Science.gov

Sample records for aeronautical science facility

  1. Aeronautical facilities assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penaranda, F. E. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    A survey of the free world's aeronautical facilities was undertaken and an evaluation made on where the relative strengths and weaknesses exist. Special emphasis is given to NASA's own capabilities and needs. The types of facilities surveyed are: Wind Tunnels; Airbreathing Propulsion Facilities; and Flight Simulators

  2. Review of Aeronautical Wind Tunnel Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The nation's aeronautical wind tunnel facilities constitute a valuable technological resource and make a significant contribution to the global supremacy of U.S. aircraft, both civil and military. At the request of NASA, the National Research Council's Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board organized a commitee to review the state of repair, adequacy, and future needs of major aeronautical wind tunnel facilities in meeting national goals. The comittee identified three main areas where actions are needed to sustain the capability of NASA's aeronautical wind tunnel facilities to support the national aeronautical research and development activities: tunnel maintenance and upgrading, productivity enhancement, and accommodation of new requirements (particularly in hypersonics). Each of these areas are addressed and the committee recommendations for appropriate actions presented.

  3. Center for Aeronautics and Space Information Sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes the research done during 1991/92 under the Center for Aeronautics and Space Information Science (CASIS) program. The topics covered are computer architecture, networking, and neural nets.

  4. 75 FR 36722 - Aeronautics Science and Technology Subcommittee; Committee on Technology; National Science and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-28

    ... TECHNOLOGY POLICY Aeronautics Science and Technology Subcommittee; Committee on Technology; National Science... development of the draft National Aeronautics Research, Development, Test and Evaluation (RDT&E) Infrastructure Plan. SUMMARY: The Aeronautics Science and Technology Subcommittee (ASTS) of the National...

  5. Aeronautical Facilities Catalogue. Volume 1: Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penaranda, F. E. (Compiler); Freda, M. S. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    Domestic and foreign wind tunnel facilities are enumerated and their technical parameters are described. Data pertinent to managers and engineers are presented. Facilities judged comparable in testing capability are noted and grouped together. Several comprehensive cross-indexes and charts are included.

  6. National facilities study. Volume 2: Task group on aeronautical research and development facilities report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The Task Group on Aeronautics R&D Facilities examined the status and requirements for aeronautics facilities against the competitive need. Emphasis was placed on ground-based facilities for subsonic, supersonic and hypersonic aerodynamics, and propulsion. Subsonic and transonic wind tunnels were judged to be most critical and of highest priority. Results of the study are presented.

  7. FY11 Facility Assessment Study for Aeronautics Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loboda, John A.; Sydnor, George H.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the approach and results for the Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) FY11 Facility Assessment Project. ATP commissioned assessments in FY07 and FY11 to aid in the understanding of the current condition and reliability of its facilities and their ability to meet current and future (five year horizon) test requirements. The principle output of the assessment was a database of facility unique, prioritized investments projects with budgetary cost estimates. This database was also used to identify trends for the condition of facility systems.

  8. 75 FR 81678 - Aeronautics Science and Technology Subcommittee; Committee on Technology; National Science and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ... TECHNOLOGY POLICY Aeronautics Science and Technology Subcommittee; Committee on Technology; National Science... Aeronautics Research, Development, Test and Evaluation (RDT&E) Infrastructure Plan. SUMMARY: The Aeronautics...) Committee on Technology will hold a public meeting ] to review and discuss the National Aeronautics...

  9. NASA Ames and Future of Space Exploration, Science, and Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Pushing the frontiers of aeronautics and space exploration presents multiple challenges. NASA Ames Research Center is at the forefront of tackling these issues, conducting cutting edge research in the fields of air traffic management, entry systems, advanced information technology, intelligent human and robotic systems, astrobiology, aeronautics, space, earth and life sciences and small satellites. Knowledge gained from this research helps ensure the success of NASA's missions, leading us closer to a world that was only imagined as science fiction just decades ago.

  10. Science Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butin, Dan W.; Biehle, James T.; Motz, LaMoine L.; West, Sandra S.

    2009-01-01

    The National Research Council's "National Science Education Standards" call for science education to be "developmentally appropriate, interesting, and relevant to students' lives, emphasize student understanding through inquiry, and be connected with other school subjects." This description captures the three major trends in science education…

  11. Science Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biehle, James T.

    2002-01-01

    Describes how schools in Carroll County, Maryland; Toronto, Ontario; Durham, North Carolina; Englewood, Colorado; and Troy, New York, are renovating their vocational areas for inquiry-based, hands-on science learning. Includes sample floor plans and photographs. (EV)

  12. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Science and Engineering Apprentice Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Science and Engineering Apprentice Program for high school students is one of NASA's many efforts toward a goal of scientific literacy. It embraces science, mathematics, and technology as keys to purposeful and sustained progress and security for our nation and its people. It serves as a model for helping reform education by striving to address mechanisms to influence the knowledge, skills, and attitudes of our students. It focuses on what to do today to meet the challenges of tomorrow.

  13. A distributed data acquisition system for aeronautics test facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fronek, Dennis L.; Setter, Robert N.; Blumenthal, Philip Z.; Smalley, Robert R.

    1987-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center is in the process of installing a new data acquisition and display system. This new system will provide small and medium sized aeronautics test facilities with a state-of-the-art real-time data acquisition and display system. The new data system will provide for the acquisition of signals from a variety of instrumentation sources. They include analog measurements of temperatures, pressures, and other steady state voltage inputs; frequency inputs to measure speed and flow; discrete I/O for significant events, and modular instrument systems such as multiplexed pressure modules or electronic instrumentation with a IEEE 488 interface. The data system is designed to acquire data, convert it to engineering units, compute test dependent performance calculations, limit check selected channels or calculations, and display the information in alphanumeric or graphical form with a cycle time of one second for the alphanumeric data. This paper describes the system configuration, its salient features, and the expected impact on testing.

  14. Aeronautics and Aviation Science: Careers and Opportunities Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Texter, P. Cardie

    1998-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration funded project, Aeronautics and Aviation Science: Careers and Opportunities has been in operation since July, 1995. This project operated as a collaboration with Massachusetts Corporation for Educational Telecommunications, the Federal Aviation Administration, Bridgewater State College and four targeted "core sites" in the greater Boston area. In its first and second years, a video series on aeronautics and aviation science was developed and broadcast via "live, interactive" satellite feed. Accompanying teacher and student supplementary instructional materials for grades 6-9 were produced and disseminated by the Massachusetts Corporation for Educational Telecommunications (MCET). In the MCET grant application it states that project Take Off! in its initial phase would recruit and train teachers at "core" sites in the greater Boston area, as well as opening participation to other on-line users of MCET's satellite feeds. "Core site" classrooms would become equipped so that teachers and students might become engaged in an interactive format which aimed at not only involving the students during the "live" broadcast of the instructional video series, but which would encourage participation in electronic information gathering and sharing among participants. As a Take Off! project goal, four schools with a higher than average proportion of minority and underrepresented youth were invited to become involved with the project to give these students the opportunity to consider career exploration and development in the field of science aviation and aeronautics. The four sites chosen to participate in this project were: East Boston High School, Dorchester High School, Randolph Junior-Senior High School and Malden High School. In year 3 Dorchester was unable to continue to fully participate and exited out. Danvers was added to the "core site" list in year 3. In consideration of Goals 2000, the National Science Foundation

  15. Western Aeronautical Test Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakahara, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the work of the Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR). NASA's Western Aeronautical Test Range is a network of facilities used to support aeronautical research, science missions, exploration system concepts, and space operations. The WATR resides at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center located at Edwards Air Force Base, California. The WATR is a part of NASA's Corporate Management of Aeronautical Facilities and funded by the Strategic Capability Asset Program (SCAP). Maps show the general location of the WATR area that is used for aeronautical testing and evaluation. The products, services and facilities of WATR are discussed,

  16. Take Off! Aeronautics and Aviation Science: Careers and Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Funded by National Aeronautic and Space Administration's High Performance Computing and Communications/ Learning Technologies Project (HPCC/LTP) Cooperative Agreement, Aeronautics and aviation Science: Careers and Opportunities was operative from July 1995 through July 1998. This project operated as a collaboration with Massachusetts Corporation for Educational Telecommunications, the Federal Aviation Administration, Bridgewater State College and four targeted "core sites" in the greater Boston area: Dorchester, Malden, East Boston and Randolph. In its first and second years, a video series with a participatory website on aeronautics and aviation science was developed and broadcast via "live, interactive" satellite feed. Accompanying teacher and student supplementary instructional materials for grades 6-12 were produced and disseminated by the Massachusetts Corporation for Educational Telecommunications (MCET). In year three, the project team redesigned the website, edited 14 videos to a five part thematic unit, and developed a teacher's guide to the video and web materials supplement for MAC and PC platforms, aligned with national standards. In the MCET grant application it states that project Take Off! in its initial phase would recruit and train teachers at "core" sites in the greater Boston area, as well as opening participation to other on-line users of MCET's satellite feeds. "Core site" classrooms would become equipped so that teachers and students might become engaged in an interactive format which aimed at not only involving the students during the "live" broadcast of the instructional video series, but which would encourage participation in electronic information gathering and sharing among participants. As a Take Off! project goal, four schools with a higher than average proportion of minority and underrepresented youth were invited to become involved with the project to give these students the opportunity to consider career exploration and development

  17. Science Facilities Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC.

    A bibliographic collection on science buildings and facilities is cited with many different reference sources for those concerned with the design, planning, and layout of science facilities. References are given covering a broad scope of information on--(1) physical plant planning, (2) management and safety, (3) building type studies, (4) design…

  18. Technicians at General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., (GA-ASI) facility at Adelanto, Calif., ca

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Technicians at General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., (GA-ASI) facility at Adelanto, Calif., carefully thread control lines through a bulkhead during engine installation on NASA's Altair aircraft. General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., is developing the Altair version of its Predator B unmanned reconnaissance aircraft under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. NASA plans to use the Altair as a technology demonstrator to validate a variety of command and control technologies for UAVs, as well as demonstrate the capability to perform a variety of Earth science missions. The Altair is designed to carry an 700-lb. payload of scientific instruments and imaging equipment for as long as 32 hours at up to 52,000 feet altitude. Eleven-foot extensions have been added to each wing, giving the Altair an overall wingspan of 86 feet with an aspect ratio of 23. It is powered by a 700-hp. rear-mounted TPE-331-10 turboprop engine, driving a three-blade propeller. Altair is scheduled to begin flight tests in the fourth quarter of 2002, and be acquired by NASA following successful completion of basic airworthiness tests in early 2003 for evaluation of over-the-horizon control, detect, see and avoid and other technologies required to allow UAVs to operate safely with other aircraft in the national airspace.

  19. Technicians at General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., (GA-ASI) facility at Adelanto, Calif., ca

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Technicians at General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., (GA-ASI) facility at Adelanto, Calif., carefully install a turboprop engine to the rear fuselage of NASA's Altair aircraft during final assembly operations. General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., is developing the Altair version of its Predator B unmanned reconnaissance aircraft under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. NASA plans to use the Altair as a technology demonstrator to validate a variety of command and control technologies for UAVs, as well as demonstrate the capability to perform a variety of Earth science missions. The Altair is designed to carry an 700-lb. payload of scientific instruments and imaging equipment for as long as 32 hours at up to 52,000 feet altitude. Eleven-foot extensions have been added to each wing, giving the Altair an overall wingspan of 86 feet with an aspect ratio of 23. It is powered by a 700-hp. rear-mounted TPE-331-10 turboprop engine, driving a three-blade propeller. Altair is scheduled to begin flight tests in the fourth quarter of 2002, and be acquired by NASA following successful completion of basic airworthiness tests in early 2003 for evaluation of over-the-horizon control, detect, see and avoid and other technologies required to allow UAVs to operate safely with other aircraft in the national airspace.

  20. Science Facilities Design Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Dept. of Education, Baltimore.

    These guidelines, presented in five chapters, propose a framework to support the planning, designing, constructing, and renovating of school science facilities. Some program issues to be considered in the articulation of a science program include environmental concerns, interdisciplinary approaches, space flexibility, and electronic…

  1. An Update of the Nation's Long-Term Strategic Needs for NASA's Aeronautics Test Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anton, Philip S.; Raman, Raj; Osburg, Jan; Kallimani, James G.

    2009-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) major wind tunnel (WT), propulsion test (PT), and simulation facilities exist to serve NASA's and the nation's aeronautics needs. RAND Corporation researchers conducted a prior study of these facilities from 2002 to 2003, identifying (1) NASA's continuing ability to serve national needs, (2) which facilities appear strategically important from an engineering perspective given the vehicle classes the nation investigates and produces, and (3) management challenges and issues. This documented briefing (DB) is the final report from a new, one-year study (conducted from September 2006 through January 2008), partially updating the prior assessment. The study focuses on updating the list of facilities in the prior study that were deemed to be strategically important (again, from an engineering perspective) in serving those needs. This update also adds a new assessment of national needs for six major aeronautics simulators at NASA and lists those deemed strategically important.

  2. Aeronautics Learning Laboratory for Science, Technology, and Research (ALLSTAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Cesar; Ebadian, M. A.

    1998-01-01

    We finished the material development of Level 1, Level 2 and most of Level 3. We created three new galleries, one of streaming videos enabling the user to select his/her appropriate speed of Internet connectivity for better performance. The second gallery on NASA's X-series aircraft and the third is on F-series aircraft. We also completed the placement and activation of all thirteen kiosks. We added one more kiosk over the number suggested in the proposal at Baker Aviation High School - a Dade County Public School for special aviation programs. We felt that the goals of this school matched ALLSTAR's goals and that the placement of the kiosk would better help the local students become interested in the Aviation and Aeronautics field. We continue to work on the development of our "Teacher Resource Guide to ALLSTAR material" in which we tied our material into the national and Florida State standards. We finished the Florida Sunshine State standards, getting positive feedback from local and other educators who use the material on a regular basis. We had another successful workshop on October 29 th, 1997. We introduced the ALLSTAR website and kiosk to about twenty science and history teachers from Dade County Public Schools (DCPS). Most teachers were from middle schools, although we had some from elementary schools also. We provided several demonstrations of the ALLSTAR material to local schools in the Dade County Public Schools (DCPS) system. We used the ALLSTAR material with FIU's summer immersion program for FLAME students. This program includes a high number of minority students interested in science and engineering. We also presented the material at National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) and National Congress on Aviation and Space Education (NCASE) conferences and will be presenting the material at the Southeast Florida Aviation Consortium (SEFAC). We provided two on-site workshops in the NSTA conference with total attended of about 70 teachers. The BBS was

  3. Achieving Aeronautics Leadership: Aeronautics Strategic Enterprise Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Today, more than ever, aggressive leadership is required to ensure that our national investments in aeronautical research, technology, and facilities are shaped into a coordinated, and high-impact, strategy. Under the auspices of the National Science and Technology Council, and in conjunction with the domestic industry, universities, the Department of Defense, and the Federal Aviation Administration - our partners in aeronautics - we propose to provide that leadership, and this document is our plan.

  4. An inventory of aeronautical ground research facilities. Volume 4: Engineering flight simulation facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirrello, C. J.; Hardin, R. D.; Capelluro, L. P.; Harrison, W. D.

    1971-01-01

    The general purpose capabilities of government and industry in the area of real time engineering flight simulation are discussed. The information covers computer equipment, visual systems, crew stations, and motion systems, along with brief statements of facility capabilities. Facility construction and typical operational costs are included where available. The facilities provide for economical and safe solutions to vehicle design, performance, control, and flying qualities problems of manned and unmanned flight systems.

  5. Experimenting with Science Facility Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butterfield, Eric

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the modern school science facility and how computers and teaching methods are changing their design. Issues include power, lighting, and space requirements; funding for planning; architect assessment; materials requirements for work surfaces; and classroom flexibility. (GR)

  6. Facility Focus: Science Buildings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Planning & Management, 1999

    1999-01-01

    Provides examples of four university science buildings whose design fosters interdisciplinary interaction among students coupled with lab flexibility. Design concepts, innovations, and building layouts are examined. (GR)

  7. Life Sciences Centrifuge Facility assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Robert H.

    1994-01-01

    This report provides an assessment of the status of the Centrifuge Facility being developed by ARC for flight on the International Space Station Alpha. The assessment includes technical status, schedules, budgets, project management, performance of facility relative to science requirements, and identifies risks and issues that need to be considered in future development activities.

  8. An inventory of aeronautical ground research facilities. Volume 2: Air breathing engine test facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirrello, C. J.; Hardin, R. D.; Heckart, M. V.; Brown, K. R.

    1971-01-01

    The inventory covers free jet and direct connect altitude cells, sea level static thrust stands, sea level test cells with ram air, and propulsion wind tunnels. Free jet altitude cells and propulsion wind tunnels are used for evaluation of complete inlet-engine-exhaust nozzle propulsion systems under simulated flight conditions. These facilities are similar in principal of operation and differ primarily in test section concept. The propulsion wind tunnel provides a closed test section and restrains the flow around the test specimen while the free jet is allowed to expand freely. A chamber of large diameter about the free jet is provided in which desired operating pressure levels may be maintained. Sea level test cells with ram air provide controlled, conditioned air directly to the engine face for performance evaluation at low altitude flight conditions. Direct connect altitude cells provide a means of performance evaluation at simulated conditions of Mach number and altitude with air supplied to the flight altitude conditions. Sea level static thrust stands simply provide an instrumented engine mounting for measuring thrust at zero airspeed. While all of these facilities are used for integrated engine testing, a few provide engine component test capability.

  9. Western Aeronautical Test Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakahara, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) is a network of facilities used to support aeronautical research, science missions, exploration system concepts, and space operations. The WATR resides at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center located at Edwards Air Force Base, California. The WATR is a part of NASA's Corporate Management of Aeronautical Facilities and funded by the Strategic Capability Asset Program (SCAP). It is managed by the Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) of the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) to provide the right facility at the right time. NASA is a tenant on Edwards Air Force Base and has an agreement with the Air Force Flight Test Center to use the land and airspace controlled by the Department of Defense (DoD). The topics include: 1) The WATR supports a variety of vehicles; 2) Dryden shares airspace with the AFFTC; 3) Restricted airspace, corridors, and special use areas are available for experimental aircraft; 4) WATR Products and Services; 5) WATR Support Configuration; 6) Telemetry Tracking; 7) Time Space Positioning; 8) Video; 9) Voice Communication; 10) Mobile Operations Facilities; 11) Data Processing; 12) Mission Control Center; 13) Real-Time Data Analysis; and 14) Range Safety.

  10. Facility Focus: Science Labs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Planning & Management, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Describes the buildings of the International Center for Public Health of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, and the Louise C. Buhl Hall of Sciences at Chatham College in Pennsylvania, particularly their atriums. Includes photographs. (EV)

  11. Sources and Distribution of Polychlorinated Terphenyls at a Major US Aeronautics Research Facility.

    PubMed

    HALE; ENOS; GALLAGHER

    1998-11-01

    / High concentrations of an unusual, complex mixture of chlorinated compounds were discovered in sediments and oysters near a federal aeronautics facility during implementation of a pollutant screening protocol. The mixture was identified as Aroclor 5432, a polychlorinated terphenyl (PCT) formulation, produced in the US until 1972. PCTs, particularly low chlorinated mixtures, have rarely been reported in the environment, despite significant manufacture and usage. Releases were traced to two outfalls. Creek sediments downstream of one contained concentrations as high as 200,000 |gmg/kg (dry weight basis); those in indigenous oysters reached 35,000 |gmg/kg, indicating significant bioavailability and bioaccumulation potential. Subsequent work showed that PCTs were widely disseminated in marsh grass, crabs, and fish. PCTs, PCBs, and mercury were also detected in storm drain lines entering these outfalls. The lines received input from both storm water and research buildings. Historical hydraulic fluid leaks and in-service compressor fluids in some buildings contained PCTs and PCBs. Contaminated materials on-site were removed to minimize pollutant spread. Aroclor 5432 usage, most likely as compressor/hydraulic fluid additives, probably ended about ten years prior to its on-site detection. In terms of biological effects, intraperitoneal injection of fish with Aroclor 5432 induced cytochrome P-4501A (CYP1A) and ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity to a similar degree as PCB Aroclor 1254 and to a greater extent than PCT Aroclor 5460. The presence of high concentrations of PCTs contributed to the facility being included on the National Priorities List. It subsequently became the first US federal facility to sign a Federal Facility Agreement, identifying cleanup responsibilities, prior to formal listing.KEY WORDS: Polychlorinated terphenyls; Aroclor; Contaminated sediments; Hydraulic fluid; Enzyme induction; Polychlorinated biphenyls

  12. Aeronautics. An Educator's Guide with Activities in Science, Mathematics, and Technology Education: What Pilot, Astronaut, or Aeronautical Engineer didn't Start out with a Toy Glider?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biggs, Pat (Editor); Huetter, Ted (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    Welcome to the exciting world of aeronautics. The term aeronautics originated in France, and was derived from the Greek words for "air" and "to sail." It is the study of flight and the operation of aircraft. This educator guide explains basic aeronautical concepts, provides a background in the history of aviation, and sets them within the context of the flight environment (atmosphere, airports, and navigation). The activities in this guide are designed to be uncomplicated and fun. They have been developed by NASA Aerospace Education Services Program specialists, who have successfully used them in countless workshops and student programs around the United States. The activities encourage students to explore the nature of flight, and experience some real-life applications of mathematics, science, and technology. The subject of flight has a wonderful power to inspire learning.

  13. Designs for Science Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Education, St. Paul.

    Traditional-classical programs, individualized instruction, differentiated staffing, flexible-modular scheduling are all programs and ideas much discussed in the field of education today. However, science instruction is still in the logarithmic phase of change. Curricular and instructional styles alter so rapidly that often reference points are…

  14. Weathering Heights: The Emergence of Aeronautical Meteorology as an Infrastructural Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Roger

    The first half of the 20th century was an era of weathering heights. As the development of powered flight made the free atmosphere militarily and economically relevant, meteorologists encountered new kinds of weather conditions at altitude. Pilots also learned to weather heights, as they struggled to survive in an atmosphere that revealed surprising dangers like squall lines, fog, icing, and turbulence. Aeronautical meteorology evolved out of these encounters, a heterogeneous body of knowledge that included guidelines for routing aircraft, networks for observing the upper air using scientific instruments, and procedures for synthesizing those observations into weather forecasts designed for pilots. As meteorologists worked to make the skies safe for aircraft, they remade their science around the physics of the free atmosphere. The dissertation tracks a small group of Scandinavian meteorologists, the "Bergen School," who came to be the dominant force in world meteorology by forecasting for Arctic exploration flights, designing airline weather services, and training thousands of military weather officers during World War II. After the war, some of these military meteorologists invented the TV weather report (now the most widely consumed genre of popular science) by combining the narrative of the pre-fight weather briefing with the visual style of comic-illustrated training manuals. The dissertation argues that aeronautical meteorology is representative of what I call the "infrastructural sciences," a set of organizationally intensive, purposefully invisible, applied sciences. These sciences enable the reliable operation of large technological systems by integrating theory-derived knowledge with routine environmental observation. The dissertation articulates a set of characteristics for identifying and understanding infrastructural science, and then argues that these culturally modest technical practices play a pervasive role in maintaining industrial lifeways. It

  15. Aeronautics: An Educator's Guide with Activities in Science, Mathematics, and Technology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This educator's guide, developed for students in grades 2-4, discusses the field of aeronautics. It begins with education standards and skill matrices for the classroom activities, a description of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) aeronautics mission, and a brief history of aeronautics. Activities are written for the…

  16. Project Mercury: Man-In-Space Program of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. [Report of the Committee on Aeronautical and Space Sciences United States Senate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    The purpose of this staff study, made at the request of the chairman, is to serve members of the Committee on Aeronautical and Space Sciences as a source of basic information on Project Mercury, the man-in-space program of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The study is largely derived from unclassified information released by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and testimony concerning Project Mercury given during hearings before this committee. The program descriptions are based upon current program planning. Since this is a highly advanced research and development program, the project is obviously subject to changes that may result from future developments and accomplishments characteristic of such research activities. Certain information with respect to revised schedules, obtained on a classified basis by the committee during inspection trips, is necessarily omitted. The appendixes to the study include information that may prove helpful on various aspects of space flight and exploration. Included are unofficial comments and observations relating to Russia's manned space flight activities and also a complete chronology of all satellites, lunar probes, and space probes up to the present.

  17. Fundamental Aeronautics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay

    2009-01-01

    The Overarching Mission of NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) is: To advance U.S. technological leadership in aeronautics in partnership with industry, academia, and other government agencies that conduct aeronautics-related research. ARMD supports the Agency's goal of developing a balanced overall program of science, exploration, and aeronautics, and ARMD's research plans also directly support the National Aeronautics R&D Policy and accompanying Executive Order 131419.

  18. Overview of the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility aeronautical flight projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Robert R., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Several principal aerodynamics flight projects of the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility are discussed. Key vehicle technology areas from a wide range of flight vehicles are highlighted. These areas include flight research data obtained for ground facility and computation correlation, applied research in areas not well suited to ground facilities (wind tunnels), and concept demonstration.

  19. Science Facilities: Educational Facilities Review Series Number 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baas, Alan M.

    The design of today's science facilities for elementary and secondary schools reflects trends toward education's growing emphasis on dynamic student-teacher interaction and toward a growing national sensitivity to social and environmental needs. The modern science facility exhibits a primary concern for individual student involvement in the…

  20. Research facility access & science education

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, S.P.; Teplitz, V.L.

    1994-10-01

    As Congress voted to terminate the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Laboratory in October of 1993, the Department of Energy was encouraged to maximize the benefits to the nation of approximately $2 billion which had already been expended to date on its evolution. Having been recruited to Texas from other intellectually challenging enclaves around the world, many regional scientists, especially physicists, of course, also began to look for viable ways to preserve some of the potentially short-lived gains made by Texas higher education in anticipation of {open_quotes}the SSC era.{close_quotes} In fact, by November, 1993, approximately 150 physicists and engineers from thirteen Texas universities and the SSC itself, had gathered on the SMU campus to discuss possible re-uses of the SSC assets. Participants at that meeting drew up a petition addressed to the state and federal governments requesting the creation of a joint Texas Facility for Science Education and Research. The idea was to create a facility, open to universities and industry alike, which would preserve the research and development infrastructure and continue the educational mission of the SSC.

  1. Budget estimates, fiscal year 1995. Volume 1: Agency summary, human space flight, and science, aeronautics and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The NASA budget request has been restructured in FY 1995 into four appropriations: human space flight; science, aeronautics, and technology; mission support; and inspector general. The human space flight appropriations provides funding for NASA's human space flight activities. This includes the on-orbit infrastructure (space station and Spacelab), transportation capability (space shuttle program, including operations, program support, and performance and safety upgrades), and the Russian cooperation program, which includes the flight activities associated with the cooperative research flights to the Russian Mir space station. These activities are funded in the following budget line items: space station, Russian cooperation, space shuttle, and payload utilization and operations. The science, aeronautics, and technology appropriations provides funding for the research and development activities of NASA. This includes funds to extend our knowledge of the earth, its space environment, and the universe and to invest in new technologies, particularly in aeronautics, to ensure the future competitiveness of the nation. These objectives are achieved through the following elements: space science, life and microgravity sciences and applications, mission to planet earth, aeronautical research and technology, advanced concepts and technology, launch services, mission communication services, and academic programs.

  2. Fourth National Aeronautics and Space Administration Weather and Climate Program Science Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreins, E. R. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    The NASA Weather and Climate Program has two major thrusts. The first involves the development of experimental and prototype operational satellite systems, sensors, and space facilities for monitoring and understanding the atmosphere. The second thrust involves basic scientific investigation aimed at studying the physical and chemical processes which control weather and climate. This fourth science review concentrated on the scientific research rather than the hardware development aspect of the program. These proceedings contain 65 papers covering the three general areas: severe storms and local weather research, global weather, and climate.

  3. NASA Allstar Project Aeronautics Learning Laboratory for Science,Technology, and Research (Allstar)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Cesar; Ebadian M. A.

    1998-01-01

    We finished the material development of Level 1, Level 2 and most of Level 3. We created three new galleries, one of streaming videos enabling the user to select his/her appropriate speed of Internet connectivity for better performance. The second gallery on NASA's X-series aircraft and the third is on F-series aircraft. We also completed the placement and activation of all thirteen kiosks. We added one more kiosk over the number suggested in the proposal at Baker Aviation High School - a Dade County Public School for special aviation programs. We felt that the goals of this school matched ALLSTAR's goals and that the placement of the kiosk would better help the local students become interested in the Aviation and Aeronautics field. We continue to work on the development of our "Teacher Resource Guide to ALLSTAR material" in which we tied our material into the national and Florida State standards. We finished the Florida Sunshine State standards, getting positive feedback from local and other educators who use the material on a regular basis. We had another successful workshop on October 29', 1997. We introduced the ALLSTAR website and kiosk to about twenty science and history teachers from Dade County Public Schools (DCPS). Most teachers were from middle schools, although we had some from elementary schools also. We provided several demonstrations of the ALLSTAR material to local schools in the Dade County Public Schools (DCPS) system. We used the ALLSTAR material with FIU's summer immersion program for FLAME students. This program includes a high number of minority students interested in science and engineering. We also presented the material at National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) and National Congress on Aviation and Space Education (NCASE) conferences and will be presenting the material at the Southeast Florida Aviation Consortium (SEFAC). We provided two on-site workshops in the NSTA conference with total attended of about 70 teachers. The BBS was

  4. Aeronautical Engineering: A continuing bibliography with indexes (supplement 175)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    This bibliography lists 467 reports, articles and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in May 1984. Topics cover varied aspects of aeronautical engineering, geoscience, physics, astronomy, computer science, and support facilities.

  5. A bill to redesignate certain facilities of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Feinstein, Dianne [D-CA

    2013-10-31

    10/31/2013 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (text of measure as introduced: CR S7732) (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see H.R.667, which became Public Law 113-75 on 1/16/2014. Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  6. Program of Research in Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A prospectus of the educational and research opportunities available at the Joint Institute for Advancement of Flight Sciences, operated at NASA Langley Research Center in conjunction with George Washington University's School of Engineering and Applied Sciences is presented. Requirements of admission to various degree programs are given as well as the course offerings in the areas of acoustics, aeronautics, environmental modelling, materials science, and structures and dynamics. Research facilities for each field of study are described. Presentations and publications (including dissertations and theses) generated by each program are listed as well as faculty members visting scientists and engineers.

  7. Mars mission science operations facilities design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, Jeffrey S.; Wales, Roxana; Powell, Mark W.; Backes, Paul G.; Steinke, Robert C.

    2002-01-01

    A variety of designs for Mars rover and lander science operations centers are discussed in this paper, beginning with a brief description of the Pathfinder science operations facility and its strengths and limitations. Particular attention is then paid to lessons learned in the design and use of operations facilities for a series of mission-like field tests of the FIDO prototype Mars rover. These lessons are then applied to a proposed science operations facilities design for the 2003 Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission. Issues discussed include equipment selection, facilities layout, collaborative interfaces, scalability, and dual-purpose environments. The paper concludes with a discussion of advanced concepts for future mission operations centers, including collaborative immersive interfaces and distributed operations. This paper's intended audience includes operations facility and situation room designers and the users of these environments.

  8. NASA thesaurus aeronautics vocabulary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The controlled vocabulary used by the NASA Scientific and Technical Information effort to index documents in the area of aeronautics is presented. The terms comprise a subset of the 1988 edition of the NASA Thesaurus and its supplements issued through the end of 1990. The Aeronautics Vocabulary contains over 4700 terms presented in a hierarchical display format. In addition to aeronautics per se, the vocabulary covers supporting terminology from areas such as fluid dynamics, propulsion engineering, and test facilities and instrumentation.

  9. Life Sciences Centrifuge Facility review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Laurence R.

    1994-01-01

    The Centrifuge Facility Project at ARC was reviewed by a code U team to determine appropriateness adequacy for the ISSA. This report represents the findings of one consultant to this team and concentrates on scientific and technical risks. This report supports continuation of the project to the next phase of development.

  10. Microgravity science and applications: Apparatus and facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    NASA support apparatus and facilities for microgravity research are summarized in fact sheets. The facilities are ground-based simulation environments for short-term experiments, and the shuttle orbiter environment for long duration experiments. The 17 items of the microgravitational experimental apparatus are described. Electronic materials, alloys, biotechnology, fluid dynamics and transport phenomena, glasses and ceramics, and combustion science are among the topics covered.

  11. Science Research Facilities - Versatility for Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giannovario, J. A.; Schelkopf, J. D.; Massey, K.; Solly, M.

    1986-01-01

    The Space Station Science Lab Module (SLM) and its interfaces are designed to minimize complexity and maximize user accommodations. The facilities provided encompass life sciences research, the control of external payloads, the servicing of customer equipment, and general scientific investigations. The SLM will have the unprecedented ability to diagnose, service, and replace equipment while in orbit. In addition, the SLM will have significant operational advantages over previous spacecraft in terms of available volume, power, and crew interaction possibilities.

  12. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Earth Science Applications Program: Exploring Partnerships to Enhance Decision Making in Public Health Practice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vann, Timi S.; Venezia, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Earth Science Enterprise is engaged in applications of NASA Earth science and remote sensing technologies for public health. Efforts are focused on establishing partnerships with those agencies and organizations that have responsibility for protecting the Nation's Health. The program's goal is the integration of NASA's advanced data and technology for enhanced decision support in the areas of disease surveillance and environmental health. A focused applications program, based on understanding partner issues and requirements, has the potential to significantly contribute to more informed decision making in public health practice. This paper intends to provide background information on NASA's investment in public health and is a call for partnership with the larger practice community.

  13. Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) Nuclear Science Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Ronald Owen; Wender, Steve

    2015-06-19

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) facilities for Nuclear Science consist of a high-energy "white" neutron source (Target 4) with 6 flight paths, three low-energy nuclear science flight paths at the Lujan Center, and a proton reaction area. The neutron beams produced at the Target 4 complement those produced at the Lujan Center because they are of much higher energy and have shorter pulse widths. The neutron sources are driven by the 800-MeV proton beam of the LANSCE linear accelerator. With these facilities, LANSCE is able to deliver neutrons with energies ranging from a milli-electron volt to several hundreds of MeV, as well as proton beams with a wide range of energy, time and intensity characteristics. The facilities, instruments and research programs are described briefly.

  14. Building Flexibility into School Science Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Paul H.

    1980-01-01

    Identified are areas to be considered in designing flexible school science facilities, such as educational philosophy and objectives, major trends, and teaching methods; also specific area considerations of site selection, spatial relationships, media and computer usage, various environmental considerations, ventilation, furniture, storage, and…

  15. Life science payloads planning study integration facility survey results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, G. W.; Brown, N. E.; Nelson, W. G.

    1976-01-01

    The integration facility survey effort described is structured to examine the facility resources needed to conduct life science payload (LSP) integration checkout activities at NASA-JSC. The LSP integration facility operations and functions are defined along with the LSP requirements for facility design. A description of available JSC life science facilities is presented and a comparison of accommodations versus requirements is reported.

  16. Third National Aeronautics and Space Administration Weather and climate program science review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreins, E. R. (Editor)

    1977-01-01

    Research results of developing experimental and prototype operational systems, sensors, and space facilities for monitoring, and understanding the atmosphere are reported. Major aspects include: (1) detection, monitoring, and prediction of severe storms; (2) improvement of global forecasting; and (3) monitoring and prediction of climate change.

  17. Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology preliminary requirements for space science and applications platform studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Needs and requirements for a free flying space science and applications platform to host groupings of compatible, extended mission experiments in earth orbit are discussed. A payload model which serves to define a typical set of mission requirements in the form of a descriptive data base is presented along with experiment leval and group level data summarizations and flight schedules. The payload descriptions are grouped by technology into the following categories: communications, materials (long term effect upon), materials technology development, power, sensors, and thermal control.

  18. RAON experimental facilities for nuclear science

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Y. K.; Kim, Y. K.; Komatsubara, T.; Moon, J. Y.; Park, J. S.; Shin, T. S.; Kim, Y. J.

    2014-05-02

    The Rare Isotope Science Project (RISP) was established in December 2011 and has put quite an effort to carry out the design and construction of the accelerator complex facility named “RAON”. RAON is a rare isotope (RI) beam facility that aims to provide various RI beams of proton-and neutron-rich nuclei as well as variety of stable ion beams of wide ranges of energies up to a few hundreds MeV/nucleon for the researches in basic science and application. Proposed research programs for nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics at RAON include studies of the properties of exotic nuclei, the equation of state of nuclear matter, the origin of the universe, process of nucleosynthesis, super heavy elements, etc. Various high performance magnetic spectrometers for nuclear science have been designed, which are KOBRA (KOrea Broad acceptance Recoil spectrometer and Apparatus), LAMPS (Large Acceptance Multi-Purpose Spectrometer), and ZDS (Zero Degree Spectrometer). The status of those spectrometers for nuclear science will be presented with a brief report on the RAON.

  19. NASA aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderton, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    Aeronautical research programs are discussed in relation to research methods and the status of the programs. The energy efficient aircraft, STOL aircraft and general aviation aircraft are considered. Aerodynamic concepts, rotary wing aircraft, aircraft safety, noise reduction, and aircraft configurations are among the topics included.

  20. Aeronautic instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everling, E; Koppe, H

    1924-01-01

    The development of aeronautic instruments. Vibrations, rapid changes of the conditions of flight and of atmospheric conditions, influence of the air stream all call for particular design and construction of the individual instruments. This is shown by certain examples of individual instruments and of various classes of instruments for measuring pressure, change of altitude, temperature, velocity, inclination and turning or combinations of these.

  1. SNOLAB - An International Facility for Underground Science

    SciTech Connect

    Hime, A.

    2005-09-08

    SNOLAB, an international facility for underground science, is presently under construction at a depth of 6000 meters of water equivalent (m.w.e.) at Inco's Creighton mine near Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. Building on the success of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) experiment, the creation of SNOLAB will provide the deep-site infrastructure required of next generation particle-astrophysics experiments in pursuit of low-energy solar neutrinos, neutrinoless double beta decay, and cosmological dark matter. Following an enthusiastic response from the scientific community to a call for Letters of Interest (LOI's) in staging experiments at SNOLAB, an initial evaluation process is now complete and an exercise is underway to define an initial suite of experiments and the longer term scientific program for this new facility.

  2. University research in aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duberg, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    The contributions which universities can make to aeronautical research projects are discussed. The activities of several facilities are presented to show the effectiveness of the educational and research programs. Reference is made to the Intergovernmental Personnel Act of 1970 which permits an exchange of federal agency personnel with state and local governments and with public and private higher education schools.

  3. Charter for the ARM Climate Research Facility Science Board

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrell, W

    2013-03-08

    The objective of the ARM Science Board is to promote the Nation’s scientific enterprise by ensuring that the best quality science is conducted at the DOE’s User Facility known as the ARM Climate Research Facility. The goal of the User Facility is to serve scientific researchers by providing unique data and tools to facilitate scientific applications for improving understanding and prediction of climate science.

  4. News from the ESO Science Archive Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrzycki, A.; Arnaboldi, M.; Bierwirth, T.; Boelter, M.; Da Rocha, C.; Delmotte, N.; Forchì, V.; Fourniol, N.; klein Gebbinck, M.; Lange, U.; Mascetti, L.; Micol, A.; Moins, C.; Munte, C.; Pluciennik, C.; Retzlaff, J.; Romaniello, M.; Rosse, N.; Sequeiros, I. V.; Vuong, M.-H.; Zampieri, S.

    2015-09-01

    ESO Science Archive Facility (SAF) - one of the world's biggest astronomical archives - combines two roles: operational (ingest, tallying, safekeeping and distribution to observers of raw data taken with ESO telescopes and processed data generated both internally and externally) and scientific (publication and delivery of all flavours of data to external users). This paper presents the “State of the SAF.” SAF, as a living entity, is constantly implementing new services and upgrading the existing ones. We present recent and future developments related to the Archive's Request Handler and metadata handling as well as performance and usage statistics and trends. We also discuss the current and future datasets on offer at SAF.

  5. Facilities for Secondary School Science Teaching. Evolving Patterns in Facilities and Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Joseph D.

    A future-oriented report on secondary school science facilities is presented in this book by the National Science Teachers Association to provide assistance in school design. Examplar facilities of more than 140 observed schools are analyzed in connection with the social influences on science education and the evolving patterns in technology,…

  6. Science with the Space Infrared Telescope Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roellig, Thomas L.

    2003-01-01

    The Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF), the fourth and final member of NASA's series of Great Observatories, is scheduled to launch on April 15,2003. Together with the Hubbie Space Telescope, the Compton Gamma ray Telescope, and the Chandra X-Ray Telescope this series of observatories offers observational capabilities across the electromagnetic spectrum from the infrared to high-energy gamma rays. SIRTF is based on three focal plane instruments - an infrared spectrograph and two infrared imagers - coupled to a superfluid-helium cooled telescope to achieve unprecedented sensitivity from 3 to 180 microns. Although SIRTF is a powerful general-purpose infrared observatory, its design was based on the capability to address four broad science themes: (1) understanding the structure and composition of the early universe, (2) understanding the nature of brown dwarfs and super-planets, (3) probing protostellar, protoplanetary, and planetary debris disk systems, and (4) understanding the origin and structure of ultraluminous infrared galaxies and active galactic nuclei. This talk will address the design and capabilities of the SIRTF observatory, provide an overview of some of the initial science investigations planned by the SIRTF Guaranteed Time Observers, and give a brief overview of the General Observer proposal process.

  7. NASDA life science experiment facilities for ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanigaki, F.; Masuda, D.; Yano, S.; Fujimoto, N.; Kamigaichi, S.

    National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) has been developing various experiment facilities to conduct space biology researches in KIBO (JEM). The Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) and the Clean Bench (CB) are installed into JEM Life Science Rack. The Biological Experiment Units (BEU) are operated in the CBEF and the CB for many kinds of experiments on cells, tissues, plants, microorganisms, or small animals. It is possible for all researchers to use these facilities under the system of the International Announcement of Opportunity. The CBEF is a CO2 incubator to provide a controlled environment (temperature, humidity, and CO2 concentration), in which a rotating table is equipped to make variable gravity (0-2g) for reference experiments. The containers called "Canisters" can be used to install the BEU in the CBEF. The CBEF supplies power, command, sensor, and video interfaces for the BEU through the utility connectors of Canisters. The BEU is a multiuser system consisting of chambers and control segments. It is operated by pre-set programs and by commands from the ground. NASDA is currently developing three types of the BEU: the Plant Experiment Unit (PEU) for plant life cycle observations and the Cell Experiment Unit (CEU1&2) for cell culture experiments. The PEU has an automated watering system with a water sensor, an LED matrix as a light source, and a CCD camera to observe the plant growth. The CEUs have culture chambers and an automated cultural medium exchange system. Engineering models of the PEU and CEU1 have been accomplished. The preliminary design of CEU2 is in progress. The design of the BEU will be modified to meet science requirements of each experiment. The CB provides a closed aseptic work-space (Operation Chamber) with gloves for experiment operations. Samples and the BEU can be manually handled in the CB. The CB has an air lock (Disinfection Chamber) to prevent contamination, and HEPA filters to make class-100-equivalent clean air

  8. [Exploring Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Brandi

    2004-01-01

    This summer I have been working with the N.A.S.A. Project at Cuyahoga Community College (Tri-C) under the title of Exploring Aeronautics Project Leader. The class that I have worked with is comprised of students that will enter the eighth grade in the fall of 2004. The program primarily focuses upon math proficiency and individualized class projects. My duties have encompassed both realms. During the first 2-3 weeks of my internship, I worked at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) researching, organizing, and compiling information for weekly Scholastic Challenges and the Super Scholastic Challenge. I was able to complete an overview of Scholastic Challenge and staff responsibilities regarding the competition; a proposal for an interactive learning system, Quizdom; a schedule for challenge equipment, as well as a schedule listing submission deadlines for the staff. Also included in my tasks, during these first 2-3 weeks, were assisting Tammy Allen and Candice Thomas with the student application review and interview processes for student applicants. For the student and parent orientation, I was assigned publications and other varying tasks to complete before the start of the program. Upon the commencement of the program, I changed location from NASA GRC to Tri-C Metro Campus, where student classes for the Cleveland site are held. During the duration of the program, I work with the instructor for the Exploring Aeronautics class, kkkk, assisting in classroom management, daily attendance, curriculum, project building, and other tasks as needed. These tasks include the conducting of the weekly competition, known as Scholastic Challenge. As a Project Leader, I am also responsible for one subject area of the Scholastic Challenge aspect of the N.A.S.A. Project curriculum. Each week I have to prepare a mission that the participants will take home the following Monday and at least 10 questions that will be included in the pool of questions used for the Scholastic Challenge

  9. The Muon Science Facility at the JKJ Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, Y.; Nishiyama, K.; Sakamoto, S.; Shimomura, K.; Kadono, R.; Higemoto, W.; Fukuchi, K.; Makimura, S.; Beveridge, J. L.; Ishida, K.; Matsuzaki, T.; Watanabe, I.; Matsuda, Y.; Kawamura, N.; Nagamine, K.

    2001-12-01

    The muon science facility is one of the experimental arenas of the JKJ project, which was recently approved for construction in a period from 2001 to 2006, as well as neutron science, particle and nuclear physics, neutrino physics and nuclear transmutation science. The muon science experimental area is planned to be located in the integrated building of the facility for the materials and life science study. One muon target will be installed upstream of the neutron target in a period of phase 1. The beam line and facility are designed to allow the later installation of a 2nd muon target in a more upstream location. The detailed design for electricity, cooling water, primary proton beam line, one muon target and secondary beam lines (a superconducting solenoid decay muon channel, a dedicated surface muon channel, and an ultra slow muon channel) is underway. In the symposium, a latest status of the muon science facility at JKJ project will be reported.

  10. Aeronautics and space report of the President: 1981 activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Achievements in the aeronautics and space program by function are summarized. Activities in communications, Earth's resources and environment, space science, space transportation, international activities, and aeronautics are included.

  11. NASA's Role in Aeronautics: A Workshop. Volume 1: Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The state of the U.S. aeronautic industry and progressive changes in national priorities as reflected in federal unified budget outlays are reviewed as well as the contribution of NACA and the character and substance of U.S. aeronautical research under NASA. Eight possible roles for the future defined by NASA are examined and the extent to which the agency should carry out these activities is considered. The roles include: (1) national facilities expertise; (2) flight sciences research; (3) generic technology evolution; (4) vehicle class evolution; (5) technology demonstration; (6) prototype development; (7) technology validation; and (8) operations feasibility; How NASA's roles varies in the areas of military aviation, general aviation, transport aircraft aeronautics, rotorcraft aeronautics, engineering education, information dissemination, and cooperation with other organizations and agencies is discussed with regard to research in aerodynamics; structures and materials; propulsion; electronics and avionics; vehicle operations; and human engineering.

  12. User Research Facilities in the Earth Sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton,S.

    2006-01-01

    The past several decades have seen an explosion in the availability of state-of-the-art research facilities, facilities that have been specifically constructed and operated for use by the general scientific community. Earth scientists have recognized the power of these methods for frontier research and are taking advantage of them in increasing numbers. 'User-friendliness' is the key that makes these shared instruments very effective components in our arsenal of collaborative and interdisciplinary research tools. Articles in this issue of Elements: User Facilities Around the World; Synchrotron Radiation, Neutron, and Mass Spectrometry Techniques at User Facilities; Scientific Advances Made Possible by User Facilities; and Accessing User Facilities and Making Your Research Experience Successful.

  13. NASA Aeronautics Research: An Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. air transportation system is vital to the economic well-being and security of the United States. To support continued U.S. leadership in aviation, Congress and NASA requested that the National Research Council undertake a decadal survey of civil aeronautics research and technology (R&T) priorities that would help NASA fulfill its responsibility to preserve U.S. leadership in aeronautics technology. In 2006, the National Research Council published the Decadal Survey of Civil Aeronautics. That report presented a set of six strategic objectives for the next decade of aeronautics R&T, and it described 51 high-priority R&T challenges--characterized by five common themes--for both NASA and non-NASA researchers. The National Research Council produced the present report, which assesses NASA's Aeronautics Research Program, in response to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Authorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109-155). This report focuses on three sets of questions: 1. How well does NASA's research portfolio implement appropriate recommendations and address relevant high-priority research and technology challenges identified in the Decadal Survey of Civil Aeronautics? If gaps are found, what steps should be taken by the federal government to eliminate them? 2. How well does NASA's aeronautics research portfolio address the aeronautics research requirements of NASA, particularly for robotic and human space exploration? How well does NASA's aeronautics research portfolio address other federal government department/agency non-civil aeronautics research needs? If gaps are found, what steps should be taken by NASA and/or other parts of the federal government to eliminate them? 3. Will the nation have a skilled research workforce and research facilities commensurate with the requirements in (1) and (2) above? What critical improvements in workforce expertise and research facilities, if any, should NASA and the nation make to achieve the goals of NASA

  14. NASA's Role in Aeronautics: A Workshop. Volume 6: Aeronautical research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    While each aspect of its aeronautical technology program is important to the current preeminence of the United States in aeronautics, the most essential contributions of NASA derive from its research. Successes and challenges in NASA's efforts to improve civil and military aviation are discussed for the following areas: turbulence, noise, supercritical aerodynamics, computational aerodynamics, fuels, high temperature materials, composite materials, single crystal components, powder metallurgy, and flight controls. Spin offs to engineering and other sciences explored include NASTRAN, lubricants, and composites.

  15. Preliminary design study for an atomospheric science facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchison, R.

    1972-01-01

    The activities and results of the Atmospheric Science Facility preliminary design study are reported. The objectives of the study were to define the scientific goals, to determine the range of experiment types, and to develop the preliminary instrument design requirements for a reusable, general purpose, optical research facility for investigating the earth's atmosphere from a space shuttle orbital vehicle.

  16. The MATROSHKA Facility - History and science overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitz, G.; Berger, T.

    The ESA MATROSHKA facility was realized through the German Aerospace Center DLR Cologne as main contractor On the 29th of January 2004 the facility was launched with a Russian PROGRESS vehicle to the International Space Station It was installed outside the Russian segment Zvezda on the 26th February 2004 and remained there until August 2005 and simulates as exact as possible an astronaut during an extravehicular activity EVA The MATROSHKA facility basically consists of a human phantom a Base Structure and a Container The container as well as the phantom is mounted to the base structure which serves as a footprint for the human phantom The container is a Carbon Fiber structure and forms with the Base Structure a closed volume that contains a dry oxygen atmosphere and protects the phantom against e g space vacuum space debris solar UV and material off-gassing It acts also as a simulation of the space suit The phantom body is made of commercial phantom parts well introduced in the field of radiotherapy It consists of 33 slices composed of natural bones embedded in tissue equivalent plastic of different density for tissue and lung The Phantom slices are equipped with channels and cut-outs to allow the accommodation of active and passive dosemeters temperature and pressure sensors The radiation experiments accommodated in the facility are performed under leadership of DLR in a cooperation of more than 15 research institutes from all over the world The MATROSHKA experiments represent therefore the currently biggest international

  17. LANSCE nuclear science facilities and activities

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Ronald O

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear science activities at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) encompass measurements spanning the neutron energy range from thermal to 600 MeV. The neutron sources use spallation of the LANSCE 800 MeV pulsed proton beam with the time-of-flight technique to measure properties of neutron-induced reactions as a function of energy over this large energy range. Current experiments are conducted at the Lujan Center moderated neutron source, the unmoderated WNR target, and with a lead-slowing-down spectrometer. Instruments in use include the DANCE array of BaF{sub 2} scintillators for neutron capture studies, the FIGARO array of liquid scintillator neutron detectors, the GEANIE array of high-resolution HPGe x-ray and gamma-ray detectors, and a number of fission chambers, and other detectors. The LANL capabilities for production and handling of radioactive materials coupled with the neutron sources and detectors at LANSCE are enabling new and challenging measurements for a variety of applications including nuclear energy and nuclear astrophysics. An overview of recent research and examples of results is presented.

  18. Astronautics and aeronautics, 1973: Chronology of science, technology and policy. [including artificial satellites, space probes, and manned space flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A brief chronological account is presented of key events of the year in aerospace sciences. Dates, actions, hardware, persons, scientific discoveries are recorded along with plans, decisions, achievements and preliminary evaluations of results. Samples of public reaction and social impact are included. Sources are identified and an index is provided to aid in tracing related events through the year. The index also serves as a glossary of acronyms and abbreviations.

  19. Environmental statement for National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Office of Space Science, launch vehicle and propulsion programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    NASA OSS Launch Vehicle and Propulsion Programs are responsible for the launch of approximately 20 automated science and applications spacecraft per year. These launches are for NASA programs and those of other U. S. government agencies, private organizations, such as the Comsat Corporation, foreign countries, and international organizations. Launches occur from Cape Kennedy, Florida; Vandenberg Air Force Base, California; Wallops Island, Virginia; and the San Marco Platform in the Indian Ocean off Kenya. Spacecraft launched by this program contribute in a variety of ways to the control of and betterment of the environment. Environmental effects caused by the launch vehicles are limited in extent, duration, and intensity and are considered insignificant.

  20. The CCAT Observatory: Science and Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stacey, G. J.; Bertoldi, F.; Magnelli, B.; Stutzki, J.; Schilke, P.; Glenn, J.; Bally, J.; Giovanelli, R.; Riechers, D.; Karim, A.; Plume, R.

    2016-05-01

    CCAT is a 25 meter submm telescope proposed to be built at 5600 meters elevation on Cerro Chajnantor overlooking the ALMA site in northern Chile. The CCAT site is the best submm site that is accessible by truck, so that with its large aperture, exceptionally good surface accuracy (˜17 μm rms total wavefront error, WFE), state-of-the-art instrumentation and large (≥20 arcmin) field-of-view (FoV) CCAT will deliver unsurpassed point source sensitivity and mapping speeds across the submm telluric windows. Our primary science goals are: (1) to trace the obscurred star formation (SF) history of the Universe through multicolor submm surveys of 100's deg2 on the sky followed up by spectroscopy to characterize the energy sources in dusty SF galaxies; (2) to measure and characterize the SF process in the Milky Way galaxy and nearby resolved galaxies through submm spectroscopic and dust continuum surveys; and (3) to probe galaxy cluster astrophysics through the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect.

  1. Data products in the ESO Science Archive Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retzlaff, Jörg; Arnaboldi, Magda; Romaniello, Martino; Ballester, Pascal; Carson, Paul; Delmotte, Nausicaa; Forchi, Vincenzo; Freudling, Wolfram; Gabasch, Armin; Garcia-Dabo, Cesar Enrique; Hanuschik, Reinhard; Hummel, Wolfgang; Klein Gebbinck, Maurice; Lockhart, John; Micol, Alberto; Modigliani, Andrea; Percheron, Isabelle; Szostak, Artur; Vera Sequeiros, Ignacio

    2014-07-01

    The European Southern Observatory Science Archive Facility is evolving from an archive containing predominantly raw data into a resource also offering science-grade data products for immediate analysis and prompt interpretation. New products originate from two different sources. On the one hand Principal Investigators of Public Surveys and other programmes reduce the raw observational data and return their products using the so-called Phase 3 - a process that extends the Data Flow System after proposal submission (Phase 1) and detailed specification of the observations (Phase 2). On the other hand raw data of selected instruments and modes are uniformly processed in-house, independently of the original science goal. Current data products assets in the ESO science archive facility include calibrated images and spectra, as well as catalogues, for a total volume in excess of 16 TB and increasing. Images alone cover more than 4500 square degrees in the NIR bands and 2400 square degrees in the optical bands; over 85000 individually searchable spectra are already available in the spectroscopic data collection. In this paper we review the evolution of the ESO science archive facility content, illustrate the data access by the community, give an overview of the implemented processes and the role of the associated data standard.

  2. Research objectives, opportunities, and facilities for microgravity science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayuzick, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    Microgravity Science in the U.S.A. involves research in fluids science, combustion science, materials science, biotechnology, and fundamental physics. The purpose is to achieve a thorough understanding of the effects of gravitational body forces on physical phenomena relevant to those disciplines. This includes the study of phenomena which are usually overwhelmed by the presence of gravitational body forces and, therefore, chiefly manifested when gravitational forces are weak. In the pragmatic sense, the research involves gravity level as an experimental parameter. Calendar year 1992 is a landmark year for research opportunities in low earth orbit for Microgravity Science. For the first time ever, three Spacelab flights will fly in a single year: IML-1 was launched on January 22; USML-1 was launched on June 25; and, in September, SL-J will be launched. A separate flight involving two cargo bay carriers, USMP-1, will be launched in October. From the beginning of 1993 up to and including the Space Station era (1997), nine flights involving either Spacelab or USMP carriers will be flown. This will be augmented by a number of middeck payloads and get away specials flying on various flights. All of this activity sets the stage for experimentation on Space Station Freedom. Beginning in 1997, experiments in Microgravity Science will be conducted on the Space Station. Facilities for doing experiments in protein crystal growth, solidification, and biotechnology will all be available. These will be joined by middeck-class payloads and the microgravity glove box for conducting additional experiments. In 1998, a new generation protein crystal growth facility and a facility for conducting combustion research will arrive. A fluids science facility and additional capability for conducting research in solidification, as well as an ability to handle small payloads on a quick response basis, will be added in 1999. The year 2000 will see upgrades in the protein crystal growth and

  3. Nuclear Science in the Undergraduate Curriculum: The New Nuclear Science Facility at San Jose State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ling, A. Campbell

    1979-01-01

    The following aspects of the radiochemistry program at San Jose State University in California are described: the undergraduate program in radiation chemistry, the new nuclear science facility, and academic programs in nuclear science for students not attending San Jose State University. (BT)

  4. Unique life sciences research facilities at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulenburg, G. M.; Vasques, M.; Caldwell, W. F.; Tucker, J.

    1994-01-01

    The Life Science Division at NASA's Ames Research Center has a suite of specialized facilities that enable scientists to study the effects of gravity on living systems. This paper describes some of these facilities and their use in research. Seven centrifuges, each with its own unique abilities, allow testing of a variety of parameters on test subjects ranging from single cells through hardware to humans. The Vestibular Research Facility allows the study of both centrifugation and linear acceleration on animals and humans. The Biocomputation Center uses computers for 3D reconstruction of physiological systems, and interactive research tools for virtual reality modeling. Psycophysiological, cardiovascular, exercise physiology, and biomechanical studies are conducted in the 12 bed Human Research Facility and samples are analyzed in the certified Central Clinical Laboratory and other laboratories at Ames. Human bedrest, water immersion and lower body negative pressure equipment are also available to study physiological changes associated with weightlessness. These and other weightlessness models are used in specialized laboratories for the study of basic physiological mechanisms, metabolism and cell biology. Visual-motor performance, perception, and adaptation are studied using ground-based models as well as short term weightlessness experiments (parabolic flights). The unique combination of Life Science research facilities, laboratories, and equipment at Ames Research Center are described in detail in relation to their research contributions.

  5. The relationship between science classroom facility conditions and ninth grade students' attitudes toward science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Angela Y.

    Over half of the school facilities in America are in poor condition. Unsatisfactory school facilities have a negative impact on teaching and learning. The purpose of this correlational study was to identify the relationship between high school science teachers' perceptions of the school science environment (instructional equipment, demonstration equipment, and physical facilities) and ninth grade students' attitudes about science through their expressed enjoyment of science, importance of time spent on science, and boredom with science. A sample of 11,523 cases was extracted, after a process of data mining, from a databank of over 24,000 nationally representative ninth graders located throughout the United States. The instrument used to survey these students was part of the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:2009). The research design was multiple linear regression. The results showed a significant relationship between the science classroom conditions and students' attitudes. Demonstration equipment and physical facilities were the best predictors of effects on students' attitudes. Conclusions based on this study and recommendations for future research are made.

  6. Molecular Science Computing Facility Scientific Challenges: Linking Across Scales

    SciTech Connect

    De Jong, Wibe A.; Windus, Theresa L.

    2005-07-01

    The purpose of this document is to define the evolving science drivers for performing environmental molecular research at the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) and to provide guidance associated with the next-generation high-performance computing center that must be developed at EMSL's Molecular Science Computing Facility (MSCF) in order to address this critical research. The MSCF is the pre-eminent computing facility?supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER)?tailored to provide the fastest time-to-solution for current computational challenges in chemistry and biology, as well as providing the means for broad research in the molecular and environmental sciences. The MSCF provides integral resources and expertise to emerging EMSL Scientific Grand Challenges and Collaborative Access Teams that are designed to leverage the multiple integrated research capabilities of EMSL, thereby creating a synergy between computation and experiment to address environmental molecular science challenges critical to DOE and the nation.

  7. Physical Sciences Facility Air Emission Control Equivalency Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, David M.; Belew, Shan T.

    2008-10-17

    This document presents the adequacy evaluation for the application of technology standards during design, fabrication, installation and testing of radioactive air exhaust systems at the Physical Sciences Facility (PSF), located on the Horn Rapids Triangle north of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) complex. The analysis specifically covers the exhaust portion of the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems associated with emission units EP-3410-01-S, EP-3420-01-S and EP 3430-01-S.

  8. Nuclear Science User Facilities (NSUF) Monthly Report March 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Soelberg, Renae

    2015-03-01

    Nuclear Science User Facilities (NSUF) Formerly: Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report February 2015 Highlights; Jim Cole attended the OECD NEA Expert Group on Innovative Structural Materials meeting in Paris, France; Jim Lane and Doug Copsey of Writers Ink visited PNNL to prepare an article for the NSUF annual report; Brenden Heidrich briefed the Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee-Facilities Subcommittee on the Nuclear Energy Infrastructure Database project and provided them with custom reports for their upcoming visits to Argonne National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; and University of California-Berkeley Principal Investigator Mehdi Balooch visited PNNL to observe measurements and help finalize plans for completing the desired suite of analyses. His visit was coordinated to coincide with the visit of Jim Lane and Doug Copsey.

  9. ICAT: Integrating data infrastructure for facilities based science

    SciTech Connect

    Flannery, Damian; Matthews, Brian; Griffin, Tom; Bicarregui, Juan; Gleaves, Michael; Lerusse, Laurent; Downing, Roger; Ashton, Alun; Sufi, Shoaib; Drinkwater, Glen; Kleese van Dam, Kerstin

    2009-12-21

    ICAT: Integrating data infrastructure for facilities based science Damian Flannery, Brian Matthews, Tom Griffin, Juan Bicarregui, Michael Gleaves, Laurent Lerusse, Roger Downing, Alun Ashton, Shoaib Sufi, Glen Drinkwater, Kerstin Kleese Abstract— Scientific facilities, in particular large-scale photon and neutron sources, have demanding requirements to manage the increasing quantities of experimental data they generate in a systematic and secure way. In this paper, we describe the ICAT infrastructure for cataloguing facility generated experimental data which has been in development within STFC and DLS for several years. We consider the factors which have influenced its design and describe its architecture and metadata model, a key tool in the management of data. We go on to give an outline of its current implementation and use, with plans for its future development.

  10. International Space Station Research and Facilities for Life Sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Julie A.; Ruttley, Tara M.

    2009-01-01

    Assembly of the International Space Station is nearing completion in fall of 2010. Although assembly has been the primary objective of its first 11 years of operation, early science returns from the ISS have been growing at a steady pace. Laboratory facilities outfitting has increased dramatically 2008-2009 with the European Space Agency s Columbus and Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency s Kibo scientific laboratories joining NASA s Destiny laboratory in orbit. In May 2009, the ISS Program met a major milestone with an increase in crew size from 3 to 6 crewmembers, thus greatly increasing the time available to perform on-orbit research. NASA will launch its remaining research facilities to occupy all 3 laboratories in fall 2009 and winter 2010. To date, early utilization of the US Operating Segment of the ISS has fielded nearly 200 experiments for hundreds of ground-based investigators supporting international and US partner research. With a specific focus on life sciences research, this paper will summarize the science accomplishments from early research aboard the ISS- both applied human research for exploration, and research on the effects of microgravity on life. We will also look ahead to the full capabilities for life sciences research when assembly of ISS is complete in 2010.

  11. Nomenclature for Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1923-01-01

    This nomenclature for aeronautics was prepared by a special conference on aeronautical nomenclature, composed of representatives of the Army and Navy Air Services, the Air Mail Service, the Bureau of Standards, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, and private life. This report supersedes all previous publications of the committee on this subject. It is published with the intention of securing greater uniformity and accuracy in official documents of the government, and, as far as possible, in technical and other commercial publications. (author)

  12. National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1938-01-01

    NASA was created from the National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics in 1958. This is a photo of the members of the advisory board of NACA in 1938. NACA was the governmental organization charged with the supervision and conduct of scientific laboratory research in aeronautics. Its laboratories located at Langley Field, Virginia, provide new knowledge underlying the continuous improvement in the performance, efficiency, and safety of American aircraft. At this meeting Dr. Joesph S. Ames, President Emeritus of John Hopkins University, was re-elected Chairman, and Dr. Vannevar Bush, President- elect of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, was elected Vice Chairman. Dr. Ames' re-election as chairman was a recognition of his outstanding contributions to the science of aeronautics. He has been the leading scientific member of the Committee for over twenty-three years and chairman for eleven years. Under his visionary leadership the great laboratories of the N.A.C.A. at Langley Field have been developed. Left to Right: Hon. C. M. Hester, Administrator, Civil Aeronautics Authority Captain S. M. Kraus, U.S.N. Brig. General A. W. Robins, Chief, Materiel Division, Army Air Corps. Dr. L.J. Biggs, Director, National Bureau of Standards Dr. E.P. Warner Dr. Orville Wright Dr. Joesph S. Ames, Chairman Dr. C.J. Abbot, Secretary, Smithsonian Institution J.F. Victory, Secretary Rear Adm. A.B. Cook, U.S.N., Chief, Bureau Aeronautics Authority Dr. Vannevar Bush Dr. J.C. Hunsaker Dr. G.W. Lewis, Director of Aeronautical Research. Absent: Col. Charles A. Lindbergh and Maj. Gen. H. 'Hap' Arnold, Chief, Army Air Corps. One Vacany: U.S. Weather Bureau.

  13. Aeronautics and space report of the President

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the activities and accomplishments of all agencies of the United States in the fields of aeronautics and space science during FY 1994. Activity summaries are presented for the following areas: space launch activities, space science, space flight and space technology, space communications, aeronuatics, and studies of the planet Earth. Several appendices providing data on U.S. launch activities, the Federal budget for space and aeronautics, remote sensing capabilities, and space policy are included.

  14. The Family Science Starter Kit: A Manual To Assist You in the Development of a Family Aeronautical Science Program. UNOAI Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehrer, Henry R.

    This book is designed to involve families working together on several different hands-on activities during evening meetings at school. The basis for these activities is the in-school study of related science and mathematical concepts and topics by the students in each family. The program provides an opportunity for families to work together in an…

  15. First Materials Science Research Facility Rack Capabilities and Design Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cobb, S.; Higgins, D.; Kitchens, L.; Curreri, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The first Materials Science Research Rack (MSRR-1) is the primary facility for U.S. sponsored materials science research on the International Space Station. MSRR-1 is contained in an International Standard Payload Rack (ISPR) equipped with the Active Rack Isolation System (ARIS) for the best possible microgravity environment. MSRR-1 will accommodate dual Experiment Modules and provide simultaneous on-orbit processing operations capability. The first Experiment Module for the MSRR-1, the Materials Science Laboratory (MSL), is an international cooperative activity between NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and the European Space Agency's (ESA) European Space Research and Technology Center (ESTEC). The MSL Experiment Module will accommodate several on-orbit exchangeable experiment-specific Module Inserts which provide distinct thermal processing capabilities. Module Inserts currently planned for the MSL are a Quench Module Insert, Low Gradient Furnace, and a Solidification with Quench Furnace. The second Experiment Module for the MSRR-1 configuration is a commercial device supplied by MSFC's Space Products Development (SPD) Group. Transparent furnace assemblies include capabilities for vapor transport processes and annealing of glass fiber preforms. This Experiment Module is replaceable on-orbit. This paper will describe facility capabilities, schedule to flight and research opportunities.

  16. The Neutrons for Science Facility at SPIRAL-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledoux, X.; Aïche, M.; Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.; Audouin, L.; Balanzat, E.; Ban-détat, B.; Ban, G.; Barreau, G.; Bauge, E.; Bélier, G.; Bem, P.; Blideanu, V.; Borcea, C.; Bouffard, S.; Caillaud, T.; Chatillon, A.; Czajkowski, S.; Dessagne, P.; Doré, D.; Fallot, M.; Farget, F.; Fischer, U.; Giot, L.; Granier, T.; Guillous, S.; Gunsing, F.; Gustavsson, C.; Jacquot, B.; Jansson, K.; Jurado, B.; Kerveno, M.; Klix, A.; Landoas, O.; Lecolley, F. R.; Lecouey, J. L.; Majerle, M.; Marie, N.; Materna, T.; Mrazek, J.; Negoita, F.; Novak, J.; Oberstedt, S.; Oberstedt, A.; Panebianco, S.; Perrot, L.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Pomp, S.; Ramillon, J. M.; Ridikas, D.; Rossé, B.; Rudolf, G.; Serot, O.; Simakov, S. P.; Simeckova, E.; Smith, A. G.; Sublet, J. C.; Taieb, J.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tarrio, D.; Takibayev, A.; Thfoin, I.; Tsekhanovich, I.; Varignon, C.

    2014-05-01

    The Neutrons For Science (NFS) facility is a component of SPIRAL-2 laboratory under construction at Caen (France). SPIRAL-2 is dedicated to the production of high intensity Radioactive Ions Beams (RIB). It is based on a high-power linear accelerator (LINAG) to accelerate deuterons beams in order to produce neutrons by breakup reactions on a C converter. These neutrons will induce fission in 238U for production of radioactive isotopes. Additionally to the RIB production, the proton and deuteron beams delivered by the accelerator will be used in the NFS facility. NFS is composed of a pulsed neutron beam and irradiation stations for cross-section measurements and material studies. The beams delivered by the LINAG will allow producing intense neutron beams in the 100 keV-40 MeV energy range with either a continuous or quasi-mono-energetic spectrum. At NFS available average fluxes will be up to 2 orders of magnitude higher than those of other existing time-of-flight facilities in the 1 MeV - 40 MeV range. NFS will be a very powerful tool for fundamental physics and application related research in support of the transmutation of nuclear waste, design of future fission and fusion reactors, nuclear medicine or test and development of new detectors. The facility and its characteristics are described, and several examples of the first potential experiments are presented.

  17. Bibliography of Aeronautics, 1929

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockett, Paul

    1930-01-01

    This Bibliography of Aeronautics for 1929 covers the aeronautical literature published from January 1 to December 31, 1929. The first Bibliography of Aeronautics was published by the Smithsonian Institution as Volume 55 of the Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections and covered the material published prior to June 30, 1909. Supplementary volumes of the Bibliography of Aeronautics for the subsequent years have been published by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. The last preceding volume was for the calendar year 1928. As in the previous volumes, citations of the pUblications of all nations are included in th.e languages in which. these publications originally appeared. The arrangement is in dictionary form with author and subject entry, and one alphabetical arrangement. Detail in the matter of subject reference has been omitted on account of the cost of presentation, but an attempt has been made to give sufficient cross reference for research in special lines.

  18. Bibliography of Aeronautics: 1932

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1935-01-01

    This Bibliography of Aeronautics for 1932 covers the aeronautical literature published from January 1 to December 31, 1932. The first Bibliography of Aeronautics was published by the Smithsonian Institution as volume 55 of the Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections and covered the material published prior to June 30, 1909. Supplementary volumes of the Bibliography of Aeronautics for the subsequent years have been published by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. The last preceding volume was for the calendar year 1931. As in the previous volumes, citations of the publications of all nations are included in the languages in which these publications originally appeared. The arrangement is in dictionary form with author and subject entry and one alphabetical arrangement. Detail in the matter of subject reference has been omitted on account of the cost of presentation, but an attempt has been made to give sufficient cross-reference for research in special lines.

  19. Bibliography of Aeronautics: 1926

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockett, Paul

    1928-01-01

    This Bibliography of Aeronautics for 1926 covers the aeronautical literature published from January 1 to December 31, 1926. The first Bibliography of Aeronautics was published by the Smithsonian Institution as volume 55 of the Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections and covered the material published prior to June 30, 1909. Supplementary volumes of the Bibliography of Aeronautics for the subsequent years have been published by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. The last preceding volume was for the calendar year 1925. As in the previous volumes, citations of the publications of all nations are included in the languages in which these publications originally appeared. The arrangement is dictionary form with author find subject entry, and one alphabetical arrangement. Detail in the matter of subject reference has been omitted on aCC01.mt of the cost of presentation, but an attempt has been made to give sufficient cross reference for research in special lines.

  20. Bibliography of Aeronautics: 1928

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockett, Paul

    1928-01-01

    This Bibliography of Aeronautics for 1928 covers the aeronautical literature published from January 1 to December 31, 1928. The first Bibliography of Aeronautics was published by the Smithsonian Institution as volume 55 of the Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections and covered the material published prior to June 30, 1909. Supplementary volumes of the Bibliography of Aeronautics for the subsequent years have been published by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. The last preceding volume was for the calendar year 1927. As in the previous volumes, citations of the publications of all nations are included in the languages in which these publications originally appeared. The arrangement is in dictionary form with author and subject entry, and one alphabetical arrangement. Detail in the matter of subject reference has been omitted on account of the cost of presentation, but an attempt has been made to give sufficient cross reference for research in special lines.

  1. Space Station accommodation engineering for Life Sciences Research Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilchey, J.; Gustan, E.; Rudiger, C. E.

    1984-01-01

    Exploratory studies conducted by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and several contractors in connection with defining the design requirements, parameters, and tradeoffs of the Life Sciences Research Facilities for nonhuman test subjects aboard the Space Station are reviewed. The major system discriminators which determine the size of the accommodation system are identified, along with a number of mission options. Moreover, characteristics of several vivarium concepts are summarized, focusing on the cost, size, variable-g capability, and the number of specimens accommodated. Finally, the objectives of the phase B studies of the Space Station Laboratory, which are planned for FY85, are described.

  2. Alaska Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Facility science data processing architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilland, Jeffrey E.; Bicknell, Thomas; Miller, Carol L.

    1991-01-01

    The paper describes the architecture of the Alaska SAR Facility (ASF) at Fairbanks, being developed to generate science data products for supporting research in sea ice motion, ice classification, sea-ice-ocean interaction, glacier behavior, ocean waves, and hydrological and geological study areas. Special attention is given to the individual substructures of the ASF: the Receiving Ground Station (RGS), the SAR Processor System, and the Interactive Image Analysis System. The SAR data will be linked to the RGS by the ESA ERS-1 and ERS-2, the Japanese ERS-1, and the Canadian Radarsat.

  3. ACTS broadband aeronautical terminal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agan, M. J.; Densmore, A. C.

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses the design of, and experiments with, the ACTS Broadband Aeronautical Terminal. As part of the ongoing effort to investigate commercial applications of ACTS technologies, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and various industry/government partners are developing a broadband mobile terminal for aeronautical applications. The ACTS Broadband Aeronautical Terminal is designed to explore the use of K/Ka-band for high data rate aeronautical satellite communications. Currently available commercial aeronautical satellite communications systems are only capable of achieving data rates on the order of tens of kilobits per second. The broadband terminal used in conjunction with the ACTS mechanically steerable antenna, can achieve data rates of 384 kilobits per second, while use of an ACTS spot beam antenna with this terminal will allow up to T1 data rates (1.544 megabits per second). The aeronautical terminal will be utilized to test a variety of applications that require a high data rate communications link. The use of the K/Ka-band for wideband aeronautical communications has the advantages of spectrum availability and smaller antennas, while eliminating the one major drawback of this frequency band, rain attenuation, by flying above the clouds the majority of the time.

  4. Nomenclature for Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1939-01-01

    The nomenclature for aeronautics presented in this Report No. 474 is a revision of the last previous report on this subject (i.e., Report no. 240.) This report is published for the purpose of encouraging greater uniformity and precision in the use of terms relating to aeronautics, both in official documents of the Government and in commercial publications. Terms in general use in other branches of engineering have been included only where they have some special significance in aeronautics, or form an integral part of its terminology.

  5. Life Sciences Space Station planning document: A reference payload for the Life Sciences Research Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The Space Station, projected for construction in the early 1990s, will be an orbiting, low-gravity, permanently manned facility providing unprecedented opportunities for scientific research. Facilities for Life Sciences research will include a pressurized research laboratory, attached payloads, and platforms which will allow investigators to perform experiments in the crucial areas of Space Medicine, Space Biology, Exobiology, Biospherics and Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS). These studies are designed to determine the consequences of long-term exposure to space conditions, with particular emphasis on assuring the permanent presence of humans in space. The applied and basic research to be performed, using humans, animals, and plants, will increase our understanding of the effects of the space environment on basic life processes. Facilities being planned for remote observations from platforms and attached payloads of biologically important elements and compounds in space and on other planets (Exobiology) will permit exploration of the relationship between the evolution of life and the universe. Space-based, global scale observations of terrestrial biology (Biospherics) will provide data critical for understanding and ultimately managing changes in the Earth's ecosystem. The life sciences community is encouraged to participate in the research potential the Space Station facilities will make possible. This document provides the range and scope of typical life sciences experiments which could be performed within a pressurized laboratory module on Space Station.

  6. National scientific facilities and their science impact on nonbiomedical research

    PubMed Central

    Kinney, A. L.

    2007-01-01

    The “h index” proposed by Hirsch [Hirsch JE (2005) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 102:16569–16573] is a good indicator of the impact of a scientist's research and has the advantage of being objective. When evaluating departments, institutions, or laboratories, the importance of the h index can be further enhanced when it is properly calibrated for the size of the group. Particularly acute is the issue of federally funded facilities whose number of actively publishing scientists frequently dwarfs that of academic departments. Recently, Molinari and Molinari [Molinari JF, Molinari A (2008) Scientometrics, in press] developed a methodology that shows that the h index has a universal growth rate for large numbers of papers, allowing for meaningful comparisons between institutions. An additional challenge when comparing large institutions is that fields have distinct internal cultures, with different typical rates of publication and citation; biology is more highly cited than physics, for example. For this reason, the present study has focused on the physical sciences, engineering, and technology and has excluded biomedical research. Comparisons between individual disciplines are reported here to provide a framework. Generally, it was found that the universal growth rate of Molinari and Molinari holds well across the categories considered, testifying to the robustness of both their growth law and our results. The goal here is to set the highest standard of comparison for federal investment in science. Comparisons are made of the nation's preeminent private and public institutions. We find that many among the national science facilities compare favorably in research impact with the nation's leading universities. PMID:17991781

  7. IGNITION AND FRONTIER SCIENCE ON THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, E

    2009-06-22

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high-energy-density (HED) science, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF construction Project was certified by the Department of Energy as complete on March 30, 2009. NIF, a 192-beam Nd-glass laser facility, will produce 1.8 MJ, 500 TW of light at the third-harmonic, ultraviolet light of 351 nm. On March 10, 2009, a total 192-beam energy of 1.1 MJ was demonstrated; this is approximately 30 times more energy than ever produced in an ICF laser system. The principal goal of NIF is to achieve ignition of a deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel capsule and provide access to HED physics regimes needed for experiments related to national security, fusion energy and for broader frontier scientific exploration. NIF experiments in support of indirect drive ignition will begin in FY2009. These first experiments represent the next phase of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The NIC is a 1.7 billion dollar national effort to achieve fusion ignition and is coordinated through a detailed execution plan that includes the science, technology, and equipment. Equipment required for ignition experiments include diagnostics, cryogenic target manipulator, and user optics. Participants in this effort include LLNL, General Atomics (GA), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Energetics (LLE). The primary goal for NIC is to have all of the equipment operational and integrated into the facility and be ready to begin a credible ignition campaign in 2010. With NIF now operational, the long-sought goal of achieving self-sustained nuclear fusion and energy gain in the laboratory is much closer to realization. Successful demonstration of ignition and net energy gain on NIF will be a major step towards demonstrating the feasibility of

  8. Los Alamos neutron science user facility - control system risk mitigation & updates

    SciTech Connect

    Pieck, Martin

    2011-01-05

    LANSCE User Facility is seeing continuing support and investments. The investment will sustain reliable facility operations well into the next decade. As a result, the LANSCE User Facility will continue to be a premier Neutron Science Facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  9. Science Computing Facility for ICESat/GLAS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, K. A.; Brenner, A. C.; Dimarzio, J. P.; Fiegles, S. L.; Sidel, T.; Zwally, H. J.

    2003-12-01

    The Science Computing Facility (SCF) for ICESat/GLAS data consists of a data base management system for temporal and geographic subsetting of GLAS products, autonomous tools for electronic distribution to geographically-distributed remote sites, and a data analysis and visualization package. The SCF also maintains a website that conveys instrument state and GLAS product information, displays browse products of all GLAS products produced to date, and hosts a bulletin board for communicating product and tool problems. The 15 GLAS science and engineering data products produced daily by the ICESat Science Investigator-led Processing System (I-SIPS) are distributed electronically by the SCF to GLAS Science Team members and their associates at nine remote sites, as requested. Interactive Graphical User Interfaces easily enable the remote users to subscribe to customized data sets from the standard products by defining the product, temporal spans, and geographic regions. As data are received from the I-SIPS, the individual subscriptions are automatically filled and the customized data sets are electronically transferred to the remote users. Normally, receipt of these data sets at the remote sites occurs within hours of the I-SIPS processing. Subsetting is accomplished using a Data Management System (DMS) that quickly determines if data for a subscription are present in the newly received product and then allows fast, direct, efficient access to each second of data that falls within the subscription's temporal and geographic span, instead of reading through the files sequentially. The distribution is accomplished via secure-shell communications, a MYSql database, a series of Perl and Tcl scripts, and a collection of IDL and Fortran 90 software.

  10. Magnet design considerations for Fusion Nuclear Science Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Zhai, Yuhu; Kessel, Chuck; El-guebaly, Laila; Titus, Peter

    2016-02-25

    The Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) is a nuclear confinement facility to provide a fusion environment with components of the reactor integrated together to bridge the technical gaps of burning plasma and nuclear science between ITER and the demonstration power plant (DEMO). Compared to ITER, the FNSF is smaller in size but generates much higher magnetic field, 30 times higher neutron fluence with 3 orders of magnitude longer plasma operation at higher operating temperatures for structures surrounding the plasma. Input parameters to the magnet design from system code analysis include magnetic field of 7.5 T at the plasma center withmore » plasma major radius of 4.8 m and minor radius of 1.2 m, and a peak field of 15.5 T on the TF coils for FNSF. Both low temperature superconductor (LTS) and high temperature superconductor (HTS) are considered for the FNSF magnet design based on the state-of-the-art fusion magnet technology. The higher magnetic field can be achieved by using the high performance ternary Restack Rod Process (RRP) Nb3Sn strands for toroidal field (TF) magnets. The circular cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) design similar to ITER magnets and a high aspect ratio rectangular CICC design are evaluated for FNSF magnets but low activation jacket materials may need to be selected. The conductor design concept and TF coil winding pack composition and dimension based on the horizontal maintenance schemes are discussed. Neutron radiation limits for the LTS and HTS superconductors and electrical insulation materials are also reviewed based on the available materials previously tested. As a result, the material radiation limits for FNSF magnets are defined as part of the conceptual design studies for FNSF magnets.« less

  11. The Neutrons for Science Facility at SPIRAL-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledoux, X.; Aïche, M.; Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.; Audouin, L.; Balanzat, E.; Ban-d'Etat, B.; Ban, G.; Barreau, G.; Bauge, E.; Bélier, G.; Bem, P.; Blideanu, V.; Blomgren, J.; Borcea, C.; Bouffard, S.; Caillaud, T.; Chatillon, A.; Czajkowski, S.; Dessagne, P.; Doré, D.; Fallot, M.; Farget, F.; Fischer, U.; Giot, L.; Granier, T.; Guillous, S.; Gunsing, F.; Gustavsson, C.; Herber, S.; Jacquot, B.; Jurado, B.; Kerveno, M.; Klix, A.; Landoas, O.; Lecolley, F. R.; Lecolley, J. F.; Lecouey, J. L.; Majerle, M.; Marie, N.; Materna, T.; Mrazek, J.; Negoita, F.; Novak, J.; Oberstedt, S.; Oberstedt, A.; Panebianco, S.; Perrot, L.; Petrascu, M.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Pomp, S.; Ramillon, J. M.; Ridikas, D.; Rossé, B.; Rudolf, G.; Serot, O.; Shcherbakov, O.; Simakov, S. P.; Simeckova, E.; Smith, A. G.; Steckmeyer, J. C.; Sublet, J. C.; Taïeb, J.; Tassan-Got, L.; Takibayev, A.; Tungborn, E.; Thfoin, I.; Tsekhanovich, I.; Varignon, C.; Wieleczko, J. P.

    2011-12-01

    The "Neutrons for Science" (NFS) facility will be a component of SPIRAL-2, the future accelerator dedicated to the production of very intense radioactive ion beams, under construction at GANIL in Caen (France). NFS will be composed of a pulsed neutron beam for in-flight measurements and irradiation stations for cross-section measurements and material studies. Continuous and quasi-monokinetic energy spectra will be available at NFS respectively produced by the interaction of deuteron beam on thick a Be converter and by the 7Li(p,n) reaction on a thin converter. The flux at NFS will be up to 2 orders of magnitude higher than those of other existing time-of-flight facilities in the 1 MeV to 40 MeV range. NFS will be a very powerful tool for physics and fundamental research as well as applications like the transmutation of nuclear waste, design of future fission and fusion reactors, nuclear medicine or test and development of new detectors.

  12. Design concepts for the Centrifuge Facility Life Sciences Glovebox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Sidney C.; Horkachuck, Michael J.; Mckeown, Kellie A.

    1989-01-01

    The Life Sciences Glovebox will provide the bioisolated environment to support on-orbit operations involving non-human live specimens and samples for human life sceinces experiments. It will be part of the Centrifuge Facility, in which animal and plant specimens are housed in bioisolated Habitat modules and transported to the Glovebox as part of the experiment protocols supported by the crew. At the Glovebox, up to two crew members and two habitat modules must be accommodated to provide flexibility and support optimal operations. This paper will present several innovative design concepts that attempt to satisfy the basic Glovebox requirements. These concepts were evaluated for ergonomics and ease of operations using computer modeling and full-scale mockups. The more promising ideas were presented to scientists and astronauts for their evaluation. Their comments, and the results from other evaluations are presented. Based on the evaluations, the authors recommend designs and features that will help optimize crew performance and facilitate science accommodations, and specify problem areas that require further study.

  13. Advanced light microscopy core facilities: Balancing service, science and career.

    PubMed

    Ferrando-May, Elisa; Hartmann, Hella; Reymann, Jürgen; Ansari, Nariman; Utz, Nadine; Fried, Hans-Ulrich; Kukat, Christian; Peychl, Jan; Liebig, Christian; Terjung, Stefan; Laketa, Vibor; Sporbert, Anje; Weidtkamp-Peters, Stefanie; Schauss, Astrid; Zuschratter, Werner; Avilov, Sergiy

    2016-06-01

    Core Facilities (CF) for advanced light microscopy (ALM) have become indispensable support units for research in the life sciences. Their organizational structure and technical characteristics are quite diverse, although the tasks they pursue and the services they offer are similar. Therefore, throughout Europe, scientists from ALM-CFs are forming networks to promote interactions and discuss best practice models. Here, we present recommendations for ALM-CF operations elaborated by the workgroups of the German network of ALM-CFs, German Bio-Imaging (GerBI). We address technical aspects of CF planning and instrument maintainance, give advice on the organization and management of an ALM-CF, propose a scheme for the training of CF users, and provide an overview of current resources for image processing and analysis. Further, we elaborate on the new challenges and opportunities for professional development and careers created by CFs. While some information specifically refers to the German academic system, most of the content of this article is of general interest for CFs in the life sciences. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:463-479, 2016. © 2016 THE AUTHORS MICROSCOPY RESEARCH AND TECHNIQUE PUBLISHED BY WILEY PERIODICALS, INC. PMID:27040755

  14. Advanced light microscopy core facilities: Balancing service, science and career.

    PubMed

    Ferrando-May, Elisa; Hartmann, Hella; Reymann, Jürgen; Ansari, Nariman; Utz, Nadine; Fried, Hans-Ulrich; Kukat, Christian; Peychl, Jan; Liebig, Christian; Terjung, Stefan; Laketa, Vibor; Sporbert, Anje; Weidtkamp-Peters, Stefanie; Schauss, Astrid; Zuschratter, Werner; Avilov, Sergiy

    2016-06-01

    Core Facilities (CF) for advanced light microscopy (ALM) have become indispensable support units for research in the life sciences. Their organizational structure and technical characteristics are quite diverse, although the tasks they pursue and the services they offer are similar. Therefore, throughout Europe, scientists from ALM-CFs are forming networks to promote interactions and discuss best practice models. Here, we present recommendations for ALM-CF operations elaborated by the workgroups of the German network of ALM-CFs, German Bio-Imaging (GerBI). We address technical aspects of CF planning and instrument maintainance, give advice on the organization and management of an ALM-CF, propose a scheme for the training of CF users, and provide an overview of current resources for image processing and analysis. Further, we elaborate on the new challenges and opportunities for professional development and careers created by CFs. While some information specifically refers to the German academic system, most of the content of this article is of general interest for CFs in the life sciences. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:463-479, 2016. © 2016 THE AUTHORS MICROSCOPY RESEARCH AND TECHNIQUE PUBLISHED BY WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  15. Advanced light microscopy core facilities: Balancing service, science and career

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Hella; Reymann, Jürgen; Ansari, Nariman; Utz, Nadine; Fried, Hans‐Ulrich; Kukat, Christian; Peychl, Jan; Liebig, Christian; Terjung, Stefan; Laketa, Vibor; Sporbert, Anje; Weidtkamp‐Peters, Stefanie; Schauss, Astrid; Zuschratter, Werner; Avilov, Sergiy

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Core Facilities (CF) for advanced light microscopy (ALM) have become indispensable support units for research in the life sciences. Their organizational structure and technical characteristics are quite diverse, although the tasks they pursue and the services they offer are similar. Therefore, throughout Europe, scientists from ALM‐CFs are forming networks to promote interactions and discuss best practice models. Here, we present recommendations for ALM‐CF operations elaborated by the workgroups of the German network of ALM‐CFs, German Bio‐Imaging (GerBI). We address technical aspects of CF planning and instrument maintainance, give advice on the organization and management of an ALM‐CF, propose a scheme for the training of CF users, and provide an overview of current resources for image processing and analysis. Further, we elaborate on the new challenges and opportunities for professional development and careers created by CFs. While some information specifically refers to the German academic system, most of the content of this article is of general interest for CFs in the life sciences. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:463–479, 2016. © 2016 THE AUTHORS MICROSCOPY RESEARCH AND TECHNIQUE PUBLISHED BY WILEY PERIODICALS, INC. PMID:27040755

  16. Life sciences space station planning document: A reference payload for the exobiology research facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The Cosmic Dust Collection and Gas Grain Simulation Facilities represent collaborative efforts between the Life Sciences and Solar System Exploration Divisions designed to strengthen a natural exobiology/Planetary Sciences connection. The Cosmic Dust Collection Facility is a Planetary Science facility, with Exobiology a primary user. Conversely, the Gas Grain Facility is an exobiology facility, with Planetary Science a primary user. Requirements for the construction and operation of the two facilities, contained herein, were developed through joint workshops between the two disciplines, as were representative experiments comprising the reference payloads. In the case of the Gas Grain Simulation Facility, the astrophysics Division is an additional potential user, having participated in the workshop to select experiments and define requirements.

  17. Diaphragms for Aeronautic Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersey, M D

    1924-01-01

    This investigation was carried out at the request of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics and comprises an outline of historical developments and theoretical principles, together with a discussion of expedients for making the most effective use of existing diaphragms actuated by the hydrostatic pressure form an essential element of a great variety instruments for aeronautic and other technical purposes. The various physical data needed as a foundation for rational methods of diaphragm design have not, however, been available hitherto except in the most fragmentary form.

  18. ARMD Fundamental Aeronautics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dryer, Jay; DelRosario, Ruben

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation focuses work of the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) with particular interest on the work being done to address the environmental and energy efficiency challenges. Particular interest is on the Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) project, though there is discussion of the rotorcraft and the supersonics environmental challenges.

  19. Advanced Civilian Aeronautical Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, Dennis M.

    1996-01-01

    Paper discusses alternatives to currently deployed systems which could provide revolutionary improvements in metrics applicable to civilian aeronautics. Specific missions addressed include subsonic transports, supersonic transports and personal aircraft. These alternative systems and concepts are enabled by recent and envisaged advancements in electronics, communications, computing and Designer Fluid Mechanics in conjunction with a design approach employing extensive synergistic interactions between propulsion, aerodynamics and structures.

  20. ACTS broadband aeronautical experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbe, Brian S.; Jedrey, Thomas C.; Estabrook, Polly; Agan, Martin J.

    1993-01-01

    In the last decade, the demand for reliable data, voice, and video satellite communication links between aircraft and ground to improve air traffic control, airline management, and to meet the growing demand for passenger communications has increased significantly. It is expected that in the near future, the spectrum required for aeronautical communication services will grow significantly beyond that currently available at L-band. In anticipation of this, JPL is developing an experimental broadband aeronautical satellite communications system that will utilize NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) as a satellite of opportunity and the technology developed under JPL's ACTS Mobile Terminal (AMT) Task to evaluate the feasibility of using K/Ka-band for these applications. The application of K/Ka-band for aeronautical satellite communications at cruise altitudes is particularly promising for several reasons: (1) the minimal amount of signal attenuation due to rain; (2) the reduced drag due to the smaller K/Ka-band antennas (as compared to the current L-band systems); and (3) the large amount of available bandwidth. The increased bandwidth available at these frequencies is expected to lead to significantly improved passenger communications - including full-duplex compressed video and multiple channel voice. A description of the proposed broadband experimental system will be presented including: (1) applications of K/Ka-band aeronautical satellite technology to U.S. industry; (2) the experiment objectives; (3) the experiment set-up; (4) experimental equipment description; and (5) industrial participation in the experiment and the benefits.

  1. Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) before Upgrade to Component Test Facility (CTF)

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Yueng Kay Martin

    2010-01-01

    The compact (R0~1.2-1.3m) Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) is aimed at providing a fully integrated, continuously driven fusion nuclear environment of copious fusion neutrons. This facility would be used to test, discover, understand, and innovate scientific and technical solutions for the challenges facing DEMO, by addressing the multi-scale synergistic interactions involving fusion plasma material interactions, tritium fuel cycle, power extraction, and the nuclear effects on materials. Such a facility properly designed would provide, initially at the JET-level plasma pressure (~30%T2) and conditions (e.g., Hot-Ion H-Mode), an outboard fusion neutron flux of 0.25 MW/m2 while requiring a fusion power of 19 MW. If and when this research operation is successful, its performance can be extended to 1 MW/m2 and 76 MW by reaching for twice the JET plasma pressure and Q. High-safety factor q and moderate- plasmas would minimize plasma-induced disruptions, helping to deliver reliably a neutron fluence of 1 MW-yr/m2 and a duty factor of 10% presently anticipated for the FNS research. Success of this research will depend on achieving time-efficient installation and replacement of all components using extensive remote handling (RH). This in turn requires modular designs for all internal components, including the single-turn toroidal field coil center-post with RH-compatible bi-directional sliding joints. Such device goals would further dictate placement of support structures and vacuum seal welds behind the internal and shielding components. If these further goals could be achieved, the FNSF would provide a ready upgrade path to the Component Test Facility (CTF), which would aim to test, at higher neutron fluence and duty cycle, the demanding fusion nuclear engineering and technologies for DEMO. This FNSF-CTF strategy would be complementary to the ITER and the Broader Approach programs, and thereby help mitigate the risks of an aggressive world fusion DEMO R&D Program

  2. Reshaping NASA's Aeronautics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Anita D.

    2007-01-01

    We will dedicate ourselves to the mastery and intellectual stewardship of the core competencies of Aeronautics for the Nation in all flight regimes. We will focus our research in areas that are appropriate to NASA's unique capabilities. we will directly address the R&D needs of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NGATS) in partnership with the member agencies of the Joint Planning and development Office (JPDO).

  3. Langley aeronautics and space test highlights, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The role of the Langley Research Center is to perform basic and applied research necessary for the advancement of aeronautics and space flight, to generate new and advanced concepts for the accomplishment of related national goals, and to provide research advice, technological support, and assistance to other NASA installations, other government agencies, and industry. Some of the significant tests which were performed during calendar year 1984 in Langley test facilities are highlighted. The broad range of the research and technology activities at the Langley Research Center and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States leadership in aeronautics and space research are illustrated.

  4. Dutch Minister of Science Visits ESO Facilities in Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-05-01

    Mrs. Maria van der Hoeven, the Dutch Minister of Education, Culture and Science, who travelled to the Republic of Chile, arrived at the ESO Paranal Observatory on Friday afternoon, May 13, 2005. The Minister was accompanied, among others, by the Dutch Ambassador to Chile, Mr. Hinkinus Nijenhuis, and Mr. Cornelis van Bochove, the Dutch Director of Science. The distinguished visitors were able to acquaint themselves with one of the foremost European research facilities, the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT), during an overnight stay at this remote site, and later, with the next major world facility in sub-millimetre and millimetre astronomy, the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA). At Paranal, the guests were welcomed by the ESO Director General, Dr. Catherine Cesarsky; the ESO Council President, Prof. Piet van der Kruit; the ESO Representative in Chile, Prof. Felix Mirabel; the Director of the La Silla Paranal Observatory, Dr. Jason Spyromilio; by one of the Dutch members of the ESO Council, Prof. Tim de Zeeuw; by the renowned astrophysicist from Leiden, Prof. Ewine van Dishoek, as well as by ESO staff members. The visitors were shown the various high-tech installations at the observatory, including many of the large, front-line VLT astronomical instruments that have been built in collaboration between ESO and European research institutes. Explanations were given by ESO astronomers and engineers and the Minister gained a good impression of the wide range of exciting research programmes that are carried out with the VLT. Having enjoyed the spectacular sunset over the Pacific Ocean from the Paranal deck, the Minister visited the VLT Control Room from where the four 8.2-m Unit Telescopes and the VLT Interferometer (VLTI) are operated. Here, the Minister was invited to follow an observing sequence at the console of the Kueyen (UT2) and Melipal (UT3) telescopes. "I was very impressed, not just by the technology and the science, but most of all by all the people involved

  5. NASA's Role in Aeronautics: A Workshop. Volume VI - Aeronautical Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Assembly of Engineering.

    The central task of a 1980 workshop on the role of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in aeronautics was to examine the relationship of NASA's research capabilities to the state of U.S. aviation and to make recommendations about NASA's future role in aeronautics. Following a brief introduction, the Overview Panel on…

  6. Space Station life science research facility - The vivarium/laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilchey, J. D.; Arno, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    Research opportunities possible with the Space Station are discussed. The objective of the research program will be study gravity relationships for animal and plant species. The equipment necessary for space experiments including vivarium facilities are described. The cost of the development of research facilities such as the vivarium/laboratory and a bioresearch centrifuge is examined.

  7. User Facilities of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences: A National Resource for Scientific Research

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    The BES user facilities provide open access to specialized instrumentation and expertise that enable scientific users from universities, national laboratories, and industry to carry out experiments and develop theories that could not be done at their home institutions. These forefront research facilities require resource commitments well beyond the scope of any non-government institution and open up otherwise inaccessible facets of Nature to scientific inquiry. For approved, peer-reviewed projects, instrument time is available without charge to researchers who intend to publish their results in the open literature. These large-scale user facilities have made significant contributions to various scientific fields, including chemistry, physics, geology, materials science, environmental science, biology, and biomedical science. Over 16,000 scientists and engineers.pdf file (27KB) conduct experiments at BES user facilities annually. Thousands of other researchers collaborate with these users and analyze the data measured at the facilities to publish new scientific findings in peer-reviewed journals.

  8. The National Ignition Facility: A New Era in High Energy Density Science

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, E

    2009-06-10

    The National Ignition Facility, the world's most energetic laser system, is now operational. This talk will describe NIF, the ignition campaign, and new opportunities in fusion energy and high energy density science enabled by NIF.

  9. Ensuring US National Aeronautics Test Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    U.S. leadership in aeronautics depends on ready access to technologically advanced, efficient, and affordable aeronautics test capabilities. These systems include major wind tunnels and propulsion test facilities and flight test capabilities. The federal government owns the majority of the major aeronautics test capabilities in the United States, primarily through the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Department of Defense (DoD). However, changes in the Aerospace landscape, primarily the decrease in demand for testing over the last 20 years required an overarching strategy for management of these national assets. Therefore, NASA established the Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) as a two-pronged strategic initiative to: (1) retain and invest in NASA aeronautics test capabilities considered strategically important to the agency and the nation, and (2) establish a strong, high level partnership with the DoD. Test facility utilization is a critical factor for ATP because it relies on user occupancy fees to recover a substantial part of the operations costs for its facilities. Decreasing utilization is an indicator of excess capacity and in some cases low-risk redundancy (i.e., several facilities with basically the same capability and overall low utilization). However, low utilization does not necessarily translate to lack of strategic importance. Some facilities with relatively low utilization are nonetheless vitally important because of the unique nature of the capability and the foreseeable aeronautics testing needs. Unfortunately, since its inception, the customer base for ATP has continued to shrink. Utilization of ATP wind tunnels has declined by more than 50% from the FY 2006 levels. This significant decrease in customer usage is attributable to several factors, including the overall decline in new programs and projects in the aerospace sector; the impact of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) on the design, development, and research

  10. A Glimpse of Scientific Research on Fundamental Problems of Military and Civil Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1939-01-01

    Among the outstanding accomplishments of the last century is man's conquest of the air. That conquest began in 1903 when the Wright brothers made the first successful flight of an airplane at Kitty Hawk, N. C. Five years later the United States Government purchased its first airplane for the use of the Army, and began the training of officers for military flying. During the years immediately preceding the outbreak of the World War the Government and a meager aircraft industry had made important progress, but the Government, practically the only customer, had purchased less than 100 airplanes. In the meantime, leading European nations, sensing acutely the potentialities of aircraft in warfare, had made greater progress and had begun laying the foundations for the new science of aeronautics. The World War gave a remarkable impetus to the development of aeronautics and emphasized the need for organized research on the fundamental problems of flight. By act of Congress approved March 3, 1915, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics was created and charged with the duty of supervising, directing, and conducting fundamental scientific research and experiment in aeronautics. With the farsighted support of the Congress the Committee has led the world in the development of unique aeronautical research facilities in its laboratories at Langley Field, Va. The research programs include problems initiated by the Committee and its subcommittees and also investigations requested by the Army, the Navy, and the Civil Aeronautics Authority. The results of researches conducted under one control, serve without duplication of effort, the needs of all branches of aviation, civil and military, and exert a profound influence on the progress of aeronautics by improving the performance, efficiency, and safety of aircraft. A brief description of the results of some of the committee's researches and of the equipment employed will be found in the following pages.

  11. The Centrifuge Facility Life Sciences Glovebox configuration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Sidney C.; Goulart, Carla V.

    1992-01-01

    Crew operations associated with nonhuman life sciences research on Space Station Freedom will be conducted in the Life Sciences Glovebox, whose enclosed work volume must accommodate numerous life science procedures. Two candidate Glovebox work volume concepts have been developed: one in which two operators work side-by-side, and another that conforms to the reach envelope of a single operator. Six test volunteers tested the concepts according to preestablished operational criteria. The wrap-around, single-operator concept has been judged the superior system.

  12. Mobile Aerial Tracking and Imaging System (MATRIS) for Aeronautical Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Daniel W.; Blanchard, R. C.; Miller, G. M.

    2004-01-01

    A mobile, rapidly deployable ground-based system to track and image targets of aeronautical interest has been developed. Targets include reentering reusable launch vehicles (RLVs) as well as atmospheric and transatmospheric vehicles. The optics were designed to image targets in the visible and infrared wavelengths. To minimize acquisition cost and development time, the system uses commercially available hardware and software where possible. The conception and initial funding of this system originated with a study of ground-based imaging of global aerothermal characteristics of RLV configurations. During that study NASA teamed with the Missile Defense Agency/Innovative Science and Technology Experimentation Facility (MDA/ISTEF) to test techniques and analysis on two Space Shuttle flights.

  13. The European HST Science Data Archive. [and Data Management Facility (DMF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasian, F.; Pirenne, B.; Albrecht, R.; Russo, G.

    1993-01-01

    The paper describes the European HST Science Data Archive. Particular attention is given to the flow from the HST spacecraft to the Science Data Archive at the Space Telescope European Coordinating Facility (ST-ECF); the archiving system at the ST-ECF, including the hardware and software system structure; the operations at the ST-ECF and differences with the Data Management Facility; and the current developments. A diagram of the logical structure and data flow of the system managing the European HST Science Data Archive is included.

  14. A checklist for planning and designing audiovisual facilities in health sciences libraries.

    PubMed Central

    Holland, G J; Bischoff, F A; Foxman, D S

    1984-01-01

    Developed by an MLA/HeSCA (Health Sciences Communications Association) joint committee, this checklist is intended to serve as a conceptual framework for planning a new or renovated audiovisual facility in a health sciences library. Emphasis is placed on the philosophical and organizational decisions that must be made about an audiovisual facility before the technical or spatial decisions can be wisely made. Specific standards for facilities or equipment are not included. The first section focuses on health sciences library settings. Ideas presented in the remaining sections could apply to academic learning resource center environments as well. A bibliography relating to all aspects of audiovisual facilities planning and design is included with references to specific sections of the checklist. PMID:6208957

  15. Aeronautical tubes and pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauclair, N.

    1984-12-01

    The main and subcomponent French suppliers of aircraft tubes and pipes are discussed, and the state of the industry is analyzed. Quality control is essential for tubes with regard to their i.d. and metallurgical compositions. French regulations do not allow welded seam tubes in hydraulic circuits unless no other form is available, and then rustproofed steel must be installed. The actual low level of orders for any run of tubes dictates that the product is only one of several among the manufacturers' line. Automation, both in NDT and quality control, assures that the tubes meet specifications. A total of 10 French companies participate in the industry, serving both civil and military needs, with some companies specializing only in titanium, steel, or aluminum materials. Concerns wishing to enter the market must upgrade their equipment to meet the higher aeronautical specifications and be prepared to furnish tubes and pipes that serve both functional and structural purposes simultaneously. Additionally, pipe-bending machines must also perform to tight specifications. Pipes can range from 0.2 mm exterior diameter to 40 mm, with wall thicknesses from 0.02 mm to 3 mm. A chart containing a list of manufacturers and their respective specifications and characteristics is presented, and a downtrend in production with reduction of personnel is noted.

  16. Aeronautical Engineering: 1983 cumulative index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    This bibliography is a cumulative index to the abstracts contained in NASA SP-7037 (158) through NASA SP-7037 (169) of Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography. NASA SP-7037 and its supplements have been compiled through the cooperative efforts of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). This cumulative index includes subject, personal author, corporate source, contract, report number, and accession number indexes.

  17. Aeronautics and Space Report of the President

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The years 1989 to 1990 activities are reported including human space flight, unmanned expendable launch vehicles, space science and applications, space communications operations, space research and technology, and aeronautics research and technology. Contributions made by the 14 participating government organizations are outline. Each organization's aeronautics and/or space activities for the year are presented. The organizations involved include: (1) NASA; (2) Dept. of Defense; (3) Dept. of Commerce; (4) Dept. of Energy; (5) Dept. of the Interior; (6) Dept. of Agriculture; (7) Federal Communications Commission; (8) Dept. of Transportation; (9) Environmental Protection Agency; (10) National Science Foundation; (11) Smithsonian Institution; (12) Dept. of State; (13) Arms Control and Disarmament; and (14) United States Information Agency.

  18. Healthcare security staffing for smaller facilities: where science meets art.

    PubMed

    Warren, Bryan

    2013-01-01

    Obtaining effective security resourcing and staffing for smaller healthcare facilities presents many difficulties, according to the author In this article, he provides guidance to security practitioners on taking existing data and translating it into a language that administration will understand and appreciate.

  19. Aeronautics in NACA and NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Initiated in 1915, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics/National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NACA/NASA) aeronautical programs have been the keystone of a sustained U.S. Government, industry, and university research effort which has been a primary factor in the development of our remarkable air transportation systems, the country's largest positive trade balance component, and the world's finest military Air Force. This overview summarizes the flow of events, and the major trends, that have led from the NACA origins to the present NASA Aeronautics program, and indicates some important directions for the years ahead.

  20. Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) science instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dailey, C. C.; Cumings, N. P.; Winkler, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    AXAF is to be equipped with a high performance X-ray telescope for the conduction of detailed astrophysics research. The observatory is to be serviced by the Space Station or the Shuttle, depending on capabilities during the AXAF operational period. The AXAF is to utilize the wavelength band from 1.2 A to 120 A. Attention is given to the AXAF science team, the AXAF observatory characteristics, the AXAF science instrument definition program, the Advanced Charge Coupled Device (CCD) Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS), the High Resolution Camera (HRC), the Bragg Crystal Spectrometer (BCS), the X-ray Spectrometer (XRS), the transmission gratings, and the program schedule.

  1. High energy-density science on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, E.M.; Cauble, R.; Remington, B.A.

    1997-08-01

    The National Ignition Facility, as well as its French counterpart Le Laser Megajoule, have been designed to confront one of the most difficult and compelling problem in shock physics - the creation of a hot, compassed DT plasma surrounded and confined by cold, nearly degenerate DT fuel. At the same time, these laser facilities will present the shock physics community with unique tools for the study of high energy density matter at states unreachable by any other laboratory technique. Here we describe how these lasers can contribute to investigations of high energy density in the area of material properties and equations of state, extend present laboratory shock techniques such as high-speed jets to new regimes, and allow study of extreme conditions found in astrophysical phenomena.

  2. NNS computing facility manual P-17 Neutron and Nuclear Science

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeberling, M.; Nelson, R.O.

    1993-11-01

    This document describes basic policies and provides information and examples on using the computing resources provided by P-17, the Neutron and Nuclear Science (NNS) group. Information on user accounts, getting help, network access, electronic mail, disk drives, tape drives, printers, batch processing software, XSYS hints, PC networking hints, and Mac networking hints is given.

  3. Development Approach for the Accommodation of Materials Science Research for the Materials Science Research Facility on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, D. A.; Cobb, S. D.; Szofran, F. R.

    2000-01-01

    The Materials Science Research Facility (MSRF) is a modular facility comprised of autonomous Materials Science Research Racks (MSRR's) for research in the microgravity environment afforded by the International Space Station (ISS). The initial MSRF concept consists of three Materials Science Research Racks (MSRR-1, MSRR-2, and MSRR-3) which will be developed for a phased deployment beginning on the third Utilization Flight (UF-3). The facility will house materials processing apparatus and common subsystems required for operating each device. Each MSRR is a stand alone autonomous rack and will be comprised of either on-orbit replaceable Experiment Modules, Module Inserts, investigation unique apparatus, and/or multiuser generic processing apparatus. Each MSRR will support a wide range of materials science themes in the NASA research program and will use the ISS Active Rack Isolation System (ARIS). MSRF is being developed for the United States Laboratory Module and will provide the apparatus for satisfying near-term and long-range Materials Science Discipline goals and objectives.

  4. System analysis study of space platform and station accommodations for life sciences research facilities. Volume 2: Study results. Appendix D: Life sciences research facility requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiley, Lowell F.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this requirements document is to develop the foundation for concept development for the Life Sciences Research Facility (LSRF) on the Space Station. These requirements are developed from the perspective of a Space Station laboratory module outfitter. Science and mission requirements including those related to specimens are set forth. System requirements, including those for support, are detailed. Functional and design requirements are covered in the areas of structures, mechanisms, electrical power, thermal systems, data management system, life support, and habitability. Finally, interface requirements for the Command Module and Logistics Module are described.

  5. Fifty Years of Aeronautical Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This booklet contains a detailed review of the aeronautical research conducted at Langley Research Center during the 50 years after its construction in 1917 as the first research laboratory for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. The research is discussed in five parts, by decades: 1917-27, 1928-37, 1938-47, 1948-57, 1958-67.…

  6. Aeronautical Engineering: A continuing bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    This bibliography lists 347 reports, articles and other documents introduced into the scientific and technical information system. Documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated compounds, equipment, and systems are included. Research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles are also included.

  7. Biofuels Science and Facilities (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    ScienceCinema

    Keasling, Jay D

    2016-07-12

    Jay D. Keasling speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 2, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  8. Conceptual design and programmatics studies of space station accommodations for Life Sciences Research Facilities (LSRF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Conceptual designs and programmatics of the space station accommodations for the Life Sciences Research Facilities (LSRF) are presented. The animal ECLSS system for the LSRF provides temperature-humidity control, air circulation, and life support functions for experimental subjects. Three ECLSS were studied. All configurations presented satisfy the science requirements for: animal holding facilities with bioisolation; facilities interchangeable to hold rodents, small primates, and plants; metabolic cages interchangeable with standard holding cages; holding facilities adaptable to restrained large primates and rodent breeding/nesting cages; volume for the specified instruments; enclosed ferm-free workbench for manipulation of animals and chemical procedures; freezers for specimen storage until return; and centrifuge to maintain animals and plants at fractional g to 1 g or more, with potential for accommodating humans for short time intervals.

  9. An Overview of the NASA Aeronautics Test Program Strategic Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    U.S. leadership in aeronautics depends on ready access to technologically advanced, efficient, and affordable aeronautics test capabilities. These systems include major wind tunnels and propulsion test facilities and flight test capabilities. The federal government owns the majority of the major aeronautics test capabilities in the United States, primarily through the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Department of Defense (DoD), however an overarching strategy for management of these national assets was needed. Therefore, in Fiscal Year (FY) 2006 NASA established the Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) as a two-pronged strategic initiative to: (1) retain and invest in NASA aeronautics test capabilities considered strategically important to the agency and the nation, and (2) establish a strong, high level partnership with the DoD Test Resources Management Center (TRMC), stewards of the DoD test and evaluation infrastructure. Since then, approximately seventy percent of the ATP budget has been directed to underpin fixed and variable costs of facility operations within its portfolio and the balance towards strategic investments in its test facilities, including maintenance and capability upgrades. Also, a strong guiding coalition was established through the National Partnership for Aeronautics Testing (NPAT), with governance by the senior leadership of NASA s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) and the DoD's TRMC. As part of its strategic planning, ATP has performed or participated in many studies and analyses, including assessments of major NASA and DoD aeronautics test capabilities, test facility condition evaluations and market research. The ATP strategy has also benefitted from unpublished RAND research and analysis by Ant n et al. (2009). Together, these various studies, reports and assessments serve as a foundation for a new, five year strategic plan that will guide ATP through FY 2014. Our vision for the future is a balanced

  10. Langley aeronautics and space test highlights, 1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The role of the Langley Research Center is to perform basic and applied research necessary for the advancement of aeronautics and space flight, to generate new and advanced concepts for the accomplishment of related national goals, and to provide research advice, technological support, and assistance to other NASA installations, other government agencies, and industry. Some of the significant tests which were performed during calendar year 1983 in Langley test facilities, a number of which are unique in the world are highlighted. Both the broad range of the research and technology activities at the Langley Research Center and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States leadership in aeronautics and space research are illustrated.

  11. NASA's Aeronautics Vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenney, Darrel R.

    2004-01-01

    Six long-term technology focus areas are: 1. Environmentally Friendly, Clean Burning Engines. Focus: Develop innovative technologies to enable intelligent turbine engines that significantly reduce harmful emissions while maintaining high performance and increasing reliability. 2. New Aircraft Energy Sources and Management. Focus: Discover new energy sources and intelligent management techniques directed towards zero emissions and enable new vehicle concepts for public mobility and new science missions. 3. Quiet Aircraft for Community Friendly Service. Focus: Develop and integrate noise reduction technology to enable unrestricted air transportation service to all communities. 4. Aerodynamic Performance for Fuel Efficiency. Focus: Improve aerodynamic efficiency,structures and materials technologies, and design tools and methodologies to reduce fuel burn and minimize environmental impact and enable new vehicle concepts and capabilities for public mobility and new science missions. 5. Aircraft Weight Reduction and Community Access. Focus: Develop ultralight smart materials and structures, aerodynamic concepts, and lightweight subsystems to increase vehicle efficiency, leading to high altitude long endurance vehicles, planetary aircraft, advanced vertical and short takeoff and landing vehicles and beyond. 6. Smart Aircraft and Autonomous Control. Focus: Enable aircraft to fly with reduced or no human intervention, to optimize flight over multiple regimes, and to provide maintenance on demand towards the goal of a feeling, seeing, sensing, sentient air vehicle.

  12. National facility for advanced computational science: A sustainable path to scientific discovery

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Horst; Kramer, William; Saphir, William; Shalf, John; Bailey, David; Oliker, Leonid; Banda, Michael; McCurdy, C. William; Hules, John; Canning, Andrew; Day, Marc; Colella, Philip; Serafini, David; Wehner, Michael; Nugent, Peter

    2004-04-02

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) proposes to create a National Facility for Advanced Computational Science (NFACS) and to establish a new partnership between the American computer industry and a national consortium of laboratories, universities, and computing facilities. NFACS will provide leadership-class scientific computing capability to scientists and engineers nationwide, independent of their institutional affiliation or source of funding. This partnership will bring into existence a new class of computational capability in the United States that is optimal for science and will create a sustainable path towards petaflops performance.

  13. CosmoQuest: Training Educators and Engaging Classrooms in Citizen Science through a Virtual Research Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxner, Sanlyn; Bracey, Georgia; Summer, Theresa; Cobb, Whitney; Gay, Pamela L.; Finkelstein, Keely D.; Gurton, Suzanne; Felix-Strishock, Lisa; Kruse, Brian; Lebofsky, Larry A.; Jones, Andrea J.; Tweed, Ann; Graff, Paige; Runco, Susan; Noel-Storr, Jacob; CosmoQuest Team

    2016-10-01

    CosmoQuest is a Citizen Science Virtual Research Facility that engages scientists, educators, students, and the public in analyzing NASA images. Often, these types of citizen science activities target enthusiastic members of the public, and additionally engage students in K-12 and college classrooms. To support educational engagement, we are developing a pipeline in which formal and informal educators and facilitators use the virtual research facility to engage students in real image analysis that is framed to provide meaningful science learning. This work also contributes to the larger project to produce publishable results. Community scientists are being solicited to propose CosmoQuest Science Projects take advantage of the virtual research facility capabilities. Each CosmoQuest Science Project will result in formal education materials, aligned with Next Generation Science Standards including the 3-dimensions of science learning; core ideas, crosscutting concepts, and science and engineering practices. Participating scientists will contribute to companion educational materials with support from the CosmoQuest staff of data specialists and education specialists. Educators will be trained through in person and virtual workshops, and classrooms will have the opportunity to not only work with NASA data, but interface with NASA scientists. Through this project, we are bringing together subject matter experts, classrooms, and informal science organizations to share the excitement of NASA SMD science with future citizen scientists. CosmoQuest is funded through individual donations, through NASA Cooperative Agreement NNX16AC68A, and through additional grants and contracts that are listed on our website, cosmoquest.org.

  14. The National Ignition Facility and the Golden Age of High Energy Density Science

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W; Moses, E I; Newton, M

    2007-09-27

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a 192-beam Nd:glass laser facility being constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to conduct research in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high energy density (HED) science. When completed, NIF will produce 1.8 MJ, 500 TW of ultraviolet light, making it the world's largest and highest-energy laser system. The NIF is poised to become the world's preeminent facility for conducting ICF and fusion energy research and for studying matter at extreme densities and temperatures.

  15. Reference Mission Operational Analysis Document (RMOAD) for the Life Sciences Research Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The space station will be constructed during the next decade as an orbiting, low-gravity, permanent facility. The facility will provide a multitude of research opportunities for many different users. The pressurized research laboratory will allow life scientists to study the effects of long-term exposure to microgravity on humans, animals, and plants. The results of these studies will increase our understanding of this foreign environment on basic life processes and ensure the safety of man's long-term presence in space. This document establishes initial operational requirements for the use of the Life Sciences Research Facility (LSRF) during its construction.

  16. Conversion of the Aeronautics Interactive Workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riveras, Nykkita L.

    2004-01-01

    This summer I am working in the Educational Programs Office. My task is to convert the Aeronautics Interactive Workstation from a Macintosh (Mac) platform to a Personal Computer (PC) platform. The Aeronautics Interactive Workstation is a workstation in the Aerospace Educational Laboratory (AEL), which is one of the three components of the Science, Engineering, Mathematics, and Aerospace Academy (SEMAA). The AEL is a state-of-the-art, electronically enhanced, computerized classroom that puts cutting-edge technology at the fingertips of participating students. It provides a unique learning experience regarding aerospace technology that features activities equipped with aerospace hardware and software that model real-world challenges. The Aeronautics Interactive Workstation, in particular, offers a variety of activities pertaining to the history of aeronautics. When the Aeronautics Interactive Workstation was first implemented into the AEL it was designed with Macromedia Director 4 for a Mac. Today it is being converted to Macromedia DirectorMX2004 for a PC. Macromedia Director is the proven multimedia tool for building rich content and applications for CDs, DVDs, kiosks, and the Internet. It handles the widest variety of media and offers powerful features for building rich content that delivers red results, integrating interactive audio, video, bitmaps, vectors, text, fonts, and more. Macromedia Director currently offers two programmingkripting languages: Lingo, which is Director's own programmingkripting language and JavaScript. In the workstation, Lingo is used in the programming/scripting since it was the only language in use when the workstation was created. Since the workstation was created with an older version of Macromedia Director it hosted significantly different programming/scripting protocols. In order to successfully accomplish my task, the final product required correction of Xtra and programming/scripting errors. I also had to convert the Mac platform

  17. Mobile Aerial Tracking and Imaging System (MATrIS) for Aeronautical Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Daniel W.; Blanchard, Robert C.; Miller, Geoffrey M.

    2004-01-01

    A mobile, rapidly deployable ground-based system to track and image targets of aeronautical interest has been developed. Targets include reentering reusable launch vehicles as well as atmospheric and transatmospheric vehicles. The optics were designed to image targets in the visible and infrared wavelengths. To minimize acquisition cost and development time, the system uses commercially available hardware and software where possible. The conception and initial funding of this system originated with a study of ground-based imaging of global aerothermal characteristics of reusable launch vehicle configurations. During that study the National Aeronautics and Space Administration teamed with the Missile Defense Agency/Innovative Science and Technology Experimentation Facility to test techniques and analysis on two Space Shuttle flights.

  18. Aeronautics and Space Report of the President

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Nineteen eighty-eight marked the United States' return to space flight with two successful space shuttle launches in September and December, as well as six successful expendable rocket launches. Meanwhile, many other less spectacular but important contributions were made in aeronautics and space by the 14 participating government organizations. Each organization's aeronautics and/or space activities for the year are presented. The organizations involved include: (1) NASA; (2) Department of Defense; (3) Department of Commerce; (4) Department of Energy; (5) Department of the Interior; (6) Department of Agriculture; (7) Federal Communications Commission; (8) Department of Transportation; (9) Environmental Protection Agency; (10) National Science Foundation; (11) Smithsonian Institution; (12) Department of State; (13) Arms Control and Disarmament Agency; and (14) United States Information Agency.

  19. [Burns in an aeronautic environment].

    PubMed

    Rigotti, G

    1979-10-27

    Following an examination of the aetiology of burns in aeronautic environments, the physiopathology, classification and general and local treatment of the burn case is discussed. Special mention is then made of aircraft as an extremely useful means of transport.

  20. Safe Science Facilities: Reviewing Factors that Affect Classroom Environment, Curriculum, and Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texley, Juliana

    2005-01-01

    Science teachers often have two different curricula--the ideal framework on paper and the real, day-to-day instructional program that occurs in the classroom. A number of factors can affect how much of that ideal framework is accomplished. For example, how a facility is designed and how space is used can affect student achievement, classroom…

  1. Proposal to DOE Basic Energy Sciences: Ultrafast X-ray science facility at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenlein, Robert W.; Falcone, Roger W.; Abela, R.; Alivisatos, A.P.; Belkacem, A.; Berrah, N.; Bozek, J.; Bressler, C.; Cavalleri, A.; Chergui, M.; Glover, T.E.; Heimann, P.A.; Hepburn, J.; Larsson, J.; Lee, R.W.; McCusker, J.; Padmore, H.A.; Pattison, P.; Pratt, S.T.; Shank, C.V.; Wark, J.; Chang, Z.; Robin, D.W.; Schlueter, R.D.; Zholents, A.A.; Zolotorev, M.S.

    2001-12-12

    We propose to develop a true user facility for ultrafast x-ray science at the Advanced Light Source. This facility will be unique in the world, and will fill a critical need for the growing ultrafast x-ray research community. The development of this facility builds upon the expertise from long-standing research efforts in ultrafast x-ray spectroscopy and the development of femtosecond x-ray sources and techniques at both the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and at U.C. Berkeley. In particular, the technical feasibility of a femtosecond x-ray beamline at the ALS has already been demonstrated, and existing ultrafast laser technology will enable such a beamline to operate near the practical limit for femtosecond x-ray flux and brightness from a 3rd generation synchrotron.

  2. NASA Aeronautics: Research and Technology Program Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This report contains numerous color illustrations to describe the NASA programs in aeronautics. The basic ideas involved are explained in brief paragraphs. The seven chapters deal with Subsonic aircraft, High-speed transport, High-performance military aircraft, Hypersonic/Transatmospheric vehicles, Critical disciplines, National facilities and Organizations & installations. Some individual aircraft discussed are : the SR-71 aircraft, aerospace planes, the high-speed civil transport (HSCT), the X-29 forward-swept wing research aircraft, and the X-31 aircraft. Critical disciplines discussed are numerical aerodynamic simulation, computational fluid dynamics, computational structural dynamics and new experimental testing techniques.

  3. NASA's plans for life sciences research facilities on a Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arno, R.; Heinrich, M.; Mascy, A.

    1984-01-01

    A Life Sciences Research Facility on a Space Station will contribute to the health and well-being of humans in space, as well as address many fundamental questions in gravitational and developmental biology. Scientific interests include bone and muscle attrition, fluid and electrolyte shifts, cardiovascular deconditioning, metabolism, neurophysiology, reproduction, behavior, drugs and immunology, radiation biology, and closed life-support system development. The life sciences module will include a laboratory and a vivarium. Trade-offs currently being evaluated include (1) the need for and size of a 1-g control centrifuge; (2) specimen quantities and species for research; (3) degree of on-board analysis versus sample return and ground analysis; (4) type and extent of equipment automation; (5) facility return versus on-orbit refurbishment; (6) facility modularity, isolation, and system independence; and (7) selection of experiments, design, autonomy, sharing, compatibility, and integration.

  4. Materials Science Experiments Under Microgravity - A Review of History, Facilities, and Future Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenzel, Ch.

    2012-01-01

    Materials science experiments have been a key issue already since the early days of research under microgravity conditions. A microgravity environment facilitates processing of metallic and semiconductor melts without buoyancy driven convection and sedimentation. Hence, crystal growth of semiconductors, solidification of metallic alloys, and the measurement of thermo-physical parameters are the major applications in the field of materials science making use of these dedicated conditions in space. In the last three decades a large number of successful experiments have been performed, mainly in international collaborations. In parallel, the development of high-performance research facilities and the technological upgrade of diagnostic and stimuli elements have also contributed to providing optimum conditions to perform such experiments. A review of the history of materials science experiments in space focussing on the development of research facilities is given. Furthermore, current opportunities to perform such experiments onboard ISS are described and potential future options are outlined.

  5. Astronautics and Aeronautics, 1991-1995: A Chronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gawdiak, Ihor Y. (Compiler); Shetland, Charles (Compiler)

    2000-01-01

    This chronology of events in aeronautics, aviation, space science, and space exploration was prepared by the Federal Research Division of the Library of Congress and RSIS for the History Division of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). It covers the years 1991-1995 and continues the series of annual chronologies published by NASA. The present volume uses the format of the previous edition of this series, Astronautics and Aeronautics, 1986-1990: A Chronology. It also integrates, in the appendices, information presented in previous publication

  6. Astronautics and Aeronautics, 1986-1990: A Chronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gawdiak, Ihor Y.; Miro, Ramon J.; Stueland, Sam

    1997-01-01

    This chronology of events in aeronautics, aviation, space science, and space exploration was prepared by the Federal Research Division of the LibrarY of Congress for the History Division of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). It covers the years 1996-1990 and continues the series of annual chronologies published by NASA. The present volume returns to the format used in the Astronautics and Aeronautics, 1979-1984: A Chronology volume. It also integrates in a single table the information presented in two or three previous publications.

  7. Kennedy Educate to Innovate (KETI) Aeronautics PowerPoint Presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, Dina

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some fundamental features of aeronautics. It is designed to introduce students to aeronautics and to engage them in Science Technology Education and Mathematics (STEM). It reviews the history of airflight, the aircraft components and their interaction with the forces that make flight possible (i.e. lift, weight drag and thrust), and the interaction of the components that create aircraft movements (roll, pitch and yaw)

  8. Aeronautical engineering: A continuing bibliography with indexes (supplement 316)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This bibliography lists 413 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in April 1995. Subject coverage includes: aeronautics; mathematical and computer sciences; chemistry and material sciences; geosciences; design, construction and testing of aircraft and aircraft engines; aircraft components, equipment, and systems; ground support systems; and theoretical and applied aspects of aerodynamics and general fluid dynamics.

  9. Aeronautical Engineering: A continuing bibliography with indexes, supplement 185

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    This bibliography lists 462 reports, articles and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in February 1985. Aerodynamics, aeronautical engineering, aircraft design, aircraft stability and control, geophysics, social sciences, and space sciences are some of the areas covered.

  10. Compressibility Effects in Aeronautical Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stack, John

    1941-01-01

    Compressible-flow research, while a relatively new field in aeronautics, is very old, dating back almost to the development of the first firearm. Over the last hundred years, researches have been conducted in the ballistics field, but these results have been of practically no use in aeronautical engineering because the phenomena that have been studied have been the more or less steady supersonic condition of flow. Some work that has been done in connection with steam turbines, particularly nozzle studies, has been of value, In general, however, understanding of compressible-flow phenomena has been very incomplete and permitted no real basis for the solution of aeronautical engineering problems in which.the flow is likely to be unsteady because regions of both subsonic and supersonic speeds may occur. In the early phases of the development of the airplane, speeds were so low that the effects of compressibility could be justifiably ignored. During the last war and immediately after, however, propellers exhibited losses in efficiency as the tip speeds approached the speed of sound, and the first experiments of an aeronautical nature were therefore conducted with propellers. Results of these experiments indicated serious losses of efficiency, but aeronautical engineers were not seriously concerned at the time became it was generally possible. to design propellers with quite low tip. speeds. With the development of new engines having increased power and rotational speeds, however, the problems became of increasing importance.

  11. Preliminary Concepts for the Materials Science Research Facility on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cobb, S.D.; Szofran, F. R.; Schaefer, D. A.

    1999-01-01

    The Materials Science Research Facility (MSRF) is designed to accommodate the current and evolving cadre of peer-reviewed materials science investigations selected to conduct research in the microgravity environment of the International Space Station (ISS). The MSRF consists of modular autonomous Materials Science Research Racks (MSRR's). The initial MSRF concept consists of three Materials Science Research Racks (MSRR-1, MSRR-2, and MSRR-3) which will be developed for a phased deployment beginning on Utilization Flight 3. Each MSRR is a stand-alone autonomous rack and will be comprised of either on-orbit replaceable Experiment Modules, Module Inserts, investigation unique apparatus, or multi-user generic processing apparatus Each MSRR will support a wide variety of scientific investigations.

  12. Atmospheric science facility pallet-only mode space transportation system payload (feasibility study), Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The economic and technical feasibility is assessed of employing a pallet-only mode for conducting Atmospheric Magnetospheric Plasmas-in-Space experiments. A baseline design incorporating the experiment and instrument descriptions is developed. The prime instruments are packaged into four pallets in a physical and functional manner compatible with the Space Transportation System capabilities and/or constraints and an orbiter seven-day mission timeline. Operational compatibility is verified between the orbiter/payload and supporting facilities. The development status and the schedule requirements applicable to the Atmospheric Science Facility mission are identified. Conclusions and recommendations are presented and discussed.

  13. Considerations in the design of life sciences research facilities for the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinrich, M.; Rudiger, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    The facilities required for life science research on a permanent Space Station are examined. Specifications important to the designing of facilities and planning of activities on the Space Shuttle are: (1) the species to be tested, (2) the number and procedure for testing, (3) the number of specimens at each sampling time, (4) the analyses required, (5) the methods of preserving samples, instruments, and supplies, and (6) the amount of crew time required. Experiments which are relevant to understanding the effects of microgravity on living systems are to be performed on the Space Station. The design and instruments of a Space Station laboratory and specimen centrifuge are described.

  14. Spacelab Life Sciences 3 biomedical research using the Rhesus Research Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, R. W.; Searby, N. D.; Stone, L. S.; Hogan, R. P.; Viso, M.; Venet, M.

    1992-01-01

    In 1985, a letter of agreement was signed between the French space agency, CNES, and NASA, formally initiating a joint venture called the RHESUS Project. The goal of this project is to provide a facility to fly rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) to support spaceflight experiments which are applicable but not practical to carry out on human subjects. Biomedical investigations in behavior/performance, immunology/microbiology, muscle physiology, cardiopulmonary physiology, bone/calcium physiology, regulatory physiology, and neurophysiology disciplines will be performed. The Rhesus Research Facility, hardware capable of supporting two adult rhesus monkeys in a microgravity environment, is being developed for a first flight on Spacelab Life Sciences in early 1996.

  15. Microgravity Combustion Science and Fluid Physics Experiments and Facilities for the ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauver, Richard W.; Kohl, Fred J.; Weiland, Karen J.; Zurawski, Robert L.; Hill, Myron E.; Corban, Robert R.

    2001-01-01

    At the NASA Glenn Research Center, the Microgravity Science Program supports both ground-based and flight experiment research in the disciplines of Combustion Science and Fluid Physics. Combustion Science research includes the areas of gas jet diffusion flames, laminar flames, burning of droplets and misting fuels, solids and materials flammability, fire and fire suppressants, turbulent combustion, reaction kinetics, materials synthesis, and other combustion systems. The Fluid Physics discipline includes the areas of complex fluids (colloids, gels, foams, magneto-rheological fluids, non-Newtonian fluids, suspensions, granular materials), dynamics and instabilities (bubble and drop dynamics, magneto/electrohydrodynamics, electrochemical transport, geophysical flows), interfacial phenomena (wetting, capillarity, contact line hydrodynamics), and multiphase flows and phase changes (boiling and condensation, heat transfer, flow instabilities). A specialized International Space Station (ISS) facility that provides sophisticated research capabilities for these disciplines is the Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF). The FCF consists of the Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR), the Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) and the Shared Accommodations Rack and is designed to accomplish a large number of science investigations over the life of the ISS. The modular, multiuser facility is designed to optimize the science return within the available resources of on-orbit power, uplink/downlink capacity, crew time, upmass/downmass, volume, etc. A suite of diagnostics capabilities, with emphasis on optical techniques, will be provided to complement the capabilities of the subsystem multiuser or principal investigator-specific experiment modules. The paper will discuss the systems concept, technical capabilities, functionality, and the initial science investigations in each discipline.

  16. Modeling the Office of Science Ten Year Facilities Plan: The PERI Architecture Tiger Team

    SciTech Connect

    de Supinski, Bronis R.; Alam, Sadaf; Bailey, David H.; Carrington, Laura; Daley, Chris; Dubey, Anshu; Gamblin, Todd; Gunter, Dan; Hovland, Paul D.; Jagode, Heike; Karavanic, Karen; Marin, Gabriel; Mellor-Crummey, John; Moore, Shirley; Norris, Boyana; Oliker, Leonid; Olschanowsky, Catherine; Roth, Philip C.; Schulz, Martin; Shende, Sameer; Snavely, Allan; Spear, Wyatt; Tikir, Mustafa; Vetter, Jeff; Worley, Pat; Wright, Nicholas

    2009-06-26

    The Performance Engineering Institute (PERI) originally proposed a tiger team activity as a mechanism to target significant effort optimizing key Office of Science applications, a model that was successfully realized with the assistance of two JOULE metric teams. However, the Office of Science requested a new focus beginning in 2008: assistance in forming its ten year facilities plan. To meet this request, PERI formed the Architecture Tiger Team, which is modeling the performance of key science applications on future architectures, with S3D, FLASH and GTC chosen as the first application targets. In this activity, we have measured the performance of these applications on current systems in order to understand their baseline performance and to ensure that our modeling activity focuses on the right versions and inputs of the applications. We have applied a variety of modeling techniques to anticipate the performance of these applications on a range of anticipated systems. While our initial findings predict that Office of Science applications will continue to perform well on future machines from major hardware vendors, we have also encountered several areas in which we must extend our modeling techniques in order to fulfill our mission accurately and completely. In addition, we anticipate that models of a wider range of applications will reveal critical differences between expected future systems, thus providing guidance for future Office of Science procurement decisions, and will enable DOE applications to exploit machines in future facilities fully.

  17. Modeling the Office of Science Ten Year Facilities Plan: The PERI Architecture Team

    SciTech Connect

    de Supinski, Bronis R.; Alam, Sadaf R; Bailey, David; Carrington, Laura; Daley, Christopher; Dubey, Anshu; Gamblin, Todd; Gunter, Dan; Hovland, Paul; Jagode, Heike; Karavanic, Karen; Marin, Gabriel; Mellor-Crummey, John; Moore, Shirley; Norris, Boyana; Oliker, Leonid; Olschanowsky, Cathy; Roth, Philip C; Schulz, Martin; Shende, Sameer; Snavely, Allan; Spea, Wyatt; Tikir, Mustafa; Vetter, Jeffrey S; Worley, Patrick H; Wright, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    The Performance Engineering Institute (PERI) originally proposed a tiger team activity as a mechanism to target significant effort optimizing key Office of Science applications, a model that was successfully realized with the assistance of two JOULE metric teams. However, the Office of Science requested a new focus beginning in 2008: assistance in forming its ten year facilities plan. To meet this request, PERI formed the Architecture Tiger Team, which is modeling the performance of key science applications on future architectures, with S3D, FLASH and GTC chosen as the first application targets. In this activity, we have measured the performance of these applications on current systems in order to understand their baseline performance and to ensure that our modeling activity focuses on the right versions and inputs of the applications. We have applied a variety of modeling techniques to anticipate the performance of these applications on a range of anticipated systems. While our initial findings predict that Office of Science applications will continue to perform well on future machines from major hardware vendors, we have also encountered several areas in which we must extend our modeling techniques in order to fulfilll our mission accurately and completely. In addition, we anticipate that models of a wider range of applications will reveal critical differences between expected future systems, thus providing guidance for future Office of Science procurement decisions, and will enable DOE applications to exploit machines in future facilities fully.

  18. Modeling the Office of Science Ten Year FacilitiesPlan: The PERI Architecture Tiger Team

    SciTech Connect

    de Supinski, B R; Alam, S R; Bailey, D H; Carrington, L; Daley, C

    2009-05-27

    The Performance Engineering Institute (PERI) originally proposed a tiger team activity as a mechanism to target significant effort to the optimization of key Office of Science applications, a model that was successfully realized with the assistance of two JOULE metric teams. However, the Office of Science requested a new focus beginning in 2008: assistance in forming its ten year facilities plan. To meet this request, PERI formed the Architecture Tiger Team, which is modeling the performance of key science applications on future architectures, with S3D, FLASH and GTC chosen as the first application targets. In this activity, we have measured the performance of these applications on current systems in order to understand their baseline performance and to ensure that our modeling activity focuses on the right versions and inputs of the applications. We have applied a variety of modeling techniques to anticipate the performance of these applications on a range of anticipated systems. While our initial findings predict that Office of Science applications will continue to perform well on future machines from major hardware vendors, we have also encountered several areas in which we must extend our modeling techniques in order to fulfill our mission accurately and completely. In addition, we anticipate that models of a wider range of applications will reveal critical differences between expected future systems, thus providing guidance for future Office of Science procurement decisions, and will enable DOE applications to exploit machines in future facilities fully.

  19. Life Sciences Research Facility automation requirements and concepts for the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, Daryl N.

    1986-01-01

    An evaluation is made of the methods and preliminary results of a study on prospects for the automation of the NASA Space Station's Life Sciences Research Facility. In order to remain within current Space Station resource allocations, approximately 85 percent of planned life science experiment tasks must be automated; these tasks encompass specimen care and feeding, cage and instrument cleaning, data acquisition and control, sample analysis, waste management, instrument calibration, materials inventory and management, and janitorial work. Task automation will free crews for specimen manipulation, tissue sampling, data interpretation and communication with ground controllers, and experiment management.

  20. Advances in the archiving and distribution facilities at the Space Telescope Science Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanisch, Robert J.; Postman, Marc; Pollizzi, Joseph; Richon, J.

    1998-07-01

    The Hubble Data Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute contains over 4.3 TB of data, primarily for the Hubble Space Telescope, but also from complementary space- based and ground-based facilities. We are in the process of upgrading and generalizing many of the HDA's component system, developing tools to provide more integrated access to the HDA holdings, and working with other major data providing organizations to implement global data location services for astronomy and other space science disciplines. This paper describes the key elements of our archiving and data distribution systems, including a planned transition to DVD media, data compression, data segregation, on-the-fly calibration, an engineering data warehouse, and distributed search and retrieval facilities.

  1. 77 FR 55863 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Applied Sciences Advisory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-11

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Applied Sciences Advisory Group Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of... Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Applied Science Advisory Group....

  2. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Science Research for Energy Management. Part 1; Overview of Energy Issues and an Assessment of the Potential for Application of NASA Earth Science Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zell, E.; Engel-Cox, J.

    2005-01-01

    Effective management of energy resources is critical for the U.S. economy, the environment, and, more broadly, for sustainable development and alleviating poverty worldwide. The scope of energy management is broad, ranging from energy production and end use to emissions monitoring and mitigation and long-term planning. Given the extensive NASA Earth science research on energy and related weather and climate-related parameters, and rapidly advancing energy technologies and applications, there is great potential for increased application of NASA Earth science research to selected energy management issues and decision support tools. The NASA Energy Management Program Element is already involved in a number of projects applying NASA Earth science research to energy management issues, with a focus on solar and wind renewable energy and developing interests in energy modeling, short-term load forecasting, energy efficient building design, and biomass production.

  3. The Lunar L1 Gateway Concept: Supporting Future Major Space Science Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronson, H.; Geffre, J.; Prusha, S.; Caroff, L.; Weisbin, C.

    2004-01-01

    We report here on a series of ongoing studies to evaluate alternative architectures for future space science facilities and how robots, humans, and autonomous systems might be optimally used to support them. This presentation outlines one scenario -- a "Gateway" at the Earth-Moon L1 point for supporting multiple options beyond Low Earth Orbit -- plus our process for evaluating human/robotic activities to construct telescopes.

  4. The compact AMS facility at Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Sanyuan; Ding, Ping; Wang, Ning; Shen, Chengde; Jia, Guodong; Zhang, Gan

    2015-10-01

    A compact 14C AMS facility manufactured by the National Electrostatics Corporation (NEC) has been installed at Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences (GIGCAS). The system is based on a Model 1.5SDH-1 Pelletron accelerator with a maximum terminal volt 0.6 MV. This paper reports the performance and the operation of this machine in the first several months after installation.

  5. Review of the Physical Science Facility Stack Air Sampling Probe Locations

    SciTech Connect

    Glissmeyer, John A.

    2007-09-30

    This letter report reviews compliance of the current design of the Physical Science Facility (PSF) stack air sampling locations with the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 standard. The review was based on performance criteria used for locating air sampling probes, the design documents provided and available information on systems previously tested for compliance with the criteria. Recommendations are presented for ways to bring the design into compliance with the requirements for the sampling probe placement.

  6. 1997 NASA Academy in Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrisani, Dominick, II

    1998-01-01

    The NASA Academy in Aeronautics at the Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) was a ten-week summer leadership training program conducted for the first time in the summer of 1997. Funding was provided by a contract between DFRC and Purdue University. Mr. Lee Duke of DFRC was the contract monitor, and Professor Dominick Andrisani was the principal investigator. Five student research associates participated in the program. Biographies of the research associates are given in Appendix 1. Dominick Andrisani served as Dean of the NASA Academy in Aeronautics. NASA Academy in Aeronautics is a unique summer institute of higher learning that endeavors to provide insight into all of the elements that make NASA aeronautical research possible. At the same time the Academy assigns the research associate to be mentored by one of NASA!s best researchers so that they can contribute towards an active flight research program. Aeronautical research and development are an investment in the future, and NASA Academy is an investment in aeronautical leaders of the future. The Academy was run by the Indiana Space Grant Consortium at Purdue in strategic partnership with the National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program. Research associates at the Academy were selected with help from the Space Grant Consortium that sponsored the research associate. Research associate stipend and travel to DFRC were paid by the students' Space Grant Consortium. All other student expenses were paid by the Academy. Since the Academy at DFRC had only five students the opportunity for individual growth and attention was unique in the country. About 30% of the working time and most of the social time of the students were be spent as a "group" or "team." This time was devoted to exchange of ideas, on forays into the highest levels of decision making, and in executing aeronautical research. This was done by interviewing leaders throughout the aerospace industry, seminars, working dinners, and informal

  7. Biomedical neutron research at the Californium User Facility for neutron science

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.C.; Byrne, T.E.; Miller, L.F.

    1997-04-01

    The Californium User Facility for Neutron Science has been established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The Californium User Facility (CUF) is a part of the larger Californium Facility, which fabricates and stores compact {sup 252}Cf neutron sources for worldwide distribution. The CUF can provide a cost-effective option for research with {sup 252}Cf sources. Three projects at the CUF that demonstrate the versatility of {sup 252}Cf for biological and biomedical neutron-based research are described: future establishment of a {sup 252}Cf-based neutron activation analysis system, ongoing work to produce miniature high-intensity, remotely afterloaded {sup 252}Cf sources for tumor therapy, and a recent experiment that irradiated living human lung cancer cells impregnated with experimental boron compounds to test their effectiveness for boron neutron capture therapy.

  8. Aeronautics Technology Possibilities for 2000: Report of a workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The potential of aeronautical research and technology (R&T) development, which could provide the basis for facility planning and long range guidance of R&T programs and could establish justification for support of aeronautical research and technology was studied. The projections served specific purposes: (1) to provide a base for research and future facilities needed to support the projected technologies, and development advanced vehicles; (2) to provide insight on the possible state of the art in aeronautical technology by the year 2000 for civil and military planners of air vehicles and systems. Topics discussed include: aerodynamics; propulsion; structures; materials; guidance, navigation and control; computer and information technology; human factors; and systems integration.

  9. 14 CFR 77.35 - Aeronautical studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aeronautical studies. 77.35 Section 77.35 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRSPACE OBJECTS AFFECTING NAVIGABLE AIRSPACE Aeronautical Studies of Effect of Proposed Construction on...

  10. 14 CFR 61.125 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aeronautical knowledge. 61.125 Section 61... Aeronautical knowledge. (a) General. A person who applies for a commercial pilot certificate must receive and... aeronautical knowledge areas of paragraph (b) of this section that apply to the aircraft category and...

  11. 14 CFR 61.155 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aeronautical knowledge. 61.155 Section 61....155 Aeronautical knowledge. (a) General. The knowledge test for an airline transport pilot certificate is based on the aeronautical knowledge areas listed in paragraph (c) of this section that...

  12. 14 CFR 61.125 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Aeronautical knowledge. 61.125 Section 61... Aeronautical knowledge. (a) General. A person who applies for a commercial pilot certificate must receive and... aeronautical knowledge areas of paragraph (b) of this section that apply to the aircraft category and...

  13. 14 CFR 61.125 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Aeronautical knowledge. 61.125 Section 61... Aeronautical knowledge. (a) General. A person who applies for a commercial pilot certificate must receive and... aeronautical knowledge areas of paragraph (b) of this section that apply to the aircraft category and...

  14. Aeronautics. America in Space: The First Decade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderton, David A.

    The major research and developments in aeronautics during the late 1950's and 1960's are reviewed descriptively with a minimum of technical content. Topics covered include aeronautical research, aeronautics in NASA, The National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, the X-15 Research Airplane, variable-sweep wing design, the Supersonic Transport…

  15. 14 CFR 61.99 - Aeronautical experience.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aeronautical experience. 61.99 Section 61.99 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... Aeronautical experience. A person who applies for a recreational pilot certificate must receive and log...

  16. Aeronautical mobile satellite service: Air traffic control applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sim, Dave

    1990-01-01

    Canada's history both in aviation and in satellite communications development spans several decades. The introduction of aeronautical mobile satellite communications will serve our requirements for airspace management in areas not served by line-of-sight radio and radar facilities. The ensuing improvements in air safety and operating efficiency are eagerly awaited by the aviation community.

  17. NASA/University Conference on Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The proceedings of a conference on the future of aeronautics are presented. The subjects discussed include the following: (1) aeronautics and the education of the engineer, (2) technical trends in aeronautics, and (3) the role of the university in aeronautics. The technical trends in aeronautics are concerned with aircraft noise control, the effect of the aircraft on the environment, airborne electronics for automated flight, and trends in aircraft design.

  18. Life science experiments performed in space in the ISS/Kibo facility and future research plans

    PubMed Central

    Ohnishi, Takeo

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several years, current techniques in molecular biology have been used to perform experiments in space, focusing on the nature and effects of space radiation. In the Japanese ‘Kibo’ facility in the International Space Station (ISS), the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has performed five life science experiments since 2009, and two additional experiments are currently in progress. The first life science experiment in space was the ‘Rad Gene’ project, which utilized two human cultured lymphoblastoid cell lines containing a mutated p53 gene (mp53) and a parental wild-type p53 gene (wtp53) respectively. Four parameters were examined: (i) detecting space radiation–induced DSBs by observing γH2AX foci; (ii) observing p53-dependent gene expression during space flight; (iii) observing p53-dependent gene expression after space flight; and (iv) observing the adaptive response in the two cell lines containing the mutated and wild type p53 genes after exposure to space radiation. These observations were completed and have been reported, and this paper is a review of these experiments. In addition, recent new information from space-based experiments involving radiation biology is presented here. These experiments involve human cultured cells, silkworm eggs, mouse embryonic stem cells and mouse eggs in various experiments designed by other principal investigators in the ISS/Kibo. The progress of Japanese science groups involved in these space experiments together with JAXA are also discussed here. The Japanese Society for Biological Sciences in Space (JSBSS), the Utilization Committee of Space Environment Science (UCSES) and the Science Council of Japan (ACJ) have supported these new projects and new experimental facilities in ISS/Kibo. Currently, these organizations are proposing new experiments for the ISS through 2024. PMID:27130692

  19. Life science experiments performed in space in the ISS/Kibo facility and future research plans.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Takeo

    2016-08-01

    Over the past several years, current techniques in molecular biology have been used to perform experiments in space, focusing on the nature and effects of space radiation. In the Japanese 'Kibo' facility in the International Space Station (ISS), the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has performed five life science experiments since 2009, and two additional experiments are currently in progress. The first life science experiment in space was the 'Rad Gene' project, which utilized two human cultured lymphoblastoid cell lines containing a mutated P53 : gene (m P53 : ) and a parental wild-type P53 : gene (wt P53 : ) respectively. Four parameters were examined: (i) detecting space radiation-induced DSBs by observing γH2AX foci; (ii) observing P53 : -dependent gene expression during space flight; (iii) observing P53 : -dependent gene expression after space flight; and (iv) observing the adaptive response in the two cell lines containing the mutated and wild type P53 : genes after exposure to space radiation. These observations were completed and have been reported, and this paper is a review of these experiments. In addition, recent new information from space-based experiments involving radiation biology is presented here. These experiments involve human cultured cells, silkworm eggs, mouse embryonic stem cells and mouse eggs in various experiments designed by other principal investigators in the ISS/Kibo. The progress of Japanese science groups involved in these space experiments together with JAXA are also discussed here. The Japanese Society for Biological Sciences in Space (JSBSS), the Utilization Committee of Space Environment Science (UCSES) and the Science Council of Japan (ACJ) have supported these new projects and new experimental facilities in ISS/Kibo. Currently, these organizations are proposing new experiments for the ISS through 2024.

  20. Life science experiments performed in space in the ISS/Kibo facility and future research plans.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Takeo

    2016-08-01

    Over the past several years, current techniques in molecular biology have been used to perform experiments in space, focusing on the nature and effects of space radiation. In the Japanese 'Kibo' facility in the International Space Station (ISS), the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has performed five life science experiments since 2009, and two additional experiments are currently in progress. The first life science experiment in space was the 'Rad Gene' project, which utilized two human cultured lymphoblastoid cell lines containing a mutated P53 : gene (m P53 : ) and a parental wild-type P53 : gene (wt P53 : ) respectively. Four parameters were examined: (i) detecting space radiation-induced DSBs by observing γH2AX foci; (ii) observing P53 : -dependent gene expression during space flight; (iii) observing P53 : -dependent gene expression after space flight; and (iv) observing the adaptive response in the two cell lines containing the mutated and wild type P53 : genes after exposure to space radiation. These observations were completed and have been reported, and this paper is a review of these experiments. In addition, recent new information from space-based experiments involving radiation biology is presented here. These experiments involve human cultured cells, silkworm eggs, mouse embryonic stem cells and mouse eggs in various experiments designed by other principal investigators in the ISS/Kibo. The progress of Japanese science groups involved in these space experiments together with JAXA are also discussed here. The Japanese Society for Biological Sciences in Space (JSBSS), the Utilization Committee of Space Environment Science (UCSES) and the Science Council of Japan (ACJ) have supported these new projects and new experimental facilities in ISS/Kibo. Currently, these organizations are proposing new experiments for the ISS through 2024. PMID:27130692

  1. Progress Toward National Aeronautics Goals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russo, Carlo J.; Sehra, Arun K.

    1999-01-01

    NASA has made definitive progress towards achieving several bold U.S. goals in aeronautics related to air breathing engines. The advanced technologies developed towards these goals span applications from general aviation to large subsonic and supersonic aircraft. The proof of successful technology development is demonstrated through successful technology transfer to U.S. industry and projected fleet impact. Specific examples of progress are discussed that quantifies the achievement towards these goals. In addition, a more detailed vision for NASA aeronautics is defined and key strategic issues are explored which invite international and national debate and involvement especially in reduced environmental impact for subsonic and supersonic aircraft, dramatic new capabilities in general aviation engines, and reduced development cycle time and costs.

  2. Multipath modeling for aeronautical communications.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Painter, J. H.; Gupta, S. C.; Wilson, L. R.

    1973-01-01

    One of the fundamental technical problems in aeronautical digital communications is that of multipath propagation between aircraft and ground terminal. This paper examines in detail a model of the received multipath signal that is useful for application of modern detection and estimation theories. The model treats arbitrary modulation and covers the selective and nonselective cases. The necessarily nonstationary statistics of the received signal are determined from the link geometry and the surface roughness parameters via a Kirchhoff solution.

  3. Canadian aeronautical mobile data trials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedersen, Allister; Pearson, Andrea

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a series of aeronautical mobile data trials conducted on small aircraft (helicopters and fixed wing) utilizing a low-speed store-and-forward mobile data service. The paper outlines the user requirements for aeronautical mobile satellite communications. 'Flight following' and improved wide-area dispatch communications were identified as high priority requirements. A 'proof-of-concept' trial in a Cessna Skymaster aircraft is described. This trial identified certain development work as essential to the introduction of commercial service including antenna development, power supply modifications and doppler software modifications. Other improvements were also proposed. The initial aeronautical mobile data service available for pre-operational (Beta) trials is outlined. Pre-operational field trials commenced in October 1992 and consisted of installations on a Gralen Communications Inc. Cessna 177 and an Aerospatiale Astar 350 series light single engine helicopter. The paper concludes with a discussion of desirable near term mobile data service developments, commercial benefits, current safety benefits and potential future applications for improved safety.

  4. Performance of a Regional Aeronautical Telecommunications Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bretmersky, Steven C.; Ripamonti, Claudio; Konangi, Vijay K.; Kerczewski, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports the findings of the simulation of the ATN (Aeronautical Telecommunications Network) for three typical average-sized U.S. airports and their associated air traffic patterns. The models of the protocols were designed to achieve the same functionality and meet the ATN specifications. The focus of this project is on the subnetwork and routing aspects of the simulation. To maintain continuous communication between the aircrafts and the ground facilities, a model based on mobile IP is used. The results indicate that continuous communication is indeed possible. The network can support two applications of significance in the immediate future FTP and HTTP traffic. Results from this simulation prove the feasibility of development of the ATN concept for AC/ATM (Advanced Communications for Air Traffic Management).

  5. New observational capabilities on atmospheric sciences of the Eastern North Atlantic (ENA) Graciosa island ARM facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitschke, Kim; Ortega, Paul; Azevedo, Eduardo; Miller, Mark

    2016-04-01

    with an extensive set of radiometric measurements and routine radiosonde soundings, a full three-dimensional view of the atmospheric phenomena, some of them poorly understood until now, are freely available to the research community. This presentation, besides showcasing the capabilities of this ARM Facility, aims to promote discussion about the potential for the facilities use in collaborative efforts in support of atmospheric and climatic sciences and in particular how they may relate to European research initiatives. The facility as a designated DOE user facility makes all of its data freely and publicly available. In addition, there may be opportunities for the facility to be used as a deployment platform with instrument accommodation and infrastructure available on request.

  6. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Scientific and Technical Information Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinelli, Thomas E., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Eleven articles discuss informational and educational programs of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Some of the areas discussed include scientific and technical information management, the new Space and Earth Science Information Systems, transfer of technology to other industries, intellectual property issues, and the…

  7. Aeronautics Study Takes Off! Glider Design for Beginners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazaros, Edward J.; Carlson, Katie

    2008-01-01

    Study of aeronautics is an interesting and motivating subject for students and educators alike. The activity described in this article--appropriate for upper elementary or middle school students--provides an excellent introduction to airplane design and the science of aerodynamics. It also gives students good experience applying knowledge from a…

  8. Aeronautics research and technology program and specific objectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Aeronautics research and technology program objectives in fluid and thermal physics, materials and structures, controls and guidance, human factors, multidisciplinary activities, computer science and applications, propulsion, rotorcraft, high speed aircraft, subsonic aircraft, and rotorcraft and high speed aircraft systems technology are addressed.

  9. Aeronautical applications of high-temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turney, George E.; Luidens, Roger W.; Uherka, Kenneth; Hull, John

    1989-01-01

    The successful development of high-temperature superconductors (HTS) could have a major impact on future aeronautical propulsion and aeronautical flight vehicle systems. A preliminary examination of the potential application of HTS for aeronautics indicates that significant benefits may be realized through the development and implementation of these newly discovered materials. Applications of high-temperature superconductors (currently substantiated at 95 K) were envisioned for several classes of aeronautical systems, including subsonic and supersonic transports, hypersonic aircraft, V/STOL aircraft, rotorcraft, and solar, microwave and laser powered aircraft. Introduced and described are the particular applications and potential benefits of high-temperature superconductors as related to aeronautics and/or aeronautical systems.

  10. A Review of Filovirus Work and Facilities at The Defence Science and Technology Laboratory Porton Down

    PubMed Central

    Smither, Sophie J.; Lever, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    Porton Down houses two separate sites capable of conducting high containment research on ACDP (Advisory Committee on Dangerous Pathogens) Hazard Group 4 agents: the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl) and the Health Protection Agency (HPA), and filovirus research has been performed at Porton Down since the first Marburg virus disease outbreak in 1967. All work is conducted within primary containment either within cabinet lines (for in vitro work) or large rigid half-suit isolators (for in vivo work). There are extensive aerobiological facilities at high containment and the use of these facilities will be reported. Research at Dstl is primarily focused on assessing and quantifying the hazard, and testing the efficacy of medical countermeasures against filoviruses. Fundamental research directed to the study and understanding of the infectious and pathogenic nature of the filoviruses, particularly in aerosols, will be reported. PMID:23012627

  11. The NIF: An international high energy density science and inertial fusion user facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, E. I.; Storm, E.

    2013-11-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), a 1.8-MJ/500-TW Nd:Glass laser facility designed to study inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high-energy-density science (HEDS), is operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). A primary goal of NIF is to create the conditions necessary to demonstrate laboratory-scale thermonuclear ignition and burn. NIF experiments in support of indirect-drive ignition began late in FY2009 as part of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), an international effort to achieve fusion ignition in the laboratory. To date, all of the capabilities to conduct implosion experiments are in place with the goal of demonstrating ignition and developing a predictable fusion experimental platform in 2012. The results from experiments completed are encouraging for the near-term achievement of ignition. Capsule implosion experiments at energies up to 1.6 MJ have demonstrated laser energetics, radiation temperatures, and symmetry control that scale to ignition conditions. Of particular importance is the demonstration of peak hohlraum temperatures near 300 eV with overall backscatter less than 15%. Important national security and basic science experiments have also been conducted on NIF. Successful demonstration of ignition and net energy gain on NIF will be a major step towards demonstrating the feasibility of laser-driven Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE). This paper will describe the results achieved so far on the path toward ignition, the beginning of fundamental science experiments and the plans to transition NIF to an international user facility providing access to HEDS and fusion energy researchers around the world.

  12. Simulation of Cascaded Longitudinal-Space-Charge Amplifier at the Fermilab Accelerator Science & Technology (Fast) Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Halavanau, A.; Piot, P.

    2015-12-01

    Cascaded Longitudinal Space Charge Amplifiers (LSCA) have been proposed as a mechanism to generate density modulation over a board spectral range. The scheme has been recently demonstrated in the optical regime and has confirmed the production of broadband optical radiation. In this paper we investigate, via numerical simulations, the performance of a cascaded LSCA beamline at the Fermilab Accelerator Science & Technology (FAST) facility to produce broadband ultraviolet radiation. Our studies are carried out using elegant with included tree-based grid-less space charge algorithm.

  13. Materials Science Clean Room Facility at Tulane University (Final Technical Report)

    SciTech Connect

    Altiero, Nicholas

    2014-10-28

    The project involves conversion of a 3,000 sq. ft. area into a clean room facility for materials science research. It will be accomplished in phases. Phase I will involve preparation of the existing space, acquisition and installation of clean room equipped with a pulsed laser deposition (PLD) processing system, and conversion of ancillary space to facilitate the interface with the clean room. From a capital perspective, Phases II and III will involve the acquisition of additional processing, fabrication, and characterization equipment and capabilities.

  14. CosmoQuest: A Virtual Facility for Learning and Doing Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay, P.; Lehan, C.; Bracey, G.; Gugiucci, N.

    2012-09-01

    CosmoQuest is a new online citizen science project designed to bring to the public the facilities typically enjoyed by professional researchers working in academic environments. Research is enabled through a series of online interfaces that guide individuals through tasks that professional collaborators need completed. Seminars, star parties, and other professional development is conducted through online video conferencing using the Google Hangouts on Air technology. Additional learning materials are maintained online using wiki software, and social interactions and collaboration are facilitated via online forums and social media.

  15. National Institute of Standards and Technology Synchrotron Radiation Facilities for Materials Science

    PubMed Central

    Long, Gabrielle G.; Allen, Andrew J.; Black, David R.; Burdette, Harold E.; Fischer, Daniel A.; Spal, Richard D.; Woicik, Joseph C.

    2001-01-01

    Synchrotron Radiation Facilities, supported by the Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory of the National Institute of Standards and Technology, include beam stations at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory and at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. The emphasis is on materials characterization at the microstructural and at the atomic and molecular levels, where NIST scientists, and researchers from industry, universities and government laboratories perform state-of-the-art x-ray measurements on a broad range of materials. PMID:27500070

  16. Evaluation of a Virtual Citizen Science Facility: A Comprehensive Mixed-Methods Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracey, G.

    2014-07-01

    The CosmoQuest Virtual Citizen Science Facility allows the public to participate in scientific research, learning opportunities, and community activities. Evaluation efforts include an online survey of users' attitudes about and use of the CosmoQuest website and their motivations for participation. Pre/post-participation assessments examine learning of science content. Along with these quantitative assessments we seek a deeper level of understanding through qualitative methods. Formative and summative evaluations use semi-structured interviews and open-ended survey questions. Participant responses are analyzed using an iterative process of open coding, allowing patterns to emerge inductively from the data. Triangulation of data increases the validity of findings. This approach gives a more rigorous look at the motivations, behaviors, and learning of participants, and a more complete and in-depth understanding of project impact.

  17. Developing Open Loop Radio Science Facility for YH-1 Martian Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Jinsong; Jian, Nianchuan; Shi, Xian; Yan, Jianguo; Wang, Mingyuan; Zhang, Sujun; Shang, Kun; Huang, Qian; Wang, Guangli; Qiu, Shi

    The first Chinese martian orbiter, Yinghuo-1, is planned to be launched together with the Rassian Phobos-Grunt sampling return mission next year. Open loop radio tracking technique will be applied for s/c tracking and radio science study. A team from Shanghai Astronomical Observatory of CAS has been involved to develop the open loop radio science techniques. They simulated the OD by considering the VLBI and One-way tracking technique; they are developing the DOR/DOD and one-way tracking system; also, they are developing the s/c to ground occultation facilities to study the Martian atmosphere. Using the data released by PDS (http://pds.jpl.nasa.gov) and other resources, they are learning the experiences of deep space tracking and exploration, step by step.

  18. An aeronautical mobile satellite experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedrey, T. C.; Dessouky, K. I.; Lay, N. E.

    1990-01-01

    The various activities and findings of a NASA/FAA/COMSAT/INMARSAT collaborative aeronautical mobile satellite experiment are detailed. The primary objective of the experiment was to demonstrate and evaluate an advanced digital mobile satellite terminal developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory under the NASA Mobile Satellite Program. The experiment was a significant milestone for NASA/JPL, since it was the first test of the mobile terminal in a true mobile satellite environment. The results were also of interest to the general mobile satellite community because of the advanced nature of the technologies employed in the terminal.

  19. Engaging Scientists with the CosmoQuest Citizen Science Virtual Research Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grier, Jennifer A.; Gay, Pamela L.; Buxner, Sanlyn; Noel-Storr, Jacob; CosmoQuest Team

    2016-10-01

    NASA Science Mission Directorate missions and research return more data than subject matter experts (SMEs – scientists and engineers) can effectively utilize. Citizen scientist volunteers represent a robust pool of energy and talent that SMEs can draw upon to advance projects that require the processing of large quantities of images, and other data. The CosmoQuest Virtual Research Facility has developed roles and pathways to engage SMEs in ways that advance the education of the general public while producing science results publishable in peer-reviewed journals, including through the CosmoQuest Facility Small Grants Program and CosmoAcademy. Our Facility Small Grants Program is open to SMEs to fund them to work with CosmoQuest and engage the public in analysis. Ideal projects have a specific and well-defined need for additional eyes and minds to conduct basic analysis and data collection (such as crater counting, identifying lineaments, etc.) Projects selected will undergo design and implementation as Citizen Science Portals, and citizen scientists will be recruited and trained to complete the project. Users regularly receive feedback on the quality of their data. Data returned will be analyzed by the SME and the CQ Science Team for joint publication in a peer-reviewed journal. SMEs are also invited to consider presenting virtual learning courses in the subjects of their choice in CosmoAcademy. The audience for CosmoAcademy are lifelong-learners and education professionals. Classes are capped at 10, 15, or 20 students. CosmoAcademy can also produce video material to archive seminars long-term. SMEs function as advisors in many other areas of CosmoQuest, including the Educator's Zone (curricular materials for K-12 teachers), Science Fair Projects, and programs that partner to produce material for podcasts and planetaria. Visit the CosmoQuest website at cosmoquest.org to learn more, and to investigate current opportunities to engage with us. CosmoQuest is funded

  20. 14 CFR 61.105 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... log ground training from an authorized instructor or complete a home-study course on the aeronautical... techniques for the airplane and glider category ratings; (12) Aeronautical decision making and judgment;...

  1. Aeronautical record : no. 1 (to June, 1923)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1923-01-01

    "...considerations have prompted us to pay special attention to the development of aeronautical industries and aerial navigation as a commercial enterprise and to publish an analytical review of events in the aeronautical world and of the attendant problems."

  2. NASA's Role in Aeronautics: A Workshop. Volume 2: Military aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    While the National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 makes DOD primarily responsible for military aeronautics, it stipulates a role for NASA in providing direct and indirect support for national defense. The existing role of NASA in support of military aeronautics is working well and is well coordinated. The role needs only to be kept effective and then improved by increasing its responsiveness to changing military requirements and by the selective application of additional people. Funding resources should also be made available to NASA for research. Specific roles that NASA could or should play were examined. It was determined that the most important areas for this support are in basic research, generic technology evolution, and facility support in the fields of aerodynamics, structures and materials, and propulsion.

  3. 75 FR 60484 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Applied Sciences Advisory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-30

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Applied Sciences Advisory Group Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of..., the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Applied...

  4. Aeronautical audio broadcasting via satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tzeng, Forrest F.

    1993-01-01

    A system design for aeronautical audio broadcasting, with C-band uplink and L-band downlink, via Inmarsat space segments is presented. Near-transparent-quality compression of 5-kHz bandwidth audio at 20.5 kbit/s is achieved based on a hybrid technique employing linear predictive modeling and transform-domain residual quantization. Concatenated Reed-Solomon/convolutional codes with quadrature phase shift keying are selected for bandwidth and power efficiency. RF bandwidth at 25 kHz per channel, and a decoded bit error rate at 10(exp -6) with E(sub b)/N(sub o) at 3.75 dB are obtained. An interleaver, scrambler, modem synchronization, and frame format were designed, and frequency-division multiple access was selected over code-division multiple access. A link budget computation based on a worst-case scenario indicates sufficient system power margins. Transponder occupancy analysis for 72 audio channels demonstrates ample remaining capacity to accommodate emerging aeronautical services.

  5. Aeronautics and space report of the President, 1982 activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Achievements of the space program are summerized in the area of communication, Earth resources, environment, space sciences, transportation, aeronautics, and space energy. Space program activities of the various deprtments and agencies of the Federal Government are discussed in relation to the agencies' goals and policies. Records of U.S. and world spacecraft launchings, successful U.S. launches for 1982, U.S. launched applications and scientific satellites and space probes since 1975, U.S. and Soviet manned spaceflights since 1961, data on U.S. space launch vehicles, and budget summaries are provided. The national space policy and the aeronautical research and technology policy statements are included.

  6. 14 CFR 61.105 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Aeronautical knowledge. 61.105 Section 61... Aeronautical knowledge. (a) General. A person who is applying for a private pilot certificate must receive and... knowledge areas of paragraph (b) of this section that apply to the aircraft category and class rating...

  7. 14 CFR 61.105 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Aeronautical knowledge. 61.105 Section 61... Aeronautical knowledge. (a) General. A person who is applying for a private pilot certificate must receive and... knowledge areas of paragraph (b) of this section that apply to the aircraft category and class rating...

  8. 14 CFR 61.105 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Aeronautical knowledge. 61.105 Section 61... Aeronautical knowledge. (a) General. A person who is applying for a private pilot certificate must receive and... knowledge areas of paragraph (b) of this section that apply to the aircraft category and class rating...

  9. Questions & Answers about Aeronautics and Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    Answers to 27 questions about aeronautics, space, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are provided in this pamphlet. Among the topics dealt with in these questions are: costs of the space program; NASA's role in aeronautics; benefits received from the space program; why the United States hasn't developed means of rescuing…

  10. NASA's aeronautics research and technology base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    NASA's research technology base in aeronautics is assessed in terms of: (1) US aeronautical technology needs and requirements in the future; (2) objectives of the aeronautics program; (3) magnitude and scope of the program; and (4) research and technology performed by NASA and other research organizations.

  11. Use of the National Ignition Facility for defense, energy, and basic research science

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, B.G.

    1994-07-15

    On January 15, 1993, the Department of Energy (DOE) approved the Justification for Mission Need (JMN) for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This action (Key Decision Zero, or KD0) commenced the conceptual design for the facility, which has resulted in a recently completed Conceptual Design Report (CDR). The JMN document defined the NIF mission elements to include laboratory fusion ignition and energy gain, weapons physics, and nuclear weapons effects testing research (NWET). NIF has a dual benefit by contributing to inertial fusion energy (IFE), industrial technology development, new basic science areas applying high power lasers, and training young scientists for future stewardship activities. For consideration of the next DOE action, Key Decision One (KD1), all mission elements of the NIF as stated in the JMN are consistent with and important to the US stockpile stewardship program, and are expected to continue to be in the vital interest of the United States for the long term. This document provides further information on the utility of NIF for stockpile stewardship, including support for a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), and specific findings of four national workshops on the NIF utility for weapons physics, NWET, IFE and basic science research. The role of NIF for stockpile stewardship has been refined since a DOE meeting in Albuquerque, NM Feb. 1--2, 1994. The possible compliance of NIF research with anticipated CTBT and NPT limitations was discussed at the DOE Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation in Washington, DC on March 8, 1994.

  12. Conceptual design of a biological specimen holding facility. [Life Science Laboratory for Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, J. K.; Yakut, M. M.

    1976-01-01

    An all-important first step in the development of the Spacelab Life Science Laboratory is the design of the Biological Specimen Holding Facility (BSHF) which will provide accommodation for living specimens for life science research in orbit. As a useful tool in the understanding of physiological and biomedical changes produced in the weightless environment, the BSHF will enable biomedical researchers to conduct in-orbit investigations utilizing techniques that may be impossible to perform on human subjects. The results of a comprehensive study for defining the BSHF, description of its experiment support capabilities, and the planning required for its development are presented. Conceptual designs of the facility, its subsystems and interfaces with the Orbiter and Spacelab are included. Environmental control, life support and data management systems are provided. Interface and support equipment required for specimen transfer, surgical research, and food, water and waste storage is defined. New and optimized concepts are presented for waste collection, feces and urine separation and sampling, environmental control, feeding and watering, lighting, data management and other support subsystems.

  13. The Planning of New Japanese Facilities for Life Science in ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Takeo; Hoson, Takayuki

    Though basic rules and mechanisms of life have been rapidly advanced, in recent years, the most sciences are limited under earth environment. To clarify the universality and the real nature of life, it is necessary to perform the space experiments. We, Japanese Society for Biological Sciences in Space, schedule new five types of up-to-date facilities required for the forefront research in the Kibo Module for utilization during 2015-2020. The project was proposed to the Council of Japan and the utilization Committee of Space Environment Science. We aim (1) further high quality science, (2) widely utilization for various requirements among Japan and foreign scientists. The schedules are 2015-2016, manufacture of them and suitability for space experiments and safety tests; 2016-2018, settlement of the new facilities to ISS; 2018-2023, space experiments. At now stage, we are unable to use space shuttles any more. It is difficult to get the biological samples to the spot of launch. Tests of vibration and shock during launch and landing are required. We recommend the down-road of experimental results from ISS. Now, we schedule new facilities: (1) Plant culture system; culture of various kinds of plants for the cell cycle and the next generation, and space agriculture for long stay in space. (2) Whole-body animal culture system; fertilization, growth, development, movement, life keeping in closed environment and health life in space by many kinds of analysis. (3) Localization and movement of cellular components; gene expression, proteins, chromosome and organelles in the cell with a real time analysis. (4) Collection of biological samples from space and total analysis system; (a) settlement of samples in ISS, space experiments and analysis in space, (b) the collection the samples after space experiments. (5) Exposure area at ISS platform; biological effect and fine physical dosimetry of solar radiations and space radiations under various filters among different radiation

  14. Model research, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, 1915-1958, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roland, A.

    1985-01-01

    Appendices providing comprehensive data on personnel, organization, funding, research programs, and publications of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) are presented. Information concerning NACA-related legislation and research facilities is also included.

  15. National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, M. Catherine

    NASA has requested a $14.3 billion budget for fiscal year 1995, which is $250 million below the $14.5 billion it received in fiscal 1994. NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin said the budget conveys the president's commitment to a strong and vital aeronautics and space program while reflecting today's very real fiscal constraints. No major programs were canceled.“The president's budget plan for NASA is a sound one, with reductions that still preserve a meaningful space program, but this is it. We can't get any closer to the bone,” Goldin warned. In real terms, this 5-year fiscal 1995 budget represents a 30% cut in the last 2 years. “We must hold the line at this level and will work closely with Congress to do so,” Goldin said.

  16. Enabling Extreme Scale Earth Science Applications at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anantharaj, V. G.; Mozdzynski, G.; Hamrud, M.; Deconinck, W.; Smith, L.; Hack, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Oak Ridge Leadership Facility (OLCF), established at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), welcomes investigators from universities, government agencies, national laboratories and industry who are prepared to perform breakthrough research across a broad domain of scientific disciplines, including earth and space sciences. Titan, the OLCF flagship system, is currently listed as #2 in the Top500 list of supercomputers in the world, and the largest available for open science. The computational resources are allocated primarily via the Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE) program, sponsored by the U.S. DOE Office of Science. In 2014, over 2.25 billion core hours on Titan were awarded via INCITE projects., including 14% of the allocation toward earth sciences. The INCITE competition is also open to research scientists based outside the USA. In fact, international research projects account for 12% of the INCITE awards in 2014. The INCITE scientific review panel also includes 20% participation from international experts. Recent accomplishments in earth sciences at OLCF include the world's first continuous simulation of 21,000 years of earth's climate history (2009); and an unprecedented simulation of a magnitude 8 earthquake over 125 sq. miles. One of the ongoing international projects involves scaling the ECMWF Integrated Forecasting System (IFS) model to over 200K cores of Titan. ECMWF is a partner in the EU funded Collaborative Research into Exascale Systemware, Tools and Applications (CRESTA) project. The significance of the research carried out within this project is the demonstration of techniques required to scale current generation Petascale capable simulation codes towards the performance levels required for running on future Exascale systems. One of the techniques pursued by ECMWF is to use Fortran2008 coarrays to overlap computations and communications and

  17. Data management and its role in delivering science at DOE BES user facilities - Past, Present, and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Stephen D.; Herwig, Kenneth W.; Ren, Shelly; Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S.; Jemian, Pete R.; Luitz, Steffen; Salnikov, Andrei A.; Gaponenko, Igor; Proffen, Thomas; Lewis, Paul; Green, Mark L.

    2009-07-01

    The primary mission of user facilities operated by Basic Energy Sciences under the Department of Energy is to produce data for users in support of open science and basic research [1]. We trace back almost 30 years of history across selected user facilities illustrating the evolution of facility data management practices and how these practices have related to performing scientific research. The facilities cover multiple techniques such as X-ray and neutron scattering, imaging and tomography sciences. Over time, detector and data acquisition technologies have dramatically increased the ability to produce prolific volumes of data challenging the traditional paradigm of users taking data home upon completion of their experiments to process and publish their results. During this time, computing capacity has also increased dramatically, though the size of the data has grown significantly faster than the capacity of one's laptop to manage and process this new facility produced data. Trends indicate that this will continue to be the case for yet some time. Thus users face a quandary for how to manage today's data complexity and size as these may exceed the computing resources users have available to themselves. This same quandary can also stifle collaboration and sharing. Realizing this, some facilities are already providing web portal access to data and computing thereby providing users access to resources they need [2]. Portal based computing is now driving researchers to think about how to use the data collected at multiple facilities in an integrated way to perform their research, and also how to collaborate and share data. In the future, inter-facility data management systems will enable next tier cross-instrument-cross facility scientific research fuelled by smart applications residing upon user computer resources. We can learn from the medical imaging community that has been working since the early 1990's to integrate data from across multiple modalities to achieve

  18. NASA's Role in Aeronautics: A Workshop. Volume 3: Transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Segments of the spectrum of research and development activities that clearly must be within the purview of NASA in order for U.S. transport aircraft manufacturing and operating industries to succeed and to continue to make important contributions to the nation's wellbeing were examined. National facilities and expertise; basic research, and the evolution of generic and vehicle class technologies were determined to be the areas in which NASA has an essential role in transport aircraft aeronautics.

  19. Earth and environmental science in the 1980's: Part 1: Environmental data systems, supercomputer facilities and networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Overview descriptions of on-line environmental data systems, supercomputer facilities, and networks are presented. Each description addresses the concepts of content, capability, and user access relevant to the point of view of potential utilization by the Earth and environmental science community. The information on similar systems or facilities is presented in parallel fashion to encourage and facilitate intercomparison. In addition, summary sheets are given for each description, and a summary table precedes each section.

  20. [Progress in development and application of experimental facilities for life sciences on onboard the International Space Station].

    PubMed

    Guo, Shuang-sheng; Fu, Lan; Ai, Wei-dang

    2003-12-01

    The construction of the International Space Station (ISS) will be completed soon, and life sciences studies are important tasks to be carried out onboard. Therefore, various related facilities for life science flight experiments are being developed aimed at diverse objectives, and some of them were completed and passed ground-based simulation experiment or airplane parabolic flight tests, and to be arranged for implementation of spaceflight experiments. This article reviews comprehensively the recent progress in the development of various types of related experimental facilities and the onboard experiments, in the hope that it will provide reference for related fields of research.

  1. Aeronautics and Space Report of the President

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Fiscal Year (FY) 2002 brought advances on many fronts in support of NASA's new vision, announced by Administrator Sean O Keefe on April 12, "to improve life here, to extend life to there, to find life beyond." NASA successfully carried out four Space Shuttle missions, including three to the International Space Station (ISS) and one servicing mission to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). By the end of the fiscal year, humans had occupied the ISS continuously for 2 years. NASA also managed five expendable launch vehicle (ELV) missions and participated in eight international cooperative ELV launches. In the area of space science, two of the Great Observatories, the Hubble Space Telescope and the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, continued to make spectacular observations. The Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Odyssey carried out their mapping missions of the red planet in unprecedented detail. Among other achievements, the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) Shoemaker spacecraft made the first soft landing on an asteroid, and the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) monitored a variety of solar activity, including the largest sunspot observed in 10 years. The education and public outreach program stemming from NASA's space science missions continues to grow. In the area of Earth science, attention focused on completing the first Earth Observing Satellite series. Four spacecraft were successfully launched. The goal is to understand our home planet as a system, as well as how the global environment responds to change. In aerospace technology, NASA conducted studies to improve aviation safety and environmental friendliness, progressed with its Space Launch Initiative Program, and explored a variety of pioneering technologies, including nanotechnology, for their application to aeronautics and aerospace. NASA remained broadly engaged in the international arena and concluded over 60 international cooperative and reimbursable international agreements during FY 2002.

  2. Three Good Reasons for Celebrating at the ESO/ST-ECF Science Archive Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-12-01

    Great Demand for Data from New "Virtual Observatory" Summary Due to a happy coincidence, the ESO/ST-ECF Science Archive Facility is celebrating three different milestones at the same time: * its 10th anniversary since the establishment in 1991 * the 10,000th request for data , and * the signing-up of active user number 2000 . This Archive contains over 8 Terabytes (1 Terabyte = 1 million million bytes) of valuable observational data from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope (HST), the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) and other ESO telescopes . Its success paves the way for the establishment of "Virtual Observatories" from which first-class data can be obtained by astronomers all over the world. This greatly enhances the opportunities for more (young) scientists to participate in front-line research. PR Photo 34/00 : Front-page of a new brochure, describing the ESO/ST-ECF Science Archive Facility. Just 10 years ago, on the 1st of January 1991, the ESO/ST-ECF (European Southern Observatory/Space Telescope-European Coordinating Facility) Science Archive Facility opened. It has since served the astronomical community with gigabyte after gigabyte of high-quality astronomical data from some of the world's leading telescopes. The Archive, which is located in Garching, just outside Munich (Germany), contains data from the 2.4-m NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope , as well as from several ESO telescopes: the four 8.2-m Unit Telescopes of the Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the Paranal Observatory , and the 3.5-m New Technology Telescope (NTT) , the 3.6-m telescope and the MPG/ESO 2.2-m telescope at La Silla. The Archive is a continuously developing project - in terms of amounts of data stored, the number of users and in particular because of the current dramatic development of innovative techniques for data handling and storage. In the year 2000 more than 2 Terabytes (2000 Gigabytes) of data were distributed to users worldwide. The archiving of VLT data has been described in ESO PR

  3. Irreducible error rate in aeronautical satellite channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, F.

    1988-01-01

    The irreducible error rate in aeronautical satellite systems is experimentally investigated. It is shown that the introduction of a delay in the multipath component of a Rician channel increases the channel irreducible error rate. However, since the carrier/multipath ratio is usually large for aeronautical applications, this rise in the irreducible error rate should not be interpreted as a practical limitation of aeronautical satellite communications.

  4. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography. Supplement 421

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP#2000-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles.

  5. Nuclear theory and science of the facility for rare isotope beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balantekin, A. B.; Carlson, J.; Dean, D. J.; Fuller, G. M.; Furnstahl, R. J.; Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Li, Bao-An; Nazarewicz, W.; Nunes, F. M.; Ormand, W. E.; Reddy, S.; Sherrill, B. M.

    2014-03-01

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) will be a world-leading laboratory for the study of nuclear structure, reactions and astrophysics. Experiments with intense beams of rare isotopes produced at FRIB will guide us toward a comprehensive description of nuclei, elucidate the origin of the elements in the cosmos, help provide an understanding of matter in neutron stars and establish the scientific foundation for innovative applications of nuclear science to society. FRIB will be essential for gaining access to key regions of the nuclear chart, where the measured nuclear properties will challenge established concepts, and highlight shortcomings and needed modifications to current theory. Conversely, nuclear theory will play a critical role in providing the intellectual framework for the science at FRIB, and will provide invaluable guidance to FRIB's experimental programs. This review overviews the broad scope of the FRIB theory effort, which reaches beyond the traditional fields of nuclear structure and reactions, and nuclear astrophysics, to explore exciting interdisciplinary boundaries with other areas.

  6. Mobile-ip Aeronautical Network Simulation Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Tran, Diepchi T.

    2001-01-01

    NASA is interested in applying mobile Internet protocol (mobile-ip) technologies to its space and aeronautics programs. In particular, mobile-ip will play a major role in the Advanced Aeronautic Transportation Technology (AATT), the Weather Information Communication (WINCOMM), and the Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS) aeronautics programs. This report presents the results of a simulation study of mobile-ip for an aeronautical network. The study was performed to determine the performance of the transmission control protocol (TCP) in a mobile-ip environment and to gain an understanding of how long delays, handoffs, and noisy channels affect mobile-ip performance.

  7. Science Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Presented are 29 science activities for secondary school science instruction. Topic areas include botany, genetics, biochemistry, anatomy, entomology, molecular structure, spreadsheets, chemistry, mechanics, astronomy, relativity, aeronautics, instrumentation, electrostatics, quantum mechanics, and laboratory interfacing. (CW)

  8. The role of Facilities in Engaging and Informing the Public of EarthScope Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlevoix, D. J.; Taber, J. J.; Berg, M.; Dorr, P. M.; McQuillan, P.; Olds, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    The IRIS and UNAVCO facilities play an important role in support of EarthScope through joint and independent education and outreach activities. These activities are focused on providing data and data products to a wide range of audiences, disseminating EarthScope science results through formal and informal venues, and informing the public of the broader impacts of EarthScope. The facilities are particularly well-suited for sustained engagement of multiple audiences over the decade-long course of EarthScope. One such example of a long-term effort was the Transportable Array student siting program, where over an 8 year period, students from about 55 institutions across the US and Canada conducted site reconnaissance and talked to landowners about EarthScope. Another activity focused on students was the development of a student intern program to support field engineering efforts during the construction of the Plate Boundary Observatory. Other ongoing activities include developing and maintaining relationships with media representatives and annual training of National Parks staff throughout the western U.S. The UNAVCO-IRIS partnership has been particularly valuable for EarthScope-related activities, where UNAVCO and IRIS work closely with the EarthScope National Office (ESNO) to bring EarthScope science to national, regional and local audiences within the EarthScope footprint. Collaborations have ranged across each group's products and services, including: EarthScope-focused teacher workshops, participation in EarthScope interpretive workshops for informal educators (led by ESNO), development of content for the IRIS Active Earth Monitor, preparing PBO-, USArray- and EarthScope-focused materials on topics such as Episodic Tremor and Slip for wider distribution through print, web, and mobile information technologies, and organizing research experiences for undergraduates on EarthScope-related topics. Other collaborations have focused on social media, and the development

  9. Reynolds number influences in aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, Dennis M.; Yip, Long P.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Lin, John C.; Lawing, Pierce L.; Batina, John T.; Hardin, Jay C.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Fenbert, James W.; Domack, Christopher S.

    1993-01-01

    Reynolds number, a measure of the ratio of inertia to viscous forces, is a fundamental similarity parameter for fluid flows and therefore, would be expected to have a major influence in aerodynamics and aeronautics. Reynolds number influences are generally large, but monatomic, for attached laminar (continuum) flow; however, laminar flows are easily separated, inducing even stronger, non-monatomic, Reynolds number sensitivities. Probably the strongest Reynolds number influences occur in connection with transitional flow behavior. Transition can take place over a tremendous Reynolds number range, from the order of 20 x 10(exp 3) for 2-D free shear layers up to the order of 100 x 10(exp 6) for hypersonic boundary layers. This variability in transition behavior is especially important for complex configurations where various vehicle and flow field elements can undergo transition at various Reynolds numbers, causing often surprising changes in aerodynamics characteristics over wide ranges in Reynolds number. This is further compounded by the vast parameterization associated with transition, in that any parameter which influences mean viscous flow development (e.g., pressure gradient, flow curvature, wall temperature, Mach number, sweep, roughness, flow chemistry, shock interactions, etc.), and incident disturbance fields (acoustics, vorticity, particulates, temperature spottiness, even electro static discharges) can alter transition locations to first order. The usual method of dealing with the transition problem is to trip the flow in the generally lower Reynolds number wind tunnel to simulate the flight turbulent behavior. However, this is not wholly satisfactory as it results in incorrectly scaled viscous region thicknesses and cannot be utilized at all for applications such as turbine blades and helicopter rotors, nacelles, leading edge and nose regions, and High Altitude Long Endurance and hypersonic airbreathers where the transitional flow is an innately critical

  10. Space station furnace facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobb, Sharon D.; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    1996-07-01

    The Space Shuttle Furnace Facility (SSFF) is the modular, multi-user scientific instrumentation for conducting materials research in the reduced gravity environment of the International Space Station. The facility is divided into the Core System and two Instrument Racks. The core system provides the common electrical and mechanical support equipment required to operate experiment modules (EMs). The EMs are investigator unique furnaces or apparatus designed to accomplish specific science investigations. Investigations are peer selected every two years from proposals submitted in response to National Aeronautics and Space Administration Research Announcements. The SSFF Core systems are designed to accommodate an envelope of eight types of experiment modules. The first two modules to be developed for the first instrument rack include a high temperature gradient furnace with quench, and a low temperature gradient furnace. A new EM is planned to be developed every two years.

  11. 78 FR 69885 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics... Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces...

  12. 75 FR 41240 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics... Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces...

  13. 76 FR 58843 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics... Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces...

  14. 78 FR 10640 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics... Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces...

  15. 76 FR 183 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics... Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces...

  16. 77 FR 38091 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting. AGENCY: National Aeronautics... Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces...

  17. 75 FR 50782 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics... Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces...

  18. 78 FR 41114 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics... Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces...

  19. 77 FR 61432 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics... Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces...

  20. 76 FR 40753 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics... Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces...

  1. 75 FR 17166 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics... Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces...

  2. 76 FR 16643 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics... Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces...

  3. Aeronautics and Space Report of the President: Fiscal Year 1996 Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Topics considered include: (1) Space launch activities: space shuttle missions; expendable launch vehicles. (2) Space science: astronomy and space physics; solar system exploration. (3) Space flight and technology: life and microgravity sciences; space shuttle technology; reuseable launch vehicles; international space station; energy; safety and mission assurance; commercial development and regulation of space; surveillance. (4) Space communications: communications satellites; space network; ground networks; mission control and data systems. (5) Aeronautical activities: technology developments; air traffic control and navigation; weather-related aeronautical activities; flight safety and security; aviation medicine and human factors. (6) Studies of the planet earth: terrestrial studies and applications: atmospheric studies: oceanographic studies; international aeronautical and space activities; and appendices.

  4. Guidebook to excellence: A directory of federal facilities and other resources for mathematics and science education improvement. [Contains acronym list

    SciTech Connect

    Shipman, T.

    1993-01-01

    The Guidebook to Excellence is a State-by-State directory of Federal facilities and other resources for improving mathematics and science education. This directory, the first of its kind, is being published to assist educators, parents, and students across the country in attaining the National Education Goals, particularly Goal No. 4: By the year 2000, US students will be first in the world in science and mathematics achievement. Some of the larger research facilities in this directory, such as those of NASA, EPA and the Departments of Energy, Commerce, and the Interior, provide a wide range of education programs, and some offer students and teachers hands on experience with state-of-the-art research in world class facilities. Other sites, such as those of the Department of Transportation or Agriculture may be quite small, but can provide assistance in a single field of research or workforce expertise. Also listed are individuals responsible for State or regional coordination of major programs, such as the US Department of Education's Eisenhower Mathematics and Science Education Program, or the National Science Foundation's Statewide Systemic Initiative Program. In addition, each State listing includes facilities or coordinators providing regional assistance from neighboring States.

  5. (abstract) The Evolving Spaceborne Radar Data Support to Earth Science and Operations at the Alaska SAR Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carsey, Frank D.

    1996-01-01

    The Alaska SAR Facility (ASF) has been receiving, processing, archiving, and distributing data for Earth scientists and operations since it began receiving data in 1991. Four radar satellites are now being handled. Recent developments have served to increase the level of services of ASF to the Earth science community considerably. These developments are discussed.

  6. 14 CFR 77.35 - Aeronautical studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... physical and electromagnetic radiation effect the proposal may have on the operation of an air navigation... OBJECTS AFFECTING NAVIGABLE AIRSPACE (Eff. until 1-18-11) Aeronautical Studies of Effect of Proposed..., conducts the aeronautical study of the effect of the proposal upon the operation of air...

  7. 14 CFR 61.97 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Aeronautical knowledge. 61.97 Section 61.97... knowledge. (a) General. A person who applies for a recreational pilot certificate must receive and log... knowledge areas of paragraph (b) of this section that apply to the aircraft category and class rating...

  8. 14 CFR 61.97 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Aeronautical knowledge. 61.97 Section 61.97... knowledge. (a) General. A person who applies for a recreational pilot certificate must receive and log... knowledge areas of paragraph (b) of this section that apply to the aircraft category and class rating...

  9. 14 CFR 61.97 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Aeronautical knowledge. 61.97 Section 61.97... knowledge. (a) General. A person who applies for a recreational pilot certificate must receive and log... knowledge areas of paragraph (b) of this section that apply to the aircraft category and class rating...

  10. 14 CFR 61.97 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Aeronautical knowledge. 61.97 Section 61.97... knowledge. (a) General. A person who applies for a recreational pilot certificate must receive and log... knowledge areas of paragraph (b) of this section that apply to the aircraft category and class rating...

  11. Economic analysis of aeronautical research and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gellman, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    The appropriateness of government intervention in the civilian market for aeronautics research and technology (R&T) is examined. The economic rationale for government intervention is examined. The conclusion is that the institutional role played by NASA in civilian aeronautics R&T markets is economically justified.

  12. Development of the Materials Science Research Facility (MSRF) and Experiment Apparatus for the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, D. A.; Cobb, S. D.; Szofran, F. R.

    2000-01-01

    The Materials Science Research Facility (MSRF) is a modular facility designed to accommodate the current and evolving cadre of peer-reviewed materials science investigations selected to conduct research in the microgravity environment of the International Space Station (ISS). The MSRF concept consists of three Materials Science Research Racks (MSRR-1, MSRR-2, and MSRR-3) which will be developed for phased deployment into the United States Laboratory Module beginning on the third Utilization Flight (UF-3). The facility will house the materials processing apparatus and common subsystems required for operating each device, and will use the ISS Active Rack Isolation System (ARIS). Each MSRR is an autonomous rack and will be comprised of on-orbit replaceable Experiment Modules, Module Inserts, investigation unique apparatus, and/or multi-user generic processing apparatus. The MSRF will be the primary apparatus for satisfying near-term and long-range materials science discipline goals and objectives with each MSRR supporting a wide range of materials science themes in the NASA research program.

  13. The Attached Payload Facility Program: A Family of In-Space Commercial Facilities for Technology, Science and Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avery, Don E.; Kaszubowski, Martin J.; Kearney, Michael E.; Howard, Trevor P.

    1996-01-01

    It is anticipated that as the utilization of space increases in both the government and commercial sec tors the re will be a high degree of interest in materials and coatings research as well as research in space environment definition, deployable structures, multi-functional structures and electronics. The International Space Station (ISS) is an excellent platform for long-term technology development because it provides large areas for external attached payloads, power and data capability, and ready access for experiment exchange and return. An alliance of SPACEHAB, MicroCraft, Inc. and SpaceTec, Inc. has been formed to satisfy this research need through commercial utilization of the capabilities of ISS. The alliance will provide a family of facilities designed to provide low-cost, reliable access to space for experimenters. This service would start as early as 1997 and mature to a fully functional attached facility on ISS by 2001. The alliances facilities are based on early activities by NASA, Langley Research Center (LaRC) to determine the feasibility of a Material Exposure Facility (MEF).

  14. The National Ignition Facility: The Path to Ignition, High Energy Density Science and Inertial Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, E

    2011-03-25

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, CA, is a Nd:Glass laser facility capable of producing 1.8 MJ and 500 TW of ultraviolet light. This world's most energetic laser system is now operational with the goals of achieving thermonuclear burn in the laboratory and exploring the behavior of matter at extreme temperatures and energy densities. By concentrating the energy from its 192 extremely energetic laser beams into a mm{sup 3}-sized target, NIF can produce temperatures above 100 million K, densities of 1,000 g/cm{sup 3}, and pressures 100 billion times atmospheric pressure - conditions that have never been created in a laboratory and emulate those in the interiors of planetary and stellar environments. On September 29, 2010, NIF performed the first integrated ignition experiment which demonstrated the successful coordination of the laser, the cryogenic target system, the array of diagnostics and the infrastructure required for ignition. Many more experiments have been completed since. In light of this strong progress, the U.S. and the international communities are examining the implication of achieving ignition on NIF for inertial fusion energy (IFE). A laser-based IFE power plant will require a repetition rate of 10-20 Hz and a 10% electrical-optical efficiency laser, as well as further advances in large-scale target fabrication, target injection and tracking, and other supporting technologies. These capabilities could lead to a prototype IFE demonstration plant in 10- to 15-years. LLNL, in partnership with other institutions, is developing a Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) baseline design and examining various technology choices for LIFE power plant This paper will describe the unprecedented experimental capabilities of the NIF, the results achieved so far on the path toward ignition, the start of fundamental science experiments and plans to transition NIF to an international user facility

  15. NASA's Role in Aeronautics: A Workshop. Volume 4: General aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A substantially improved flow of new technology is imperative if the general aviation industry is to maintain a strong world position. Although NASA is the most eminently suited entity available to carry out the necessary research and technology development effort because of its facilities, expertise, and endorsement by the aircraft industry, less than 3% of its aeronautical R&T budget is devoted to general aviation aeronautics. It is recommended that (1) a technology program, particularly one that focuses on improving fuel efficienty and safety, be aggressively pursued by NASA; (2) NASA be assigned the role of leading basic research technology effort in general aviation up through technology demonstration; (3) a strategic plan be developed by NASA, in cooperation with the industry, and implemented in time for the 1982 budget cycle; and (4) a NASA R&T budget be allocated for general aviation adequate to support the proposed plan.

  16. NASA Johnson Space Center's Planetary Sample Analysis and Mission Science (PSAMS) Laboratory: A National Facility for Planetary Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draper, D. S.

    2016-01-01

    NASA Johnson Space Center's (JSC's) Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) Division, part of the Exploration Integration and Science Directorate, houses a unique combination of laboratories and other assets for conducting cutting edge planetary research. These facilities have been accessed for decades by outside scientists, most at no cost and on an informal basis. ARES has thus provided substantial leverage to many past and ongoing science projects at the national and international level. Here we propose to formalize that support via an ARES/JSC Plane-tary Sample Analysis and Mission Science Laboratory (PSAMS Lab). We maintain three major research capa-bilities: astromaterial sample analysis, planetary process simulation, and robotic-mission analog research. ARES scientists also support planning for eventual human ex-ploration missions, including astronaut geological training. We outline our facility's capabilities and its potential service to the community at large which, taken together with longstanding ARES experience and expertise in curation and in applied mission science, enable multi-disciplinary planetary research possible at no other institution. Comprehensive campaigns incorporating sample data, experimental constraints, and mission science data can be conducted under one roof.

  17. The Machine Protection System for the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jinyuan; Warner, Arden; Liu, Ning; Neswold, Richard; Carmichael, Linden

    2015-11-15

    The Machine Protection System (MPS) for the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology Facility (FAST) has been implemented and tested. The system receives signals from several subsystems and devices which conveys the relevant status needed to the safely operate the accelerator. Logic decisions are made based on these inputs and some predefined user settings which in turn controls the gate signal to the laser of the photo injector. The inputs of the system have a wide variety of signal types, encoding methods and urgencies for which the system is designed to accommodate. The MPS receives fast shutdown (FSD) signals generated by the beam loss system and inhibits the beam or reduces the beam intensity within a macropulse when the beam losses at several places along the accelerator beam line are higher than acceptable values. TTL or relay contact signals from the vacuum system, toroids, magnet systems etc., are chosen with polarities that ensure safe operation of the accelerator from unintended events such as cable disconnection in the harsh industrial environment of the experimental hall. A RS422 serial communication scheme is used to interface the operation permit generator module and a large number of movable devices each reporting multi-bit status. The system also supports operations at user defined lower beam levels for system conunissioning. The machine protection system is implemented with two commercially available off-the-shelf VMEbus based modules with on board FPGA devices. The system is monitored and controlled via the VMEbus by a single board CPU

  18. ARC: A compact, high-field, disassemblable fusion nuclear science facility and demonstration power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorbom, Brandon; Ball, Justin; Palmer, Timothy; Mangiarotti, Franco; Sierchio, Jennifer; Bonoli, Paul; Kasten, Cale; Sutherland, Derek; Barnard, Harold; Haakonsen, Christian; Goh, Jon; Sung, Choongki; Whyte, Dennis

    2014-10-01

    The Affordable, Robust, Compact (ARC) reactor conceptual design aims to reduce the size, cost, and complexity of a combined Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) and demonstration fusion pilot power plant. ARC is a 270 MWe tokamak reactor with a major radius of 3.3 m, a minor radius of 1.1 m, and an on-axis magnetic field of 9.2 T. ARC has Rare Earth Barium Copper Oxide (REBCO) superconducting toroidal field coils with joints to allow disassembly, allowing for removal and replacement of the vacuum vessel as a single component. Inboard-launched current drive of 25 MW LHRF power and 13.6 MW ICRF power is used to provide a robust, steady state core plasma far from disruptive limits. ARC uses an all-liquid blanket, consisting of low pressure, slowly flowing Fluorine Lithium Beryllium (FLiBe) molten salt. The liquid blanket acts as a working fluid, coolant, and tritium breeder, and minimizes the solid material that can become activated. The large temperature range over which FLiBe is liquid permits blanket operation at 800-900 K with single phase fluid cooling and allows use of a high-efficiency Brayton cycle for electricity production in the secondary coolant loop.

  19. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Undergraduate Education and Research Programs, Facilities, and Information Access

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The titles in this section include: 1) GRIDVIEW: Recent Improvements in Research and Education Software for Exploring Mars Topography; 2) Software and Hardware Upgrades for the University of North Dakota Asteroid and Comet Internet Telescope (ACIT); 3) Web-based Program for Calculating Effects of an Earth Impact; 4) On-Line Education, Web- and Virtual-Classes in an Urban University: A Preliminary Overview; 5) Modelling Planetary Material's Structures: From Quasicrystalline Microstructure to Crystallographic Materials by Use of Mathematica; 6) How We Used NASA Lunar Set in Planetary and Material Science Studies: Textural and Cooling Sequences in Sections of Lava Column from a Thin and a Thick Lava-Flow, from the Moon and Mars with Terrestrial Analogue and Chondrule Textural Comparisons; 7) Classroom Teaching of Space Technology and Simulations by the Husar Rover Model; 8) New Experiments (In Meteorology, Aerosols, Soil Moisture and Ice) on the New Hunveyor Educational Planetary Landers of Universities and Colleges in Hungary; 9) Teaching Planetary GIS by Constructing Its Model for the Test Terrain of the Hunveyor and Husar; 10) Undergraduate Students: An Untapped Resource for Planetary Researchers; 11) Analog Sites in Field Work of Petrology: Rock Assembly Delivered to a Plain by Floods on Earth and Mars; 12) RELAB (Reflectance Experiment Laboratory): A NASA Multiuser Spectroscopy Facility; 13) Full Text Searching and Customization in the NASA ADS Abstract Service.

  20. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography. Supplment 385

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-1998-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract.

  1. Chemical Gas Sensors for Aeronautic and Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Chen, Liang-Yu; Neudeck, Philip G.; Knight, Dak; Liu, Chung-Chiun; Wu, Quing-Hai; Zhou, Huan-Jun

    1997-01-01

    Aeronautic and space applications require the development of chemical sensors with capabilities beyond those of commercially available sensors. Two areas of particular interest are safety monitoring and emission monitoring. In safety monitoring, detection of low concentrations of hydrogen at potentially low temperatures is important while for emission monitoring the detection of nitrogen oxides, hydrogen, hydrocarbons and oxygen is of interest. This paper discusses the needs of aeronautic and space applications and the point-contact sensor technology being developed to address these needs. The development of these sensors is based on progress in two types of technology: (1) Micromachining and microfabrication technology to fabricate miniaturized sensors. (2) The development of high temperature semiconductors, especially silicon carbide. The detection of each type of gas involves its own challenges in the fields of materials science and fabrication technology. The number of dual-use commercial applications of this microfabricated gas sensor technology make this general area of sensor development a field of significant interest.

  2. Chemical Gas Sensors for Aeronautics and Space Applications III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, G. W.; Neudeck, P. G.; Chen, L. Y.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.; Sawayda, M. S.; Jin, Z.; Hammond, J.; Makel, D.; Liu, M.; Rauch, W. A.; Hall, G.

    1999-01-01

    Aeronautic and space applications require the development of chemical sensors with capabilities beyond those of commercially available sensors. Areas of interest include launch vehicle safety monitoring, emission monitoring, and fire detection. This paper discusses the needs of aeronautic and space applications and the point-contact sensor technology being developed to address these needs. The development of these sensors is based on progress in two types of technology: 1) Micromachining and microfabrication technology to fabricate miniaturized sensors. 2) The development of high temperature semiconductors, especially silicon carbide. Sensor development for each application involves its own challenges in the fields of materials science and fabrication technology. The number of dual-use commercial applications of this microfabricated gas sensor technology make this area of sensor development a field of significant interest.

  3. Chemical Gas Sensors for Aeronautic and Space Applications 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, G. W.; Chen, L. Y.; Neudeck, P. G.; Knight, D.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.; Zhou, H. J.; Makel, D.; Liu, M.; Rauch, W. A.

    1998-01-01

    Aeronautic and Space applications require the development of chemical sensors with capabilities beyond those of commercially available sensors. Areas of most interest include launch vehicle safety monitoring emission monitoring and fire detection. This paper discusses the needs of aeronautic and space applications and the point-contact sensor technology being developed to address these needs. The development of these sensor is based on progress two types of technology: 1) Micro-machining and micro-fabrication technology to fabricate miniaturized sensors. 2) The development of high temperature semiconductors, especially silicon carbide. Sensor development for each application involves its own challenges in the fields of materials science and fabrication technology. The number of dual-use commercial applications of this micro-fabricated gas sensor technology make this area of sensor development a field of significant interest.

  4. Chemical Gas Sensors for Aeronautic and Space Applications 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Chen, Liong-Yu; Neudeck, Phil G.; Knight, Dale; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.; Zhou, H. J.; Makel, Darby; Liu, M.; Rauch, W. A.

    1998-01-01

    Aeronautic and space applications require the development of chemical sensors with capabilities beyond those of commercially available sensors. Areas of interest include launch vehicle safety monitoring, emission monitoring, and fire detection. This paper discusses the needs of aeronautic and space applications and the point-contact sensor technology being developed to address these needs. The development of these sensors is based on progress in two types of technology: 1) Micromachining and microfabrication technology to fabricate miniaturized sensors. 2) The development of high temperature semiconductors, especially silicon carbide. Sensor development for each application involves its own challenges in the fields of materials science and fabrication technology. The number of dual-use commercial applications of this microfabricated gas sensor technology make this area of sensor development a field of significant interest.

  5. Progress in aeronautical research and technology applicable to civil air transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bower, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Recent progress in the aeronautical research and technology program being conducted by the United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration is discussed. Emphasis is on computational capability, new testing facilities, drag reduction, turbofan and turboprop propulsion, noise, composite materials, active controls, integrated avionics, cockpit displays, flight management, and operating problems. It is shown that this technology is significantly impacting the efficiency of the new civil air transports. The excitement of emerging research promises even greater benefits to future aircraft developments.

  6. Facilitating Student Involvement in NASA Research: The NASA Space Grant Aeronautics Example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, Brent D.

    1998-01-01

    Many consider NASA programs to be exclusively space-oriented. However, NASA's roots originated in the aeronautical sciences. Recent developments within NASA elevated the declining role of aeronautics back to a position of priority. On a parallel pattern, aeronautics was a priority in the legislation which authorized the National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program. This paper outlines the development of the aeronautics aspect of the National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program, and the resulting student opportunities in research. Results from two aeronautics surveys provide a baseline and direction for further development. A key result of this work is the increase in student research opportunities which now exist in more states and at the national level.

  7. NASA Aeronautics Showcased at Balloon Fiesta

    NASA Video Gallery

    Visitors at the 2010 International Balloon Fiesta in Albuquerque, N.M., got visual stimulation from hundreds of colorful hot-air balloons soaring skyward, but also learned about NASA's aeronautics ...

  8. 14 CFR 61.97 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ground training from an authorized instructor or complete a home-study course on the aeronautical... systems; (10) Stall awareness, spin entry, spins, and spin recovery techniques, if applying for...

  9. NASA Aeronautics: A New Strategic Vision

    NASA Video Gallery

    The aviation landscape is shifting. Emerging global trends are creating challenges that are changing the face of aviation for the next 20-40 years. How is NASA Aeronautics responding? With a new st...

  10. 14 CFR 61.105 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... log ground training from an authorized instructor or complete a home-study course on the aeronautical...; and (ii) How to plan for alternatives if the planned flight cannot be completed or delays...

  11. Costs and Benefits of Advanced Aeronautical Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bobick, J. C.; Denny, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    Programs available from COSMIC used to evaluate economic feasibility of applying advanced aeronautical technology to civil aircraft of future. Programs are composed of three major models: Fleet Accounting Module, Airframe manufacturer Module, and Air Carrier Module.

  12. Astronautics and aeronautics, 1977: A chronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritchie, E. H.

    1986-01-01

    This publication is a chronology of events during the year 1977 in the fields of aeronautical and space research, development, activity, and policy. It includes appendixes, an index, and illustrations. Chronological entries list sources for further inquiry.

  13. TIMED Science With the Space Physics Data Facility's (SPDF) Data and Models Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilitza, D.; McGuire, R. E.; Kovalick, T.; Candey, R. M.; Leckner, H.

    2005-12-01

    NASA's Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) provides access to a large volume of data and models that are of relevance to Ionospheric, Thermospheric and Mesospheric (ITM) physics and to the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) mission in particular. SPDF has developed a number of web systems to facilitate user access to important data and model resources and is making these services available through Web Services (or Application Programming Interfaces, API) directly to applications such as VxOs. The Coordinated Data Analysis web (CDAWeb) provides access to data from most of NASA's currently operating space science satellites and many of the earlier missions covering the full expanse of the Earth-Sun system from mesosphere to heliosphere. CDAWeb lets user plot data using a wide range of parameter display options including mapped images and movies; capabilities also include parameter listings and data downloads in CDF and ASCII format. TIMED data display options, for example, include GUVI airglow intensities and TIDI neutral wind vectors in a transverse Mercator projection that shows simultaneously both poles and the equatorial region. Coupled with CDAWeb's comprehensive coverage of solar wind parameters the TIMED data will provide new insights into the ITM response to solar and magnetic storms. SPDF's SSCWeb interface enables users to plot orbits for the majority of space physics satellites and to query for magnetic field line conjunctions between multiple spacecraft and ground stations and for magnetic region occupancy and thus enables coordinates science investigation between TIMED and CEDAR ground stations. Recently an Interactive 3-D orbit viewer was added to SSCWeb. Access to legacy data from older ITM satellite missions is provided through the ATMOWeb browse and download system enabling the study of solar cycle effects on ITM parameters. SPDF's Modelweb service is the front-end to a unique collection of solar-terrestrial databased

  14. Molecular Environmental Science: An Assessment of Research Accomplishments, Available Synchrotron Radiation Facilities, and Needs

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G

    2004-02-05

    Synchrotron-based techniques are fundamental to research in ''Molecular Environmental Science'' (MES), an emerging field that involves molecular-level studies of chemical and biological processes affecting the speciation, properties, and behavior of contaminants, pollutants, and nutrients in the ecosphere. These techniques enable the study of aqueous solute complexes, poorly crystalline materials, solid-liquid interfaces, mineral-aqueous solution interactions, microbial biofilm-heavy metal interactions, heavy metal-plant interactions, complex material microstructures, and nanomaterials, all of which are important components or processes in the environment. Basic understanding of environmental materials and processes at the molecular scale is essential for risk assessment and management, and reduction of environmental pollutants at field, landscape, and global scales. One of the main purposes of this report is to illustrate the role of synchrotron radiation (SR)-based studies in environmental science and related fields and their impact on environmental problems of importance to society. A major driving force for MES research is the need to characterize, treat, and/or dispose of vast quantities of contaminated materials, including groundwater, sediments, and soils, and to process wastes, at an estimated cost exceeding 150 billion dollars through 2070. A major component of this problem derives from high-level nuclear waste. Other significant components come from mining and industrial wastes, atmospheric pollutants derived from fossil fuel consumption, agricultural pesticides and fertilizers, and the pollution problems associated with animal waste run-off, all of which have major impacts on human health and welfare. Addressing these problems requires the development of new characterization and processing technologies--efforts that require information on the chemical speciation of heavy metals, radionuclides, and xenobiotic organic compounds and their reactions with

  15. Molecular environmental science : an assessment of research accomplishments, available synchrotron radiation facilities, and needs.

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G. E., Jr.; Sutton, S. R.; Bargar, J. R.; Shuh, D. K.; Fenter, P. A.; Kemner, K. M.

    2004-10-20

    Synchrotron-based techniques are fundamental to research in ''Molecular Environmental Science'' (MES), an emerging field that involves molecular-level studies of chemical and biological processes affecting the speciation, properties, and behavior of contaminants, pollutants, and nutrients in the ecosphere. These techniques enable the study of aqueous solute complexes, poorly crystalline materials, solid-liquid interfaces, mineral-aqueous solution interactions, microbial biofilm-heavy metal interactions, heavy metal-plant interactions, complex material microstructures, and nanomaterials, all of which are important components or processes in the environment. Basic understanding of environmental materials and processes at the molecular scale is essential for risk assessment and management, and reduction of environmental pollutants at field, landscape, and global scales. One of the main purposes of this report is to illustrate the role of synchrotron radiation (SR)-based studies in environmental science and related fields and their impact on environmental problems of importance to society. A major driving force for MES research is the need to characterize, treat, and/or dispose of vast quantities of contaminated materials, including groundwater, sediments, and soils, and to process wastes, at an estimated cost exceeding 150 billion dollars through 2070. A major component of this problem derives from high-level nuclear waste. Other significant components come from mining and industrial wastes, atmospheric pollutants derived from fossil fuel consumption, agricultural pesticides and fertilizers, and the pollution problems associated with animal waste run-off, all of which have major impacts on human health and welfare. Addressing these problems requires the development of new characterization and processing technologies--efforts that require information on the chemical speciation of heavy metals, radionuclides, and xenobiotic organic compounds and their reactions with

  16. Microgravity science and applications overview - Research, facility and instrumentation development, Space Station Freedom operations and utilization planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kicza, M. E.

    1990-01-01

    An overview is provided of NASA's Microgravity Science and Applications Program, with emphasis on plans for evolution to the Space Station. The Microgravity Science and Applications Division program consists of two major parts including the ground-based research program and the flight program. Transition to flight experiment status may occur only after the ground-based research and testing demonstrates sufficient technical maturity to assure that scientific objectives can be met in space with a high degree of success. Program strategy calls for a transition to the Space Station Freedom before the end of the century. In this connection, six multi-user facilities are planned to be phased into operation aboard the Space Station over an extended time frame. It is projected that the design of these facilities will evolve based on experience with precursor experiment hardware designed and operated on Skylab and other carriers.

  17. Addendum report to atmospheric science facility pallet-only mode space transportation system payload feasibility study, volume 3, revision A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of accomplishing selected atmospheric science mission using a pallet-only mode was studied. Certain unresolved issues were identified. The first issue was that of assuring that the on-board computer facility was adequate to process scientific data, control subsystems such as instrument pointing, provide mission operational program capability, and accomplish display and control. The second issue evolved from an investigation of the availability of existing substitute instruments that could be used instead of the prime instrumentation where the development tests and schedules are incompatible with the realistic budgets and shuttle vehicle schedules. Some effort was expended on identifying candidate substitute instruments, and the performance, cost, and development schedule trade-offs found during that effort were significant enough to warrant a follow-on investigation. This addendum documents the results of that follow-on effort, as it applies to the Atmospheric Sciences Facility.

  18. Aeronautical engineering: A continuing bibliography with indexes (supplement 280)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This bibliography lists 647 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in June, 1991. Subject coverage includes: aerodynamics, air transportation safety, aircraft communication and navigation, aircraft design and performance, aircraft instrumentation, aircraft propulsion, aircraft stability and control, research facilities, astronautics, chemistry and materials, engineering, geosciences, computer sciences, physics, and social sciences.

  19. Evaluation of CFETR as a Fusion Nuclear Science Facility using multiple system codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, V. S.; Costley, A. E.; Wan, B. N.; Garofalo, A. M.; Leuer, J. A.

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents the results of a multi-system codes benchmarking study of the recently published China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) pre-conceptual design (Wan et al 2014 IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 42 495). Two system codes, General Atomics System Code (GASC) and Tokamak Energy System Code (TESC), using different methodologies to arrive at CFETR performance parameters under the same CFETR constraints show that the correlation between the physics performance and the fusion performance is consistent, and the computed parameters are in good agreement. Optimization of the first wall surface for tritium breeding and the minimization of the machine size are highly compatible. Variations of the plasma currents and profiles lead to changes in the required normalized physics performance, however, they do not significantly affect the optimized size of the machine. GASC and TESC have also been used to explore a lower aspect ratio, larger volume plasma taking advantage of the engineering flexibility in the CFETR design. Assuming the ITER steady-state scenario physics, the larger plasma together with a moderately higher BT and Ip can result in a high gain Qfus ˜ 12, Pfus ˜ 1 GW machine approaching DEMO-like performance. It is concluded that the CFETR baseline mode can meet the minimum goal of the Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) mission and advanced physics will enable it to address comprehensively the outstanding critical technology gaps on the path to a demonstration reactor (DEMO). Before proceeding with CFETR construction steady-state operation has to be demonstrated, further development is needed to solve the divertor heat load issue, and blankets have to be designed with tritium breeding ratio (TBR) >1 as a target.

  20. Civilian Aeronautical Futures - The Responsibly Imaginable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, Dennis M.

    2006-01-01

    Since 1940 Aeronautics has had an immense impact upon Global Human lifestyles and affairs - in both the Civilian and Military arenas. During this period Long distance Train and Ship passenger transport were largely supplanted by Air Travel and Aviation assumed a dominant role in warfare. The early 1940 s to the mid 1970 s was a particularly productive period in terms of Aeronautical Technology. What is interesting is that, since the mid 1970 s, the rate of Aeronautical Technological Progress has been far slower, the basic technology in nearly all of our current Aero Systems dates from the mid 70 s or earlier. This is especially true in terms of Configuration Aerodynamics, Aeronautics appears to have "settled" on the 707, double delta and rotary wing as the approach of choice for Subsonic long haul, supersonic cruise and VTOL respectively. Obviously there have been variants and some niche digression from this/these but in the main Aeronautics, particularly civilian Aeronautics, has become a self-professed "mature", Increasingly "Commodity", Industry. The Industry is far along an existing/deployed technology curve and focused, now for decades, on incremental/evolutionary change - largely Appliers vs. developers of technology. This is, of course, in sharp contrast to the situation in the early-to-later 20th century where Aeronautics was viewed as A Major Technological Engine, much the way IT/Bio/Nano/Energetics/Quantum Technologies are viewed today. A search for Visionary Aeronautical "Futures" papers/projections indicates a decided dearth thereof over the last 20 plus years compared to the previous quarter Century. Aeronautics is part of Aerospace and Aerospace [including Aeronautics] has seen major cutbacks over the last decades. Some numbers for the U.S. Aerospace Industry serve as examples. Order of 600,000 jobs lost, with some 180,000 more on the block over the next 10 years. Approximately 25% of the Aerospace workforce is eligible to retire and the average

  1. Educational Programs and Facilities in Nuclear Science and Engineering. Fifth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    This publication contains detailed descriptions of nuclear programs and facilities of 182 four-year educational institutions. Instead of chapters, the contents are presented in five tables. Table I presents the degrees, graduate appointments, special facilities and programs of the institutions. The institutions are arranged in alphabetical order…

  2. Fusion nuclear science facilities and pilot plants based on the spherical tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menard, J. E.; Brown, T.; El-Guebaly, L.; Boyer, M.; Canik, J.; Colling, B.; Raman, R.; Wang, Z.; Zhai, Y.; Buxton, P.; Covele, B.; D'Angelo, C.; Davis, A.; Gerhardt, S.; Gryaznevich, M.; Harb, M.; Hender, T. C.; Kaye, S.; Kingham, D.; Kotschenreuther, M.; Mahajan, S.; Maingi, R.; Marriott, E.; Meier, E. T.; Mynsberge, L.; Neumeyer, C.; Ono, M.; Park, J.-K.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Valanju, P.; Woolley, R.

    2016-10-01

    A fusion nuclear science facility (FNSF) could play an important role in the development of fusion energy by providing the nuclear environment needed to develop fusion materials and components. The spherical torus/tokamak (ST) is a leading candidate for an FNSF due to its potentially high neutron wall loading and modular configuration. A key consideration for the choice of FNSF configuration is the range of achievable missions as a function of device size. Possible missions include: providing high neutron wall loading and fluence, demonstrating tritium self-sufficiency, and demonstrating electrical self-sufficiency. All of these missions must also be compatible with a viable divertor, first-wall, and blanket solution. ST-FNSF configurations have been developed simultaneously incorporating for the first time: (1) a blanket system capable of tritium breeding ratio TBR  ≈  1, (2) a poloidal field coil set supporting high elongation and triangularity for a range of internal inductance and normalized beta values consistent with NSTX/NSTX-U previous/planned operation, (3) a long-legged divertor analogous to the MAST-U divertor which substantially reduces projected peak divertor heat-flux and has all outboard poloidal field coils outside the vacuum chamber and superconducting to reduce power consumption, and (4) a vertical maintenance scheme in which blanket structures and the centerstack can be removed independently. Progress in these ST-FNSF missions versus configuration studies including dependence on plasma major radius R 0 for a range 1 m-2.2 m are described. In particular, it is found the threshold major radius for TBR  =  1 is {{R}0}≥slant 1.7 m, and a smaller R 0  =  1 m ST device has TBR  ≈  0.9 which is below unity but substantially reduces T consumption relative to not breeding. Calculations of neutral beam heating and current drive for non-inductive ramp-up and sustainment are described. An A  =  2, R 0

  3. Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site: Field-Scale Test Facility for Addressing Fundamental Questions of Environmental Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrash, W.; Routh, P. S.

    2006-12-01

    The Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site (BHRS) is a research wellfield or field-scale test facility developed in a shallow, coarse, fluvial aquifer with the objectives of supporting (a) development of cost-effective, non- invasive methods for quantitative characterization and imaging methods in heterogeneous aquifers using hydrologic and geophysical techniques; (b) examination of fundamental relationships and processes at multiple scales; (c) testing theories and models for groundwater flow and solute transport; and (d) educating and training the next generation of professionals in multidisciplinary subsurface science and engineering. The design of the wells and the wellfield provide for a wide range of single-well, cross-hole, multiwell and multilevel hydrologic, geophysical, and combined hydrologic-geophysical experiments. Efforts have been focused largely on (a) establishing the 3D distributions of geologic, hydrologic, and geophysical parameters which can then be used as the basis for testing methods to jointly invert hard and soft data to return the "known" 3D K distribution and (b) developing subsurface measurement and imaging methods including static and time-lapse tomographic imaging methods. From this work we have developed a good understanding of the hydrostratigraphic framework of the BHRS as a hierarchical system which includes layers and lenses; this framework is recognized with geologic, hydrologic, radar, seismic, and EM methods and tracer tests. Work to date has been conducted by Boise State University with some collaboration and exchange with researchers and students from other institutions. At this point the BHRS is functioning well as a field-scale control volume and test cell in a multiscale heterogeneous aquifer so there is an opportunity to increase the range of both collaborative participation and research activities at the BHRS. In this regard, opportunities exist to investigate and monitor process and property variation in time and space

  4. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. The NASA CASI price code table, addresses of organizations, and document availability information are included before the abstract section. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  5. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-1999-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. The NASA CASI price code table, addresses of organizations, and document availability information are included before the abstract section. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  6. Emerging Options and Opportunities in Civilian Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, Dennis M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses the major problems/issues with civilian aeronautics going forward, the contextual ongoing technology revolutions, the several emerging civilian aeronautical "Big Ideas" and associated enabling technological approaches. The ongoing IT Revolution is increasingly providing, as 5 senses virtual presence/reality becomes available, along with Nano/Molecular Manufacturing, virtual alternatives to Physical transportation for both people and goods. Paper examines the potential options available to aeronautics to maintain and perhaps grow "market share" in the context of this evolving competition. Many of these concepts are not new, but the emerging technology landscape is enhancing their viability and marketability. The concepts vary from the "interesting" to the truly revolutionary and all require considerable research. Paper considers the speed range from personal/general aviation to supersonic transports and technologies from energetics to fabrication.

  7. Human Factors in Aeronautics at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mogford, Richard

    2016-01-01

    This is a briefing to a regularly meeting DoD group called the Human Systems Community of Interest: Mission Effectiveness. I was asked to address human factors in aeronautics at NASA. (Exploration (space) human factors has apparently already been covered.) The briefing describes human factors organizations at NASA Ames and Langley. It then summarizes some aeronautics tasks that involve the application of human factors in the development of specific tools and capabilities. The tasks covered include aircrew checklists, dispatch operations, Playbook, Dynamic Weather Routes, Traffic Aware Strategic Aircrew Requests, and Airplane State Awareness and Prediction Technologies. I mention that most of our aeronautics work involves human factors as embedded in development tasks rather than basic research.

  8. Inmarsat aeronautical mobile satellite system: Internetworking issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sengupta, Jay R.

    1990-01-01

    The Inmarsat Aeronautical Mobile Satellite System (AMSS) provides air-ground and air-air communications services to aero-mobile users on a global basis. Communicating parties may be connected either directly, or more commonly, via interconnecting networks to the Inmarsat AMSS, in order to construct end-to-end communications circuits. The aircraft earth station (AES) and the aeronautical ground earth station (GES) are the points of interconnection of the Inmarsat AMSS to users, as well as to interconnecting networks. This paper reviews the internetworking aspects of the Inmarsat AMSS, by introducing the Inmarsat AMSS network architecture and services concepts and then discussing the internetwork address/numbering and routing techniques.

  9. Wireless Sensor Applications in Extreme Aeronautical Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William C.; Atkinson, Gary M.

    2013-01-01

    NASA aeronautical programs require rigorous ground and flight testing. Many of the testing environments can be extremely harsh. These environments include cryogenic temperatures and high temperatures (greater than 1500 C). Temperature, pressure, vibration, ionizing radiation, and chemical exposure may all be part of the harsh environment found in testing. This paper presents a survey of research opportunities for universities and industry to develop new wireless sensors that address anticipated structural health monitoring (SHM) and testing needs for aeronautical vehicles. Potential applications of passive wireless sensors for ground testing and high altitude aircraft operations are presented. Some of the challenges and issues of the technology are also presented.

  10. Insert Concepts for the Material Science Research Rack (MSRR-1) of the Material Science Research Facility (MSRF) on the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouch, Myscha; Carswell, Bill; Farmer, Jeff; Rose, Fred; Tidwell, Paul

    2000-01-01

    The Material Science Research Rack I (MSRR-1) of the Material Science Research Facility (MSRF) contains an Experiment Module (EM) being developed collaboratively by NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA). This NASA/ESA EM will accommodate several different removable and replaceable Module Inserts (MIs) which are installed on orbit NASA's planned inserts include the Quench Module Insert (QMI) and the Diffusion Module Insert (DMI). The QMI is a high-gradient Bridgman-type vacuum furnace with quench capabilities used for experiments on directional solidification of metal alloys. The DMI is a vacuum Bridgman-Stockbarger-type furnace for experiments on Fickian and Soret diffusion in liquids. This paper discusses specific design features and performance capabilities of each insert. The paper also presents current prototype QMI hardware analysis and testing activities and selected results.

  11. 77 FR 6824 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and... Committee Act, Public Law 92-462, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration...

  12. 78 FR 41115 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and... Committee Act, Public Law 92-462, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration...

  13. 78 FR 67202 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and... Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration...

  14. Earth Systems Questions in Experimental Climate Change Science: Pressing Questions and Necessary Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Osmond, B.

    2002-05-20

    Sixty-four scientists from universities, national laboratories, and other research institutions worldwide met to evaluate the feasibility and potential of the Biosphere2 Laboratory (B2L) as an inclusive multi-user scientific facility (i.e., a facility open to researchers from all institutions, according to agreed principles of access) for earth system studies and engineering research, education, and training relevant to the mission of the United States Department of Energy (DOE).

  15. Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF): Science working group report. [space shuttle payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) mission concept is examined from a scientific viewpoint. A brief description of the development of X-ray astronomy and a summary description of AXAF, the scientific objectives of the facility, a description of representative scientific instruments, requirements for X-ray ground testing, and a summary of studies related to spacecraft and support subsystems, are included.

  16. Academic Research Equipment in Computer Science, Central Computer Facilities and Engineering: 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westat, Inc., Rockville, MD.

    This monograph is one in a series of analytical reports presenting findings from the National Science Foundation's 1989-90 National Survey of Academic Research Instruments and Instrumentation Needs. It describes recent national trends in academic research equipment and equipment needs in the fields of computer science and engineering. It also…

  17. 14 CFR 61.185 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Flight Instructors With a Sport Pilot Rating § 61.185 Aeronautical knowledge. (a) A person who is applying for a flight instructor certificate must receive and log ground training from an authorized... testing; (iv) Course development; (v) Lesson planning; and (vi) Classroom training techniques. (2)...

  18. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with indexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    This bibliography lists 426 reports, articles and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in August 1984. Reports are cited in the area of Aeronautical Engineering. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing operation and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment and systems.

  19. Developing a global aeronautical satellite system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dement, Donald K.

    1988-01-01

    Arinc, an airline industry-owned and operated company in the United States, has taken steps toward establishing a global aeronautical satellite communications system. Plans call for initiation of a thin-route data operation in 1989, upgrading to establish voice communications via shared spot-beam transponders carried on other satellites, and deploying a worldwide network using dedicated satellites by 1994.

  20. Astronautics and aeronautics, 1974: A chronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brun, N. L.

    1977-01-01

    The 14th volume in the NASA series of day-by-day records of aeronautical and space events has somewhat narrowed its scope and selectivity in its brief accounts from immediately available, open sources. This year the emphasis is even more directly focused on concrete air and space activities. The text continues to reflect some events in other agencies and countries.

  1. Bibliography of Aeronautics, 1920-1921

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockett, Paul

    1925-01-01

    This work covers the literatme published from January 1, 1920, to December 31, 1921, and continues the work of the Smithsonian Institution issued as Volume 55 of the Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections, which covered the material published prior to June 30, 1909, and the work of Lhe National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics as published in the Bibliography of Aeronautics for the years 1909 to 1916 and 1917 to 1919. As in the Smithsonian volume and in the Bibliography of Aeronautics for the years 1909 to 1916 and 1917 to 1919, citations of the publications of all nations have been included in the languages in which these publications originally appeared. The arrangement is in dictionary form with author and subject entry and one alphabetical arrangement. Detail in the matter of subject reference has been omitted on account of the cost of presentation, but an attempt has been made to give sufficient cross reference for research in special lines. The National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics will next present a bibliography for the year 1922.

  2. The history of aeronautical medicine in Venezuela

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iriarte, D. R.

    1986-01-01

    The Aerial Medical Service of the Ministry of Transportation and Communications of Venezuela was created on June 1949, and later became the Department of Aeronautical Medicine. Its functions include the medical examinations of future pilots, navigators and flight engineers. The importance of good mental and physical health in all flight and ground personnel to ensure the safety of air travel is discussed.

  3. Experiment In Aeronautical-Mobile/Satellite Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedrey, Thomas C.; Lay, Norman E.; Dessouky, Khaled

    1992-01-01

    Report describes study of performance of digital mobile/satellite communication terminals of advanced design intended for use in ground stations and airplanes in aeronautical-mobile service. Study was collaboration of NASA, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Communications Satellite Corp. (COMSAT), and International Maritime Satellite System (INMARSAT).

  4. 14 CFR 61.185 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Flight Instructors With a Sport Pilot Rating § 61.185 Aeronautical knowledge. (a) A person who is applying for a flight instructor certificate must receive and log ground training from an authorized... testing; (iv) Course development; (v) Lesson planning; and (vi) Classroom training techniques. (2)...

  5. 14 CFR 61.185 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Flight Instructors With a Sport Pilot Rating § 61.185 Aeronautical knowledge. (a) A person who is applying for a flight instructor certificate must receive and log ground training from an authorized... testing; (iv) Course development; (v) Lesson planning; and (vi) Classroom training techniques. (2)...

  6. 14 CFR 61.185 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Flight Instructors With a Sport Pilot Rating § 61.185 Aeronautical knowledge. (a) A person who is applying for a flight instructor certificate must receive and log ground training from an authorized... testing; (iv) Course development; (v) Lesson planning; and (vi) Classroom training techniques. (2)...

  7. Exploring Aeronautics and Space Technology. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buck, Sue; And Others

    This curriculum guide contains six units of instruction for an introduction to the technology systems in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Designed to be used either as a stand-alone publication or to be infused into the instruction and activities of an existing technology education program, this publication describes the…

  8. Aeronautical engineering. A continuing bibliography with indexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    This bibliography lists 326 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in January 1982. Topics on aeronautical engineering and aerodynamics such as flight control systems, avionics, computer programs, computational fluid dynamics and composite structures are covered.

  9. Astronautics and aeronautics, 1976. A chronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritchie, E. H.

    1984-01-01

    A chronology of events concerning astronautics and aeronautics for the year 1976 is presented. Some of the many and varied topics include the aerospace industry, planetary exploration, space transportation system, defense department programs, politics, and aerospace medicine. The entries are organized by the month and presented in a news release format.

  10. Astronautics and aeronautics, 1978: A chronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janson, Bette R.

    1986-01-01

    This is the 18th in a series of annual chronologies of significant events in the fields of astronautics and aeronautics. Events covered are international as well as national and political as well as scientific and technical. This series is a reference work for historians, NASA personnel, government agencies, congressional staffs, and the media.

  11. Astronautics and aeronautics, 1985: A chronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janson, Bette R.

    1988-01-01

    This book is part of a series of annual chronologies of significant events in the fields of astronautics and aeronautics. Events covered are international as well as national, in political as well as scientific and technical areas. This series is an important reference work used by historians, NASA personnel, government agencies, and congressional staffs, as well as the media.

  12. Space education in the context of U.S. government multiagency efforts in science and mathematics education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finarelli, Margaret G.; Brown, Robert W.; Owens, Frank C.

    1992-01-01

    The educational activities of NASA which is one of 16 agencies on the Federal Coordinating Council for Science, Engineering and Technology is discussed. NASA's education mission is to utilize its unique facilities and its specialized workforce to conduct and to leverage externally conducted science, mathematics, and technology education programs and activities. These efforts aimed at meeting the national education goals should help to preserve U.S. leadership in aeronautics, space science, and technology.

  13. 14 CFR 1253.410 - Comparable facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Comparable facilities. 1253.410 Section 1253.410 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE...

  14. 14 CFR 1253.410 - Comparable facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Comparable facilities. 1253.410 Section 1253.410 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE...

  15. 14 CFR 1253.410 - Comparable facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Comparable facilities. 1253.410 Section 1253.410 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination...

  16. Laboratories for the 21st Century: Case Studies; National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Science and Technology Facility, Golden, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2007-03-01

    This publication is one in series of case studies for "Laboratories for the 21st Century," a joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program. It is intended for those who plan to design and construct public and private-sector laboratory buildings. This case study describes the Science and Technology Facility, a new laboratory at NREL that incorporated energy-efficient and sustainable design features including underfloor air distribution in offices, daylighting, and process cooling.

  17. Modeling of the charge-state separation at ITEP experimental facility for material science based on a Bernas ion source.

    PubMed

    Barminova, H Y; Saratovskyh, M S

    2016-02-01

    The experiment automation system is supposed to be developed for experimental facility for material science at ITEP, based on a Bernas ion source. The program CAMFT is assumed to be involved into the program of the experiment automation. CAMFT is developed to simulate the intense charged particle bunch motion in the external magnetic fields with arbitrary geometry by means of the accurate solution of the particle motion equation. Program allows the consideration of the bunch intensity up to 10(10) ppb. Preliminary calculations are performed at ITEP supercomputer. The results of the simulation of the beam pre-acceleration and following turn in magnetic field are presented for different initial conditions.

  18. Facilities Planning for the Neuroscience Curriculum at a Primarily Undergraduate Institution: St. Olaf College’s Regents Hall of Natural and Mathematical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Gary M.; Van Wylen, David G.L.

    2009-01-01

    Planning for new science facilities at your institution is an exciting, challenging, and rewarding endeavor. Perhaps most significantly, it also embodies a rare opportunity to provide new infrastructure to support a programmatic vision for the future. Here, we describe St. Olaf’s new Regents Hall of Natural and Mathematical Sciences, beginning with an outline of the planning/design process, then an overview of the features of the building - with particular regard to the Neuroscience Program facilities - and finally a discussion of lessons learned. We hope our experiences may benefit those engaged in the facilities planning process at their own institutions. PMID:23493647

  19. NASA's Role in Aeronautics: A Workshop. Volume I--Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Assembly of Engineering.

    The central task of the workshop summarized in this report was to examine the relationship of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) aeronautical research capabilities to the state of U.S. aviation and to make recommendations about NASA's future roles in aeronautics. Topics include NASA's role in: (1) aeronautics research and…

  20. 14 CFR 1204.1403 - Available airport facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Available airport facilities. 1204.1403 Section 1204.1403 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION ADMINISTRATIVE... having an airfield. The airport facilities available are: (a) Shuttle Landing Facility—(1)...

  1. Current issues in the design of academic health sciences libraries: findings from three recent facility projects*

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Patricia P.

    2003-01-01

    Planning a new health sciences library at the beginning of the twenty-first century is a tremendous challenge. Technology has radically changed the way libraries function in an academic environment and the services they provide. Some individuals question whether the library as place will continue to exist as information becomes increasingly available electronically. To understand how libraries resolve programming and building design issues, visits were made to three academic health sciences libraries that have had significant renovation or completed new construction. The information gathered will be valuable for planning a new library for the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center and may assist other health sciences librarians as they plan future library buildings. PMID:12883559

  2. Current issues in the design of academic health sciences libraries: findings from three recent facility projects.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Patricia P

    2003-07-01

    Planning a new health sciences library at the beginning of the twenty-first century is a tremendous challenge. Technology has radically changed the way libraries function in an academic environment and the services they provide. Some individuals question whether the library as place will continue to exist as information becomes increasingly available electronically. To understand how libraries resolve programming and building design issues, visits were made to three academic health sciences libraries that have had significant renovation or completed new construction. The information gathered will be valuable for planning a new library for the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center and may assist other health sciences librarians as they plan future library buildings.

  3. James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) Cryogenic Component Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, Edward A.

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the design, construction, and operation of a cryogenic chamber, and its use in testing the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST).

  4. Information Systems for NASA's Aeronautics and Space Enterprises

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutler, Paul

    1998-01-01

    effort in pursuit of revolutionary, IT-based approaches to satisfying NASA's aeronautics and space requirements. The objective of the effort is to incorporate information technologies within each of the Agency's four Enterprises, i.e., Aeronautics and Space Transportation Technology, Earth, Science, Human Exploration and Development of Space and Space Sciences. The end results of these efforts for Enterprise programs and projects should be reduced cost, enhanced mission capability and expedited mission completion.

  5. 76 FR 41647 - Airworthiness Directives; Lockheed Martin Corporation/Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company Model...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ... of a certain other publication listed in this AD as of November 3, 2008 (73 FR 56464, dated September... Corporation/Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company, Airworthiness Office, Dept. 6A0M, Zone 0252, Column P-58, 86... person at the Docket Management Facility between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except...

  6. The centrifuge facility - A life sciences research laboratory for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, Charles A.; Johnson, Catherine C.; Hargens, Alan R.

    1991-01-01

    The paper describes the centrifugal facility that is presently being developed by NASA for studies aboard the Space Station Freedom on the role of gravity, or its absence, at varying intensities for varying periods of time and with multiple model systems. Special attention is given to the design of the centrifuge system, the habitats designed to hold plants and animals, the glovebox system designed for experimental manipulations of the specimens, and the service unit. Studies planned for the facility will include experiments in the following disciplines: cell and developmental biology, plant biology, regulatory physiology, musculoskeletal physiology, behavior and performance, neurosciences, cardiopulmonary physiology, and environmental health and radiation.

  7. The centrifuge facility - A life sciences research laboratory for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Charles A.; Johnson, Catherine C.; Hargens, Alan R.

    1991-02-01

    The paper describes the centrifugal facility that is presently being developed by NASA for studies aboard the Space Station Freedom on the role of gravity, or its absence, at varying intensities for varying periods of time and with multiple model systems. Special attention is given to the design of the centrifuge system, the habitats designed to hold plants and animals, the glovebox system designed for experimental manipulations of the specimens, and the service unit. Studies planned for the facility will include experiments in the following disciplines: cell and developmental biology, plant biology, regulatory physiology, musculoskeletal physiology, behavior and performance, neurosciences, cardiopulmonary physiology, and environmental health and radiation.

  8. A new glovebox—surface science facility for the study of plutonium surface chemistry at AWE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piper, T. J.; Shaw, D. S.; Roussel, P.; Geeson, D. A.

    2000-07-01

    In order to simulate production processes and in-service conditions, an extensive array of non-standard sample preparation facilities has been retrofitted to the base system. All of these preparation techniques can be used in association with the most toxic and hazardous gaseous environments encountered during the manufacture and service life of a modern weapon system.

  9. Aeronautic Instruments. Section II : Altitude Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mears, A H; Henrickson, H B; Brombacher, W G

    1923-01-01

    This report is Section two of a series of reports on aeronautic instruments (Technical Report nos. 125 to 132, inclusive). This section discusses briefly barometric altitude determinations, and describes in detail the principal types of altimeters and barographs used in aeronautics during the recent war. This is followed by a discussion of performance requirements for such instruments and an account of the methods of testing developed by the Bureau of Standards. The report concludes with a brief account of the results of recent investigations. For accurate measurements of altitude, reference must also be made to thermometer readings of atmospheric temperature, since the altitude is not fixed by atmospheric pressure alone. This matter is discussed in connection with barometric altitude determination.

  10. Future Aeronautical Communication Infrastructure Technology Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Tricia; Jin, Jenny; Bergerm Jason; Henriksen, Steven

    2008-01-01

    This National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Contractor Report summarizes and documents the work performed to investigate technologies that could support long-term aeronautical mobile communications operating concepts for air traffic management (ATM) in the timeframe of 2020 and beyond, and includes the associated findings and recommendations made by ITT Corporation and NASA Glenn Research Center to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The work was completed as the final phase of a multiyear NASA contract in support of the Future Communication Study (FCS), a cooperative research and development program of the United States FAA, NASA, and EUROCONTROL. This final report focuses on an assessment of final five candidate technologies, and also provides an overview of the entire technology assessment process, including final recommendations.

  11. World-wide aeronautical satellite communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Peter; Smith, Keith

    1988-01-01

    INMARSAT decided to expand the spectrum covered by its new generation of satellites, INMARSAT-2, to include 1 MHz (subsequently increased to 3 MHz) of the spectrum designed for aeronautical use. It began a design study that led to the specifications for the system that is now being implemented. Subsequently, INMARSAT awarded contracts for the design of avionics and high gain antennas to a number of manufactures, while several of the signatories that provide ground equipment for communicating with the INMARSAT satellites are modifying their earth stations to work with the avionic equipment. As a resullt of these activities, a world-wide aeronautical satellite system supporting both voice and data will become operational in 1989.

  12. The history and importance of aeronautic dentistry.

    PubMed

    Rai, Balwant; Kaur, Jasdeep

    2011-06-01

    Current projected missions to Mars will require 18 to 24 months of exposure to microgravity conditions, which might have serious effects on human physiology, including that of the oral cavity. Very few studies have been published on the effect of microgravity on the oral cavity, although it has been reported that microgravity increases the prevalence of periodontitis, dental caries, bone loss and fracture in the jaw bone, pain and numbness in teeth and oral cavity tissue, salivary duct stones, and oral cancer. Aeronautic dentistry is a new field, so further study of the effects of microgravity are required. In this article, we review the role of aeronautic dentistry in space missions and offer our recommendations for the future growth of this field.

  13. European Science Notes Information Bulletin: Reports on Current European/ Middle Eastern Science. Directory of European Research Facilities for the Condensed Matter and Materials Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Dean L.; Orendorf, Connie R.

    1990-07-01

    The purpose of this directory is to provide research investigators with information on specialized or unique facilities in Europe that could be useful in their research. The basic information from each laboratory include a description of: special or unique instrumentation; typical experiments, calculations, or data searches suited to the facility; description of the modes for carrying out research including requirements for access, funding requirements, scheduling policies; and the name or title, address, and telephone number of a person to contact for further information. The solicited laboratories provided the information in this guide on a voluntary basis.

  14. Smart Aeronautical Chart Management System Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakdil, M. E.; Celik, R. N.; Kaya, Ö.; Konak, Y. C.; Guney, C.

    2015-10-01

    Civil aviation is developing rapidly, and the number of domestic and international operations is increasing exponentially every year than the previous one. Airline companies with increased air traffic and the number of passengers increase the demand of new aircrafts. An aircraft needs not only fuel but also pilot and aeronautical information (charts, digital navigation information, flight plan, and etc.) to perform flight operation. One of the most important components in aeronautical information is the terminal chart. Authorized institution in every state is responsible to publish their terminal charts for certain periods. Although these charts are produced in accordance with ICAO's Annex 4 and Annex 15, cartographic representation and page layout differs in each state's publication. This situation makes difficult to read them by pilots. In this paper, standard instrument departure (SID) charts are analysed to produce by use of cutting-edge and competitive technologies instead of classical computer-aided drawing and vector based graphic applications that are currently used by main chart producers. The goal is to design efficient and commercial chart management system that is able to produce aeronautical charts with same cartographic representation for all states.

  15. GeoSoilEnviroCARS: A National User Facility for Synchrotron Radiation Research in GeoScience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivers, M. L.; Sutton, S. R.; Prakapenka, V.; Wang, Y.; Newville, M.; Eng, P.; Dera, P. K.

    2009-12-01

    GeoSoilEnviroCARS (GSECARS) is a national user facility for geoscience research at Sector 13 of the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. GSECARS provides the scientific community with access to high-brightness x-rays and supports a wide range of experimental techniques. The operation of the facility is funded by the NSF Earth Sciences Facilities and Instrumentation Program, and by the Department of Energy Geosciences Program. GSECARS is managed by the Consortium for Advanced Radiation Sources (CARS) at the University of Chicago, and provides access to resources for earth science research which no single university or other institution could provide. By operating beamlines that are specialized for earth science research, we are able to provide staff who understand and participate in the research being conducted, which is critical for productivity. GSECARS began operations in 1996, and currently operates 4 experimental stations, two on the bending magnet beamline and two on the undulator beamline. The two bending magnet stations operate independently and simultaneously, while the two undulator stations currently share the beam time. (An upgrade proposal has recently been funded by NSF, DOE and NASA to allow the undulator stations to also operate independently and simultaneously). The experimental techniques provided at the facility include: - Diamond Anvil Cell: Monochromatic diffraction and spectroscopy. Online laser heating is available on the undulator beamline, and external heating is available on the bending magnet beamline. - Multi-anvil Press: energy-dispersive and monochromatic diffraction and imaging. There is a 250 ton press on the bending magnet beamline, and a 1000 ton press on the undulator beamline; deformation experiments, acoustic velocity measurements, and computed tomography can all be performed in the press. - Microprobe: micro-XRF, micro-XAFS, fluorescence microCMT, micro-XRD - Microtomography: absorption and differential

  16. James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) Cryogenic Component Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, Edward A.; Tolson, Julius; Or, Tak; Skocik, Christopher; Glazer, Stuart

    2004-01-01

    Contents include the following: James Webb Space Telescope/Integrated Science Instrument Module (JWST/ISIM) Overview. ISIM Thermal Verification Requirements. Emittance Test Objectives. Cryochamber Design Requirements. Cryochamber Construction. Emittance Test Sample Selection and Configuration. Error Sources and Error Mitigation. Cryochamber Operation. Cryochamber and Emittance Sample Test Results.

  17. University Facilities as Real-World Foci of Multidisciplinary Science Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wojdak, Jeremy; Guinan, Judy; Wirgau, Joseph; Kugler, Charles; Hammond, Georgia; Small, Christine; Manyara, Charles; Singer, Frederick; Watts, Chester; Bodo, Bethany; Baldwin, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    The authors sought to better approximate the practice of "real" science in our classrooms by having students study a newly built storm-water remediation wetland on campus. The wetland was meant to gather and clean storm water running off of student parking lots--thus students had ownership in the problem and potential solution. Participating…

  18. Comparison of Marketing Techniques to Enroll Females at a Major Aeronautical University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, David Scott

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally, industries belonging to the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields are dominated by males. Recruitment and enrollment of females for STEM fields have become an issue among universities specializing in fields such as aviation and aeronautics. The research problem for this study was that marketing departments…

  19. Astronautics and aeronautics, 1970. Chronology on science, technology, and policy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    An immediate reference to aerospace-related events of 1970 is provided to help historians in preserving historical accuracy and precision. Chronologies of major NASA launches, and manned space flights for 1970 are included.

  20. The pros and cons of code validation. [in aeronautical sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bobbitt, Percy J.

    1988-01-01

    Computational and wind tunnel error sources are examined and quantified using specific calculations or experimental data, and a substantial comparison of theoretical and experimental results, or a code validation, is discussed. Wind tunnel error sources considered include wall interference, sting effects, Reynolds number effects, flow quality and transition, and instrumentation such as strain gage balances, electronically scanned pressure systems, hot film gages, hot wire anemometers, and laser velocimeters. Computational error sources include math model equation sets, the solution algorithm, artificial viscosity/dissipation, boundary conditions, the uniqueness of solutions, grid resolution, turbulence modeling, and Reynolds number effects. It is concluded that although improvements in theory are being made more quickly than in experiments, wind tunnel research has the advantage of the more realistic transition process of a right turbulence model in a free-transition test.

  1. Engineering Support of Microgravity Life Science Research: Development of an Avian Development Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vellinger, J.; Deuser, M.; Hullinger, R.

    1995-01-01

    The Avian Development Facility (ADF) is designed to provide a 'window' for the study of embryogenesis in space. It allows researchers to determine and then to mitigate or nullify the forces of altered gravity upon embryos when leaving and re-entering the Earth's gravity. The ADF design will allow investigations to begin their incubation after their experiments have achieved orbit, and shut down the experiment and fix specimens before leaving orbit. In effect, the ADF makes every attempt to minimize launch and re-entry effects in order to isolate and preserve the effects of the experimental variable(s) of the space environment.

  2. Materials sciences research. [research facilities, research projects, and technical reports of materials tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Research projects involving materials research conducted by various international test facilities are reported. Much of the materials research is classified in the following areas: (1) acousto-optic, acousto-electric, and ultrasonic research, (2) research for elucidating transport phenomena in well characterized oxides, (3) research in semiconductor materials and semiconductor devices, (4) the study of interfaces and interfacial phenomena, and (5) materials research relevant to natural resources. Descriptions of the individual research programs are listed alphabetically by the name of the author and show all personnel involved, resulting publications, and associated meeting speeches.

  3. A browse facility for Earth science remote sensing data: Center director's discretionary fund final report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, P. J.

    1993-01-01

    An image data visual browse facility is developed for a UNIX platform using the X Windows 11 system. It allows one to visually examine reduced resolution image data to determine which data are applicable for further research. Links with a relational data base manager then allow one to extract not only the full resolution image data, but any other ancillary data related to the case study. Various techniques are examined for compression of the image data in order to reduce data storage requirements and time necessary to transmit the data on the internet. Data used were from the WetNet project.

  4. Aeronautics and space report of the President, 1983 activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Achievements in communication; space science; space transportation; aeronautics; and Earth resources and environment are summarized. Activities of the various Federal agencies and cooperation with NASA in these areas are described. The Presidential policy announcement on the endorsement of commercial operation of expendable launch vehicles is included. Tables show, the space activities budget; a historical budget summary, U.S. space launch vehicles; U.S. and Soviet manned spaceflights, 1961 to 1983; U.S. launched space probes, 1975 to 1983; U.S. launched scientific and applications satellites, 1978 to 1983; the U.S. spacecraft record; the world record of space launches successful in attaining Earth orbit or beyond; and successful U.S. launchings for 1983.

  5. Current and future translation trends in aeronautics and astronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowe, Timothy

    1986-01-01

    The pattern of translation activity in aeronautics and astronautics is reviewed. It is argued that the international nature of the aerospace industry and the commercialization of space have increased the need for the translation of scientific literature in the aerospace field. Various factors which can affect the quality of translations are examined. The need to translate the activities of the Soviets, Germans, and French in materials science in microgravity, of the Japanese, Germans, and French in the development of industrial ceramics, and of the Chinese in launching and communications satellites is discussed. It is noted that due to increases in multilateral and bilateral relationships in the aerospace industry, the amount of translation from non-English source material into non-English text will increase and the most important languages will be French and German, with an increasing demand for Japanese, Chinese, Spanish, and Italian translations.

  6. Solar energy and the aeronautics industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedek, L.

    1985-11-01

    An introduction to the physical aspects of solar energy, incidental energy and variations in solar flux is presented, along with an explanation of the physical principles of obtaining solar energy. The history of the application of solar energy to aeronautics, including the Gossamer Penguin and the Solar Challenger is given. Finally, an analysis of the possibilities of using a reaction motor with hybrid propulsion combining solar energy with traditional fuels as well as calculations of the proposed cycle and its mode of operation are given.

  7. The K-8 Aeronautics Internet Textbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Efforts were focused on web site migration, from UC (University of California) Davis to the National Business Aviation Association's (NBAA) web site. K8AIT (K-8 Aeronautics Internet Textbook), which has remained an unadvertised web site, receives almost two million hits per month. Project continuation funding with the National Business Aviation Association is being pursued. A Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between NASA Ames LTP (Learning Technologies Project) and Cislunar has been drafted and approved by NASA's legal department. Additional web content on space flight and the Wright brothers has been added in English and Spanish.

  8. Graduate engineering research participation in aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, A. S., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The Aeronautics Graduate Research Program commenced in 1971, with the primary goal of engaging students who qualified for regular admission to the Graduate School of Engineering at Old Dominion University in a graduate engineering research and study program in collaboration with NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. The format and purposes of this program are discussed. Student selection and program statistics are summarized. Abstracts are presented in the folowing areas: aircraft design, aerodynamics, lift/drag characteristics; avionics; fluid mechanics; solid mechanics; instrumentation and measurement techniques; thermophysical properties experiments; large space structures; earth orbital dynamics; and environmental engineering.

  9. Graduate engineering research participation in aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, A. S., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Graduate student engineering research in aeronautics at Old Dominion University is surveyed. Student participation was facilitated through a NASA sponsored university program which enabled the students to complete degrees. Research summaries are provided and plans for the termination of the grant program are outlined. Project topics include: Failure modes for mechanically fastened joints in composite materials; The dynamic stability of an earth orbiting satellite deploying hinged appendages; The analysis of the Losipescu shear test for composite materials; and the effect of boundary layer structure on wing tip vortex formation and decay.

  10. Solar energy and the aeronautics industry. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benedek, L.

    1985-01-01

    An introduction to the physical aspects of solar energy, incidental energy and variations in solar flux is presented, along with an explanation of the physical principles of obtaining solar energy. The history of the application of solar energy to aeronautics, including the Gossamer Penguin and the Solar Challenger is given. Finally, an analysis of the possibilities of using a reaction motor with hybrid propulsion combining solar energy with traditional fuels as well as calculations of the proposed cycle and its mode of operation are given.

  11. The Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST): Science Drivers, Technology Developments, and Synergies with Other Future Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postman, Marc; Brown, Tom; Sembach, Kenneth; Giavalisco, Mauro; Traub, Wesley; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Calzetti, Daniela; Oegerle, William; Rich, R. Michael; Stahl, H. Philip; Tumlinson, Jason; Mountain, Matt; Soummer, Remi; Hyde, Tupper

    2011-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) is a concept for an 8-meter to 16-meter UVOIR space observatory for launch in the 2025-2030 era. ATLAST will allow astronomers to answer fundamental questions at the forefront of modern astrophysics, including "Is there life elsewhere in the Galaxy?" We present a range of science drivers that define the main performance requirements for ATLAST (8 to 16 milliarcsec angular resolution, diffraction limited imaging at 0.5 m wavelength, minimum collecting area of 45 square meters, high sensitivity to light wavelengths from 0.1 m to 2.4 m, high stability in wavefront sensing and control). We will also discuss the synergy between ATLAST and other anticipated future facilities (e.g., TMT, EELT, ALMA) and the priorities for technology development that will enable the construction for a cost that is comparable to current generation observatory-class space missions.

  12. 75 FR 11225 - Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting AGENCY: Federal...-annual meeting of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Government/Industry Aeronautical...

  13. Publications and geothermal sample library facilities of the Earth Science Laboratory, University of Utah Research Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Phillip M.; Ruth, Kathryn A.; Langton, David R.; Bullett, Michael J.

    1990-03-30

    The Earth Science Laboratory of the University of Utah Research Institute has been involved in research in geothermal exploration and development for the past eleven years. Our work has resulted in the publication of nearly 500 reports, which are listed in this document. Over the years, we have collected drill chip and core samples from more than 180 drill holes in geothermal areas, and most of these samples are available to others for research, exploration and similar purposes. We hope that scientists and engineers involved in industrial geothermal development will find our technology transfer and service efforts helpful.

  14. National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1921-01-01

    The National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics in session at Washington to discuss plans to place America foremost in the development of avaition. A report was heard from Dr. Ames, chairman of the executive committee, on research work to develop the new heavy oil fuel injection aircraft engine which does away with carburetor and spark plugs, and will lesson the fire hazard. Dr. S.W. Stratton, secretary of the committee and director of the Bureau of Standards, is shown seated at the extreme left. Around the table, left to right, are: Prof. Charles F. Marvin, chief of the weather bureau; Dr. John F. Hayford (Northwestern Univ.); Orville Wright; Major Thurman H. Bane (chief Engineer Div. Army); Paul Henderson, (Second Ass. Postmaster Gen.); Rear Adm. W.A. Moffet, Chief Bureau Aeronautics, Navy; Dr. Michael I. Pupin, (Columbia Univ.); Rear Adm. D.W. Taylor, U.S.N. (Chief Bureau Construction and repair); Dr. Charles D. Walcott, chairman, (Chief Air Service) and Dr. Joesph S. Ames, chairman executive committee (John Hopkins Univ.)

  15. A CCIR aeronautical mobile satellite report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, Faramaz; Bishop, Dennis; Rogers, David; Smith, Ernest K.

    1989-01-01

    Propagation effects in the aeronautical mobile-satellite service differ from those in the fixed-satellite service and other mobile-satellite services because: small antennas are used on aircraft, and the aircraft body may affect the performance of the antenna; high aircraft speeds cause large Doppler spreads; aircraft terminals must accommodate a large dynamic range in transmission and reception; and due to their high speeds, banking maneuvers, and three-dimensional operation, aircraft routinely require exceptionally high integrity of communications, making even short-term propagation effects very important. Data and models specifically required to characterize the path impairments are discussed, which include: tropospheric effects, including gaseous attenuation, cloud and rain attenuation, fog attenuation, refraction and scintillation; surface reflection (multipath) effects; ionospheric effects such as scintillation; and environmental effects (aircraft motion, sea state, land surface type). Aeronautical mobile-satellite systems may operate on a worldwide basis, including propagation paths at low elevation angles. Several measurements of multipath parameters over land and sea were conducted. In some cases, laboratory simulations are used to compare measured data and verify model parameters. The received signals is considered in terms of its possible components: a direct wave subject to atmospheric effects, and a reflected wave, which generally contains mostly a diffuse component.

  16. Model research: The National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, 1915-1958, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roland, A.

    1984-01-01

    The National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, the predecessor of NASA, was the premier aeronautical research organization in the United States. It conducted scientific study of the problems of flight with a view to their practical solution. This institutional history traces the birth and evolution of the NACA and analyzes such recurrent themes as the roles of science and engineering, the influence of politics on technology, the way in which the institution shapes technology and technology shapes the institution, the contributions of key individuals, the nature of the research process, and the relation between military and civilian aviation.

  17. Aeronautics and Space Report of the President: 1975 Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This report, submitted to the Congress by President Ford in accordance with the National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958, summarizes the United States' space and aeronautics activities for the year 1975. Detailed summaries of the activities of the following governmental departments or agencies are provided: National Aeronautics and Space…

  18. NASA's Role in Aeronautics: A Workshop. Volume III - Transport Aircraft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Assembly of Engineering.

    The central task of a 1980 workshop on the role of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in aeronautics was to examine the relationship of NASA's research capabilities to the state of U.S. aviation and to make recommendations about NASA's future role in aeronautics. The specific task of the Panel on Transport Aircraft was to…

  19. NASA's Role in Aeronautics: A Workshop. Volume II - Military Aviation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Assembly of Engineering.

    The central task of a 1980 workshop on the role of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in aeronautics was to examine the relationship of NASA's research capabilities to the state of U.S. aviation and to make recommendations about NASA's future role in aeronautics. The findings and recommendations of the Panel on Military…

  20. NASA's Role in Aeronautics: A Workshop. Volume IV - General Aviation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Assembly of Engineering.

    The central task of a 1980 workshop on the role of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in aeronautics was to examine the relationship of NASA's research capabilities to the state of U.S. aviation and to make recommendations about NASA's future role in aeronautics. The findings and recommendations of the Panel on General…

  1. 14 CFR 63.37 - Aeronautical experience requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aeronautical experience requirements. 63.37... experience requirements. (a) Except as otherwise specified therein, the flight time used to satisfy the aeronautical experience requirements of paragraph (b) of this section must have been obtained on an...

  2. NASA's Role in Aeronautics: A Workshop. Volume V - Rotorcraft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Assembly of Engineering.

    The central task of a 1980 workshop on the role of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in aeronautics was to examine the relationship of NASA's research capabilities to the state of U.S. aviation and to make recommendations about NASA's future role in aeronautics. Following an introduction, findings and recommendations of the…

  3. An Overview of the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) Facility and the Research Performed in the MSG on the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spivey, Reggie; Flores, Ginger N.

    2009-01-01

    The Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) is a double rack facility aboard the International Space Station (ISS) designed for investigation handling. The MSG has been operating on the ISS since July 2002 and is currently located in the Columbus Laboratory Module. The unique design of the facility allows it to accommodate science and technology investigations in a workbench type environment. The facility has an enclosed working volume that is held at a negative pressure with respect to the crew living area. This allows the facility to provide two levels of containment for small parts, particulates, fluids, and gases. This containment approach protects the crew from possible hazardous operations that take place inside the MSG work volume. Research investigations operating inside the MSG are provided a large 255 liter enclosed work space, 1000 watts of dc power via a versatile supply interface (120, 28, +/- 12, and 5 Vdc), 1000 watts of cooling capability, video and data recording and real time downlink, ground commanding capabilities, access to ISS Vacuum Exhaust and Vacuum Resource Systems, and gaseous nitrogen supply. These capabilities make the MSG one of the most utilized facilities on ISS. In fact, the MSG has been used for over 5000 hours of scientific payload operations. MSG investigations involve research in cryogenic fluid management, fluid physics, spacecraft fire safety, materials science, combustion, plant growth, and life support technologies. MSG is an ideal platform for science investigations and research required to advance the technology readiness levels (TRLs) applicable to the Constellation Program. This paper will provide an overview of the MSG facility, a synopsis of the research that has already been accomplished in the MSG, an overview of future investigations currently planned for operation in the MSG, and potential applications of MSG investigations that can provide useful data to the Constellation Program. In addition, this paper will address

  4. Development of IR-FEL facility for energy science in Kyoto University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zen, Heishun; Kii, Toshiteru; Masuda, Kai; Ohgaki, Hideaki; Yamazaki, Tetsuo

    2008-05-01

    A mid-infrared free electron laser (FEL) has been constructed for energy science in the Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University. The FEL system consists of a compact S-band Linac and an undulator to generate 4-13 μm coherent mid-infrared radiations. The Linac consists of a 4.5 cell rf gun with a thermionic cathode and a 3-m traveling-wave-type accelerator tube fed by 10 MW and 20 MW rf power, respectively. We have succeeded to produce 40 MeV, 40 mA and 3 μs electron beams. Last December, the 9.2 μm spontaneous emission from the undulator generated by 29.5 MeV electron beams was observed for the first time. Further optimization parameters of both the electron beam and the optical cavity are being pursued for an FEL lasing in the near future.

  5. A planetary ultra hypervelocity impact mechanics and shock wave science facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1987-01-01

    Using the concept of intercepting orbits from a pair of Space Station serviced free flyers, a class of impact and shock wave experiments pertinent to planetary science can be performed. One proposed free flying vehicle is an impactor dispensor, and the second is the impact laboratory. How collision is achieved by utilizing essentially twice orbital velocity is demonstrated. The impactor dispensor contains a series of small flyer plates or other projectiles which are launched into the trajectory of the impactor laboratory at appropriate positions. The impactor laboratory is a large impact tank similar to those in terrestrial gun laboratories, except that it contains a supply of targets and instrumentation such as high speed cameras, flash X-ray apparatus, and digital recorders. Shock and isentropic pressures of up to 20 Mbar are achievable with such a system which provides 15 km/sec impact velocities for precisely oriented projectiles.

  6. Aeronautical concerns and National Aeronautics and Space Administration atmospheric electricity projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, W. W.

    1980-01-01

    The phenomenology of lightning and lightning measurement techniques are briefly examined with a particular reference to aeronautics. Developments made in airborne and satellite detection methods are reported. NASA research efforts are outlined which cover topics including in-situ measurements, design factors and protection, remote optical and radio frequency measurements, and space vehicle design.

  7. Application of Mobile-ip to Space and Aeronautical Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, Kent; Shell, Dan; Ivancic, William D.; Stewart, David H.; Bell, Terry L.; Kachmar, Brian A.

    2001-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is interested in applying mobile Internet protocol (mobile-ip) technologies to its space and aeronautics programs. In particular, mobile-ip will play a major role in the Advanced Aeronautic Transportation Technology (AAT-F), the Weather Information Communication (WINCOMM), and the Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS) aeronautics programs. This paper describes mobile-ip and mobile routers--in particular, the features, capabilities, and initial performance of the mobile router are presented. The application of mobile-router technology to NASA's space and aeronautics programs is also discussed.

  8. The "Apollo" of Aeronautics: NASA's Aircraft Energy Efficiency Program, 1973-1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Mark D.

    2010-01-01

    In fall 1975, 10 distinguished United States Senators from the Aeronautical and Space Sciences Committee summoned a group of elite aviation experts to Washington, DC. The Senators were holding hearings regarding the state of the American airline industry, which was struggling in the wake of the 1973 Arab oil embargo and the dramatically increasing cost of fuel. Providing testimony were presidents or vice presidents of United Airlines, Boeing, Pratt & Whitney, and General Electric. Other witnesses included high-ranking officials from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the U.S. Air Force, and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Their Capitol Hill testimony painted a bleak economic picture, described in phrases that included immediate crisis condition, long-range trouble, serious danger, and economic dislocation.

  9. Facility for Ground Tests with Active Neutron Instrumentation for the Planetary Science Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvak, Maxim; Jun, Insoo; Kozyrev, Alexander; Mitrofanov, Igor; Sanin, Anton; Shvetsov, Valery; Starr, Richard; Timoshenko, Gennady

    2015-04-01

    To conduct a feasibility study of active neutron and gamma spectrometers a special radiation test facility has been developed and built at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna, Russia. It has total area of about 62 m2 and with height from floor to roof up to 3.5 m. To provide measurements with prototypes of space instruments developed for the nuclear planetology applications and to test capabilities of such instruments we have designed and constructed special soil targets similar to planetary material with known elemental composition, appropriate geometry and layered structure. Here we also present results of first experimental work performed with a spare flight model of the DAN/MSL instrument selected as a flight prototype of an active neutron spectrometer applicable for the future landed missions to various solid solar system bodies. In our experiment we have tested the capability of neutron activation methods to detect thin layers of water/water ice lying on top of planetary dry regolith or buried within a dry regolith at different depths.

  10. The Materials Data Facility: Data Services to Advance Materials Science Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaiszik, B.; Chard, K.; Pruyne, J.; Ananthakrishnan, R.; Tuecke, S.; Foster, I.

    2016-07-01

    With increasingly strict data management requirements from funding agencies and institutions, expanding focus on the challenges of research replicability, and growing data sizes and heterogeneity, new data needs are emerging in the materials community. The materials data facility (MDF) operates two cloud-hosted services, data publication and data discovery, with features to promote open data sharing, self-service data publication and curation, and encourage data reuse, layered with powerful data discovery tools. The data publication service simplifies the process of copying data to a secure storage location, assigning data a citable persistent identifier, and recording custom (e.g., material, technique, or instrument specific) and automatically-extracted metadata in a registry while the data discovery service will provide advanced search capabilities (e.g., faceting, free text range querying, and full text search) against the registered data and metadata. The MDF services empower individual researchers, research projects, and institutions to (I) publish research datasets, regardless of size, from local storage, institutional data stores, or cloud storage, without involvement of third-party publishers; (II) build, share, and enforce extensible domain-specific custom metadata schemas; (III) interact with published data and metadata via representational state transfer (REST) application program interfaces (APIs) to facilitate automation, analysis, and feedback; and (IV) access a data discovery model that allows researchers to search, interrogate, and eventually build on existing published data. We describe MDF's design, current status, and future plans.

  11. The Materials Data Facility: Data Services to Advance Materials Science Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaiszik, B.; Chard, K.; Pruyne, J.; Ananthakrishnan, R.; Tuecke, S.; Foster, I.

    2016-08-01

    With increasingly strict data management requirements from funding agencies and institutions, expanding focus on the challenges of research replicability, and growing data sizes and heterogeneity, new data needs are emerging in the materials community. The materials data facility (MDF) operates two cloud-hosted services, data publication and data discovery, with features to promote open data sharing, self-service data publication and curation, and encourage data reuse, layered with powerful data discovery tools. The data publication service simplifies the process of copying data to a secure storage location, assigning data a citable persistent identifier, and recording custom (e.g., material, technique, or instrument specific) and automatically-extracted metadata in a registry while the data discovery service will provide advanced search capabilities (e.g., faceting, free text range querying, and full text search) against the registered data and metadata. The MDF services empower individual researchers, research projects, and institutions to (I) publish research datasets, regardless of size, from local storage, institutional data stores, or cloud storage, without involvement of third-party publishers; (II) build, share, and enforce extensible domain-specific custom metadata schemas; (III) interact with published data and metadata via representational state transfer (REST) application program interfaces (APIs) to facilitate automation, analysis, and feedback; and (IV) access a data discovery model that allows researchers to search, interrogate, and eventually build on existing published data. We describe MDF's design, current status, and future plans.

  12. 14 CFR 65.39 - Practical experience requirements: Facility rating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Practical experience requirements: Facility rating. 65.39 Section 65.39 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Operators § 65.39 Practical experience requirements: Facility rating. Each applicant for a facility...

  13. System analysis study of space platform and station accommodations for life sciences research facilities. Volume 2: Study results, attachment 2. Phase A: Conceptual design and programmatics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiley, Lowell F.

    1985-01-01

    The study results from the conceptual design and programmatics segment of the Space Platform and Station Accommodation for Life Sciences Research Facilities. The results and significant findings of the conceptual design and programmatics were generated by these tasks: (1) the review and update engineering and science requirements; (2) analysis of life sciences mission transition scenario; (3) the review and update of key trade issues; (4) the development of conceptual definition and designs; and (5) the development of the work breakdown schedule and its dictionary, program schedule, and estimated costs.

  14. A fuel level sensor for aeronautical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrazzuoli, L.; Persichetti, G.; Onorato, G.; Grimaldi, I. A.; Testa, G.; Bernini, R.

    2015-03-01

    A novel fuel level sensor for aeronautical applications is developed. The sensor is based on an array of total internal reflection (TIR) point sensors. Respect to conventional TIR sensors the new design permits to be sensitive to common jet fuels (JetA, JP4,JP7) but also to operate with new alternative fuels. The sensor doesn't require aircraft calibration, temperature compensation and furthermore is able to operate correctly when partially or totally exposed to presence of condensed water on its surface. The point sensors are multiplexed on a single fiber by optical couplers and interrogated simultaneously by Optical Time Domain Reflectometry (OTDR) at a wavelength of 1550nm. Experimental results show a resolution of +/-1.5mm could be achieved. The sensors is also able to measure the free water level in the fuel.

  15. Current and future opportunities in aeronautical engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brizendine, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    Current demand for aeronautical engineers is approximately balanced with supply, with some shortfall in certain specialties. In the near term (5 years), demand will exceed supply of new graduates. A number of factors have brought on the state of imbalance: (1) the cyclic nature of the demand of our defense requirements; (2) drastic changes in DOD aircraft procurement; (3) the emergence of the space age; (4) evolution of social attitudes toward technology with resultant decline in enrollments; and (5) the universities themselves through their influences in the direction of careers selected by engineers. These factors have been counteracted somewhat by increased DOD emphasis on aircraft development programs but more importantly by the favorable growth in civil aircraft requirements.

  16. System analysis study of space platform and station accommodations for life sciences research facilities. Volume 2: Study results. Appendix E: Work breakdown structure and dictionary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiley, Lowell F.

    1985-01-01

    A work breakdown structure for the Space Station Life Sciences Research Facility (LSRF) is presented up to level 5. The purpose is to provide the framework for task planning and control and to serve as a basis for budgeting, task assignment, cost collection and report, and contractual performance measurement and tracking of the Full Scale Development Phase tasks.

  17. Western aeronautical test range real-time graphics software package MAGIC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, Jacqueline C.; Moore, Archie L.

    1988-01-01

    The master graphics interactive console (MAGIC) software package used on the Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) of the NASA Ames Research Center is described. MAGIC is a resident real-time research tool available to flight researchers-scientists in the NASA mission control centers of the WATR at the Dryden Flight Research Facility at Edwards, California. The hardware configuration and capabilities of the real-time software package are also discussed.

  18. 14 CFR § 1253.410 - Comparable facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Comparable facilities. § 1253.410 Section § 1253.410 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL...

  19. 14 CFR 61.109 - Aeronautical experience.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., recovery from unusual flight attitudes, radio communications, and the use of navigation systems/facilities... (with each landing involving a flight in the traffic pattern) at an airport with an operating control... involving a flight in the traffic pattern) at an airport with an operating control tower. (d) For...

  20. 14 CFR 61.109 - Aeronautical experience.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., recovery from unusual flight attitudes, radio communications, and the use of navigation systems/facilities... (with each landing involving a flight in the traffic pattern) at an airport with an operating control... involving a flight in the traffic pattern) at an airport with an operating control tower. (d) For...

  1. Test devices for aeronautical research and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The objectives of the DFVLR in six areas are described: (1) transportation and communication systems; (2) aircraft, space technology, (4) remote sensing, (5) energy and propulsion technology; and (6) research and development. A detailed description of testing devices and other facilities required to carry out the research program is given.

  2. Life prediction technologies for aeronautical propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgaw, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    Fatigue and fracture problems continue to occur in aeronautical gas turbine engines. Components whose useful life is limited by these failure modes include turbine hot-section blades, vanes, and disks. Safety considerations dictate that catastrophic failures be avoided, while economic considerations dictate that catastrophic failures be avoided, while economic considerations dictate that noncatastrophic failures occur as infrequently as possible. Therefore, the decision in design is making the tradeoff between engine performance and durability. LeRC has contributed to the aeropropulsion industry in the area of life prediction technology for over 30 years, developing creep and fatigue life prediction methodologies for hot-section materials. At the present time, emphasis is being placed on the development of methods capable of handling both thermal and mechanical fatigue under severe environments. Recent accomplishments include the development of more accurate creep-fatigue life prediction methods such as the total strain version of LeRC's strain-range partitioning (SRP) and the HOST-developed cyclic damage accumulation (CDA) model. Other examples include the development of a more accurate cumulative fatigue damage rule - the double damage curve approach (DDCA), which provides greatly improved accuracy in comparison with usual cumulative fatigue design rules. Other accomplishments in the area of high-temperature fatigue crack growth may also be mentioned. Finally, we are looking to the future and are beginning to do research on the advanced methods which will be required for development of advanced materials and propulsion systems over the next 10-20 years.

  3. Deflecting RF cavity design for a recirculating linac based facility for ultrafast X-ray science (LUX)

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Derun; Corlett, J.N.

    2003-05-01

    We report on superconducting deflecting RF cavity designs for a Recirculating Linac Based Facility for Ultrafast X-ray Science (LUX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The deflecting cavities operate in the lowest dipole mode and are required to produce a temporal correlation within flat electron bunches, as needed for x-ray compression in crystal optics. Deflecting voltage of up to 8.5-MV is required at 3.9-GHz. We present a 7-cell cavity design in this paper. Seven such cavities are required to generate the 8.5 MV deflecting voltage. Longitudinal and transverse impedance from LOM (lower order mode) and HOM (higher order mode) are simulated using the MAFIA code. Short-range and long-range wakefield excited through these impedances are calculated. Beam loading effects of the deflecting mode and LOM modes are estimated. Q values of the LOM monopole modes in the cavity may need to be damped to be below 10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} levels in order to maintain the required energy spread.

  4. Science plan for the Alaska SAR facility program. Phase 1: Data from the first European sensing satellite, ERS-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carsey, Frank D.

    1989-01-01

    Science objectives, opportunities and requirements are discussed for the utilization of data from the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) on the European First Remote Sensing Satellite, to be flown by the European Space Agency in the early 1990s. The principal applications of the imaging data are in studies of geophysical processes taking place within the direct-reception area of the Alaska SAR Facility in Fairbanks, Alaska, essentially the area within 2000 km of the receiver. The primary research that will be supported by these data include studies of the oceanography and sea ice phenomena of Alaskan and adjacent polar waters and the geology, glaciology, hydrology, and ecology of the region. These studies focus on the area within the reception mask of ASF, and numerous connections are made to global processes and thus to the observation and understanding of global change. Processes within the station reception area both affect and are affected by global phenomena, in some cases quite critically. Requirements for data processing and archiving systems, prelaunch research, and image processing for geophysical product generation are discussed.

  5. A cumulative index to a continuing bibliography on aeronautical engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This bibliography is a cumulative index to the abstracts contained in NASA-SP-7037(184) through NASA-SP-7037(195) of Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography. NASA SP-7037 and its supplements have been compiled through the cooperative efforts of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). This cumulative index includes subject, personal author, corporate source, foreign technology, contract, report number, and accession number indexes.

  6. Cyber Technology for Materials and Structures in Aeronautics and Aerospace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pipes, R. Byron

    2002-01-01

    The evolution of composites applications in aeronautics from 1970 to the present is discussed. The barriers and challenges to economic application and to certification are presented and recommendations for accelerated development are outlined. The potential benefits of emerging technologies to aeronautics and their foundation in composite materials are described and the resulting benefits in vehicle take off gross weight are quantified. Finally, a 21st century vision for aeronautics in which human mobility is increased by an order of magnitude is articulated.

  7. Aeronautical Engineering: A continuing bibliography, 1982 cumulative index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    This bibliography is a cumulative index to the abstracts contained in NASA SP-7037 (145) through NASA SP-7037 (156) of Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography. NASA SP-7037 and its supplements have been compiled through the cooperative efforts of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). This cumulative index includes subject, personal author, corporate source, contract, and report number indexes.

  8. Aeronautical engineering: A cumulative index to a continuing bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    This bibliography is a cumulative index to the abstracts contained in NASA SP-7037 (197) through NASA SP-7037 (208) of Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography. NASA SP-7037 and its supplements have been compiled through the cooperative efforts of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). This cumulative index includes subject, personal author, corporate source, foreign technology, contract, report number, and accession number indexes.

  9. Aeronautical engineering: A cumulative index to a continuing bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    This bibliography is a cumulative index to the abstracts contained in NASA SP-7037(210) through NASA SP-7037(221) of Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography. NASA SP-7037 and its supplements have been compiled through the cooperative efforts of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). This cumulative index includes subject, personal author, corporate source, foreign technology, contract number, report number, and accession number indexes.

  10. A cumulative index to Aeronautical Engineering: A continuing bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    This bibliography is a cumulated index to the abstracts contained in NASA SP-7037(132) through NASA SP-7037(143) of Aeronautical Engineering: A continuing bibliography. NASA SP-7037 and its supplements have been compiled through the cooperative efforts of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). This cumulative index includes subject, personal author, corporate source, contract, and report number indexes.

  11. NASA Ames Sustainability Initiatives: Aeronautics, Space Exploration, and Sustainable Futures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grymes, Rosalind A.

    2015-01-01

    In support of the mission-specific challenges of aeronautics and space exploration, NASA Ames produces a wealth of research and technology advancements with significant relevance to larger issues of planetary sustainability. NASA research on NexGen airspace solutions and its development of autonomous and intelligent technologies will revolutionize both the nation's air transporation systems and have applicability to the low altitude flight economy and to both air and ground transporation, more generally. NASA's understanding of the Earth as a complex of integrated systems contributes to humanity's perception of the sustainability of our home planet. Research at NASA Ames on closed environment life support systems produces directly applicable lessons on energy, water, and resource management in ground-based infrastructure. Moreover, every NASA campus is a 'city'; including an urbanscape and a workplace including scientists, human relations specialists, plumbers, engineers, facility managers, construction trades, transportation managers, software developers, leaders, financial planners, technologists, electricians, students, accountants, and even lawyers. NASA is applying the lessons of our mission-related activities to our urbanscapes and infrastructure, and also anticipates a leadership role in developing future environments for living and working in space.

  12. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography. Supplement 384

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This bibliography lists reports, articles and other documents announced in the NASA science and technical information system. Subject coverage includes: Design, construction and testing of aircraft and aircraft engines; aircraft components, equipment and systems; ground support systems; and theoretical and applied aspects of aerodynamics and general fluid dynamics.

  13. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography. Supplement 383

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This bibliography lists reports, articles and other documents announced in the NASA science and technical information system. Subject coverage includes: Design, construction and testing of aircraft and aircraft engines; aircraft components, equipment and systems; ground support systems; and theoretical and applied aspects of aerodynamics and general fluid dynamics.

  14. An Overview of the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) Facility and the Research Performed in the MSG on the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Lee P.

    2013-01-01

    The Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) is a rack facility aboard the International Space Station (ISS) designed for investigation handling. The MSG was built by the European Space Agency (ESA) which also provides sustaining engineering support for the facility. The MSG has been operating on the ISS since July 2002 and is currently located in the US Laboratory Module. The unique design of the facility allows it to accommodate science and technology investigations in a "workbench" type environment. The facility has an enclosed working volume that is held at a negative pressure with respect to the crew living area. This allows the facility to provide two levels of containment for small parts, particulates, fluids, and gases. This containment approach protects the crew from possible hazardous operations that take place inside the MSG work volume. Research investigations operating inside the MSG are provided a large 255 liter enclosed work space, 1000 watts of dc power via a versatile supply interface (120, 28, +/- 12, and 5 Vdc), 1000 watts of cooling capability, video and data recording and real time downlink, ground commanding capabilities, access to ISS Vacuum Exhaust and Vacuum Resource Systems, and gaseous nitrogen supply. These capabilities make the MSG one of the most utilized facilities on ISS. The MSG has been used for over 14500 hours of scientific payload operations. MSG investigations involve research in cryogenic fluid management, fluid physics, spacecraft fire safety, materials science, combustion, plant growth, and life support technology. The MSG facility is operated by the Payloads Operations Integration Center at Marshall Space flight Center. Payloads may also operate remotely from different telescience centers located in the United States and Europe. The investigative Payload Integration Manager (iPIM) is the focal to assist organizations that have payloads operating in the MSG facility. NASA provides an MSG engineering unit for payload developers

  15. Sustaining and Extending the Open Science Grid: Science Innovation on a PetaScale Nationwide Facility (DE-FC02-06ER41436) SciDAC-2 Closeout Report

    SciTech Connect

    Livny, Miron; Shank, James; Ernst, Michael; Blackburn, Kent; Goasguen, Sebastien; Tuts, Michael; Gibbons, Lawrence; Pordes, Ruth; Sliz, Piotr; Deelman, Ewa; Barnett, William; Olson, Doug; McGee, John; Cowles, Robert; Wuerthwein, Frank; Gardner, Robert; Avery, Paul; Wang, Shaowen; Lincoln, David Swanson

    2015-02-11

    Under this SciDAC-2 grant the project’s goal w a s t o stimulate new discoveries by providing scientists with effective and dependable access to an unprecedented national distributed computational facility: the Open Science Grid (OSG). We proposed to achieve this through the work of the Open Science Grid Consortium: a unique hands-on multi-disciplinary collaboration of scientists, software developers and providers of computing resources. Together the stakeholders in this consortium sustain and use a shared distributed computing environment that transforms simulation and experimental science in the US. The OSG consortium is an open collaboration that actively engages new research communities. We operate an open facility that brings together a broad spectrum of compute, storage, and networking resources and interfaces to other cyberinfrastructures, including the US XSEDE (previously TeraGrid), the European Grids for ESciencE (EGEE), as well as campus and regional grids. We leverage middleware provided by computer science groups, facility IT support organizations, and computing programs of application communities for the benefit of consortium members and the US national CI.

  16. Advancing Aeronautics: A Decision Framework for Selecting Research Agendas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anton, Philip S.; Ecola, Liisa; Kallimani, James G.; Light, Thomas; Ohlandt, Chad J. R.; Osburg, Jan; Raman, Raj; Grammich, Clifford A.

    2011-01-01

    Publicly funded research has long played a role in the development of aeronautics, ranging from foundational research on airfoils to development of the air-traffic control system. Yet more than a century after the research and development of successful controlled, sustained, heavier-than-air flight vehicles, there are questions over the future of aeronautics research. The field of aeronautics is relatively mature, technological developments within it have become more evolutionary, and funding decisions are sometimes motivated by the continued pursuit of these evolutionary research tracks rather than by larger factors. These developments raise questions over whether public funding of aeronautics research continues to be appropriate or necessary and at what levels. Tightened federal budgets and increasing calls to address other public demands make these questions sharper still. To help it address the questions of appropriate directions for publicly funded aeronautics research, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) asked the RAND Corporation to assess the elements required to develop a strategic view of aeronautics research opportunities; identify candidate aeronautic grand challenges, paradigms, and concepts; outline a framework for evaluating them; and exercise the framework as an example of how to use it. Accordingly, this research seeks to address these questions: What aeronautics research should be supported by the U.S. government? What compelling and desirable benefits drive government-supported research? How should the government--especially NASA--make decisions about which research to support? Advancing aeronautics involves broad policy and decisionmaking challenges. Decisions involve tradeoffs among competing perspectives, uncertainties, and informed judgment.

  17. Identification of Technologies for Provision of Future Aeronautical Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Tricia; Dyer, Glen; Henriksen, Steve; Berger, Jason; Jin, Jenny; Boci, Tony

    2006-01-01

    This report describes the process, findings, and recommendations of the second of three phases of the Future Communications Study (FCS) technology investigation conducted by NASA Glenn Research Center and ITT Advanced Engineering & Sciences Division for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The FCS is a collaborative research effort between the FAA and Eurocontrol to address frequency congestion and spectrum depletion for safety critical airground communications. The goal of the technology investigation is to identify technologies that can support the longterm aeronautical mobile communication operating concept. A derived set of evaluation criteria traceable to the operating concept document is presented. An adaptation of the analytical hierarchy process is described and recommended for selecting candidates for detailed evaluation. Evaluations of a subset of technologies brought forward from the prescreening process are provided. Five of those are identified as candidates with the highest potential for continental airspace solutions in L-band (P-34, W-CDMA, LDL, B-VHF, and E-TDMA). Additional technologies are identified as best performers in the unique environments of remote/oceanic airspace in the satellite bands (Inmarsat SBB and a custom satellite solution) and the airport flight domain in C-band (802.16e). Details of the evaluation criteria, channel models, and the technology evaluations are provided in appendixes.

  18. REVIEW ARTICLE: Recent developments in smart structures with aeronautical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loewy, Robert G.

    1997-10-01

    The original version of this paper was presented and distributed as part of the 37th Israel Annual Conference on Aerospace Sciences Proceedings. Without attempting a thorough review of the burgeoning literature, the results of a representative sampling of recent papers dealing with smart materials and structures as actuators in aeronautical systems are summarized here. Their potential for improving performance, handling qualities in a stall, and increasing fatigue life is discussed briefly as requiring relatively slow-acting shape and shape-distribution changes. A similar review is made of applications for improving aeroelastic divergence, flutter instabilities, and tail buffeting on fixed-wing aircraft; and reducing vibrations, improving external acoustics, and providing flight controls for rotating-wing aircraft - all of which require a high-frequency response. The status of some of the most promising developments is noted and the remaining problems are touched on. Two approaches, which have not been given substantial attention elsewhere, are reviewed; these are: developing concentrated, namely nondistributed, piezoelectric actuators in helicoidal configurations, on the one hand, as a way to improve force - deflection output; and using control surfaces purposefully designed to be marginally unstable and stabilized by smart structures, on the other hand, as a means of reducing the force - deflection combinations required of smart-structure actuators.

  19. Wind Tunnel and Propulsion Test Facilities: An Assessment of NASA's Capabilities to Serve National Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anton, Philip S.; Gritton, Eugene C.; Mesic, Richard; Steinberg, Paul; Johnson, Dana J.

    2004-01-01

    This monograph reveals and discusses the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) wind tunnel and propulsion test facility management issues that are creating real risks to the United States' competitive aeronautics advantage.

  20. A cumulative index to Aeronautical Engineering: A special bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    This publication is a cumulative index to the abstracts contained in NASA SP-7037 (80) through NASA SP-7037 (91) of Aeronautical Engineering: A Special Bibliography. NASA SP-7037 and its supplements have been compiled through the cooperative efforts of the American Institute of Aeronautics (AIAA) and Space Administration (NASA). This cumulative index includes subject, personal author, corporate source, contract, and report number indexes.

  1. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 405

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This report lists reports, articles and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles.

  2. NASA's Role in Aeronautics: A Workshop. Volume VII - Background Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Assembly of Engineering.

    Sixteen background papers presented to a plenary session at a 1980 workshop on the role of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in aeronautics are presented. The central task of the workshop was to examine the relationship of NASA's research capabilities to the state of U.S. aviation and to make recommendations about NASA's…

  3. Aeronautical engineering: A continuing bibliography with indexes (supplement 319)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This report lists 349 reports, articles and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles.

  4. Aeronautical engineering: A continuing bibliography with indexes (supplement 324)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This bibliography lists 149 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in December 1995. Subject coverage includes engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles.

  5. Aeronautics and Space Report of the President: 1977 Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    The national programs in aeronautics and space made steady progress in 1977 toward their long-term objectives. In aeronautics the goals were improved performance, energy efficiency, and safety in aircraft. In space the goals were: (1) better remote sensing systems to generate more sophisticated information about the Earth's environment; (2)…

  6. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography With Indexes. Supplement 392

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This report lists reports, articles and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles.

  7. Aeronautical engineering: A continuing bibliography with indexes (supplement 284)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This bibliography lists 974 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in Oct. 1992. The coverage includes documents on design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles.

  8. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. SUPPL-422

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This report lists reports, articles and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles.

  9. 47 CFR 76.1804 - Aeronautical frequencies: leakage monitoring (CLI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Aeronautical frequencies: leakage monitoring... Aeronautical frequencies: leakage monitoring (CLI). An MVPD shall notify the Commission before transmitting any... to be used; and (g) For MVPDs subject to § 76.611, the cumulative signal leakage index derived...

  10. 47 CFR 76.1804 - Aeronautical frequencies: leakage monitoring (CLI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Aeronautical frequencies: leakage monitoring... Aeronautical frequencies: leakage monitoring (CLI). An MVPD shall notify the Commission before transmitting any... to be used; and (g) For MVPDs subject to § 76.611, the cumulative signal leakage index derived...

  11. 47 CFR 76.1804 - Aeronautical frequencies: leakage monitoring (CLI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Aeronautical frequencies: leakage monitoring... Aeronautical frequencies: leakage monitoring (CLI). An MVPD shall notify the Commission before transmitting any... to be used; and (g) For MVPDs subject to § 76.611, the cumulative signal leakage index derived...

  12. 47 CFR 76.1804 - Aeronautical frequencies: leakage monitoring (CLI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Aeronautical frequencies: leakage monitoring... Aeronautical frequencies: leakage monitoring (CLI). An MVPD shall notify the Commission before transmitting any... to be used; and (g) For MVPDs subject to § 76.611, the cumulative signal leakage index derived...

  13. 47 CFR 76.1804 - Aeronautical frequencies: leakage monitoring (CLI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Aeronautical frequencies: leakage monitoring... Aeronautical frequencies: leakage monitoring (CLI). An MVPD shall notify the Commission before transmitting any... to be used; and (g) For MVPDs subject to § 76.611, the cumulative signal leakage index derived...

  14. Aeronautical engineering: A continuing bibliography with indexes (supplement 310)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This bibliography lists 29 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in Nov. 1994. Subject coverage includes: engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction,evaluation testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles.

  15. Aeronautics and Space Report of the President: Fiscal Year 1998 Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 directed the annual Aeronautics and Space Report to include a "comprehensive description of the programmed activities and the accomplishments of all agencies of the United States in the field of aeronautics and space activities during the preceding calendar year. In recent years, the reports have been prepared on a fiscal year (FY) basis, consistent with the budgetary period now used in programs of the Federal Government. This year's report covers activities that took place from October 1, 1997, through September 30, 1998. The activities of agencies included are NASA, the Department of Defense, The Federal Aviation Administration, the Department of Commerce, the Department of the Interior, the Federal Communications Commission, the Department of Agriculture, the National Science Foundation, the Department of State, the Department of Energy, the Smithsonian Institution, the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the U.S. Information Agency. Appendices cover the U.S. Government Spacecraft Record, World Record of Space Launches Successful in Attaining Earth Orbit or Beyond , Successful Launches to Orbit on U.S. Launch Vehicles, October 1, 1997-September 30, 1998, U.S. and Russian Human Space Flights, 1961-September 30, 1998, U.S. Space Launch Vehicles, Space Activities of the U.S. Government-Historical Budget Summary, Space Activities of the U.S. Government-Budget Authority in Equivalent FY 1998 Dollars, Federal Space Activities Budget, Federal Aeronautics Budget, and a glossary

  16. Aeronautical engineering: A continuing bibliography with indexes (supplement 294)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This issue of Aeronautical Engineering - A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes lists 590 reports, journal articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspect of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. The bibliographic series is compiled through the cooperative efforts of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Seven indexes are included: subject, personal author, corporate source, foreign technology, contract number, report number, and accession number.

  17. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Twenty-Fifth Anniversary, 1958-1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    This year marks a major milestone for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration: its silver anniversary. It seems appropriate, on this occasion, to sum up how NASA has responded to the legislative charter that established the agency. Among the responsibilities the Congress assigned NASA in the National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 were these: preservation of U.S. leadership in aerospace science and technology; cooperation with other nations in the peaceful application of technology; expansion of human knowledge of phenomena in the atmosphere and in space; pursuit of the practical benefits to be gained from aeronautical and space activities. There can be no doubt that NASA's quarter century of effort has preserved the nation's leadership role and strengthened its posture in aerospace science and technology. As for international cooperation. NASA has - since its inception - fostered the concept that the fruits of civil space research are to be shared with all mankind. The agency has provided technical assistance to scores of nations and has actively promoted cooperative ventures; indeed, virtually every major NASA space project today boasts some degree of foreign participation. In the last 25 years, man has teamed more about his planet, the near-Earth environment, and the universe than in all the prior years of history. NASA's space science program has spearheaded this great expansion of human knowledge. And, from the beginning, NASA has vigorously pursued the practical benefits that aerospace research offers. The agency pioneered in weather, communications and Earth resources survey satellites, the prime examples of space technology applied for Earth benefit, and it has built a broad base for expanding into new applications, some of which promise direct benefits of exceptional order. In aeronautical research, NASA has contributed in substantial degree to safer, better performing, more efficient, more environmentally acceptable aircraft.

  18. 14 CFR 121.123 - Servicing maintenance facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Servicing maintenance facilities. 121.123 Section 121.123 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Operations § 121.123 Servicing maintenance facilities. Each certificate holder conducting...

  19. 14 CFR 121.123 - Servicing maintenance facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Servicing maintenance facilities. 121.123 Section 121.123 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Operations § 121.123 Servicing maintenance facilities. Each certificate holder conducting...

  20. 14 CFR 121.103 - En route navigation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false En route navigation facilities. 121.103 Section 121.103 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... § 121.103 En route navigation facilities. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section,...

  1. 14 CFR 121.121 - En route navigation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false En route navigation facilities. 121.121 Section 121.121 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Operations § 121.121 En route navigation facilities. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this...

  2. 14 CFR 125.51 - En route navigation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false En route navigation facilities. 125.51 Section 125.51 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... and Miscellaneous Requirements § 125.51 En route navigation facilities. (a) Except as provided...

  3. 14 CFR 21.137 - Location of manufacturing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Location of manufacturing facilities. 21.137 Section 21.137 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... manufacturing facilities. The Administrator does not issue a production certificate if the...

  4. 14 CFR 21.137 - Location of manufacturing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Location of manufacturing facilities. 21.137 Section 21.137 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... manufacturing facilities. The Administrator does not issue a production certificate if the...

  5. The Fluids And Combustion Facility Combustion Integrated Rack And The Multi-User Droplet Combustion Apparatus: Microgravity Combustion Science Using Modular Multi-User Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OMalley, Terence F.; Myhre, Craig A.

    2000-01-01

    The Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) is a multi-rack payload planned for the International Space Station (ISS) that will enable the study of fluid physics and combustion science in a microgravity environment. The Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) is one of two International Standard Payload Racks of the FCF and is being designed primarily to support combustion science experiments. The Multi-user Droplet Combustion Apparatus (MDCA) is a multi-user apparatus designed to accommodate four different droplet combustion science experiments and is the first payload for CIR. The CIR will function independently until the later launch of the Fluids Integrated Rack component of the FCF. This paper provides an overview of the capabilities and the development status of the CIR and MDCA.

  6. Development, support, evaluation, and productivity of community-based Earth science research facilities: The NSF-EAR/IF model and why it has been so successful

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochella, M. F.

    2002-12-01

    The Instrumentation and Facilities (IF) program within the Division of Earth Sciences (EAR), Directorate for Geosciences, at the National Science Foundation in Washington, D.C., has been highly successful in encouraging the development of, and thereafter nurturing, a number of outstanding community-based research facilities. Currently about 70% of the EAR/IF budget goes to 13 such facilities, accounting for about \\$20M annually. These facilities range widely in their scope and cost of operations, from laboratories with single instruments whose in-house directors give outside academic users scheduling priorities and lower cost per time rates, to very large consortia of universities with an extensive instrumentation base and funding from a number of sources beyond NSF. The attribute that all of these facilities share is the ability to bring to the at-large user community facilities that would be otherwise impractical to provide to such a number of individual investigators. Especially when this NSF funding is supplemented by support from the participating universities and other agencies, these facilities have been exceptionally successful and long-lived, in part due to the rigorous scrutiny of extensive and objective review procedures. Perhaps most interesting of all is the fact the NSF scientific staff, and the staffs of cooperating agencies, as program administrators, are skilled in knowing how to keep in mind the pulse of the community that they serve and the direction of future scientific development. As they collaborate in the development of new initiatives, NSF staff are really mirrors, reflecting and focusing the carefully formulated visions determined by the outside community itself. Within this system, EAR/IF has multiple checks and balances to keep the research that they are presently supporting fresh, progressive, and often unique. These include constantly searching for new initiatives, as well as developing innovative cost-sharing strategies with other

  7. A Hybrid Satellite-Terrestrial Approach to Aeronautical Communication Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Chomos, Gerald J.; Griner, James H.; Mainger, Steven W.; Martzaklis, Konstantinos S.; Kachmar, Brian A.

    2000-01-01

    Rapid growth in air travel has been projected to continue for the foreseeable future. To maintain a safe and efficient national and global aviation system, significant advances in communications systems supporting aviation are required. Satellites will increasingly play a critical role in the aeronautical communications network. At the same time, current ground-based communications links, primarily very high frequency (VHF), will continue to be employed due to cost advantages and legacy issues. Hence a hybrid satellite-terrestrial network, or group of networks, will emerge. The increased complexity of future aeronautical communications networks dictates that system-level modeling be employed to obtain an optimal system fulfilling a majority of user needs. The NASA Glenn Research Center is investigating the current and potential future state of aeronautical communications, and is developing a simulation and modeling program to research future communications architectures for national and global aeronautical needs. This paper describes the primary requirements, the current infrastructure, and emerging trends of aeronautical communications, including a growing role for satellite communications. The need for a hybrid communications system architecture approach including both satellite and ground-based communications links is explained. Future aeronautical communication network topologies and key issues in simulation and modeling of future aeronautical communications systems are described.

  8. Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Linda E., Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on science instruction and technology: "A 3-D Journey in Space: A New Visual Cognitive Adventure" (Yoav Yair, Rachel Mintz, and Shai Litvak); "Using Collaborative Inquiry and Interactive Technologies in an Environmental Science Project for Middle School Teachers: A Description and Analysis" (Patricia…

  9. NASA's Role in Aeronautics: A Workshop. Volume 7: Background papers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The nature and implications of the current state of U.S. aviation in a world setting are examined as well as their significance for NASA's role in the nation's aeronautical future. The outlook for the 1980's is examined from the point of view of legislation, economics and finance; petroleum; manpower, metallic materials, general aviation; military aviation; transport aircraft developments; and helicopters. Possible NASA assistance to DOD and the FAA is examined and the evolution of NACA and NASA in aeronautics and of NASA's aeronautics capabilities are described.

  10. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 391

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-1999-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract.

  11. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 387

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-1998-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract.

  12. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography With Indexes. Supplement 404

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-1999-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  13. Aeronautics and space report of the president, 1974 activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The U.S. Government activities for 1974 in aeronautics and space are presented. Significant contributions toward the fulfillment of the nation's goals in space and aeronautics are covered, including application of space systems and technology to beneficial uses on earth, exploration of space and increase of scientific knowledge, development of improved space systems and technology, international cooperation, and advancement of civil and military aeronautics. Also in 1974, space activities in the private sector expanded to provide additional services to the public. The accomplishments are summarized.

  14. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 420

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-2000-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  15. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 386

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-1998-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract.

  16. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 419

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-2000-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  17. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography With Indexes. Supplement 398

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. The NASA CASI price code table, addresses of organizations, and document availability information are included before the abstract section. Two indexes - subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  18. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography With Indexes. Supplement 406

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-1999-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  19. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 413

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-2000-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  20. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography With Indexes. Supplement 418

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-2000-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  1. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 396

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-1999-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  2. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 389

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-1998-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract.

  3. An Overview of the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) Facility, and the Gravity-Dependent Phenomena Research Performed in the MSG on the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spivey, Reggie A.; Sheredy, William A.; Flores, Ginger

    2008-01-01

    The Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) is a double rack facility aboard the International Space Station (ISS) designed for gravity-dependent phenomena investigation handling. The MSG has been operating in the ISS US Laboratory Module since July 2002. The MSG facility provides an enclosed working area for investigation manipulation and observation, The MSG's unique design provides two levels of containment to protect the ISS crew from hazardous operations. Research investigations operating inside the MSG are provided a large 255 liter work volume, 1000 watts of dc power via a versatile supply interface (120, 28, +/-12, and 5 Vdc), 1000 watts of cooling capability, video and data recording and real time downlink, ground commanding capabilities, access to ISS Vacuum Exhaust and Vacuum Resource Systems, and gaseous nitrogen supply. With these capabilities, the MSG is an ideal platform for research required to advance the technology readiness levels (TRL) needed for the Crew Exploration Vehicle and the Exploration Initiative. Areas of research that will benefit from investigations in the MSG include thermal management, fluid physics, spacecraft fire safety, materials science, combustion, reaction control systems, in situ fabrication and repair, and advanced life support technologies. This paper will provide a detailed explanation of the MSG facility, a synopsis of the research that has already been accomplished in the MSG and an overview of investigations planning to operate in the MSG. In addition, this paper will address possible changes to the MSG utilization process that will be brought about by the transition to ISS as a National Laboratory.

  4. Bureau of Aeronautics, June 5, 1945, Photograph 519. ASERIAL OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Bureau of Aeronautics, June 5, 1945, Photograph 51-9. ASERIAL OF ROOSEVELT BASE, DIRECT OVERHEAD, SHOWING PIERS AND MOLE UNDER CONSTRUCTION - Roosevelt Base, Bounded by Ocean Boulevard, Pennsylvania Avenue, Richardson Avenue, & Idaho Street, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  5. Bureau of Aeronautics, October 16, 1943, Photograph #4875. AERIAL OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Bureau of Aeronautics, October 16, 1943, Photograph #4875. AERIAL OF ROOSEVELT BASE LOOKING EAST - Roosevelt Base, Bounded by Ocean Boulevard, Pennsylvania Avenue, Richardson Avenue, & Idaho Street, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  6. Astronautics and Aeronautics, 1979-1984: A chronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janson, Bette R.; Ritchie, Eleanor H.

    1989-01-01

    This volume of the Astronautics and Aeronautics series covers 1979 through 1984. The series provides a chronological presentation of all significant events and developments in space exploration and the administration of the space program during the period covered.

  7. The Aeronautical Laboratory of the Stockholm Technical Institute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malmer, Ivar

    1935-01-01

    This report presents a detailed analysis and history of the construction and operation of the aeronautical laboratory of the Stockholm Technical Institute. Engines and balances are discussed and experimental results are also given.

  8. 77 FR 50759 - Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: This...

  9. 76 FR 12211 - Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces the...

  10. National Aeronautics and Space Administration technology application team program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Contracts are reported between the RTI TATeam and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and other governmental, educational, and industrial organizations participating in NASA's Technology Utilization Program.

  11. 78 FR 52230 - Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces the...

  12. 75 FR 54221 - Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces the...

  13. 77 FR 13683 - Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces the...

  14. 76 FR 53530 - Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces the...

  15. 78 FR 12415 - Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces the...

  16. Aeronautical engineering: A continuing bibliography with indexes (supplement 119)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    This bibliography lists 341 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in January 1980. Abstracts on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems are presented. Research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles are also presented.

  17. Aeronautical Engineering, a special bibliography with indexes, supplement 15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This special bibliography lists 363 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in January 1972. Emphasis is placed on engineering and theoretical aspects for design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment and systems. Also included are entries on research and development in aeronautics and aerodynamics and research and ground support for aeronautical vehicles.

  18. Aeronautical Engineering: A special bibliography with indexes, supplement 13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This special bibliography lists 283 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in December, 1971. Emphasis is placed on engineering and theoretical aspects for design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines), and associated components, equipment and systems. Also included are entries on research and development in aeronautics and aerodynamics and research and ground support for aeronautical vehicles.

  19. Aeronautical engineering: A continuing bibliography with indexes (supplement 282)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This bibliography lists 623 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in Aug. 1992. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles.

  20. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 397

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This report lists reports, articles and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract.

  1. First Semiannual Report of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glennan, T. Keith

    1959-01-01

    The First Semiannual Report of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is submitted to Congress pursuant to section 206 (a) of the National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 (Public Law 85-568) to provide for research into problems of flight within and outside the Earth's atmosphere, which states: The Administration shall submit to the President for transmittal to Congress, semiannually and at such other times as it deems desirable, a report on its activities and accomplishments.

  2. A Vision in Aeronautics: The K-12 Wind Tunnel Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A Vision in Aeronautics, a project within the NASA Lewis Research Center's Information Infrastructure Technologies and Applications (IITA) K-12 Program, employs small-scale, subsonic wind tunnels to inspire students to explore the world of aeronautics and computers. Recently, two educational K-12 wind tunnels were built in the Cleveland area. During the 1995-1996 school year, preliminary testing occurred in both tunnels.

  3. The Characteristics of Project Managers: An Exploration of Complex Projects in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulenburg, Gerald M.

    2000-01-01

    Study of characteristics and relationships of project managers of complex projects in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Study is based on Research Design, Data Collection, Interviews, Case Studies, and Data Analysis across varying disciplines such as biological research, space research, advanced aeronautical test facilities, aeronautic flight demonstrations, and projects at different NASA centers to ensure that findings were not endemic to one type of project management, or to one Center's management philosophies. Each project is treated as a separate case with the primary data collected during semi-structured interviews with the project manager responsible for the overall project. Results of the various efforts show some definite similarities of characteristics and relationships among the project managers in the study. A model for how the project managers formulated and managed their projects is included.

  4. Long Duration Exposure Facility: A general overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oneal, Robert L.; Lightner, E. Burton

    1992-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) is a large, low-cost, reusable, unmanned, free-flying spacecraft which accommodates technology, science, and applications experiments for long-term exposure to the space environment. The LDEF was designed and built by the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) for NASA's Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology. Specifically, the LDEF was designed to transport experiments into space via the Space Shuttle, to free fly in Earth orbit for an extended period, and be retrieved on a later Space Shuttle flight allowing experiments to be returned to Earth for postflight analysis in the laboratory. The LDEF with a full complement of experiments was placed in Earth orbit in April 1984 by Challenger and retrieved from orbit in January 1990 by Columbia. A general overview of the LDEF, its mission, systems, experiments, and operations is presented. Excerpts from various NASA documents are extensively used.

  5. SOLERAS - Solar Controlled Environment Agriculture Project. Final report, Volume 7. Science Applications, Incorporated field test facility preliminary design

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This report contains the preliminary design of an SCEAS Engineering Test Facility (ETF). The ETF is a 3600 m/sup 2/ fluid roof greenhouse with an inflated plastic film roof to maintain a clean environment for the fluid roof and to protect the inner glazing from hail and other small missiles. The objective of the design was the faithful scaling of the commercial facility to ensure that the ETF results could be extrapolated to a commercial facility of any size. Therefore, all major features, including the photovoltaic power system, an integral water desalination system and even the basic structural module have been retained. The design is described in substantial detail in the body of this report, with appendices giving the drawings and specifications.

  6. 78 FR 8684 - Fifteenth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 217-Aeronautical Databases Joint with EUROCAE WG-44...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-06

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Fifteenth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 217--Aeronautical Databases Joint with EUROCAE WG-44--Aeronautical Databases AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Notice of RTCA Special Committee 217--Aeronautical...

  7. 78 FR 25134 - Sixteenth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 217-Aeronautical Databases Joint With EUROCAE WG-44...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-29

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Sixteenth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 217--Aeronautical Databases Joint With EUROCAE WG-44--Aeronautical Databases AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Notice of RTCA Special Committee 217--Aeronautical...

  8. 78 FR 51809 - Seventeenth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 217-Aeronautical Databases Joint With EUROCAE WG-44...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-21

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Seventeenth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 217--Aeronautical Databases Joint With EUROCAE WG-44--Aeronautical Databases AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Notice of RTCA Special Committee 217--Aeronautical...

  9. 78 FR 7816 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Unmanned Aircraft Systems Subcommittee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Unmanned Aircraft Systems Subcommittee Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting....

  10. 77 FR 7183 - Public Availability of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration FY 2011 Service Contract...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION Public Availability of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration FY 2011 Service Contract Inventory AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of...

  11. 76 FR 75565 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Subcommittee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Subcommittee Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of Meeting....

  12. 77 FR 32699 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; UAS Subcommittee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; UAS Subcommittee Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with...

  13. 78 FR 13383 - Public Availability of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration FY 2012 Service Contract...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION Public Availability of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration FY 2012 Service Contract Inventory (SCI) AGENCY: Office of Procurement, National Aeronautics and...

  14. 78 FR 25100 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Unmanned Aircraft Systems Subcommittee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Unmanned Aircraft Systems Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting....

  15. 78 FR 38076 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Unmanned Aircraft Systems Subcommittee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Unmanned Aircraft Systems Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of Meeting....

  16. 77 FR 59020 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Unmanned Aircraft Systems Subcommittee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Unmanned Aircraft Systems Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting....

  17. [Is dry eye syndrome a professional disease for aeronautical personnel?].

    PubMed

    Nicodin, Aurora; Macri, Marian

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the eye comfort of the aeronautical personnel. This study has been conducted in ophthalmologic office of the National Institute of Aeronautical and Space Medicine, for 68 patients (group 1), men and women, active aeronautical personnel, between 35-55 years old, apparently ophthalmologically normal subjects. First the patients filled out a questionnaire that was intended to provide the subjective evaluation; objective investigation included: biomicroscopy, fluorescein stain, tear break up time (BUT) and Schirmer tear test. There have been found subclinical, mild and moderate dry eye; tear substitutes have been prescribed. The patients were re-examined every 3 months, for a period of 9 months. Results were compared with those obtained from a control group--20 people (group 2), women and men, with ages in the same range, people not involved in the aviation field who requested ophthalmological examination for optical correction. The results raise the question: can the "Dry eye syndrome" be considered a work-related disease? The answer will be "probably no" indulging oneself conditions required by International Aeronautical Authority (ex. periodically hydration and enough in volume), even if the environmental conditions inside the aircraft can produce this disorder. During flight, aeronautical personnel should use tear substitutes, because of the low humidity of the air inside the aircraft.

  18. Figures of Merit for Aeronautics Programs and Addition to NASA LARC Fire Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, Belinda M.

    1995-01-01

    This report accounts details of two research projects for the Langley Aerospace Research Summer Scholars (LARSS) program. The first project, with the Office of Mission Assurance, involved subjectively predicting the probable success of two aeronautics programs by means of a tool called a Figure of Merit. The figure of merit bases program success on the quality and reliability of the following factors: parts, complexity of research, quality programs, hazards elimination, and single point failures elimination. The second project, for the Office of Safety and Facilities Assurance, required planning, layouts, and source seeking for an addition to the fire house. Forecasted changes in facility layout necessitate this addition which will serve as housing for the fire fighters.

  19. The Aeronautics Education, Research, and Industry Alliance (AERIAL) 2002 Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, Brent D.; Box, Richard C.; Fink, Mary; Gogos, George; Lehrer, Henry R.; Narayanan, Ram M.; Nickerson, Jocelyn S.; Tarry, Scott E.; Vlasek, Karisa D.; O'Neil, Patrick D.

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Nebraska Space Grant Consortium (NSGC) & EPSCoR programs at the University of Nebraska at Omaha are involved in a variety of innovative research activities. Such research is supported through the Aeronautics Education, Research, and Industry Alliance (AERIAL) and collaborative seed funds. AERIAL is a comprehensive, multi-faceted, five year NASA EPSCoR initiative that contributes substantially to the strategic research and technology priorities of NASA while intensifying Nebraska s rapidly growing aeronautics research and development endeavors. AERIAL includes three major collaborative research teams (CRTs) whose nexus is a common focus in aeronautics research. Each CRT - Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS), Airborne Remote Sensing for Agricultural Research and Commercialization Applications (ARS), and Numerical Simulation of the Combustion of Fuel Droplets: Finite Rate Kinetics and Flame Zone Grid Adaptation (CEFD) -has a distinct research agenda. This program provides the template for funding of new and innovative research that emphasizes aerospace technology.

  20. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplment 394

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-1999-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. The NASA CASI price code table, addresses of organizations, and document availability information are included before the abstract section. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.