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Sample records for aeronautics interactive workstation

  1. Conversion of the Aeronautics Interactive Workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riveras, Nykkita L.

    2004-01-01

    This summer I am working in the Educational Programs Office. My task is to convert the Aeronautics Interactive Workstation from a Macintosh (Mac) platform to a Personal Computer (PC) platform. The Aeronautics Interactive Workstation is a workstation in the Aerospace Educational Laboratory (AEL), which is one of the three components of the Science, Engineering, Mathematics, and Aerospace Academy (SEMAA). The AEL is a state-of-the-art, electronically enhanced, computerized classroom that puts cutting-edge technology at the fingertips of participating students. It provides a unique learning experience regarding aerospace technology that features activities equipped with aerospace hardware and software that model real-world challenges. The Aeronautics Interactive Workstation, in particular, offers a variety of activities pertaining to the history of aeronautics. When the Aeronautics Interactive Workstation was first implemented into the AEL it was designed with Macromedia Director 4 for a Mac. Today it is being converted to Macromedia DirectorMX2004 for a PC. Macromedia Director is the proven multimedia tool for building rich content and applications for CDs, DVDs, kiosks, and the Internet. It handles the widest variety of media and offers powerful features for building rich content that delivers red results, integrating interactive audio, video, bitmaps, vectors, text, fonts, and more. Macromedia Director currently offers two programmingkripting languages: Lingo, which is Director's own programmingkripting language and JavaScript. In the workstation, Lingo is used in the programming/scripting since it was the only language in use when the workstation was created. Since the workstation was created with an older version of Macromedia Director it hosted significantly different programming/scripting protocols. In order to successfully accomplish my task, the final product required correction of Xtra and programming/scripting errors. I also had to convert the Mac platform

  2. Personal telepresence: an interactive multimedia workstation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pihlman, Mike; Farrell, Renee E.

    1994-04-01

    Personal Telepresence is an interactive multimedia tool that allows individuals or groups to, affordably, meet with remotely located individuals or groups--from their desktop--as if they were all in the same location. A Personal Telepresence workstation would include telephony, computer, desktop videoconferencing, groupware, and graphics capability on a single platform. The user interface presented will allow natural, face-to-face interaction between all those involved in `virtual' meeting, classroom, office or manufacturing problem solving sessions. Files could be opened and placed on a virtual `conference table' where changes could be made interactively by any or all the `meeting' participants. `Copies' of the files can be made, `stapled' together, and given to each of the attendees. The desktop would include a `whiteboard' for brainstorming sessions and a `projector screen' to display movies, video mail, and/or the results of a simulation program. This paper discusses desktop collaboration needs and the Personal Telepresence project at LLNL.

  3. Low Cost Desktop Image Analysis Workstation With Enhanced Interactive User Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratib, Osman M.; Huang, H. K.

    1989-05-01

    A multimodality picture archiving and communication system (PACS) is in routine clinical use in the UCLA Radiology Department. Several types workstations are currently implemented for this PACS. Among them, the Apple Macintosh II personal computer was recently chosen to serve as a desktop workstation for display and analysis of radiological images. This personal computer was selected mainly because of its extremely friendly user-interface, its popularity among the academic and medical community and its low cost. In comparison to other microcomputer-based systems the Macintosh II offers the following advantages: the extreme standardization of its user interface, file system and networking, and the availability of a very large variety of commercial software packages. In the current configuration the Macintosh II operates as a stand-alone workstation where images are imported from a centralized PACS server through an Ethernet network using a standard TCP-IP protocol, and stored locally on magnetic disk. The use of high resolution screens (1024x768 pixels x 8bits) offer sufficient performance for image display and analysis. We focused our project on the design and implementation of a variety of image analysis algorithms ranging from automated structure and edge detection to sophisticated dynamic analysis of sequential images. Specific analysis programs were developed for ultrasound images, digitized angiograms, MRI and CT tomographic images and scintigraphic images.

  4. Telescience workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Robert L.; Doyle, Dee; Haines, Richard F.; Slocum, Michael

    1989-01-01

    As part of the Telescience Testbed Pilot Program, the Universities Space Research Association/ Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (USRA/RIACS) proposed to support remote communication by providing a network of human/machine interfaces, computer resources, and experimental equipment which allows: remote science, collaboration, technical exchange, and multimedia communication. The telescience workstation is intended to provide a local computing environment for telescience. The purpose of the program are as follows: (1) to provide a suitable environment to integrate existing and new software for a telescience workstation; (2) to provide a suitable environment to develop new software in support of telescience activities; (3) to provide an interoperable environment so that a wide variety of workstations may be used in the telescience program; (4) to provide a supportive infrastructure and a common software base; and (5) to advance, apply, and evaluate the telescience technolgy base. A prototype telescience computing environment designed to bring practicing scientists in domains other than their computer science into a modern style of doing their computing was created and deployed. This environment, the Telescience Windowing Environment, Phase 1 (TeleWEn-1), met some, but not all of the goals stated above. The TeleWEn-1 provided a window-based workstation environment and a set of tools for text editing, document preparation, electronic mail, multimedia mail, raster manipulation, and system management.

  5. A computer graphics pilot project - Spacecraft mission support with an interactive graphics workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagedorn, John; Ehrner, Marie-Jacqueline; Reese, Jodi; Chang, Kan; Tseng, Irene

    1986-01-01

    The NASA Computer Graphics Pilot Project was undertaken to enhance the quality control, productivity and efficiency of mission support operations at the Goddard Operations Support Computing Facility. The Project evolved into a set of demonstration programs for graphics intensive simulated control room operations, particularly in connection with the complex space missions that began in the 1980s. Complex mission mean more data. Graphic displays are a means to reduce the probabilities of operator errors. Workstations were selected with 1024 x 768 pixel color displays controlled by a custom VLSI chip coupled to an MC68010 chip running UNIX within a shell that permits operations through the medium of mouse-accessed pulldown window menus. The distributed workstations run off a host NAS 8040 computer. Applications of the system for tracking spacecraft orbits and monitoring Shuttle payload handling illustrate the system capabilities, noting the built-in capabilities of shifting the point of view and rotating and zooming in on three-dimensional views of spacecraft.

  6. A Workstation for Interactive Display and Quantitative Analysis of 3-D and 4-D Biomedical Images

    PubMed Central

    Robb, R.A.; Heffeman, P.B.; Camp, J.J.; Hanson, D.P.

    1986-01-01

    The capability to extract objective and quantitatively accurate information from 3-D radiographic biomedical images has not kept pace with the capabilities to produce the images themselves. This is rather an ironic paradox, since on the one hand the new 3-D and 4-D imaging capabilities promise significant potential for providing greater specificity and sensitivity (i.e., precise objective discrimination and accurate quantitative measurement of body tissue characteristics and function) in clinical diagnostic and basic investigative imaging procedures than ever possible before, but on the other hand, the momentous advances in computer and associated electronic imaging technology which have made these 3-D imaging capabilities possible have not been concomitantly developed for full exploitation of these capabilities. Therefore, we have developed a powerful new microcomputer-based system which permits detailed investigations and evaluation of 3-D and 4-D (dynamic 3-D) biomedical images. The system comprises a special workstation to which all the information in a large 3-D image data base is accessible for rapid display, manipulation, and measurement. The system provides important capabilities for simultaneously representing and analyzing both structural and functional data and their relationships in various organs of the body. This paper provides a detailed description of this system, as well as some of the rationale, background, theoretical concepts, and practical considerations related to system implementation. ImagesFigure 5Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11Figure 12Figure 13Figure 14Figure 15Figure 16

  7. Evolving technologies for Space Station Freedom computer-based workstations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Dean G.; Rudisill, Marianne

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on evolving technologies for Space Station Freedom computer-based workstations are presented. The human-computer computer software environment modules are described. The following topics are addressed: command and control workstation concept; cupola workstation concept; Japanese experiment module RMS workstation concept; remote devices controlled from workstations; orbital maneuvering vehicle free flyer; remote manipulator system; Japanese experiment module exposed facility; Japanese experiment module small fine arm; flight telerobotic servicer; human-computer interaction; and workstation/robotics related activities.

  8. The Particle Beam Optics Interactive Computer Laboratory for Personal Computers and Workstations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, G. H.; Hill, B.; Brown, N.; Martono, H.; Moore, J.; Babcock, C.

    1997-05-01

    The Particle Beam Optics Interactive Computer Laboratory (PBO Lab) is a new software concept to aid both students and professionals in modeling charged particle beams and particle beam optical systems. The PBO Lab has been designed to run on several computer platforms and includes four key elements: a graphic user interface shell; (2) a knowledge database on electric and magnetic optics elements, including interactive tutorials on the physics of charged particle optics and on the technology used in particle optics hardware; (3) a graphic construction kit for users to interactively and visually construct optical beam lines; and (4) a set of charged particle optics computational engines that compute transport matrices, beam envelopes and trajectories, fit parameters to optical constraints, and carry out similar calculations for the graphically-defined beam lines. The primary computational engines in the first generation PBO Lab are the third-order TRANSPORT code, the multiple ray tracing program TURTLE, and a new first-order matrix code that includes an envelope space charge model with support for calculating single trajectories in the presence of the beam space charge. Progress on the PBO Lab development is described and a demonstration will be given.

  9. The human factors of workstation telepresence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Thomas J.; Smith, Karl U.

    1990-01-01

    The term workstation telepresence has been introduced to describe human-telerobot compliance, which enables the human operator to effectively project his/her body image and behavioral skills to control of the telerobot itself. Major human-factors considerations for establishing high fidelity workstation telepresence during human-telerobot operation are discussed. Telerobot workstation telepresence is defined by the proficiency and skill with which the operator is able to control sensory feedback from direct interaction with the workstation itself, and from workstation-mediated interaction with the telerobot. Numerous conditions influencing such control have been identified. This raises the question as to what specific factors most critically influence the realization of high fidelity workstation telepresence. The thesis advanced here is that perturbations in sensory feedback represent a major source of variability in human performance during interactive telerobot operation. Perturbed sensory feedback research over the past three decades has established that spatial transformations or temporal delays in sensory feedback engender substantial decrements in interactive task performance, which training does not completely overcome. A recently developed social cybernetic model of human-computer interaction can be used to guide this approach, based on computer-mediated tracking and control of sensory feedback. How the social cybernetic model can be employed for evaluating the various modes, patterns, and integrations of interpersonal, team, and human-computer interactions which play a central role is workstation telepresence are discussed.

  10. Telerobotic workstation design aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corker, K.; Hudlicka, E.; Young, D.; Cramer, N.

    1989-01-01

    Telerobot systems are being developed to support a number of space mission applications. In low earth orbit, telerobots and teleoperated manipulators will be used in shuttle operations and space station construction/maintenance. Free flying telerobotic service vehicles will be used at low and geosynchronous orbital operations. Rovers and autonomous vehicles will be equipped with telerobotic devices in planetary exploration. In all of these systems, human operators will interact with the robot system at varied levels during the scheduled operations. The human operators may be in either orbital or ground-based control systems. To assure integrated system development and maximum utility across these systems, designers must be sensitive to the constraints and capabilities that the human brings to system operation and must be assisted in applying these human factors to system development. The simulation and analysis system is intended to serve the needs of system analysis/designers as an integrated workstation in support of telerobotic design.

  11. Stellar Inertial Navigation Workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.; Johnson, B.; Swaminathan, N.

    1989-01-01

    Software and hardware assembled to support specific engineering activities. Stellar Inertial Navigation Workstation (SINW) is integrated computer workstation providing systems and engineering support functions for Space Shuttle guidance and navigation-system logistics, repair, and procurement activities. Consists of personal-computer hardware, packaged software, and custom software integrated together into user-friendly, menu-driven system. Designed to operate on IBM PC XT. Applied in business and industry to develop similar workstations.

  12. Workstations in Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joy, William; Gage, John

    1985-01-01

    Workstations are microprocessor-based desktop computers with the hardware architecture of superminicomputers, combining virtual memory with sophisticated operating systems, communications protocols, advanced languages, and high-resolution graphics. The development of workstations and their uses in scientific environments are discussed. (JN)

  13. Flow visualization of CFD using graphics workstations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasinski, Thomas; Buning, Pieter; Choi, Diana; Rogers, Stuart; Bancroft, Gordon

    1987-01-01

    High performance graphics workstations are used to visualize the fluid flow dynamics obtained from supercomputer solutions of computational fluid dynamic programs. The visualizations can be done independently on the workstation or while the workstation is connected to the supercomputer in a distributed computing mode. In the distributed mode, the supercomputer interactively performs the computationally intensive graphics rendering tasks while the workstation performs the viewing tasks. A major advantage of the workstations is that the viewers can interactively change their viewing position while watching the dynamics of the flow fields. An overview of the computer hardware and software required to create these displays is presented. For complex scenes the workstation cannot create the displays fast enough for good motion analysis. For these cases, the animation sequences are recorded on video tape or 16 mm film a frame at a time and played back at the desired speed. The additional software and hardware required to create these video tapes or 16 mm movies are also described. Photographs illustrating current visualization techniques are discussed. Examples of the use of the workstations for flow visualization through animation are available on video tape.

  14. [Exploring Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Brandi

    2004-01-01

    This summer I have been working with the N.A.S.A. Project at Cuyahoga Community College (Tri-C) under the title of Exploring Aeronautics Project Leader. The class that I have worked with is comprised of students that will enter the eighth grade in the fall of 2004. The program primarily focuses upon math proficiency and individualized class projects. My duties have encompassed both realms. During the first 2-3 weeks of my internship, I worked at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) researching, organizing, and compiling information for weekly Scholastic Challenges and the Super Scholastic Challenge. I was able to complete an overview of Scholastic Challenge and staff responsibilities regarding the competition; a proposal for an interactive learning system, Quizdom; a schedule for challenge equipment, as well as a schedule listing submission deadlines for the staff. Also included in my tasks, during these first 2-3 weeks, were assisting Tammy Allen and Candice Thomas with the student application review and interview processes for student applicants. For the student and parent orientation, I was assigned publications and other varying tasks to complete before the start of the program. Upon the commencement of the program, I changed location from NASA GRC to Tri-C Metro Campus, where student classes for the Cleveland site are held. During the duration of the program, I work with the instructor for the Exploring Aeronautics class, kkkk, assisting in classroom management, daily attendance, curriculum, project building, and other tasks as needed. These tasks include the conducting of the weekly competition, known as Scholastic Challenge. As a Project Leader, I am also responsible for one subject area of the Scholastic Challenge aspect of the N.A.S.A. Project curriculum. Each week I have to prepare a mission that the participants will take home the following Monday and at least 10 questions that will be included in the pool of questions used for the Scholastic Challenge

  15. Orbiter Flying Qualities (OFQ) Workstation user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Thomas T.; Parseghian, Zareh; Hogue, Jeffrey R.

    1988-01-01

    This project was devoted to the development of a software package, called the Orbiter Flying Qualities (OFQ) Workstation, for working with the OFQ Archives which are specially selected sets of space shuttle entry flight data relevant to flight control and flying qualities. The basic approach to creation of the workstation software was to federate and extend commercial software products to create a low cost package that operates on personal computers. Provision was made to link the workstation to large computers, but the OFQ Archive files were also converted to personal computer diskettes and can be stored on workstation hard disk drives. The primary element of the workstation developed in the project is the Interactive Data Handler (IDH) which allows the user to select data subsets from the archives and pass them to specialized analysis programs. The IDH was developed as an application in a relational database management system product. The specialized analysis programs linked to the workstation include a spreadsheet program, FREDA for spectral analysis, MFP for frequency domain system identification, and NIPIP for pilot-vehicle system parameter identification. The workstation also includes capability for ensemble analysis over groups of missions.

  16. Java Mission Evaluation Workstation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettinger, Ross; Watlington, Tim; Ryley, Richard; Harbour, Jeff

    2006-01-01

    The Java Mission Evaluation Workstation System (JMEWS) is a collection of applications designed to retrieve, display, and analyze both real-time and recorded telemetry data. This software is currently being used by both the Space Shuttle Program (SSP) and the International Space Station (ISS) program. JMEWS was written in the Java programming language to satisfy the requirement of platform independence. An object-oriented design was used to satisfy additional requirements and to make the software easily extendable. By virtue of its platform independence, JMEWS can be used on the UNIX workstations in the Mission Control Center (MCC) and on office computers. JMEWS includes an interactive editor that allows users to easily develop displays that meet their specific needs. The displays can be developed and modified while viewing data. By simply selecting a data source, the user can view real-time, recorded, or test data.

  17. Engineering workstation: Sensor modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavel, M; Sweet, B.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the engineering workstation is to provide an environment for rapid prototyping and evaluation of fusion and image processing algorithms. Ideally, the algorithms are designed to optimize the extraction of information that is useful to a pilot for all phases of flight operations. Successful design of effective fusion algorithms depends on the ability to characterize both the information available from the sensors and the information useful to a pilot. The workstation is comprised of subsystems for simulation of sensor-generated images, image processing, image enhancement, and fusion algorithms. As such, the workstation can be used to implement and evaluate both short-term solutions and long-term solutions. The short-term solutions are being developed to enhance a pilot's situational awareness by providing information in addition to his direct vision. The long term solutions are aimed at the development of complete synthetic vision systems. One of the important functions of the engineering workstation is to simulate the images that would be generated by the sensors. The simulation system is designed to use the graphics modeling and rendering capabilities of various workstations manufactured by Silicon Graphics Inc. The workstation simulates various aspects of the sensor-generated images arising from phenomenology of the sensors. In addition, the workstation can be used to simulate a variety of impairments due to mechanical limitations of the sensor placement and due to the motion of the airplane. Although the simulation is currently not performed in real-time, sequences of individual frames can be processed, stored, and recorded in a video format. In that way, it is possible to examine the appearance of different dynamic sensor-generated and fused images.

  18. Semiconductor device modeling on a workstation

    SciTech Connect

    Diegert, C.

    1985-09-01

    We choose to move from large mainframe computers to workstations to gain the interactive graphics we need to prepare and to analyze semiconductor device modeling problems. Given this much on a workstation, it is convenient to attempt to solve the entire problem there. We find that a top-of-the-line Apollo 660 workstation, with bit-slice processor, pipelined arithmetic processor, and 4 megabytes of real memory, is surprisingly effective in finding solutions when running the Pisces II device modeling code. In our experiment we find where the workstation bogs down when running these problems. We both analyze the Pisces CPU time log and we sample the executing program to accumulate a histogram of execution time as distributed over the source code. Results suggest how Pisces could be adapted to solve somewhat larger problems entirely on the workstation. Evolution of a trusted derivative of Pisces, to be used on supercomputers without interactivity, is suggested to complement our success with Pisces on workstations. 4 refs.

  19. NASA aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderton, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    Aeronautical research programs are discussed in relation to research methods and the status of the programs. The energy efficient aircraft, STOL aircraft and general aviation aircraft are considered. Aerodynamic concepts, rotary wing aircraft, aircraft safety, noise reduction, and aircraft configurations are among the topics included.

  20. CEM reporting workstation

    SciTech Connect

    Caulfield, C.; Dene, C.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to describe the Continuous Emissions Monitoring (CEM) Reporting Workstation. The authors explore the uses for the CEM Reporting Workstation, look at the technical challenges, summarize the CEM Reporting Workstation solutions and describe the CEM Reporting Workstation architecture and development aspects. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) was formed to apply advanced science and technology to the benefit of member utilities and their customers. Funded through annual membership dues from some 660 member utilities, EPRI`s work covers a wide range of technologies related to the generation, delivery, and use of electricity, with special attention paid to cost-effectiveness and environmental concerns. Texas Utilities and Pennsylvania Electric approached EPRI to look at their concerns about reporting emissions data to the EPA and making the emissions information available to many people within the utility. EPRI contracted Electric Software Products to research the utility market to find out specific needs of the utilities and to develop the CEM Reporting Workstation.

  1. Automated software development workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Engineering software development was automated using an expert system (rule-based) approach. The use of this technology offers benefits not available from current software development and maintenance methodologies. A workstation was built with a library or program data base with methods for browsing the designs stored; a system for graphical specification of designs including a capability for hierarchical refinement and definition in a graphical design system; and an automated code generation capability in FORTRAN. The workstation was then used in a demonstration with examples from an attitude control subsystem design for the space station. Documentation and recommendations are presented.

  2. Integrated telemedicine workstation for intercontinental grand rounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Charles E.; Leckie, Robert G.; Brink, Linda; Goeringer, Fred

    1995-04-01

    The Telemedicine Spacebridge to Moscow was a series of intercontinental sessions sponsored jointly by NASA and the Moscow Academy of Medicine. To improve the quality of medical images presented, the MDIS Project developed a workstation for acquisition, storage, and interactive display of radiology and pathology images. The workstation was based on a Macintosh IIfx platform with a laser digitizer for radiographs and video capture capability for microscope images. Images were transmitted via the Russian Lyoutch Satellite which had only a single video channel available and no high speed data channels. Two workstations were configured -- one for use at the Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences in Bethesda, MD. and the other for use at the Hospital of the Interior in Moscow, Russia. The two workstations were used may times during 16 sessions. As clinicians used the systems, we modified the original configuration to improve interactive use. This project demonstrated that numerous acquisition and output devices could be brought together in a single interactive workstation. The video images were satisfactory for remote consultation in a grand rounds format.

  3. Synergistic Airframe-Propulsion Interactions and Integrations: A White Paper Prepared by the 1996-1997 Langley Aeronautics Technical Committee

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yaros, Steven F.; Sexstone, Matthew G.; Huebner, Lawrence D.; Lamar, John E.; McKinley, Robert E., Jr.; Torres, Abel O.; Burley, Casey L.; Scott, Robert C.; Small, William J.

    1998-01-01

    This white paper addresses the subject of Synergistic Airframe-Propulsion interactions and integrations (SnAPII). The benefits of SnAPII have not been as extensively explored. This is due primarily to the separateness of design process for airframes and propulsion systems, with only unfavorable interactions addressed. The question 'How to design these two systems in such a way that the airframe needs the propulsion and the propulsion needs the airframe?' is the fundamental issue addressed in this paper. Successful solutions to this issue depend on appropriate technology ideas. This paper first details some ten technologies that have yet to make it to commercial products (with limited exceptions) and that could be utilized in a synergistic manner. Then these technologies, either alone or in combination, are applied to both a conventional twin-engine transonic transport and to an unconventional transport, the Blended Wing Body. Lastly, combinations of these technologies are applied to configuration concepts to assess the possibilities of success relative to five of the ten NASA aeronautics goals. These assessments are subjective, but they point the way in which the applied technologies could work together for some break-through benefits.

  4. Bio-photonics workstation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Perch-Nielsen, Ivan; Dam, Jeppe S.; Palima, Darwin Z.

    2007-01-01

    We outline the specifications of a portable Bio-photonics Workstation we have developed that utilizes just a single spatial light modulator to generate an array of up to 100 reconfigurable laser-traps with adjustable power ratios making 3D real-time optical manipulation possible with the click of a laptop mouse. We employ a simple patented optical mapping approach from a fast spatial light modulator to obtain reconfigurable intensity patterns corresponding to two independently addressable regions relayed to the sample volume where the optical manipulation of a plurality of nano-featured micro-objects takes place. The stand-alone Biophotonics Workstation is currently being tested by external partners with micro-biologic and chemistry expertise.

  5. An innovative workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villarreal, James

    1987-01-01

    A workstation was developed which uses the operator's eye movements and position to determine the placement of the cursor on a computer screen. A brainwave sensing technology overview and an introduction to the known rhythms or signals generated by the brain are given. This is followed by a descriptive explanation of the Ocular Attention Interface System (OASIS) and its intended integration into the proposed testbed.

  6. A graphical ICU workstation.

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, S. B.; Jiang, K.; Swindell, B. B.; Bernard, G. R.

    1991-01-01

    A workstation designed to facilitate electronic charting in the intensive care unit is described. The system design incorporates a graphical, windows-based user interface. The system captures all data formerly recorded on the paper flowsheet including direct patient measurements, nursing assessment, patient care procedures, and nursing notes. It has the ability to represent charted data in a variety of graphical formats, thereby providing additional insights to facilitate the management of the critically ill patient. Initial nursing evaluation is described. PMID:1807712

  7. Advanced Civilian Aeronautical Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, Dennis M.

    1996-01-01

    Paper discusses alternatives to currently deployed systems which could provide revolutionary improvements in metrics applicable to civilian aeronautics. Specific missions addressed include subsonic transports, supersonic transports and personal aircraft. These alternative systems and concepts are enabled by recent and envisaged advancements in electronics, communications, computing and Designer Fluid Mechanics in conjunction with a design approach employing extensive synergistic interactions between propulsion, aerodynamics and structures.

  8. Microgravity human factors workstation development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Mihriban; Wilmington, Robert P.; Morris, Randy B.; Jensen, Dean G.

    1992-01-01

    Microgravity evaluations of workstation hardware as well as its system components were found to be very useful for determining the expected needs of the Space Station crew and for refining overall workstation design. Research at the Johnson Space Center has been carried out to provide optimal workstation design and human interface. The research included evaluations of hand controller configurations for robots and free flyers, the identification of cursor control device requirements, and the examination of anthropometric issues of workstation design such as reach, viewing distance, and head clearance.

  9. Firefly: A multiprocessor workstation

    SciTech Connect

    Thacker, C.P.; Stewart, L.C.; Satterthwaite, E.H.

    1988-08-01

    Firefly is a shared memory multiprocessor workstation developed at the Digital Equipment Corporation Systems Research Center (SRC). A Firefly system consists of from one to nine VLSI VAX processors, each with a floating point accelerator and a cache. The caches are coherent, so that all processors see a consistent view of main memory. The Firefly runs a software system that emulates the Ultrix system call interface, and in addition provides support for multiprocessing through multiple threads of control in a single address space. Communication is provided uniformly through the use of remote procedure call. The authors describe the goals, hardware, software system, and performance of the Firefly, and discuss the extent to which SRC has been successful in providing software to take advantage of multi-processing.

  10. Computer workstation speeds

    SciTech Connect

    Grcar, J.F.

    1996-06-01

    This report compares the performance of several computers. Some of the machines are discontinued, and some are anticipated, but most are currently installed at Sandia Laboratories. All the computers are personal workstations or departmental servers, except for comparison, one is a Cray C90 mainframe supercomputer (not owned by the Laboratories). A few of the computers have multiple processors, but parallelism is not tested. The time to run three programs is reported for every computer. Unlike many benchmarks, these are complete application programs. They were written and are used at Sandia Laboratories. Also SPECmarks are reported for many computers. These are industry standard performance ratings. They are in general agreement with the speeds of running the Sandia programs. This report concludes with some background material and notes about specific manufacturers.

  11. Automated Analysis Workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Information from NASA Tech Briefs of work done at Langley Research Center and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory assisted DiaSys Corporation in manufacturing their first product, the R/S 2000. Since then, the R/S 2000 and R/S 2003 have followed. Recently, DiaSys released their fourth workstation, the FE-2, which automates the process of making and manipulating wet-mount preparation of fecal concentrates. The time needed to read the sample is decreased, permitting technologists to rapidly spot parasites, ova and cysts, sometimes carried in the lower intestinal tract of humans and animals. Employing the FE-2 is non-invasive, can be performed on an out-patient basis, and quickly provides confirmatory results.

  12. Setting Up Computer Workstations in Classrooms and Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Glenn

    1996-01-01

    Explains the benefits of computer workstations in schools and describes various components, including projection tools such as LCD (liquid crystal display) projectors, printers, Internet connections, tape drives, digitizers, scanners, laserdisc players, and CD-i (interactive) players. (LRW)

  13. Space Station Workstation Technology Workshop Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moe, K. L.; Emerson, C. M.; Eike, D. R.; Malone, T. B.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the results of a workshop conducted at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to identify current and anticipated trends in human-computer interface technology that may influence the design or operation of a space station workstation. The workshop was attended by approximately 40 persons from government and academia who were selected for their expertise in some aspect of human-machine interaction research. The focus of the workshop was a 1 1/2 brainstorming/forecasting session in which the attendees were assigned to interdisciplinary working groups and instructed to develop predictions for each of the following technology areas: (1) user interface, (2) resource management, (3) control language, (4) data base systems, (5) automatic software development, (6) communications, (7) training, and (8) simulation. This report is significant in that it provides a unique perspective on workstation design for the space station. This perspective, which is characterized by a major emphasis on user requirements, should be most valuable to Phase B contractors involved in design development of the space station workstation. One of the more compelling results of the workshop is the recognition that no major technological breakthroughs are required to implement the current workstation concept. What is required is the creative application of existing knowledge and technology.

  14. Voice control of complex workstations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scruggs, Jeffrey L.

    1988-01-01

    The use of a speaker-dependent connected word recognition system to control an Air Traffic Control (ATC) demonstration workstation is described, also the work that went into developing that speech system. The workstation with speech recognition was demonstrated live at an Air Traffic Controller's Association convention in 1987. The purpose of the demonstration workstation is discussed, with the development of the speech interface highlighted. Included are: a brief description of the speech hardware and software, and overview of the speech driven workstation functions, a description of the speech vocabulary/grammer, and details that the enrollment and training procedures used in preparing the controllers for the demonstrations. Although no quantitative results are available, the potential benefits of using voice as an interface to this type of workstation are discussed and limitations of current speech technology and areas where more work is required are highlighted.

  15. Zero-G Workstation Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gundersen, R. T.; Bond, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    Zero-g workstations were designed throughout manned spaceflight, based on different criteria and requirements for different programs. The history of design of these workstations is presented along with a thorough evaluation of selected Skylab workstations (the best zero-g experience available on the subject). The results were applied to on-going and future programs, with special emphasis on the correlation of neutral body posture in zero-g to workstation design. Where selected samples of shuttle orbiter workstations are shown as currently designed and compared to experience gained during prior programs in terms of man machine interface design, the evaluations were done in a generic sense to show the methods of applying evaluative techniques.

  16. Next-Generation Telemetry Workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    A next-generation telemetry workstation has been developed to replace the one currently used to test and control Range Safety systems. Improving upon the performance of the original system, the new telemetry workstation uses dual-channel telemetry boards for better synchronization of the two uplink telemetry streams. The new workstation also includes an Interrange Instrumentation Group/Global Positioning System (IRIG/GPS) time code receiver board for independent, local time stamping of return-link data. The next-generation system will also record and play back return-link data for postlaunch analysis.

  17. Transportable telemetry workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Aaron S.

    1989-01-01

    The goal was to complete the design of a prototype for a Transportable Telemetry Workstation (TTW). The Macintosh 2 is used to provide a low-cost system which can house real-time cards mounted on the NuBus inside the Macintosh 2 plus provide a standardized user interface on the Macintosh 2 console. Prior to a telemetry run, the user will be able to configure his real-time telemetry processing functions from the Macintosh 2 console. During a telemetry run, the real-time cards will store the telemetry data directly on a hard disk while permitting viewing of the data cards on the Macintosh 2 console on various selectable formats. The user will view the cards in terms of the functions they perform and the selectable paths through the cards, it is not required to become involved directly in hardware issue except in terms of the functional configuration of the system components. The TTW will accept telemetry data from an RS422 serial input data bus, pass it through a frame synchronizer card and on to a real time controller card via a telemetry backplane bus. The controller card will then route the data to a hard disk through a SCSI interface, and/or to a user interface on the Macintosh 2 console by way of the Macintosh 2 NuBus. The three major components to be designed, therefore, are the TTW Controller Card, the TTW Synchronizer Card, and the NuBus/Macintosh 2 User Interface. Design and prototyping of this state-of-the-art, transportable, low-cost, easy-to-use multiprocessor telemetry system is continuing. Other functions are planned for the future.

  18. Transportable telemetry workstation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Aaron S.

    1989-09-01

    The goal was to complete the design of a prototype for a Transportable Telemetry Workstation (TTW). The Macintosh 2 is used to provide a low-cost system which can house real-time cards mounted on the NuBus inside the Macintosh 2 plus provide a standardized user interface on the Macintosh 2 console. Prior to a telemetry run, the user will be able to configure his real-time telemetry processing functions from the Macintosh 2 console. During a telemetry run, the real-time cards will store the telemetry data directly on a hard disk while permitting viewing of the data cards on the Macintosh 2 console on various selectable formats. The user will view the cards in terms of the functions they perform and the selectable paths through the cards, it is not required to become involved directly in hardware issue except in terms of the functional configuration of the system components. The TTW will accept telemetry data from an RS422 serial input data bus, pass it through a frame synchronizer card and on to a real time controller card via a telemetry backplane bus. The controller card will then route the data to a hard disk through a SCSI interface, and/or to a user interface on the Macintosh 2 console by way of the Macintosh 2 NuBus. The three major components to be designed, therefore, are the TTW Controller Card, the TTW Synchronizer Card, and the NuBus/Macintosh 2 User Interface. Design and prototyping of this state-of-the-art, transportable, low-cost, easy-to-use multiprocessor telemetry system is continuing. Other functions are planned for the future.

  19. Workshop on NASA workstation technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Robert L.

    1990-01-01

    RIACS hosted a workshop which was designed to foster communication among those people within NASA working on workstation related technology, to share technology, and to learn about new developments and futures in the larger university and industrial workstation communities. Herein, the workshop is documented along with its conclusions. It was learned that there is both a large amount of commonality of requirements and a wide variation in the modernness of in-use technology among the represented NASA centers.

  20. Microgravity Workstation and Restraint Evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chmielewski, C.; Whitmore, M.; Mount, F.

    1999-01-01

    Confined workstations, where the operator has limited visibility and physical access to the work area, may cause prolonged periods of unnatural posture. Impacts on performance, in terms of fatigue and posture, may occur especially if the task is tedious and repetitive or requires static muscle loading. The glovebox design is a good example of the confined workstation concept. Within the scope of the 'Microgravity Workstation and Restraint Evaluation' project, funded by the NASA Headquarters Life Sciences Division, it was proposed to conduct a series of evaluations in ground, KC-135 and Shuttle environments to investigate the human factors issues concerning confined/unique workstations, such as gloveboxes, and also including crew restraint requirements. As part of the proposed integrated evaluations, two Shuttle Detailed Supplementary Objectives (DSOs) were manifested; one on Space Transportation System (STS)-90 and one on STS-88. The DSO on STS-90 evaluated use of the General Purpose Workstation (GPWS). The STS-88 mission was planned to evaluate a restraint system at the Remote Manipulator System (RMS). In addition, KC- 1 35 flights were conducted to investigate user/workstation/restraint integration for long-duration microgravity use. The scope of these evaluations included workstations and restraints to be utilized in the ISS environment, but also incorporated other workstations/ restraints in an attempt to provide findings/requirements with broader applications across multiple programs (e.g., Shuttle, ISS, and future Lunar-Mars programs). In addition, a comprehensive electronic questionnaire has been prepared and is under review by the Astronaut Office which will compile crewmembers' lessons learned information concerning glovebox and restraint use following their missions. These evaluations were intended to be complementary and were coordinated with hardware developers, users (crewmembers), and researchers. This report is intended to provide a summary of the

  1. Effects of Be, Sr, Fe and Mg interactions on the microstructure and mechanical properties of aluminum based aeronautical alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Mohamed Fawzy

    The present work was carried out on a series of heat-treatable aluminum-based aeronautical alloys containing various amounts of magnesium (Mg), iron (Fe), strontium (Sr) and beryllium (Be). Tensile test bars (dendrite arm spacing ~ 24mum) were solutionized for either 5 or 12 hours at 540°C, followed by quenching in warm water (60°C). Subsequently, these quenched samples were aged at 160°C for times up to 12 hours. Microstructural assessment was performed. All heat-treated samples were pulled to fracture at room temperature using a servo-hydraulic tensile testing machine. The results show that Be causes partial modification of the eutectic silicon (Si) particles similar to that reported for Mg addition. Addition of 0.8 wt.% Mg reduced the eutectic temperature by ~10°C. During solidification of alloys containing high levels of Fe and Mg, without Sr, a peak corresponding to the formation of a Be-Fe phase (Al8Fe2BeSi) was detected at 611°C. The Be-Fe phase precipitates in a script-like morphology. A new quinary eutectic-like reaction was observed to take place near the end of solidification of high Mg, high Fe, Be-containing alloys. This new reaction is composed mainly of fine particles of Si, Mg2Si, pi-Al 8Mg3FeSi6 and (Be-Fe) phases. The volume fraction of this reaction decreased with the addition of Sr. The addition of Be has a noticeable effect on decreasing the beta-phase length, or volume fraction, this effect may be limited by adding Sr. Beryllium addition also results in the precipitation of the beta-phase in a nodular form, which reduces the harmful effects of these intermetallics on the alloy mechanical properties. Increasing both Mg and Fe levels led to an increase in the amount of the pi-phase; increasing the iron content led to an increase in the volume fraction of the partially soluble beta- and pi-phases, while Mg2Si particles were completely dissolved. The beta-phase platelets were observed to undergo changes in their morphology due to the

  2. Fundamental Aeronautics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay

    2009-01-01

    The Overarching Mission of NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) is: To advance U.S. technological leadership in aeronautics in partnership with industry, academia, and other government agencies that conduct aeronautics-related research. ARMD supports the Agency's goal of developing a balanced overall program of science, exploration, and aeronautics, and ARMD's research plans also directly support the National Aeronautics R&D Policy and accompanying Executive Order 131419.

  3. Arusha Rover Deployable Medical Workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boswell, Tyrone; Hopson, Sonya; Marzette, Russell; Monroe, Gilena; Mustafa, Ruqayyah

    2014-01-01

    The NSBE Arusha rover concept offers a means of human transport and habitation during long-term exploration missions on the moon. This conceptual rover calls for the availability of medical supplies and equipment for crew members in order to aid in mission success. This paper addresses the need for a dedicated medical work station aboard the Arusha rover. The project team investigated multiple options for implementing a feasible deployable station to address both the medical and workstation layout needs of the rover and crew. Based on layout specifications and medical workstation requirements, the team has proposed a deployable workstation concept that can be accommodated within the volumetric constraints of the Arusha rover spacecraft

  4. The Modern Integrated Anaesthesia Workstation

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Vijaya P; Shetmahajan, Madhavi G; Divatia, Jigeeshu V

    2013-01-01

    Over the years, the conventional anaesthesia machine has evolved into an advanced carestation. The new machines use advanced electronics, software and technology to offer extensive capabilities for ventilation, monitoring, inhaled agent delivery, low-flow anaesthesia and closed-loop anaesthesia. They offer integrated monitoring and recording facilities and seamless integration with anaesthesia information systems. It is possible to deliver tidal volumes accurately and eliminate several hazards associated with the low pressure system and oxygen flush. Appropriate use can result in enhanced safety and ergonomy of anaesthetic delivery and monitoring. However, these workstations have brought in a new set of limitations and potential drawbacks. There are differences in technology and operational principles amongst the new workstations. Understand the principles of operation of these workstations and have a thorough knowledge of the operating manual of the individual machines. PMID:24249877

  5. Achieving Aeronautics Leadership: Aeronautics Strategic Enterprise Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Today, more than ever, aggressive leadership is required to ensure that our national investments in aeronautical research, technology, and facilities are shaped into a coordinated, and high-impact, strategy. Under the auspices of the National Science and Technology Council, and in conjunction with the domestic industry, universities, the Department of Defense, and the Federal Aviation Administration - our partners in aeronautics - we propose to provide that leadership, and this document is our plan.

  6. Computational Control Workstation: Users' perspectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roithmayr, Carlos M.; Straube, Timothy M.; Tave, Jeffrey S.

    1993-01-01

    A Workstation has been designed and constructed for rapidly simulating motions of rigid and elastic multibody systems. We examine the Workstation from the point of view of analysts who use the machine in an industrial setting. Two aspects of the device distinguish it from other simulation programs. First, one uses a series of windows and menus on a computer terminal, together with a keyboard and mouse, to provide a mathematical and geometrical description of the system under consideration. The second hallmark is a facility for animating simulation results. An assessment of the amount of effort required to numerically describe a system to the Workstation is made by comparing the process to that used with other multibody software. The apparatus for displaying results as a motion picture is critiqued as well. In an effort to establish confidence in the algorithms that derive, encode, and solve equations of motion, simulation results from the Workstation are compared to answers obtained with other multibody programs. Our study includes measurements of computational speed.

  7. Western Aeronautical Test Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakahara, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the work of the Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR). NASA's Western Aeronautical Test Range is a network of facilities used to support aeronautical research, science missions, exploration system concepts, and space operations. The WATR resides at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center located at Edwards Air Force Base, California. The WATR is a part of NASA's Corporate Management of Aeronautical Facilities and funded by the Strategic Capability Asset Program (SCAP). Maps show the general location of the WATR area that is used for aeronautical testing and evaluation. The products, services and facilities of WATR are discussed,

  8. Development and use of interactive displays in real-time ground support research facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhea, Donald C.; Hammons, Kvin R.; Malone, Jacqueline C.; Nesel, Michael C.

    1989-01-01

    The NASA Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) is one of the world's most advanced aeronautical research flight test support facilities. A variety of advanced and often unique real-time interactive displays has been developed for use in the mission control centers (MCC) to support research flight and ground testing. These dispalys consist of applications operating on systems described as real-time interactive graphics super workstations and real-time interactive PC/AT compatible workstations. This paper reviews these two types of workstations and the specific applications operating on each display system. The applications provide examples that demonstrate overall system capability applicable for use in other ground-based real-time research/test facilities.

  9. Design method for multi-user workstations utilizing anthropometry and preference data.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Joseph M; Kurczewski, Nicolas A; Froede, Erick W

    2015-01-01

    Past efforts have been made to design single-user workstations to accommodate users' anthropometric and preference distributions. However, there is a lack of methods for designing workstations for group interaction. This paper introduces a method for sizing workstations to allow for a personal work area for each user and a shared space for adjacent users. We first create a virtual population with the same anthropometric and preference distributions as an intended demographic of college-aged students. Members of the virtual population are randomly paired to test if their extended reaches overlap but their normal reaches do not. This process is repeated in a Monte Carlo simulation to estimate the total percentage of groups in the population that will be accommodated for a workstation size. We apply our method to two test cases: in the first, we size polygonal workstations for two populations and, in the second, we dimension circular workstations for different group sizes. PMID:25048681

  10. Nomenclature for Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1927-01-01

    This nomenclature for aeronautics was prepared by a Special Conference on Aeronautical Nomenclature by the executive committee of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics at a meeting held on August 19, 1924, at which meeting Dr. Joseph S. Ames was appointed chairman of the conference. The conference was composed of representatives of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics and specially appointed representatives officially designated by the Army Air Service, the Bureau of Aeronautics of the Navy Department, the Bureau of Standards, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the Society of Automotive Engineers, and the Aeronautical Chamber of Commerce. The purpose of the committee in the preparation and publication of this report is to secure uniformity in the official documents of the government and, as far as possible, in technical and other commercial publications

  11. Nomenclature for Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1924-01-01

    This nomenclature for aeronautics was prepared by a special conference on aeronautical nomenclature by the Executive Committee of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics at a meeting held August 11, 1933. This publication supersedes all previous publications of the committee on this subject. The purpose of the committee in the preparation and publication of this report is to secure uniformity in the official documents of the government and, as far as possible, in technical and other commercial publications.

  12. Nomenclature for Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1923-01-01

    This nomenclature for aeronautics was prepared by a special conference on aeronautical nomenclature, composed of representatives of the Army and Navy Air Services, the Air Mail Service, the Bureau of Standards, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, and private life. This report supersedes all previous publications of the committee on this subject. It is published with the intention of securing greater uniformity and accuracy in official documents of the government, and, as far as possible, in technical and other commercial publications. (author)

  13. NASA thesaurus aeronautics vocabulary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The controlled vocabulary used by the NASA Scientific and Technical Information effort to index documents in the area of aeronautics is presented. The terms comprise a subset of the 1988 edition of the NASA Thesaurus and its supplements issued through the end of 1990. The Aeronautics Vocabulary contains over 4700 terms presented in a hierarchical display format. In addition to aeronautics per se, the vocabulary covers supporting terminology from areas such as fluid dynamics, propulsion engineering, and test facilities and instrumentation.

  14. Challenges in Developing Clinical Workstation

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanan, Venkatesh; Vedula, Venumadhav

    2008-09-26

    Over the years, medical imaging has become very common and data intensive. New technology is needed to help visualize and analyze these large, complex data sets, especially in an acute care situation where time is of the essence. Also it is very important to present the data in an efficient and simple manner to aid the clinical decision making processes. There is a need for a clinical workstation that handles data from different modalities and performs the necessary post- processing operations on the data in order to enhance the image quality and improve the reliability of diagnosis. This paper briefly explains clinical workstation, emphasizing the requirements and challenges in design and architecture for the development of such systems.

  15. Designing diagnostic workstations for neuroradiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentino, Daniel J.; Bhushan, Vikas; Johnson, Sandra L.; Bentsen, John R.

    1995-05-01

    Despite over a decade of development, diagnostic radiology workstations have not gained popular acceptance by radiologists. Among the requirements for a clinically acceptable workstation are good image quality, a well designed user-interface, and access to ancillary diagnostic information. The user-interface should reflect radiologists' film reading habits and encourage new reading methods that take advantage of the electronic environment. We documented neuroradiologists' reading habits and used software engineering tools to design interfaces that could provide rapid access to common diagnostic tasks in neuroradiology. We used an embedded configuration tool to prototype layouts for specific clinical cases on a commercial workstation, and database integration and user-interface design tools to develop interfaces for browsing medical records. We then designed an image presentation model using the concept of a `virtual view box' for the rapid browsing and pairwise comparison of images. We used the interface design tools to prototype the `virtual view box' on commercially available hardware and tested it with experienced neuroradiologists.

  16. The Ames Virtual Environment Workstation: Implementation issues and requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Scott S.; Jacoby, R.; Bryson, S.; Stone, P.; Mcdowall, I.; Bolas, M.; Dasaro, D.; Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Coler, C.; Kerr, D.

    1991-01-01

    This presentation describes recent developments in the implementation of a virtual environment workstation in the Aerospace Human Factors Research Division of NASA's Ames Research Center. Introductory discussions are presented on the primary research objectives and applications of the system and on the system's current hardware and software configuration. Principle attention is then focused on unique issues and problems encountered in the workstation's development with emphasis on its ability to meet original design specifications for computational graphics performance and for associated human factors requirements necessary to provide compelling sense of presence and efficient interaction in the virtual environment.

  17. Nomenclature for aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1920-01-01

    Report defines the principal terms which have come into use in the development of aeronautics. It was prepared in cooperation with a committee engaged upon a similar undertaking in Great Britain. As a result this nomenclature is in substantial agreement with the one which has been adopted by the aeronautical authorities of Great Britain.

  18. Bibliography of Aeronautics: 1926

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockett, Paul

    1928-01-01

    This Bibliography of Aeronautics for 1926 covers the aeronautical literature published from January 1 to December 31, 1926. The first Bibliography of Aeronautics was published by the Smithsonian Institution as volume 55 of the Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections and covered the material published prior to June 30, 1909. Supplementary volumes of the Bibliography of Aeronautics for the subsequent years have been published by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. The last preceding volume was for the calendar year 1925. As in the previous volumes, citations of the publications of all nations are included in the languages in which these publications originally appeared. The arrangement is dictionary form with author find subject entry, and one alphabetical arrangement. Detail in the matter of subject reference has been omitted on aCC01.mt of the cost of presentation, but an attempt has been made to give sufficient cross reference for research in special lines.

  19. Bibliography of Aeronautics: 1928

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockett, Paul

    1928-01-01

    This Bibliography of Aeronautics for 1928 covers the aeronautical literature published from January 1 to December 31, 1928. The first Bibliography of Aeronautics was published by the Smithsonian Institution as volume 55 of the Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections and covered the material published prior to June 30, 1909. Supplementary volumes of the Bibliography of Aeronautics for the subsequent years have been published by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. The last preceding volume was for the calendar year 1927. As in the previous volumes, citations of the publications of all nations are included in the languages in which these publications originally appeared. The arrangement is in dictionary form with author and subject entry, and one alphabetical arrangement. Detail in the matter of subject reference has been omitted on account of the cost of presentation, but an attempt has been made to give sufficient cross reference for research in special lines.

  20. Bibliography of Aeronautics: 1932

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1935-01-01

    This Bibliography of Aeronautics for 1932 covers the aeronautical literature published from January 1 to December 31, 1932. The first Bibliography of Aeronautics was published by the Smithsonian Institution as volume 55 of the Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections and covered the material published prior to June 30, 1909. Supplementary volumes of the Bibliography of Aeronautics for the subsequent years have been published by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. The last preceding volume was for the calendar year 1931. As in the previous volumes, citations of the publications of all nations are included in the languages in which these publications originally appeared. The arrangement is in dictionary form with author and subject entry and one alphabetical arrangement. Detail in the matter of subject reference has been omitted on account of the cost of presentation, but an attempt has been made to give sufficient cross-reference for research in special lines.

  1. Bibliography of Aeronautics, 1929

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockett, Paul

    1930-01-01

    This Bibliography of Aeronautics for 1929 covers the aeronautical literature published from January 1 to December 31, 1929. The first Bibliography of Aeronautics was published by the Smithsonian Institution as Volume 55 of the Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections and covered the material published prior to June 30, 1909. Supplementary volumes of the Bibliography of Aeronautics for the subsequent years have been published by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. The last preceding volume was for the calendar year 1928. As in the previous volumes, citations of the pUblications of all nations are included in th.e languages in which. these publications originally appeared. The arrangement is in dictionary form with author and subject entry, and one alphabetical arrangement. Detail in the matter of subject reference has been omitted on account of the cost of presentation, but an attempt has been made to give sufficient cross reference for research in special lines.

  2. Nomenclature for Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1939-01-01

    The nomenclature for aeronautics presented in this Report No. 474 is a revision of the last previous report on this subject (i.e., Report no. 240.) This report is published for the purpose of encouraging greater uniformity and precision in the use of terms relating to aeronautics, both in official documents of the Government and in commercial publications. Terms in general use in other branches of engineering have been included only where they have some special significance in aeronautics, or form an integral part of its terminology.

  3. Workstation experience with RELAP5

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.S.; Wagner, R.J.

    1993-08-01

    One of the major improvements in the progress from RELAP5/MOD2 to RELAP5/MOD3 was the modification to improve portability. The use of the code was thus extended from the 60 and 64 bit work mainframe computers to 32 bit workstations and PC`s. This has taken RELAP5 from a few types of mainframes` environmentally controlled computer rooms to many smaller machines running under several different operating systems, with different compilers, and running on, beside, and under engineers desks.

  4. Curriculum for modern aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, L.

    1975-01-01

    Methods for improving the university training of aeronautical engineering students are discussed. Specific topics considered are: (1) the kind of students which should be developed through aeronautical engineering education, (2) to what extent should aerospace engineering be prepared for diversity and change, (3) to what extent should theory be emphasized as compared with practical engineering and design, and (4) a suggestion for NASA/Industry/University collaboration.

  5. Comparison Of Digital Workstations And Conventional Reading For Evaluation Of User Interfaces In Digital Radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeill, Kevin M.; Seeley, George W.; Maloney, Kris; Fajardo, Laurie; Kozik, Mark

    1988-06-01

    The User Interface Study Group at the University of Arizona is investigating the interaction of Radiologists with digital workstations. Using the Arizona Viewing Console we have conducted an experiment to compare a digital workstation with a particular conventional reading process used for cases from a local Health Maintenance Organization. A model consisting of three distinct phases of activity was developed to describe conventional reading process. From this model software was developed for the Arizona Viewing Console to approximate the process. Radiologists were then video taped reading similar sets of cases at each workstation and the tapes were analyzed for frequency of hand movements and time required for each phase of the process. This study provides a comparison between conventional reading and a digital workstation. This paper describes the reading process, the model and its approximation on the digital workstation, as well as the analysis of the video tapes.

  6. Western Aeronautical Test Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakahara, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) is a network of facilities used to support aeronautical research, science missions, exploration system concepts, and space operations. The WATR resides at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center located at Edwards Air Force Base, California. The WATR is a part of NASA's Corporate Management of Aeronautical Facilities and funded by the Strategic Capability Asset Program (SCAP). It is managed by the Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) of the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) to provide the right facility at the right time. NASA is a tenant on Edwards Air Force Base and has an agreement with the Air Force Flight Test Center to use the land and airspace controlled by the Department of Defense (DoD). The topics include: 1) The WATR supports a variety of vehicles; 2) Dryden shares airspace with the AFFTC; 3) Restricted airspace, corridors, and special use areas are available for experimental aircraft; 4) WATR Products and Services; 5) WATR Support Configuration; 6) Telemetry Tracking; 7) Time Space Positioning; 8) Video; 9) Voice Communication; 10) Mobile Operations Facilities; 11) Data Processing; 12) Mission Control Center; 13) Real-Time Data Analysis; and 14) Range Safety.

  7. Assessment of a cooperative workstation.

    PubMed Central

    Beuscart, R. J.; Molenda, S.; Souf, N.; Foucher, C.; Beuscart-Zephir, M. C.

    1996-01-01

    Groupware and new Information Technologies have now made it possible for people in different places to work together in synchronous cooperation. Very often, designers of this new type of software are not provided with a model of the common workspace, which is prejudicial to software development and its acceptance by potential users. The authors take the example of a task of medical co-diagnosis, using a multi-media communication workstation. Synchronous cooperative work is made possible by using local ETHERNET or public ISDN Networks. A detailed ergonomic task analysis studies the cognitive functioning of the physicians involved, compares their behaviour in the normal and the mediatized situations, and leads to an interpretation of the likely causes for success or failure of CSCW tools. PMID:8947764

  8. Mars Science Laboratory Workstation Test Set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriquez, David A.; Canham, Timothy K.; Chang, Johnny T.; Villaume, Nathaniel

    2009-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory developed the Workstation TestSet (WSTS) is a computer program that enables flight software development on virtual MSL avionics. The WSTS is the non-real-time flight avionics simulator that is designed to be completely software-based and run on a workstation class Linux PC.

  9. Diaphragms for Aeronautic Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersey, M D

    1924-01-01

    This investigation was carried out at the request of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics and comprises an outline of historical developments and theoretical principles, together with a discussion of expedients for making the most effective use of existing diaphragms actuated by the hydrostatic pressure form an essential element of a great variety instruments for aeronautic and other technical purposes. The various physical data needed as a foundation for rational methods of diaphragm design have not, however, been available hitherto except in the most fragmentary form.

  10. Office ergonomics: deficiencies in computer workstation design.

    PubMed

    Shikdar, Ashraf A; Al-Kindi, Mahmoud A

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this research was to study and identify ergonomic deficiencies in computer workstation design in typical offices. Physical measurements and a questionnaire were used to study 40 workstations. Major ergonomic deficiencies were found in physical design and layout of the workstations, employee postures, work practices, and training. The consequences in terms of user health and other problems were significant. Forty-five percent of the employees used nonadjustable chairs, 48% of computers faced windows, 90% of the employees used computers more than 4 hrs/day, 45% of the employees adopted bent and unsupported back postures, and 20% used office tables for computers. Major problems reported were eyestrain (58%), shoulder pain (45%), back pain (43%), arm pain (35%), wrist pain (30%), and neck pain (30%). These results indicated serious ergonomic deficiencies in office computer workstation design, layout, and usage. Strategies to reduce or eliminate ergonomic deficiencies in computer workstation design were suggested. PMID:17599795

  11. The fetal imaging workstation demonstration project.

    PubMed

    Lee, W

    1996-01-01

    Congenital birth defects are a leading cause of infant mortality. Early detection of fetal anomalies by prenatal ultrasound may improve clinical outcome in selected cases. However, many training programs are hindered by curriculum weaknesses which include: (1) limited physician exposure to ultrasound anomalies; (2) inadequate postnatal correlation with prenatal findings; (3) constraints imposed by static images for ultrasound training; and (4) difficulty with understanding complex three-dimensional anatomy. The Fetal Imaging Workstation Demonstration Project addresses these problems by illustrating how computers can supplement traditional prenatal ultrasound training through interactive multimedia. The project uses a laserdisc library of ultrasound video images as source material for a variety of interactive software tutorials. An educational testing module has been developed that can evaluate diagnostic skills through simulated ultrasound studies provided by the laserdisc library. An interactive three-dimensional fetal heart model also provides a new way for physicians to better understand their two-dimensional ultrasound studies. A survey suggests that this prototype has been widely accepted by housestaff physicians and that there is a perceived need for this supplementary training. Future work will address the educational effectiveness of these materials and will consider cost-effective ways to disseminate the software for other institutions. However, future development must be implemented against a background of rapidly emerging technologies involving faster computers, digital video, and virtual reality applications. PMID:9007213

  12. Aeronautical facilities assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penaranda, F. E. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    A survey of the free world's aeronautical facilities was undertaken and an evaluation made on where the relative strengths and weaknesses exist. Special emphasis is given to NASA's own capabilities and needs. The types of facilities surveyed are: Wind Tunnels; Airbreathing Propulsion Facilities; and Flight Simulators

  13. ACTS broadband aeronautical experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbe, Brian S.; Jedrey, Thomas C.; Estabrook, Polly; Agan, Martin J.

    1993-01-01

    In the last decade, the demand for reliable data, voice, and video satellite communication links between aircraft and ground to improve air traffic control, airline management, and to meet the growing demand for passenger communications has increased significantly. It is expected that in the near future, the spectrum required for aeronautical communication services will grow significantly beyond that currently available at L-band. In anticipation of this, JPL is developing an experimental broadband aeronautical satellite communications system that will utilize NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) as a satellite of opportunity and the technology developed under JPL's ACTS Mobile Terminal (AMT) Task to evaluate the feasibility of using K/Ka-band for these applications. The application of K/Ka-band for aeronautical satellite communications at cruise altitudes is particularly promising for several reasons: (1) the minimal amount of signal attenuation due to rain; (2) the reduced drag due to the smaller K/Ka-band antennas (as compared to the current L-band systems); and (3) the large amount of available bandwidth. The increased bandwidth available at these frequencies is expected to lead to significantly improved passenger communications - including full-duplex compressed video and multiple channel voice. A description of the proposed broadband experimental system will be presented including: (1) applications of K/Ka-band aeronautical satellite technology to U.S. industry; (2) the experiment objectives; (3) the experiment set-up; (4) experimental equipment description; and (5) industrial participation in the experiment and the benefits.

  14. ARMD Fundamental Aeronautics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dryer, Jay; DelRosario, Ruben

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation focuses work of the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) with particular interest on the work being done to address the environmental and energy efficiency challenges. Particular interest is on the Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) project, though there is discussion of the rotorcraft and the supersonics environmental challenges.

  15. Advanced Software Development Workstation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Daniel

    1989-01-01

    The Advanced Software Development Workstation Project, funded by Johnson Space Center, is investigating knowledge-based techniques for software reuse in NASA software development projects. Two prototypes have been demonstrated and a third is now in development. The approach is to build a foundation that provides passive reuse support, add a layer that uses domain-independent programming knowledge, add a layer that supports the acquisition of domain-specific programming knowledge to provide active support, and enhance maintainability and modifiability through an object-oriented approach. The development of new application software would use specification-by-reformulation, based on a cognitive theory of retrieval from very long-term memory in humans, and using an Ada code library and an object base. Current tasks include enhancements to the knowledge representation of Ada packages and abstract data types, extensions to support Ada package instantiation knowledge acquisition, integration with Ada compilers and relational databases, enhancements to the graphical user interface, and demonstration of the system with a NASA contractor-developed trajectory simulation package. Future work will focus on investigating issues involving scale-up and integration.

  16. Automated Software Development Workstation (ASDW)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fridge, Ernie

    1990-01-01

    Software development is a serious bottleneck in the construction of complex automated systems. An increase of the reuse of software designs and components has been viewed as a way to relieve this bottleneck. One approach to achieving software reusability is through the development and use of software parts composition systems. A software parts composition system is a software development environment comprised of a parts description language for modeling parts and their interfaces, a catalog of existing parts, a composition editor that aids a user in the specification of a new application from existing parts, and a code generator that takes a specification and generates an implementation of a new application in a target language. The Automated Software Development Workstation (ASDW) is an expert system shell that provides the capabilities required to develop and manipulate these software parts composition systems. The ASDW is now in Beta testing at the Johnson Space Center. Future work centers on responding to user feedback for capability and usability enhancement, expanding the scope of the software lifecycle that is covered, and in providing solutions to handling very large libraries of reusable components.

  17. Advanced Free Flight Planner and Dispatcher's Workstation: Preliminary Design Specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J.; Wright, C.; Couluris, G. J.

    1997-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has implemented the Advanced Air Transportation Technology (AATT) program to investigate future improvements to the national and international air traffic management systems. This research, as part of the AATT program, developed preliminary design requirements for an advanced Airline Operations Control (AOC) dispatcher's workstation, with emphasis on flight planning. This design will support the implementation of an experimental workstation in NASA laboratories that would emulate AOC dispatch operations. The work developed an airline flight plan data base and specified requirements for: a computer tool for generation and evaluation of free flight, user preferred trajectories (UPT); the kernel of an advanced flight planning system to be incorporated into the UPT-generation tool; and an AOC workstation to house the UPT-generation tool and to provide a real-time testing environment. A prototype for the advanced flight plan optimization kernel was developed and demonstrated. The flight planner uses dynamic programming to search a four-dimensional wind and temperature grid to identify the optimal route, altitude and speed for successive segments of a flight. An iterative process is employed in which a series of trajectories are successively refined until the LTPT is identified. The flight planner is designed to function in the current operational environment as well as in free flight. The free flight environment would enable greater flexibility in UPT selection based on alleviation of current procedural constraints. The prototype also takes advantage of advanced computer processing capabilities to implement more powerful optimization routines than would be possible with older computer systems.

  18. Reshaping NASA's Aeronautics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Anita D.

    2007-01-01

    We will dedicate ourselves to the mastery and intellectual stewardship of the core competencies of Aeronautics for the Nation in all flight regimes. We will focus our research in areas that are appropriate to NASA's unique capabilities. we will directly address the R&D needs of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NGATS) in partnership with the member agencies of the Joint Planning and development Office (JPDO).

  19. Ergonomic Evaluations of Microgravity Workstations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Mihriban; Berman, Andrea H.; Byerly, Diane

    1996-01-01

    Various gloveboxes (GBXs) have been used aboard the Shuttle and ISS. Though the overall technical specifications are similar, each GBX's crew interface is unique. JSC conducted a series of ergonomic evaluations of the various glovebox designs to identify human factors requirements for new designs to provide operator commonality across different designs. We conducted 2 0g evaluations aboard the Shuttle to evaluate the material sciences GBX and the General Purpose Workstation (GPWS), and a KC-135 evaluation to compare combinations of arm hole interfaces and foot restraints (flexible arm holes were better than rigid ports for repetitive fine manipulation tasks). Posture analysis revealed that the smallest and tallest subjects assumed similar postures at all four configurations, suggesting that problematic postures are not necessarily a function of the operator s height but a function of the task characteristics. There was concern that the subjects were using the restrictive nature of the GBX s cuffs as an upper-body restraint to achieve such high forces, which might lead to neck/shoulder discomfort. EMG data revealed more consistent muscle performance at the GBX; the variability in the EMG profiles observed at the GPWS was attributed to the subjects attempts to provide more stabilization for themselves in the loose, flexible gauntlets. Tests revealed that the GBX should be designed for a 95 percentile American male to accommodate a neutral working posture. In addition, the foot restraint with knee support appeared beneficial for GBX operations. Crew comments were to provide 2 foot restraint mechanical modes, loose and lock-down, to accommodate a wide range of tasks without egressing the restraint system. Thus far, we have developed preliminary design guidelines for GBXs and foot.

  20. NASA's Role in Aeronautics: A Workshop. Volume VI - Aeronautical Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Assembly of Engineering.

    The central task of a 1980 workshop on the role of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in aeronautics was to examine the relationship of NASA's research capabilities to the state of U.S. aviation and to make recommendations about NASA's future role in aeronautics. Following a brief introduction, the Overview Panel on…

  1. Treadmill Workstations: The Effects of Walking while Working on Physical Activity and Work Performance

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Ner, Avner; Hamann, Darla J.; Koepp, Gabriel; Manohar, Chimnay U.; Levine, James

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a 12-month-long experiment in a financial services company to study how the availability of treadmill workstations affects employees’ physical activity and work performance. We enlisted sedentary volunteers, half of whom received treadmill workstations during the first two months of the study and the rest in the seventh month of the study. Participants could operate the treadmills at speeds of 0–2 mph and could use a standard chair-desk arrangement at will. (a) Weekly online performance surveys were administered to participants and their supervisors, as well as to all other sedentary employees and their supervisors. Using within-person statistical analyses, we find that overall work performance, quality and quantity of performance, and interactions with coworkers improved as a result of adoption of treadmill workstations. (b) Participants were outfitted with accelerometers at the start of the study. We find that daily total physical activity increased as a result of the adoption of treadmill workstations. PMID:24586359

  2. Aeronautical Science Course of Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southbay Union High School District, Redondo Beach, CA.

    This revision of "Aeronautical Science Course of Study for California High Schools," first issued in 1967, is designed by and for the use of teachers of high school aeronautical courses. It differs from other aeronautical instructional materials in its emphasis on inquiry, exploration, and open-ended experimentation. The eleven units may be used…

  3. Control of a pulse height analyzer using an RDX workstation

    SciTech Connect

    Montelongo, S.; Hunt, D.N.

    1984-12-01

    The Nuclear Chemistry Division of Lawrence Livermore National laboratory is in the midst of upgrading its radiation counting facilities to automate data acquisition and quality control. This upgrade requires control of a pulse height analyzer (PHA) from an interactive LSI-11/23 workstation running RSX-11M. The PHA is a micro-computer based multichannel analyzer system providing data acquisition, storage, display, manipulation and input/output from up to four independent acquisition interfaces. Control of the analyzer includes reading and writing energy spectra, issuing commands, and servicing device interrupts. The analyzer communicates to the host system over a 9600-baud serial line using the Digital Data Communications link level Protocol (DDCMP). We relieved the RSX workstation CPU from the DDCMP overhead by implementing a DEC compatible in-house designed DMA serial line board (the ISL-11) to communicate with the analyzer. An RSX I/O device driver was written to complete the path between the analyzer and the RSX system by providing the link between the communication board and an application task. The I/O driver is written to handle several ISL-11 cards all operating in parallel thus providing support for control of multiple analyzers from a single workstation. The RSX device driver, its design and use by application code controlling the analyzer, and its operating environment will be discussed.

  4. Multifunction Habitat Workstation/OLED Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumacher, Shawn; Salazar, George; Schmidt, Oron

    2013-01-01

    This paper gives a general outline of both a multifunction habitat workstation and the research put into an Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED) device. It first covers the tests that the OLED device will go through to become flight ready along with reasoning. Guidelines for building an apparatus to house the display and its components are given next, with the build of such following. The three tests the OLED goes through are presented (EMI, Thermal/Vac, Radiation) along with the data recovered. The second project of a multifunction workstation is then discussed in the same pattern. Reasoning for building such a workstation with telepresence in mind is offered. Build guidelines are presented first, with the build timeline following. Building the workstation will then be shown in great detail along with accompanying photos. Once the workstation has been discussed, the versatility of its functions are given. The paper concludes with future views and concepts that can added when the time or technology presents itself.

  5. Aeronautics in the American Society

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    The trends in aeronautics and aeronautical education are discussed with respect to the roles of industry, government, and the universities. The importance of the aviation industry to the economy of the country is examined. The impact of reduced enrollment of aeronautical engineering students in the universities on the future of the aeronautical industry is stressed. It is stated that the role of the government should be to sponsor and conduct basic research and advanced technology programs for civil and military aviation, and the specification, development, procurement, and operation of military aircraft. Recommendations are made for approaches which may be taken to influence more qualified students to enter the field of aeronautics.

  6. Computational Controls Workstation: Algorithms and hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venugopal, R.; Kumar, M.

    1993-01-01

    The Computational Controls Workstation provides an integrated environment for the modeling, simulation, and analysis of Space Station dynamics and control. Using highly efficient computational algorithms combined with a fast parallel processing architecture, the workstation makes real-time simulation of flexible body models of the Space Station possible. A consistent, user-friendly interface and state-of-the-art post-processing options are combined with powerful analysis tools and model databases to provide users with a complete environment for Space Station dynamics and control analysis. The software tools available include a solid modeler, graphical data entry tool, O(n) algorithm-based multi-flexible body simulation, and 2D/3D post-processors. This paper describes the architecture of the workstation while a companion paper describes performance and user perspectives.

  7. Cyber-workstation for computational neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Digiovanna, Jack; Rattanatamrong, Prapaporn; Zhao, Ming; Mahmoudi, Babak; Hermer, Linda; Figueiredo, Renato; Principe, Jose C; Fortes, Jose; Sanchez, Justin C

    2010-01-01

    A Cyber-Workstation (CW) to study in vivo, real-time interactions between computational models and large-scale brain subsystems during behavioral experiments has been designed and implemented. The design philosophy seeks to directly link the in vivo neurophysiology laboratory with scalable computing resources to enable more sophisticated computational neuroscience investigation. The architecture designed here allows scientists to develop new models and integrate them with existing models (e.g. recursive least-squares regressor) by specifying appropriate connections in a block-diagram. Then, adaptive middleware transparently implements these user specifications using the full power of remote grid-computing hardware. In effect, the middleware deploys an on-demand and flexible neuroscience research test-bed to provide the neurophysiology laboratory extensive computational power from an outside source. The CW consolidates distributed software and hardware resources to support time-critical and/or resource-demanding computing during data collection from behaving animals. This power and flexibility is important as experimental and theoretical neuroscience evolves based on insights gained from data-intensive experiments, new technologies and engineering methodologies. This paper describes briefly the computational infrastructure and its most relevant components. Each component is discussed within a systematic process of setting up an in vivo, neuroscience experiment. Furthermore, a co-adaptive brain machine interface is implemented on the CW to illustrate how this integrated computational and experimental platform can be used to study systems neurophysiology and learning in a behavior task. We believe this implementation is also the first remote execution and adaptation of a brain-machine interface. PMID:20126436

  8. Cyber-Workstation for Computational Neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    DiGiovanna, Jack; Rattanatamrong, Prapaporn; Zhao, Ming; Mahmoudi, Babak; Hermer, Linda; Figueiredo, Renato; Principe, Jose C.; Fortes, Jose; Sanchez, Justin C.

    2009-01-01

    A Cyber-Workstation (CW) to study in vivo, real-time interactions between computational models and large-scale brain subsystems during behavioral experiments has been designed and implemented. The design philosophy seeks to directly link the in vivo neurophysiology laboratory with scalable computing resources to enable more sophisticated computational neuroscience investigation. The architecture designed here allows scientists to develop new models and integrate them with existing models (e.g. recursive least-squares regressor) by specifying appropriate connections in a block-diagram. Then, adaptive middleware transparently implements these user specifications using the full power of remote grid-computing hardware. In effect, the middleware deploys an on-demand and flexible neuroscience research test-bed to provide the neurophysiology laboratory extensive computational power from an outside source. The CW consolidates distributed software and hardware resources to support time-critical and/or resource-demanding computing during data collection from behaving animals. This power and flexibility is important as experimental and theoretical neuroscience evolves based on insights gained from data-intensive experiments, new technologies and engineering methodologies. This paper describes briefly the computational infrastructure and its most relevant components. Each component is discussed within a systematic process of setting up an in vivo, neuroscience experiment. Furthermore, a co-adaptive brain machine interface is implemented on the CW to illustrate how this integrated computational and experimental platform can be used to study systems neurophysiology and learning in a behavior task. We believe this implementation is also the first remote execution and adaptation of a brain-machine interface. PMID:20126436

  9. Holographic assembly workstation for optical manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Graham; Carberry, David M.; Whyte, Graeme; Leach, Jonathan; Courtial, Johannes; Jackson, Joseph C.; Robert, Daniel; Miles, Mervyn; Padgett, Miles

    2008-04-01

    We report a holographic assembler workstation for optical trapping and micro-manipulation. The workstation is based on a titanium sapphire laser, making it particularly suited for biomaterials and incorporates a choice of user interfaces for different applications. The system is designed around a commercial inverted microscope and is configured such that it can be easily used by the non-specialist. We demonstrate the bio-capabilities of our system by manipulating a group of yeast cells, a single red blood cell and a single cell of the green algae colony Volvox.

  10. Aeronautical tubes and pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauclair, N.

    1984-12-01

    The main and subcomponent French suppliers of aircraft tubes and pipes are discussed, and the state of the industry is analyzed. Quality control is essential for tubes with regard to their i.d. and metallurgical compositions. French regulations do not allow welded seam tubes in hydraulic circuits unless no other form is available, and then rustproofed steel must be installed. The actual low level of orders for any run of tubes dictates that the product is only one of several among the manufacturers' line. Automation, both in NDT and quality control, assures that the tubes meet specifications. A total of 10 French companies participate in the industry, serving both civil and military needs, with some companies specializing only in titanium, steel, or aluminum materials. Concerns wishing to enter the market must upgrade their equipment to meet the higher aeronautical specifications and be prepared to furnish tubes and pipes that serve both functional and structural purposes simultaneously. Additionally, pipe-bending machines must also perform to tight specifications. Pipes can range from 0.2 mm exterior diameter to 40 mm, with wall thicknesses from 0.02 mm to 3 mm. A chart containing a list of manufacturers and their respective specifications and characteristics is presented, and a downtrend in production with reduction of personnel is noted.

  11. WorkstationJ: workstation emulation software for medical image perception and technology evaluation research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schartz, Kevin M.; Berbaum, Kevin S.; Caldwell, Robert T.; Madsen, Mark T.

    2007-03-01

    We developed image presentation software that mimics the functionality available in the clinic, but also records time-stamped, observer-display interactions and is readily deployable on diverse workstations making it possible to collect comparable observer data at multiple sites. Commercial image presentation software for clinical use has limited application for research on image perception, ergonomics, computer-aids and informatics because it does not collect observer responses, or other information on observer-display interactions, in real time. It is also very difficult to collect observer data from multiple institutions unless the same commercial software is available at different sites. Our software not only records observer reports of abnormalities and their locations, but also inspection time until report, inspection time for each computed radiograph and for each slice of tomographic studies, window/level, and magnification settings used by the observer. The software is a modified version of the open source ImageJ software available from the National Institutes of Health. Our software involves changes to the base code and extensive new plugin code. Our free software is currently capable of displaying computed tomography and computed radiography images. The software is packaged as Java class files and can be used on Windows, Linux, or Mac systems. By deploying our software together with experiment-specific script files that administer experimental procedures and image file handling, multi-institutional studies can be conducted that increase reader and/or case sample sizes or add experimental conditions.

  12. Aeronautical Engineering: 1983 cumulative index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    This bibliography is a cumulative index to the abstracts contained in NASA SP-7037 (158) through NASA SP-7037 (169) of Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography. NASA SP-7037 and its supplements have been compiled through the cooperative efforts of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). This cumulative index includes subject, personal author, corporate source, contract, report number, and accession number indexes.

  13. The Microcomputer as an Educational Laboratory Workstation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciociolo, James M.

    1983-01-01

    Describes laboratory workstations which provide direct connection for monitoring and control of analytical instruments such as pH meters, spectrophotometers, temperature, and chromatographic instruments. This is accomplished through analog/digital and digital/analog converters for analog signals and input/output devices for on/off signals.…

  14. Technical Services Workstations. SPEC Kit 213.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brugger, Judith M., Comp.; And Others

    Technical services workstations (TSWs) are personal computers that have been customized for use in technical services departments. To gather information on their use and prevalence in research libraries, the Program for Cooperative Cataloging Standing Committee on Automation surveyed the 119 members of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL)…

  15. Workstations and gloveboxes for space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Junge, Maria

    1990-01-01

    Lockheed Missiles and Space Company is responsible for designing, developing, and building the Life Sciences Glovebox, the Laboratory Sciences Workbench, and the Maintenance Workstation plus 16 other pieces of equipment for the U.S. Laboratory Module of the Space Station Freedom. The Laboratory Sciences Workbench and the Maintenance Workstation were functionally combined into a double structure to save weight and volume which are important commodities on the Space Station Freedom. The total volume of these items is approximately 180 cubic feet. These workstations and the glovebox will be delivered to NASA in 1994 and will be launched in 1995. The very long lifetime of 30 years presents numerous technical challenges in the areas of design and reliability. The equipment must be easy to use by international crew members and also easy to maintain on-orbit. For example, seals must be capable of on-orbit changeout and reverification. The stringent contamination requirements established for Space Station Freedom equipment also complicate the zero gravity glovebox design. The current contamination control system for the Life Sciences Glovebox and the Maintenance Workstation is presented. The requirement for the Life Sciences Glovebox to safely contain toxic, reactive, and radioactive materials presents challenges. Trade studies, CAD simulation techniques and design challenges are discussed to illustrate the current baseline conceptual designs. Areas which need input from the user community are identified.

  16. Human Visual Perception--Learning at Workstations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaal, Stefen; Bogner, Franz X.

    2005-01-01

    This study compares two methods of instruction in practical school biology. The content remains the same but two teaching methods are used, one based on workstations (Group 1) and the other a conventional approach (Group 2). The content was a regular 9th grade syllabus issue: visual perception. Method 1 included a phenomenological introduction,…

  17. Planning and Implementing Technical Services Workstations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Michael, Ed.

    The job of the library cataloger has grown increasingly complex. Catalogers must draw from a vast pool of dynamic information as they handle traditional and new forms of media. Technical Services Workstations (TSWs) provide catalogers the network data, application programs, and standard hardware required to catalog all types of media quickly and…

  18. Aeronautics in NACA and NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Initiated in 1915, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics/National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NACA/NASA) aeronautical programs have been the keystone of a sustained U.S. Government, industry, and university research effort which has been a primary factor in the development of our remarkable air transportation systems, the country's largest positive trade balance component, and the world's finest military Air Force. This overview summarizes the flow of events, and the major trends, that have led from the NACA origins to the present NASA Aeronautics program, and indicates some important directions for the years ahead.

  19. Aeronautical Engineering: A continuing bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    This bibliography lists 347 reports, articles and other documents introduced into the scientific and technical information system. Documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated compounds, equipment, and systems are included. Research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles are also included.

  20. Fifty Years of Aeronautical Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This booklet contains a detailed review of the aeronautical research conducted at Langley Research Center during the 50 years after its construction in 1917 as the first research laboratory for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. The research is discussed in five parts, by decades: 1917-27, 1928-37, 1938-47, 1948-57, 1958-67.…

  1. Microcomputers and Workstations in Libraries: Trends and Opportunities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welsch, Erwin K.

    1990-01-01

    Summarizes opinions of scholars in various disciplines on workstation history, definition, and functions. Networks and configurations for library workstations, including hardware and software recommendations, are described. The impact of workstations on the workplace resulting in task, process, and institutional transformation, is also considered.…

  2. NASA Aeronautics Research: An Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. air transportation system is vital to the economic well-being and security of the United States. To support continued U.S. leadership in aviation, Congress and NASA requested that the National Research Council undertake a decadal survey of civil aeronautics research and technology (R&T) priorities that would help NASA fulfill its responsibility to preserve U.S. leadership in aeronautics technology. In 2006, the National Research Council published the Decadal Survey of Civil Aeronautics. That report presented a set of six strategic objectives for the next decade of aeronautics R&T, and it described 51 high-priority R&T challenges--characterized by five common themes--for both NASA and non-NASA researchers. The National Research Council produced the present report, which assesses NASA's Aeronautics Research Program, in response to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Authorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109-155). This report focuses on three sets of questions: 1. How well does NASA's research portfolio implement appropriate recommendations and address relevant high-priority research and technology challenges identified in the Decadal Survey of Civil Aeronautics? If gaps are found, what steps should be taken by the federal government to eliminate them? 2. How well does NASA's aeronautics research portfolio address the aeronautics research requirements of NASA, particularly for robotic and human space exploration? How well does NASA's aeronautics research portfolio address other federal government department/agency non-civil aeronautics research needs? If gaps are found, what steps should be taken by NASA and/or other parts of the federal government to eliminate them? 3. Will the nation have a skilled research workforce and research facilities commensurate with the requirements in (1) and (2) above? What critical improvements in workforce expertise and research facilities, if any, should NASA and the nation make to achieve the goals of NASA

  3. A graphical workstation based part-task flight simulator for preliminary rapid evaluation of advanced displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanke, Craig; Kuchar, James; Hahn, Edward; Pritchett, Amy; Hansman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    Advances in avionics and display technology are significantly changing the cockpit environment in current transport aircraft. The MIT Aeronautical Systems Lab (ASL) has developed a part-task flight simulator specifically to study the effects of these new technologies on flight crew situational awareness and performance. The simulator is based on a commercially-available graphics workstation, and can be rapidly reconfigured to meet the varying demands of experimental studies. The simulator has been successfully used to evaluate graphical microburst alerting displays, electronic instrument approach plates, terrain awareness and alerting displays, and ATC routing amendment delivery through digital datalinks.

  4. A graphical workstation based part-task flight simulator for preliminary rapid evaluation of advanced displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanke, Craig; Kuchar, James; Hahn, Edward; Pritchett, A.; Hansman, R. John

    1994-01-01

    Advances in avionics and display technology are significantly changing the cockpit environment in current transport aircraft. The MIT Aeronautical Systems Lab (ASL) developed a part-task flight simulator specifically to study the effects of these new technologies on flight crew situational awareness and performance. The simulator is based on a commercially-available graphics workstation, and can be rapidly reconfigured to meet the varying demands of experimental studies. The simulator was successfully used to evaluate graphical microbursts alerting displays, electronic instrument approach plates, terrain awareness and alerting displays, and ATC routing amendment delivery through digital datalinks.

  5. NASA's Role in Aeronautics: A Workshop. Volume 6: Aeronautical research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    While each aspect of its aeronautical technology program is important to the current preeminence of the United States in aeronautics, the most essential contributions of NASA derive from its research. Successes and challenges in NASA's efforts to improve civil and military aviation are discussed for the following areas: turbulence, noise, supercritical aerodynamics, computational aerodynamics, fuels, high temperature materials, composite materials, single crystal components, powder metallurgy, and flight controls. Spin offs to engineering and other sciences explored include NASTRAN, lubricants, and composites.

  6. Integrated Design of a Telerobotic Workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochlis, Jennifer L.; Clarke, John-Paul

    2001-01-01

    The experiments described in this paper are part of a larger joint MIT/NASA research effort that focuses on the development of a methodology for designing and evaluating integrated interfaces for highly dexterous and multi-functional telerobots. Specifically, a telerobotic workstation is being designed for an Extravehicular Activity (EVA) anthropomorphic space station telerobot. Previous researchers have designed telerobotic workstations based upon performance of discrete subsets of tasks (for example, peg-in-hole, tracking, etc.) without regard for transitions that operators go through between tasks performed sequentially in the context of larger integrated tasks. The exploratory research experiments presented here took an integrated approach and assessed how subjects operating a full-immersion telerobot perform during the transitions between sub-tasks of two common EVA tasks. Preliminary results show that up to 30% of total task time is spent gaining and maintaining Situation Awareness (SA) of their task space and environment during transitions. Although task performance improves over the two trial days, the percentage of time spent on SA remains the same. This method identifies areas where workstation displays and feedback mechanisms are most needed to increase operator performance and decrease operator workload - areas that previous research methods have not been able to address.

  7. The role of graphics super-workstations in a supercomputing environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, E.

    1989-01-01

    A new class of very powerful workstations has recently become available which integrate near supercomputer computational performance with very powerful and high quality graphics capability. These graphics super-workstations are expected to play an increasingly important role in providing an enhanced environment for supercomputer users. Their potential uses include: off-loading the supercomputer (by serving as stand-alone processors, by post-processing of the output of supercomputer calculations, and by distributed or shared processing), scientific visualization (understanding of results, communication of results), and by real time interaction with the supercomputer (to steer an iterative computation, to abort a bad run, or to explore and develop new algorithms).

  8. A workstation based simulator for teaching compressible aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Thomas J.

    1994-01-01

    A workstation-based interactive flow simulator has been developed to aid in the teaching of undergraduate compressible aerodynamics. By solving the equations found in NACA 1135, the simulator models three basic fluids problems encountered in supersonic flow: flow past a compression corner, flow past two wedges in series, and flow past two opposed wedges. The study can vary the geometry or flow conditions through a graphical user interface and the new conditions are calculated immediately. Various graphical formats present the results of the flow calculations to the student. The simulator includes interactive questions and answers to aid in both the use of the tool and to develop an understanding of some of the complexities of compressible aerodynamics. A series of help screens make the simulator easy to learn and use.

  9. DAWN (Design Assistant Workstation) for advanced physical-chemical life support systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudokas, Mary R.; Cantwell, Elizabeth R.; Robinson, Peter I.; Shenk, Timothy W.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a project supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology (NASA-OAST) under the Advanced Life Support Development Program. It is an initial attempt to integrate artificial intelligence techniques (via expert systems) with conventional quantitative modeling tools for advanced physical-chemical life support systems. The addition of artificial intelligence techniques will assist the designer in the definition and simulation of loosely/well-defined life support processes/problems as well as assist in the capture of design knowledge, both quantitative and qualitative. Expert system and conventional modeling tools are integrated to provide a design workstation that assists the engineer/scientist in creating, evaluating, documenting and optimizing physical-chemical life support systems for short-term and extended duration missions.

  10. 14 CFR 77.35 - Aeronautical studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aeronautical studies. 77.35 Section 77.35 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRSPACE OBJECTS AFFECTING NAVIGABLE AIRSPACE Aeronautical Studies of Effect of Proposed Construction on Navigable Airspace § 77.35 Aeronautical studies....

  11. Kennedy Educate to Innovate (KETI) Aeronautics PowerPoint Presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, Dina

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some fundamental features of aeronautics. It is designed to introduce students to aeronautics and to engage them in Science Technology Education and Mathematics (STEM). It reviews the history of airflight, the aircraft components and their interaction with the forces that make flight possible (i.e. lift, weight drag and thrust), and the interaction of the components that create aircraft movements (roll, pitch and yaw)

  12. Reynolds number influences in aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, Dennis M.; Yip, Long P.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Lin, John C.; Lawing, Pierce L.; Batina, John T.; Hardin, Jay C.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Fenbert, James W.; Domack, Christopher S.

    1993-01-01

    Reynolds number, a measure of the ratio of inertia to viscous forces, is a fundamental similarity parameter for fluid flows and therefore, would be expected to have a major influence in aerodynamics and aeronautics. Reynolds number influences are generally large, but monatomic, for attached laminar (continuum) flow; however, laminar flows are easily separated, inducing even stronger, non-monatomic, Reynolds number sensitivities. Probably the strongest Reynolds number influences occur in connection with transitional flow behavior. Transition can take place over a tremendous Reynolds number range, from the order of 20 x 10(exp 3) for 2-D free shear layers up to the order of 100 x 10(exp 6) for hypersonic boundary layers. This variability in transition behavior is especially important for complex configurations where various vehicle and flow field elements can undergo transition at various Reynolds numbers, causing often surprising changes in aerodynamics characteristics over wide ranges in Reynolds number. This is further compounded by the vast parameterization associated with transition, in that any parameter which influences mean viscous flow development (e.g., pressure gradient, flow curvature, wall temperature, Mach number, sweep, roughness, flow chemistry, shock interactions, etc.), and incident disturbance fields (acoustics, vorticity, particulates, temperature spottiness, even electro static discharges) can alter transition locations to first order. The usual method of dealing with the transition problem is to trip the flow in the generally lower Reynolds number wind tunnel to simulate the flight turbulent behavior. However, this is not wholly satisfactory as it results in incorrectly scaled viscous region thicknesses and cannot be utilized at all for applications such as turbine blades and helicopter rotors, nacelles, leading edge and nose regions, and High Altitude Long Endurance and hypersonic airbreathers where the transitional flow is an innately critical

  13. Computerized Workstation for Tsunami Hazard Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrentiev-Jr, Mikhail; Marchuk, Andrey; Romanenko, Alexey; Simonov, Konstantin; Titov, Vasiliy

    2010-05-01

    We present general structure and functionality of the proposed Computerized Workstation for Tsunami Hazard Monitoring (CWTHM). The tool allows interactive monitoring of hazard, tsunami risk assessment, and mitigation - at all stages, from the period of strong tsunamigenic earthquake preparation to inundation of the defended coastal areas. CWTHM is a software-hardware complex with a set of software applications, optimized to achieve best performance on hardware platforms in use. The complex is calibrated for selected tsunami source zone(s) and coastal zone(s) to be defended. The number of zones (both source and coastal) is determined, or restricted, by available hardware resources. The presented complex performs monitoring of selected tsunami source zone via the Internet. The authors developed original algorithms, which enable detection of the preparation zone of the strong underwater earthquake automatically. For the so-determined zone the event time, magnitude and spatial location of tsunami source are evaluated by means of energy of the seismic precursors (foreshocks) analysis. All the above parameters are updated after each foreshock. Once preparing event is detected, several scenarios are forecasted for wave amplitude parameters as well as the inundation zone. Estimations include the lowest and the highest wave amplitudes and the least and the most inundation zone. In addition to that, the most probable case is calculated. In case of multiple defended coastal zones, forecasts and estimates can be done in parallel. Each time the simulated model wave reaches deep ocean buoys or tidal gauge, expected values of wave parameters and inundation zones are updated with historical events information and pre-calculated scenarios. The Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) software package is used for mathematical simulation. The authors suggest code acceleration for deep water wave propagation. As a result, performance is 15 times faster compared to MOST, original version

  14. Workstation-assisted education at MIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champine, George A.

    1992-06-01

    MIT launched a major new initiative called Project Athena in 1983 to improve the quality of education through the introduction of a high-quality computing infrastructure throughout the campus. Implementation of the Project Athena computing environment required eight years, cost about 100 million, and was sponsored by Digital Equipment and IBM in addition to MIT. The Athena computing environment is based almost entirely on workstations from these two vendors using the Unix operating system. Project Athena is now complete. The resulting computer system has been turned over to the campus computing organization for ongoing operation and maintenance. The computing environment available at MIT for education has been significantly improved. Students are graduating today that have never known life at MIT without the ubiquitous availability of high-quality computing. This article provides an overview of the initial objectives and strategies of Project Athena at MIT relative to its educational use. The specific strategies that MIT employed in the use of work-stations in educational are then described. These strategies are contrasted with other available strategies. Specific examples of the use of workstations are presented. An important element in current and future education delivery is multimedia. Athena in conjunction with the MIT Media Lab has one of the largest efforts in multimedia development of any of the universities, and MIT is using multimedia in education on a daily basis. A new laboratory, the Center for Educational Computing Initiatives, has been established with a major focus on multimedia. Finally the lessons learned from Athena relative to its primary objective — that of improving education — are reviewed.

  15. Telerobotics Workstation (TRWS) for Deep Space Habitats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittman, David S.; Howe, Alan S.; Tores, Recaredo J.; Rochlis, Jennifer L.; Hambuchen, Kimberly A.; Demel, Matthew; Chapman, Christopher C.

    2012-01-01

    On medium- to long-duration human spaceflight missions, latency in communications from Earth could reduce efficiency or hinder local operations, control, and monitoring of the various mission vehicles and other elements. Regardless of the degree of autonomy of any one particular element, a means of monitoring and controlling the elements in real time based on mission needs would increase efficiency and response times for their operation. Since human crews would be present locally, a local means for monitoring and controlling all the various mission elements is needed, particularly for robotic elements where response to interesting scientific features in the environment might need near- instantaneous manipulation and control. One of the elements proposed for medium- and long-duration human spaceflight missions, the Deep Space Habitat (DSH), is intended to be used as a remote residence and working volume for human crews. The proposed solution for local monitoring and control would be to provide a workstation within the DSH where local crews can operate local vehicles and robotic elements with little to no latency. The Telerobotics Workstation (TRWS) is a multi-display computer workstation mounted in a dedicated location within the DSH that can be adjusted for a variety of configurations as required. From an Intra-Vehicular Activity (IVA) location, the TRWS uses the Robot Application Programming Interface Delegate (RAPID) control environment through the local network to remotely monitor and control vehicles and robotic assets located outside the pressurized volume in the immediate vicinity or at low-latency distances from the habitat. The multiple display area of the TRWS allows the crew to have numerous windows open with live video feeds, control windows, and data browsers, as well as local monitoring and control of the DSH and associated systems.

  16. An open architecture for medical image workstation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Liang; Hu, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xiangyun

    2005-04-01

    Dealing with the difficulties of integrating various medical image viewing and processing technologies with a variety of clinical and departmental information systems and, in the meantime, overcoming the performance constraints in transferring and processing large-scale and ever-increasing image data in healthcare enterprise, we design and implement a flexible, usable and high-performance architecture for medical image workstations. This architecture is not developed for radiology only, but for any workstations in any application environments that may need medical image retrieving, viewing, and post-processing. This architecture contains an infrastructure named Memory PACS and different kinds of image applications built on it. The Memory PACS is in charge of image data caching, pre-fetching and management. It provides image applications with a high speed image data access and a very reliable DICOM network I/O. In dealing with the image applications, we use dynamic component technology to separate the performance-constrained modules from the flexibility-constrained modules so that different image viewing or processing technologies can be developed and maintained independently. We also develop a weakly coupled collaboration service, through which these image applications can communicate with each other or with third party applications. We applied this architecture in developing our product line and it works well. In our clinical sites, this architecture is applied not only in Radiology Department, but also in Ultrasonic, Surgery, Clinics, and Consultation Center. Giving that each concerned department has its particular requirements and business routines along with the facts that they all have different image processing technologies and image display devices, our workstations are still able to maintain high performance and high usability.

  17. Xplot: XY plotting software for Sun Workstations

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, B.V.

    1991-06-01

    A user friendly XY plotting package for Sun Workstations has been developed. Xplot is X-windows based and Open Look compliant. Running under an Open Look window manager, it supports the Drag Drop metaphor allowing the user to simply drag and drop a file icon into the plot window to create XY plots of multi-column ASCII data files. It supports color and monochrome PostScript hardcopy and re-sizeable windows. It has been designed to provide simple XY plots with minimal effort from the user. 7 figs.

  18. The console password feature for DEC workstations

    SciTech Connect

    Van Lehn, A.L.

    1993-10-01

    New VAXstations and all DECstations offer a ``hardware`` password feature that, when enabled, restricts unauthorized access to your system console terminal when turned on or restarted. VAXstation 3100s shipped after July, 1989 offer this feature. A description of this feature should be part of the Hardware User Guide for your workstation; however, some of the early systems did not document this security enhancement. This document is based on the author`s investigation as well as information provided by the Digital Equipment Corporation.

  19. Habitat Demonstration Unit Medical Operations Workstation Upgrades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trageser, Katherine H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the design and fabrication associated with upgrades for the Medical Operations Workstation in the Habitat Demonstration Unit. The work spanned a ten week period. The upgrades will be used during the 2011 Desert Research and Technology Studies (Desert RATS) field campaign. Upgrades include a deployable privacy curtain system, a deployable tray table, an easily accessible biological waste container, reorganization and labeling of the medical supplies, and installation of a retractable camera. All of the items were completed within the ten week period.

  20. Efficient Parallel Engineering Computing on Linux Workstations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lou, John Z.

    2010-01-01

    A C software module has been developed that creates lightweight processes (LWPs) dynamically to achieve parallel computing performance in a variety of engineering simulation and analysis applications to support NASA and DoD project tasks. The required interface between the module and the application it supports is simple, minimal and almost completely transparent to the user applications, and it can achieve nearly ideal computing speed-up on multi-CPU engineering workstations of all operating system platforms. The module can be integrated into an existing application (C, C++, Fortran and others) either as part of a compiled module or as a dynamically linked library (DLL).

  1. Videoconferencing using workstations in the ATLAS collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Onions, C.

    1994-12-31

    The ATLAS collaboration consists of about 1000 physicists from close to 100 institutes around the world. This number is expected to grow over the coming years. The authors realized that they needed to do something to allow people to participate in meetings held at CERN without having to travel and hence they started a pilot project in July, 1993 to look into this. Colleagues from Nikhef already had experience of international network meetings (e.g. RIPE) using standard UNIX workstations and public domain software tools using the MBONE, hence they investigated this as a first priority.

  2. Heterogenous database integration in a physician workstation.

    PubMed Central

    Annevelink, J.; Young, C. Y.; Tang, P. C.

    1991-01-01

    We discuss the integration of a variety of data and information sources in a Physician Workstation (PWS), focusing on the integration of data from DHCP, the Veteran Administration's Distributed Hospital Computer Program. We designed a logically centralized, object-oriented data-schema, used by end users and applications to explore the data accessible through an object-oriented database using a declarative query language. We emphasize the use of procedural abstraction to transparently integrate a variety of information sources into the data schema. PMID:1807624

  3. Compressibility Effects in Aeronautical Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stack, John

    1941-01-01

    Compressible-flow research, while a relatively new field in aeronautics, is very old, dating back almost to the development of the first firearm. Over the last hundred years, researches have been conducted in the ballistics field, but these results have been of practically no use in aeronautical engineering because the phenomena that have been studied have been the more or less steady supersonic condition of flow. Some work that has been done in connection with steam turbines, particularly nozzle studies, has been of value, In general, however, understanding of compressible-flow phenomena has been very incomplete and permitted no real basis for the solution of aeronautical engineering problems in which.the flow is likely to be unsteady because regions of both subsonic and supersonic speeds may occur. In the early phases of the development of the airplane, speeds were so low that the effects of compressibility could be justifiably ignored. During the last war and immediately after, however, propellers exhibited losses in efficiency as the tip speeds approached the speed of sound, and the first experiments of an aeronautical nature were therefore conducted with propellers. Results of these experiments indicated serious losses of efficiency, but aeronautical engineers were not seriously concerned at the time became it was generally possible. to design propellers with quite low tip. speeds. With the development of new engines having increased power and rotational speeds, however, the problems became of increasing importance.

  4. Local Surface Reconstruction from MER images using Stereo Workstation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Dongjoe; Muller, Jan-Peter

    2010-05-01

    -HRSC reconstruction workflow. This algorithm's performance is reasonable even for close-range imagery so long as the stereo -pair does not too large a baseline displacement. For post-processing, a Bundle Adjustment (BA) is used to optimise the initial calibration parameters, which bootstrap the reconstruction results. Amongst many options for the non-linear optimisation, the LMA has been adopted due to its stability so that the BA searches the best calibration parameters whilst iteratively minimising the re-projection errors of the initial reconstruction points. For the evaluation of the proposed method, the result of the method is compared with the reconstruction from a disparity map provided by JPL using their operational processing system. Visual and quantitative comparison will be presented as well as updated camera parameters. As part of future work, we will investigate a method expediting the processing speed of the stereo region growing process and look into the possibility of extending the use of the stereo workstation to orbital image processing. Such an interactive stereo workstation can also be used to digitize points and line features as well as assess the accuracy of stereo processed results produced from other stereo matching algorithms available from within the consortium and elsewhere. It can also provide "ground truth" when suitably refined for stereo matching algorithms as well as provide visual cues as to why these matching algorithms sometimes fail to mitigate this in the future. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement n° 218814 "PRoVisG".

  5. Advanced satellite workstation: An integrated workstation environment for operational support of satellite system planning and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, Stewart A.

    1992-01-01

    A prototype integrated environment, the Advanced Satellite Workstation (ASW), is described that has been developed and delivered for evaluation and operator feedback in an operational satellite control center. The current ASW hardware consists of a Sun Workstation and Macintosh II Workstation connected via an ethernet Network Hardware and Software, Laser Disk System, Optical Storage System, and Telemetry Data File Interface. The central mission of ASW is to provide an intelligent decision support and training environment for operator/analysts of complex systems such as satellites. There have been many workstation implementations recently which incorporate graphical telemetry displays and expert systems. ASW is a considerably broader look at intelligent, integrated environments for decision support, based upon the premise that the central features of such an environment are intelligent data access and integrated toolsets. A variety of tools have been constructed in support of this prototype environment including: an automated pass planner for scheduling vehicle support activities, architectural modeler for hierarchical simulation and analysis of satellite vehicle subsystems, multimedia-based information systems that provide an intuitive and easily accessible interface to Orbit Operations Handbook and other relevant support documentation, and a data analysis architecture that integrates user modifiable telemetry display systems, expert systems for background data analysis, and interfaces to the multimedia system via inter-process communication.

  6. National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1938-01-01

    NASA was created from the National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics in 1958. This is a photo of the members of the advisory board of NACA in 1938. NACA was the governmental organization charged with the supervision and conduct of scientific laboratory research in aeronautics. Its laboratories located at Langley Field, Virginia, provide new knowledge underlying the continuous improvement in the performance, efficiency, and safety of American aircraft. At this meeting Dr. Joesph S. Ames, President Emeritus of John Hopkins University, was re-elected Chairman, and Dr. Vannevar Bush, President- elect of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, was elected Vice Chairman. Dr. Ames' re-election as chairman was a recognition of his outstanding contributions to the science of aeronautics. He has been the leading scientific member of the Committee for over twenty-three years and chairman for eleven years. Under his visionary leadership the great laboratories of the N.A.C.A. at Langley Field have been developed. Left to Right: Hon. C. M. Hester, Administrator, Civil Aeronautics Authority Captain S. M. Kraus, U.S.N. Brig. General A. W. Robins, Chief, Materiel Division, Army Air Corps. Dr. L.J. Biggs, Director, National Bureau of Standards Dr. E.P. Warner Dr. Orville Wright Dr. Joesph S. Ames, Chairman Dr. C.J. Abbot, Secretary, Smithsonian Institution J.F. Victory, Secretary Rear Adm. A.B. Cook, U.S.N., Chief, Bureau Aeronautics Authority Dr. Vannevar Bush Dr. J.C. Hunsaker Dr. G.W. Lewis, Director of Aeronautical Research. Absent: Col. Charles A. Lindbergh and Maj. Gen. H. 'Hap' Arnold, Chief, Army Air Corps. One Vacany: U.S. Weather Bureau.

  7. HiRel - Reliability/availability integrated workstation tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bavuso, Salvatore J.; Dugan, Joanne B.

    1992-01-01

    The HiRel software tool is described and demonstrated by application to the mission avionics subsystem of the Advanced System Integration Demonstrations (ASID) system that utilizes the PAVE PILLAR approach. HiRel marks another accomplishment toward the goal of producing a totally integrated computer-aided design (CAD) workstation design capability. Since a reliability engineer generally represents a reliability model graphically before it can be solved, the use of a graphical input description language increases productivity and decreases the incidence of error. The graphical postprocessor module HARPO makes it possible for reliability engineers to quickly analyze huge amounts of reliability/availability data to observe trends due to exploratory design changes. The addition of several powerful HARP modeling engines provides the user with a reliability/availability modeling capability for a wide range of system applications all integrated under a common interactive graphical input-output capability.

  8. Medical workstations for applied imaging and graphics research.

    PubMed

    Ehricke, H H; Grunert, T; Buck, T; Kolb, R; Skalej, M

    1994-01-01

    We present a medical workstation for the efficient implementation of research ideas related to image processing and computer graphics. Based on standard hardware platforms the software system encompasses two major components: A turnkey application system provides a functionally kernel for a broad community of clinical users working with digital imaging devices, including methods of noise suppression, interactive and automatic segmentation, 3D surface reconstruction and multi-modal registration. A development toolbox allows new algorithms and applications to be efficiently implemented and consistently integrated with the common framework of the turnkey system. The platform is based on an elaborate object class structure describing objects for image processing, computer graphics, study handling and user interface control. Thus expertise of computer scientists familiar with this application domain is brought into the hospital and can be readily used by clinical researchers. PMID:7850734

  9. Workstation Designs for a Cis-Lunar Deep Space Habitat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, A. Scott

    2014-01-01

    Using the International Standard Payload Rack (ISPR) system, a suite of workstations required for deep space missions have been proposed to fill out habitation functions in an International Space Station (ISS) derived Cis-lunar Deep Space Habitat. This paper introduces the functional layout of the Cis-lunar habitat design, and describes conceptual designs for modular deployable work surfaces, General Maintenance Workstation (GMWS), In-Space Manufacturing Workstation (ISMW), Intra-Vehicular Activity Telerobotics Work Station (IVA-TRWS), and Galley / Wardroom.

  10. Earthbound applications for NASA's physician workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grams, R.; Yu, F. S.; Li, B.; Iddings, E.; Fiorentino, R.; Shao, S.; Wang, L.; Broughton, H.

    1993-01-01

    The dream of a space probe to Mars or an astronaut colony on the moon persists. Despite years of setbacks and delays, NASA continues to lay the foundation for a new frontier in space. The necessity of a self contained health maintenance facility is an integral part of this stellar venture. As a subsystem of this health maintenance facility, the physician or astronaut workstation was envisioned as the vehicle of interface between the computer resources of the space station and the care provider. Our efforts to define and build this interface have resulted in a series of programs which can now be tested and refined using earth-based applications. The modules which have dual-use application from the NASA workstation include: patient scheduling and master patient index, pharmacy, laboratory, medical library, problem list/progress notes, and digital medical records. Our current plan is to develop these tools as objects that can be assembled in a variety of configurations. This will allow the technology to be used by the private sector where each doctor can select the starting point of his outpatient office system and add modules as he makes progress in system integration and training.

  11. Job Prospects for Aeronautical Engineers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basta, Nicholas

    1985-01-01

    Huge defense budgets and a commercial aircraft comeback are contributing to high demands for aeronautical engineers. Job offers are plentiful and are expected to rise by 41 percent from 1982 to 1995. Federal space programs will provide additional employment opportunities. (DH)

  12. NASA's role in aeronautical research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, M.

    1983-01-01

    Past and current research in the aeronautical field conducted by NASA is reviewed. The first national center for aeronautical research, the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory, was established in 1917 by the then formed National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). Two other research centers established later by NACA (Lewis and Ames) were staffed with research cadres from Langley. These three research centers formed the nucleus of NASA when it was established in 1958. Studies conducted today by NASA's research centers include: a concept for commuter-style aircraft, turbofan engines for military supersonic fighter aircraft, strength and durability of man-made fiber materials, and maneuverability problems in high speed aircraft. In addition, at Ames, research is being conducted on short-haul aviation, and short and vertical takeoff while at Lewis studies concentrate on propulsion system and engines. At Langley the emphasis is on basic research, stressing aircraft structure improvements, stall avoidance and noise abatement. Finally, the importance of NASA's educational program is discussed.

  13. 1997 NASA Academy in Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrisani, Dominick, II

    1998-01-01

    The NASA Academy in Aeronautics at the Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) was a ten-week summer leadership training program conducted for the first time in the summer of 1997. Funding was provided by a contract between DFRC and Purdue University. Mr. Lee Duke of DFRC was the contract monitor, and Professor Dominick Andrisani was the principal investigator. Five student research associates participated in the program. Biographies of the research associates are given in Appendix 1. Dominick Andrisani served as Dean of the NASA Academy in Aeronautics. NASA Academy in Aeronautics is a unique summer institute of higher learning that endeavors to provide insight into all of the elements that make NASA aeronautical research possible. At the same time the Academy assigns the research associate to be mentored by one of NASA!s best researchers so that they can contribute towards an active flight research program. Aeronautical research and development are an investment in the future, and NASA Academy is an investment in aeronautical leaders of the future. The Academy was run by the Indiana Space Grant Consortium at Purdue in strategic partnership with the National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program. Research associates at the Academy were selected with help from the Space Grant Consortium that sponsored the research associate. Research associate stipend and travel to DFRC were paid by the students' Space Grant Consortium. All other student expenses were paid by the Academy. Since the Academy at DFRC had only five students the opportunity for individual growth and attention was unique in the country. About 30% of the working time and most of the social time of the students were be spent as a "group" or "team." This time was devoted to exchange of ideas, on forays into the highest levels of decision making, and in executing aeronautical research. This was done by interviewing leaders throughout the aerospace industry, seminars, working dinners, and informal

  14. 14 CFR 61.185 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aeronautical knowledge. 61.185 Section 61... Flight Instructors With a Sport Pilot Rating § 61.185 Aeronautical knowledge. (a) A person who is... aeronautical knowledge areas for a recreational, private, and commercial pilot certificate applicable to...

  15. 14 CFR 61.125 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aeronautical knowledge. 61.125 Section 61... Aeronautical knowledge. (a) General. A person who applies for a commercial pilot certificate must receive and... aeronautical knowledge areas of paragraph (b) of this section that apply to the aircraft category and...

  16. 14 CFR 61.105 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Aeronautical knowledge. 61.105 Section 61.105 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Private Pilots § 61.105 Aeronautical knowledge. (a) General. A person who...

  17. 14 CFR 61.125 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Aeronautical knowledge. 61.125 Section 61.125 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Commercial Pilots § 61.125 Aeronautical knowledge. (a) General. A person...

  18. 14 CFR 61.97 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Aeronautical knowledge. 61.97 Section 61.97 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Recreational Pilots § 61.97 Aeronautical knowledge. (a) General. A person...

  19. Aeronautics. America in Space: The First Decade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderton, David A.

    The major research and developments in aeronautics during the late 1950's and 1960's are reviewed descriptively with a minimum of technical content. Topics covered include aeronautical research, aeronautics in NASA, The National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, the X-15 Research Airplane, variable-sweep wing design, the Supersonic Transport…

  20. 14 CFR 61.97 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Aeronautical knowledge. 61.97 Section 61.97 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Recreational Pilots § 61.97 Aeronautical knowledge. (a) General. A person...

  1. 14 CFR 61.125 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Aeronautical knowledge. 61.125 Section 61.125 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Commercial Pilots § 61.125 Aeronautical knowledge. (a) General. A person...

  2. 14 CFR 61.185 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Aeronautical knowledge. 61.185 Section 61... Flight Instructors With a Sport Pilot Rating § 61.185 Aeronautical knowledge. (a) A person who is... aeronautical knowledge areas for a recreational, private, and commercial pilot certificate applicable to...

  3. 14 CFR 61.185 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Aeronautical knowledge. 61.185 Section 61... Flight Instructors With a Sport Pilot Rating § 61.185 Aeronautical knowledge. (a) A person who is... aeronautical knowledge areas for a recreational, private, and commercial pilot certificate applicable to...

  4. 14 CFR 61.185 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Aeronautical knowledge. 61.185 Section 61... Flight Instructors With a Sport Pilot Rating § 61.185 Aeronautical knowledge. (a) A person who is... aeronautical knowledge areas for a recreational, private, and commercial pilot certificate applicable to...

  5. 14 CFR 61.185 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Aeronautical knowledge. 61.185 Section 61... Flight Instructors With a Sport Pilot Rating § 61.185 Aeronautical knowledge. (a) A person who is... aeronautical knowledge areas for a recreational, private, and commercial pilot certificate applicable to...

  6. HERMES: a health care workstation integration architecture.

    PubMed

    van Mulligen, E M; Timmers, T; Brand, J; Cornet, R; van den Heuvel, F; Kalshoven, M; van Bemmel, J H

    1994-01-01

    An architecture is described that facilitates integration of existing databases and applications without modifying them. By means of this architecture, data from different sources dispersed in a network can be combined and directly used in existing applications or applications that have been developed specially for integration. This feature of combining data from different sources into one workstation is viewed as the enabling technology on which computer-based patient records can be built. The abstraction of computer-, network- and application-specific details is completely dealt with by the integration architecture. This integration architecture has been developed with extendibility and flexibility in mind, and allows for a growth-path towards application of the open system paradigm in medicine. PMID:8125638

  7. Unattended ground sensor situation assessment workstation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeppesen, David M.; Trellue, Ron

    1997-07-01

    Advancements in both sensor hardware technology and in software systems and processing technology have enabled the development of practical realtime situation assessment capabilities based upon information from unattended ground sensors. A decision support workstation that employs rule- based expert system processing of reports from unattended ground sensors is described. The primary goal of this development activity is to produce a suite of software to track vehicles using data from unattended ground sensors. The situational assessment products from this system have stand-alone utility, but are also intended to provide cueing support for overhead sensors and supplementary feeds to all- source fusion centers. The conceptual framework, developmental architecture, and demonstration field tests of the system are described.

  8. Application development environment for advanced digital workstations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentino, Daniel J.; Harreld, Michael R.; Liu, Brent J.; Brown, Matthew S.; Huang, Lu J.

    1998-06-01

    One remaining barrier to the clinical acceptance of electronic imaging and information systems is the difficulty in providing intuitive access to the information needed for a specific clinical task (such as reaching a diagnosis or tracking clinical progress). The purpose of this research was to create a development environment that enables the design and implementation of advanced digital imaging workstations. We used formal data and process modeling to identify the diagnostic and quantitative data that radiologists use and the tasks that they typically perform to make clinical decisions. We studied a diverse range of radiology applications, including diagnostic neuroradiology in an academic medical center, pediatric radiology in a children's hospital, screening mammography in a breast cancer center, and thoracic radiology consultation for an oncology clinic. We used object- oriented analysis to develop software toolkits that enable a programmer to rapidly implement applications that closely match clinical tasks. The toolkits support browsing patient information, integrating patient images and reports, manipulating images, and making quantitative measurements on images. Collectively, we refer to these toolkits as the UCLA Digital ViewBox toolkit (ViewBox/Tk). We used the ViewBox/Tk to rapidly prototype and develop a number of diverse medical imaging applications. Our task-based toolkit approach enabled rapid and iterative prototyping of workstations that matched clinical tasks. The toolkit functionality and performance provided a 'hands-on' feeling for manipulating images, and for accessing textual information and reports. The toolkits directly support a new concept for protocol based-reading of diagnostic studies. The design supports the implementation of network-based application services (e.g., prefetching, workflow management, and post-processing) that will facilitate the development of future clinical applications.

  9. Debris analysis workstation: from concept to reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, David B.; Maethner, Scott R.; Shubert, Ann J.; Yates, Ken W.

    1995-06-01

    Determining the hazards from debris generating events is a design and safety consideration for a number of space systems, both currently operating and planned. To meet these and other requirements, the US Air Force Phillips Laboratory Space Debris Research Program is developing a simulation platform called the Debris Analysis Workstation (DAW) which provides an analysis capability for assessing a wide variety of debris studies. DAW integrates several component debris analysis models and data visualization tools into a single analysis platform that meets the needs for DoD space debris analysis, and is both user friendly and modular. This allows for studies to be performed expeditiously by analysts that are not debris experts. DAW has gone from concept to reality with the recent deliveries of Versions 0.1 to 0.4 to a number of customers. The current version of DAW incorporates a spacecraft break-up model, drag inclusive propagator, a collision dispersion model, a graphical user interface, and data visualization routines, which together provide capabilities to conduct missile intercept range safety analyses. Work is progressing to add new capabilities with the incorporation of additional models and improved designs. The existing tools are in their initial integrated form, but the 'glue' that will ultimately bring them together into an integrated, user-friendly system, is an object oriented language layer that is scheduled to be added in 1995. Other candidate component models that are under consideration for incorporation include additional orbital propagators, error estimation routines, dispersion models, and other breakup models. At present, DAW resides on a SUN workstation, although future versions could be tailored for other platforms, depending on the need.

  10. Expanding capabilities of the debris analysis workstation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, David B.; Sorge, Marlon E.; Mains, Deanna L.; Shubert, Ann J.; Gerhart, Charlotte M.; Yates, Ken W.; Leake, Michael

    1996-10-01

    Determining the hazards from debris-generating events is a design and safety consideration for a number of space systems, both currently operating and planned. To meet these and other requirements, the United States Air Force (USAF) Phillips Laboratory (PL) Space Debris Research Program has developed a simulation software package called the Debris Analysis Workstation (DAW). This software provides an analysis capability for assessing a wide variety of debris hazards. DAW integrates several component debris analysis models and data visualization tools into a single analysis platform that meets the needs for Department of Defense space debris analysis, and is both user friendly and modular. This allows for studies to be performed expeditiously by analysts who are not debris experts. The current version of DAW includes models for spacecraft breakup, debris orbital lifetime, collision hazard risk assessment, and collision dispersion, as well as a satellite catalog database manager, a drag inclusive propagator, a graphical user interface, and data visualization routines. Together they provide capabilities to conduct several types of analyses, ranging from range safety assessments to satellite constellation risk assessment. Work is progressing to add new capabilities with the incorporation of additional models and improved designs. The existing tools are in their initial integrated form, but the 'glue' that will ultimately bring them together into an integrated system is an object oriented language layer scheduled to be added soon. Other candidate component models under consideration for incorporation include additional orbital propagators, error estimation routines, other dispersion models, and other breakup models. At present, DAW resides on a SUNR workstation, although future versions could be tailored for other platforms, depending on the need.

  11. Energy consumption of personal computer workstations

    SciTech Connect

    Szydlowski, R.

    1995-12-01

    An important question for consideration is, {open_quotes}Are office equipment plug loads increasing?{close_quotes} Data taken by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in May 1990 from the Forrestal Building, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) headquarters in Washington, DC, are desegregated by end use including: plug loads, lights, HVAC, large dedicated computers, and elevators. This study was repeated in November 1993, and there was a 3.8%/yr increase in plug loads in a building of approximately 1.75 million sq ft. Subsequent to this measurement, the plug loads were measured continuously by PNL over a 10-month period from November 1993 through September 1994, and the results showed another increase of 3.9%, nearly the same increase as in the previous three years. The energy use of personal computers (PCs) was measured by setting up a mobile outlet module (MOM), a replacement for a strip outlet, with current transformers (CTs) and potential transformers. The MOM was connected to a set of dataloggers, allowing for the monitoring of up to four PCs at a time. The PCs were plugged in through the MOM to a C180 datalogger, the data collected to a laptop, and the individual 24-hour profiles were then reduced to a standard profile. About 200 workstations were studied, including the PC, monitor, printer, modem, external disk drives, and CAD systems with their own peripherals. Also monitored were an additional collection of printers, photocopiers, facsimile machines, and monitor controllers. The end result was a set of profiles for energy use during working hours for five different buildings. There was a wide variation in these profiles from daytime to nighttime, since 16 to 35% of the computers remain on at night. Therefore, the needs for computers left on at night vary, along with the attitudes of people. Another area of energy consumption concern is the type of PC, such as IBM- or Macintosh-compatible, and there are many different kinds of workstations.

  12. Commodity clusters: Performance comparison between PC`s and workstations

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, R.; Laroco, J.; Armstrong, R.

    1996-03-01

    Workstation clusters were originally developed as a way to leverage the better cost basis of UNIX workstations to perform computations previously handled only by relatively more expensive supercomputers. Commodity workstation clusters take this evolutionary process one step further by replacing equivalent proprietary workstation functionality with less expensive PC technology. As PC technology encroaches on proprietary UNIX workstation vendor markets, these vendors will see a declining share of the overall market. As technology advances continue, the ability to upgrade a workstations performance plays a large role in cost analysis. For example, a major upgrade to a typical UNIX workstation means replacing the whole machine. As major revisions to the UNIX vendor`s product line come out, brand new systems are introduced. IBM compatibles, however, are modular by design, and nothing need to be replaced except the components that are truly improved. The DAISy cluster, for example, is about to undergo a major upgrade from 90MHz Pentiums to 200MHz Pentium Pros. All of the memory -- the system`s largest expense -- and disks, power supply, etc., can be reused. As a result, commodity workstation clusters ought to gain an increasingly large share of the distributed computing market.

  13. Public Access Workstations in the Library: New Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beecher, Henry

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the use of microcomputer-based workstations that are provided for public access in libraries. Criteria for workstations are discussed, including standard hardware, open-design software, scalable interface, and connectivity options for networking; systems that provide full-text access are described; and the need for standards is…

  14. Z39.50 and the Scholar's Workstation Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Gary Lee

    1992-01-01

    Examines the potential application of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/National Information Standards Organization (NISO) Z39.50 library networking protocol as a client/server environment for a scholar's workstation. Computer networking models are described, and linking the workstation to an online public access catalog (OPAC) is…

  15. Implementing Accessible Workstations in a Large Diverse University Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christierson, Eric; Marota, Cindy; Radwan, Neveen; Wydeven, Julie

    This paper describes how San Jose State University installed adaptive and accessible computer workstations for students with disabilities. It begins by discussing factors crucial to the installation of such workstations, including the importance of understanding legal and budgetary constraints, applying standards which meet diverse disability…

  16. ANL statement of site strategy for computing workstations

    SciTech Connect

    Fenske, K.R.; Boxberger, L.M.; Amiot, L.W.; Bretscher, M.E.; Engert, D.E.; Moszur, F.M.; Mueller, C.J.; O'Brien, D.E.; Schlesselman, C.G.; Troyer, L.J.

    1991-11-01

    This Statement of Site Strategy describes the procedure at Argonne National Laboratory for defining, acquiring, using, and evaluating scientific and office workstations and related equipment and software in accord with DOE Order 1360.1A (5-30-85), and Laboratory policy. It is Laboratory policy to promote the installation and use of computing workstations to improve productivity and communications for both programmatic and support personnel, to ensure that computing workstations acquisitions meet the expressed need in a cost-effective manner, and to ensure that acquisitions of computing workstations are in accord with Laboratory and DOE policies. The overall computing site strategy at ANL is to develop a hierarchy of integrated computing system resources to address the current and future computing needs of the laboratory. The major system components of this hierarchical strategy are: Supercomputers, Parallel computers, Centralized general purpose computers, Distributed multipurpose minicomputers, and Computing workstations and office automation support systems. Computing workstations include personal computers, scientific and engineering workstations, computer terminals, microcomputers, word processing and office automation electronic workstations, and associated software and peripheral devices costing less than $25,000 per item.

  17. NASA/University Conference on Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The proceedings of a conference on the future of aeronautics are presented. The subjects discussed include the following: (1) aeronautics and the education of the engineer, (2) technical trends in aeronautics, and (3) the role of the university in aeronautics. The technical trends in aeronautics are concerned with aircraft noise control, the effect of the aircraft on the environment, airborne electronics for automated flight, and trends in aircraft design.

  18. Evaluating the low back biomechanics of three different office workstations: Seated, standing, and perching.

    PubMed

    Le, Peter; Marras, William S

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate how different workstations may influence physical behavior in office work through motion and how that may affect spinal loads and discomfort. Twenty subjects performed a typing task in three different workstations (seated, standing, and perching) for one hour each. Measures of postural transitions, spinal loads, discomfort, and task performance were assessed in order to understand the effects of workstation interaction over time. Results indicated that standing had the most amount of motion (6-8 shifts/min), followed by perching (3-7 shifts/min), and then seating (<1 shift/min). Standing had the highest reports of discomfort and seating the least. However, spinal loads were highest in A/P shear during standing (190N posterior shear, 407N anterior shear) compared to perching (65N posterior shear, 288N anterior shear) and seating (106N posterior shear, 287 anterior shear). These loads are below the risk threshold for shear, but may still elicit a cumulative response. Perching may induce motion through supported mobility in the perching stool, whereas standing motion may be due to postural discomfort. Office workstation designs incorporating supported movement may represent a reasonable trade-off in the costs-benefits between seating and standing. PMID:27184325

  19. Flexible structure control experiments using a real-time workstation for computer-aided control engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stieber, Michael E.

    1989-01-01

    A Real-Time Workstation for Computer-Aided Control Engineering has been developed jointly by the Communications Research Centre (CRC) and Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum (RUB), West Germany. The system is presently used for the development and experimental verification of control techniques for large space systems with significant structural flexibility. The Real-Time Workstation essentially is an implementation of RUB's extensive Computer-Aided Control Engineering package KEDDC on an INTEL micro-computer running under the RMS real-time operating system. The portable system supports system identification, analysis, control design and simulation, as well as the immediate implementation and test of control systems. The Real-Time Workstation is currently being used by CRC to study control/structure interaction on a ground-based structure called DAISY, whose design was inspired by a reflector antenna. DAISY emulates the dynamics of a large flexible spacecraft with the following characteristics: rigid body modes, many clustered vibration modes with low frequencies and extremely low damping. The Real-Time Workstation was found to be a very powerful tool for experimental studies, supporting control design and simulation, and conducting and evaluating tests withn one integrated environment.

  20. High-resolution workstations for primary and secondary radiology readings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taira, Ricky K.; Simons, Margaret A.; Razavi, Mahmood; Kangarloo, Hooshang; Boechat, Maria I.; Hall, Theodore R.; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Huang, H. K.; Eldredge, Sandra L.

    1990-08-01

    We have implemented two high resolution workstations within our pediatric radiology PACS module: a two-monitor 2K x 2K station and a six-monitor 1K x 1K station. The 2K x 2K workstation is under evaluation for primary reading of pediatric radiographs from a computed radiography unit. System implementation and evaluation methods are described. Operational efficiency measures of both film and digital systems are reported. This study is our first attempt to integrate a primary viewing station into a busy clinical environment. The 1K x 1K workstation is available 24-hours a day, 7 days a week for fast reviews by referring physicians. Images from a compated radiography system are available at the workstation in about 8 minutes. A digital voice reporting system is being developed to communicate radiology reports from the 2K x 2K workstation to the 1K x 1K secondary review station.

  1. Progress Toward National Aeronautics Goals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russo, Carlo J.; Sehra, Arun K.

    1999-01-01

    NASA has made definitive progress towards achieving several bold U.S. goals in aeronautics related to air breathing engines. The advanced technologies developed towards these goals span applications from general aviation to large subsonic and supersonic aircraft. The proof of successful technology development is demonstrated through successful technology transfer to U.S. industry and projected fleet impact. Specific examples of progress are discussed that quantifies the achievement towards these goals. In addition, a more detailed vision for NASA aeronautics is defined and key strategic issues are explored which invite international and national debate and involvement especially in reduced environmental impact for subsonic and supersonic aircraft, dramatic new capabilities in general aviation engines, and reduced development cycle time and costs.

  2. Canadian aeronautical mobile data trials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedersen, Allister; Pearson, Andrea

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a series of aeronautical mobile data trials conducted on small aircraft (helicopters and fixed wing) utilizing a low-speed store-and-forward mobile data service. The paper outlines the user requirements for aeronautical mobile satellite communications. 'Flight following' and improved wide-area dispatch communications were identified as high priority requirements. A 'proof-of-concept' trial in a Cessna Skymaster aircraft is described. This trial identified certain development work as essential to the introduction of commercial service including antenna development, power supply modifications and doppler software modifications. Other improvements were also proposed. The initial aeronautical mobile data service available for pre-operational (Beta) trials is outlined. Pre-operational field trials commenced in October 1992 and consisted of installations on a Gralen Communications Inc. Cessna 177 and an Aerospatiale Astar 350 series light single engine helicopter. The paper concludes with a discussion of desirable near term mobile data service developments, commercial benefits, current safety benefits and potential future applications for improved safety.

  3. Development of a Pamphlet Targeting Computer Workstation Ergonomics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faraci, Jennifer S.

    1997-01-01

    With the increased use of computers throughout Goddard Space Flight Center, the Industrial Hygiene Office (IHO) has observed a growing trend in the number of health complaints attributed to poor computer workstation setup. A majority of the complaints has centered around musculoskeletal symptoms, including numbness, pain, and tingling in the upper extremities, shoulders, and neck. Eye strain and headaches have also been reported. In some cases, these symptoms can lead to chronic conditions such as repetitive strain injuries (RSI's). In an effort to prevent or minimize the frequency of these symptoms among the GSFC population, the IHO conducts individual ergonomic workstation evaluations and ergonomics training classes upon request. Because of the extensive number of computer workstations at GSFC, and the limited amount of manpower which the Industrial Hygiene staff could reasonably allocate to conduct workstation evaluations and employee training, a pamphlet was developed with a two-fold purpose: (1) to educate the GSFC population about the importance of ergonomically-correct computer workstation setup and the potential effects of a poorly configured workstation; and (2) to enable employees to perform a general assessment of their own workstations and make any necessary modifications for proper setup.

  4. How one engineer and computer workstation design a surface mine. [New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Chironis, N.P.

    1984-04-01

    Engineers at the new Lee Ranch coal mine near Grants, New Mexico, decided to use an interactive computer and workstation, and a mine-planning programme capable of handling day-to-day production. Scheduling and producing necessary plans, maps, and other graphics: the programme called MINEMAP can deal also with drill-hole data and stripping ratios. Teamed with MINEMAP is a computerized drafting and plotting system called DISSPLA.

  5. An aeronautical mobile satellite experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedrey, T. C.; Dessouky, K. I.; Lay, N. E.

    1990-01-01

    The various activities and findings of a NASA/FAA/COMSAT/INMARSAT collaborative aeronautical mobile satellite experiment are detailed. The primary objective of the experiment was to demonstrate and evaluate an advanced digital mobile satellite terminal developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory under the NASA Mobile Satellite Program. The experiment was a significant milestone for NASA/JPL, since it was the first test of the mobile terminal in a true mobile satellite environment. The results were also of interest to the general mobile satellite community because of the advanced nature of the technologies employed in the terminal.

  6. Program of Research in Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A prospectus of the educational and research opportunities available at the Joint Institute for Advancement of Flight Sciences, operated at NASA Langley Research Center in conjunction with George Washington University's School of Engineering and Applied Sciences is presented. Requirements of admission to various degree programs are given as well as the course offerings in the areas of acoustics, aeronautics, environmental modelling, materials science, and structures and dynamics. Research facilities for each field of study are described. Presentations and publications (including dissertations and theses) generated by each program are listed as well as faculty members visting scientists and engineers.

  7. Graphical workstation capability for reliability modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bavuso, Salvatore J.; Koppen, Sandra V.; Haley, Pamela J.

    1992-01-01

    In addition to computational capabilities, software tools for estimating the reliability of fault-tolerant digital computer systems must also provide a means of interfacing with the user. Described here is the new graphical interface capability of the hybrid automated reliability predictor (HARP), a software package that implements advanced reliability modeling techniques. The graphics oriented (GO) module provides the user with a graphical language for modeling system failure modes through the selection of various fault-tree gates, including sequence-dependency gates, or by a Markov chain. By using this graphical input language, a fault tree becomes a convenient notation for describing a system. In accounting for any sequence dependencies, HARP converts the fault-tree notation to a complex stochastic process that is reduced to a Markov chain, which it can then solve for system reliability. The graphics capability is available for use on an IBM-compatible PC, a Sun, and a VAX workstation. The GO module is written in the C programming language and uses the graphical kernal system (GKS) standard for graphics implementation. The PC, VAX, and Sun versions of the HARP GO module are currently in beta-testing stages.

  8. The anesthesia workstation of the future.

    PubMed

    Saunders, R J

    1994-09-01

    This team's concern is that technology is not the primary limitation to developing the anesthesia workstation to its full potential. In some ways, medical equipment lags far behind other industries in technological sophistication, standardization, miniaturization, and human factors engineering. Real obstacles appear to be economic and conceptual. The anesthetic process has not been reduced to a series of rigorously derived equations; what the user does is still poorly understood. Manufacturers whose design engineers do not spend a significant part of their work week in the operating room seem to be so ignorant of the real needs of the clinician that their products are doomed to fail or to be mediocre. Clinicians need to encourage their industrial counterparts in the development process to become partners in developing the anesthesia systems of the future. Progress can only be made by having clinicians and developers spend time with one another. Can this inconvenient and frustrating process possibly be worse than the everyday torment caused by manufacturers building what the clinicians do not need, because the clinicians cannot tell them? PMID:7983491

  9. User metaphors for health care professional workstations.

    PubMed

    Esterhay, R J

    1994-01-01

    The problem encountered by health care professionals and software developers has been a lack of demonstrable visions (prototypes) for Computer-based Patient Record (CPR) and Clinical Information System (CIS) applications. This deficiency has resulted in a quest for and consideration of models, metaphors, and mind maps for the Healthcare Professional Workstation (HPW)--the access mechanism for the CPR and the CIS. The familiar physician desktop and traditional paper-based metaphors are not adequate for all aspects of clinical information processes. In the clinical care environment, the flowsheet is a transporting metaphor because many different applications and tasks can be 'transported' into the flowsheet. 3D Rooms, Gopher and Genes are familiar and transporting metaphors to be exploited for HPWs. Using transporting metaphors for HPW software emphasizes commonality and de-emphasizes diversity. Each model and metaphor has an associated mind map. Only the mental model, mental metaphor or mind map for HPW software is important. Metaphors communicate real-world analogies, and communication is at the core of what defines usability. A mind map facilitates communication by building a model in the user's mind. The barriers to HPWs are not technical; they are related to economics, ownership of patient information, liability and information standards. PMID:8125658

  10. The advanced software development workstation project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fridge, Ernest M., III; Pitman, Charles L.

    1991-01-01

    The Advanced Software Development Workstation (ASDW) task is researching and developing the technologies required to support Computer Aided Software Engineering (CASE) with the emphasis on those advanced methods, tools, and processes that will be of benefit to support all NASA programs. Immediate goals are to provide research and prototype tools that will increase productivity, in the near term, in projects such as the Software Support Environment (SSE), the Space Station Control Center (SSCC), and the Flight Analysis and Design System (FADS) which will be used to support the Space Shuttle and Space Station Freedom. Goals also include providing technology for development, evolution, maintenance, and operations. The technologies under research and development in the ASDW project are targeted to provide productivity enhancements during the software life cycle phase of enterprise and information system modeling, requirements generation and analysis, system design and coding, and system use and maintenance. On-line user's guides will assist users in operating the developed information system with knowledge base expert assistance.

  11. A versatile nondestructive evaluation imaging workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chern, E. James; Butler, David W.

    1994-01-01

    Ultrasonic C-scan and eddy current imaging systems are of the pointwise type evaluation systems that rely on a mechanical scanner to physically maneuver a probe relative to the specimen point by point in order to acquire data and generate images. Since the ultrasonic C-scan and eddy current imaging systems are based on the same mechanical scanning mechanisms, the two systems can be combined using the same PC platform with a common mechanical manipulation subsystem and integrated data acquisition software. Based on this concept, we have developed an IBM PC-based combined ultrasonic C-scan and eddy current imaging system. The system is modularized and provides capacity for future hardware and software expansions. Advantages associated with the combined system are: (1) eliminated duplication of the computer and mechanical hardware, (2) unified data acquisition, processing and storage software, (3) reduced setup time for repetitious ultrasonic and eddy current scans, and (4) improved system efficiency. The concept can be adapted to many engineering systems by integrating related PC-based instruments into one multipurpose workstation such as dispensing, machining, packaging, sorting, and other industrial applications.

  12. Unattended ground sensor situation assessment workstation

    SciTech Connect

    Jeppesen, D.; Trellue, R.

    1997-04-01

    Effective utilization of unattended ground sensors (UGSs) in a theater reconnaissance, surveillance, target acquisition, and kill assessment environment requires that a human operator be able to interpret, and collectively assess, the significance of real time data obtained from UGS emplacements over large geographical regions of interest. The products of this UGS data interpretation and assessment activity can then be used in the decision support process for command level evaluation of appropriate courses of action. Advancements in both sensor hardware technology and in software systems and processing technology have enabled the development of practical real time situation assessment capabilities based upon information from unattended ground sensors. A decision support workstation that employs rule-based expert system processing of reports from unattended ground sensors is described. The primary goal of this development activity is to produce a suite of software to track vehicles using data from unattended ground sensors. The situational assessment products from this system have stand-alone utility, but are also intended to provide cueing support for overhead sensors and supplementary feeds to all-source fusion centers. The conceptual framework, developmental architecture, and demonstration field tests of the system are described.

  13. A Portable Image Workstation/Transmission System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrante, R. D.; Tom, V. T.; Walton, G.

    1986-11-01

    This paper describes a PC-based workstation for the acquisition, enhancement, transmission and reception of image and text data. The system was designed to provide both ease of use and reasonable performance using IBM PC technology with a 512 X 512 monochrome frame grabber board (PCVISION). The system allows the user to annotate an image with text legends and graphics. The system utilizes some unique methods for achieving eye pleasing two pixel graphics. An image may also be enhanced in two ways: globally with look up table alterations and locally with contrast and edge enhancing operations. Performance enhancement is achieved by implementing primarily integer operations, thereby elimating floating point operations, and radically increasing the apparent processor speed. We show that designing a system for ease of use may also significantly enhance its responsiveness and speed. For example, the edge enhancement technique only allows selection of low, medium, and high levels of enhancement, simplifying user choices and speeding up process operations. In addition, all look up table enhancements are precalculated and stored, allowing the user to alter the contrast with keystroke rapidity without being concerned about the applicability of the algorithm to a particular image.

  14. Aeronautical record : no. 1 (to June, 1923)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1923-01-01

    "...considerations have prompted us to pay special attention to the development of aeronautical industries and aerial navigation as a commercial enterprise and to publish an analytical review of events in the aeronautical world and of the attendant problems."

  15. 14 CFR 61.105 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ....105 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED.... (b) Aeronautical knowledge areas. (1) Applicable Federal Aviation Regulations of this chapter that...) Recognition of critical weather situations from the ground and in flight, windshear avoidance, and...

  16. 14 CFR 61.97 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN.... (b) Aeronautical knowledge areas. (1) Applicable Federal Aviation Regulations of this chapter that... using pilotage with the aid of a magnetic compass; (5) Recognition of critical weather situations...

  17. 14 CFR 61.105 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ....105 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED.... (b) Aeronautical knowledge areas. (1) Applicable Federal Aviation Regulations of this chapter that...) Recognition of critical weather situations from the ground and in flight, windshear avoidance, and...

  18. 14 CFR 61.125 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ....125 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... rating sought. (b) Aeronautical knowledge areas. (1) Applicable Federal Aviation Regulations of this... principles of flight; (4) Meteorology to include recognition of critical weather situations,...

  19. 14 CFR 61.125 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ....125 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... rating sought. (b) Aeronautical knowledge areas. (1) Applicable Federal Aviation Regulations of this... principles of flight; (4) Meteorology to include recognition of critical weather situations,...

  20. Aeronautical audio broadcasting via satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzeng, Forrest F.

    A system design for aeronautical audio broadcasting, with C-band uplink and L-band downlink, via Inmarsat space segments is presented. Near-transparent-quality compression of 5-kHz bandwidth audio at 20.5 kbit/s is achieved based on a hybrid technique employing linear predictive modeling and transform-domain residual quantization. Concatenated Reed-Solomon/convolutional codes with quadrature phase shift keying are selected for bandwidth and power efficiency. RF bandwidth at 25 kHz per channel, and a decoded bit error rate at 10(exp -6) with E(sub b)/N(sub o) at 3.75 dB are obtained. An interleaver, scrambler, modem synchronization, and frame format were designed, and frequency-division multiple access was selected over code-division multiple access. A link budget computation based on a worst-case scenario indicates sufficient system power margins. Transponder occupancy analysis for 72 audio channels demonstrates ample remaining capacity to accommodate emerging aeronautical services.

  1. Aeronautical audio broadcasting via satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tzeng, Forrest F.

    1993-01-01

    A system design for aeronautical audio broadcasting, with C-band uplink and L-band downlink, via Inmarsat space segments is presented. Near-transparent-quality compression of 5-kHz bandwidth audio at 20.5 kbit/s is achieved based on a hybrid technique employing linear predictive modeling and transform-domain residual quantization. Concatenated Reed-Solomon/convolutional codes with quadrature phase shift keying are selected for bandwidth and power efficiency. RF bandwidth at 25 kHz per channel, and a decoded bit error rate at 10(exp -6) with E(sub b)/N(sub o) at 3.75 dB are obtained. An interleaver, scrambler, modem synchronization, and frame format were designed, and frequency-division multiple access was selected over code-division multiple access. A link budget computation based on a worst-case scenario indicates sufficient system power margins. Transponder occupancy analysis for 72 audio channels demonstrates ample remaining capacity to accommodate emerging aeronautical services.

  2. 76 FR 40753 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-11

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics... Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a..., Executive Secretary for the Aeronautics Committee, National Aeronautics and Space......

  3. 14 CFR 61.105 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aeronautical knowledge. 61.105 Section 61... Aeronautical knowledge. (a) General. A person who is applying for a private pilot certificate must receive and... knowledge areas of paragraph (b) of this section that apply to the aircraft category and class rating...

  4. NASA's aeronautics research and technology base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    NASA's research technology base in aeronautics is assessed in terms of: (1) US aeronautical technology needs and requirements in the future; (2) objectives of the aeronautics program; (3) magnitude and scope of the program; and (4) research and technology performed by NASA and other research organizations.

  5. Questions & Answers about Aeronautics and Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    Answers to 27 questions about aeronautics, space, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are provided in this pamphlet. Among the topics dealt with in these questions are: costs of the space program; NASA's role in aeronautics; benefits received from the space program; why the United States hasn't developed means of rescuing…

  6. 16. VIEW OF GLOVE BOX WORKSTATIONS WITHIN THE PLUTONIUM BUTTON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. VIEW OF GLOVE BOX WORKSTATIONS WITHIN THE PLUTONIUM BUTTON BREAKOUT ROOM. (9/82) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Recovery Facility, Northwest portion of Rocky Flats Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  7. A software engineering approach for medical workstations development.

    PubMed

    Jean, F C; Lavril, M; Lemaitre, D; Sauquet, D; Degoulet, P

    1994-01-01

    Multimedia medical workstations represent the natural tool for accessing the hospital information system environment. They are complex medical systems that have to gather, in a single framework, a large collection of components dealing with multimedia medical objects. To remain current with both medical practice and with advances in the computer science field, they have to allow the iterative addition of new functions to the set of existing ones. In this paper, after a survey of commonly required medical workstation functional components, we shall try to discuss how a software engineering approach can streamline the development of a medical workstation. Different software engineering tools needed to build the functional components of a workstation are described. Their integration in a single dedicated environment is considered through four perspectives: data, presentation, communication and control. Benefits and limitations of an object-oriented approach are discussed. PMID:8125636

  8. Dimensioning of Aeronautical Satellite Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzbock, M.; Jahn, A.; Werner, M.

    2002-01-01

    This paper will provide a generalised baseline for a systematic AirCom design process and address in particular the dimensioning of satellite systems for aeronautical services. These services will roll out soon in medium- and long-haul aircraft. The offered services will range from low rate telephony, internet access, and streaming applications for video and audio. The aggregate bit rates on up- and downlink will certainly be statistically time-dependent and asymmetric in forward and backward direction. A tool will be described that is able to model this traffic. Furthermore the dimensioning of satellite constellations can be done. Due to the stochastic nature of the traffic, multi-service models for the traffic generation of different services will be described. Furthermore, the traffic will be affected by the available bit rate and shaping or blocking will equalize the peak loads. If fleets with many aircraft are considered, aeronautical traffic models must be based on actual aircraft routes, flight schedules, location and time of day, as well as seats per aircraft and type of aircraft (charter, business etc.). The regionally distributed traffic has to be served by several satellites and appropriate sharing of the serving satellites may spread the traffic in hot zones and yield a better load distribution. When aeronautical services will spread out, the capacity demand will grow quickly and the capacity of existing Ku-band GEO satellites will soon be exceeded. Changing to higher frequency bands will provide large spectrum portions and smaller spotbeams will allow better frequency reuse. Even constellations with non-geostationary satellites could be re-advent to serve better the higher latitude regions. Then, another mobility component for the fast changing satellite topology need to be addressed, and routing issues of the traffic must be considered. The paper will describe solutions for the mapping of satellites and traffic demand as well as routing algorithms

  9. C.A.D. and ergonomic workstations conception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keravel, Francine

    1986-07-01

    Computer Aided Design is able to perform workstation's conception. An ergonomic data could be complete this view and warrant a coherent fiability conception. Complexe form representation machines, anthropometric data and environment factors are allowed to perceive the limit points between humain and new technology situation. Work ability users, safety, confort and human efficiency could be also included. Such a programm with expert system integration will give a complete listing appreciation about workstation's conception.

  10. Simulation of automatic rotorcraft nap-of-the-earth flight in graphics workstation environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, T.; Cheng, Victor H. L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a three-dimensional (3D) helicopter flight simulation system. The simulation is designed to be a readily available tool for concept verification and tuning of automatic obstacle-avoidance guidance algorithms. The system has been implemented on networked workstations capable of interactive 3D graphics simulation. The simulation uses realistic terrain and obstacle models. The dynamics of the rotorcraft and the functional capabilities of the range sensors are simulated to provide all the components required to evaluate the guidance function. Standard graphics hardware available on the workstation is utilized to accelerate the range-data calculations for sensor simulation at the guidance rate. An example is given to demonstrate the performance of the obstacle-avoidance capability.

  11. Evaluation of an ultrasonic free-space mouse to control an image workstation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowberg, Alan H.; Li, Paul; Ramey, Judith A.

    1993-06-01

    We evaluated a prototype free-space pointing device with a medical image display workstation. The target environment is the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), where there is very little counter space available, and image workstations are used intermittently and for short periods of time. Managers of the typical ICU do not want to dedicate space to PACS, but would rather mount the image monitors through the wall at eye level, so they can be viewed from the hallway. The hallway image viewing location allows use by a large number of people, as when making morning ward rounds or teaching rounds. Because many physicians are accustomed to graphical user interfaces and pointing devices, the transition to the free- space mouse is an easy and natural one. The use of a free-space mouse allows a very flexible interaction and intuitive graphical user interface, but does not require a horizontal surface, and is easily operated with one hand from the standing position.

  12. Parallel simulation of subsonic fluid dynamics on a cluster of workstations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skordos, Panayotis A.

    1994-11-01

    An effective approach of simulating fluid dynamics on a cluster of non-dedicated workstations is presented. The approach uses local interaction algorithms, small communication capacity, and automatic migration of parallel processes from busy hosts to free hosts. The approach is well-suited for simulating subsonic flow problems which involve both hydrodynamics and acoustic waves, for example, the flow of air inside wind musical instruments. Typical simulations achieve 80% parallel efficiency (speedup/processors) using 20 HP-Apollo workstations. Detailed measurements of the parallel efficiency of 2D and 3D simulations are presented, and a theoretical model of efficiency is developed which fits closely the measurements. Two numerical methods of fluid dynamics are tested: explicit finite differences, and the lattice Boltzmann method.

  13. Processes involved in reading imaging studies: workflow analysis and implications for workstation development.

    PubMed

    Gay, S B; Sobel, A H; Young, L Q; Dwyer, S J

    1997-02-01

    Software development for imaging workstations has lagged behind hardware availability. To guide development and to analyze work flow involved in interpretation of cross-sectional imaging studies, we assessed the cognitive and physical processes. We observed the performance and interpretation of body computed tomography (CT) scans and recorded the events that occurred during this process. We studied work flow using a bottleneck analysis. Twenty-four of a total of 54 cases (44%) involved comparing the images with those of prior scans. Forty-seven of 54 scans (87%) were viewed using windows other than soft tissue, or compared with precontrast scans. In 46 cases (85%), the interpretation stopped to return to a previous level for review. Measurement of lesions was performed in 24 of 54 (44%) cases, and in 15 (63%) of these cases, measurements were taken of lesions on old studies for comparison. Interpretation was interrupted in 14 of 54 cases (26%) by referring clinicians desiring consultation. The work flow analysis showed film folder retrieval by the film room to be the bottleneck for interpretation by film. For picture archiving and communication system (PACS) reading, the CT examination itself proved to be the bottleneck. We conclude that workstations for CT interpretation should facilitate movement within scans, comparison with prior examinations, and measuring lesions on these scans. Workstation design should consider means of optimizing time currently not used between interpretation sessions, minimizing interruptions and providing more automated functions currently requiring physician interaction. PMID:9147527

  14. Process involved in reading imaging studies: workflow analysis and implications for workstation development.

    PubMed

    Gay, Spencer B; Sobel, Amy H; Young, Linda Q; Dwyer, Samuel J

    2002-09-01

    Software development for imaging workstations has lagged behind hardware availability. To guide development and to analyze work flow involved in interpretation of cross-sectional imaging studies, we assessed the cognitive and physical processes. We observed the performance and interpretation of body computed tomography (CT scans and recorded the events that occurred during this process. We studied work flow using a bottleneck analysis. Twenty-four ofa total of 54 cases (44%) involved comparing the images with those of prior scans. Forty-seven of 54 scans (87%) were viewed using windows other than soft tissue, or compared with precontrast scans. In 46 cases (85%), the interpretation stopped to return to a previous level for review. Measurement of lesions was performed in 24 of 54 (44%) cases, and in 15 (63%)of these cases, measurements were taken of lesions on old studies for comparison. Interpretation was interrupted in 14 of 54 cases (26%) by referring clinicians desiring consultation. The work flow analysis showed film folder retrieval by the film room to be the bottleneck for interpretation by film. For picture archiving and communication system (PACS) reading,the CT examination itself proved to be the bottleneck. We conclude that workstations for CT interpretation should facilitate movement within scans, comparison with prior examinations, and measuring lesions on these scans. Workstation design should consider means of optimizing time currently not used between interpretation sessions, minimizing interruptions and providing more automated functions currently requiring physician interaction. PMID:12641097

  15. Use of invisible windows for PACS workstation menus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowberg, Alan H.; Ramey, Judith A.; Heyano, Scott L.

    1992-05-01

    Workstations are becoming more commonly used in medical environments, and are being used increasingly for viewing medical images. In most clinical environments, counter and wall space is not readily available, and there is a strong motivation to make the equipment small, while making the displayed images as large as possible to preserve image detail. This precludes the use of a separate text monitor for user interaction, and any menus or displays on the image monitor use valuable space -- pixels backed up with 256-shade grayscale capability. We have developed a method for user interaction which requires essentially no screen area for permanent menus, but uses much of the image screen for `invisible' menus -- menus which are in windows which are always open (active) but only obscure the underlying image for the small portion of time that they are actually in use. These invisible menus respond to movements of the mouse, and become visible when the mouse is moved into the window which holds the menu. The menu becomes invisible again after a period of mouse inactivity. Because these windows are always active, a given item may be selected multiple times by simply pressing the mouse button repeatedly. This `type-ahead' capability is not normally available on systems which do not include a keyboard, and may be easily used for common repetitive functions, analogous to pressing the NEXT IMAGE key multiple times. This invisible window concept can also be used to display analysis results, so that the results do not cover any of the active image area, but are immediately available for on-screen viewing.

  16. Interactive boundary delineation of agricultural lands using graphics workstations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Thomas D.; Angelici, Gary L.; Slye, Robert E.; Ma, Matt

    1992-01-01

    A review is presented of the computer-assisted stratification and sampling (CASS) system developed to delineate the boundaries of sample units for survey procedures. CASS stratifies the sampling units by land-cover and land-use type, employing image-processing software and hardware. This procedure generates coverage areas and the boundaries of stratified sampling units that are utilized for subsequent sampling procedures from which agricultural statistics are developed.

  17. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography. Supplement 421

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP#2000-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles.

  18. Mobile-ip Aeronautical Network Simulation Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Tran, Diepchi T.

    2001-01-01

    NASA is interested in applying mobile Internet protocol (mobile-ip) technologies to its space and aeronautics programs. In particular, mobile-ip will play a major role in the Advanced Aeronautic Transportation Technology (AATT), the Weather Information Communication (WINCOMM), and the Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS) aeronautics programs. This report presents the results of a simulation study of mobile-ip for an aeronautical network. The study was performed to determine the performance of the transmission control protocol (TCP) in a mobile-ip environment and to gain an understanding of how long delays, handoffs, and noisy channels affect mobile-ip performance.

  19. PACS workstation for computer-assisted image diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoba, Minoru; Horino, Masato; Takemura, Kunihiko; Wani, Hidenobu; Hidaka, Akinari; Hatabu, Hiroto; Kasagi, Kanji; Konishi, Junji

    1990-08-01

    Major two functions that a PACS workstation is considered to be equipped with are 1) efficient retrieval of image data and 2) supporting or consultation of writing reports, as radiologists have to diagnose increasing number of digital images in routine clinical studies. The authors developed a prototype PACS workstation with high speed image retrieving architecture and computer aided diagnosis and reporting function by using an artificial intelligence technology (AIPACS workstation). When physician selects the patient and his studies, the system performs feature extraction and generates diagnostic report by the inference engine with backward reasoning using the knowledge installed as production rules. Clinical application to the system for thyroid diagnosis showed good correlation with the diagnosis done by the physician.

  20. Rebuilding a clinical workstation with spider's silk of the Web.

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, F; Morgenweck, L

    1999-01-01

    The Yale-New Haven Hospital (YNHH) clinical workstation came into existence in 1993 to provide a simple menu-driven interface to high use information systems that would be easily accessible on the wards and in the intensive care units. Direct Internet access, advances in Web-based software, and greater cooperation between Yale-New Haven Hospital and Yale School of Medicine network technology groups have enabled the clinical workstations to become an integral tool for providing clinical care. The workstation provides bedside access to an expanding array of internal and external resources to support patient care and has the potential to become the basis for an interface that will be utilized throughout the multi-location Yale-New Haven Healthcare System. Images PMID:10550023

  1. The transition of GTDS to the Unix workstation environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, D.; Metzinger, R.; Proulx, R.; Cefola, P.

    1995-01-01

    Future Flight Dynamics systems should take advantage of the possibilities provided by current and future generations of low-cost, high performance workstation computing environments with Graphical User Interface. The port of the existing mainframe Flight Dynamics systems to the workstation environment offers an economic approach for combining the tremendous engineering heritage that has been encapsulated in these systems with the advantages of the new computing environments. This paper will describe the successful transition of the Draper Laboratory R&D version of GTDS (Goddard Trajectory Determination System) from the IBM Mainframe to the Unix workstation environment. The approach will be a mix of historical timeline notes, descriptions of the technical problems overcome, and descriptions of associated SQA (software quality assurance) issues.

  2. Classroom evaluation of the Arlyn Arm robotic workstation.

    PubMed

    Eberhardt, S P; Osborne, J; Rahman, T

    2000-01-01

    High school and junior high school students with neuromuscular weakness and other disorders of the arms evaluated a recently commercialized robotic workstation, the Arlyn Arm, to carry out art projects and science experiments. These tasks were designed for independent execution with the workstation using standard or custom-designed tools. Each task was divided into subtasks, and the execution time of each subtask was determined as a measure of efficiency. Special attention was given to the causes of required experimenter intervention. While subjects easily accomplished some subtasks, others required considerable intervention. Most of these interventions could be avoided by further customizing accessories. It is concluded that the Arlyn Arm workstation could be of considerable benefit in a classroom setting to persons with severe neuromuscular disorders. PMID:11508403

  3. Task-analytic evaluations of Space Station Freedom workstations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diaz, Manuel F.; Jensen, Dean G.

    1991-01-01

    Space Station Freedom will be a permanently manned multipurpose facility in low Earth orbit by the late 1990's. Integral to Space Station Freedom will be Data Management System workstations. These workstations will provide the human-machine interface for controlling such systems as Guidance, Navigation and Control, Propulsion, and Environmental Control and Life Support. In addition, they will be used by crewmembers in the space station's pressurized shirt-sleeve environment to control remote manipulator systems and free-flyer devices. This paper presents an overview of proposed workstations and current task-analytic evaluations being used to assess their adequacy in supporting Space Station Freedom operations. Particular emphasis is placed on the results and conclusions of the analysis.

  4. 77 FR 61432 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-09

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics... Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a... Committee Management Officer, National Aeronautics and Space Administration. BILLING......

  5. 75 FR 41240 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics... Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces...

  6. 75 FR 50782 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics... Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces...

  7. 77 FR 38091 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting. AGENCY: National Aeronautics... Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces...

  8. Design criteria for payload workstation accommodations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watters, H. H.; Stokes, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    Anticipated shuttle sortie payload man-system design criteria needs are investigated. Man-system interactions for the scientific disciplines are listed and the extent is assessed to which documented Skylab experience is expected to provide system design guidance for each of the identified interactions. Where the analysis revealed that the reduced Skylab data does not answer the anticipated needs candidate criteria, based on unreduced Skylab data, available prior research, original analysis, or related requirements derived from previous space programs, are provided.

  9. Iterative usability testing: ensuring a usable clinical workstation.

    PubMed

    Coble, J M; Karat, J; Orland, M J; Kahn, M G

    1997-01-01

    Once the users' needs are determined, how does one ensure that the resulting software meets the users' needs? This paper describes our application of a process, usability testing, that is used to measure the usability of systems as well as guide modifications to address usability problems. Usability testing is not a method to elicit opinions about software, but rather a method to determine scientifically a product's level of usability. Our application of usability testing is designed to determine the current usability level of a workstation designed for the clinician's use, determine specific problems with the Clinical Workstation's usability, and then evaluate the effectiveness of changes that address those problems. PMID:9357724

  10. EVA crew workstation provisions for Skylab and Space Shuttle missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, N. E.; Saenger, E. L.

    1973-01-01

    A synopsis of scheduled extravehicular activities (EVA) for a nominal Skylab mission is presented with an overview of EV workstation equipment developed for the program. Also included are the unprogrammed extravehicular activities and supporting equipment that was quickly developed and retrofitted in a series of successful operations to salvage the crippled Skylab Cluster during the Skylab 1 Mission. Because EVA appears to be a requirement for the Space Shuttle Program, candidate EV workstations are discussed in terms of effective and economical Shuttle payload servicing and maintenance. Several such concepts, which could provide a versatile, portable EV support system, are presented.

  11. Vertical interferometer workstation for testing large spherical optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truax, B.

    2013-09-01

    The design of an interferometer workstation for the testing of large concave and convex spherical optics is presented. The workstation handles optical components and mounts up to 425 mm in diameter with mass of up to 40 kg with 6 axes of adjustment. A unique method for the implementation of focus, roll and pitch was used allowing for extremely precise adjustment. The completed system includes transmission spheres with f-numbers from f/1.6 to f/0.82 incorporating reference surface diameters of up to 306 mm and surface accuracies of better than 63 nm PVr. The design challenges and resulting solutions are discussed. System performance results are presented.

  12. The knowledge workstation: an electronic environment for knowledge management.

    PubMed Central

    Lucier, R E; Matheson, N W; Butter, K A; Reynolds, R E

    1988-01-01

    This paper focuses on the creation of the IAIMS workstation in the context of the outcomes of a year-long IAIMS strategic planning process at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions (JHMI). These outcomes include a long-term institutional vision for a functional knowledge management environment, a JHMI IAIMS model, a strategic plan, and two model prototypes. The functional requirements and specific implementation strategies for the IAIMS workstation, the prototype for managing the knowledge base of the published biomedical literature, are discussed in detail. PMID:3416102

  13. 14 CFR 61.97 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aeronautical knowledge. 61.97 Section 61.97... knowledge. (a) General. A person who applies for a recreational pilot certificate must receive and log... knowledge areas of paragraph (b) of this section that apply to the aircraft category and class rating...

  14. Economic analysis of aeronautical research and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gellman, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    The appropriateness of government intervention in the civilian market for aeronautics research and technology (R&T) is examined. The economic rationale for government intervention is examined. The conclusion is that the institutional role played by NASA in civilian aeronautics R&T markets is economically justified.

  15. 14 CFR 77.35 - Aeronautical studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... physical and electromagnetic radiation effect the proposal may have on the operation of an air navigation... OBJECTS AFFECTING NAVIGABLE AIRSPACE (Eff. until 1-18-11) Aeronautical Studies of Effect of Proposed..., conducts the aeronautical study of the effect of the proposal upon the operation of air...

  16. University/government/industry relations in aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schairer, G. S.

    1975-01-01

    Methods for improving the relationships between universities, the aircraft industry, and the Government are proposed. The author submits nine specific recommendations aimed at more effective aeronautical engineering education and employment of graduate engineers. The need for improved communication between the organizations which influence the advancement of aeronautical sciences is stressed.

  17. Review of Aeronautical Wind Tunnel Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The nation's aeronautical wind tunnel facilities constitute a valuable technological resource and make a significant contribution to the global supremacy of U.S. aircraft, both civil and military. At the request of NASA, the National Research Council's Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board organized a commitee to review the state of repair, adequacy, and future needs of major aeronautical wind tunnel facilities in meeting national goals. The comittee identified three main areas where actions are needed to sustain the capability of NASA's aeronautical wind tunnel facilities to support the national aeronautical research and development activities: tunnel maintenance and upgrading, productivity enhancement, and accommodation of new requirements (particularly in hypersonics). Each of these areas are addressed and the committee recommendations for appropriate actions presented.

  18. Validation and evaluation of a workstation for monitoring sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, Neil; Boardman, Diane; Darwin, David; Sullivan, Ken

    1994-12-01

    Demand for reliable sea ice information comes from many quarters including ship routing and resource exploitation companies, weather forecasting agencies and glaciological research institution. For operational purposes, this information is typically required for local regions on short timescales. To explore this market a prototype sea ice workstation has been developed. The workstation uses data from several current earth observation sensors, combining the advantages of regional survey, all-weather capability and high-resolution imagery. The output from the workstation is an integrated sea ice chart which can be used to display combinations of ice edge, ice type, ice concentrations, ice motion vectors and sea surface temperatures. During the course of its development significant new progress in automated ice classification has been achieved together with the enhancement of existing ice motion algorithms. The quality of the sea ice information from each geophysical algorithm was assessed through validation campaigns which collected independent datasets. The results of this analysis show the ice type classification to be most accurate in identifying multi-year ice; this is probably the most critical ice category for navigational purposes. A program of end-user evaluation has also been started in which sea ice charts are supplied to operational organizations and value-added services. This will continue during 1994 and provide feedback on the use of the workstation in a semi-operational environment.

  19. Accessible Microscopy Workstation for Students and Scientists with Mobility Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duerstock, Bradley S.

    2006-01-01

    An integrated accessible microscopy workstation was designed and developed to allow persons with mobility impairments to control all aspects of light microscopy with minimal human assistance. This system, named AccessScope, is capable of performing brightfield and fluorescence microscopy, image analysis, and tissue morphometry requisite for…

  20. An open systems architecture for development of a physician's workstation.

    PubMed Central

    Young, C. Y.; Tang, P. C.; Annevelink, J.

    1991-01-01

    We are developing a physician's workstation consisting of highly integrated information management tools for use by physicians in patient care. We have designed and implemented an open systems, client/server architecture as a development platform which allows new applications to be easily added to the system. Applications cooperate by exchanging messages via a broadcast message server. PMID:1807649

  1. High Performance Diskless Linux Workstations in AX-Division

    SciTech Connect

    Councell, E; Busby, L

    2003-09-30

    AX Division has recently installed a number of diskless Linux workstations to meet the needs of its scientific staff for classified processing. Results so far are quite positive, although problems do remain. Some unusual requirements were met using a novel, but simple, design: Each diskless client has a dedicated partition on a server disk that contains a complete Linux distribution.

  2. MDIS (medical diagnostic imaging support) workstation issues: clinical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Donald V.; Smith, Suzy; Cawthon, Michael A.

    1991-05-01

    A joint DoD effort is in the final stages of contract acquisition to achieve a ''filmless'' hospital environment in the near future. Success of implementation lays to a large degree on an effective image workstation. This paper will discuss soft copy image display (SCID) of the MDIS system including hardware and software.

  3. A methodology to emulate and evaluate a productive virtual workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krubsack, David; Haberman, David

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Display and Computer Augmented Control (ADCACS) Program at ACT is sponsored by NASA Ames to investigate the broad field of technologies which must be combined to design a 'virtual' workstation for the Space Station Freedom. This program is progressing in several areas and resulted in the definition of requirements for a workstation. A unique combination of technologies at the ACT Laboratory have been networked to effectively create an experimental environment. This experimental environment allows the integration of nonconventional input devices with a high power graphics engine within the framework of an expert system shell which coordinates the heterogeneous inputs with the 'virtual' presentation. The flexibility of the workstation is evolved as experiments are designed and conducted to evaluate the condition descriptions and rule sets of the expert system shell and its effectiveness in driving the graphics engine. Workstation productivity has been defined by the achievable performance in the emulator of the calibrated 'sensitivity' of input devices, the graphics presentation, the possible optical enhancements to achieve a wide field of view color image and the flexibility of conditional descriptions in the expert system shell in adapting to prototype problems.

  4. 6. VIEW OF BUILDING 707 INTERIOR. GLOVE BOX WORKSTATIONS ARE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF BUILDING 707 INTERIOR. GLOVE BOX WORKSTATIONS ARE BEING CONSTRUCTED FOR FOUNDRY PROCESSES IN MODULE A. (10/6/69) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Manufacturing Facility, North-central section of Plant, just south of Building 776/777, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  5. First Year's Experience of the MAClinical Computer Workstations Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stair, Thomas O.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Computerized workstations at a teaching hospital were developed so that physicians in training could integrate and automate some of their information management tasks. The project is part of the National Library of Medicine's Integrated Academic Information Management Systems program at Georgetown University School of Medicine. (Author/MLW)

  6. From Aeronautics to Space: Lessons in Human Automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connors, Mary M.; Rosekind, Mark R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Civilian air flight continues on a growth curve, as more and more people utilize air travel to meet business and personal travel needs: This consumer-driven demand has resulted in the adoption of new methods to increase air system capacity and to make the air transportation system increasingly more efficient. As a consequence, civilian aviation, as an industry, has assumed a leading role in the use of automated systems, and, by implication, in the understanding of how human openers interact with these systems. Aeronautical automation systems serve a variety of roles. These include controlling aircraft and aiding, advising and monitoring numerous functions in the aircraft/airspace system. Experiences in the use of human/automation systems gathered from aviation are, in many cases, generalizable to other industries having similar requirements for human and non-human intelligent system interaction. However, the human/automation lessons learned from aviation have special relevance to the space application, where many of the same operational demands prevail. The application of aeronautical lessons of human-automated interaction to spaceflight is the subject of this paper. The discussion will address: the progress that has been made through aeronautically-based research and experience in understanding human/automation interaction, ways that this understanding can be applied to the needs of space, and the limits of our present understanding of human/automations systems. Suggestions will be offered related to human-automation research generally, and to the particular needs of the space endeavor.

  7. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography. Supplment 385

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-1998-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract.

  8. 14 CFR 61.155 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ....155 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... knowledge areas. (1) Applicable Federal Aviation Regulations of this chapter that relate to airline... aircraft's flight characteristics and performance in normal and abnormal flight regimes; (11) Human...

  9. 14 CFR 61.155 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ....155 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... knowledge areas. (1) Applicable Federal Aviation Regulations of this chapter that relate to airline... aircraft's flight characteristics and performance in normal and abnormal flight regimes; (11) Human...

  10. 14 CFR 61.155 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ....155 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... knowledge areas. (1) Applicable Federal Aviation Regulations of this chapter that relate to airline... aircraft's flight characteristics and performance in normal and abnormal flight regimes; (11) Human...

  11. 14 CFR 61.155 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ....155 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... knowledge areas. (1) Applicable Federal Aviation Regulations of this chapter that relate to airline... aircraft's flight characteristics and performance in normal and abnormal flight regimes; (11) Human...

  12. NASA Aeronautics Showcased at Balloon Fiesta

    NASA Video Gallery

    Visitors at the 2010 International Balloon Fiesta in Albuquerque, N.M., got visual stimulation from hundreds of colorful hot-air balloons soaring skyward, but also learned about NASA's aeronautics ...

  13. NASA Aeronautics: A New Strategic Vision

    NASA Video Gallery

    The aviation landscape is shifting. Emerging global trends are creating challenges that are changing the face of aviation for the next 20-40 years. How is NASA Aeronautics responding? With a new st...

  14. Astronautics and aeronautics, 1977: A chronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritchie, E. H.

    1986-01-01

    This publication is a chronology of events during the year 1977 in the fields of aeronautical and space research, development, activity, and policy. It includes appendixes, an index, and illustrations. Chronological entries list sources for further inquiry.

  15. Center for Aeronautics and Space Information Sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes the research done during 1991/92 under the Center for Aeronautics and Space Information Science (CASIS) program. The topics covered are computer architecture, networking, and neural nets.

  16. Costs and Benefits of Advanced Aeronautical Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bobick, J. C.; Denny, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    Programs available from COSMIC used to evaluate economic feasibility of applying advanced aeronautical technology to civil aircraft of future. Programs are composed of three major models: Fleet Accounting Module, Airframe manufacturer Module, and Air Carrier Module.

  17. Aeronautics and space report of the President

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the activities and accomplishments of all agencies of the United States in the fields of aeronautics and space science during FY 1994. Activity summaries are presented for the following areas: space launch activities, space science, space flight and space technology, space communications, aeronuatics, and studies of the planet Earth. Several appendices providing data on U.S. launch activities, the Federal budget for space and aeronautics, remote sensing capabilities, and space policy are included.

  18. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This bibliography lists 193 reports, journal articles, and other documents introduced in the NASA scientific and technical system in Aug. 1995. Subject coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles

  19. An Analysis of Computer Workstation and Handwriting Use by ESP Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izzo, John

    A study at the University of Aizu (Japan) investigated characteristics of technical writing assignments composed in English as a second language on computer workstations and by hand. The in-class workstation essays and hand-written essays of 24 students revealed that while all were of similar overall quality, the workstation essays were not as…

  20. Progress report on the clinical workstation and clinical data repository at UNC Hospitals.

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, J. E.; Berger, R. G.; Carey, T. S.; Fakhry, S. M.; Rutledge, R.; Kichak, J. P.; Cleveland, T. J.; Dempsey, M. J.; Tsongalis, N. M.; Ayscue, C. F.

    1993-01-01

    In 1991, we demonstrated a prototype version of the Clinical Workstation at SCAMC. At the present time 48 workstations have been implemented in the ambulatory care areas of the Hospital. We describe the present functionality of the workstation and the work done to date on the clinical data repository. PMID:8130470

  1. Human Modeling Evaluations in Microgravity Workstation and Restraint Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Mihriban; Chmielewski, Cynthia; Wheaton, Aneice; Hancock, Lorraine; Beierle, Jason; Bond, Robert L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will provide long-term missions which will enable the astronauts to live and work, as well as, conduct research in a microgravity environment. The dominant factor in space affecting the crew is "weightlessness" which creates a challenge for establishing workstation microgravity design requirements. The crewmembers will work at various workstations such as Human Research Facility (HRF), Microgravity Sciences Glovebox (MSG) and Life Sciences Glovebox (LSG). Since the crew will spend considerable amount of time at these workstations, it is critical that ergonomic design requirements are integral part of design and development effort. In order to achieve this goal, the Space Human Factors Laboratory in the Johnson Space Center Flight Crew Support Division has been tasked to conduct integrated evaluations of workstations and associated crew restraints. Thus, a two-phase approach was used: 1) ground and microgravity evaluations of the physical dimensions and layout of the workstation components, and 2) human modeling analyses of the user interface. Computer-based human modeling evaluations were an important part of the approach throughout the design and development process. Human modeling during the conceptual design phase included crew reach and accessibility of individual equipment, as well as, crew restraint needs. During later design phases, human modeling has been used in conjunction with ground reviews and microgravity evaluations of the mock-ups in order to verify the human factors requirements. (Specific examples will be discussed.) This two-phase approach was the most efficient method to determine ergonomic design characteristics for workstations and restraints. The real-time evaluations provided a hands-on implementation in a microgravity environment. On the other hand, only a limited number of participants could be tested. The human modeling evaluations provided a more detailed analysis of the setup. The issues identified

  2. UWGSP7: a real-time optical imaging workstation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, John E.; Kim, Yongmin; Pennington, Stan D.; Alleman, Andrew P.

    1995-04-01

    With the development of UWGSP7, the University of Washington Image Computing Systems Laboratory has a real-time workstation for continuous-wave (cw) optical reflectance imaging. Recent discoveries in optical science and imaging research have suggested potential practical use of the technology as a medical imaging modality and identified the need for a machine to support these applications in real time. The UWGSP7 system was developed to provide researchers with a high-performance, versatile tool for use in optical imaging experiments with the eventual goal of bringing the technology into clinical use. One of several major applications of cw optical reflectance imaging is tumor imaging which uses a light-absorbing dye that preferentially sequesters in tumor tissue. This property could be used to locate tumors and to identify tumor margins intraoperatively. Cw optical reflectance imaging consists of illumination of a target with a band-limited light source and monitoring the light transmitted by or reflected from the target. While continuously illuminating the target, a control image is acquired and stored. A dye is injected into a subject and a sequence of data images are acquired and processed. The data images are aligned with the control image and then subtracted to obtain a signal representing the change in optical reflectance over time. This signal can be enhanced by digital image processing and displayed in pseudo-color. This type of emerging imaging technique requires a computer system that is versatile and adaptable. The UWGSP7 utilizes a VESA local bus PC as a host computer running the Windows NT operating system and includes ICSL developed add-on boards for image acquisition and processing. The image acquisition board is used to digitize and format the analog signal from the input device into digital frames and to the average frames into images. To accommodate different input devices, the camera interface circuitry is designed in a small mezzanine board

  3. Civilian Aeronautical Futures - The Responsibly Imaginable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, Dennis M.

    2006-01-01

    Since 1940 Aeronautics has had an immense impact upon Global Human lifestyles and affairs - in both the Civilian and Military arenas. During this period Long distance Train and Ship passenger transport were largely supplanted by Air Travel and Aviation assumed a dominant role in warfare. The early 1940 s to the mid 1970 s was a particularly productive period in terms of Aeronautical Technology. What is interesting is that, since the mid 1970 s, the rate of Aeronautical Technological Progress has been far slower, the basic technology in nearly all of our current Aero Systems dates from the mid 70 s or earlier. This is especially true in terms of Configuration Aerodynamics, Aeronautics appears to have "settled" on the 707, double delta and rotary wing as the approach of choice for Subsonic long haul, supersonic cruise and VTOL respectively. Obviously there have been variants and some niche digression from this/these but in the main Aeronautics, particularly civilian Aeronautics, has become a self-professed "mature", Increasingly "Commodity", Industry. The Industry is far along an existing/deployed technology curve and focused, now for decades, on incremental/evolutionary change - largely Appliers vs. developers of technology. This is, of course, in sharp contrast to the situation in the early-to-later 20th century where Aeronautics was viewed as A Major Technological Engine, much the way IT/Bio/Nano/Energetics/Quantum Technologies are viewed today. A search for Visionary Aeronautical "Futures" papers/projections indicates a decided dearth thereof over the last 20 plus years compared to the previous quarter Century. Aeronautics is part of Aerospace and Aerospace [including Aeronautics] has seen major cutbacks over the last decades. Some numbers for the U.S. Aerospace Industry serve as examples. Order of 600,000 jobs lost, with some 180,000 more on the block over the next 10 years. Approximately 25% of the Aerospace workforce is eligible to retire and the average

  4. Optimization of a low-cost truly preemptive multitasking PC diagnostic workstation.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S; Andriole, K P; Avrin, D E; Arenson, R L

    1997-08-01

    The Windows 95/NT operating systems (Microsoft Corp, Redmond, WA) currently provide the only low-cost truly preemptive multitasking environment and as such become an attractive diagnostic workstation platform. The purpose of this project is to test and optimize display station graphical user interface (GUI) actions previously designed on the pseudomultitasking Macintosh (Apple Computer, Cupertino, CA) platform, and image data transmission using time slicing/ dynamic prioritization assignment capabilities of the new Windows platform. A diagnostic workstation in the clinical environment must process two categories of events: user interaction with the GUI through keyboard/mouse input, and transmission of incoming data files. These processes contend for central processing units (CPU) time resulting in GUI "lockout" during image transmission or delay in transmission until GUI "quiet time." WinSockets and the Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocal (TCP/IP) communication protocol software (Microsoft) are implemented using dynamic priority timeslicing to ensure that GUI delays at the time of Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) file transfer do not exceed 1/10 second. Assignment of thread priority does not translate into an absolute fixed percentage of CPU time. Therefore, the relationship between dynamic priority assignment by the processor, and the GUI and communication application threads will be more fully investigated to optimize CPU resource allocation. These issues will be tested using 10 MB/sec Ethernet and 100 MB/sec fast and wide Ethernet transmission. Preliminary results of typical clinical files (10 to 30 MB) over Ethernet show no visually perceptible interruption of the GUI, suggesting that the new Windows PC platform may be a viable diagnostic workstation option. PMID:9268871

  5. ARAC`s site workstation final design and deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Abriam, R.O.; Moore, R.M.

    1994-08-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) Center located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, provides real-time estimates of the environmental consequences of accidental releases of radioactivity or other hazardous materials into the atmosphere anywhere in the world. ARAC`s expertise includes integrating a suite of local, regional and global dispersion models into a highly automated system. Since 1979, on-site computers have provided the link between DOE and DOD facilities around the U.S. and the ARAC Center. Beginning in 1993, these facilities have been replacing their personal computers with UNIX workstations running ARAC`s Site Workstation Systems (SWS) software. The SWS consists of a collection of applications that help sites prepare for and respond to incidents involving an atmospheric release. The SWS can be used either as a real-time emergency-response tool or to make historical or hypothetical assessments of releases.

  6. Automated simulation as part of a design workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantwell, Elizabeth; Shenk, T.; Robinson, P.; Upadhye, R.

    1990-01-01

    A development project for a design workstation for advanced life-support systems (called the DAWN Project, for Design Assistant Workstation), incorporating qualitative simulation, required the implementation of a useful qualitative simulation capability and the integration of qualitative and quantitative simulation such that simulation capabilities are maximized without duplication. The reason is that to produce design solutions to a system goal, the behavior of the system in both a steady and perturbed state must be represented. The Qualitative Simulation Tool (QST), on an expert-system-like model building and simulation interface toll called ScratchPad (SP), and on the integration of QST and SP with more conventional, commercially available simulation packages now being applied in the evaluation of life-support system processes and components are discussed.

  7. Physics and detector simulation facility Type O workstation specifications

    SciTech Connect

    Chartrand, G.; Cormell, L.R.; Hahn, R.; Jacobson, D.; Johnstad, H.; Leibold, P.; Marquez, M.; Ramsey, B.; Roberts, L.; Scipioni, B.; Yost, G.P.

    1990-11-01

    This document specifies the requirements for the front-end network of workstations of a distributed computing facility. This facility will be needed to perform the physics and detector simulations for the design of Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) detectors, and other computations in support of physics and detector needs. A detailed description of the computer simulation facility is given in the overall system specification document. This document provides revised subsystem specifications for the network of monitor-less Type 0 workstations. The requirements specified in this document supersede the requirements given. In Section 2 a brief functional description of the facility and its use are provided. The list of detailed specifications (vendor requirements) is given in Section 3 and the qualifying requirements (benchmarks) are described in Section 4.

  8. Stratigraphic interpretation of seismic data on the workstation

    SciTech Connect

    Bahorich, M.; Van Bemmel, P.

    1994-12-31

    Until recently, interpretation of seismic data in the workstation environment has been restricted primarily to horizon and attribute maps. Interpreters have not had the ability to make various types of notations on seismic data and subsequent map views as has been done for years on paper. New thinking in the industry is leading to the development of software which provides the geoscientist with a broader range of interpretive functionality on seismic and subsequent map views. This new functionality reduces the tedious bookkeeping tasks associated with seismic sequence stratigraphy and facies analysis. Interpreters may now perform stratigraphic analysis in more detail in less time by employing the power of the interpretive workstation. A data set over a deep-water fan illustrates the power of this technology.

  9. An integrated distributed processing interface for supercomputers and workstations

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.; McGavran, L.

    1989-01-01

    Access to documentation, communication between multiple processes running on heterogeneous computers, and animation of simulations of engineering problems are typically weak in most supercomputer environments. This presentation will describe how we are improving this situation in the Computer Research and Applications group at Los Alamos National Laboratory. We have developed a tool using UNIX filters and a SunView interface that allows users simple access to documentation via mouse driven menus. We have also developed a distributed application that integrated a two point boundary value problem on one of our Cray Supercomputers. It is controlled and displayed graphically by a window interface running on a workstation screen. Our motivation for this research has been to improve the usual typewriter/static interface using language independent controls to show capabilities of the workstation/supercomputer combination. 8 refs.

  10. Supporting large scale applications on networks of workstations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Robert; Birman, Kenneth P.

    1989-01-01

    Distributed applications on networks of workstations are an increasingly common way to satisfy computing needs. However, existing mechanisms for distributed programming exhibit poor performance and reliability as application size increases. Extension of the ISIS distributed programming system to support large scale distributed applications by providing hierarchical process groups is discussed. Incorporation of hierarchy in the program structure and exploitation of this to limit the communication and storage required in any one component of the distributed system is examined.

  11. Let's Use Cognitive Science to Create Collaborative Workstations.

    PubMed

    Reicher, Murray A; Wolfe, Jeremy M

    2016-05-01

    When informed by an understanding of cognitive science, radiologists' workstations could become collaborative to improve radiologists' performance and job satisfaction. The authors review relevant literature and present several promising areas of research, including image toggling, eye tracking, cognitive computing, intelligently restricted messaging, work habit tracking, and innovative input devices. The authors call for more research in "perceptual design," a promising field that can complement advances in computer-aided detection. PMID:26873029

  12. Parallel Computation of Unsteady Flows on a Network of Workstations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Parallel computation of unsteady flows requires significant computational resources. The utilization of a network of workstations seems an efficient solution to the problem where large problems can be treated at a reasonable cost. This approach requires the solution of several problems: 1) the partitioning and distribution of the problem over a network of workstation, 2) efficient communication tools, 3) managing the system efficiently for a given problem. Of course, there is the question of the efficiency of any given numerical algorithm to such a computing system. NPARC code was chosen as a sample for the application. For the explicit version of the NPARC code both two- and three-dimensional problems were studied. Again both steady and unsteady problems were investigated. The issues studied as a part of the research program were: 1) how to distribute the data between the workstations, 2) how to compute and how to communicate at each node efficiently, 3) how to balance the load distribution. In the following, a summary of these activities is presented. Details of the work have been presented and published as referenced.

  13. ARCIMBOLDO_LITE: single-workstation implementation and use.

    PubMed

    Sammito, Massimo; Millán, Claudia; Frieske, Dawid; Rodríguez-Freire, Eloy; Borges, Rafael J; Usón, Isabel

    2015-09-01

    ARCIMBOLDO solves the phase problem at resolutions of around 2 Å or better through massive combination of small fragments and density modification. For complex structures, this imposes a need for a powerful grid where calculations can be distributed, but for structures with up to 200 amino acids in the asymmetric unit a single workstation may suffice. The use and performance of the single-workstation implementation, ARCIMBOLDO_LITE, on a pool of test structures with 40-120 amino acids and resolutions between 0.54 and 2.2 Å is described. Inbuilt polyalanine helices and iron cofactors are used as search fragments. ARCIMBOLDO_BORGES can also run on a single workstation to solve structures in this test set using precomputed libraries of local folds. The results of this study have been incorporated into an automated, resolution- and hardware-dependent parameterization. ARCIMBOLDO has been thoroughly rewritten and three binaries are now available: ARCIMBOLDO_LITE, ARCIMBOLDO_SHREDDER and ARCIMBOLDO_BORGES. The programs and libraries can be downloaded from http://chango.ibmb.csic.es/ARCIMBOLDO_LITE. PMID:26327382

  14. User Interface Design for a Radiological Imaging Workstation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gee, James C.; Desoto, Larry A.; Kim, Yongmin; Haynor, David R.; Loop, John W.

    1989-05-01

    The diagnostic workstation serves as the radiologist's interface to the PACS and is intended to ultimately supersede the film alternator as the radiologist's principal tool for image reviewing, reporting, and consulting. At the University of Washington, we have developed a personal computer-based, single-screen, radiological imaging workstation and two supporting user interfaces. The first interface, RadUI I, used pictorial directories to offer the user a quick visual overview of a single patient study. In addition, it made available a variety of image processing functions through a mouse-based, menu-driven user interface. A second user interface was motivated by our belief that the display of images, rather than image processing, is the fundamental issue in workstation design for radiological viewing. The RadUI II user interface supports the tiled display of up to 4 independent, virtual display monitors on a single physical screen. Both interfaces are based on a hybrid alternator-filmstrip conceptual model. This paper describes the two user interfaces and reports the results of an evaluation designed to study the effectiveness of the alternator-filmstrip model.

  15. Dual modality virtual colonoscopy workstation: design, implementation, and preliminary evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dongqing; Meissner, Michael

    2006-03-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a virtual colonoscopy (VC) workstation that supports both CT (computed tomography) and MR (magnetic resonance) imaging procedures. The workflow should be optimized and be able to take advantage of both image modalities. The technological break through is at the real-time volume rendering of spatial-intensity-inhomogeneous MR images to achieve high quality 3D endoluminal view. VC aims at visualizing CT or MR tomography images for detection of colonic polyp and lesion. It is also called as CT/MR colonography based on the imaging modality that is employed. The published results of large scale clinical trial demonstrated more than 90% of sensitivity on polyp detection for certain CT colonography (CTC) workstation. A drawback of the CT colonoscopy is the radiation exposure. MR colonography (MRC) is free from the X-ray radiation. It achieved almost 100% specificity for polyp detection in published trials. The better tissue contrast in MR image allows the accurate diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease also, which is usually difficult in CTC. At present, most of the VC workstations are designed for CT examination. They are not able to display multi-sequence MR series concurrently in a single application. The automatic correlation between 2D and 3D view is not available due to the difficulty of 3D model building for MR images. This study aims at enhancing a commercial VC product that was successfully used for CTC to equally support dark-lumen protocol MR procedure also.

  16. Effects of a standing and three dynamic workstations on computer task performance and cognitive function tests.

    PubMed

    Commissaris, Dianne A C M; Könemann, Reinier; Hiemstra-van Mastrigt, Suzanne; Burford, Eva-Maria; Botter, Juliane; Douwes, Marjolein; Ellegast, Rolf P

    2014-11-01

    Sedentary work entails health risks. Dynamic (or active) workstations, at which computer tasks can be combined with physical activity, may reduce the risks of sedentary behaviour. The aim of this study was to evaluate short term task performance while working on three dynamic workstations: a treadmill, an elliptical trainer, a bicycle ergometer and a conventional standing workstation. A standard sitting workstation served as control condition. Fifteen Dutch adults performed five standardised but common office tasks in an office-like laboratory setting. Both objective and perceived work performance were measured. With the exception of high precision mouse tasks, short term work performance was not affected by working on a dynamic or a standing workstation. The participant's perception of decreased performance might complicate the acceptance of dynamic workstations, although most participants indicate that they would use a dynamic workstation if available at the workplace. PMID:24951234

  17. A collaborative approach to lean laboratory workstation design reduces wasted technologist travel.

    PubMed

    Yerian, Lisa M; Seestadt, Joseph A; Gomez, Erron R; Marchant, Kandice K

    2012-08-01

    Lean methodologies have been applied in many industries to reduce waste. We applied Lean techniques to redesign laboratory workstations with the aim of reducing the number of times employees must leave their workstations to complete their tasks. At baseline in 68 workflows (aggregates or sequence of process steps) studied, 251 (38%) of 664 tasks required workers to walk away from their workstations. After analysis and redesign, only 59 (9%) of the 664 tasks required technologists to leave their workstations to complete these tasks. On average, 3.4 travel events were removed for each workstation. Time studies in a single laboratory section demonstrated that workers spend 8 to 70 seconds in travel each time they step away from the workstation. The redesigned workstations will allow employees to spend less time travelling around the laboratory. Additional benefits include employee training in waste identification, improved overall laboratory layout, and identification of other process improvement opportunities in our laboratory. PMID:22904140

  18. Emerging Options and Opportunities in Civilian Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, Dennis M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses the major problems/issues with civilian aeronautics going forward, the contextual ongoing technology revolutions, the several emerging civilian aeronautical "Big Ideas" and associated enabling technological approaches. The ongoing IT Revolution is increasingly providing, as 5 senses virtual presence/reality becomes available, along with Nano/Molecular Manufacturing, virtual alternatives to Physical transportation for both people and goods. Paper examines the potential options available to aeronautics to maintain and perhaps grow "market share" in the context of this evolving competition. Many of these concepts are not new, but the emerging technology landscape is enhancing their viability and marketability. The concepts vary from the "interesting" to the truly revolutionary and all require considerable research. Paper considers the speed range from personal/general aviation to supersonic transports and technologies from energetics to fabrication.

  19. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. The NASA CASI price code table, addresses of organizations, and document availability information are included before the abstract section. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  20. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-1999-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. The NASA CASI price code table, addresses of organizations, and document availability information are included before the abstract section. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  1. Aeronautics and space report of the President: 1981 activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Achievements in the aeronautics and space program by function are summarized. Activities in communications, Earth's resources and environment, space science, space transportation, international activities, and aeronautics are included.

  2. Wireless Sensor Applications in Extreme Aeronautical Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William C.; Atkinson, Gary M.

    2013-01-01

    NASA aeronautical programs require rigorous ground and flight testing. Many of the testing environments can be extremely harsh. These environments include cryogenic temperatures and high temperatures (greater than 1500 C). Temperature, pressure, vibration, ionizing radiation, and chemical exposure may all be part of the harsh environment found in testing. This paper presents a survey of research opportunities for universities and industry to develop new wireless sensors that address anticipated structural health monitoring (SHM) and testing needs for aeronautical vehicles. Potential applications of passive wireless sensors for ground testing and high altitude aircraft operations are presented. Some of the challenges and issues of the technology are also presented.

  3. Langley aeronautics and space test highlights, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The role of the Langley Research Center is to perform basic and applied research necessary for the advancement of aeronautics and space flight, to generate new and advanced concepts for the accomplishment of related national goals, and to provide research advice, technological support, and assistance to other NASA installations, other government agencies, and industry. Some of the significant tests which were performed during calendar year 1984 in Langley test facilities are highlighted. The broad range of the research and technology activities at the Langley Research Center and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States leadership in aeronautics and space research are illustrated.

  4. Inmarsat aeronautical mobile satellite system: Internetworking issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sengupta, Jay R.

    1990-01-01

    The Inmarsat Aeronautical Mobile Satellite System (AMSS) provides air-ground and air-air communications services to aero-mobile users on a global basis. Communicating parties may be connected either directly, or more commonly, via interconnecting networks to the Inmarsat AMSS, in order to construct end-to-end communications circuits. The aircraft earth station (AES) and the aeronautical ground earth station (GES) are the points of interconnection of the Inmarsat AMSS to users, as well as to interconnecting networks. This paper reviews the internetworking aspects of the Inmarsat AMSS, by introducing the Inmarsat AMSS network architecture and services concepts and then discussing the internetwork address/numbering and routing techniques.

  5. JACK - ANTHROPOMETRIC MODELING SYSTEM FOR SILICON GRAPHICS WORKSTATIONS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, B.

    1994-01-01

    JACK is an interactive graphics program developed at the University of Pennsylvania that displays and manipulates articulated geometric figures. JACK is typically used to observe how a human mannequin interacts with its environment and what effects body types will have upon the performance of a task in a simulated environment. Any environment can be created, and any number of mannequins can be placed anywhere in that environment. JACK includes facilities to construct limited geometric objects, position figures, perform a variety of analyses on the figures, describe the motion of the figures and specify lighting and surface property information for rendering high quality images. JACK is supplied with a variety of body types pre-defined and known to the system. There are both male and female bodies, ranging from the 5th to the 95th percentile, based on NASA Standard 3000. Each mannequin is fully articulated and reflects the joint limitations of a normal human. JACK is an editor for manipulating previously defined objects known as "Peabody" objects. Used to describe the figures as well as the internal data structure for representing them, Peabody is a language with a powerful and flexible mechanism for representing connectivity between objects, both the joints between individual segments within a figure and arbitrary connections between different figures. Peabody objects are generally comprised of several individual figures, each one a collection of segments. Each segment has a geometry represented by PSURF files that consist of polygons or curved surface patches. Although JACK does not have the capability to create new objects, objects may be created by other geometric modeling programs and then translated into the PSURF format. Environment files are a collection of figures and attributes that may be dynamically moved under the control of an animation file. The animation facilities allow the user to create a sequence of commands that duplicate the movements of a

  6. Prediction of Foreign Object Debris/Damage (FOD) type for elimination in the aeronautics manufacturing environment through logistic regression model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espino, Natalia V.

    Foreign Object Debris/Damage (FOD) is a costly and high-risk problem that aeronautics industries such as Boeing, Lockheed Martin, among others are facing at their production lines every day. They spend an average of $350 thousand dollars per year fixing FOD problems. FOD can put pilots, passengers and other crews' lives into high-risk. FOD refers to any type of foreign object, particle, debris or agent in the manufacturing environment, which could contaminate/damage the product or otherwise undermine quality control standards. FOD can be in the form of any of the following categories: panstock, manufacturing debris, tools/shop aids, consumables and trash. Although aeronautics industries have put many prevention plans in place such as housekeeping and "clean as you go" philosophies, trainings, use of RFID for tooling control, etc. none of them has been able to completely eradicate the problem. This research presents a logistic regression statistical model approach to predict probability of FOD type under given specific circumstances such as workstation, month and aircraft/jet being built. FOD Quality Assurance Reports of the last three years were provided by an aeronautical industry for this study. By predicting type of FOD, custom reduction/elimination plans can be put in place and by such means being able to diminish the problem. Different aircrafts were analyzed and so different models developed through same methodology. Results of the study presented are predictions of FOD type for each aircraft and workstation throughout the year, which were obtained by applying proposed logistic regression models. This research would help aeronautic industries to address the FOD problem correctly, to be able to identify root causes and establish actual reduction/elimination plans.

  7. Bibliography of Aeronautics, 1920-1921

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockett, Paul

    1925-01-01

    This work covers the literatme published from January 1, 1920, to December 31, 1921, and continues the work of the Smithsonian Institution issued as Volume 55 of the Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections, which covered the material published prior to June 30, 1909, and the work of Lhe National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics as published in the Bibliography of Aeronautics for the years 1909 to 1916 and 1917 to 1919. As in the Smithsonian volume and in the Bibliography of Aeronautics for the years 1909 to 1916 and 1917 to 1919, citations of the publications of all nations have been included in the languages in which these publications originally appeared. The arrangement is in dictionary form with author and subject entry and one alphabetical arrangement. Detail in the matter of subject reference has been omitted on account of the cost of presentation, but an attempt has been made to give sufficient cross reference for research in special lines. The National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics will next present a bibliography for the year 1922.

  8. Developing a global aeronautical satellite system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dement, Donald K.

    1988-01-01

    Arinc, an airline industry-owned and operated company in the United States, has taken steps toward establishing a global aeronautical satellite communications system. Plans call for initiation of a thin-route data operation in 1989, upgrading to establish voice communications via shared spot-beam transponders carried on other satellites, and deploying a worldwide network using dedicated satellites by 1994.

  9. The history of aeronautical medicine in Venezuela

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iriarte, D. R.

    1986-01-01

    The Aerial Medical Service of the Ministry of Transportation and Communications of Venezuela was created on June 1949, and later became the Department of Aeronautical Medicine. Its functions include the medical examinations of future pilots, navigators and flight engineers. The importance of good mental and physical health in all flight and ground personnel to ensure the safety of air travel is discussed.

  10. 14 CFR 61.97 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... using pilotage with the aid of a magnetic compass; (5) Recognition of critical weather situations from... recognition and avoidance of wake turbulence; (7) Effects of density altitude on takeoff and climb performance... airplane single-engine rating; (11) Aeronautical decision making and judgment; and (12) Preflight...

  11. Astronautics and aeronautics, 1985: A chronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janson, Bette R.

    1988-01-01

    This book is part of a series of annual chronologies of significant events in the fields of astronautics and aeronautics. Events covered are international as well as national, in political as well as scientific and technical areas. This series is an important reference work used by historians, NASA personnel, government agencies, and congressional staffs, as well as the media.

  12. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with indexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    This bibliography lists 426 reports, articles and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in August 1984. Reports are cited in the area of Aeronautical Engineering. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing operation and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment and systems.

  13. Experiment In Aeronautical-Mobile/Satellite Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedrey, Thomas C.; Lay, Norman E.; Dessouky, Khaled

    1992-01-01

    Report describes study of performance of digital mobile/satellite communication terminals of advanced design intended for use in ground stations and airplanes in aeronautical-mobile service. Study was collaboration of NASA, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Communications Satellite Corp. (COMSAT), and International Maritime Satellite System (INMARSAT).

  14. Astronautics and aeronautics, 1974: A chronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brun, N. L.

    1977-01-01

    The 14th volume in the NASA series of day-by-day records of aeronautical and space events has somewhat narrowed its scope and selectivity in its brief accounts from immediately available, open sources. This year the emphasis is even more directly focused on concrete air and space activities. The text continues to reflect some events in other agencies and countries.

  15. Aeronautical engineering. A continuing bibliography with indexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    This bibliography lists 326 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in January 1982. Topics on aeronautical engineering and aerodynamics such as flight control systems, avionics, computer programs, computational fluid dynamics and composite structures are covered.

  16. Astronautics and aeronautics, 1976. A chronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritchie, E. H.

    1984-01-01

    A chronology of events concerning astronautics and aeronautics for the year 1976 is presented. Some of the many and varied topics include the aerospace industry, planetary exploration, space transportation system, defense department programs, politics, and aerospace medicine. The entries are organized by the month and presented in a news release format.

  17. Astronautics and aeronautics, 1978: A chronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janson, Bette R.

    1986-01-01

    This is the 18th in a series of annual chronologies of significant events in the fields of astronautics and aeronautics. Events covered are international as well as national and political as well as scientific and technical. This series is a reference work for historians, NASA personnel, government agencies, congressional staffs, and the media.

  18. Ensuring US National Aeronautics Test Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    U.S. leadership in aeronautics depends on ready access to technologically advanced, efficient, and affordable aeronautics test capabilities. These systems include major wind tunnels and propulsion test facilities and flight test capabilities. The federal government owns the majority of the major aeronautics test capabilities in the United States, primarily through the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Department of Defense (DoD). However, changes in the Aerospace landscape, primarily the decrease in demand for testing over the last 20 years required an overarching strategy for management of these national assets. Therefore, NASA established the Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) as a two-pronged strategic initiative to: (1) retain and invest in NASA aeronautics test capabilities considered strategically important to the agency and the nation, and (2) establish a strong, high level partnership with the DoD. Test facility utilization is a critical factor for ATP because it relies on user occupancy fees to recover a substantial part of the operations costs for its facilities. Decreasing utilization is an indicator of excess capacity and in some cases low-risk redundancy (i.e., several facilities with basically the same capability and overall low utilization). However, low utilization does not necessarily translate to lack of strategic importance. Some facilities with relatively low utilization are nonetheless vitally important because of the unique nature of the capability and the foreseeable aeronautics testing needs. Unfortunately, since its inception, the customer base for ATP has continued to shrink. Utilization of ATP wind tunnels has declined by more than 50% from the FY 2006 levels. This significant decrease in customer usage is attributable to several factors, including the overall decline in new programs and projects in the aerospace sector; the impact of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) on the design, development, and research

  19. 78 FR 69885 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-21

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics... meeting of the Aeronautics Committee of the NASA Advisory Council. This Committee reports to the NAC. The... for the Aeronautics Committee, NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC 20546, (202) 358-0566, or...

  20. 14 CFR 63.37 - Aeronautical experience requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Aeronautical experience requirements. 63.37 Section 63.37 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS OTHER THAN PILOTS Flight Engineers § 63.37 Aeronautical experience requirements. (a) Except...

  1. NASA's Role in Aeronautics: A Workshop. Volume I--Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Assembly of Engineering.

    The central task of the workshop summarized in this report was to examine the relationship of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) aeronautical research capabilities to the state of U.S. aviation and to make recommendations about NASA's future roles in aeronautics. Topics include NASA's role in: (1) aeronautics research and…

  2. Developing a workstation-based, real-time simulation for rapid handling qualities evaluations during design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Frederick; Biezad, Daniel J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the Rapid Aircraft DynamIcs AssessmeNt (RADIAN) project - an integration of the Aircraft SYNThesis (ACSTNT) design code with the USAD DATCOM code that estimates stability derivatives. Both of these codes are available to universities. These programs are then linked to flight simulation and flight controller synthesis tools and resulting design is evaluated on a graphics workstation. The entire process reduces the preliminary design time by an order of magnitude and provides an initial handling qualities evaluation of the design coupled to a control law. The integrated design process is applicable to both conventional aircraft taken from current textbooks and to unconventional designs emphasizing agility and propulsive control of attitude. The interactive and concurrent nature of the design process has been well received by industry and by design engineers at NASA. The process is being implemented into the design curriculum and is being used by students who view it as a significant advance over prior methods.

  3. Application of EVA guidelines and design criteria. Volume 2: EVA workstation conceptual designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, N. E.

    1973-01-01

    Several EV workstation concepts were developed and are documented. The workstation concepts were developed following a comprehensive analysis of potential EV missions, functions, and tasks as interpreted from NASA and contractor space shuttle and space station studies, mission models, and related reports. The design of a versatile, portable EVA workstation is aimed at reducing the design and development costs for each mission and aiding in the development of on-orbit serviceable payloads.

  4. Aeronautics and Aviation Science: Careers and Opportunities Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Texter, P. Cardie

    1998-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration funded project, Aeronautics and Aviation Science: Careers and Opportunities has been in operation since July, 1995. This project operated as a collaboration with Massachusetts Corporation for Educational Telecommunications, the Federal Aviation Administration, Bridgewater State College and four targeted "core sites" in the greater Boston area. In its first and second years, a video series on aeronautics and aviation science was developed and broadcast via "live, interactive" satellite feed. Accompanying teacher and student supplementary instructional materials for grades 6-9 were produced and disseminated by the Massachusetts Corporation for Educational Telecommunications (MCET). In the MCET grant application it states that project Take Off! in its initial phase would recruit and train teachers at "core" sites in the greater Boston area, as well as opening participation to other on-line users of MCET's satellite feeds. "Core site" classrooms would become equipped so that teachers and students might become engaged in an interactive format which aimed at not only involving the students during the "live" broadcast of the instructional video series, but which would encourage participation in electronic information gathering and sharing among participants. As a Take Off! project goal, four schools with a higher than average proportion of minority and underrepresented youth were invited to become involved with the project to give these students the opportunity to consider career exploration and development in the field of science aviation and aeronautics. The four sites chosen to participate in this project were: East Boston High School, Dorchester High School, Randolph Junior-Senior High School and Malden High School. In year 3 Dorchester was unable to continue to fully participate and exited out. Danvers was added to the "core site" list in year 3. In consideration of Goals 2000, the National Science Foundation

  5. Biomek Cell Workstation: A Variable System for Automated Cell Cultivation.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, R; Severitt, J C; Roddelkopf, T; Junginger, S; Thurow, K

    2016-06-01

    Automated cell cultivation is an important tool for simplifying routine laboratory work. Automated methods are independent of skill levels and daily constitution of laboratory staff in combination with a constant quality and performance of the methods. The Biomek Cell Workstation was configured as a flexible and compatible system. The modified Biomek Cell Workstation enables the cultivation of adherent and suspension cells. Until now, no commercially available systems enabled the automated handling of both types of cells in one system. In particular, the automated cultivation of suspension cells in this form has not been published. The cell counts and viabilities were nonsignificantly decreased for cells cultivated in AutoFlasks in automated handling. The proliferation of manual and automated bioscreening by the WST-1 assay showed a nonsignificant lower proliferation of automatically disseminated cells associated with a mostly lower standard error. The disseminated suspension cell lines showed different pronounced proliferations in descending order, starting with Jurkat cells followed by SEM, Molt4, and RS4 cells having the lowest proliferation. In this respect, we successfully disseminated and screened suspension cells in an automated way. The automated cultivation and dissemination of a variety of suspension cells can replace the manual method. PMID:26259574

  6. A cycling workstation to facilitate physical activity in office settings.

    PubMed

    Elmer, Steven J; Martin, James C

    2014-07-01

    Facilitating physical activity during the workday may help desk-bound workers reduce risks associated with sedentary behavior. We 1) evaluated the efficacy of a cycling workstation to increase energy expenditure while performing a typing task and 2) fabricated a power measurement system to determine the accuracy and reliability of an exercise cycle. Ten individuals performed 10 min trials of sitting while typing (SIT type) and pedaling while typing (PED type). Expired gases were recorded and typing performance was assessed. Metabolic cost during PED type was ∼ 2.5 × greater compared to SIT type (255 ± 14 vs. 100 ± 11 kcal h(-1), P < 0.01). Typing time and number of typing errors did not differ between PED type and SIT type (7.7 ± 1.5 vs. 7.6 ± 1.6 min, P = 0.51, 3.3 ± 4.6 vs. 3.8 ± 2.7 errors, P = 0.80). The exercise cycle overestimated power by 14-138% compared to actual power but actual power was reliable (r = 0.998, P < 0.01). A cycling workstation can facilitate physical activity without compromising typing performance. The exercise cycle's inaccuracy could be misleading to users. PMID:24681071

  7. Scheduling revisited workstations in integrated-circuit fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline, Paul J.

    1992-01-01

    The cost of building new semiconductor wafer fabrication factories has grown rapidly, and a state-of-the-art fab may cost 250 million dollars or more. Obtaining an acceptable return on this investment requires high productivity from the fabrication facilities. This paper describes the Photo Dispatcher system which was developed to make machine-loading recommendations on a set of key fab machines. Dispatching policies that generally perform well in job shops (e.g., Shortest Remaining Processing Time) perform poorly for workstations such as photolithography which are visited several times by the same lot of silicon wafers. The Photo Dispatcher evaluates the history of workloads throughout the fab and identifies bottleneck areas. The scheduler then assigns priorities to lots depending on where they are headed after photolithography. These priorities are designed to avoid starving bottleneck workstations and to give preference to lots that are headed to areas where they can be processed with minimal waiting. Other factors considered by the scheduler to establish priorities are the nearness of a lot to the end of its process flow and the time that the lot has already been waiting in queue. Simulations that model the equipment and products in one of Texas Instrument's wafer fabs show the Photo Dispatcher can produce a 10 percent improvement in the time required to fabricate integrated circuits.

  8. Future Aeronautical Communication Infrastructure Technology Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Tricia; Jin, Jenny; Bergerm Jason; Henriksen, Steven

    2008-01-01

    This National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Contractor Report summarizes and documents the work performed to investigate technologies that could support long-term aeronautical mobile communications operating concepts for air traffic management (ATM) in the timeframe of 2020 and beyond, and includes the associated findings and recommendations made by ITT Corporation and NASA Glenn Research Center to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The work was completed as the final phase of a multiyear NASA contract in support of the Future Communication Study (FCS), a cooperative research and development program of the United States FAA, NASA, and EUROCONTROL. This final report focuses on an assessment of final five candidate technologies, and also provides an overview of the entire technology assessment process, including final recommendations.

  9. Langley aeronautics and space test highlights, 1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The role of the Langley Research Center is to perform basic and applied research necessary for the advancement of aeronautics and space flight, to generate new and advanced concepts for the accomplishment of related national goals, and to provide research advice, technological support, and assistance to other NASA installations, other government agencies, and industry. Some of the significant tests which were performed during calendar year 1983 in Langley test facilities, a number of which are unique in the world are highlighted. Both the broad range of the research and technology activities at the Langley Research Center and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States leadership in aeronautics and space research are illustrated.

  10. Aeronautic Instruments. Section II : Altitude Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mears, A H; Henrickson, H B; Brombacher, W G

    1923-01-01

    This report is Section two of a series of reports on aeronautic instruments (Technical Report nos. 125 to 132, inclusive). This section discusses briefly barometric altitude determinations, and describes in detail the principal types of altimeters and barographs used in aeronautics during the recent war. This is followed by a discussion of performance requirements for such instruments and an account of the methods of testing developed by the Bureau of Standards. The report concludes with a brief account of the results of recent investigations. For accurate measurements of altitude, reference must also be made to thermometer readings of atmospheric temperature, since the altitude is not fixed by atmospheric pressure alone. This matter is discussed in connection with barometric altitude determination.

  11. World-wide aeronautical satellite communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Peter; Smith, Keith

    1988-01-01

    INMARSAT decided to expand the spectrum covered by its new generation of satellites, INMARSAT-2, to include 1 MHz (subsequently increased to 3 MHz) of the spectrum designed for aeronautical use. It began a design study that led to the specifications for the system that is now being implemented. Subsequently, INMARSAT awarded contracts for the design of avionics and high gain antennas to a number of manufactures, while several of the signatories that provide ground equipment for communicating with the INMARSAT satellites are modifying their earth stations to work with the avionic equipment. As a resullt of these activities, a world-wide aeronautical satellite system supporting both voice and data will become operational in 1989.

  12. Aeronautics and Space Report of the President

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The years 1989 to 1990 activities are reported including human space flight, unmanned expendable launch vehicles, space science and applications, space communications operations, space research and technology, and aeronautics research and technology. Contributions made by the 14 participating government organizations are outline. Each organization's aeronautics and/or space activities for the year are presented. The organizations involved include: (1) NASA; (2) Dept. of Defense; (3) Dept. of Commerce; (4) Dept. of Energy; (5) Dept. of the Interior; (6) Dept. of Agriculture; (7) Federal Communications Commission; (8) Dept. of Transportation; (9) Environmental Protection Agency; (10) National Science Foundation; (11) Smithsonian Institution; (12) Dept. of State; (13) Arms Control and Disarmament; and (14) United States Information Agency.

  13. Aeronautics and Space Report of the President

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Nineteen eighty-eight marked the United States' return to space flight with two successful space shuttle launches in September and December, as well as six successful expendable rocket launches. Meanwhile, many other less spectacular but important contributions were made in aeronautics and space by the 14 participating government organizations. Each organization's aeronautics and/or space activities for the year are presented. The organizations involved include: (1) NASA; (2) Department of Defense; (3) Department of Commerce; (4) Department of Energy; (5) Department of the Interior; (6) Department of Agriculture; (7) Federal Communications Commission; (8) Department of Transportation; (9) Environmental Protection Agency; (10) National Science Foundation; (11) Smithsonian Institution; (12) Department of State; (13) Arms Control and Disarmament Agency; and (14) United States Information Agency.

  14. Future directions in aeronautical research and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bower, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    The aeronautical R & D effort in NASA is discussed with emphasis on those areas where major needs and opportunities exist. In aerodynamics, areas selected for discussion include computational aerodynamics, transonic test techniques, high Reynolds number research, skin friction drag reduction, and propulsive lift. In propulsion, consideration is given to the areas of fuel-efficient subsonic propulsion, variable-flow engines, hypersonic propulsion, alternate fuels, and aircraft noise reduction. Consideration is also given to the utilization of advanced composites and integrated avionic systems.

  15. Workout at work: laboratory test of psychological and performance outcomes of active workstations.

    PubMed

    Sliter, Michael; Yuan, Zhenyu

    2015-04-01

    With growing concerns over the obesity epidemic in the United States and other developed countries, many organizations have taken steps to incorporate healthy workplace practices. However, most workers are still sedentary throughout the day--a major contributor to individual weight gain. The current study sought to gather preliminary evidence of the efficacy of active workstations, which are a possible intervention that could increase employees' physical activity while they are working. We conducted an experimental study, in which boredom, task satisfaction, stress, arousal, and performance were evaluated and compared across 4 randomly assigned conditions: seated workstation, standing workstation, cycling workstation, and walking workstation. Additionally, body mass index (BMI) and exercise habits were examined as moderators to determine whether differences in these variables would relate to increased benefits in active conditions. The results (n = 180) showed general support for the benefits of walking workstations, whereby participants in the walking condition had higher satisfaction and arousal and experienced less boredom and stress than those in the passive conditions. Cycling workstations, on the other hand, tended to relate to reduced satisfaction and performance when compared with other conditions. The moderators did not impact these relationships, indicating that walking workstations might have psychological benefits to individuals, regardless of BMI and exercise habits. The results of this study are a preliminary step in understanding the work implications of active workstations. PMID:25347682

  16. Smart Aeronautical Chart Management System Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakdil, M. E.; Celik, R. N.; Kaya, Ö.; Konak, Y. C.; Guney, C.

    2015-10-01

    Civil aviation is developing rapidly, and the number of domestic and international operations is increasing exponentially every year than the previous one. Airline companies with increased air traffic and the number of passengers increase the demand of new aircrafts. An aircraft needs not only fuel but also pilot and aeronautical information (charts, digital navigation information, flight plan, and etc.) to perform flight operation. One of the most important components in aeronautical information is the terminal chart. Authorized institution in every state is responsible to publish their terminal charts for certain periods. Although these charts are produced in accordance with ICAO's Annex 4 and Annex 15, cartographic representation and page layout differs in each state's publication. This situation makes difficult to read them by pilots. In this paper, standard instrument departure (SID) charts are analysed to produce by use of cutting-edge and competitive technologies instead of classical computer-aided drawing and vector based graphic applications that are currently used by main chart producers. The goal is to design efficient and commercial chart management system that is able to produce aeronautical charts with same cartographic representation for all states.

  17. Take Off! Aeronautics and Aviation Science: Careers and Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Funded by National Aeronautic and Space Administration's High Performance Computing and Communications/ Learning Technologies Project (HPCC/LTP) Cooperative Agreement, Aeronautics and aviation Science: Careers and Opportunities was operative from July 1995 through July 1998. This project operated as a collaboration with Massachusetts Corporation for Educational Telecommunications, the Federal Aviation Administration, Bridgewater State College and four targeted "core sites" in the greater Boston area: Dorchester, Malden, East Boston and Randolph. In its first and second years, a video series with a participatory website on aeronautics and aviation science was developed and broadcast via "live, interactive" satellite feed. Accompanying teacher and student supplementary instructional materials for grades 6-12 were produced and disseminated by the Massachusetts Corporation for Educational Telecommunications (MCET). In year three, the project team redesigned the website, edited 14 videos to a five part thematic unit, and developed a teacher's guide to the video and web materials supplement for MAC and PC platforms, aligned with national standards. In the MCET grant application it states that project Take Off! in its initial phase would recruit and train teachers at "core" sites in the greater Boston area, as well as opening participation to other on-line users of MCET's satellite feeds. "Core site" classrooms would become equipped so that teachers and students might become engaged in an interactive format which aimed at not only involving the students during the "live" broadcast of the instructional video series, but which would encourage participation in electronic information gathering and sharing among participants. As a Take Off! project goal, four schools with a higher than average proportion of minority and underrepresented youth were invited to become involved with the project to give these students the opportunity to consider career exploration and development

  18. C3 generic workstation: Performance metrics and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eddy, Douglas R.

    1988-01-01

    The large number of integrated dependent measures available on a command, control, and communications (C3) generic workstation under development are described. In this system, embedded communications tasks will manipulate workload to assess the effects of performance-enhancing drugs (sleep aids and decongestants), work/rest cycles, biocybernetics, and decision support systems on performance. Task performance accuracy and latency will be event coded for correlation with other measures of voice stress and physiological functioning. Sessions will be videotaped to score non-verbal communications. Physiological recordings include spectral analysis of EEG, ECG, vagal tone, and EOG. Subjective measurements include SWAT, fatigue, POMS and specialized self-report scales. The system will be used primarily to evaluate the effects on performance of drugs, work/rest cycles, and biocybernetic concepts. Performance assessment algorithms will also be developed, including those used with small teams. This system provides a tool for integrating and synchronizing behavioral and psychophysiological measures in a complex decision-making environment.

  19. Use of SSH on a compartmented mode workstation

    SciTech Connect

    Tolliver, J.S.; Dillow, D.

    1997-08-01

    SSH stands for {open_quotes}Secure Shell.{close_quotes} It is now a user shell like csh or ksh. Instead it is a widely-used means to accomplish secure, encrypted communication among cooperating nodes. It is a secure replacement for the {open_quotes}r-commands{close_quotes}, rlogin, and rcp. SSH is free for noncommercial use and builds and runs on most any Unix platform. A Compartmented Mode Workstation (CMW) is an example of a secure or {open_quotes}trusted{close_quotes} operating system. The use of SSH on a CMW introduces security problems unless the SSH source code is modified to take advantage of the security features of the CMW. This paper describes the port and use of SSH on one particular brand of CMW.

  20. Diagnostic workstation for digital hand atlas in bone age assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Fei; Huang, H. K.; Pietka, Ewa; Gilsanz, Vicente; Ominsky, Steven

    1998-06-01

    Bone age assessment by a radiological examination of a hand and wrist image is a procedure frequently performed in pediatric patients to evaluate growth disorders, determine growth potential in children and monitor therapy effects. The assessment method currently used in radiological diagnosis is based on atlas matching of the diagnosed hand image with the reference set of atlas patterns, which was developed in 1950s and is not fully applicable for children of today. We intent to implement a diagnostic workstation for creating a new reference set of clinically normal images which will serve as a digital atlas and can be used for a computer-assisted bone age assessment. In this paper, we present the initial data- collection and system setup phase of this five-year research program. We describe the system design, user interface implementation and software tool development for collection, visualization, management and processing of clinically normal hand and wrist images.

  1. EMP (electromagnetic pulse) representational tools for personal workstations

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, A.; Shafer, D.

    1987-01-01

    The ability to rapidly provide a visual representation of a problem set, its accompanying environment, and the variables that directly impact the analysis is of enormous value to the weapons analyst. Parametric, first-principle tools are directly and immediately usable by the analyst to represent the systems under investigation and the effects on those systems by the weapons under analysis. The three tools described, GEOREP, 3-AXIS, and G RANGE, provide these visual, analytic tools directly to the analyst on personal computer workstations. The simplicity and rapidity with which these tools may be used are especially beneficial to weapons analysts dealing with complex phenomena such as EMP. The potential flexibility of these representational tools is shown through examples of notional weapons applications. Use of GEOREP, 3-AXIS, and G RANGE, which augment, rather than supplant, complex weapons effects physics codes, can help provide the necessary, cost-effective guidance for making decisions on detailed case studies.

  2. Performance Comparison of Mainframe, Workstations, Clusters, and Desktop Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Douglas L.

    2005-01-01

    A performance evaluation of a variety of computers frequently found in a scientific or engineering research environment was conducted using a synthetic and application program benchmarks. From a performance perspective, emerging commodity processors have superior performance relative to legacy mainframe computers. In many cases, the PC clusters exhibited comparable performance with traditional mainframe hardware when 8-12 processors were used. The main advantage of the PC clusters was related to their cost. Regardless of whether the clusters were built from new computers or whether they were created from retired computers their performance to cost ratio was superior to the legacy mainframe computers. Finally, the typical annual maintenance cost of legacy mainframe computers is several times the cost of new equipment such as multiprocessor PC workstations. The savings from eliminating the annual maintenance fee on legacy hardware can result in a yearly increase in total computational capability for an organization.

  3. ACQUIRE: A data acquisition system for CAMAC on SUN workstations

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzes, R.T. ); Lowry, M.M. )

    1994-02-01

    The data acquisition software package ACQUIRE has been used for many years by the Princeton University Cyclotron Laboratory for nuclear physics research applications. This code has been ported to the SUN Sparc workstation and is fully functional, including block data transfers using an in crate Event Handler. A SCSI interface to CAMAC is utilized, and the device handling software has been developed in such a way that little modification was needed in the ACQUIRE code for the SUN implementation. The Higz X windows graphics package from CERN is used for data display. ACQUIRE will be used for test and development of CAMAC based systems within the Molecular Science Research Center at Pacific Northwest Laboratory.

  4. Advanced software development workstation project: Engineering scripting language. Graphical editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Software development is widely considered to be a bottleneck in the development of complex systems, both in terms of development and in terms of maintenance of deployed systems. Cost of software development and maintenance can also be very high. One approach to reducing costs and relieving this bottleneck is increasing the reuse of software designs and software components. A method for achieving such reuse is a software parts composition system. Such a system consists of a language for modeling software parts and their interfaces, a catalog of existing parts, an editor for combining parts, and a code generator that takes a specification and generates code for that application in the target language. The Advanced Software Development Workstation is intended to be an expert system shell designed to provide the capabilities of a software part composition system.

  5. Multi-agent data fusion workstation (MADFW) architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahbazian, Elisa; Bosse, Eloi; Valin, Pierre

    1998-03-01

    This paper describes an on-going effort to build a Multi- Agent Data Fusion Workstation (MADFW) based on a Knowledge- Based System (KBS) BlackBoard (BB) architecture to offer a range of innovative techniques for Data Fusion (DF), applicable to various domains. The initial application to be demonstrated is in the area of airborne maritime surveillance where several multi-agent concepts and algorithms have already been studied and demonstrated. The end result will offer the user a flexible and modular environment providing capability for: (1) addition of user defined sensor simulation models and fusion algorithms; (2) integration with existing models and algorithms; and (3) evaluation of performance to derive requirement specifications and help in the design phase towards fielding a real DF system. The workstation is being designed to accommodate modular interchangeable algorithm implementation and performance evaluation of: (1) fusion of positional data from imaging and non-imaging sensors; (2) fusion of attribute information obtained from imaging and non-imaging sensors and other sources such as communication systems, satellites, etc.; and (3) Object Recognition in imaging data. The design allows algorithms for sensor simulators and measures of performance to reside ether on the KBS BB shell or be separate from it, thus facilitating integration with other testbed designs. This architecture also allows the future introduction of fusion management capabilities. The real-time KBS BB shell developed by Lockheed Martin Canada, in collaboration with DREV, is the basis of the MADFW infrastructure. This system is totally generic, and could be used to implement any system comprising of components which can be numeric or AI based. It has been implemented in C++ rather than in a higher-level language (such as LISP, Smalltalk, ...) to satisfy the real-time requirement.

  6. Graduate engineering research participation in aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, A. S., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The Aeronautics Graduate Research Program commenced in 1971, with the primary goal of engaging students who qualified for regular admission to the Graduate School of Engineering at Old Dominion University in a graduate engineering research and study program in collaboration with NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. The format and purposes of this program are discussed. Student selection and program statistics are summarized. Abstracts are presented in the folowing areas: aircraft design, aerodynamics, lift/drag characteristics; avionics; fluid mechanics; solid mechanics; instrumentation and measurement techniques; thermophysical properties experiments; large space structures; earth orbital dynamics; and environmental engineering.

  7. The K-8 Aeronautics Internet Textbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Efforts were focused on web site migration, from UC (University of California) Davis to the National Business Aviation Association's (NBAA) web site. K8AIT (K-8 Aeronautics Internet Textbook), which has remained an unadvertised web site, receives almost two million hits per month. Project continuation funding with the National Business Aviation Association is being pursued. A Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between NASA Ames LTP (Learning Technologies Project) and Cislunar has been drafted and approved by NASA's legal department. Additional web content on space flight and the Wright brothers has been added in English and Spanish.

  8. NASA Aeronautics: Research and Technology Program Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This report contains numerous color illustrations to describe the NASA programs in aeronautics. The basic ideas involved are explained in brief paragraphs. The seven chapters deal with Subsonic aircraft, High-speed transport, High-performance military aircraft, Hypersonic/Transatmospheric vehicles, Critical disciplines, National facilities and Organizations & installations. Some individual aircraft discussed are : the SR-71 aircraft, aerospace planes, the high-speed civil transport (HSCT), the X-29 forward-swept wing research aircraft, and the X-31 aircraft. Critical disciplines discussed are numerical aerodynamic simulation, computational fluid dynamics, computational structural dynamics and new experimental testing techniques.

  9. Solar energy and the aeronautics industry. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benedek, L.

    1985-01-01

    An introduction to the physical aspects of solar energy, incidental energy and variations in solar flux is presented, along with an explanation of the physical principles of obtaining solar energy. The history of the application of solar energy to aeronautics, including the Gossamer Penguin and the Solar Challenger is given. Finally, an analysis of the possibilities of using a reaction motor with hybrid propulsion combining solar energy with traditional fuels as well as calculations of the proposed cycle and its mode of operation are given.

  10. MSAT aeronautical mobile satellite communications terminal development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, C. A.; Sydor, J. T.

    1995-01-01

    CAL has undertaken the development of a new aeronautical mobile terminal for the North American MSAT market. The terminal is to meet the MSAT standard and is aimed in particular at the 300,000 general aviation and business aircraft in North America. The terminals are therefore relatively low cost and small in size when compared to those currently being produced for larger airline aircraft. The terminal incorporates a top mounted mechanical steered antenna and a unique antenna steering subsystem. An overview of the terminal design is presented.

  11. Graduate engineering research participation in aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, A. S., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Graduate student engineering research in aeronautics at Old Dominion University is surveyed. Student participation was facilitated through a NASA sponsored university program which enabled the students to complete degrees. Research summaries are provided and plans for the termination of the grant program are outlined. Project topics include: Failure modes for mechanically fastened joints in composite materials; The dynamic stability of an earth orbiting satellite deploying hinged appendages; The analysis of the Losipescu shear test for composite materials; and the effect of boundary layer structure on wing tip vortex formation and decay.

  12. Combining Workstation Design and Performance Management to Increase Ergonomically Correct Computer Typing Postures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culig, Kathryn M.; Dickinson, Alyce M.; Lindstrom-Hazel, Debra; Austin, John

    2008-01-01

    The effects of workstation changes and a performance management (PM) package on seven typing postures were examined for seven office workers. Workstation adjustments were implemented first. Two participants increased five safe postures by 50% or more. The effects of a PM package on postures that did not improve by 50% were then examined using a…

  13. Evaluating the Use of Public PC Workstations at the Arizona State University Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konomos, Philip; Herrington, Scott

    2000-01-01

    Discusses concerns at the Arizona State University library regarding inappropriate uses of their public workstations, including Web surfing, personal email, and accessing pornography. Describe data collection techniques, including observation and electronic data collection software, which investigated use and availability data for workstations.…

  14. The Working Postures among Schoolchildren--Controlled Intervention Study on the Effects of Newly Designed Workstations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saarni, Lea; Nygrd, Clas-H kan; Rimpel, Arja; Nummi, Tapio; Kaukiainen, Anneli

    2007-01-01

    Background: School workstations are often inappropriate in not offering an optimal sitting posture. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of individually adjustable saddle-type chairs with wheels and desks with comfort curve and arm support on schoolchildren's working postures compared to conventional workstations. Methods:…

  15. 76 FR 21775 - Notice of Issuance of Final Determination Concerning Certain Office Workstations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-18

    ... Protection (``CBP'') has issued a final determination concerning the country of origin of certain office... country of origin of the office workstations for purposes of U.S. government procurement. DATES: The final... concerning the country of origin of the Vivo and Ethospace office workstations which may be offered to the...

  16. Aeronautical Satellite Comunications at T1 Data Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agan, M. J.; Densmore, A. C.

    1996-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Broadband Aeronautical Terminal was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory together with various industry/government partners to investigate high data rate aeronautical applications of ACTS technologies.

  17. Workstations for people with disabilities: an example of a virtual reality approach.

    PubMed

    Budziszewski, Paweł; Grabowski, Andrzej; Milanowicz, Marcin; Jankowski, Jarosław

    2016-09-01

    This article describes a method of adapting workstations for workers with motion disability using computer simulation and virtual reality (VR) techniques. A workstation for grinding spring faces was used as an example. It was adjusted for two people with a disabled right upper extremity. The study had two stages. In the first, a computer human model with a visualization of maximal arm reach and preferred workspace was used to develop a preliminary modification of a virtual workstation. In the second stage, an immersive VR environment was used to assess the virtual workstation and to add further modifications. All modifications were assessed by measuring the efficiency of work and the number of movements involved. The results of the study showed that a computer simulation could be used to determine whether a worker with a disability could access all important areas of a workstation and to propose necessary modifications. PMID:26651540

  18. Report on the clinical workstation and clinical data repository utilization at UNC Hospitals.

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, J. E.; Berger, R. G.; Carey, T. S.; Fakhry, S. M.; Rutledge, R.; Kichak, J. P.; Cleveland, T. J.; Dempsey, M. J.; Tsongalis, N. M.; Ayscue, C. F.

    1994-01-01

    On December 1, 1993, we implemented version 2.1 of the Clinical Workstation-Clinical Data Repository application in the Ambulatory Care Center. This version of the workstation allowed access of laboratory data from the clinical data repository that had been populated by a real-time HL7 interface between the Clinical Data Repository and the Laboratory Information System. This implementation completed a major part of the Clinical Workstation project. Also in December, we implemented a security system that records the date and time, user logon code, clinical workstation functions used, and the patient medical record number on whom data were displayed. In addition to the security function, this system has proven to be a valuable tool in evaluating the utilization of the clinical workstation and is the source of the data presented in this paper. PMID:7949934

  19. Workstations for people with disabilities: an example of a virtual reality approach

    PubMed Central

    Budziszewski, Paweł; Grabowski, Andrzej; Milanowicz, Marcin; Jankowski, Jarosław

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a method of adapting workstations for workers with motion disability using computer simulation and virtual reality (VR) techniques. A workstation for grinding spring faces was used as an example. It was adjusted for two people with a disabled right upper extremity. The study had two stages. In the first, a computer human model with a visualization of maximal arm reach and preferred workspace was used to develop a preliminary modification of a virtual workstation. In the second stage, an immersive VR environment was used to assess the virtual workstation and to add further modifications. All modifications were assessed by measuring the efficiency of work and the number of movements involved. The results of the study showed that a computer simulation could be used to determine whether a worker with a disability could access all important areas of a workstation and to propose necessary modifications. PMID:26651540

  20. A CCIR aeronautical mobile satellite report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davarian, Faramaz; Bishop, Dennis; Rogers, David; Smith, Ernest K.

    1989-08-01

    Propagation effects in the aeronautical mobile-satellite service differ from those in the fixed-satellite service and other mobile-satellite services because: small antennas are used on aircraft, and the aircraft body may affect the performance of the antenna; high aircraft speeds cause large Doppler spreads; aircraft terminals must accommodate a large dynamic range in transmission and reception; and due to their high speeds, banking maneuvers, and three-dimensional operation, aircraft routinely require exceptionally high integrity of communications, making even short-term propagation effects very important. Data and models specifically required to characterize the path impairments are discussed, which include: tropospheric effects, including gaseous attenuation, cloud and rain attenuation, fog attenuation, refraction and scintillation; surface reflection (multipath) effects; ionospheric effects such as scintillation; and environmental effects (aircraft motion, sea state, land surface type). Aeronautical mobile-satellite systems may operate on a worldwide basis, including propagation paths at low elevation angles. Several measurements of multipath parameters over land and sea were conducted. In some cases, laboratory simulations are used to compare measured data and verify model parameters. The received signals is considered in terms of its possible components: a direct wave subject to atmospheric effects, and a reflected wave, which generally contains mostly a diffuse component.

  1. National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1921-01-01

    The National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics in session at Washington to discuss plans to place America foremost in the development of avaition. A report was heard from Dr. Ames, chairman of the executive committee, on research work to develop the new heavy oil fuel injection aircraft engine which does away with carburetor and spark plugs, and will lesson the fire hazard. Dr. S.W. Stratton, secretary of the committee and director of the Bureau of Standards, is shown seated at the extreme left. Around the table, left to right, are: Prof. Charles F. Marvin, chief of the weather bureau; Dr. John F. Hayford (Northwestern Univ.); Orville Wright; Major Thurman H. Bane (chief Engineer Div. Army); Paul Henderson, (Second Ass. Postmaster Gen.); Rear Adm. W.A. Moffet, Chief Bureau Aeronautics, Navy; Dr. Michael I. Pupin, (Columbia Univ.); Rear Adm. D.W. Taylor, U.S.N. (Chief Bureau Construction and repair); Dr. Charles D. Walcott, chairman, (Chief Air Service) and Dr. Joesph S. Ames, chairman executive committee (John Hopkins Univ.)

  2. A CCIR aeronautical mobile satellite report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, Faramaz; Bishop, Dennis; Rogers, David; Smith, Ernest K.

    1989-01-01

    Propagation effects in the aeronautical mobile-satellite service differ from those in the fixed-satellite service and other mobile-satellite services because: small antennas are used on aircraft, and the aircraft body may affect the performance of the antenna; high aircraft speeds cause large Doppler spreads; aircraft terminals must accommodate a large dynamic range in transmission and reception; and due to their high speeds, banking maneuvers, and three-dimensional operation, aircraft routinely require exceptionally high integrity of communications, making even short-term propagation effects very important. Data and models specifically required to characterize the path impairments are discussed, which include: tropospheric effects, including gaseous attenuation, cloud and rain attenuation, fog attenuation, refraction and scintillation; surface reflection (multipath) effects; ionospheric effects such as scintillation; and environmental effects (aircraft motion, sea state, land surface type). Aeronautical mobile-satellite systems may operate on a worldwide basis, including propagation paths at low elevation angles. Several measurements of multipath parameters over land and sea were conducted. In some cases, laboratory simulations are used to compare measured data and verify model parameters. The received signals is considered in terms of its possible components: a direct wave subject to atmospheric effects, and a reflected wave, which generally contains mostly a diffuse component.

  3. 78 FR 41114 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-09

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics... meeting of the Aeronautics Committee of the NASA Advisory Council. This Committee reports to the NAC. The.... to 5:00 p.m.; Local Time. ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters, Room 6E40, 300 E Street SW., Washington,...

  4. 76 FR 58843 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-22

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics... meeting of the Aeronautics Committee of the NASA Advisory Council. The meeting will be held for the...) 358-0566, or susan.l.minor@nasa.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The meeting will be open to...

  5. 75 FR 17166 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-05

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics... meeting of the Aeronautics Committee of the NASA Advisory Council. The meeting will be held for the.... ADDRESSES: NASA Langley Research Center, Building 1219, Room 225, Hampton, Virginia (Note that visitors...

  6. 78 FR 10640 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-14

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics... meeting of the Aeronautics Committee of the NASA Advisory Council. The meeting will be held for the... Administration Headquarters, Washington, DC 20546, (202) 358-0566, or susan.l.minor@nasa.gov ....

  7. NASA's Role in Aeronautics: A Workshop. Volume III - Transport Aircraft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Assembly of Engineering.

    The central task of a 1980 workshop on the role of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in aeronautics was to examine the relationship of NASA's research capabilities to the state of U.S. aviation and to make recommendations about NASA's future role in aeronautics. The specific task of the Panel on Transport Aircraft was to…

  8. Aeronautics and Space Report of the President: 1975 Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This report, submitted to the Congress by President Ford in accordance with the National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958, summarizes the United States' space and aeronautics activities for the year 1975. Detailed summaries of the activities of the following governmental departments or agencies are provided: National Aeronautics and Space…

  9. 78 FR 52230 - Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-22

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting AGENCY: Federal...-annual meeting of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Aeronautical Charting Forum (ACF) to discuss...), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the FAA Aeronautical Charting Forum to be held from October...

  10. 76 FR 53530 - Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-26

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting AGENCY: Federal...-annual meeting of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Aeronautical Charting Forum (ACF) to discuss... given of a meeting of the FAA Aeronautical Charting Forum to be held from October 25 through October...

  11. 76 FR 12211 - Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-04

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting AGENCY: Federal...-annual meeting of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Aeronautical Charting Forum (ACF) to discuss... of a meeting of the FAA Aeronautical ] Charting Forum to be held from April 26 through April 28,...

  12. 75 FR 11225 - Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-10

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting AGENCY: Federal... Forum (ACF 10-01) to discuss informational content and design of aeronautical charts and related.... App. II), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the FAA Aeronautical Charting Forum to be held...

  13. 77 FR 50759 - Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-22

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting AGENCY... announces the bi-annual meeting of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Aeronautical Charting Forum... hereby given of a meeting of the FAA Aeronautical Charting Forum to be held from October 23...

  14. 78 FR 12415 - Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-22

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting AGENCY: Federal...-annual meeting of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Aeronautical Charting Forum (ACF) to discuss...), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the FAA Aeronautical Charting Forum to be held from April...

  15. 75 FR 54221 - Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-03

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting AGENCY: Federal...-annual meeting of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Aeronautical Charting Forum (ACF) to discuss... is hereby given of a meeting of the FAA Aeronautical Charting Forum to be held from October...

  16. NASA's Role in Aeronautics: A Workshop. Volume II - Military Aviation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Assembly of Engineering.

    The central task of a 1980 workshop on the role of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in aeronautics was to examine the relationship of NASA's research capabilities to the state of U.S. aviation and to make recommendations about NASA's future role in aeronautics. The findings and recommendations of the Panel on Military…

  17. 14 CFR 61.159 - Aeronautical experience: Airplane category rating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aeronautical experience: Airplane category... Transport Pilots § 61.159 Aeronautical experience: Airplane category rating. (a) Except as provided in... certificate with an airplane category and class rating must have at least 1,500 hours of total time as a...

  18. 76 FR 183 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-03

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics... meeting of the Aeronautics Committee of the NASA Advisory Council. The meeting will be held for the... Administration Headquarters, Washington, DC 20546, (202) 358-0566, or susan.l.minor@nasa.gov ....

  19. NASA's Role in Aeronautics: A Workshop. Volume IV - General Aviation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Assembly of Engineering.

    The central task of a 1980 workshop on the role of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in aeronautics was to examine the relationship of NASA's research capabilities to the state of U.S. aviation and to make recommendations about NASA's future role in aeronautics. The findings and recommendations of the Panel on General…

  20. Color postprocessing for 3-dimensional finite element mesh quality evaluation and evolving graphical workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panthaki, Malcolm J.

    1987-01-01

    Three general tasks on general-purpose, interactive color graphics postprocessing for three-dimensional computational mechanics were accomplished. First, the existing program (POSTPRO3D) is ported to a high-resolution device. In the course of this transfer, numerous enhancements are implemented in the program. The performance of the hardware was evaluated from the point of view of engineering postprocessing, and the characteristics of future hardware were discussed. Second, interactive graphical tools implemented to facilitate qualitative mesh evaluation from a single analysis. The literature was surveyed and a bibliography compiled. Qualitative mesh sensors were examined, and the use of two-dimensional plots of unaveraged responses on the surface of three-dimensional continua was emphasized in an interactive color raster graphics environment. Finally, a postprocessing environment was designed for state-of-the-art workstation technology. Modularity, personalization of the environment, integration of the engineering design processes, and the development and use of high-level graphics tools are some of the features of the intended environment.

  1. Aeronautical concerns and National Aeronautics and Space Administration atmospheric electricity projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, W. W.

    1980-01-01

    The phenomenology of lightning and lightning measurement techniques are briefly examined with a particular reference to aeronautics. Developments made in airborne and satellite detection methods are reported. NASA research efforts are outlined which cover topics including in-situ measurements, design factors and protection, remote optical and radio frequency measurements, and space vehicle design.

  2. High-performance mass storage system for workstations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, T.; Tang, Y.; Gupta, L.; Cooperman, S.

    1993-01-01

    Reduced Instruction Set Computer (RISC) workstations and Personnel Computers (PC) are very popular tools for office automation, command and control, scientific analysis, database management, and many other applications. However, when using Input/Output (I/O) intensive applications, the RISC workstations and PC's are often overburdened with the tasks of collecting, staging, storing, and distributing data. Also, by using standard high-performance peripherals and storage devices, the I/O function can still be a common bottleneck process. Therefore, the high-performance mass storage system, developed by Loral AeroSys' Independent Research and Development (IR&D) engineers, can offload a RISC workstation of I/O related functions and provide high-performance I/O functions and external interfaces. The high-performance mass storage system has the capabilities to ingest high-speed real-time data, perform signal or image processing, and stage, archive, and distribute the data. This mass storage system uses a hierarchical storage structure, thus reducing the total data storage cost, while maintaining high-I/O performance. The high-performance mass storage system is a network of low-cost parallel processors and storage devices. The nodes in the network have special I/O functions such as: SCSI controller, Ethernet controller, gateway controller, RS232 controller, IEEE488 controller, and digital/analog converter. The nodes are interconnected through high-speed direct memory access links to form a network. The topology of the network is easily reconfigurable to maximize system throughput for various applications. This high-performance mass storage system takes advantage of a 'busless' architecture for maximum expandability. The mass storage system consists of magnetic disks, a WORM optical disk jukebox, and an 8mm helical scan tape to form a hierarchical storage structure. Commonly used files are kept in the magnetic disk for fast retrieval. The optical disks are used as archive

  3. Application of Mobile-ip to Space and Aeronautical Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, Kent; Shell, Dan; Ivancic, William D.; Stewart, David H.; Bell, Terry L.; Kachmar, Brian A.

    2001-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is interested in applying mobile Internet protocol (mobile-ip) technologies to its space and aeronautics programs. In particular, mobile-ip will play a major role in the Advanced Aeronautic Transportation Technology (AAT-F), the Weather Information Communication (WINCOMM), and the Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS) aeronautics programs. This paper describes mobile-ip and mobile routers--in particular, the features, capabilities, and initial performance of the mobile router are presented. The application of mobile-router technology to NASA's space and aeronautics programs is also discussed.

  4. Future developments in aeronautical satellite communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Peter

    1990-01-01

    Very shortly aeronautical satellite communications will be introduced on a world wide basis. By the end of the year, voice communications (both to the cabin and cockpit) and packet data communications will be available to both airlines and executive aircraft. During the decade following the introduction of the system, there will be many enhancements and developments which will increase the range of applications, expand the potential number of users, and reduce costs. A number of ways in which the system is expected to evolve over this period are presented. Among the issues which are covered are the impact of spot beam satellites, spectrum and power conservation techniques, and the expanding range of user services.

  5. Adaptive multisatellite systems for aeronautical services.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bisaga, J. J.; Redisch, W. N.

    1971-01-01

    The use of satellite systems to provide operational communications and ATC services to aircraft flying the oceanic routes has been the subject of considerable interest recently. Since most of the link factors are functions of geometry and the aircraft traffic density varies with time, the satellite power needed to meet the communication demand varies considerably in an oceanic area as a function of both location and time. An adaptive system that tailors the use of system resources to the needs of the user can result in an additional system capacity improvement by a factor of between two and three. Results of studies conducted to date indicate that simple implementation of adaptive techniques in aeronautical satellite systems is feasible. Study is continuing in this area and on the application of satellite multibeam techniques to gain even further increase in capacity.

  6. Performance of a Regional Aeronautical Telecommunications Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bretmersky, Steven C.; Ripamonti, Claudio; Konangi, Vijay K.; Kerczewski, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports the findings of the simulation of the ATN (Aeronautical Telecommunications Network) for three typical average-sized U.S. airports and their associated air traffic patterns. The models of the protocols were designed to achieve the same functionality and meet the ATN specifications. The focus of this project is on the subnetwork and routing aspects of the simulation. To maintain continuous communication between the aircrafts and the ground facilities, a model based on mobile IP is used. The results indicate that continuous communication is indeed possible. The network can support two applications of significance in the immediate future FTP and HTTP traffic. Results from this simulation prove the feasibility of development of the ATN concept for AC/ATM (Advanced Communications for Air Traffic Management).

  7. A fuel level sensor for aeronautical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrazzuoli, L.; Persichetti, G.; Onorato, G.; Grimaldi, I. A.; Testa, G.; Bernini, R.

    2015-03-01

    A novel fuel level sensor for aeronautical applications is developed. The sensor is based on an array of total internal reflection (TIR) point sensors. Respect to conventional TIR sensors the new design permits to be sensitive to common jet fuels (JetA, JP4,JP7) but also to operate with new alternative fuels. The sensor doesn't require aircraft calibration, temperature compensation and furthermore is able to operate correctly when partially or totally exposed to presence of condensed water on its surface. The point sensors are multiplexed on a single fiber by optical couplers and interrogated simultaneously by Optical Time Domain Reflectometry (OTDR) at a wavelength of 1550nm. Experimental results show a resolution of +/-1.5mm could be achieved. The sensors is also able to measure the free water level in the fuel.

  8. Integration of radiologist peer review into clinical review workstation.

    PubMed

    McEnery, K W; Suitor, C T; Hildebrand, S; Downs, R L

    2000-05-01

    Professional peer review of random prior radiologist's interpretations is mandated by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO). The JCAHO expects documentation of 5% rate of random peer-review cases. Countless hours are spent in departments fulfilling these requirements. The integration of the peer-review process into the radiologist's interpretation workflow was expected to increase the percentage of documented peer review, yet decrease the time and effort for this documentation. radStation clinical review workstations are deployed at every reading station. When a requisition is bar-coded, radStation retrieves the patient's clinical information and automatically displays the prior comparison report. If the radiologist agrees with the prior report, a single click on a "quality assurance' agree box documents the agreement. In the case of a discordance, an additional dialog box automatically appears and the radiologist enters the reason for disagreement and then submits the case as a discrepancy. The system holds the discordance for 3 to 5 working days, then notifies the original radiologist via E-mail that a prior interpretation has been submitted for peer review, lists the submitted discrepancy reason, and provides a link to display the discordant report. The peer-review database is separate from the existing radiology information system (RIS). At the end of every month, summary reports of all peer-review activity are generated automatically. Initial benchmarks of our deployed system anticipate documentation of long-term random peer-review rate at greater than 50% of interpreted cases. The system enhances the peer-review process by integrating it with the normal interpretation workflow. The time to complete peer review using radStation is less than 1 second per normal case and less than 60 seconds for a discordant case. The E-mail notification system is fully automated, eliminating the need for secretarial involvement in the data

  9. Modulation and Synchronization for Aeronautical Telemetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Christopher G.

    Aeronautical telemetry systems have historically been implemented with constant envelope modulations like CPM. Shifts in system constraints including reduced available bandwidth and increased throughput demands have caused many in the field to reevaluate traditional methods and design practices. This work examines the costs and benefits of using APSK for aeronautical telemetry instead of CPM. Variable rate turbo codes are used to improve the power efficiency of 16- and 32-APSK. Spectral regrowth in nonlinear power amplifiers when driven by non-constant envelope modulation is also considered. Simulation results show the improved spectral efficiency of this modulation scheme over those currently defined in telemetry standards. Additionally, the impact of transitioning from continuous transmission to burst-mode is considered. Synchronization loops are ineffective in burst-mode communication. Data-aided feedforward algorithms can be used to estimate offsets in carrier phase, frequency, and symbol timing between the transmitter and the receiver. If a data-aided algorithm is used, a portion of the transmitted signal is devoted to a known sequence of pilot symbols. Optimum pilot sequences for the three synchronization parameters are obtained analytically and numerically for different system constraints. The alternating sequence is shown to be optimal given a peak power constraint. Alternatively, synchronization can be accomplished using blind algorithms that do not rely on a priori knowledge of a pilot sequence. If blind algorithms are used, the observation interval can be longer than for data-aided algorithms. There are combinations of pilot sequence length and packet length where data-aided algorithms perform better than blind algorithms and vice versa. The conclusion is that a sequential arrangement of blind algorithms operating over an entire burst performs better than a CRB-achieving data-aided algorithm operating over a short pilot sequence.

  10. From Electronic Library to a Learning Center in the Academic Library: Integrating Traditional and New Uses in the Library Workstation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shoham, Snunith; Roitberg N.

    2005-01-01

    Questionnaires and computerized observations were used to measure purposes for visiting the academic library and uses made on its workstations. The research was done among 1004 users in Israel. The findings show that non-library uses are the major activity on academic library workstations and that libraries with large number of workstations are…

  11. Radiologists' requirements for primary diagnosis workstations: preliminary results of task-based design surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohman, Suzan A.; Johnson, Sandra L.; Valentino, Daniel J.; Taira, Ricky K.; Manzo, William A.

    1994-05-01

    There has been a tremendous amount of effort put into the design of diagnostic radiology workstations; however, few workstations have been clinically accepted. Among the requirements for a clinically acceptable workstation are good image quality, a well designed user-interface, and access to all relevant diagnostic information. The user-interface design should reflect radiologist's film reading habits and encourage new reading methods that take advantage of the electronic environment. As part of our effort to improve diagnostic workstation design, we surveyed radiologists in the UCLA Department of Radiological Sciences. Sixteen radiologists from the fields of pediatric, genitourinary, thoracic, and neuroradiology participated in the initial survey. We asked their opinions regarding our PACS infrastructure performance and our existing diagnostic workstations. We also asked them to identify certain pathologies that they found to be less evident on workstations as compared to film. We are using this information to determine the current limitations of diagnostic workstations and to develop a user interface design that addresses the clinical requirements of a busy teritiary care medical center the radiologists who use it.

  12. The role of the host in a cooperating mainframe and workstation environment, volumes 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kusmanoff, Antone; Martin, Nancy L.

    1989-01-01

    In recent years, advancements made in computer systems have prompted a move from centralized computing based on timesharing a large mainframe computer to distributed computing based on a connected set of engineering workstations. A major factor in this advancement is the increased performance and lower cost of engineering workstations. The shift to distributed computing from centralized computing has led to challenges associated with the residency of application programs within the system. In a combined system of multiple engineering workstations attached to a mainframe host, the question arises as to how does a system designer assign applications between the larger mainframe host and the smaller, yet powerful, workstation. The concepts related to real time data processing are analyzed and systems are displayed which use a host mainframe and a number of engineering workstations interconnected by a local area network. In most cases, distributed systems can be classified as having a single function or multiple functions and as executing programs in real time or nonreal time. In a system of multiple computers, the degree of autonomy of the computers is important; a system with one master control computer generally differs in reliability, performance, and complexity from a system in which all computers share the control. This research is concerned with generating general criteria principles for software residency decisions (host or workstation) for a diverse yet coupled group of users (the clustered workstations) which may need the use of a shared resource (the mainframe) to perform their functions.

  13. Changing the way we work: elevating energy expenditure with workstation alternatives.

    PubMed

    Tudor-Locke, C; Schuna, J M; Frensham, L J; Proenca, M

    2014-06-01

    Emerging evidence supports the feasibility of raising daily energy expenditure (EE) by replacing office work-related sedentary behavior with low-intensity non-exercise physical activity (PA) via workstation alternatives to the traditional office chair and desktop computer-based combinations. The purpose of this review article is to introduce a simple taxonomy to facilitate classification and study of workstation alternatives, catalog the diversity of research undertaken to date related to energy balance, and present and summarize the gaps and opportunities for a research agenda for workstation alternatives moving forward. A PubMed search elicited 57 English language articles published since 2000; additional articles were identified by reviewing reference sections and contacting authors. Selection criteria ultimately focused on use of workstation alternatives during simulated or real work tasks. The EE of sitting on a stability ball or using sit-stand/standing desks is comparable to the traditional seated condition (≅1.2 kcal min(-1)). The treadmill and pedal desks (active workstation alternatives) offer the greatest promise in terms of EE (≅2-4 kcal min(-1)). Sitting on a stability ball or using sit-stand/standing desks does not impair task performance relative to the traditional seated condition. Some evidence of typing impairment is inconsistently reported with active workstation alternatives; the finer motor skills required for mouse-related tasks may be more affected. Little is known about learning or adaptation with practice. Users are generally accepting of workstation alternatives; however, there is evidence of less than optimal use. Active workstations (that is, treadmill desks and pedal desks) in particular represent a potential strategy for mitigating the diminished EE inherent to contemporary office-based workplaces, but only if they are scalable. The science supporting active workstations is young and heterogeneous; however, this means that

  14. An overview of high-speed networking for workstations

    SciTech Connect

    Hake, K.

    1995-04-01

    The telecommunications industry provides new technologies for GIS (Geographic Information System) workstation upgrades: Fast Ethernet, 100VG-AnyLAN, and Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM). These network technologies are based on approved standards and have industry backing (alliance for Fast Ethernet). This paper briefly examines these technologies. Fast Ethernet is an extension to its predecessor 10 Mbps Ethernet, providing a 10x increase in transmission rate. 100VG-AnyLAN offers extensions to Ethernet but embraces the Token Ring technology, allowing internetworking and better performance for networked video. ATM takes a radial approach by simplifying the information quantum to a 53-byte cell, resulting in rapid data handling for telecommunications equipment and allowing efficient transport of data, video, and voice communications. Switched Ethernet and Full Duplexing are among the other technologies competing for this market. The ultimate test of usefulness for any technology lies in how they handle the GIS environment requirements; working demonstration systems will help clarify marketing rhetoric and determine which vendor best implemented the standard.

  15. Advisory Algorithm for Scheduling Open Sectors, Operating Positions, and Workstations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloem, Michael; Drew, Michael; Lai, Chok Fung; Bilimoria, Karl D.

    2012-01-01

    Air traffic controller supervisors configure available sector, operating position, and work-station resources to safely and efficiently control air traffic in a region of airspace. In this paper, an algorithm for assisting supervisors with this task is described and demonstrated on two sample problem instances. The algorithm produces configuration schedule advisories that minimize a cost. The cost is a weighted sum of two competing costs: one penalizing mismatches between configurations and predicted air traffic demand and another penalizing the effort associated with changing configurations. The problem considered by the algorithm is a shortest path problem that is solved with a dynamic programming value iteration algorithm. The cost function contains numerous parameters. Default values for most of these are suggested based on descriptions of air traffic control procedures and subject-matter expert feedback. The parameter determining the relative importance of the two competing costs is tuned by comparing historical configurations with corresponding algorithm advisories. Two sample problem instances for which appropriate configuration advisories are obvious were designed to illustrate characteristics of the algorithm. Results demonstrate how the algorithm suggests advisories that appropriately utilize changes in airspace configurations and changes in the number of operating positions allocated to each open sector. The results also demonstrate how the advisories suggest appropriate times for configuration changes.

  16. Converting multiple OC-3c ATM streams to HIPPI to drive an HDTV frame buffer from a workstation cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Tolmie, D.E.; Dornhoff, A.G.; DuBois, A.J.

    1994-12-01

    A group of eight Digital Equipment Corporation Alpha workstations is interconnected with ATM to form a cluster with supercomputer power. For output, each workstation drives a single ``tile`` on an 8-tile high-resolution frame buffer. A special purpose adapter is used to convert the workstation`s ATM format to the frame buffer`s HIPPI format. This paper discusses the rationale behind the workstation farm, and then describes the visualization output path in detail. To provide the system quickly, special emphasis was placed on making the design as simple as possible. The design choices are examined, and the resultant system is described.

  17. Aeronautical Satellite-Assisted Process for Information Exchange Through Network Technologies (Aero-SAPIENT) Conducted

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zernic, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    Broadband satellite communications for aeronautics marries communication and network technologies to address NASA's goals in information technology base research and development, thereby serving the safety and capacity needs of the National Airspace System. This marriage of technology increases the interactivity between airborne vehicles and ground systems. It improves decision-making and efficiency, reduces operation costs, and improves the safety and capacity of the National Airspace System. To this end, a collaborative project called the Aeronautical Satellite Assisted Process for Information Exchange through Network Technologies, or Aero-SAPIENT, was conducted out of Tinker AFB, Oklahoma, during November and December 2000.

  18. The revolutionary impact of evolving aeronautical technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kayten, G. G.; Driver, C.; Maglieri, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    Recent advances in aeronautical technologies which could produce revolutionary changes in transport aircraft if fully implemented are delineated. Laminar flow control offers a L/D improvement from the current 18 to 22 if used with a 767 configuration. Higher aspect and thickness/chord ratios could yield more efficient structural designs and further drag reduction. High-strength, fiber-reinforced composite structures can reduce structural weight by 10-30 percent. Improved engine cooling methods, higher stage loadings and exhaust temperatures can lower the SFC by 15 percent, engine weight by 15 percent, and the parts count by 50 percent. Aft-mounted counterrotating propellers can potentially decrease the SFC an additional 15-20 percent. Supersonic transport aircraft with L/D ratios of 18 and 70 seat miles/gal fuel efficiency can now be built that weigh half as much as the Concorde and carry the same load. The new SST would have superplastic-molded Al alloy structures.

  19. Life prediction technologies for aeronautical propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgaw, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    Fatigue and fracture problems continue to occur in aeronautical gas turbine engines. Components whose useful life is limited by these failure modes include turbine hot-section blades, vanes, and disks. Safety considerations dictate that catastrophic failures be avoided, while economic considerations dictate that catastrophic failures be avoided, while economic considerations dictate that noncatastrophic failures occur as infrequently as possible. Therefore, the decision in design is making the tradeoff between engine performance and durability. LeRC has contributed to the aeropropulsion industry in the area of life prediction technology for over 30 years, developing creep and fatigue life prediction methodologies for hot-section materials. At the present time, emphasis is being placed on the development of methods capable of handling both thermal and mechanical fatigue under severe environments. Recent accomplishments include the development of more accurate creep-fatigue life prediction methods such as the total strain version of LeRC's strain-range partitioning (SRP) and the HOST-developed cyclic damage accumulation (CDA) model. Other examples include the development of a more accurate cumulative fatigue damage rule - the double damage curve approach (DDCA), which provides greatly improved accuracy in comparison with usual cumulative fatigue design rules. Other accomplishments in the area of high-temperature fatigue crack growth may also be mentioned. Finally, we are looking to the future and are beginning to do research on the advanced methods which will be required for development of advanced materials and propulsion systems over the next 10-20 years.

  20. Simulation Technology Research Division assessment of the IBM RISC SYSTEM/6000 Model 530 workstation

    SciTech Connect

    Valdez, G.D. ); Halbleib, J.A.; Kensek, R.P.; Lorence, L.J. )

    1990-11-01

    A workstation manufactured by International Business Machines Corporation (IBM) was loaned to the Simulation Technology Research Division for evaluation. We have found that these new UNIX workstations from IBM have superior cost to performance ratios compared to the CRAY supercomputers and Digital's VAX machines. Our appraisal of this workstation included floating-point performance, system and environment functionality, and cost effectiveness. Our assessment was based on a suite of radiation transport codes developed at Sandia that constitute the bulk of our division's computing workload. In this report, we also discuss our experience with features that are unique to this machine such as the AIX operating system and the XLF Fortran Compiler. The interoperability of the RS/6000 workstation with Sandia's network of CRAYs and VAXs was also assessed.

  1. Real time data acquisition for expert systems in Unix workstations at Space Shuttle Mission Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muratore, John F.; Heindel, Troy A.; Murphy, Terri B.; Rasmussen, Arthur N.; Gnabasik, Mark; Mcfarland, Robert Z.; Bailey, Samuel A.

    1990-01-01

    A distributed system of proprietary engineering-class workstations is incorporated into NASA's Space Shuttle Mission-Control Center to increase the automation of mission control. The Real-Time Data System (RTDS) allows the operator to utilize expert knowledge in the display program for system modeling and evaluation. RTDS applications are reviewed including: (1) telemetry-animated communications schematics; (2) workstation displays of systems such as the Space Shuttle remote manipulator; and (3) a workstation emulation of shuttle flight instrumentation. The hard and soft real-time constraints are described including computer data acquisition, and the support techniques for the real-time expert systems include major frame buffers for logging and distribution as well as noise filtering. The incorporation of the workstations allows smaller programming teams to implement real-time telemetry systems that can improve operations and flight testing.

  2. Use of personal computer technology in supporting a radiological review workstation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaswamy, Mohan R.; Avrin, David A.; Andriole, Katherine P.; Wong, Albert W. K.; Bazzill, Todd M.; Arenson, Ronald L.

    1994-05-01

    Recent advances in personal computer technology have made these low-cost platforms quite attractive for the implementation of radiological workstations, particularly in those cases where high throughput is not critical (such as clinical review workstations). In light of this observation, the objectives of this on-going project are threefold: (1) to identify the characteristics and performance specifications that are desirable in a radiological review workstation (within the UCSF PACS architecture), (2) to review current personal computer technology in terms of its ability to support such a workstation, and (3) to design and implement a prototype hardware and software architecture. This paper outlines our progress to data and discusses some of our projections for the near future.

  3. Digitizing rocks standardizing the geological description process using workstations

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, M.R. , Windsor, Berkshire ); Shields, J.A. ); Taylor, M.R. )

    1993-09-01

    The preservation of geological knowledge in a standardized digital form presents a challenge. Data sources, inherently fuzzy, range in scale from the macroscopic (e.g., outcrop) through the mesoscopic (e.g., hand-specimen) core and sidewall core, to the microscopic (e.g., drill cuttings, thin sections, and microfossils). Each scale change results in increased heterogeneity and potentially contradictory data and the providers of such data may vary in experience level. To address these issues with respect to cores and drill cuttings, a geological description workstation has been developed and is undergoing field trials. Over 1000 carefully defined geological attributes are currently available within a depth-indexed, relational database. Attributes are stored in digital form, allowing multiple users to select familiar usage (e.g., diabase vs. dolerite). Data can be entered in one language and retrieved in other languages. The database structure allow groupings of similar elements (e.g., rhyolites in acidic, igneous or volcanics subgroups or the igneous rock group) permitting different uses to analyze details appropriate to the scale of the usage. Data entry uses a graphical user interface, allowing the geologist to make quick, logical selections in a standardized or custom-built format with extensive menus, on-screen graphics and help screens available. Description ranges are permissible. Entries for lithology, petrology, structures (sedimentary, organic and deformational), reservoir characteristics (porosity and hydrocarbon shows), and macrofossils are available. Sampling points for thin sections, core analysis, geochemistry, or micropaleontology studies are also recorded. Using digital data storage, geological logs using graphical, alphanumeric and symbolic depictions are possible. Data can be integrated with drilling and mud gas data, MWD and wireline data and off well-site analyses to produced composite formation evaluation logs and interpretational crossplots.

  4. A cumulative index to a continuing bibliography on aeronautical engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This bibliography is a cumulative index to the abstracts contained in NASA-SP-7037(184) through NASA-SP-7037(195) of Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography. NASA SP-7037 and its supplements have been compiled through the cooperative efforts of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). This cumulative index includes subject, personal author, corporate source, foreign technology, contract, report number, and accession number indexes.

  5. Aeronautical engineering: A cumulative index to a continuing bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    This bibliography is a cumulative index to the abstracts contained in NASA SP-7037(210) through NASA SP-7037(221) of Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography. NASA SP-7037 and its supplements have been compiled through the cooperative efforts of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). This cumulative index includes subject, personal author, corporate source, foreign technology, contract number, report number, and accession number indexes.

  6. Aeronautical Engineering: A continuing bibliography, 1982 cumulative index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    This bibliography is a cumulative index to the abstracts contained in NASA SP-7037 (145) through NASA SP-7037 (156) of Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography. NASA SP-7037 and its supplements have been compiled through the cooperative efforts of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). This cumulative index includes subject, personal author, corporate source, contract, and report number indexes.

  7. Cyber Technology for Materials and Structures in Aeronautics and Aerospace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pipes, R. Byron

    2002-01-01

    The evolution of composites applications in aeronautics from 1970 to the present is discussed. The barriers and challenges to economic application and to certification are presented and recommendations for accelerated development are outlined. The potential benefits of emerging technologies to aeronautics and their foundation in composite materials are described and the resulting benefits in vehicle take off gross weight are quantified. Finally, a 21st century vision for aeronautics in which human mobility is increased by an order of magnitude is articulated.

  8. A cumulative index to Aeronautical Engineering: A continuing bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    This bibliography is a cumulated index to the abstracts contained in NASA SP-7037(132) through NASA SP-7037(143) of Aeronautical Engineering: A continuing bibliography. NASA SP-7037 and its supplements have been compiled through the cooperative efforts of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). This cumulative index includes subject, personal author, corporate source, contract, and report number indexes.

  9. Aeronautical engineering: A cumulative index to a continuing bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    This bibliography is a cumulative index to the abstracts contained in NASA SP-7037 (197) through NASA SP-7037 (208) of Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography. NASA SP-7037 and its supplements have been compiled through the cooperative efforts of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). This cumulative index includes subject, personal author, corporate source, foreign technology, contract, report number, and accession number indexes.

  10. Office ergonomics training and a sit-stand workstation: effects on musculoskeletal and visual symptoms and performance of office workers.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Michelle M; Ciriello, Vincent M; Garabet, Angela M

    2013-01-01

    Work Related Musculoskeletal Disorders (WMSDs) among office workers with intensive computer use is widespread and the prevalence of symptoms is growing. This randomized controlled trial investigated the effects of an office ergonomics training combined with a sit-stand workstation on musculoskeletal and visual discomfort, behaviors and performance. Participants performed a lab-based customer service job for 8 h per day, over 15 days and were assigned to: Ergonomics Trained (n = 11) or Minimally Trained (n = 11). The training consisted of: a 1.5-h interactive instruction, a sit/stand practice period, and ergonomic reminders. Ergonomics Trained participants experienced minimal musculoskeletal and visual discomfort across the 15 days, varied their postures, with significantly higher performance compared to the Minimally Trained group who had a significantly higher number of symptoms, suggesting that training plays a critical role. The ability to mitigate symptoms, change behaviors and enhance performance through training combined with a sit-stand workstation has implications for preventing discomforts in office workers. PMID:22727324

  11. Design and implementation of an integrated PACS workstation in the ICU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahmias, Claude; Kenyon, David B.; Tan, Lianne; Coblentz, Craig L.

    1997-05-01

    A PACS workstation grants to Intensive Care Unit (ICU) staff direct and convenient access to radiographic images. The special requirements of access to, and display of radiographic images in the ICU were considered in the design of a PACS workstation for the ICU. and implemented as an extension of the Image Management and Communication Systems (IMACS) network at McMaster University Medical Center. The majority of radiographic exams performed in the ICU are portable chest x-ray exams. These images are processed by Computed Radiography and immediately directed towards online storage on the ICU workstation's local disk. Our image display software interface for the workstation was specially designed for the ICU to provide patient data entry, fast thumbnail viewing of all images for the occupied beds, full resolution display, and image manipulation, all in a user- friendly graphical interface. The workstation has been in place in the ICU for 1.5 years. While there are upgrades still to be made to the computer and monitors, and changes to the workflow to be made, the workstation has established itself as a n important part of the ICU.

  12. Intensive care unit referring physician usage of PACS workstation functions based on disease categories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horii, Steven C.; Kundel, Harold L.; Shile, Peter E.; Carey, Bruce; Seshadri, Sridhar B.; Feingold, Eric R.

    1994-05-01

    As part of a study of the use of a PACS workstation compared to film in a Medical Intensive Care Unit, logs of workstation activity were maintained. The software for the workstation kept track of the type of user (i.e., intern, resident, fellow, or attending physician) and also of the workstation image manipulation functions used. The functions logged were: no operation, brightness/contrast adjustment, invert video, zoom, and high resolution display (this last function resulted in the display of the full 2 K X 2 K image rather than the usual subsampled 1 K X 1 K image. Associated data collection allows us to obtain the diagnostic category of the examination being viewed (e.g., location of tubes and lines, rule out: pneumonia, congestive heart failure, pneumothorax, and pleural effusion). The diagnostic categories and user type were then correlated with the use of workstation functions during viewing of images. In general, there was an inverse relationship between the level of training and the number of workstation uses. About two-thirds of the time, there was no image manipulation operation performed. Adjustment of brightness/contrast had the highest percentage of use overall, followed by zoom, video invert, and high resolution display.

  13. Aeronautics and Space Report of the President

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Fiscal Year (FY) 2002 brought advances on many fronts in support of NASA's new vision, announced by Administrator Sean O Keefe on April 12, "to improve life here, to extend life to there, to find life beyond." NASA successfully carried out four Space Shuttle missions, including three to the International Space Station (ISS) and one servicing mission to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). By the end of the fiscal year, humans had occupied the ISS continuously for 2 years. NASA also managed five expendable launch vehicle (ELV) missions and participated in eight international cooperative ELV launches. In the area of space science, two of the Great Observatories, the Hubble Space Telescope and the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, continued to make spectacular observations. The Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Odyssey carried out their mapping missions of the red planet in unprecedented detail. Among other achievements, the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) Shoemaker spacecraft made the first soft landing on an asteroid, and the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) monitored a variety of solar activity, including the largest sunspot observed in 10 years. The education and public outreach program stemming from NASA's space science missions continues to grow. In the area of Earth science, attention focused on completing the first Earth Observing Satellite series. Four spacecraft were successfully launched. The goal is to understand our home planet as a system, as well as how the global environment responds to change. In aerospace technology, NASA conducted studies to improve aviation safety and environmental friendliness, progressed with its Space Launch Initiative Program, and explored a variety of pioneering technologies, including nanotechnology, for their application to aeronautics and aerospace. NASA remained broadly engaged in the international arena and concluded over 60 international cooperative and reimbursable international agreements during FY 2002.

  14. Advancing Aeronautics: A Decision Framework for Selecting Research Agendas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anton, Philip S.; Ecola, Liisa; Kallimani, James G.; Light, Thomas; Ohlandt, Chad J. R.; Osburg, Jan; Raman, Raj; Grammich, Clifford A.

    2011-01-01

    Publicly funded research has long played a role in the development of aeronautics, ranging from foundational research on airfoils to development of the air-traffic control system. Yet more than a century after the research and development of successful controlled, sustained, heavier-than-air flight vehicles, there are questions over the future of aeronautics research. The field of aeronautics is relatively mature, technological developments within it have become more evolutionary, and funding decisions are sometimes motivated by the continued pursuit of these evolutionary research tracks rather than by larger factors. These developments raise questions over whether public funding of aeronautics research continues to be appropriate or necessary and at what levels. Tightened federal budgets and increasing calls to address other public demands make these questions sharper still. To help it address the questions of appropriate directions for publicly funded aeronautics research, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) asked the RAND Corporation to assess the elements required to develop a strategic view of aeronautics research opportunities; identify candidate aeronautic grand challenges, paradigms, and concepts; outline a framework for evaluating them; and exercise the framework as an example of how to use it. Accordingly, this research seeks to address these questions: What aeronautics research should be supported by the U.S. government? What compelling and desirable benefits drive government-supported research? How should the government--especially NASA--make decisions about which research to support? Advancing aeronautics involves broad policy and decisionmaking challenges. Decisions involve tradeoffs among competing perspectives, uncertainties, and informed judgment.

  15. NASA aeronautics. [fact sheet on NASA programs for aeronautical research and aircraft development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A fact sheet depicting the NASA programs involving aircraft development and aeronautics is presented. The fact sheet consists of artist concepts of the various aircraft which represent specific programs. Among the subjects discussed in the concise explanatory notes are: (1) the YF-12 aircraft, (2) hypersonic drag tests in wind tunnels, (3) augmentor wing concepts, (4) rotary wing development, (5) fly-by-wire aircraft control, (6) supercritical wings, (7) the quiet engine program for noise and emission abatement, (8) flight capabilities of lifting bodies, (9) tilt rotor concepts for improved helicopter performance, and (10) flight safety improvements for general aviation aircraft.

  16. Posture And Dorsal Shape At A Sitted Workstation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepoutre, F. X.; Cloup, P.; Guerra, T. M.

    1986-07-01

    The ergonomic analysis of a control or a supervision workstation for a vehicle or a process, necessitates to take into account the biomecanical visuo-postural system. The measurements, which are necessary to do, must give informations about the spatial direction of the limbs, the dorsal shape, eventually the eyes direction, and the postural evolution during the working time. More, the smallness of the work station, the backrest and sometime a vibratory environment made use specific, strong and small devices wich do not disturb the operator. The measurement system which we propose is made of an optical device. This system is studied in relation with the french "Institute de Recherche pour les Transports" for an ergonomic analysis of a truck cabin. The optical device consists on placing on the body of the driver on particular places materializing specially members and trunck joint points, some drops which reflect the infra-red raies coming from a specific light. Several cameras whose relative positions depend on the experiment site, transmit video signals to the associated treatment systems which extract the coordinates (Xi, Yi) of each drop in the observation scope of any camera. By regrouping the informations obtained from every view, it is possible to obtain the spatial drop position and then to restore the individual's posture in three dimensions. Therefore, this device doesn't enable us, in consideration of the backrest, to analyse the dorsal posture, which is important with regard to dorsal pains frequency. For that reason, we complete the measurements by using a "curvometer". This device consists of a flexible stick fixed upon the individual back with elastic belts, whose distorsions (curvature in m-1) are measured, in the individual's sagittal plane, with 4 strain gauges pairs; located approximately at the level of vertebra D1, D6, D10 and L3. A fifth measurement, concerning the inclination (in degree) of the lower part of the stick, makes it is possible to

  17. DIFMAP: an interactive program for synthesis imaging.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, M. C.; Pearson, T. J.; Taylor, G. B.

    1994-05-01

    DIFMAP is a new interactive program for synthesis imaging. It includes data display, data editing, selfcalibration, imaging, and deconvolution. The program, written in ANSI C, runs on UNIX workstations.

  18. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 405

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This report lists reports, articles and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles.

  19. Aeronautical engineering: A continuing bibliography with indexes (supplement 313)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This bibliography lists 179 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in Jan. 1995. Subject coverage includes: engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles.

  20. Aeronautical engineering: A continuing bibliography with indexes (supplement 284)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This bibliography lists 974 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in Oct. 1992. The coverage includes documents on design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles.

  1. The Western Aeronautical Test Range of NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, A. L.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of the Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) of NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) is presented in this paper. The three WATR facilities are discussed, and three WATR elements - mission control centerns, communications systems, real-time processing and display systems, and tracking systems -are reviewed. The relationships within the NASA WATR, with respect to the NASA aeronautics program, are also discussed.

  2. A cumulative index to Aeronautical Engineering: A special bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    This publication is a cumulative index to the abstracts contained in NASA SP-7037 (80) through NASA SP-7037 (91) of Aeronautical Engineering: A Special Bibliography. NASA SP-7037 and its supplements have been compiled through the cooperative efforts of the American Institute of Aeronautics (AIAA) and Space Administration (NASA). This cumulative index includes subject, personal author, corporate source, contract, and report number indexes.

  3. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography With Indexes. Supplement 392

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This report lists reports, articles and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles.

  4. NASA's Role in Aeronautics: A Workshop. Volume VII - Background Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Assembly of Engineering.

    Sixteen background papers presented to a plenary session at a 1980 workshop on the role of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in aeronautics are presented. The central task of the workshop was to examine the relationship of NASA's research capabilities to the state of U.S. aviation and to make recommendations about NASA's…

  5. Aeronautical engineering: A continuing bibliography with indexes (supplement 310)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This bibliography lists 29 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in Nov. 1994. Subject coverage includes: engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction,evaluation testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles.

  6. 14 CFR 61.159 - Aeronautical experience: Airplane category rating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... rating. 61.159 Section 61.159 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Transport Pilots § 61.159 Aeronautical experience: Airplane category rating. (a) Except as provided in... certificate with an airplane category and class rating must have at least 1,500 hours of total time as a...

  7. 14 CFR 61.159 - Aeronautical experience: Airplane category rating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... rating. 61.159 Section 61.159 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Transport Pilots § 61.159 Aeronautical experience: Airplane category rating. (a) Except as provided in... certificate with an airplane category and class rating must have at least 1,500 hours of total time as a...

  8. 14 CFR 61.159 - Aeronautical experience: Airplane category rating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... rating. 61.159 Section 61.159 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Transport Pilots § 61.159 Aeronautical experience: Airplane category rating. (a) Except as provided in... certificate with an airplane category and class rating must have at least 1,500 hours of total time as a...

  9. 14 CFR 61.159 - Aeronautical experience: Airplane category rating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... rating. 61.159 Section 61.159 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Transport Pilots § 61.159 Aeronautical experience: Airplane category rating. (a) Except as provided in... certificate with an airplane category and class rating must have at least 1,500 hours of total time as a...

  10. Aeronautical engineering: A continuing bibliography with indexes (supplement 324)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This bibliography lists 149 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in December 1995. Subject coverage includes engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles.

  11. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. SUPPL-422

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This report lists reports, articles and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles.

  12. Aeronautical engineering: A continuing bibliography with indexes (supplement 319)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This report lists 349 reports, articles and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles.

  13. Aeronautics and Space Report of the President: 1977 Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    The national programs in aeronautics and space made steady progress in 1977 toward their long-term objectives. In aeronautics the goals were improved performance, energy efficiency, and safety in aircraft. In space the goals were: (1) better remote sensing systems to generate more sophisticated information about the Earth's environment; (2)…

  14. SARA - SURE/ASSIST RELIABILITY ANALYSIS WORKSTATION (VAX VMS VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, R. W.

    1994-01-01

    SARA, the SURE/ASSIST Reliability Analysis Workstation, is a bundle of programs used to solve reliability problems. The mathematical approach chosen to solve a reliability problem may vary with the size and nature of the problem. The Systems Validation Methods group at NASA Langley Research Center has created a set of four software packages that form the basis for a reliability analysis workstation, including three for use in analyzing reconfigurable, fault-tolerant systems and one for analyzing non-reconfigurable systems. The SARA bundle includes the three for reconfigurable, fault-tolerant systems: SURE reliability analysis program (COSMIC program LAR-13789, LAR-14921); the ASSIST specification interface program (LAR-14193, LAR-14923), and PAWS/STEM reliability analysis programs (LAR-14165, LAR-14920). As indicated by the program numbers in parentheses, each of these three packages is also available separately in two machine versions. The fourth package, which is only available separately, is FTC, the Fault Tree Compiler (LAR-14586, LAR-14922). FTC is used to calculate the top-event probability for a fault tree which describes a non-reconfigurable system. PAWS/STEM and SURE are analysis programs which utilize different solution methods, but have a common input language, the SURE language. ASSIST is a preprocessor that generates SURE language from a more abstract definition. ASSIST, SURE, and PAWS/STEM are described briefly in the following paragraphs. For additional details about the individual packages, including pricing, please refer to their respective abstracts. ASSIST, the Abstract Semi-Markov Specification Interface to the SURE Tool program, allows a reliability engineer to describe the failure behavior of a fault-tolerant computer system in an abstract, high-level language. The ASSIST program then automatically generates a corresponding semi-Markov model. A one-page ASSIST-language description may result in a semi-Markov model with thousands of states and

  15. SARA - SURE/ASSIST RELIABILITY ANALYSIS WORKSTATION (UNIX VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, R. W.

    1994-01-01

    SARA, the SURE/ASSIST Reliability Analysis Workstation, is a bundle of programs used to solve reliability problems. The mathematical approach chosen to solve a reliability problem may vary with the size and nature of the problem. The Systems Validation Methods group at NASA Langley Research Center has created a set of four software packages that form the basis for a reliability analysis workstation, including three for use in analyzing reconfigurable, fault-tolerant systems and one for analyzing non-reconfigurable systems. The SARA bundle includes the three for reconfigurable, fault-tolerant systems: SURE reliability analysis program (COSMIC program LAR-13789, LAR-14921); the ASSIST specification interface program (LAR-14193, LAR-14923), and PAWS/STEM reliability analysis programs (LAR-14165, LAR-14920). As indicated by the program numbers in parentheses, each of these three packages is also available separately in two machine versions. The fourth package, which is only available separately, is FTC, the Fault Tree Compiler (LAR-14586, LAR-14922). FTC is used to calculate the top-event probability for a fault tree which describes a non-reconfigurable system. PAWS/STEM and SURE are analysis programs which utilize different solution methods, but have a common input language, the SURE language. ASSIST is a preprocessor that generates SURE language from a more abstract definition. ASSIST, SURE, and PAWS/STEM are described briefly in the following paragraphs. For additional details about the individual packages, including pricing, please refer to their respective abstracts. ASSIST, the Abstract Semi-Markov Specification Interface to the SURE Tool program, allows a reliability engineer to describe the failure behavior of a fault-tolerant computer system in an abstract, high-level language. The ASSIST program then automatically generates a corresponding semi-Markov model. A one-page ASSIST-language description may result in a semi-Markov model with thousands of states and

  16. PC-based workstation for global PACS remote consultation and diagnosis in rural clinics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Ralph; Robles, Saul; Kim, Jinman

    1995-05-01

    Most rural clinics across the country have limited facilities to provide state-of-the-art medical services. The availability of enabling technologies, such as telecommunication networks, multimedia workstations, and telemedicine systems which provide medical services to patients without requiring them to travel from their cities represents a great step in patient care. In previous work, we have developed a distributed software for remote consultation and diagnosis (RCD) in a Global PACS environment over the Internet. The RCD system has been designed and tested on DEC and SUN workstations. In this paper, we present a Unix-PC based platform to implement the RCD over a standard telephone line and Serial Line Internet Protocol (SLIP). The Unix-PC platform offers an inexpensive option for telemedicine workstations in rural clinics, where no Internet is available. If an Internet connection is available at the rural clinic, full RCD multimedia services are possible. The Unix-PC platform has been developed by using Linux, a Unix-like operating system available from several public sites over the Internet. We call the system PC-PACS. The PC-PACS workstation has been tested from different rural sites by connecting the Unix-PC system to the Internet through SLIP. Once the system is connected, RCD sessions have been performed between the Unix- PC platform and SUN workstations. The tests have included diagnosis on radiology and pathology images. A separate telephone line for voice communications during the RCD session is required. This paper describes performance tests for the PC-based workstation and the RCD system over SLIP and Ethernet interfaces. Results show acceptable performance of the workstation and the RCD software.

  17. Methodology for design of adaptive interfaces for diagnostic workstations with integrated images and reports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harreld, Michael R.; Valentino, Daniel J.; Liu, Brent J.; El-Saden, Suzie; Duckwiler, Gary R.

    1998-06-01

    Diagnostic workstations have generally lacked acceptance due to awkward interfaces, poor usability and lack of clinical data integration. We developed a new methodology for the design and implementation of diagnostic workstations and applied the methodology in diagnostic neuroradiology. The methodology facilitated the objective design and evaluation of optimal diagnostic features, including the integration of images and reports, and the implementation of intelligent and adaptive graphical user interfaces. As a test of this new methodology, we developed and evaluated a neuroradiological diagnostic workstation. The general goals of diagnostic neuroradiologists were modeled and directly used in the design of the UCLA Digital ViewBox, an object-oriented toolkit for medical imaging workstations. For case-specific goals, an object-oriented protocol toolkit was developed for rapid development and integration of new protocols, modes, and tools. Each protocol defines a way to arrange and process data in order to accomplish diagnostic goals that are specific to anatomy (e.g., a spine protocol), or to a suspected pathology (e.g., a tumor protocol). Each protocol was divided into modes that represent diagnostic reading tasks. Each mode was further broken down into functions supporting that task. Via a data mediator engine, the workstation communicated with clinical data repositories, including the UCLA HIS, Clinical RIS/PACS and individual DICOM compatible scanners. The data mediator served to transparently integrate, retrieve, and cache image and report data. Task-oriented Reading protocols automatically present the appropriate diagnostic information and diagnostic tools to the radiologist. We describe a protocol toolkit that enables the rapid design and implementation of customized reading protocols. We also present an intelligent layer that enables the automatic presentation of the appropriate information. This new methodology for diagnostic workstation design led to an

  18. Aeronautical engineering: A continuing bibliography with indexes (supplement 294)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This issue of Aeronautical Engineering - A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes lists 590 reports, journal articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspect of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. The bibliographic series is compiled through the cooperative efforts of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Seven indexes are included: subject, personal author, corporate source, foreign technology, contract number, report number, and accession number.

  19. Physical database port to workstations project plan. Version 2.6

    SciTech Connect

    Rhoades, C.E. Jr.

    1993-03-01

    The project goal is to port those physical databases used on the Cray by our important production codes to high-performance Unix workstations while maintaining the current computational capabilities and accuracies, and achieving reasonably efficient execution on the workstations. The port must strike a judicious balance between (a) not changing the current N/LTSS databases, accessing libraries, generating codes and using codes, and (b) adversely impacting the maintenance or performance of the various codes that create or use the databases on the Cray. (Because of its forthcoming delivery, the Sun Sparcstation 2, using SunOS 4.0.3 or later, is the initial hardware platform selected for the first workstation port.) The purpose in undertaking this project is to enable the production codes, Tart, Lasnex, Meg, Xraser, Sandyl (and its planned successor), Nike3d and Dyna3d to get up and running on the Unix platforms as soon as possible. Since most Cray file formats are not available on the workstations, the workstation databases and their libraries may have to use a variety of techniques to provide the same capabilities. The project`s primary approach will be to support either an ascii portable format (where this is readily feasible) or a bit-for-bit Cray identical absolute binary format (where ascii is not available or suitable). The physical databases are identified.

  20. Optimization of image transfer from the central archive to workstations in a PACS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Lugin, Jay J.; Boehme, Johannes M.; Choplin, Robert H.; Maynard, C. D.; Wolfman, Neil T.

    1990-08-01

    Despite the much-discussed advantages of the all-digital radiology department, the speed of electronic display continues to be a major obstacle to its acceptance; physicians generally agree that sophisticated workstation functionality cannot compensate for an interpretation environment that delays diagnosis. Two design schemes have been devised and discussed at length at the Bowman Gray School of Medicine (BGSM) that will improve the efficiency of image transmission significantly. The first of these is image routing and pre-loading. The central archive can use information associated with each exam and a set of rules to predict which workstations will be used to read the exam. The images can thus be sent automatically before the physician arrives at the workstation to interpret a series of exams. The second scheme, which is intimately associated with the first, allows a workstation to manage its own local disk to remove copies of exams so that new ones may be pre-loaded. This disk management algorithm assigns priorities to the exams based on their status in the acquisition/interpretation cycle and performs automatic deletion as the workstation's disk reaches its capacity. The effect is a virtually limitless disk that eliminates the time-consuming task of manual deletion and retrieval of images.

  1. Development and evaluation of a clinical workstation for pulmonary disease diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouhamed, Souad; Peyrin, Francoise; Odet, Christophe; Goutte, Robert

    1994-05-01

    Due to the increasing number of medical imaging modalities, the integration capacity of a PACS is necessary. Indeed, the PACS will lead the way in the introduction of advanced technology in the hospital. Among the elements that compose a PACS the elaboration of a software implemented in the workstation is the most essential part because this software realizes the interface between the user and the system. The introduction of a workstation in the hospital imposes a fundamental change in the work of radiologists and clinicians. This paper deals with the design and the development of a clinical workstation for pulmonary disease diagnostic. The usual working method of the clinician is taken as a reference for the design of the workstation. A software with image manipulating and processing facilities running in an X Window environment is described. The evaluation of the workstation is then undertaken in the service of pneumology of the pneumo-cardiologic hospital in Lyon, France. The conviviality and flexibility of the software is optimized in the function of the suggestions and criticism of the users.

  2. Virtual slide telepathology workstation of the future: lessons learned from teleradiology☆

    PubMed Central

    Krupinski, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The clinical reading environment for the 21st century pathologist looks very different than it did even a few short years ago. Glass slides are quickly being replaced by digital “virtual slides,” and the traditional light microscope is being replaced by the computer display. There are numerous questions that arise however when deciding exactly what this new digital display viewing environment will be like. Choosing a workstation for daily use in the interpretation of digital pathology images can be a very daunting task. Radiology went digital nearly 20 years ago and faced many of the same challenges so there are lessons to be learned from these experiences. One major lesson is that there is no “one size fits all” workstation so users must consider a variety of factors when choosing a workstation. In this article, we summarize some of the potentially critical elements in a pathology workstation and the characteristics one should be aware of and look for in the selection of one. Issues pertaining to both hardware and software aspects of medical workstations will be reviewed particularly as they may impact the interpretation process. PMID:19552939

  3. An ergonomics evaluation of cashier work activities at checker-unload workstations.

    PubMed

    Grant, K A; Habes, D J; Baron, S L

    1994-10-01

    The ergonomic suitability of the 'over-the-counter' (OTC) or 'checker unload' workstation for grocery-scanning operations has been questioned by a number of ergonomists, safety and health professionals, and retail food industry executives in the USA. There is concern that requiring cashiers to remove grocery items directly from the customer's cart for scanning exacerbates the risk of musculoskeletal disorders associated with this job. For this reason, a study was conducted to determine whether supermarket cashiers are exposed to increased biomechanical stress due to the use of checker-unload workstations for standing work. The work activities of 12 grocery cashiers from three supermarkets were recorded on videotape. Postures and movements associated with the scanning task were visually evaluated and compared with those of 10 grocery cashiers using a front-facing, customer-unload workstation examined in a previous study. The results indicate that use of the checker-unload workstation places additional stresses on the cashier beyond those imposed by customer-unload checkstands. Specifically, the task of removing groceries directly from the cart for scanning increases the frequency of long reaches, awkward shoulder postures, and lifts. These stresses can be mitigated by eliminating checker-unload operations and providing checkstands with conveyor belts for delivering groceries to the cashier. Implementing additional workstation modifications and encouraging cashiers to adopt alternative work practices also may reduce the frequencies of awkward postures and stressful motions associated with this checkstand design. PMID:15676983

  4. A Hybrid Satellite-Terrestrial Approach to Aeronautical Communication Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Chomos, Gerald J.; Griner, James H.; Mainger, Steven W.; Martzaklis, Konstantinos S.; Kachmar, Brian A.

    2000-01-01

    Rapid growth in air travel has been projected to continue for the foreseeable future. To maintain a safe and efficient national and global aviation system, significant advances in communications systems supporting aviation are required. Satellites will increasingly play a critical role in the aeronautical communications network. At the same time, current ground-based communications links, primarily very high frequency (VHF), will continue to be employed due to cost advantages and legacy issues. Hence a hybrid satellite-terrestrial network, or group of networks, will emerge. The increased complexity of future aeronautical communications networks dictates that system-level modeling be employed to obtain an optimal system fulfilling a majority of user needs. The NASA Glenn Research Center is investigating the current and potential future state of aeronautical communications, and is developing a simulation and modeling program to research future communications architectures for national and global aeronautical needs. This paper describes the primary requirements, the current infrastructure, and emerging trends of aeronautical communications, including a growing role for satellite communications. The need for a hybrid communications system architecture approach including both satellite and ground-based communications links is explained. Future aeronautical communication network topologies and key issues in simulation and modeling of future aeronautical communications systems are described.

  5. A randomized controlled trial of a computer-based physician workstation in an outpatient setting: implementation barriers to outcome evaluation.

    PubMed Central

    Rotman, B L; Sullivan, A N; McDonald, T W; Brown, B W; DeSmedt, P; Goodnature, D; Higgins, M C; Suermondt, H J; Young, C; Owens, D K

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A research prototype Physician Workstation (PWS) incorporating a graphical user interface and a drug ordering module was compared with the existing hospital information system in an academic Veterans Administration General Medical Clinic. Physicians in the intervention group received recommendations for drug substitutions to reduce costs and were alerted to potential drug interactions. The objective was to evaluate the effect of the PWS on user satisfaction, on health-related outcomes, and on costs. DESIGN: A one-year, two-period, randomized controlled trial with 37 subjects. MEASUREMENTS: Differences in the reliance on noncomputer sources of information, in user satisfaction, in the cost of prescribed medications, and in the rate of clinically relevant drug interactions were assessed. RESULTS: The study subjects logged onto the workstation an average of 6.53 times per provider and used it to generate 2.8% of prescriptions during the intervention period. On a five-point scale (5 = very satisfied, 1 = very dissatisfied), user satisfaction declined in the PWS group (3.44 to 2.98 p = 0.008), and increased in the control group (3.23 to 3.72, p < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: The intervention physicians did not use the PWS frequently enough to influence information-seeking behavior, health outcomes, or cost. The study design did not determine whether the poor usage resulted from satisfaction with the control system, problems using the PWS intervention, or the functions provided by the PWS intervention. Evaluative studies should include provisions to improve the chance of successful implementation as well as to yield maximum information if a negative study occurs. PMID:8880681

  6. An Overview of the NASA Aeronautics Test Program Strategic Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    U.S. leadership in aeronautics depends on ready access to technologically advanced, efficient, and affordable aeronautics test capabilities. These systems include major wind tunnels and propulsion test facilities and flight test capabilities. The federal government owns the majority of the major aeronautics test capabilities in the United States, primarily through the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Department of Defense (DoD), however an overarching strategy for management of these national assets was needed. Therefore, in Fiscal Year (FY) 2006 NASA established the Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) as a two-pronged strategic initiative to: (1) retain and invest in NASA aeronautics test capabilities considered strategically important to the agency and the nation, and (2) establish a strong, high level partnership with the DoD Test Resources Management Center (TRMC), stewards of the DoD test and evaluation infrastructure. Since then, approximately seventy percent of the ATP budget has been directed to underpin fixed and variable costs of facility operations within its portfolio and the balance towards strategic investments in its test facilities, including maintenance and capability upgrades. Also, a strong guiding coalition was established through the National Partnership for Aeronautics Testing (NPAT), with governance by the senior leadership of NASA s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) and the DoD's TRMC. As part of its strategic planning, ATP has performed or participated in many studies and analyses, including assessments of major NASA and DoD aeronautics test capabilities, test facility condition evaluations and market research. The ATP strategy has also benefitted from unpublished RAND research and analysis by Ant n et al. (2009). Together, these various studies, reports and assessments serve as a foundation for a new, five year strategic plan that will guide ATP through FY 2014. Our vision for the future is a balanced

  7. Astronautics and Aeronautics, 1991-1995: A Chronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gawdiak, Ihor Y. (Compiler); Shetland, Charles (Compiler)

    2000-01-01

    This chronology of events in aeronautics, aviation, space science, and space exploration was prepared by the Federal Research Division of the Library of Congress and RSIS for the History Division of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). It covers the years 1991-1995 and continues the series of annual chronologies published by NASA. The present volume uses the format of the previous edition of this series, Astronautics and Aeronautics, 1986-1990: A Chronology. It also integrates, in the appendices, information presented in previous publication

  8. NASA's Role in Aeronautics: A Workshop. Volume 7: Background papers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The nature and implications of the current state of U.S. aviation in a world setting are examined as well as their significance for NASA's role in the nation's aeronautical future. The outlook for the 1980's is examined from the point of view of legislation, economics and finance; petroleum; manpower, metallic materials, general aviation; military aviation; transport aircraft developments; and helicopters. Possible NASA assistance to DOD and the FAA is examined and the evolution of NACA and NASA in aeronautics and of NASA's aeronautics capabilities are described.

  9. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography With Indexes. Supplement 404

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-1999-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  10. Aeronautics and space report of the president, 1974 activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The U.S. Government activities for 1974 in aeronautics and space are presented. Significant contributions toward the fulfillment of the nation's goals in space and aeronautics are covered, including application of space systems and technology to beneficial uses on earth, exploration of space and increase of scientific knowledge, development of improved space systems and technology, international cooperation, and advancement of civil and military aeronautics. Also in 1974, space activities in the private sector expanded to provide additional services to the public. The accomplishments are summarized.

  11. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 386

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-1998-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract.

  12. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography With Indexes. Supplement 418

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-2000-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  13. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography With Indexes. Supplement 406

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-1999-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  14. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 389

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-1998-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract.

  15. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 391

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-1999-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract.

  16. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 396

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-1999-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  17. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 413

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-2000-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  18. Astronautics and Aeronautics, 1986-1990: A Chronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gawdiak, Ihor Y.; Miro, Ramon J.; Stueland, Sam

    1997-01-01

    This chronology of events in aeronautics, aviation, space science, and space exploration was prepared by the Federal Research Division of the LibrarY of Congress for the History Division of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). It covers the years 1996-1990 and continues the series of annual chronologies published by NASA. The present volume returns to the format used in the Astronautics and Aeronautics, 1979-1984: A Chronology volume. It also integrates in a single table the information presented in two or three previous publications.

  19. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography With Indexes. Supplement 398

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. The NASA CASI price code table, addresses of organizations, and document availability information are included before the abstract section. Two indexes - subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  20. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 419

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-2000-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  1. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 420

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-2000-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  2. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 387

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-1998-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract.

  3. A study of workstation computational performance for real-time flight simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, Jeffrey M.; Cleveland, Jeff I., II

    1995-01-01

    With recent advances in microprocessor technology, some have suggested that modern workstations provide enough computational power to properly operate a real-time simulation. This paper presents the results of a computational benchmark, based on actual real-time flight simulation code used at Langley Research Center, which was executed on various workstation-class machines. The benchmark was executed on different machines from several companies including: CONVEX Computer Corporation, Cray Research, Digital Equipment Corporation, Hewlett-Packard, Intel, International Business Machines, Silicon Graphics, and Sun Microsystems. The machines are compared by their execution speed, computational accuracy, and porting effort. The results of this study show that the raw computational power needed for real-time simulation is now offered by workstations.

  4. Displaying Dicom-SR reports on non-SR aware radiology workstations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsson, G.; Wintell, M.; Lindsköld, L.

    2010-03-01

    In the Vastra Gotaland region (VGR) we use a Radiology Information Infrastructure containing all information produced within the Radiology departments (1,2,3). All information is stored as Dicom-objects (4). This means that request and report information is stored as Structured Reports (SR) -objects (5) together with the images if they exist. At Sahlgrenska University Hospital (SU) in Gothenburg, Sweden we have radiological workstations that can't display the contents in the SR-objects and have a working RIS-integration at the same time. We have developed some software in conjunction with the dcmtk-software package (6) developed by the Oldenburg University to make it possible to display information from SR-objects on the radiological workstations. The workstations have the ability to use Web-functionality so the solution is based on web-technology. The following happens when a request is made to display the SR-information: 1. Workstation calls a cgi-script that checks if the archive has any SR-reports for the given study. 2. A c-move request is sent to the archive to send the SR-objects (reports) to a Dicom-receiver on the web-server. 3. The dicom-receiver (storescp) creates html-files with help of a modified version of dsr2html. 4. The cgi-script read the names of the created html-files and returns the names in an javascript-array. 5. The report is displayed on the workstation. By developing some pieces of software and using open source software we have developed a well functional solution to display SR-reports stored in a central dicom-archive on workstations that can't show SR-information by themselves.

  5. Western aeronautical test range real-time graphics software package MAGIC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, Jacqueline C.; Moore, Archie L.

    1988-01-01

    The master graphics interactive console (MAGIC) software package used on the Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) of the NASA Ames Research Center is described. MAGIC is a resident real-time research tool available to flight researchers-scientists in the NASA mission control centers of the WATR at the Dryden Flight Research Facility at Edwards, California. The hardware configuration and capabilities of the real-time software package are also discussed.

  6. Oak Ridge Environmental Information System (ORIES) site workstation information packet for OREIS V1. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Voorhees, L.D.; McCord, R.A.; Durfee, R.C.; Land, M.L.; Olson, R.J.; Palmer, M.R.; Thomas, J.K.; Tinnel, E.P.; Zygmunt, B.C.

    1993-02-01

    The OREIS site workstation information packet was developed to accompany the OREIS site workstations, which are being delivered to the Environmental Restoration programs at the five DOE-OR sites. The packet is written specifically for the Site ER program staff at each of the five Sites who have been designated the OREIS contact by their ER program manager, and is not intended for general distribution. The packet provides an overview of the components of OREIS, points to more detailed information provided in the accompanying vendor and OREIS developed manuals, and includes information on training opportunities and user support.

  7. Integration of teleconsultation workstations in a PACS for intra-hospital application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianguo; Zhou, Zheng; Zhuang, Jun; Han, Ruolin; Zhang, Guozhen; Feng, Jie; Wang, Mingpeng; Wang, Chuanfu

    2001-08-01

    There are about 30/mon consultation meetings held in Huadong Hospital in Shanghai for senior and VIP patients. In order to move to digital imaging based radiology practice in the radiology department, and also provide more efficient clinical services, we built a PACS connecting to the DICOM conformance modalities. The specially designed teleconsultation workstations were installed in the radiology department and clinical departments for better consultation services. The images generated from the modalities were sent from PACS server to these workstations following normal PACS image data flow.

  8. Present status of PACS at Kyoto University Hospital: image workstation for clinical education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minato, Kotaro; Komori, Masaru; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Okajima, Kaoru; Kimura, Ishu; Takahashi, Takashi; Konishi, Junji; Abe, Mituyuki; Gotoh, Yoshihiro; Sato, Kazuhiro

    1990-08-01

    The PAC system: KIDS (Kyoto University Hospital Image Database and Communication System) has been expanded to include several major digital imaging modalities such as X-ray CT, MRI, DSA and CR. The fiber optic high-speed local area network and the workstation with quick image handling are newly designed. The system (new KIDS) is intended to achieve a film-less environment in the department of radiology and to evaluate the feasibility of a hospital-wide PAC system. The present status of the system at the end of 1989 including a image workstation installed in a lecture hall for clinical education is described.

  9. NASA Aeronautics and Space Database for bibliometric analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, R.; Rudman, R.

    2004-01-01

    The authors use the NASA Aeronautics and Space Database to perform bibliometric analysis of citations. This paper explains their research methodology and gives some sample results showing collaboration trends between NASA Centers and other institutions.

  10. The Aeronautical Laboratory of the Stockholm Technical Institute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malmer, Ivar

    1935-01-01

    This report presents a detailed analysis and history of the construction and operation of the aeronautical laboratory of the Stockholm Technical Institute. Engines and balances are discussed and experimental results are also given.

  11. 77 FR 13683 - Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-07

    ... Charting Group, contact Valerie S. Watson, FAA, National Aeronautical Navigation Products (AeroNav Products... permits. Issued in Washington, DC, on February 28, 2012. Valerie S. Watson, Co-Chair,...

  12. National Aeronautics and Space Administration technology application team program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Contracts are reported between the RTI TATeam and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and other governmental, educational, and industrial organizations participating in NASA's Technology Utilization Program.

  13. Bureau of Aeronautics, June 5, 1945, Photograph 519. ASERIAL OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Bureau of Aeronautics, June 5, 1945, Photograph 51-9. ASERIAL OF ROOSEVELT BASE, DIRECT OVERHEAD, SHOWING PIERS AND MOLE UNDER CONSTRUCTION - Roosevelt Base, Bounded by Ocean Boulevard, Pennsylvania Avenue, Richardson Avenue, & Idaho Street, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  14. Bureau of Aeronautics, October 16, 1943, Photograph #4875. AERIAL OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Bureau of Aeronautics, October 16, 1943, Photograph #4875. AERIAL OF ROOSEVELT BASE LOOKING EAST - Roosevelt Base, Bounded by Ocean Boulevard, Pennsylvania Avenue, Richardson Avenue, & Idaho Street, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  15. Aeronautical Engineering: A continuing bibliography with indexes (supplement 175)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    This bibliography lists 467 reports, articles and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in May 1984. Topics cover varied aspects of aeronautical engineering, geoscience, physics, astronomy, computer science, and support facilities.

  16. Astronautics and Aeronautics, 1979-1984: A chronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janson, Bette R.; Ritchie, Eleanor H.

    1989-01-01

    This volume of the Astronautics and Aeronautics series covers 1979 through 1984. The series provides a chronological presentation of all significant events and developments in space exploration and the administration of the space program during the period covered.

  17. NASA's Role in Aeronautics: A Workshop. Volume 1: Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The state of the U.S. aeronautic industry and progressive changes in national priorities as reflected in federal unified budget outlays are reviewed as well as the contribution of NACA and the character and substance of U.S. aeronautical research under NASA. Eight possible roles for the future defined by NASA are examined and the extent to which the agency should carry out these activities is considered. The roles include: (1) national facilities expertise; (2) flight sciences research; (3) generic technology evolution; (4) vehicle class evolution; (5) technology demonstration; (6) prototype development; (7) technology validation; and (8) operations feasibility; How NASA's roles varies in the areas of military aviation, general aviation, transport aircraft aeronautics, rotorcraft aeronautics, engineering education, information dissemination, and cooperation with other organizations and agencies is discussed with regard to research in aerodynamics; structures and materials; propulsion; electronics and avionics; vehicle operations; and human engineering.

  18. Aeronautical Engineering, a special bibliography with indexes, supplement 15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This special bibliography lists 363 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in January 1972. Emphasis is placed on engineering and theoretical aspects for design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment and systems. Also included are entries on research and development in aeronautics and aerodynamics and research and ground support for aeronautical vehicles.

  19. First Semiannual Report of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glennan, T. Keith

    1959-01-01

    The First Semiannual Report of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is submitted to Congress pursuant to section 206 (a) of the National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 (Public Law 85-568) to provide for research into problems of flight within and outside the Earth's atmosphere, which states: The Administration shall submit to the President for transmittal to Congress, semiannually and at such other times as it deems desirable, a report on its activities and accomplishments.

  20. Aeronautical engineering: A continuing bibliography with indexes (supplement 282)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This bibliography lists 623 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in Aug. 1992. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles.

  1. A Vision in Aeronautics: The K-12 Wind Tunnel Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A Vision in Aeronautics, a project within the NASA Lewis Research Center's Information Infrastructure Technologies and Applications (IITA) K-12 Program, employs small-scale, subsonic wind tunnels to inspire students to explore the world of aeronautics and computers. Recently, two educational K-12 wind tunnels were built in the Cleveland area. During the 1995-1996 school year, preliminary testing occurred in both tunnels.

  2. Aeronautical engineering: A continuing bibliography with indexes (supplement 119)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    This bibliography lists 341 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in January 1980. Abstracts on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems are presented. Research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles are also presented.

  3. Aeronautical Engineering: A special bibliography with indexes, supplement 13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This special bibliography lists 283 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in December, 1971. Emphasis is placed on engineering and theoretical aspects for design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines), and associated components, equipment and systems. Also included are entries on research and development in aeronautics and aerodynamics and research and ground support for aeronautical vehicles.

  4. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 397

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This report lists reports, articles and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract.

  5. NASA Ames and Future of Space Exploration, Science, and Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Pushing the frontiers of aeronautics and space exploration presents multiple challenges. NASA Ames Research Center is at the forefront of tackling these issues, conducting cutting edge research in the fields of air traffic management, entry systems, advanced information technology, intelligent human and robotic systems, astrobiology, aeronautics, space, earth and life sciences and small satellites. Knowledge gained from this research helps ensure the success of NASA's missions, leading us closer to a world that was only imagined as science fiction just decades ago.

  6. 78 FR 36013 - Public Notice for Waiver of Aeronautical Land-Use Assurance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-14

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Public Notice for Waiver of Aeronautical Land-Use Assurance AGENCY....03-acre portion of Parcel AA of airport land from aeronautical use to non- aeronautical use (for... surfaces and compatible land use. The change from aeronautical to non-aeronautical use would allow...

  7. General specifications for the development of a USL/DBMS NASA/PC R and D distributed workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (Editor); Chum, Frank Y.

    1984-01-01

    The general specifications for the development of a PC-based distributed workstation (PCDWS) for an information storage and retrieval systems environment are defined. This research proposes the development of a PCDWS prototype as part of the University of Southwestern Louisiana Data Base Management System (USL/DBMS) NASA/PC R and D project in the PC-based workstation environment.

  8. From an automated flight-test management system to a flight-test engineer's workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, E. L.; Brumbaugh, Randal W.; Hewett, M. D.; Tartt, D. M.

    1991-01-01

    The capabilities and evolution is described of a flight engineer's workstation (called TEST-PLAN) from an automated flight test management system. The concept and capabilities of the automated flight test management systems are explored and discussed to illustrate the value of advanced system prototyping and evolutionary software development.

  9. Design of a test director's workstation for ROC studies in a PACS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Dennis L.; Frank, Mark S.; Smith, Donald V.; Nyland, Burnette

    1994-05-01

    A Test Director's Workstation has been developed to collect radiological exams in a PACS for studies. While the efficacy of PACS systems is being accepted in the radiological community, there remain many questions about the performance of a PACS to be answered. Some of the answers can be supplied by studies comparing the performance of radiologists using the PACS under different circumstances. A workstation that is useful in collecting images from the PACS at Madigan Army Medical Center for studies has been developed. The workstation retrieves the exam from the PACS, writes the exam to a local optical disk for permanent retention, and collects information about the exam in a Test Director's master exam file. In the process of collecting the exam the patient identification is stripped from the images to preserve the patient's privacy. The identification of the patient is retained in the Test Director's master file in order to follow the progress of the patient and determine the `truth' of any diagnosis. The Test Director's Workstation completes its task by helping the test director organize selected exams for reader's disks and by setting up a reader's worklist of exams to be read.

  10. From Workstation to Teacher Support System: A Tool to Increase Productivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, J. Wey

    1989-01-01

    Describes a teacher support system which is a computer-based workstation that provides support for teachers and administrators by integrating teacher utility programs, instructional management software, administrative packages, and office automation tools. Hardware is described and software components are explained, including database managers,…

  11. CALL in a Communicative Context: A Study of Students' Conversation at a Multimedia Workstation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miceli, Tiziana; Kennedy, Claire

    2000-01-01

    Evaluated the effectiveness of Italia Oggi, a videodisc-based system for intermediate and advanced students of Italian at Griffith University in Australia. Attention was focused on students' behavior in pair work, including talk at the workstation and the collaborative strategies they employed. (Author/VWL)

  12. Using Real-Time Visual Feedback to Improve Posture at Computer Workstations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigurdsson, Sigurdur O.; Austin, John

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the effects of a multicomponent intervention that included discrimination training, real-time visual feedback, and self-monitoring on postural behavior at a computer workstation in a simulated office environment. Using a nonconcurrent multiple baseline design across 8 participants, the study assessed…

  13. Generalization of Posture Training to Computer Workstations in an Applied Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigurdsson, Sigurdur O.; Ring, Brandon M.; Needham, Mick; Boscoe, James H.; Silverman, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Improving employees' posture may decrease the risk of musculoskeletal disorders. The current paper is a systematic replication and extension of Sigurdsson and Austin (2008), who found that an intervention consisting of information, real-time feedback, and self-monitoring improved participant posture at mock workstations. In the current study,…

  14. From an automated flight-test management system to a flight-test engineer's workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, E. L.; Brumbaugh, R. W.; Hewett, M. D.; Tartt, D. M.

    1992-01-01

    Described here are the capabilities and evolution of a flight-test engineer's workstation (called TEST PLAN) from an automated flight-test management system. The concept and capabilities of the automated flight-test management system are explored and discussed to illustrate the value of advanced system prototyping and evolutionary software development.

  15. The CD-ROM Workstation: What It Is and What to Look For.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickerson, Gord

    1991-01-01

    Describes the hardware components of a CD-ROM workstation and offers guidelines for selection decisions. Components discussed include CD-ROM drives; keyboards; monitors, including color and monochrome; graphics; microcomputers, including memory requirements; disk storage, including hard disks and floppy disks; and printers. Turnkey systems are…

  16. Taming the CD-ROM Wilderness: Developing and Managing a Workstation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starr, Karen J.

    1988-01-01

    Discussion of development and management of a CD-ROM workstation for library reference services covers: (1) IBM compatibles; (2) computer storage capacity; (3) compact disk drives and printers; (4) file management; (5) protecting the integrity of a hard disk; and (6) backing up software. (three references) (MES)

  17. Mammography workstation design: effect on mammographer behaviour and the risk of musculoskeletal disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor-Phillips, S.; Wallis, M. G.; Gale, A. G.

    2008-03-01

    In the UK Breast Screening Programme there is a growing transition from film to digital mammography, and consequently a change in mammography workstation ergonomics. This paper investigates the effect of the change for radiologists including their comfort, likelihood of developing musculoskeletal disorders (MSD's), and work practices. Three workstations types were investigated: one with all film mammograms; one with digital mammograms alongside film mammograms from the previous screening round, and one with digital mammograms alongside digitised film mammograms from the previous screening round. Mammographers were video-taped whilst conducting work sessions at each of the workstations. Event based Rapid Upper Limb Assessment (RULA) postural analysis showed no overall increase in MSD risk level in the switch from the film to digital workstation. Average number of visual glances at the prior mammograms per case measured by analysis of recorded video footage showed an increase if the prior mammograms were digitised, rather than displayed on a multi-viewer (p<.05). This finding has potential implications for mammographer performance in the transition to digital mammography in the UK.

  18. Neuroradiology workstation reading in an inter-hospital environment: a nineteen month study.

    PubMed

    Huang, H K; Lou, S L; Dillon, W P

    1997-01-01

    Two workstations (WS) each with two, 2500 line display monitors were installed in the in-patient and the out-patient neuroradiology reading areas for inter-hospital workstation readings. These WSs are part of the display component of a hospital-integrated picture archiving and communication system (PACS). Direct digital neuro images from 10 CT and MR scanners located at various buildings from two medical centers are first transmitted to the PACS database and then distributed to these two WSs automatically. This paper attempts to answer two questions. First, do the WSs facilitate neuroradiology operation? Second, does it cost less for preparing WS reading than that for the traditional film reading? Two parameters, the "time required before images become available for reading after the examination" and a "workstation utilization index" were derived as a means for answering these two questions. Nineteen months of clinical data were collected and analyzed. The results demonstrate that the workstation utilization index goes up from 40% in September 1994 when the WS was first introduced to over 80% in March 1996. This upward trend substantiates the hypothesis that these WSs do facilitate the neuroradiology operation. The derived results also exhibit that it costs much less to prepare images for WS reading than for film reading. Other indirect results derived from this study including the WS utilization hours, WS functions used, and the time duration of each WS session are also presented. PMID:9475437

  19. Sequence comparison on a cluster of workstations using the PVM system

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, X.; Mural, R.J.; Uberbacher, E.C.

    1995-02-01

    We have implemented a distributed sequence comparison algorithm on a cluster of workstations using the PVM paradigm. This implementation has achieved similar performance to the intel iPSC/860 Hypercube, a massively parallel computer. The distributed sequence comparison algorithm serves as a search tool for two Internet servers GRAIL and GENQUEST. This paper describes the implementation and the performance of the algorithm.

  20. Development and Use of a GIS Workstation at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Dickey, Mark W

    2007-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is the Department of Energy s (DOE) largest multipurpose science and energy laboratory. As an interdisciplinary research organization, access to information plays a critical part in the success of the many research efforts in progress at the Laboratory. The Research Library, in a supportive role, enables staff to fulfill the Laboratory s mission by making available a myriad of information resources including paper and electronic maps. The Research Library Geographic Information System (GIS) workstation was developed to better serve library customers by providing convenient access to a variety of mapping resources. The GIS workstation functions as a supplement to the paper map collection by providing customers with maps in an electronic format that can easily be inserted into memos, reports, and journal articles. Customer interest, together with the growing availability of low-cost and user-friendly mapping software, led to the development of the GIS workstation, which hosts an array of commercial mapping software that enables customers to produce ready-made topographic maps, current and historical maps, and road maps. Customers may also create customized maps using their own data or data supplied by the software vendor. This article focuses on the development, implementation, and use of the library s GIS workstation by providing a brief description of hardware components, mapping resources, and how these resources are used by Laboratory staff.

  1. Preliminary evaluation of a high-resolution workstation for diagnostic interpretation of portable radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honeyman-Buck, Janice C.; Huda, Walter; Palmer, Carole K.; Frost, Meryll M.; Moser, Robert; Staab, Edward V.

    1995-04-01

    A cost effectiveness study on the feasibility of using computed radiography (CR) instead of screen-film methods for portable radiographs indicates that we could only justify CR if film were eliminated. Before purchasing CR equipment, we needed to evaluate the use of softcopy to replace film for routine clinical use. The evaluation had to cover image quality, human factors, and efficiency measures. Screen-film radiographs were digitized and used to simulate CR in two studies. The first study evaluated the quality of digitized images and the workstation user interface. Twenty-one radiographs were selected at random from scopes in the radiology department, were digitized, and transferred to a megascan workstation. Five radiologists were asked to assess the quality of the images and the ease of operation of the workstation while an observer recorded their comments and scores. The second study evaluated the feasibility of using the workstation in a clinical environment. Four radiologists read adult and pediatric portable images in film and softcopy format. Reports were evaluated for differences and timing statistics were kept. The results of the first study indicate that image quality may be acceptable for diagnostic purposes and suggests some changes in the user interface. Newborn infant images were the least acceptable in softcopy, largely due to magnification artifacts introduced when viewing very small images. The evaluation was based on a digitizer as a simulator for a CR unit and the digitizer did not exhibit the same resolution characteristics as CR. Films that were unacceptable from the digitizer are expected to be acceptable with CR. The results of the second study indicated that the high resolution diagnostic workstation could be used in a clinical setting, and that the diagnostic readings were not significantly different between film and softcopy displays. The results also indicated that, depending on the radiologist and the type of images, more time was

  2. The Research and Training Activities for the Joint Institute for Aeronautics and Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantwell, Brian

    1996-01-01

    This proposal requests continued support for the program of activities to be undertaken by the Ames-Stanford Joint Institute for Aeronautics and Acoustics during the one-year period October 1, 1996 to September 30, 1997. The emphasis in this program is on training and research in experimental and computational methods with application to aerodynamics, acoustics and the important interactions between them. The program comprises activities in active flow control, Large Eddy Simulation of jet noise, flap aerodynamics and acoustics, high lift modeling studies and luminescent paint applications. During the proposed period there will be a continued emphasis on the interaction between NASA Ames, Stanford University and Industry, particularly in connection with the noise and high lift activities. The program will be conducted within the general framework of the Memorandum of Understanding (1976) establishing the Institute, as updated in 1993. As outlined in the agreement, the purposes of the institute include the following: To conduct basic and applied research. To promote joint endeavors between Center scientists and those in the academic community To provide training to graduate students in specialized areas of aeronautics and acoustics through participation in the research programs of the Institute. To provide opportunities for Post-Doctoral Fellows to collaborate in research programs of the Institute. To disseminate information about important aeronautical topics and to enable scientists and engineers of the Center to stay abreast of new advances through symposia, seminars and publications.

  3. The Research and Training Activities for the Joint Institute for Aeronautics and Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantwell, Brian

    1997-01-01

    This proposal requests continued support for the program of activities to be undertaken by the Ames-Stanford Joint Institute for Aeronautics and Acoustics during the one-year period October 1, 1997 to September 30, 1998. The emphasis in this program is on training and research in experimental and computational methods with application to aerodynamics, acoustics and the important interactions between them. The program comprises activities in active flow control, Large Eddy Simulation of jet noise, flap aerodynamics and acoustics, high lift modeling studies and luminescent paint applications. During the proposed period there will be a continued emphasis on the interaction between NASA Ames, Stanford University and Industry, particularly in connection with the noise and high lift activities. The program will be conducted within the general framework of the Memorandum of Understanding (1976) establishing the Institute, as updated in 1993. As outlined in the agreement, the purposes of the Institute include the following: (1) To conduct basic and applied research; (2) to promote joint endeavors between Center scientists and those in the academic community; (3) to provide training to graduate students in specialized areas of aeronautics and acoustics through participation in the research programs of the Institute; (4) to provide opportunities for Post-Doctoral Fellows to collaborate in research programs of the Institute; and (5) to disseminate information about important aeronautical topics and to enable scientists and engineers of the Center to stay abreast of new advances through symposia, seminars and publications.

  4. The Research and Training Activities for the Joint Institute for Aeronautics and Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantwell, Brian

    1995-01-01

    This proposal requests continued support for the program of activities to be undertaken by the Ames-Stanford Joint Institute for Aeronautics and Acoustics during the period 1 Oct. 1995 - 30 Sept. 1996. The emphasis in this program is on training and research in experimental and computational methods with application to aerodynamics, acoustics and the important interactions between them. The program comprises activities in active flow control, Large Eddy Simulation of jet noise, flap aerodynamics and acoustics and high lift modeling studies. During the proposed period there will be a continued emphasis on the interaction between NASA Ames, Stanford University and Industry, particularly in connection with the high lift activities.

  5. 78 FR 13383 - Public Availability of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration FY 2012 Service Contract...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-27

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION Public Availability of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration FY 2012 Service Contract Inventory (SCI) AGENCY: Office of Procurement, National Aeronautics and Space... National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is publishing this notice to advise the public of...

  6. 78 FR 22024 - Twenty First Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 216, Aeronautical Systems Security (Joint Meeting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-12

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Twenty First Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 216, Aeronautical Systems... of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Meeting Notice of RTCA Special Committee 216, Aeronautical Systems... of the twenty first meeting of RTCA Special Committee 216, Aeronautical Systems Security...

  7. 78 FR 5242 - 32nd Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 206, Aeronautical Information and Meteorological Data Link...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-24

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 32nd Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 206, Aeronautical Information and... Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Meeting Notice of RTCA Special Committee 206, Aeronautical Information and...-second meeting of the RTCA Special Committee 206, Aeronautical Information and Meteorological Data...

  8. 78 FR 8684 - Fifteenth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 217-Aeronautical Databases Joint with EUROCAE WG-44...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-06

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Fifteenth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 217--Aeronautical Databases Joint with EUROCAE WG-44--Aeronautical Databases AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Notice of RTCA Special Committee 217--Aeronautical...

  9. 78 FR 25134 - Sixteenth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 217-Aeronautical Databases Joint With EUROCAE WG-44...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-29

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Sixteenth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 217--Aeronautical Databases Joint With EUROCAE WG-44--Aeronautical Databases AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Notice of RTCA Special Committee 217--Aeronautical...

  10. 78 FR 51809 - Seventeenth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 217-Aeronautical Databases Joint With EUROCAE WG-44...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-21

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Seventeenth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 217--Aeronautical Databases Joint With EUROCAE WG-44--Aeronautical Databases AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Notice of RTCA Special Committee 217--Aeronautical...

  11. 78 FR 66418 - Eighteenth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 217-Aeronautical Databases Joint With EUROCAE WG-44...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-05

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Eighteenth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 217--Aeronautical Databases Joint With EUROCAE WG-44--Aeronautical Databases AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Notice of RTCA Special Committee 217--Aeronautical...

  12. 78 FR 7816 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Unmanned Aircraft Systems Subcommittee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Unmanned Aircraft Systems... Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a meeting of the Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS)...

  13. 78 FR 25100 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Unmanned Aircraft Systems Subcommittee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Unmanned Aircraft Systems... Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a meeting of the Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS)...

  14. 77 FR 59020 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Unmanned Aircraft Systems Subcommittee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Unmanned Aircraft Systems... Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a meeting of the Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS)...

  15. 76 FR 75565 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Subcommittee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Subcommittee Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of Meeting....

  16. Development of an EVA systems cost model. Volume 2: Shuttle orbiter crew and equipment translation concepts and EVA workstation concept development and integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    EVA crewman/equipment translational concepts are developed for a shuttle orbiter payload application. Also considered are EVA workstation systems to meet orbiter and payload requirements for integration of workstations into candidate orbiter payload worksites.

  17. Aeronautical engineering, a special bibliography, September 1971 (supplement 10)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    This supplement to Aeronautical Engineering-A Special Bibliography (NASA SP-7037) lists 413 reports, journal articles, and other documents originally announced in September 1971 in Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports (STAR) or in International Aerospace Abstracts (IAA). The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the bibliography consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied by an abstract. The listing of the entries is arranged in two major sections, IAA Entries and STAR Entries in that order. The citations and abstracts are reproduced exactly as they appeared originally in IAA or STAR, including the original accession numbers from the respective announcement journals.

  18. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 411

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-2000-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. The NASA CASI price code table, addresses of organizations, and document availability information are included before the abstract section. Two indexes- subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  19. NASA's Role in Aeronautics: A Workshop. Volume 2: Military aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    While the National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 makes DOD primarily responsible for military aeronautics, it stipulates a role for NASA in providing direct and indirect support for national defense. The existing role of NASA in support of military aeronautics is working well and is well coordinated. The role needs only to be kept effective and then improved by increasing its responsiveness to changing military requirements and by the selective application of additional people. Funding resources should also be made available to NASA for research. Specific roles that NASA could or should play were examined. It was determined that the most important areas for this support are in basic research, generic technology evolution, and facility support in the fields of aerodynamics, structures and materials, and propulsion.

  20. The Aeronautics Education, Research, and Industry Alliance (AERIAL) 2002 Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, Brent D.; Box, Richard C.; Fink, Mary; Gogos, George; Lehrer, Henry R.; Narayanan, Ram M.; Nickerson, Jocelyn S.; Tarry, Scott E.; Vlasek, Karisa D.; O'Neil, Patrick D.

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Nebraska Space Grant Consortium (NSGC) & EPSCoR programs at the University of Nebraska at Omaha are involved in a variety of innovative research activities. Such research is supported through the Aeronautics Education, Research, and Industry Alliance (AERIAL) and collaborative seed funds. AERIAL is a comprehensive, multi-faceted, five year NASA EPSCoR initiative that contributes substantially to the strategic research and technology priorities of NASA while intensifying Nebraska s rapidly growing aeronautics research and development endeavors. AERIAL includes three major collaborative research teams (CRTs) whose nexus is a common focus in aeronautics research. Each CRT - Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS), Airborne Remote Sensing for Agricultural Research and Commercialization Applications (ARS), and Numerical Simulation of the Combustion of Fuel Droplets: Finite Rate Kinetics and Flame Zone Grid Adaptation (CEFD) -has a distinct research agenda. This program provides the template for funding of new and innovative research that emphasizes aerospace technology.

  1. Application of the Iridium Satellite System to Aeronautical Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Meza, Mike; Gupta, Om

    2008-01-01

    The next generation air transportation system will require greater air-ground communications capacity to accommodate more air traffic with increased safety and efficiency. Communications will remain primarily terrestrially based, but satellite communications will have an increased role. Inmarsat s aeronautical services have been approved and are in use for aeronautical safety communications provided by geostationary satellites. More recently the approval process for the Iridium low earth orbit constellation is nearing completion. The current Iridium system will be able to provide basic air traffic services communications suitable for oceanic, remote and polar regions. The planned second generation of the Iridium system, called Iridium NEXT, will provide enhanced capabilities and enable a greater role in the future of aeronautical communications. This paper will review the potential role of satellite communications in the future of air transportation, the Iridium approval process and relevant system testing, and the potential role of Iridium NEXT.

  2. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplment 394

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-1999-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. The NASA CASI price code table, addresses of organizations, and document availability information are included before the abstract section. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  3. Aeronautics Technology Possibilities for 2000: Report of a workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The potential of aeronautical research and technology (R&T) development, which could provide the basis for facility planning and long range guidance of R&T programs and could establish justification for support of aeronautical research and technology was studied. The projections served specific purposes: (1) to provide a base for research and future facilities needed to support the projected technologies, and development advanced vehicles; (2) to provide insight on the possible state of the art in aeronautical technology by the year 2000 for civil and military planners of air vehicles and systems. Topics discussed include: aerodynamics; propulsion; structures; materials; guidance, navigation and control; computer and information technology; human factors; and systems integration.

  4. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 408

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, a Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP#1999-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. The NASA CASI price code table, addresses of organizations, and document availability information are included before the abstract section. Two indexes#subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  5. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography With Indexes. Supplement 407

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-1999-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. The NASA CASI price code table, addresses of organizations, and document availability information are included before the abstract section. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  6. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 415

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-2000-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. The NASA CASI price code table, addresses of organizations, and document availability information are included before the abstract section. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  7. Ergonomic Guidelines for Designing Effective and Healthy Learning Environments for Interactive Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisberg, Michael

    Many of the findings from ergonomics research on visual display workstations are relevant to the design of interactive learning stations. This 1993 paper briefly reviews ergonomics research on visual display workstations; specifically, (1) potential health hazards from electromagnetic radiation; (2) musculoskeletal disorders; (3)vision complaints;…

  8. Medical Practice Support System. A medical practitioner's multimedia workstation.

    PubMed

    Stetson, D M; Eberhart, R C; Dobbins, R W; Pugh, W

    1991-01-01

    The United States Navy has developed a computer based Medical Practice Support System (MEPSS) intended for use by medical practitioners working in isolated situations. The system, now being tested in operational settings, emphasizes inexpensive, easily obtained off-the-shelf hardware and specially developed, readily implemented software to provide users with: 1) medical record keeping, 2) an electronic medical library, 3) interactive video instruction programs suitable for continuing medical education, 4) computer based medical diagnosis and treatment assistance, and 5) electronic communications with other facilities. This demonstration emphasizes a user based developmental approach, integration of diverse systems under a single user interface, and portable hardware. The resulting system makes medical information needed by practitioners instantly available at the time of a patient encounter, whenever and wherever that encounter may occur. Making clinically valuable information immediately available, MEPSS demonstrates how practitioners can use computers to help their own efforts to improve patient care quality and efficiency. PMID:1807756

  9. A Digital Library for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Michael L.

    1999-01-01

    We describe the digital library (DL) for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA), the NACA Technical Report Server (NACATRS). The predecessor organization for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), NACA existed from 1915 until 1958. The primary manifestation of NACA's research was the NACA report series. We describe the process of converting this collection of reports to digital format and making it available on the World Wide Web (WWW) and is a node in the NASA Technical Report Server (NTRS). We describe the current state of the project, the resulting DL technology developed from the project, and the future plans for NACATRS.

  10. The application of artificial intelligence technology to aeronautical system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouchard, E. E.; Kidwell, G. H.; Rogan, J. E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the automation of one class of aeronautical design activity using artificial intelligence and advanced software techniques. Its purpose is to suggest concepts, terminology, and approaches that may be useful in enhancing design automation. By understanding the basic concepts and tasks in design, and the technologies that are available, it will be possible to produce, in the future, systems whose capabilities far exceed those of today's methods. Some of the tasks that will be discussed have already been automated and are in production use, resulting in significant productivity benefits. The concepts and techniques discussed are applicable to all design activity, though aeronautical applications are specifically presented.

  11. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography With Indexes. Supplement 414

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This report lists reports, articles and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. The NASA CASI price code table, addresses of organizations, and document availability information are included before the abstract section. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  12. Astronautics and Aeronautics: A Chronology, 2001-2005

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivey, William Noel; Lewis, Marieke

    2010-01-01

    This report is a chronological compilation of narrative summaries of news reports and government documents highlighting significant events and developments in U.S. and foreign aeronautics and astronautics. It covers the years 2001 through 2005. These summaries provide a day-by-day recounting of major activities, such as administrative developments, awards, launches, scientific discoveries, corporate and government research results, and other events in countries with aeronautics and astronautics programs. Researchers used the archives and files housed in the NASA History Division, as well as reports and databases on the NASA Web site.

  13. Astronautics and Aeronautics: A Chronology, 1996-2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Marieke; Swanson, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    This report is a chronological compilation of narrative summaries of news reports and government documents highlighting significant events and developments in United States and foreign aeronautics and astronautics. It covers the years 1996 through 2000. These summaries provide a day-by-day recounting of major activities, such as administrative developments, awards, launches, scientific discoveries, corporate and government research results, and other events in countries with aeronautics and astronautics programs. Researchers used the archives and files housed in the NASA History Division, as well as reports and databases on the NASA Web site.

  14. Aeronautics and space report of the President, 1982 activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Achievements of the space program are summerized in the area of communication, Earth resources, environment, space sciences, transportation, aeronautics, and space energy. Space program activities of the various deprtments and agencies of the Federal Government are discussed in relation to the agencies' goals and policies. Records of U.S. and world spacecraft launchings, successful U.S. launches for 1982, U.S. launched applications and scientific satellites and space probes since 1975, U.S. and Soviet manned spaceflights since 1961, data on U.S. space launch vehicles, and budget summaries are provided. The national space policy and the aeronautical research and technology policy statements are included.

  15. Aeronautical technologies for the twenty-first century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This study gives an overview of the future technologies in aeronautics. This collaborative effort relies upon the input of numerous experts from around the country. Specific issues covered include subsonic transport aircraft, high-speed civil transport aircraft short-haul aircraft, environmental issues, operational issues, aerodynamics, propulsion, materials and structures, avionics and control, and cognitive engineering. The appendices include bibliography, abbreviations and acronyms, and NASA fiscal year 1992 aeronautics funding (table) and participants. The forward states that over the last decade, foreign aircraft manufacturers have made significant inroads into the global aircraft market, to the detriment of U.S. interests. Recommendations are made to counter that trend.

  16. MIDAS-W: a workstation-based incoherent scatter radar data acquisition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, J. M.; Erickson, P. J.; Gorczyca, A. M.; Grydeland, T.

    2000-09-01

    The Millstone Hill Incoherent Scatter Data Acquisition System (MIDAS) is based on an abstract model of an incoherent scatter radar. This model is implemented in a hierarchical software system, which serves to isolate hardware and low-level software implementation details from higher levels of the system. Inherent in this is the idea that implementation details can easily be changed in response to technological advances. MIDAS is an evolutionary system, and the MIDAS hardware has, in fact, evolved while the basic software model has remained unchanged. From the earliest days of MIDAS, it was realized that some functions implemented in specialized hardware might eventually be implemented by software in a general-purpose computer. MIDAS-W is the realization of this concept. The core component of MIDAS-W is a Sun Microsystems UltraSparc 10 workstation equipped with an Ultrarad 1280 PCI bus analog to digital (A/D) converter board. In the current implementation, a 2.25 MHz intermediate frequency (IF) is bandpass sampled at 1 µs intervals and these samples are multicast over a high-speed Ethernet which serves as a raw data bus. A second workstation receives the samples, converts them to filtered, decimated, complex baseband samples and computes the lag-profile matrix of the decimated samples. Overall performance is approximately ten times better than the previous MIDAS system, which utilizes a custom digital filtering module and array processor based correlator. A major advantage of MIDAS-W is its flexibility. A portable, single-workstation data acquisition system can be implemented by moving the software receiver and correlator programs to the workstation with the A/D converter. When the data samples are multicast, additional data processing systems, for example for raw data recording, can be implemented simply by adding another workstation with suitable software to the high-speed network. Testing of new data processing software is also greatly simplified, because a

  17. A user view of office automation or the integrated workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmerling, E. R.

    1984-01-01

    Central data bases are useful only if they are kept up to date and easily accessible in an interactive (query) mode rather than in monthly reports that may be out of date and must be searched by hand. The concepts of automatic data capture, data base management and query languages require good communications and readily available work stations to be useful. The minimal necessary work station is a personal computer which can be an important office tool if connected into other office machines and properly integrated into an office system. It has a great deal of flexibility and can often be tailored to suit the tastes, work habits and requirements of the user. Unlike dumb terminals, there is less tendency to saturate a central computer, since its free standing capabilities are available after down loading a selection of data. The PC also permits the sharing of many other facilities, like larger computing power, sophisticated graphics programs, laser printers and communications. It can provide rapid access to common data bases able to provide more up to date information than printed reports. Portable computers can access the same familiar office facilities from anywhere in the world where a telephone connection can be made.

  18. Enriching Students' Education Using Interactive Workstations at a Salt Mine Turned Science Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meissner, Barbara; Bogner, Franz

    2011-01-01

    Although teachers in principle are prepared to make use of science centers, such excursions often fail to facilitate learning processes. Therefore, it is necessary to improve the link between science centers and schools. The design and evaluation of valuable outreach projects may enhance students' out-of-school science learning. In our study, we…

  19. Experience of switching from a traditional sitting workstation to a sit-stand workstation in sedentary office workers.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Nirjhar; Walton, Thomas; Pereira, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged sedentary time (ST) is associated with adverse health outcomes, while decreasing ST improves health outcomes. The use of sit-stand desks (SSDs) in workplaces has been proposed as a means of reducing ST. The purpose of this study was to gain knowledge about participants' experience and perceptions of a workplace intervention involving the introduction of SSDs. Focus groups and interviews were conducted with 28 study participants who used SSDs for 4 weeks. Data were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Participants reported a high level of satisfaction with the SSDs and 96% chose to use them permanently. Participants experienced greater energy and alertness at work and reported increased face-to-face interaction with coworkers. Lack of work-surface space was the most significant problem with the use of SSDs. There was no perception of decreased productivity or reduced workplace privacy among participants. PMID:25425587

  20. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Education 1993-2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivie, Christine M.

    2009-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration was established in 1958 and began operating a formal education program in 1993. The purpose of this study was to analyze the education program from 1993-2009 by examining strategic plan documents produced by the NASA education office and interviewing NASA education officials who served during that…