillation; surface reflection (multipath) effects; ionospheric effects such as scintillation; and environmental effects (aircraft motion, sea state, land surface type). Aeronautical mobile-satellite systems may operate on a worldwide basis, including propagation paths at low elevation angles. Several measurements of multipath parameters over land and sea were conducted. In some cases, laboratory simulations are used to compare measured data and verify model parameters. The received signals is considered in terms of its possible components: a direct wave subject to atmospheric effects, and a reflected wave, which generally contains mostly a diffuse component.

  19. A CCIR aeronautical mobile satellite report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, Faramaz; Bishop, Dennis; Rogers, David; Smith, Ernest K.

    1989-01-01

    Propagation effects in the aeronautical mobile-satellite service differ from those in the fixed-satellite service and other mobile-satellite services because: small antennas are used on aircraft, and the aircraft body may affect the performance of the antenna; high aircraft speeds cause large Doppler spreads; aircraft terminals must accommodate a large dynamic range in transmission and reception; and due to their high speeds, banking maneuvers, and three-dimensional operation, aircraft routinely require exceptionally high integrity of communications, making even short-term propagation effects very important. Data and models specifically required to characterize the path impairments are discussed, which include: tropospheric effects, including gaseous attenuation, cloud and rain attenuation, fog attenuation, refraction and scintillation; surface reflection (multipath) effects; ionospheric effects such as scintillation; and environmental effects (aircraft motion, sea state, land surface type). Aeronautical mobile-satellite systems may operate on a worldwide basis, including propagation paths at low elevation angles. Several measurements of multipath parameters over land and sea were conducted. In some cases, laboratory simulations are used to compare measured data and verify model parameters. The received signals is considered in terms of its possible components: a direct wave subject to atmospheric effects, and a reflected wave, which generally contains mostly a diffuse component.

  20. 40 CFR 798.6500 - Schedule-controlled operant behavior.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Schedule-controlled operant behavior. 798.6500 Section 798.6500 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) HEALTH EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Neurotoxicity § 798.6500 Schedule-controlled operant behavior. (a) Purpose....

  1. 69. DETAIL OF OPERATIONS AND CHECKOUT (POWER CONTROL AND MONITOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    69. DETAIL OF OPERATIONS AND CHECKOUT (POWER CONTROL AND MONITOR PANEL) AND RANGE SAFETY (DESTRUCT SYSTEM CONTROL MONITOR PANEL) PANELS IN SLC-3E CONTROL ROOM - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  2. 47 CFR 74.434 - Remote control operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Remote control operation. 74.434 Section 74.434 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES EXPERIMENTAL RADIO....434 Remote control operation. (a) A remote control system must provide adequate monitoring and...

  3. 47 CFR 74.434 - Remote control operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Remote control operation. 74.434 Section 74.434 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES EXPERIMENTAL RADIO....434 Remote control operation. (a) A remote control system must provide adequate monitoring and...

  4. 47 CFR 74.434 - Remote control operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Remote control operation. 74.434 Section 74.434 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES EXPERIMENTAL RADIO....434 Remote control operation. (a) A remote control system must provide adequate monitoring and...

  5. 47 CFR 74.434 - Remote control operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Remote control operation. 74.434 Section 74.434 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES EXPERIMENTAL RADIO....434 Remote control operation. (a) A remote control system must provide adequate monitoring and...

  6. Enhanced Engine Control for Emergency Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan S.

    2012-01-01

    C-MAPSS40k engine simulation has been developed and is available to the public. The authenticity of the engine performance and controller enabled the development of realistic enhanced control modes through controller modification alone. Use of enhanced control modes improved stability and control of an impaired aircraft. - Fast Response is useful for manual manipulation of the throttles - Use of Fast Response improved stability as part of a yaw rate feedback system. - Use of Overthrust shortened takeoff distance, but was generally useful in flight, too. Initial lack of pilot familiarity resulted in discomfort, especially with yaw rate feedback, but that was the only drawback, overall the pilot found the enhanced modes very helpful.

  7. Visual operations control in administrative environments

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, M.L.; Levine, L.O.

    1995-03-01

    When asked what comes to mind when they think of ``controlling work`` in the office, people may respond with ``overbearing boss,`` ``no autonomy,`` or ``Theory X management.`` The idea of controlling work in white collar or administrative environments can have a negative connotation. However, office life is often chaotic and miserable precisely because the work processes are out of control, and managers must spend their time looking over people`s shoulders and fighting fires. While management styles and structures vary, the need for control of work processes does not. Workers in many environments are being reorganized into self-managed work teams. These teams are expected to manage their own work through increased autonomy and empowerment. However, even empowered work teams must manage their work processes because of process variation. The amount of incoming jobs vary with both expected (seasonal) and unexpected demand. The mixture of job types vary over time, changing the need for certain skills or knowledge. And illness and turnover affect the availability of workers with needed skills and knowledge. Clearly, there is still a need to control work, whether the authority for controlling work is vested in one person or many. Visual control concepts provide simple, inexpensive, and flexible mechanisms for managing processes in work teams and continuous improvement administrative environments.

  8. An aeronautical mobile satellite experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedrey, T. C.; Dessouky, K. I.; Lay, N. E.

    1990-01-01

    The various activities and findings of a NASA/FAA/COMSAT/INMARSAT collaborative aeronautical mobile satellite experiment are detailed. The primary objective of the experiment was to demonstrate and evaluate an advanced digital mobile satellite terminal developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory under the NASA Mobile Satellite Program. The experiment was a significant milestone for NASA/JPL, since it was the first test of the mobile terminal in a true mobile satellite environment. The results were also of interest to the general mobile satellite community because of the advanced nature of the technologies employed in the terminal.

  9. 14 CFR 65.37 - Skill requirements: Operating positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Skill requirements: Operating positions. 65.37 Section 65.37 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Air Traffic Control Tower Operators § 65.37 Skill requirements:...

  10. 14 CFR 65.49 - General operating rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false General operating rules. 65.49 Section 65.49 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Air Traffic Control Tower Operators §...

  11. 14 CFR 65.49 - General operating rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false General operating rules. 65.49 Section 65.49 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Air Traffic Control Tower Operators §...

  12. 14 CFR 65.49 - General operating rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false General operating rules. 65.49 Section 65.49 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Air Traffic Control Tower Operators §...

  13. 14 CFR 65.49 - General operating rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General operating rules. 65.49 Section 65.49 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Air Traffic Control Tower Operators §...

  14. 14 CFR 65.49 - General operating rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false General operating rules. 65.49 Section 65.49 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Air Traffic Control Tower Operators §...

  15. Control Methods of Operational Properties of Lubricants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lysyannikova, N.; Kovalski, B.; Bezborodov, Yu; Lysyannikov, A.; Kravtsova, Ye; Shram, V.; Kovaleva, M.

    2016-06-01

    Some results of thermal-oxidation and temperature stability testing of motor oils are presented. The catalytic influence of metals on oxidizing processes in lubricants with use of steel 45 was determined. The parameters for identification of oils by groups of operational properties and quantity indicators of the influence of metals on oxidizing processes of lubricants are offered.

  16. Control of railroad operations: Algorithms and economics

    SciTech Connect

    Harker, P.

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents the results of a seven-year research effort to apply optimization models and techniques to improve productivity and reliability of freight railroad operations. After describing the basic modelling framework, a series of optimization models will be described in detail along with the results of their application. The paper ends with a discussion of the future research opportunities in this area.

  17. Remotely-Operated Traffic Control Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    Traffic warning light for school crossing, construction zones, and other hazardous areas activated by remote control. Apparatus consists of small radio transmitter, pole-mounted strobe light with attached power supply and radio receiver.

  18. A fuel level sensor for aeronautical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrazzuoli, L.; Persichetti, G.; Onorato, G.; Grimaldi, I. A.; Testa, G.; Bernini, R.

    2015-03-01

    A novel fuel level sensor for aeronautical applications is developed. The sensor is based on an array of total internal reflection (TIR) point sensors. Respect to conventional TIR sensors the new design permits to be sensitive to common jet fuels (JetA, JP4,JP7) but also to operate with new alternative fuels. The sensor doesn't require aircraft calibration, temperature compensation and furthermore is able to operate correctly when partially or totally exposed to presence of condensed water on its surface. The point sensors are multiplexed on a single fiber by optical couplers and interrogated simultaneously by Optical Time Domain Reflectometry (OTDR) at a wavelength of 1550nm. Experimental results show a resolution of +/-1.5mm could be achieved. The sensors is also able to measure the free water level in the fuel.

  19. Using new aggregation operators in rule-based intelligent control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berenji, Hamid R.; Chen, Yung-Yaw; Yager, Ronald R.

    1990-01-01

    A new aggregation operator is applied in the design of an approximate reasoning-based controller. The ordered weighted averaging (OWA) operator has the property of lying between the And function and the Or function used in previous fuzzy set reasoning systems. It is shown here that, by applying OWA operators, more generalized types of control rules, which may include linguistic quantifiers such as Many and Most, can be developed. The new aggregation operators, as tested in a cart-pole balancing control problem, illustrate improved performance when compared with existing fuzzy control aggregation schemes.

  20. Aeronautical record : no. 1 (to June, 1923)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1923-01-01

    "...considerations have prompted us to pay special attention to the development of aeronautical industries and aerial navigation as a commercial enterprise and to publish an analytical review of events in the aeronautical world and of the attendant problems."

  1. 14 CFR 61.105 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ....105 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED.... (b) Aeronautical knowledge areas. (1) Applicable Federal Aviation Regulations of this chapter that...) Recognition of critical weather situations from the ground and in flight, windshear avoidance, and...

  2. 14 CFR 61.97 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN.... (b) Aeronautical knowledge areas. (1) Applicable Federal Aviation Regulations of this chapter that... using pilotage with the aid of a magnetic compass; (5) Recognition of critical weather situations...

  3. 14 CFR 61.105 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ....105 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED.... (b) Aeronautical knowledge areas. (1) Applicable Federal Aviation Regulations of this chapter that...) Recognition of critical weather situations from the ground and in flight, windshear avoidance, and...

  4. 14 CFR 61.125 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ....125 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... rating sought. (b) Aeronautical knowledge areas. (1) Applicable Federal Aviation Regulations of this... principles of flight; (4) Meteorology to include recognition of critical weather situations,...

  5. 14 CFR 61.125 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ....125 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... rating sought. (b) Aeronautical knowledge areas. (1) Applicable Federal Aviation Regulations of this... principles of flight; (4) Meteorology to include recognition of critical weather situations,...

  6. Aeronautical audio broadcasting via satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzeng, Forrest F.

    A system design for aeronautical audio broadcasting, with C-band uplink and L-band downlink, via Inmarsat space segments is presented. Near-transparent-quality compression of 5-kHz bandwidth audio at 20.5 kbit/s is achieved based on a hybrid technique employing linear predictive modeling and transform-domain residual quantization. Concatenated Reed-Solomon/convolutional codes with quadrature phase shift keying are selected for bandwidth and power efficiency. RF bandwidth at 25 kHz per channel, and a decoded bit error rate at 10(exp -6) with E(sub b)/N(sub o) at 3.75 dB are obtained. An interleaver, scrambler, modem synchronization, and frame format were designed, and frequency-division multiple access was selected over code-division multiple access. A link budget computation based on a worst-case scenario indicates sufficient system power margins. Transponder occupancy analysis for 72 audio channels demonstrates ample remaining capacity to accommodate emerging aeronautical services.

  7. Aeronautical audio broadcasting via satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tzeng, Forrest F.

    1993-01-01

    A system design for aeronautical audio broadcasting, with C-band uplink and L-band downlink, via Inmarsat space segments is presented. Near-transparent-quality compression of 5-kHz bandwidth audio at 20.5 kbit/s is achieved based on a hybrid technique employing linear predictive modeling and transform-domain residual quantization. Concatenated Reed-Solomon/convolutional codes with quadrature phase shift keying are selected for bandwidth and power efficiency. RF bandwidth at 25 kHz per channel, and a decoded bit error rate at 10(exp -6) with E(sub b)/N(sub o) at 3.75 dB are obtained. An interleaver, scrambler, modem synchronization, and frame format were designed, and frequency-division multiple access was selected over code-division multiple access. A link budget computation based on a worst-case scenario indicates sufficient system power margins. Transponder occupancy analysis for 72 audio channels demonstrates ample remaining capacity to accommodate emerging aeronautical services.

  8. 19. View of interior of bridge operator's control cabin, with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. View of interior of bridge operator's control cabin, with manual control levers at left, and electrical equipment cabinet at right; looking west - India Point Railroad Bridge, Spanning Seekonk River between Providence & East Providence, Providence, Providence County, RI

  9. 14 CFR 27.683 - Operation tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Operation tests. 27.683 Section 27.683... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 27.683 Operation tests. It must be shown by operation tests that, when the controls are operated from the pilot compartment...

  10. 14 CFR 29.683 - Operation tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Operation tests. 29.683 Section 29.683... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 29.683 Operation tests. It must be shown by operation tests that, when the controls are operated from the pilot...

  11. 14 CFR 29.683 - Operation tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Operation tests. 29.683 Section 29.683... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 29.683 Operation tests. It must be shown by operation tests that, when the controls are operated from the pilot...

  12. 14 CFR 27.683 - Operation tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Operation tests. 27.683 Section 27.683... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 27.683 Operation tests. It must be shown by operation tests that, when the controls are operated from the pilot compartment...

  13. 14 CFR 29.683 - Operation tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Operation tests. 29.683 Section 29.683... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 29.683 Operation tests. It must be shown by operation tests that, when the controls are operated from the pilot...

  14. 14 CFR 27.683 - Operation tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Operation tests. 27.683 Section 27.683... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 27.683 Operation tests. It must be shown by operation tests that, when the controls are operated from the pilot compartment...

  15. 76 FR 40753 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-11

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics... Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a..., Executive Secretary for the Aeronautics Committee, National Aeronautics and Space......

  16. 47 CFR 90.473 - Operation of internal transmitter control systems through licensed fixed control points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operation of internal transmitter control... Transmitter Control Internal Transmitter Control Systems § 90.473 Operation of internal transmitter control systems through licensed fixed control points. An internal transmitter control system may be...

  17. Expert operator preferences in remote manipulator control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sundstrom, E.; Draper, J.V.; Fausz, A.; Woods, H.

    1995-06-01

    This report describes a survey of expert remote manipulator operators designed to identify features of control systems related to operator efficiency and comfort. It provides information for designing the control center for the Single-Shell Tank Waste Retrieval Manipulator System (TWRMS) Test Bed, described in a separate report. Research questions concerned preferred modes of control, optimum work sessions, sources of operator fatigue, importance of control system design features, and desired changes in control rooms. Participants comprised four expert remote manipulator operators at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, who individually have from 9 to 20 years of experience using teleoperators. The operators had all used rate and position control, and all preferred bilateral (force-reflecting) position control. They reported spending an average of 2.75 h in control of a teleoperator system during a typical shift. All were accustomed to working in a crew of two and alternating control and support roles in 2-h rotations in an 8-h shift. Operators reported that fatigue in using remote manipulator systems came mainly from watching TV monitors and making repetitive motions. Three of four experienced symptoms, including headaches and sore eyes, wrists, and back. Of 17 features of control rooms rated on importance, highest ratings went to comfort and support provided by the operator chair, location of controls, location of video monitors, video image clarity, types of controls, and control modes. When asked what they wanted to change, operators said work stations designed for comfort; simpler, lighter hand-controls; separate controls for each camera; better placement of remote camera; color monitors; and control room layouts that support crew interaction. Results of this small survey reinforced the importance of ergonomic factors in remote manipulation.

  18. 14 CFR 61.105 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aeronautical knowledge. 61.105 Section 61... Aeronautical knowledge. (a) General. A person who is applying for a private pilot certificate must receive and... knowledge areas of paragraph (b) of this section that apply to the aircraft category and class rating...

  19. NASA's aeronautics research and technology base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    NASA's research technology base in aeronautics is assessed in terms of: (1) US aeronautical technology needs and requirements in the future; (2) objectives of the aeronautics program; (3) magnitude and scope of the program; and (4) research and technology performed by NASA and other research organizations.

  20. Questions & Answers about Aeronautics and Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    Answers to 27 questions about aeronautics, space, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are provided in this pamphlet. Among the topics dealt with in these questions are: costs of the space program; NASA's role in aeronautics; benefits received from the space program; why the United States hasn't developed means of rescuing…

  1. Dimensioning of Aeronautical Satellite Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzbock, M.; Jahn, A.; Werner, M.

    2002-01-01

    This paper will provide a generalised baseline for a systematic AirCom design process and address in particular the dimensioning of satellite systems for aeronautical services. These services will roll out soon in medium- and long-haul aircraft. The offered services will range from low rate telephony, internet access, and streaming applications for video and audio. The aggregate bit rates on up- and downlink will certainly be statistically time-dependent and asymmetric in forward and backward direction. A tool will be described that is able to model this traffic. Furthermore the dimensioning of satellite constellations can be done. Due to the stochastic nature of the traffic, multi-service models for the traffic generation of different services will be described. Furthermore, the traffic will be affected by the available bit rate and shaping or blocking will equalize the peak loads. If fleets with many aircraft are considered, aeronautical traffic models must be based on actual aircraft routes, flight schedules, location and time of day, as well as seats per aircraft and type of aircraft (charter, business etc.). The regionally distributed traffic has to be served by several satellites and appropriate sharing of the serving satellites may spread the traffic in hot zones and yield a better load distribution. When aeronautical services will spread out, the capacity demand will grow quickly and the capacity of existing Ku-band GEO satellites will soon be exceeded. Changing to higher frequency bands will provide large spectrum portions and smaller spotbeams will allow better frequency reuse. Even constellations with non-geostationary satellites could be re-advent to serve better the higher latitude regions. Then, another mobility component for the fast changing satellite topology need to be addressed, and routing issues of the traffic must be considered. The paper will describe solutions for the mapping of satellites and traffic demand as well as routing algorithms

  2. Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System Description Document

    SciTech Connect

    E.F. Loros

    2000-06-29

    The Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System provides supervisory control, monitoring, and selected remote control of primary and secondary repository operations. Primary repository operations consist of both surface and subsurface activities relating to high-level waste receipt, preparation, and emplacement. Secondary repository operations consist of support operations for waste handling and treatment, utilities, subsurface construction, and other selected ancillary activities. Remote control of the subsurface emplacement operations, as well as, repository performance confirmation operations are the direct responsibility of the system. In addition, the system monitors parameters such as radiological data, air quality data, fire detection status, meteorological conditions, unauthorized access, and abnormal operating conditions, to ensure a safe workplace for personnel. Parameters are displayed in a real-time manner to human operators regarding surface and subsurface conditions. The system performs supervisory monitoring and control for both important to safety and non-safety systems. The system provides repository operational information, alarm capability, and human operator response messages during emergency response situations. The system also includes logic control to place equipment, systems, and utilities in a safe operational mode or complete shutdown during emergency response situations. The system initiates alarms and provides operational data to enable appropriate actions at the local level in support of emergency response, radiological protection response, evacuation, and underground rescue. The system provides data communications, data processing, managerial reports, data storage, and data analysis. This system's primary surface and subsurface operator consoles, for both supervisory and remote control activities, will be located in a Central Control Center (CCC) inside one of the surface facility buildings. The system

  3. Fluid logic control circuit operates nutator actuator motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Fluid logic control circuit operates a pneumatic nutator actuator motor. It has no moving parts and consists of connected fluid interaction devices. The operation of this circuit demonstrates the ability of fluid interaction devices to operate in a complex combination of series and parallel logic sequence.

  4. SSS-A attitude control prelaunch analysis and operations plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werking, R. D.; Beck, J.; Gardner, D.; Moyer, P.; Plett, M.

    1971-01-01

    A description of the attitude control support being supplied by the Mission and Data Operations Directorate is presented. Descriptions of the computer programs being used to support the mission for attitude determination, prediction, control, and definitive attitude processing are included. In addition, descriptions of the operating procedures which will be used to accomplish mission objectives are provided.

  5. Operational Control Procedures for the Activated Sludge Process: Appendix.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Alfred W.

    This document is the appendix for a series of documents developed by the National Training and Operational Technology Center describing operational control procedures for the activated sludge process used in wastewater treatment. Categories discussed include: control test data, trend charts, moving averages, semi-logarithmic plots, probability…

  6. 50 CFR 31.14 - Official animal control operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Official animal control operations. 31.14... Reduction and Disposal § 31.14 Official animal control operations. (a) Animal species which are surplus or...) Animal species which are damaging or destroying Federal property within a wildlife refuge area may...

  7. 50 CFR 31.14 - Official animal control operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Official animal control operations. 31.14... Reduction and Disposal § 31.14 Official animal control operations. (a) Animal species which are surplus or...) Animal species which are damaging or destroying Federal property within a wildlife refuge area may...

  8. 50 CFR 31.14 - Official animal control operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Official animal control operations. 31.14... Reduction and Disposal § 31.14 Official animal control operations. (a) Animal species which are surplus or...) Animal species which are damaging or destroying Federal property within a wildlife refuge area may...

  9. 50 CFR 31.14 - Official animal control operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Official animal control operations. 31.14... Reduction and Disposal § 31.14 Official animal control operations. (a) Animal species which are surplus or...) Animal species which are damaging or destroying Federal property within a wildlife refuge area may...

  10. 50 CFR 31.14 - Official animal control operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Official animal control operations. 31.14... Reduction and Disposal § 31.14 Official animal control operations. (a) Animal species which are surplus or...) Animal species which are damaging or destroying Federal property within a wildlife refuge area may...

  11. 47 CFR 74.533 - Remote control and unattended operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Remote control and unattended operation. 74.533... EXPERIMENTAL RADIO, AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES Aural Broadcast Auxiliary Stations § 74.533 Remote control and unattended operation. (a) Aural broadcast STL and...

  12. 47 CFR 74.18 - Transmitter control and operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Transmitter control and operation. 74.18... EXPERIMENTAL RADIO, AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES General; Rules Applicable to All Services in Part 74 § 74.18 Transmitter control and operation. Except where...

  13. 47 CFR 74.533 - Remote control and unattended operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Remote control and unattended operation. 74.533... EXPERIMENTAL RADIO, AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES Aural Broadcast Auxiliary Stations § 74.533 Remote control and unattended operation. (a) Aural broadcast STL and...

  14. 47 CFR 74.18 - Transmitter control and operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Transmitter control and operation. 74.18... EXPERIMENTAL RADIO, AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES General; Rules Applicable to All Services in Part 74 § 74.18 Transmitter control and operation. Except where...

  15. 47 CFR 74.18 - Transmitter control and operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Transmitter control and operation. 74.18... EXPERIMENTAL RADIO, AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES General; Rules Applicable to All Services in Part 74 § 74.18 Transmitter control and operation. Except where...

  16. 47 CFR 74.434 - Remote control operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Remote control operation. 74.434 Section 74.434 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES EXPERIMENTAL RADIO, AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES Remote Pickup Broadcast Stations § 74.434 Remote control operation....

  17. 47 CFR 74.533 - Remote control and unattended operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Remote control and unattended operation. 74.533... EXPERIMENTAL RADIO, AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES Aural Broadcast Auxiliary Stations § 74.533 Remote control and unattended operation. (a) Aural broadcast STL and...

  18. 47 CFR 74.533 - Remote control and unattended operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Remote control and unattended operation. 74.533... EXPERIMENTAL RADIO, AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES Aural Broadcast Auxiliary Stations § 74.533 Remote control and unattended operation. (a) Aural broadcast STL and...

  19. 47 CFR 74.18 - Transmitter control and operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transmitter control and operation. 74.18... EXPERIMENTAL RADIO, AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES General; Rules Applicable to All Services in Part 74 § 74.18 Transmitter control and operation. Except where...

  20. A spatial operator algebra for manipulator modeling and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, G.; Jain, A.; Kreutz-Delgado, K.

    1991-01-01

    A recently developed spatial operator algebra for manipulator modeling, control, and trajectory design is discussed. The elements of this algebra are linear operators whose domain and range spaces consist of forces, moments, velocities, and accelerations. The effect of these operators is equivalent to a spatial recursion along the span of a manipulator. Inversion of operators can be efficiently obtained via techniques of recursive filtering and smoothing. The operator algebra provides a high-level framework for describing the dynamic and kinematic behavior of a manipulator and for control and trajectory design algorithms. The interpretation of expressions within the algebraic framework leads to enhanced conceptual and physical understanding of manipulator dynamics and kinematics.

  1. Entanglement Cost of Implementing Controlled-Unitary Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soeda, Akihito; Turner, Peter S.; Murao, Mio

    2011-10-01

    We investigate the minimum entanglement cost of the deterministic implementation of two-qubit controlled-unitary operations using local operations and classical communication (LOCC). We show that any such operation can be implemented by a three-turn LOCC protocol, which requires at least 1 ebit of entanglement when the resource is given by a bipartite entangled state with Schmidt number 2. Our result implies that there is a gap between the minimum entanglement cost and the entangling power of controlled-unitary operations. This gap arises due to the requirement of implementing the operations while oblivious to the identity of the inputs.

  2. Projection Operator: A Step Towards Certification of Adaptive Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larchev, Gregory V.; Campbell, Stefan F.; Kaneshige, John T.

    2010-01-01

    One of the major barriers to wider use of adaptive controllers in commercial aviation is the lack of appropriate certification procedures. In order to be certified by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), an aircraft controller is expected to meet a set of guidelines on functionality and reliability while not negatively impacting other systems or safety of aircraft operations. Due to their inherent time-variant and non-linear behavior, adaptive controllers cannot be certified via the metrics used for linear conventional controllers, such as gain and phase margin. Projection Operator is a robustness augmentation technique that bounds the output of a non-linear adaptive controller while conforming to the Lyapunov stability rules. It can also be used to limit the control authority of the adaptive component so that the said control authority can be arbitrarily close to that of a linear controller. In this paper we will present the results of applying the Projection Operator to a Model-Reference Adaptive Controller (MRAC), varying the amount of control authority, and comparing controller s performance and stability characteristics with those of a linear controller. We will also show how adjusting Projection Operator parameters can make it easier for the controller to satisfy the certification guidelines by enabling a tradeoff between controller s performance and robustness.

  3. An Approach to Bilateral Control System for Improvement of Operationality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Ohnishi, Kouhei

    Many types of bilateral control architectures to transmit force sensation have been proposed. Some control methods obtain good performance. Operationality is not satisfactory, however, when these methods are implemented in bilateral systems with large inertia and friction force. In this paper, a novel bilateral control method is proposed to improve operationality of bilateral systems with large inertia and friction force. The proposed method is compared with a conventional method, and the effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated by coordinate transformation and experiments.

  4. Adaptive multisatellite systems for aeronautical services.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bisaga, J. J.; Redisch, W. N.

    1971-01-01

    The use of satellite systems to provide operational communications and ATC services to aircraft flying the oceanic routes has been the subject of considerable interest recently. Since most of the link factors are functions of geometry and the aircraft traffic density varies with time, the satellite power needed to meet the communication demand varies considerably in an oceanic area as a function of both location and time. An adaptive system that tailors the use of system resources to the needs of the user can result in an additional system capacity improvement by a factor of between two and three. Results of studies conducted to date indicate that simple implementation of adaptive techniques in aeronautical satellite systems is feasible. Study is continuing in this area and on the application of satellite multibeam techniques to gain even further increase in capacity.

  5. Modulation and Synchronization for Aeronautical Telemetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Christopher G.

    Aeronautical telemetry systems have historically been implemented with constant envelope modulations like CPM. Shifts in system constraints including reduced available bandwidth and increased throughput demands have caused many in the field to reevaluate traditional methods and design practices. This work examines the costs and benefits of using APSK for aeronautical telemetry instead of CPM. Variable rate turbo codes are used to improve the power efficiency of 16- and 32-APSK. Spectral regrowth in nonlinear power amplifiers when driven by non-constant envelope modulation is also considered. Simulation results show the improved spectral efficiency of this modulation scheme over those currently defined in telemetry standards. Additionally, the impact of transitioning from continuous transmission to burst-mode is considered. Synchronization loops are ineffective in burst-mode communication. Data-aided feedforward algorithms can be used to estimate offsets in carrier phase, frequency, and symbol timing between the transmitter and the receiver. If a data-aided algorithm is used, a portion of the transmitted signal is devoted to a known sequence of pilot symbols. Optimum pilot sequences for the three synchronization parameters are obtained analytically and numerically for different system constraints. The alternating sequence is shown to be optimal given a peak power constraint. Alternatively, synchronization can be accomplished using blind algorithms that do not rely on a priori knowledge of a pilot sequence. If blind algorithms are used, the observation interval can be longer than for data-aided algorithms. There are combinations of pilot sequence length and packet length where data-aided algorithms perform better than blind algorithms and vice versa. The conclusion is that a sequential arrangement of blind algorithms operating over an entire burst performs better than a CRB-achieving data-aided algorithm operating over a short pilot sequence.

  6. Test, Control and Monitor System (TCMS) operations plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macfarlane, C. K.; Conroy, M. P.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose is to provide a clear understanding of the Test, Control and Monitor System (TCMS) operating environment and to describe the method of operations for TCMS. TCMS is a complex and sophisticated checkout system focused on support of the Space Station Freedom Program (SSFP) and related activities. An understanding of the TCMS operating environment is provided and operational responsibilities are defined. NASA and the Payload Ground Operations Contractor (PGOC) will use it as a guide to manage the operation of the TCMS computer systems and associated networks and workstations. All TCMS operational functions are examined. Other plans and detailed operating procedures relating to an individual operational function are referenced within this plan. This plan augments existing Technical Support Management Directives (TSMD's), Standard Practices, and other management documentation which will be followed where applicable.

  7. Operation and Control of the PBMR Demonstration Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, Petrus D.; Nieuwoudt, Chris

    2006-07-01

    A large interest in High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGR) has been shown in recent years. HTGR power plants show a number of advantages over existing technology including improved safety, modular design and high temperatures for process heat applications. HTGR plants with closed loop direct cycle power conversion units have unique transient responses which is different from existing nuclear plants as well as conventional non-nuclear power plants. The operation and control for a HTGR power plant therefore poses new and different challenges. This paper describes the modes of operation for the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) demonstration plant. The PBMR demonstration plant is an advanced helium-cooled, graphite-moderated HTGR consisting of a closed loop direct cycle power conversion unit. The use of transient analysis simulation makes it possible to develop effective control strategies and design controllers for use in the power conversion unit as well as the reactor. In addition to plant controllers the operator tasks and operational technical specifications can be developed and evaluated making use of transient analysis simulation of the plant together with the control system. The main challenges in the operation and control of the reactor and power conversion unit are highlighted with simulation results. Control strategies in different operating regions are shown and results for the power conversion unit start-up transition and the loss of the grid connection during power operation are presented. (authors)

  8. Attitude Control Optimization for ROCSAT-2 Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chern, Jeng-Shing; Wu, A.-M.

    one revolution. The purpose of this paper is to present the attitude control design optimization such that the maximum solar energy is ingested while minimum maneuvering energy is dissipated. The strategy includes the maneuvering sequence design, the minimization of angular path, the sizing of three magnetic torquers, and the trade-off of the size, number and orientations arrangement of momentum wheels.

  9. 30. LAUNCH CONTROL CAPSULE. ACOUSTICAL ENCLOSURE. OPERATORS' CHAIR AND COMMUNICATIONS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. LAUNCH CONTROL CAPSULE. ACOUSTICAL ENCLOSURE. OPERATORS' CHAIR AND COMMUNICATIONS CONSOLE IN FOREGROUND. ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT RACK AT LEFT; LAUNCH CONTROL CONSOLE WITH CAPTAIN JAMES L. KING, JR. IN CENTER. LIEUTENANT KEVIN R. MCCLUNEY IN BACKGROUND. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Minuteman III ICBM Launch Control Facility November-1, 1.5 miles North of New Raymer & State Highway 14, New Raymer, Weld County, CO

  10. INTEGRATED ROBOT-HUMAN CONTROL IN MINING OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    George Danko

    2005-04-01

    This report contains a detailed description of the work conducted in the first year of the project on Integrated Robot-Human Control in Mining Operations at University of Nevada, Reno. This project combines human operator control with robotic control concepts to create a hybrid control architecture, in which the strengths of each control method are combined to increase machine efficiency and reduce operator fatigue. The kinematics reconfiguration type differential control of the excavator implemented with a variety of ''software machine kinematics'' is the key feature of the project. This software re-configured excavator is more desirable to execute a given digging task. The human operator retains the master control of the main motion parameters, while the computer coordinates the repetitive movement patterns of the machine links. These repetitive movements may be selected from a pre-defined family of trajectories with different transformations. The operator can make adjustments to this pattern in real time, as needed, to accommodate rapidly-changing environmental conditions. A Bobcat{reg_sign} 435 excavator was retrofitted with electro-hydraulic control valve elements. The modular electronic control was tested and the basic valve characteristics were measured for each valve at the Robotics Laboratory at UNR. Position sensors were added to the individual joint control actuators, and the sensors were calibrated. An electronic central control system consisting of a portable computer, converters and electronic driver components was interfaced to the electro-hydraulic valves and position sensors. The machine is operational with or without the computer control system depending on whether the computer interface is on or off. In preparation for emulated mining tasks tests, typical, repetitive tool trajectories during surface mining operations were recorded at the Newmont Mining Corporation's ''Lone Tree'' mine in Nevada.

  11. 21 CFR 111.110 - What quality control operations are required for laboratory operations associated with the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... laboratory operations associated with the production and process control system? 111.110 Section 111.110 Food... OPERATIONS FOR DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS Production and Process Control System: Requirements for Quality Control... production and process control system? Quality control operations for laboratory operations associated...

  12. 21 CFR 111.110 - What quality control operations are required for laboratory operations associated with the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... laboratory operations associated with the production and process control system? 111.110 Section 111.110 Food... OPERATIONS FOR DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS Production and Process Control System: Requirements for Quality Control... production and process control system? Quality control operations for laboratory operations associated...

  13. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Education 1993-2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivie, Christine M.

    2009-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration was established in 1958 and began operating a formal education program in 1993. The purpose of this study was to analyze the education program from 1993-2009 by examining strategic plan documents produced by the NASA education office and interviewing NASA education officials who served during that…

  14. Aeronautical engineering: A special bibliography with indexes, supplement 49

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The bibliography contains 368 abstract citations of reports, journal articles, and other documents concerned with the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. Research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment are also treated. Subject, personal, and contract number indexes are included for ease of access.

  15. Quality Program Provisions for Aeronautical and Space System Contractors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    This publication sets forth quality program requirements for NASA aeronautical and space programs, systems, subsystems, and related services. These requirements provide for the effective operation of a quality program which ensures that quality criteria and requirements are recognized, definitized, and performed satisfactorily.

  16. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography With Indexes. Supplement 414

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This report lists reports, articles and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. The NASA CASI price code table, addresses of organizations, and document availability information are included before the abstract section. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  17. Expert operator's associate: A knowledge based system for spacecraft control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Mogens; Grue, Klaus; Lecouat, Francois

    1991-01-01

    The Expert Operator's Associate (EOA) project is presented which studies the applicability of expert systems for day-to-day space operations. A prototype expert system is developed, which operates on-line with an existing spacecraft control system at the European Space Operations Centre, and functions as an 'operator's assistant' in controlling satellites. The prototype is demonstrated using an existing real-time simulation model of the MARECS-B2 telecommunication satellite. By developing a prototype system, the extent to which reliability and effectivens of operations can be enhanced by AI based support is examined. In addition the study examines the questions of acquisition and representation of the 'knowledge' for such systems, and the feasibility of 'migration' of some (currently) ground-based functions into future spaceborne autonomous systems.

  18. Fire Extinguisher Control System Provides Reliable Cold Weather Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branum, J. C.

    1967-01-01

    Fast acting, pneumatically and centrally controlled, fire extinguisher /firex/ system is effective in freezing climates. The easy-to-operate system provides a fail-dry function which is activated by an electrical power failure.

  19. 6. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTH OF OPERATOR DECK, SHOWING MOTOR CONTROLS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTH OF OPERATOR DECK, SHOWING MOTOR CONTROLS AND LEVERS AND HOIST FOR TRASH RAKE - Cabot Station Electric Generating Plant, Gantry Crane, Montague City Road, Turners Falls vicinity, Montague, Franklin County, MA

  20. 26. INTERIOR VIEW OF OPERATOR'S HOUSE (CENTRAL CONTROL STATION), OLD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. INTERIOR VIEW OF OPERATOR'S HOUSE (CENTRAL CONTROL STATION), OLD LE CLAIRE LOCK, LOOKING WEST - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 14, Upper Mississippi River, Le Claire, Scott County, IA

  1. 25. VIEW SHOWING FRONT SIDE OF OPERATOR'S HOUSE (CENTRAL CONTROL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. VIEW SHOWING FRONT SIDE OF OPERATOR'S HOUSE (CENTRAL CONTROL STATION), OLD LE CLAIRE LOCK - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 14, Upper Mississippi River, Le Claire, Scott County, IA

  2. Remotely operated gripper provides vertical control rod movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutter, E.; Koch, L. J.

    1968-01-01

    Remote actuation of a gripper shaft affects vertical engagement between a drive shaft and control rod. A secondary function of the gripper is to provide remote indication of positive completion of the gripping or ungripping operation.

  3. VIEW TO WEST FROM AIRFIELD APRON, SHOWING BASE OPERATIONS CONTROL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW TO WEST FROM AIRFIELD APRON, SHOWING BASE OPERATIONS CONTROL TOWER (FACILITY NO. 365), AND RESERVOIR HILL BEYOND Hangar NO. 9, AT RIGHT - Hamilton Field, East of Nave Drive, Novato, Marin County, CA

  4. 6. INTERIOR VIEW WITH CONTROL PANEL FOR CUPOLA OPERATIONS WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. INTERIOR VIEW WITH CONTROL PANEL FOR CUPOLA OPERATIONS WITH GREY IRON CUPOLA FOREMAN, DAVID CAMP REDMAN. REDMAN IS A THIRD GENERATION STOCKHAM EMPLOYEE. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  5. 20. VIEW OF OPERATING CONTROLS, NORTHWEST CORNER OF TENDERS SHANTY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. VIEW OF OPERATING CONTROLS, NORTHWEST CORNER OF TENDERS SHANTY, LOOKING NORTHWEST - Mystic River Drawbridge No. 7, Spanning Mystic River at Boston & Maine Railroad Eastern Route, Somerville, Middlesex County, MA

  6. 14 CFR 25.683 - Operation tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Operation tests. 25.683 Section 25.683... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 25.683 Operation tests. It must be shown by operation tests that when portions of the control system subject to pilot effort...

  7. 14 CFR 25.683 - Operation tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Operation tests. 25.683 Section 25.683... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 25.683 Operation tests. It must be shown by operation tests that when portions of the control system subject to pilot effort...

  8. 14 CFR 25.683 - Operation tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Operation tests. 25.683 Section 25.683... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 25.683 Operation tests. It must be shown by operation tests that when portions of the control system subject to pilot effort...

  9. Quench monitoring and control system and method of operating same

    DOEpatents

    Ryan, David Thomas; Laskaris, Evangelos Trifon; Huang, Xianrui

    2006-05-30

    A rotating machine comprising a superconductive coil and a temperature sensor operable to provide a signal representative of superconductive coil temperature. The rotating machine may comprise a control system communicatively coupled to the temperature sensor. The control system may be operable to reduce electric current in the superconductive coil when a signal representative of a defined superconducting coil temperature is received from the temperature sensor.

  10. Mission Operations Control Room (MOCR) activities during STS-6 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Vice President George Bush talks to the STS-6 astronauts from the spacecraft communicators (CAPCOM) console in the mission operations control room (MOCR) of JSC's mission control center. Astronauts Bryan D. O'Connor, second left and Roy D. Bridges, center, are the on-duty CAPCOMS. Standing near the console are (left) JSC Director Gerald D. Griffin and NASA Administrator James Beggs. Eugene F. Kranz, Director of Mission Operations, is at the back console near the glass.

  11. 14 CFR 121.543 - Flight crewmembers at controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Flight crewmembers at controls. 121.543 Section 121.543 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND OPERATORS FOR COMPENSATION OR HIRE: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND...

  12. 49 CFR 227.113 - Noise operational controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Noise operational controls. 227.113 Section 227.113 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION OCCUPATIONAL NOISE EXPOSURE Occupational Noise Exposure for Railroad Operating Employees. § 227.113...

  13. 14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - Air Traffic Control System Emergency Operation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Aviation Regulations (14 CFR chapter I), be familiar with all available information concerning that... Civil Aviation (61 stat. 1180); 42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.; E.O. 11514, 35 FR 4247, 3 CFR, 1966-1970 Comp... Operation Federal Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 60 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL...

  14. 14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - Air Traffic Control System Emergency Operation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Aviation Regulations (14 CFR chapter I), be familiar with all available information concerning that... Civil Aviation (61 stat. 1180); 42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.; E.O. 11514, 35 FR 4247, 3 CFR, 1966-1970 Comp... Operation Federal Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 60 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL...

  15. 14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - Air Traffic Control System Emergency Operation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Aviation Regulations (14 CFR chapter I), be familiar with all available information concerning that... Civil Aviation (61 stat. 1180); 42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.; E.O. 11514, 35 FR 4247, 3 CFR, 1966-1970 Comp... Operation Federal Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 60 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL...

  16. 14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - Air Traffic Control System Emergency Operation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Aviation Regulations (14 CFR chapter I), be familiar with all available information concerning that... Civil Aviation (61 stat. 1180); 42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.; E.O. 11514, 35 FR 4247, 3 CFR, 1966-1970 Comp... Operation Federal Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 60 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL...

  17. 14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - Air Traffic Control System Emergency Operation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Aviation Regulations (14 CFR chapter I), be familiar with all available information concerning that... Civil Aviation (61 stat. 1180); 42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.; E.O. 11514, 35 FR 4247, 3 CFR, 1966-1970 Comp... Operation Federal Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 60 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL...

  18. Reynolds number influences in aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, Dennis M.; Yip, Long P.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Lin, John C.; Lawing, Pierce L.; Batina, John T.; Hardin, Jay C.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Fenbert, James W.; Domack, Christopher S.

    1993-01-01

    Reynolds number, a measure of the ratio of inertia to viscous forces, is a fundamental similarity parameter for fluid flows and therefore, would be expected to have a major influence in aerodynamics and aeronautics. Reynolds number influences are generally large, but monatomic, for attached laminar (continuum) flow; however, laminar flows are easily separated, inducing even stronger, non-monatomic, Reynolds number sensitivities. Probably the strongest Reynolds number influences occur in connection with transitional flow behavior. Transition can take place over a tremendous Reynolds number range, from the order of 20 x 10(exp 3) for 2-D free shear layers up to the order of 100 x 10(exp 6) for hypersonic boundary layers. This variability in transition behavior is especially important for complex configurations where various vehicle and flow field elements can undergo transition at various Reynolds numbers, causing often surprising changes in aerodynamics characteristics over wide ranges in Reynolds number. This is further compounded by the vast parameterization associated with transition, in that any parameter which influences mean viscous flow development (e.g., pressure gradient, flow curvature, wall temperature, Mach number, sweep, roughness, flow chemistry, shock interactions, etc.), and incident disturbance fields (acoustics, vorticity, particulates, temperature spottiness, even electro static discharges) can alter transition locations to first order. The usual method of dealing with the transition problem is to trip the flow in the generally lower Reynolds number wind tunnel to simulate the flight turbulent behavior. However, this is not wholly satisfactory as it results in incorrectly scaled viscous region thicknesses and cannot be utilized at all for applications such as turbine blades and helicopter rotors, nacelles, leading edge and nose regions, and High Altitude Long Endurance and hypersonic airbreathers where the transitional flow is an innately critical

  19. Tool compensation using statistical process control on complex milling operations

    SciTech Connect

    Reilly, J.M.

    1994-03-01

    In today`s competitive manufacturing environment, many companies increasingly rely on numerical control (NC) mills to produce products at a reasonable cost. Typically, this is done by producing as many features as possible at each machining operation to minimize the total number of shop hours invested per part. Consequently, the number of cutting tools involved in one operation can become quite large since NC mills have the capacity to use in excess of 100 cutting tools. As the number of cutting tools increases, the difficulty of applying optimum tool compensation grows exponentially, quickly overwhelming machine operators and engineers. A systematic method of managing tool compensation is required. The name statistical process control (SPC) suggests a technique in which statistics are used to stabilize and control a machining operation. Feedback and control theory, the study of the stabilization of electronic and mechanical systems, states that control can be established by way of a feedback network. If these concepts were combined, SPC would stabilize and control manufacturing operations through the incorporation of statistically processed feedback. In its simplest application, SPC has been used as a tool to analyze inspection data. In its most mature application, SPC can be the link that applies process feedback. The approach involves: (1) identifying the significant process variables adjusted by the operator; (2) developing mathematical relationships that convert strategic part measurements into variable adjustments; and (3) implementing SPC charts that record required adjustment to each variable.

  20. Aeronautical engineering, a special bibliography, September 1971 (supplement 10)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    This supplement to Aeronautical Engineering-A Special Bibliography (NASA SP-7037) lists 413 reports, journal articles, and other documents originally announced in September 1971 in Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports (STAR) or in International Aerospace Abstracts (IAA). The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the bibliography consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied by an abstract. The listing of the entries is arranged in two major sections, IAA Entries and STAR Entries in that order. The citations and abstracts are reproduced exactly as they appeared originally in IAA or STAR, including the original accession numbers from the respective announcement journals.

  1. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 411

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-2000-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. The NASA CASI price code table, addresses of organizations, and document availability information are included before the abstract section. Two indexes- subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  2. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplment 394

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-1999-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. The NASA CASI price code table, addresses of organizations, and document availability information are included before the abstract section. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  3. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 408

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, a Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP#1999-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. The NASA CASI price code table, addresses of organizations, and document availability information are included before the abstract section. Two indexes#subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  4. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography With Indexes. Supplement 407

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-1999-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. The NASA CASI price code table, addresses of organizations, and document availability information are included before the abstract section. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  5. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 415

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-2000-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. The NASA CASI price code table, addresses of organizations, and document availability information are included before the abstract section. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  6. NASA aeronautics. [fact sheet on NASA programs for aeronautical research and aircraft development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A fact sheet depicting the NASA programs involving aircraft development and aeronautics is presented. The fact sheet consists of artist concepts of the various aircraft which represent specific programs. Among the subjects discussed in the concise explanatory notes are: (1) the YF-12 aircraft, (2) hypersonic drag tests in wind tunnels, (3) augmentor wing concepts, (4) rotary wing development, (5) fly-by-wire aircraft control, (6) supercritical wings, (7) the quiet engine program for noise and emission abatement, (8) flight capabilities of lifting bodies, (9) tilt rotor concepts for improved helicopter performance, and (10) flight safety improvements for general aviation aircraft.

  7. 21 CFR 111.127 - What quality control operations are required for packaging and labeling operations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What quality control operations are required for packaging and labeling operations? 111.127 Section 111.127 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CURRENT GOOD...

  8. 21 CFR 111.127 - What quality control operations are required for packaging and labeling operations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What quality control operations are required for packaging and labeling operations? 111.127 Section 111.127 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CURRENT GOOD...

  9. 21 CFR 111.127 - What quality control operations are required for packaging and labeling operations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What quality control operations are required for packaging and labeling operations? 111.127 Section 111.127 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE IN MANUFACTURING,...

  10. 21 CFR 111.127 - What quality control operations are required for packaging and labeling operations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What quality control operations are required for packaging and labeling operations? 111.127 Section 111.127 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CURRENT GOOD...

  11. 21 CFR 111.127 - What quality control operations are required for packaging and labeling operations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What quality control operations are required for packaging and labeling operations? 111.127 Section 111.127 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CURRENT GOOD...

  12. ALLY: An operator's associate for satellite ground control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushman, J. B.; Mitchell, Christine M.; Jones, P. M.; Rubin, K. S.

    1991-01-01

    The key characteristics of an intelligent advisory system is explored. A central feature is that human-machine cooperation should be based on a metaphor of human-to-human cooperation. ALLY, a computer-based operator's associate which is based on a preliminary theory of human-to-human cooperation, is discussed. ALLY assists the operator in carrying out the supervisory control functions for a simulated NASA ground control system. Experimental evaluation of ALLY indicates that operators using ALLY performed at least as well as they did when using a human associate and in some cases even better.

  13. The JPL telerobot operator control station. Part 1: Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kan, Edwin P.; Tower, John T.; Hunka, George W.; Vansant, Glenn J.

    1989-01-01

    The Operator Control Station of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)/NASA Telerobot Demonstrator System provides the man-machine interface between the operator and the system. It provides all the hardware and software for accepting human input for the direct and indirect (supervised) manipulation of the robot arms and tools for task execution. Hardware and software are also provided for the display and feedback of information and control data for the operator's consumption and interaction with the task being executed. The hardware design, system architecture, and its integration and interface with the rest of the Telerobot Demonstrator System are discussed.

  14. 77 FR 61432 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-09

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics... Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a... Committee Management Officer, National Aeronautics and Space Administration. BILLING......

  15. 75 FR 41240 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics... Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces...

  16. 75 FR 50782 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics... Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces...

  17. 77 FR 38091 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting. AGENCY: National Aeronautics... Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces...

  18. Intelligent Real-Time Reservoir Operation for Flood Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, L.; Hsu, H.

    2008-12-01

    Real-time flood control of a multi-purpose reservoir should consider decreasing the flood peak stage downstream and storing floodwaters for future usage during typhoon seasons. It is a continuous and instant decision-making process based on relevant operating rules, policy and water laws, in addition the immediate rainfall and the hydrology information; however, it is difficult to learn the intelligent experience from the elder operators. The main purpose of this study is to establish the automatic reservoir flood control model to achieve the goal of a reservoir operation during flood periods. In this study, we propose an intelligent reservoir operating methodology for real-time flood control. First, the genetic algorithm is used to search the optimal solutions, which can be considered as extracting the knowledge of reservoir operation strategies. Then, the adaptive network-based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS), which uses a hybrid learning procedure for extracting knowledge in the form of fuzzy if-then rules, is used to learn the input-output patterns and then to estimate the optimal flood operation. The Shihmen reservoir in Northern Taiwan was used as a case study, where its 26 typhoon events are investigated by the proposed method. The results demonstrate that the proposed control model can perform much better than the original reservoir operator in 26 flood events and effectively achieve decreasing peak flood stage downstream and storing floodwaters for future usage.

  19. 40 CFR 49.143 - Construction and operational control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... tanks subject to and controlled under the requirements specified in 40 CFR part 60, subpart OOOO are... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Construction and operational control... FEDERAL ASSISTANCE INDIAN COUNTRY: AIR QUALITY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT General Federal Implementation...

  20. 40 CFR 49.143 - Construction and operational control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... tanks subject to and controlled under the requirements specified in 40 CFR part 60, subpart OOOO are... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Construction and operational control... FEDERAL ASSISTANCE INDIAN COUNTRY: AIR QUALITY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT General Federal Implementation...

  1. IMP-J attitude control prelaunch analysis and operations plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooper, H. L.; Mckendrew, J. B.; Repass, G. D.

    1973-01-01

    A description of the attitude control support being supplied for the Explorer 50 mission is given. Included in the document are descriptions of the computer programs being used to support attitude determination, prediction, and control for the mission and descriptions of the operating procedures that will be used to accomplish mission objectives.

  2. Analysis of Access Control Policies in Operating Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Hong

    2009-01-01

    Operating systems rely heavily on access control mechanisms to achieve security goals and defend against remote and local attacks. The complexities of modern access control mechanisms and the scale of policy configurations are often overwhelming to system administrators and software developers. Therefore, mis-configurations are common, and the…

  3. 16. VIEW OF THE STATIONARY OPERATING ENGINEER CONTROL PANEL INSTALLATION. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. VIEW OF THE STATIONARY OPERATING ENGINEER CONTROL PANEL INSTALLATION. THE PANEL CONTROLS AIR-HANDLING EQUIPMENT AND AIR PRESSURE WITHIN THE BUILDING. (10/6/69) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Manufacturing Facility, North-central section of Plant, just south of Building 776/777, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  4. Ground controlled robotic assembly operations for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Joseph C.

    1991-01-01

    A number of dextrous robotic systems and associated positioning and transportation devices are available on Space Station Freedom (SSF) to perform assembly tasks that would otherwise need to be performed by extravehicular activity (EVA) crewmembers. The currently planned operating mode for these robotic systems during the assembly phase is teleoperation by intravehicular activity (IVA) crewmembers. While this operating mode is less hazardous and expensive than manned EVA operations, and has insignificant control loop time delays, the amount of IVA time available to support telerobotic operations is much less than the anticipated requirements. Some alternative is needed to allow the robotic systems to perform useful tasks without exhausting the available IVA resources; ground control is one such alternative. The issues associated with ground control of SSF robotic systems to alleviate onboard crew time availability constraints are investigated. Key technical issues include the effect of communication time delays, the need for safe, reliable execution of remote operations, and required modifications to the SSF ground and flight system architecture. Time delay compensation techniques such as predictive displays and world model-based force reflection are addressed and collision detection and avoidance strategies to ensure the safety of the on-orbit crew, Orbiter, and SSF are described. Although more time consuming and difficult than IVA controlled teleoperations or manned EVA, ground controlled telerobotic operations offer significant benefits during the SSF assembly phase, and should be considered in assembly planning activities.

  5. Intelligent command and control systems for satellite ground operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Christine M.

    1994-01-01

    The Georgia Tech portion of the Intelligent Control Center project includes several complementary activities. Two major activities entail thesis level research; the other activities are either support activities or preliminary explorations (e.g., task analyses) to support the research. The first research activity is the development of principles for the design of active interfaces to support monitoring during real-time supports. It is well known that as the operator's task becomes less active, i.e., more monitoring and less active control, there is concern that the operator will be less involved and less able to rapidly identify anomalous or failure situations. The research project to design active monitoring interfaces is an attempt to remediate this undesirable side-effect of increasingly automated control systems that still depend ultimately on operator supervision. The second research activity is the exploration of the use of case-based reasoning as a way to accumulate operator experience and make it available in computational form.

  6. A spatial operator algebra for manipulator modeling and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, G.; Kreutz, K.; Jain, A.

    1989-01-01

    A spatial operator algebra for modeling the control and trajectory design of manipulation is discussed, with emphasis on its analytical formulation and implementation in the Ada programming language. The elements of this algebra are linear operators whose domain and range spaces consist of forces, moments, velocities, and accelerations. The effect of these operators is equivalent to a spatial recursion along the span of the manipulator. Inversion is obtained using techniques of recursive filtering and smoothing. The operator alegbra provides a high-level framework for describing the dynamic and kinematic behavior of a manipulator and control and trajectory design algorithms. Implementable recursive algorithms can be immediately derived from the abstract operator expressions by inspection, thus greatly simplifying the transition from an abstract problem formulation and solution to the detailed mechanization of a specific algorithm.

  7. 14 CFR 93.71 - General operating procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false General operating procedures. 93.71 Section 93.71 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... International Control Dam) to the United States/Canadian Border and thence along the border to the point...

  8. 14 CFR 93.71 - General operating procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General operating procedures. 93.71 Section 93.71 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... International Control Dam) to the United States/Canadian Border and thence along the border to the point...

  9. 14 CFR 93.71 - General operating procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false General operating procedures. 93.71 Section 93.71 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... International Control Dam) to the United States/Canadian Border and thence along the border to the point...

  10. 14 CFR 93.71 - General operating procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false General operating procedures. 93.71 Section 93.71 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... International Control Dam) to the United States/Canadian Border and thence along the border to the point...

  11. 14 CFR 93.71 - General operating procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false General operating procedures. 93.71 Section 93.71 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... International Control Dam) to the United States/Canadian Border and thence along the border to the point...

  12. A rationale for human operator pulsive control behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    When performing tracking tasks which involve demanding controlled elements such as those with K/s-squared dynamics, the human operator often develops discrete or pulsive control outputs. A dual-loop model of the human operator is discussed, the dominant adaptive feature of which is the explicit appearance of an internal model of the manipulator-controlled element dynamics in an inner feedback loop. Using this model, a rationale for pulsive control behavior is offered which is based upon the assumption that the human attempts to reduce the computational burden associated with time integration of sensory inputs. It is shown that such time integration is a natural consequence of having an internal representation of the K/s-squared-controlled element dynamics in the dual-loop model. A digital simulation is discussed in which a modified form of the dual-loop model is shown to be capable of producing pulsive control behavior qualitively comparable to that obtained in experiment.

  13. 14 CFR 25.672 - Stability augmentation and automatic and power-operated systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Stability augmentation and automatic and power-operated systems. 25.672 Section 25.672 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Construction Control Systems § 25.672 Stability augmentation and automatic and power-operated systems. If...

  14. 14 CFR 27.672 - Stability augmentation, automatic, and power-operated systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Stability augmentation, automatic, and power-operated systems. 27.672 Section 27.672 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Construction Control Systems § 27.672 Stability augmentation, automatic, and power-operated systems. If...

  15. 14 CFR 27.672 - Stability augmentation, automatic, and power-operated systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Stability augmentation, automatic, and power-operated systems. 27.672 Section 27.672 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Construction Control Systems § 27.672 Stability augmentation, automatic, and power-operated systems. If...

  16. 14 CFR 27.672 - Stability augmentation, automatic, and power-operated systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Stability augmentation, automatic, and power-operated systems. 27.672 Section 27.672 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Construction Control Systems § 27.672 Stability augmentation, automatic, and power-operated systems. If...

  17. 14 CFR 29.672 - Stability augmentation, automatic, and power-operated systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Stability augmentation, automatic, and power-operated systems. 29.672 Section 29.672 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Construction Control Systems § 29.672 Stability augmentation, automatic, and power-operated systems. If...

  18. 14 CFR 25.672 - Stability augmentation and automatic and power-operated systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Stability augmentation and automatic and power-operated systems. 25.672 Section 25.672 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Construction Control Systems § 25.672 Stability augmentation and automatic and power-operated systems. If...

  19. 14 CFR 29.672 - Stability augmentation, automatic, and power-operated systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Stability augmentation, automatic, and power-operated systems. 29.672 Section 29.672 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Construction Control Systems § 29.672 Stability augmentation, automatic, and power-operated systems. If...

  20. 14 CFR 29.672 - Stability augmentation, automatic, and power-operated systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Stability augmentation, automatic, and power-operated systems. 29.672 Section 29.672 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Construction Control Systems § 29.672 Stability augmentation, automatic, and power-operated systems. If...

  1. 14 CFR 25.672 - Stability augmentation and automatic and power-operated systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Stability augmentation and automatic and power-operated systems. 25.672 Section 25.672 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Construction Control Systems § 25.672 Stability augmentation and automatic and power-operated systems. If...

  2. 14 CFR 61.97 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aeronautical knowledge. 61.97 Section 61.97... knowledge. (a) General. A person who applies for a recreational pilot certificate must receive and log... knowledge areas of paragraph (b) of this section that apply to the aircraft category and class rating...

  3. Economic analysis of aeronautical research and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gellman, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    The appropriateness of government intervention in the civilian market for aeronautics research and technology (R&T) is examined. The economic rationale for government intervention is examined. The conclusion is that the institutional role played by NASA in civilian aeronautics R&T markets is economically justified.

  4. University/government/industry relations in aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schairer, G. S.

    1975-01-01

    Methods for improving the relationships between universities, the aircraft industry, and the Government are proposed. The author submits nine specific recommendations aimed at more effective aeronautical engineering education and employment of graduate engineers. The need for improved communication between the organizations which influence the advancement of aeronautical sciences is stressed.

  5. ADVANCED COMPRESSOR ENGINE CONTROLS TO ENHANCE OPERATION, RELIABILITY AND INTEGRITY

    SciTech Connect

    Gary D. Bourn; Jess W. Gingrich; Jack A. Smith

    2004-03-01

    This document is the final report for the ''Advanced Compressor Engine Controls to Enhance Operation, Reliability, and Integrity'' project. SwRI conducted this project for DOE in conjunction with Cooper Compression, under DOE contract number DE-FC26-03NT41859. This report addresses an investigation of engine controls for integral compressor engines and the development of control strategies that implement closed-loop NOX emissions feedback.

  6. Aeronautics research and technology program and specific objectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Aeronautics research and technology program objectives in fluid and thermal physics, materials and structures, controls and guidance, human factors, multidisciplinary activities, computer science and applications, propulsion, rotorcraft, high speed aircraft, subsonic aircraft, and rotorcraft and high speed aircraft systems technology are addressed.

  7. Aeronautical Engineering: A continuing bibliography with indexes, supplement 185

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    This bibliography lists 462 reports, articles and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in February 1985. Aerodynamics, aeronautical engineering, aircraft design, aircraft stability and control, geophysics, social sciences, and space sciences are some of the areas covered.

  8. Aeronautics Technology Possibilities for 2000: Report of a workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The potential of aeronautical research and technology (R&T) development, which could provide the basis for facility planning and long range guidance of R&T programs and could establish justification for support of aeronautical research and technology was studied. The projections served specific purposes: (1) to provide a base for research and future facilities needed to support the projected technologies, and development advanced vehicles; (2) to provide insight on the possible state of the art in aeronautical technology by the year 2000 for civil and military planners of air vehicles and systems. Topics discussed include: aerodynamics; propulsion; structures; materials; guidance, navigation and control; computer and information technology; human factors; and systems integration.

  9. Review of Aeronautical Wind Tunnel Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The nation's aeronautical wind tunnel facilities constitute a valuable technological resource and make a significant contribution to the global supremacy of U.S. aircraft, both civil and military. At the request of NASA, the National Research Council's Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board organized a commitee to review the state of repair, adequacy, and future needs of major aeronautical wind tunnel facilities in meeting national goals. The comittee identified three main areas where actions are needed to sustain the capability of NASA's aeronautical wind tunnel facilities to support the national aeronautical research and development activities: tunnel maintenance and upgrading, productivity enhancement, and accommodation of new requirements (particularly in hypersonics). Each of these areas are addressed and the committee recommendations for appropriate actions presented.

  10. 49 CFR 236.402 - Signals controlled by track circuits and control operator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... THE INSTALLATION, INSPECTION, MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Traffic Control Systems Standards § 236.402 Signals controlled by track circuits and control operator. The control circuits for home signal aspects with indications more favorable...

  11. 49 CFR 236.402 - Signals controlled by track circuits and control operator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... THE INSTALLATION, INSPECTION, MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Traffic Control Systems Standards § 236.402 Signals controlled by track circuits and control operator. The control circuits for home signal aspects with indications more favorable...

  12. 49 CFR 236.402 - Signals controlled by track circuits and control operator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... THE INSTALLATION, INSPECTION, MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Traffic Control Systems Standards § 236.402 Signals controlled by track circuits and control operator. The control circuits for home signal aspects with indications more favorable...

  13. 49 CFR 236.402 - Signals controlled by track circuits and control operator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... THE INSTALLATION, INSPECTION, MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Traffic Control Systems Standards § 236.402 Signals controlled by track circuits and control operator. The control circuits for home signal aspects with indications more favorable...

  14. 49 CFR 236.402 - Signals controlled by track circuits and control operator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... THE INSTALLATION, INSPECTION, MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Traffic Control Systems Standards § 236.402 Signals controlled by track circuits and control operator. The control circuits for home signal aspects with indications more favorable...

  15. 21 CFR 111.117 - What quality control operations are required for equipment, instruments, and controls?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What quality control operations are required for equipment, instruments, and controls? 111.117 Section 111.117 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... and Process Control System: Requirements for Quality Control § 111.117 What quality control...

  16. 21 CFR 111.117 - What quality control operations are required for equipment, instruments, and controls?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What quality control operations are required for equipment, instruments, and controls? 111.117 Section 111.117 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... and Process Control System: Requirements for Quality Control § 111.117 What quality control...

  17. 14 CFR 27.1555 - Control markings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Control markings. 27.1555 Section 27.1555 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Operating Limitations and Information Markings and Placards § 27.1555 Control markings. (a) Each...

  18. 14 CFR 25.1555 - Control markings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Control markings. 25.1555 Section 25.1555 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Operating Limitations and Information Markings and Placards § 25.1555 Control markings. (a) Each...

  19. 14 CFR 29.1555 - Control markings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Control markings. 29.1555 Section 29.1555 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Operating Limitations and Information Markings and Placards § 29.1555 Control markings. (a)...

  20. Integrated Robot-Human Control in Mining Operations

    SciTech Connect

    George Danko

    2007-09-30

    This report contains a detailed description of the work conducted for the project on Integrated Robot-Human Control in Mining Operations at University of Nevada, Reno. This project combines human operator control with robotic control concepts to create a hybrid control architecture, in which the strengths of each control method are combined to increase machine efficiency and reduce operator fatigue. The kinematics reconfiguration type differential control of the excavator implemented with a variety of 'software machine kinematics' is the key feature of the project. This software re-configured excavator is more desirable to execute a given digging task. The human operator retains the master control of the main motion parameters, while the computer coordinates the repetitive movement patterns of the machine links. These repetitive movements may be selected from a pre-defined family of trajectories with different transformations. The operator can make adjustments to this pattern in real time, as needed, to accommodate rapidly-changing environmental conditions. A working prototype has been developed using a Bobcat 435 excavator. The machine is operational with or without the computer control system depending on whether the computer interface is on or off. In preparation for emulated mining tasks tests, typical, repetitive tool trajectories during surface mining operations were recorded at the Newmont Mining Corporation's 'Lone Tree' mine in Nevada. Analysis of these working trajectories has been completed. The motion patterns, when transformed into a family of curves, may serve as the basis for software-controlled machine kinematics transformation in the new human-robot control system. A Cartesian control example has been developed and tested both in simulation and on the experimental excavator. Open-loop control is robustly stable and free of short-term dynamic problems, but it allows for drifting away from the desired motion kinematics of the machine. A novel, closed

  1. SMES application for frequency control during islanded microgrid operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, A.-Rong; Kim, Gyeong-Hun; Heo, Serim; Park, Minwon; Yu, In-Keun; Kim, Hak-Man

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes the operating characteristics of a superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) for the frequency control of an islanded microgrid operation. In the grid-connected mode of a microgrid, an imbalance between power supply and demand is solved by a power trade with the upstream power grid. The difference in the islanded mode is a critical problem because the microgrid is isolated from any power grid. For this reason, the frequency control during islanded microgrid operation is a challenging issue. A test microgrid in this paper consisted of a wind power generator, a PV generation system, a diesel generator and a load to test the feasibility of the SMES for controlling frequency during islanded operation as well as the transient state varying from the grid-connected mode to the islanded mode. The results show that the SMES contributes well for frequency control in the islanded operation. In addition, a dual and a single magnet type of SMES have been compared to demonstrate the control performance. The dual magnet has the same energy capacity as the single magnet, but there are two superconducting coils and each coil has half inductance of the single magnet. The effectiveness of the SMES application with the simulation results is discussed in detail.

  2. NASA GRC/Aeronautics Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sehra, Arun K.

    2003-01-01

    Twenty-first-century aeropropulsion and power research will enable new transport engine and aircraft systems including: 1) Emerging ultralow noise and emissions with the use of intelligent turbofans; 2) Future distributed vectored propulsion with 24-hour operations and greater community mobility; 3) Research in hybrid combustion and electric propulsion systems leading to silent aircraft with near-zero emissions; and 4) The culmination of these revolutions will deliver an all-electric- powered propulsion system with zero-impact emissions and noise and high-capacity, on-demand operation

  3. Operational effectiveness of a Multiple Aquila Control System (MACS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. W.; Flynn, J. D.; Frey, M. R.

    1983-01-01

    The operational effectiveness of a multiple aquila control system (MACS) was examined under a variety of remotely piloted vehicle (RPV) mission configurations. The set of assumptions and inputs used to form the rules under which a computerized simulation of MACS was run is given. The characteristics that are to govern MACS operations include: the battlefield environment that generates the requests for RPV missions, operating time-lines of the RPV-peculiar equipment, maintenance requirements, and vulnerability to enemy fire. The number of RPV missions and the number of operation days are discussed. Command, control, and communication data rates are estimated by determining how many messages are passed and what information is necessary in them to support ground coordination between MACS sections.

  4. Pipeline gets the most from remote operations controllers

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    As electronic flow measurement and control technology spread to the remote reaches of natural gas pipelines, transmission companies have benefited from the vast amount of data communicated back to central points for control and business purposes. At the same time, the companies operating these devices have become more and more dependent on the data they provide, so maintaining this instrumentation in a state of high reliability is extremely important. Field personnel must be able to communicate with the remote units to configure them and also to make sure they are operating properly. Built-in self-test diagnostics help in trouble-shooting, and watchdog software protects against erroneous outputs, but trained personnel are needed to ensure optimum operation. The paper describes the training program set up by Northwest Pipeline to train its own technicians to maintain its automatic control equipment.

  5. Intelligent Command and Control Systems for Satellite Ground Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Christine M.

    1999-01-01

    This grant, Intelligent Command and Control Systems for Satellite Ground Operations, funded by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, has spanned almost a decade. During this time, it has supported a broad range of research addressing the changing needs of NASA operations. It is important to note that many of NASA's evolving needs, for example, use of automation to drastically reduce (e.g., 70%) operations costs, are similar requirements in both government and private sectors. Initially the research addressed the appropriate use of emerging and inexpensive computational technologies, such as X Windows, graphics, and color, together with COTS (commercial-off-the-shelf) hardware and software such as standard Unix workstations to re-engineer satellite operations centers. The first phase of research supported by this grant explored the development of principled design methodologies to make effective use of emerging and inexpensive technologies. The ultimate performance measures for new designs were whether or not they increased system effectiveness while decreasing costs. GT-MOCA (The Georgia Tech Mission Operations Cooperative Associate) and GT-VITA (Georgia Tech Visual and Inspectable Tutor and Assistant), whose latter stages were supported by this research, explored model-based design of collaborative operations teams and the design of intelligent tutoring systems, respectively. Implemented in proof-of-concept form for satellite operations, empirical evaluations of both, using satellite operators for the former and personnel involved in satellite control operations for the latter, demonstrated unequivocally the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed modeling and design strategy underlying both research efforts. The proof-of-concept implementation of GT-MOCA showed that the methodology could specify software requirements that enabled a human-computer operations team to perform without any significant performance differences from the standard two-person satellite

  6. Sprag solenoid brake. [development and operations of electrically controlled brake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dane, D. H. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The development and characteristics of an electrically operated brake are discussed. The action of the brake depends on energizing a solenoid which causes internally spaced sprockets to contact the inner surface of the housing. A spring forces the control member to move to the braking position when the electrical function is interrupted. A diagram of the device is provided and detailed operating principles are explained.

  7. Robot Control Based On Spatial-Operator Algebra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Guillermo; Kreutz, Kenneth K.; Jain, Abhinandan

    1992-01-01

    Method for mathematical modeling and control of robotic manipulators based on spatial-operator algebra providing concise representation and simple, high-level theoretical frame-work for solution of kinematical and dynamical problems involving complicated temporal and spatial relationships. Recursive algorithms derived immediately from abstract spatial-operator expressions by inspection. Transition from abstract formulation through abstract solution to detailed implementation of specific algorithms to compute solution greatly simplified. Complicated dynamical problems like two cooperating robot arms solved more easily.

  8. Activities in the Payload Operations Control Center at MSFC During the IML-1 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This photograph shows activities during the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1) mission (STS-42) in the Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Members of the Fluid Experiment System (FES) group monitor the progress of their experiment through video at the POCC. The IML-1 mission was the first in a series of Shuttle flights dedicated to fundamental materials and life sciences research. The mission was to explore, in depth, the complex effects of weightlessness on living organisms and materials processing. The crew conducted experiments on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and the effects on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Low gravity materials processing experiments included crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury, iodine, and virus. The International space science research organizations that participated in this mission were: The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administion, the European Space Agency, the Canadian Space Agency, the French National Center for Space Studies, the German Space Agency, and the National Space Development Agency of Japan. The POCC was the air/ground communication charnel used between astronauts aboard the Spacelab and scientists, researchers, and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. The facility made instantaneous video and audio communications possible for scientists on the ground to follow the progress and to send direct commands of their research almost as if they were in space with the crew.

  9. Activities in the Payload Operation Control Center at MSFC During the IML-1 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This photograph shows activities during the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1) mission (STS-42) in the Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The IML-1 mission was the first in a series of Shuttle flights dedicated to fundamental materials and life sciences research. The mission was to explore, in depth, the complex effects of weightlessness on living organisms and materials processing. The crew conducted experiments on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and the effects on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Low gravity materials processing experiments included crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury, iodine, and virus. The International space science research organizations that participated in this mission were: The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the European Space Agency, the Canadian Space Agency, the French National Center for Space Studies, the German Space Agency, and the National Space Development Agency of Japan. The POCC was the air/ground communication charnel used between the astronauts aboard the Spacelab and scientists, researchers, and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. The facility made instantaneous video and audio communications possible for scientists on the ground to follow the progress and to send direct commands of their research almost as if they were in space with the crew.

  10. Distributed Motor Controller (DMC) for Operation in Extreme Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKinney, Colin M.; Yager, Jeremy A.; Mojarradi, Mohammad M.; Some, Rafi; Sirota, Allen; Kopf, Ted; Stern, Ryan; Hunter, Don

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an extreme environment capable Distributed Motor Controller (DMC) module suitable for operation with a distributed architecture of future spacecraft systems. This motor controller is designed to be a bus-based electronics module capable of operating a single Brushless DC motor in extreme space environments: temperature (-120 C to +85 C required, -180 C to +100 C stretch goal); radiation (>;20K required, >;100KRad stretch goal); >;360 cycles of operation. Achieving this objective will result in a scalable modular configuration for motor control with enhanced reliability that will greatly lower cost during the design, fabrication and ATLO phases of future missions. Within the heart of the DMC lies a pair of cold-capable Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs) and a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) that enable its miniaturization and operation in extreme environments. The ASICs are fabricated in the IBM 0.5 micron Silicon Germanium (SiGe) BiCMOS process and are comprised of Analog circuitry to provide telemetry information, sensor interface, and health and status of DMC. The FPGA contains logic to provide motor control, status monitoring and spacecraft interface. The testing and characterization of these ASICs have yielded excellent functionality in cold temperatures (-135 C). The DMC module has demonstrated successful operation of a motor at temperature.

  11. Distributed Control of Uncertain Systems using Superpositions of Linear operators

    PubMed Central

    Sanger, Terence D.

    2011-01-01

    Control in the natural environment is difficult in part because of uncertainty in the effect of actions. Uncertainty can be due to added motor or sensory noise, unmodeled dynamics, or quantization of sensory feedback. Biological systems are faced with further difficulties, since control must be performed by networks of cooperating neurons and neural subsystems. Here, we propose a new mathematical framework for modeling and simulation of distributed control systems operating in an uncertain environment. Stochastic Differential Operators can be derived from the stochastic differential equation describing a system, and they map the current state density into the differential of the state density. Unlike discrete-time Markov update operators, stochastic differential operators combine linearly for a large class of linear and nonlinear systems, and therefore the combined effects of multiple controllable and uncontrollable subsystems can be predicted. Design using these operators yields systems whose statistical behavior can be specified throughout state space. The relationship to Bayesian estimation and discrete-time Markov processes is described. PMID:21521040

  12. Dye fading test for mission control operator console displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, H. E.

    1975-01-01

    A dye fading test of 40 days duration was conducted to determine the effect of mission control operator console and ambient lighting effects on a series of photographic products under consideration for use in mission console operator consoles. Six different display samples, each containing 36 windows of several different colors, were prepared and placed in the mission control consoles for testing. No significant changes were recorded during the testing period. All changes were attributed to a mechanical problem with the densitometer. Detailed results are given in graphs.

  13. Space Station external thermal control system design and operational overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raetz, John; Dominick, Jeff

    1992-01-01

    The driving design requirements and resulting design characteristics for a two-phase ammonia system of the Space Shuttle are reviewed with particular attention given to operational and station assembly issues related to system activation and steady-state operation. Design is described at an overall system level and an orbit replaceable unit level. It is concluded that a system flow network must be designed and ammonia pressures must be controlled to acquire waste heat efficiently from all contributing heat sources at a controlled temperature.

  14. Virtual acoustics, aeronautics, and communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, D. R.; Wenzel, E. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    An optimal approach to auditory display design for commercial aircraft would utilize both spatialized (3-D) audio techniques and active noise cancellation for safer operations. Results from several aircraft simulator studies conducted at NASA Ames Research Center are reviewed, including Traffic alert and Collision Avoidance System (TCAS) warnings, spoken orientation "beacons" for gate identification and collision avoidance on the ground, and hardware for improved speech intelligibility. The implications of hearing loss among pilots is also considered.

  15. Control and Non-Payload Communications Links for Integrated Unmanned Aircraft Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Griner, James H.

    2012-01-01

    Technology for unmanned aircraft has advanced so rapidly in recent years that many new applications to public and commercial use are being proposed and implemented. In many countries, emphasis is now being placed on developing the means to allow unmanned aircraft to operate within non-segregated airspace along with commercial, cargo and other piloted and passenger-carrying aircraft.In the U.S., Congress has mandated that the Federal Aviation Administration reduce and remove restrictions on unmanned aircraft operations in a relatively short time frame. To accomplish this, a number of technical and regulatory hurdles must be overcome. A key hurdle involve the communications link connecting the remote pilot located at a ground control station with the aircraft in the airspace, referred to as the Control and Non-Payload Communications (CNPC) link. This link represents a safety critical communications link, and thus requires dedicated and protected aviation spectrum as well as national and international standards defining the operational requirements the CNPC system. The CNPC link must provide line-of-site (LOS) communications, primarily through a ground-based communication system, and beyond-line-of-sight (BLOS) communication achieved using satellite communications. In the U.S., the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is charged with providing the technical body of evidence to support spectrum allocation requirements and national and international standards development for the CNPC link. This paper provides a description of the CNPC system, an overview of NASA's CNPC project, and current results in technology assessment, air-ground propagation characterization, and supporting system studies and analyses will be presented.

  16. A spatial operator algebra for manipulator modeling and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, G.; Kreutz, Kenneth; Jain, Abhinandan

    1989-01-01

    A recently developed spatial operator algebra, useful for modeling, control, and trajectory design of manipulators is discussed. The elements of this algebra are linear operators whose domain and range spaces consist of forces, moments, velocities, and accelerations. The effect of these operators is equivalent to a spatial recursion along the span of a manipulator. Inversion of operators can be efficiently obtained via techniques of recursive filtering and smoothing. The operator algebra provides a high level framework for describing the dynamic and kinematic behavior of a manipulator and control and trajectory design algorithms. The interpretation of expressions within the algebraic framework leads to enhanced conceptual and physical understanding of manipulator dynamics and kinematics. Furthermore, implementable recursive algorithms can be immediately derived from the abstract operator expressions by inspection. Thus, the transition from an abstract problem formulation and solution to the detailed mechanizaton of specific algorithms is greatly simplified. The analytical formulation of the operator algebra, as well as its implementation in the Ada programming language are discussed.

  17. Command and control displays for space vehicle operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Daniel D.; Zetocha, Paul; Aleva, Denise

    2010-04-01

    This paper shall examine several command and control facility display architectures supporting space vehicle operations, to include TacSat 2, TacSat 3, STPSat 2, and Communications Navigation Outage Forecasting System (CNOFS), located within the Research Development Test & Evaluation Support Complex (RSC) Satellite Operations Center 97 (SOC-97) at Kirtland Air Force Base. A principal focus is to provide an understanding for the general design class of displays currently supporting space vehicle command and control, e.g., custom, commercial-off-the-shelf, or ruggedized commercial-off-the-shelf, and more specifically, what manner of display performance capabilities, e.g., active area, resolution, luminance, contrast ratio, frame/refresh rate, temperature range, shock/vibration, etc., are needed for particular aspects of space vehicle command and control. Another focus shall be to address the types of command and control functions performed for each of these systems, to include how operators interact with the displays, e.g., joystick, trackball, keyboard/mouse, as well as the kinds of information needed or displayed for each function. [Comparison with other known command and control facilities, such as Cheyenne Mountain and NORAD Operations Center, shall be made.] Future, anticipated display systems shall be discussed.

  18. System for controlling the operating temperature of a fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Fabis, Thomas R.; Makiel, Joseph M.; Veyo, Stephen E.

    2006-06-06

    A method and system are provided for improved control of the operating temperature of a fuel cell (32) utilizing an improved temperature control system (30) that varies the flow rate of inlet air entering the fuel cell (32) in response to changes in the operating temperature of the fuel cell (32). Consistent with the invention an improved temperature control system (30) is provided that includes a controller (37) that receives an indication of the temperature of the inlet air from a temperature sensor (39) and varies the heat output by at least one heat source (34, 36) to maintain the temperature of the inlet air at a set-point T.sub.inset. The controller (37) also receives an indication of the operating temperature of the fuel cell (32) and varies the flow output by an adjustable air mover (33), within a predetermined range around a set-point F.sub.set, in order to maintain the operating temperature of the fuel cell (32) at a set-point T.sub.opset.

  19. Alternative control technology document: Ethylene oxide sterilization/fumigation operations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-03-01

    This report presents technical information that State and local agencies can use to develop strategies for reducing VOC (i.e., EO) emissions for sterilization/fumigation facilities. The information in the document will allow planners to identify available control alternatives and evaluate the VOC reduction and cost of implementing controls. The document provides information on sterilization/fumigation processes, EO (ethylene oxide) emissions, and emission reductions, and cost associated with the application of control units. Section 2.0 presents a summary of the findings of the study. Section 3.0 provides a description of sterilization/fumigation facility operations and emission sources. Section 4.0 provides a description of alternative control techniques for the reduction of ethylene oxide emissions. Section 5.0 presents a cost analysis that includes a methodology for computing annualized equipment and operating costs. A list of contacts at various Federal agencies who are knowledgeable about sterilization/fumigation processes is presented in Appendix A.

  20. 76 FR 53166 - Public Notice for Waiver of Aeronautical Land-Use Assurance; Lake in the Hills Airport, Lake in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-25

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Public Notice for Waiver of Aeronautical Land-Use Assurance; Lake in the... a proposal to change a portion of airport land from aeronautical use to non-aeronautical use and to... used as open land for control of FAR Part 77 surfaces and compatible land use and is not needed...

  1. Development of consistent hazard controls for DOE transuranic waste operations

    SciTech Connect

    Woody, W.J.

    2007-07-01

    This paper describes the results of a re-engineering initiative undertaken with the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) in order to standardize hazard analysis assumptions and methods and resulting safety controls applied to multiple transuranic (TRU) waste operations located across the United States. A wide range of safety controls are historically applied to transuranic waste operations, in spite of the fact that these operations have similar operational characteristics and hazard/accident potential. The re-engineering effort supported the development of a DOE technical standard with specific safety controls designated for accidents postulated during waste container retrieval, staging/storage, venting, onsite movements, and characterization activities. Controls cover preventive and mitigative measures; include both hardware and specific administrative controls; and provide protection to the facility worker, onsite co-located workers and the general public located outside of facility boundaries. The Standard development involved participation from all major DOE sites conducting TRU waste operations. Both safety analysts and operations personnel contributed to the re-engineering effort. Acknowledgment is given in particular to the following individuals who formed a core working group: Brenda Hawks, (DOE Oak Ridge Office), Patrice McEahern (CWI-Idaho), Jofu Mishima (Consultant), Louis Restrepo (Omicron), Jay Mullis (DOE-ORO), Mike Hitchler (WSMS), John Menna (WSMS), Jackie East (WSMS), Terry Foppe (CTAC), Carla Mewhinney (WIPP-SNL), Stephie Jennings (WIPP-LANL), Michael Mikolanis (DOESRS), Kraig Wendt (BBWI-Idaho), Lee Roberts (Fluor Hanford), and Jim Blankenhorn (WSRC). Additional acknowledgment is given to Dae Chung (EM) and Ines Triay (EM) for leadership and management of the re-engineering effort. (authors)

  2. Identification of process controls for nuclear explosive operations

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, S.R.; Konkel, H.; Houghton, K.; Wilson, M.

    1998-12-01

    Nuclear explosive assembly/disassembly operations that are carried out under United States Department of Energy (DOE) purview are characterized by activities that primarily involve manual tasks. These process activities are governed by procedural and administrative controls that traditionally have been developed without a formal link to process hazards. This work, which was based on hazard assessment (HA) activities conducted as part of the W69 Integrated Safety Process (ISP), specifies an approach to identifying formal safety controls for controlling (i.e., preventing or mitigating) hazards associated with nuclear explosive operations. Safety analysis methods are used to identify controls, which then are integrated into a safety management framework to provide assurance to the DOE that hazardous activities are managed properly. As a result of the work on the W69 ISP dismantlement effort, the authors have developed an approach to identify controls and safety measures to improve the safety of nuclear explosive operations. The methodology developed for the W69 dismantlement effort is being adapted to the W76 ISP effort. Considerable work is still ongoing to address issues such as the adequacy or effectiveness of controls. DOE nuclear explosive safety orders and some historical insights are discussed briefly in this paper. The safety measure identification methodology developed as part of the W69 ISP dismantlement process then is summarized.

  3. Operational Control Procedures for the Activated Sludge Process, Part I - Observations, Part II - Control Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Alfred W.

    This is the first in a series of documents developed by the National Training and Operational Technology Center describing operational control procedures for the activated sludge process used in wastewater treatment. Part I of this document deals with physical observations which should be performed during each routine control test. Part II…

  4. Operator performance with alternative manual control modes in teleoperation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, H.; Zak, H.; Kim, W. S.; Bejczy, A. K.; Schenker, P. S.

    1992-01-01

    Recent experiments conducted at the JPL comparing alternative manual control modes using the JPL Advanced Teleoperator system are described. Of particular interest were control modes that provide force reflection to the operator. The task selected for the experiment is a portion of the Solar Maximum Satellite Repair procedure we developed to demonstrate the repair of the Solar Maximum Satellite with teleoperators. The seven manual control modes evaluated in the experiment are combinations of manual position or resolved motion rate control with alternative control schemes for force reflection and remote manipulator compliance. Performance measures used were task completion times, average force and torque exerted during the execution of the task, and cumulative force and torque exerted. The results were statistically analyzed and they show that, in general, force reflection significantly improves operator performance and indicate that a specific force-reflecting scheme may yield the best performance among the control modes we tested. Also, our experiment showed that, for the selected task, the position control modes were preferable to the rate control modes and slave manipulator compliance reduced task interaction forces and torques.

  5. Implementation of Enhanced Propulsion Control Modes for Emergency Flight Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csank, Jeffrey T.; Chin, Jeffrey C.; May, Ryan D.; Litt, Jonathan S.; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2011-01-01

    Aircraft engines can be effective actuators to help pilots avert or recover from emergency situations. Emergency control modes are being developed to enhance the engines performance to increase the probability of recovery under these circumstances. This paper discusses a proposed implementation of an architecture that requests emergency propulsion control modes, allowing the engines to deliver additional performance in emergency situations while still ensuring a specified safety level. In order to determine the appropriate level of engine performance enhancement, information regarding the current emergency scenario (including severity) and current engine health must be known. This enables the engine to operate beyond its nominal range while minimizing overall risk to the aircraft. In this architecture, the flight controller is responsible for determining the severity of the event and the level of engine risk that is acceptable, while the engine controller is responsible for delivering the desired performance within the specified risk range. A control mode selector specifies an appropriate situation-specific enhanced mode, which the engine controller then implements. The enhanced control modes described in this paper provide additional engine thrust or response capabilities through the modification of gains, limits, and the control algorithm, but increase the risk of engine failure. The modifications made to the engine controller to enable the use of the enhanced control modes are described, as are the interaction between the various subsystems and importantly, the interaction between the flight controller/pilot and the propulsion control system. Simulation results demonstrate how the system responds to requests for enhanced operation and the corresponding increase in performance.

  6. Flight controller alertness and performance during MOD shiftwork operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Sean M.; Rosekind, Mark R.; Dinges, David F.; Miller, Donna L.; Gillen, Kelly A.; Gregory, Kevin B.; Aguilar, Ronald D.; Smith, Roy M.

    1994-01-01

    Decreased alertness and performance associated with fatigue, sleep loss, and circadian disruption are issues faced by a diverse range of shiftwork operations. During STS operations, MOD personnel provide 24 hr. coverage of critical tasks. A joint JSC and ARC project was undertaken to examine these issues in flight controllers during MOD shiftwork operations. An initial operational test of procedures and measures was conducted during STS-53 in Dec. 1992. The study measures included a background questionnaire, a subjective daily logbook completed on a 24 hr. basis (to report sleep patterns, work periods, etc.), and an 8 minute performance and mood test battery administered at the beginning, middle, and end of each shift period. Seventeen Flight controllers representing the 3 Orbit shifts participated. The initial results clearly support further data collection during other STS missions to document baseline levels of alertness and performance during MOD shiftwork operations. These issues are especially pertinent for the night shift operations and the acute phase advance required for the transition of day shift personnel into the night for shuttle launch. Implementation and evaluation of the countermeasure strategies to maximize alertness and performance is planned. As STS missions extend to further extended duration orbiters, timelines and planning for 24 circadian disruption will remain highly relevant in the MOD environment.

  7. MODIS information, data and control system (MIDACS) operations concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, D.; Salomonson, V.; Ormsby, J.; Ardanuy, P.; Mckay, A.; Hoyt, D.; Jaffin, S.; Vallette, B.; Sharts, B.; Folta, D.

    1988-01-01

    The MODIS Information, Data, and Control System (MIDACS) Operations Concepts Document provides a basis for the mutual understanding between the users and the designers of the MIDACS, including the requirements, operating environment, external interfaces, and development plan. In defining the concepts and scope of the system, how the MIDACS will operate as an element of the Earth Observing System (EOS) within the EosDIS environment is described. This version follows an earlier release of a preliminary draft version. The individual operations concepts for planning and scheduling, control and monitoring, data acquisition and processing, calibration and validation, data archive and distribution, and user access do not yet fully represent the requirements of the data system needed to achieve the scientific objectives of the MODIS instruments and science teams. The teams are not yet formed; however, it is possible to develop the operations concepts based on the present concept of EosDIS, the level 1 and level 2 Functional Requirements Documents, and through interviews and meetings with key members of the scientific community. The operations concepts were exercised through the application of representative scenarios.

  8. 47 CFR 27.1210 - Remote control operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Remote control operation. 27.1210 Section 27.1210 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Broadband Radio Service and Educational Broadband Service §...

  9. 47 CFR 27.1210 - Remote control operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Remote control operation. 27.1210 Section 27.1210 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Broadband Radio Service and Educational Broadband Service §...

  10. 47 CFR 27.1210 - Remote control operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Remote control operation. 27.1210 Section 27.1210 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Broadband Radio Service and Educational Broadband Service §...

  11. 47 CFR 27.1210 - Remote control operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Remote control operation. 27.1210 Section 27.1210 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Broadband Radio Service and Educational Broadband Service §...

  12. 30 CFR 56.12040 - Installation of operating controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Installation of operating controls. 56.12040 Section 56.12040 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES...

  13. 30 CFR 56.12040 - Installation of operating controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Installation of operating controls. 56.12040 Section 56.12040 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES...

  14. 40 CFR 49.4164 - Construction and operational control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... with produced oil storage tanks subject to the requirements specified in 40 CFR part 60, subpart OOOO... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Construction and operational control... OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE INDIAN COUNTRY: AIR QUALITY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT Implementation Plans...

  15. 40 CFR 49.4164 - Construction and operational control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... with produced oil storage tanks subject to the requirements specified in 40 CFR part 60, subpart OOOO... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Construction and operational control... OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE INDIAN COUNTRY: AIR QUALITY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT Implementation Plans...

  16. Control circuit ensures solar cell operation at maximum power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulkovich, J.

    1967-01-01

    Control circuit enables a solar cell power supply to deliver maximum electrical power to a load. It senses the magnitude of the slope of the voltage-current characteristic curve and compares it to a reference voltage which represents the slope corresponding to the desired operating limits.

  17. 30 CFR 56.12040 - Installation of operating controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Installation of operating controls. 56.12040 Section 56.12040 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES...

  18. 30 CFR 56.12040 - Installation of operating controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Installation of operating controls. 56.12040 Section 56.12040 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES...

  19. 30 CFR 56.12040 - Installation of operating controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Installation of operating controls. 56.12040 Section 56.12040 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES...

  20. 47 CFR 74.18 - Transmitter control and operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Transmitter control and operation. 74.18 Section 74.18 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES EXPERIMENTAL RADIO, AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES General; Rules Applicable to All Services in Part 74 §...

  1. 47 CFR 74.634 - Remote control operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Remote control operation. 74.634 Section 74.634 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES EXPERIMENTAL RADIO, AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES Television Broadcast Auxiliary Stations § 74.634 Remote...

  2. 47 CFR 74.533 - Remote control and unattended operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Remote control and unattended operation. 74.533 Section 74.533 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES EXPERIMENTAL RADIO, AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES Aural Broadcast Auxiliary Stations § 74.533...

  3. 101. ARAIII. View of control room with operators during attempted ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    101. ARA-III. View of control room with operators during attempted 500-hour run of ML-1 reactor. April 21, 1964. Ineel photo no. 64-2185. Photographer: Benson. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  4. 47 CFR 27.1210 - Remote control operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Remote control operation. 27.1210 Section 27.1210 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Broadband Radio Service and Educational Broadband Service §...

  5. 14 CFR 61.155 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ....155 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... knowledge areas. (1) Applicable Federal Aviation Regulations of this chapter that relate to airline... aircraft's flight characteristics and performance in normal and abnormal flight regimes; (11) Human...

  6. 14 CFR 61.155 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ....155 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... knowledge areas. (1) Applicable Federal Aviation Regulations of this chapter that relate to airline... aircraft's flight characteristics and performance in normal and abnormal flight regimes; (11) Human...

  7. 14 CFR 61.155 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ....155 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... knowledge areas. (1) Applicable Federal Aviation Regulations of this chapter that relate to airline... aircraft's flight characteristics and performance in normal and abnormal flight regimes; (11) Human...

  8. 14 CFR 61.155 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ....155 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... knowledge areas. (1) Applicable Federal Aviation Regulations of this chapter that relate to airline... aircraft's flight characteristics and performance in normal and abnormal flight regimes; (11) Human...

  9. NASA Aeronautics Showcased at Balloon Fiesta

    NASA Video Gallery

    Visitors at the 2010 International Balloon Fiesta in Albuquerque, N.M., got visual stimulation from hundreds of colorful hot-air balloons soaring skyward, but also learned about NASA's aeronautics ...

  10. NASA Aeronautics: A New Strategic Vision

    NASA Video Gallery

    The aviation landscape is shifting. Emerging global trends are creating challenges that are changing the face of aviation for the next 20-40 years. How is NASA Aeronautics responding? With a new st...

  11. Astronautics and aeronautics, 1977: A chronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritchie, E. H.

    1986-01-01

    This publication is a chronology of events during the year 1977 in the fields of aeronautical and space research, development, activity, and policy. It includes appendixes, an index, and illustrations. Chronological entries list sources for further inquiry.

  12. Center for Aeronautics and Space Information Sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes the research done during 1991/92 under the Center for Aeronautics and Space Information Science (CASIS) program. The topics covered are computer architecture, networking, and neural nets.

  13. Costs and Benefits of Advanced Aeronautical Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bobick, J. C.; Denny, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    Programs available from COSMIC used to evaluate economic feasibility of applying advanced aeronautical technology to civil aircraft of future. Programs are composed of three major models: Fleet Accounting Module, Airframe manufacturer Module, and Air Carrier Module.

  14. Operator experiences on working in screen-based control rooms

    SciTech Connect

    Salo, L.; Laarni, J.; Savioja, P.

    2006-07-01

    This paper introduces the results of two interview studies carried out in Finland in four conventional power plants and one nuclear power plant. The aim of the studies was to gather data on user experiences on the effects of control room modernization and digital control room technology on operator work Since the number of completed digitalization projects in nuclear power plants is small supplementary information was gathered by interviewing operators in conventional power plants. Our results suggest that even though the modernization processes have been success stories, they have created new challenges for operator personnel. Examples of these challenges are increased requirements for competence and collaboration, problems in trust calibration and development of awareness of the process state. Some major differences in the digitalization of human-system interfaces between conventional and nuclear power plants were discussed. (authors)

  15. Verification and Implementation of Operations Safety Controls for Flight Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalls, James R.; Jones, Cheryl L.; Carrier, Alicia S.

    2010-01-01

    There are several engineering disciplines, such as reliability, supportability, quality assurance, human factors, risk management, safety, etc. Safety is an extremely important engineering specialty within NASA, and the consequence involving a loss of crew is considered a catastrophic event. Safety is not difficult to achieve when properly integrated at the beginning of each space systems project/start of mission planning. The key is to ensure proper handling of safety verification throughout each flight/mission phase. Today, Safety and Mission Assurance (S&MA) operations engineers continue to conduct these flight product reviews across all open flight products. As such, these reviews help ensure that each mission is accomplished with safety requirements along with controls heavily embedded in applicable flight products. Most importantly, the S&MA operations engineers are required to look for important design and operations controls so that safety is strictly adhered to as well as reflected in the final flight product.

  16. Mold Heating and Cooling Pump Package Operator Interface Controls Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Josh A. Salmond

    2009-08-07

    The modernization of the Mold Heating and Cooling Pump Package Operator Interface (MHC PP OI) consisted of upgrading the antiquated single board computer with a proprietary operating system to off-the-shelf hardware and off-the-shelf software with customizable software options. The pump package is the machine interface between a central heating and cooling system that pumps heat transfer fluid through an injection or compression mold base on a local plastic molding machine. The operator interface provides the intelligent means of controlling this pumping process. Strict temperature control of a mold allows the production of high quality parts with tight tolerances and low residual stresses. The products fabricated are used on multiple programs.

  17. An adaptive controller for enhancing operator performance during teleoperation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carignan, Craig R.; Tarrant, Janice M.; Mosier, Gary E.

    1989-01-01

    An adaptive controller is developed for adjusting robot arm parameters while manipulating payloads of unknown mass and inertia. The controller is tested experimentally in a master/slave configuration where the adaptive slave arm is commanded via human operator inputs from a master. Kinematically similar six-joint master and slave arms are used with the last three joints locked for simplification. After a brief initial adaptation period for the unloaded arm, the slave arm retrieves different size payloads and maneuvers them about the workspace. Comparisons are then drawn with similar tasks where the adaptation is turned off. Several simplifications of the controller dynamics are also addressed and experimentally verified.

  18. Automatic transmission control system and method of operation

    SciTech Connect

    Lemon, R.W.; Arzoian, J.

    1991-04-16

    This patent describes a control system for an automatic transmission of a vehicle with a fluid torque converter having a bypass clutch, and a change gear assembly providing a variety of ratio changes on selective actuation of a plurality of friction engaging elements of the change gear assembly. The control system provides the selective engagement of three friction elements and the bypass clutch through the selective energization and de-energization of two solenoid operated valves and the selective actuation and de-actuation of three shift control valves.

  19. Task oriented nonlinear control laws for telerobotic assembly operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. A.; Ward, L. S.; Elia, C. F.

    1987-01-01

    The goal of this research is to achieve very intelligent telerobotic controllers which are capable of receiving high-level commands from the human operator and implementing them in an adaptive manner in the object/task/manipulator workspace. Initiatives by the authors at Integrated Systems, Inc. to identify and develop the key technologies necessary to create such a flexible, highly programmable, telerobotic controller are presented. The focus of the discussion is on the modeling of insertion tasks in three dimensions and nonlinear implicit force feedback control laws which incorporate tool/workspace constraints. Preliminary experiments with dual arm beam assembly in 2-D are presented.

  20. Aeronautics and space report of the President

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the activities and accomplishments of all agencies of the United States in the fields of aeronautics and space science during FY 1994. Activity summaries are presented for the following areas: space launch activities, space science, space flight and space technology, space communications, aeronuatics, and studies of the planet Earth. Several appendices providing data on U.S. launch activities, the Federal budget for space and aeronautics, remote sensing capabilities, and space policy are included.