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Sample records for aeronautics test capabilities

  1. Ensuring US National Aeronautics Test Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    U.S. leadership in aeronautics depends on ready access to technologically advanced, efficient, and affordable aeronautics test capabilities. These systems include major wind tunnels and propulsion test facilities and flight test capabilities. The federal government owns the majority of the major aeronautics test capabilities in the United States, primarily through the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Department of Defense (DoD). However, changes in the Aerospace landscape, primarily the decrease in demand for testing over the last 20 years required an overarching strategy for management of these national assets. Therefore, NASA established the Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) as a two-pronged strategic initiative to: (1) retain and invest in NASA aeronautics test capabilities considered strategically important to the agency and the nation, and (2) establish a strong, high level partnership with the DoD. Test facility utilization is a critical factor for ATP because it relies on user occupancy fees to recover a substantial part of the operations costs for its facilities. Decreasing utilization is an indicator of excess capacity and in some cases low-risk redundancy (i.e., several facilities with basically the same capability and overall low utilization). However, low utilization does not necessarily translate to lack of strategic importance. Some facilities with relatively low utilization are nonetheless vitally important because of the unique nature of the capability and the foreseeable aeronautics testing needs. Unfortunately, since its inception, the customer base for ATP has continued to shrink. Utilization of ATP wind tunnels has declined by more than 50% from the FY 2006 levels. This significant decrease in customer usage is attributable to several factors, including the overall decline in new programs and projects in the aerospace sector; the impact of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) on the design, development, and research

  2. Western Aeronautical Test Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakahara, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the work of the Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR). NASA's Western Aeronautical Test Range is a network of facilities used to support aeronautical research, science missions, exploration system concepts, and space operations. The WATR resides at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center located at Edwards Air Force Base, California. The WATR is a part of NASA's Corporate Management of Aeronautical Facilities and funded by the Strategic Capability Asset Program (SCAP). Maps show the general location of the WATR area that is used for aeronautical testing and evaluation. The products, services and facilities of WATR are discussed,

  3. Western Aeronautical Test Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakahara, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) is a network of facilities used to support aeronautical research, science missions, exploration system concepts, and space operations. The WATR resides at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center located at Edwards Air Force Base, California. The WATR is a part of NASA's Corporate Management of Aeronautical Facilities and funded by the Strategic Capability Asset Program (SCAP). It is managed by the Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) of the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) to provide the right facility at the right time. NASA is a tenant on Edwards Air Force Base and has an agreement with the Air Force Flight Test Center to use the land and airspace controlled by the Department of Defense (DoD). The topics include: 1) The WATR supports a variety of vehicles; 2) Dryden shares airspace with the AFFTC; 3) Restricted airspace, corridors, and special use areas are available for experimental aircraft; 4) WATR Products and Services; 5) WATR Support Configuration; 6) Telemetry Tracking; 7) Time Space Positioning; 8) Video; 9) Voice Communication; 10) Mobile Operations Facilities; 11) Data Processing; 12) Mission Control Center; 13) Real-Time Data Analysis; and 14) Range Safety.

  4. NASA Engine Icing Research Overview: Aeronautics Evaluation and Test Capabilities (AETC) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veres, Joseph P.

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of ice accretion within commercial high bypass aircraft turbine engines has been reported by airlines under certain atmospheric conditions. Engine anomalies have taken place at high altitudes that have been attributed to ice crystal ingestion by the engine. The ice crystals can result in degraded engine performance, loss of thrust control, compressor surge or stall, and flameout of the combustor. The Aviation Safety Program at NASA has taken on the technical challenge of a turbofan engine icing caused by ice crystals which can exist in high altitude convective clouds. The NASA engine icing project consists of an integrated approach with four concurrent and ongoing research elements, each of which feeds critical information to the next element. The project objective is to gain understanding of high altitude ice crystals by developing knowledge bases and test facilities for testing full engines and engine components. The first element is to utilize a highly instrumented aircraft to characterize the high altitude convective cloud environment. The second element is the enhancement of the Propulsion Systems Laboratory altitude test facility for gas turbine engines to include the addition of an ice crystal cloud. The third element is basic research of the fundamental physics associated with ice crystal ice accretion. The fourth and final element is the development of computational tools with the goal of simulating the effects of ice crystal ingestion on compressor and gas turbine engine performance. The NASA goal is to provide knowledge to the engine and aircraft manufacturing communities to help mitigate, or eliminate turbofan engine interruptions, engine damage, and failures due to ice crystal ingestion.

  5. An Overview of the NASA Aeronautics Test Program Strategic Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    U.S. leadership in aeronautics depends on ready access to technologically advanced, efficient, and affordable aeronautics test capabilities. These systems include major wind tunnels and propulsion test facilities and flight test capabilities. The federal government owns the majority of the major aeronautics test capabilities in the United States, primarily through the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Department of Defense (DoD), however an overarching strategy for management of these national assets was needed. Therefore, in Fiscal Year (FY) 2006 NASA established the Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) as a two-pronged strategic initiative to: (1) retain and invest in NASA aeronautics test capabilities considered strategically important to the agency and the nation, and (2) establish a strong, high level partnership with the DoD Test Resources Management Center (TRMC), stewards of the DoD test and evaluation infrastructure. Since then, approximately seventy percent of the ATP budget has been directed to underpin fixed and variable costs of facility operations within its portfolio and the balance towards strategic investments in its test facilities, including maintenance and capability upgrades. Also, a strong guiding coalition was established through the National Partnership for Aeronautics Testing (NPAT), with governance by the senior leadership of NASA s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) and the DoD's TRMC. As part of its strategic planning, ATP has performed or participated in many studies and analyses, including assessments of major NASA and DoD aeronautics test capabilities, test facility condition evaluations and market research. The ATP strategy has also benefitted from unpublished RAND research and analysis by Ant n et al. (2009). Together, these various studies, reports and assessments serve as a foundation for a new, five year strategic plan that will guide ATP through FY 2014. Our vision for the future is a balanced

  6. Langley aeronautics and space test highlights, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The role of the Langley Research Center is to perform basic and applied research necessary for the advancement of aeronautics and space flight, to generate new and advanced concepts for the accomplishment of related national goals, and to provide research advice, technological support, and assistance to other NASA installations, other government agencies, and industry. Some of the significant tests which were performed during calendar year 1984 in Langley test facilities are highlighted. The broad range of the research and technology activities at the Langley Research Center and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States leadership in aeronautics and space research are illustrated.

  7. Aeronautical Mobile Satellite Service (AMSS) test plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandlin, Sean M.

    1991-05-01

    A test program is described which will be conducted by the Federal Aviation Administration to support the validation of Standards and Recommended Practices being developed for the Aeronautical Mobile Satellite Service by the International Civil Aviation Organization. A description of the Communication Test Facility is also presented which will be used to perform the tests. A brief description is also included of each test to be performed along with setup and data to be recorded.

  8. Langley aeronautics and space test highlights, 1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The role of the Langley Research Center is to perform basic and applied research necessary for the advancement of aeronautics and space flight, to generate new and advanced concepts for the accomplishment of related national goals, and to provide research advice, technological support, and assistance to other NASA installations, other government agencies, and industry. Some of the significant tests which were performed during calendar year 1983 in Langley test facilities, a number of which are unique in the world are highlighted. Both the broad range of the research and technology activities at the Langley Research Center and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States leadership in aeronautics and space research are illustrated.

  9. XRCF Testing Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reily, Cary; Kegely, Jeff; Burdine, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center's X-ray Calibration Facility has been recently modified to test Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) developmental mirrors at cryogenic temperatures (35 degrees Kelvin) while maintaining capability for performance testing of x-ray optics and detectors. The facility's current cryo-optical testing capability and potential modifications for future support of NGST will be presented.

  10. TRENDS: The aeronautical post-test database management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, W. S.; Bondi, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    TRENDS, an engineering-test database operating system developed by NASA to support rotorcraft flight tests, is described. Capabilities and characteristics of the system are presented, with examples of its use in recalling and analyzing rotorcraft flight-test data from a TRENDS database. The importance of system user-friendliness in gaining users' acceptance is stressed, as is the importance of integrating supporting narrative data with numerical data in engineering-test databases. Considerations relevant to the creation and maintenance of flight-test database are discussed and TRENDS' solutions to database management problems are described. Requirements, constraints, and other considerations which led to the system's configuration are discussed and some of the lessons learned during TRENDS' development are presented. Potential applications of TRENDS to a wide range of aeronautical and other engineering tests are identified.

  11. The Western Aeronautical Test Range of NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, A. L.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of the Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) of NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) is presented in this paper. The three WATR facilities are discussed, and three WATR elements - mission control centerns, communications systems, real-time processing and display systems, and tracking systems -are reviewed. The relationships within the NASA WATR, with respect to the NASA aeronautics program, are also discussed.

  12. Aeronautical Mobile Satellite Service (AMSS) Test Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    ICAO ) . It also contains a description of the Communications Test Facility (CTF) which will be used to perform the tests. An appendix includes a brief description of each test to be performed along with setup and data to be recorded.

  13. Testing and technical capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, R.W.; Dill, M.S.

    1984-05-01

    Capabilities of the following are outlined: state-of-the-art-services, measurement control and capabilities coordination, sampling and standard section, analytical technology section, environmental-industrial hygiene section, spectrochemical section, inorganic and production control section, instrumentation and control section, instrument technology, and mass spectrometry-isotopic section.

  14. Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) mission control Blue room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Mission control Blue Room, seen here, in building 4800 at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, is part of the Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR). All aspects of a research mission are monitored from one of two of these control rooms at Dryden. The WATR consists of a highly automated complex of computer controlled tracking, telemetry, and communications systems and control room complexes that are capable of supporting any type of mission ranging from system and component testing, to sub-scale and full-scale flight tests of new aircraft and reentry systems. Designated areas are assigned for spin/dive tests, corridors are provided for low, medium, and high-altitude supersonic flight, and special STOL/VSTOL facilities are available at Ames Moffett and Crows Landing. Special use airspace, available at Edwards, covers approximately twelve thousand square miles of mostly desert area. The southern boundary lies to the south of Rogers Dry Lake, the western boundary lies midway between Mojave and Bakersfield, the northern boundary passes just south of Bishop, and the eastern boundary follows about 25 miles west of the Nevada border except in the northern areas where it crosses into Nevada.

  15. Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) mission control room monitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This photo shows monitors in a Dryden Flight Research Center mission control room of the Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR). All aspects of a research mission are monitored from one of two of these control rooms at Dryden. The WATR consists of a highly automated complex of computer controlled tracking, telemetry, and communications systems and control room complexes that are capable of supporting any type of mission ranging from system and component testing, to sub-scale and full-scale flight tests of new aircraft and reentry systems. Designated areas are assigned for spin/dive tests, corridors are provided for low, medium, and high-altitude supersonic flight, and special STOL/VSTOL facilities are available at Ames Moffett and Crows Landing. Special use airspace, available at Edwards, covers approximately twelve thousand square miles of mostly desert area. The southern boundary lies to the south of Rogers Dry Lake, the western boundary lies midway between Mojave and Bakersfield, the northern boundary passes just south of Bishop, and the eastern boundary follows about 25 miles west of the Nevada border except in the northern areas where it crosses into Nevada.

  16. Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) mission control Gold room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Mission control Gold room is seen here, located at the Dryden Flight Research Center of the Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR). All aspects of a research mission are monitored from one of two of these control rooms at Dryden. The WATR consists of a highly automated complex of computer controlled tracking, telemetry, and communications systems and control room complexes that are capable of supporting any type of mission ranging from system and component testing, to sub-scale and full-scale flight tests of new aircraft and reentry systems. Designated areas are assigned for spin/dive tests, corridors are provided for low, medium, and high-altitude supersonic flight, and special STOL/VSTOL facilities are available at Ames Moffett and Crows Landing. Special use airspace, available at Edwards, covers approximately twelve thousand square miles of mostly desert area. The southern boundary lies to the south of Rogers Dry Lake, the western boundary lies midway between Mojave and Bakersfield, the northern boundary passes just south of Bishop, and the eastern boundary follows about 25 miles west of the Nevada border except in the northern areas where it crosses into Nevada.

  17. Test devices for aeronautical research and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The objectives of the DFVLR in six areas are described: (1) transportation and communication systems; (2) aircraft, space technology, (4) remote sensing, (5) energy and propulsion technology; and (6) research and development. A detailed description of testing devices and other facilities required to carry out the research program is given.

  18. IPv6 Test Bed for Testing Aeronautical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, Ryan; Zernic, Michael; Dhas, Chris

    2004-01-01

    Aviation industries in United States and in Europe are undergoing a major paradigm shift in the introduction of new network technologies. In the US, NASA is also actively investigating the feasibility of IPv6 based networks for the aviation needs of the United States. In Europe, the Eurocontrol lead, Internet Protocol for Aviation Exchange (iPAX) Working Group is actively investigating the various ways of migrating the aviation authorities backbone infrastructure from X.25 based networks to an IPv6 based network. For the last 15 years, the global aviation community has pursued the development and implementation of an industry-specific set of communications standards known as the Aeronautical Telecommunications Network (ATN). These standards are now beginning to affect the emerging military Global Air Traffic Management (GATM) community as well as the commercial air transport community. Efforts are continuing to gain a full understanding of the differences and similarities between ATN and Internet architectures as related to Communications, Navigation, and Surveillance (CNS) infrastructure choices. This research paper describes the implementation of the IPv6 test bed at NASA GRC, and Computer Networks & Software, Inc. and these two test beds are interface to Eurocontrol over the IPv4 Internet. This research work looks into the possibility of providing QoS performance for Aviation application in an IPv6 network as is provided in an ATN based network. The test bed consists of three autonomous systems. The autonomous system represents CNS domain, NASA domain and a EUROCONTROL domain. The primary mode of connection between CNS IPv6 testbed and NASA and EUROCONTROL IPv6 testbed is initially a set of IPv6 over IPv4 tunnels. The aviation application under test (CPDLC) consists of two processes running on different IPv6 enabled machines.

  19. Capability Test Design and Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-13

    UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Joint Test and Evaluation Methodology (JTEM),Washington,DC,20301 8. PERFORMING...refinement process for testing in a joint environment (TIJE) 2. Review the methods and processes for an evaluation strategy refinement process 3...Environment System Design Document (SDD) JTEM Capability Test Methodology (CTM) v2.0 Event Management Plan Test Plan Joint Capability Evaluation (JCE

  20. FY11 Facility Assessment Study for Aeronautics Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loboda, John A.; Sydnor, George H.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the approach and results for the Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) FY11 Facility Assessment Project. ATP commissioned assessments in FY07 and FY11 to aid in the understanding of the current condition and reliability of its facilities and their ability to meet current and future (five year horizon) test requirements. The principle output of the assessment was a database of facility unique, prioritized investments projects with budgetary cost estimates. This database was also used to identify trends for the condition of facility systems.

  1. Test Laboratory Facilities and Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Jeff

    2004-01-01

    The Test Laboratory at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, located inside the boundaries of 40,000 acre Redstone Arsenal military reservation, has over 50 test facilities across 400+ acres, many inside an additional secure, fenced area. About 150 Government and 250 contractor personnel operate test facilities capable of all types of propulsion and structural testing, from small components to engine systems and structural strength/dynamic and environmental testing. We have tremendous engineering expertise in research, evaluation, analysis, design and development, and test of space transportation systems, subsystems, and components.

  2. Physical capability scale: psychometric testing.

    PubMed

    Resnick, Barbara; Boltz, Marie; Galik, Elizabeth; Wells, Chris

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the psychometric testing of the Basic Physical Capability Scale. The study was a secondary data analysis of combined data sets from three studies. Study participants included 93 older adults, recruited from 2 acute-care settings and 110 older adults living in long-term care facilities. Rasch analysis was used for the testing of the measurement model. There was some support for construct validity based on the fit of the items to the scale across both samples. In addition, there was support for hypothesis testing as physical function was significantly associated with physical capability. There was evidence for internal consistency (Alpha coefficients of .77-.83) and interrater reliability based on an intraclass correlation of .81. This study provided preliminary support for the reliability and validity of the Basic Physical Capability Scale, and guidance for scale revisions and continued use.

  3. The Western Aeronautical Test Range. Chapter 10 Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knudtson, Kevin; Park, Alice; Downing, Robert; Sheldon, Jack; Harvey, Robert; Norcross, April

    2011-01-01

    The Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) staff at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center is developing a translation software called Chapter 10 Tools in response to challenges posed by post-flight processing data files originating from various on-board digital recorders that follow the Range Commanders Council Inter-Range Instrumentation Group (IRIG) 106 Chapter 10 Digital Recording Standard but use differing interpretations of the Standard. The software will read the date files regardless of the vendor implementation of the source recorder, displaying data, identifying and correcting errors, and producing a data file that can be successfully processed post-flight

  4. Western aeronautical test range real-time graphics software package MAGIC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, Jacqueline C.; Moore, Archie L.

    1988-01-01

    The master graphics interactive console (MAGIC) software package used on the Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) of the NASA Ames Research Center is described. MAGIC is a resident real-time research tool available to flight researchers-scientists in the NASA mission control centers of the WATR at the Dryden Flight Research Facility at Edwards, California. The hardware configuration and capabilities of the real-time software package are also discussed.

  5. Advancing Test Capabilities at NASA Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, James

    2015-01-01

    NASA maintains twelve major wind tunnels at three field centers capable of providing flows at 0.1 M 10 and unit Reynolds numbers up to 45106m. The maintenance and enhancement of these facilities is handled through a unified management structure under NASAs Aeronautics and Evaluation and Test Capability (AETC) project. The AETC facilities are; the 11x11 transonic and 9x7 supersonic wind tunnels at NASA Ames; the 10x10 and 8x6 supersonic wind tunnels, 9x15 low speed tunnel, Icing Research Tunnel, and Propulsion Simulator Laboratory, all at NASA Glenn; and the National Transonic Facility, Transonic Dynamics Tunnel, LAL aerothermodynamics laboratory, 8 High Temperature Tunnel, and 14x22 low speed tunnel, all at NASA Langley. This presentation describes the primary AETC facilities and their current capabilities, as well as improvements which are planned over the next five years. These improvements fall into three categories. The first are operations and maintenance improvements designed to increase the efficiency and reliability of the wind tunnels. These include new (possibly composite) fan blades at several facilities, new temperature control systems, and new and much more capable facility data systems. The second category of improvements are facility capability advancements. These include significant improvements to optical access in wind tunnel test sections at Ames, improvements to test section acoustics at Glenn and Langley, the development of a Supercooled Large Droplet capability for icing research, and the development of an icing capability for large engine testing. The final category of improvements consists of test technology enhancements which provide value across multiple facilities. These include projects to increase balance accuracy, provide NIST-traceable calibration characterization for wind tunnels, and to advance optical instruments for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) validation. Taken as a whole, these individual projects provide significant

  6. Satellite Servicing Capabilities Office Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Sean

    2015-01-01

    While at the KSC, I was given the opportunity of assisting the Satellite Servicing Capabilities Office (SSCO) specifically the Propellant Transfer System (PTS) lead by my mentor, Brian Nufer. While waiting to test different components in the PTS, I was able to assist with testing for the Hose Management Assembly (HMA) and was able to work on a simulation in Labview. For the HMA, I was able to help with testing of a coating as well as to help test the durability of the pinch rollers in space. In Labview, I experimented with building a simulation for the PTS, to show where fluids and gases were flowing depending on which valves in the PTS were opened. Not all of the integrated parts required assembly level testing, which allowed me to test these parts individually by myself and document the results. I was also able to volunteer to assist project NEO, allowing me to gain some knowledge of cryogenic fluid systems.

  7. An electronic pressure profile display system for aeronautic test facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woike, Mark R.

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has installed an Electronic Pressure Profile Display system. This system provides for the real-time display of pressure readings on high resolution graphics monitors. The Electronic Pressure Profile Display system will replace manometer banks currently used in aeronautic test facilities. The Electronic Pressure Profile Display system consists of an industrial type Digital Pressure Transmitter (DPT) unit which interfaces with a host computer. The host computer collects the pressure data from the DPT unit, converts it into engineering units, and displays the readings on a high resolution graphics monitor in bar graph format. Software was developed to accomplish the above tasks and also draw facility diagrams as background information on the displays. Data transfer between host computer and DPT unit is done with serial communications. Up to 64 channels are displayed with one second update time. This paper describes the system configuration, its features, and its advantages over existing systems.

  8. An Electronic Pressure Profile Display system for aeronautic test facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woike, Mark R.

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has installed an Electronic Pressure Profile Display system. This system provides for the real-time display of pressure readings on high resolution graphics monitors. The Electronic Pressure Profile Display system will replace manometer banks currently used in aeronautic test facilities. The Electronic Pressure Profile Display system consists of an industrial type Digital Pressure Transmitter (DPI) unit which interfaces with a host computer. The host computer collects the pressure data from the DPI unit, converts it into engineering units, and displays the readings on a high resolution graphics monitor in bar graph format. Software was developed to accomplish the above tasks and also draw facility diagrams as background information on the displays. Data transfer between host computer and DPT unit is done with serial communications. Up to 64 channels are displayed with one second update time. This paper describes the system configuration, its features, and its advantages over existing systems.

  9. Aeronautical satellite data link concept, design, and flight test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Samuel S.; Hogle, Lawrence H.; Breitwisch, Ronald; Edwards, C. P.; Hamilton, Robert J.; Lipke, David W.

    The MITRE Corporation has conducted a three-year study of aeronautical satellite communications that culminated in a set of flight tests over the North Atlantic during August of 1985. The flight tests required the cooperation of four organizations in addition to MITRE: The Communications Satellite Corporation (COMSAT), Rockwell International, Ball Aerospace and Avantek. A test aircraft, equipped with a specially designed satellite data link terminal and antenna configuration, was flown from Cedar Rapids, Iowa across the North Atlantic to Iceland, and north of Iceland to 75° latitude. The purpose of the flight tests was to measure the performance of a full duplex aeronautical satellite data link (ASDL) using the International Maritime Satellite Organization's (INMARSAT's) spacecraft and earth station at Southbury, Connecticut, and to demonstrate potential applications. The data link operates at 200 bits-per-second (bps), uses forward error correction (FEC) coding, and employs a terminal monitor that provides interfaces to on-board avionics, data recording equipment, and an industry-standard personal computer (PC). The PC serves as a user terminal as well as a real-time monitor of bit-error-rate (BER) performance. In addition to channel propagation and BER experiments, demonstrations of potential applications of an oceanic ASDL system were conducted. A standard commercial airline data link management unit (MU) was used to communicate data over the ASDL using standard protocols. The interface to the MU allowed access to data from two distinct navigation systems: an inertial navigation system (INS) and a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver. Aircraft position data was transmitted from the aircraft to the earth station on an automatic basis to simulate automatic dependent surveillance (ADS) of oceanic air space. This paper is divided into three sections: 1) A discussion of background issues, such as the motivation for the reported research and development, and

  10. A distributed data acquisition system for aeronautics test facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fronek, Dennis L.; Setter, Robert N.; Blumenthal, Philip Z.; Smalley, Robert R.

    1987-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center is in the process of installing a new data acquisition and display system. This new system will provide small and medium sized aeronautics test facilities with a state-of-the-art real-time data acquisition and display system. The new data system will provide for the acquisition of signals from a variety of instrumentation sources. They include analog measurements of temperatures, pressures, and other steady state voltage inputs; frequency inputs to measure speed and flow; discrete I/O for significant events, and modular instrument systems such as multiplexed pressure modules or electronic instrumentation with a IEEE 488 interface. The data system is designed to acquire data, convert it to engineering units, compute test dependent performance calculations, limit check selected channels or calculations, and display the information in alphanumeric or graphical form with a cycle time of one second for the alphanumeric data. This paper describes the system configuration, its salient features, and the expected impact on testing.

  11. Mechanical Components Branch Test Facilities and Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B.

    2004-01-01

    The Mechanical Components Branch at NASA Glenn Research Center formulates, conducts, and manages research focused on propulsion systems for both present and advanced aeronautical and space vehicles. The branch is comprised of research teams that perform basic research in three areas: mechanical drives, aerospace seals, and space mechanisms. Each team has unique facilities for testing aerospace hardware and concepts. This report presents an overview of the Mechanical Components Branch test facilities.

  12. Thermomechanical Multiaxial Fatigue Testing Capability Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Structural components in aeronautical gas turbine engines typically experience multiaxial states of stress under nonisothermal conditions. To estimate the durability of the various components in the engine, one must characterize the cyclic deformation and fatigue behavior of the materials used under thermal and complex mechanical loading conditions. To this end, a testing protocol and associated test control software were developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center for thermomechanical axial-torsional fatigue tests. These tests are to be performed on thin-walled, tubular specimens fabricated from the cobalt-based superalloy Haynes 188. The software is written in C and runs on an MS-DOS based microcomputer.

  13. Photovoltaic Systems Test Facilities: Existing capabilities compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volkmer, K.

    1982-01-01

    A general description of photovoltaic systems test facilities (PV-STFs) operated under the U.S. Department of Energy's photovoltaics program is given. Descriptions of a number of privately operated facilities having test capabilities appropriate to photovoltaic hardware development are given. A summary of specific, representative test capabilities at the system and subsystem level is presented for each listed facility. The range of system and subsystem test capabilities available to serve the needs of both the photovoltaics program and the private sector photovoltaics industry is given.

  14. Development of a mobile research flight test support capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhea, Donald C.; Moore, Archie L.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the approach taken by the NASA Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) of the Ames Research Center (ARC) to develop and utilize mobile systems to satisfy unique real-time research flight test requirements of research projects such as the advanced fighter technology integration (AFTI) F-16, YAV-8B Harrier, F-18 high-alpha research vehicle (HARV), XV-15, and the UH-60 Black Hawk. The approach taken is cost-effective, staff efficient, technologically current, and provides a safe and effective research flight test environment to support a highly complex set of real-time requirements including the areas of tracking and data acquisition, communications (audio and video) and real-time processing and display, postmission processing, and command uplink. The development of this capability has been in response to the need for rapid deployment at varied site locations with full real-time comutation and display capability. This paper will discuss the requirements, implementation and growth plan for mobile systems development within the NASA Western Aeronautical Test Range.

  15. Development of a mobile research flight test support capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhea, Donald C.; Moore, Archie L.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the approach taken by the NASA Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) of the Ames Research Center to develop and utilize mobile systems to satisfy unique real-time research flight test requirements of research projects such as the advanced fighter technology integration (AFTI)F-16, YAV-8B Harrier, F-18 high-alpha research vehicle (HARV), XV-15, and the UH-60 Black Hawk. The approach taken is cost-effective, staff efficient, technologically current, and provides a safe and effective research flight test environment to support a highly complex set of real-time requirements including the areas of tracking and data acquisition, communications (audio and video) and real-time processing and display, postmission processing, and command uplink. The development of this capability has been in response to the need for rapid deployment at varied site locations with full real-time computations and display capability. This paper will discuss the requirements, implementation and growth plan for mobile systems development within the NASA Western Aeronautical Test Range.

  16. Systems test facilities existing capabilities compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, R.

    1981-01-01

    Systems test facilities (STFS) to test total photovoltaic systems and their interfaces are described. The systems development (SD) plan is compilation of existing and planned STFs, as well as subsystem and key component testing facilities. It is recommended that the existing capabilities compilation is annually updated to provide and assessment of the STF activity and to disseminate STF capabilities, status and availability to the photovoltaics program.

  17. Supersonic Particle Impact Test Capabilities: Investigative Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosales, Keisa

    2007-01-01

    NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) performed particle impact flow tests to determine the maximum capabilities of the particle impact test systems in different configurations. Additional flow tests were performed to determine the target pressures at given upstream conditions to supplement the WSTF data located in ASTM Manual 36 (2000).

  18. A Vision for the Future of Aeronautical Ground Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    high- enthalpy materials test facilities; and aeroballistic impact ranges. Of these facilities, 28 are unique in the United States and 14 are...Future wind tunnels may also need to be sited to make maximum use of renewable energy sources such as hydro, hydroelectric, geothermal , wind, or

  19. [Ionizing radiation in the aeronautics industry. Non-destructive testing].

    PubMed

    La Verde, R; Travaglini, C

    1983-08-25

    The constant increase in the non-military use of nuclear energy in various fields induced this study of one particular field: the aero industry. Alitalia has been using gammagraphy and industrial metallography for nondestructive testing for over 20 years. Workers exposed to ionising radiations at work are protected by precisely detailed standards based on extremely rigorous national and international legislation. The health and protection of these workers is entrusted to a Company Doctor and a Qualified Specialist. The latter is thought to be indispensable since he is responsible for primary preventions as well as prompt diagnosis.

  20. Flexural Fillet Geometry Optimization for Design of Force Transducers Used in Aeronautics Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynn, Keith C.; Dixon, Genevieve

    2015-01-01

    Force transducer designs used in the ground testing aeronautics community have seen minimal change over the last few decades. With increased focus on data quality and long-term performance capabilities over the life of these instruments, it is critical to investigate new methods that improve these designs. One area of focus in the past few years at NASA has been on the design of the flexural elements of traditional force balance transducers. Many of the heritage balances that have been heavily used over the last few decades have started to develop fatigue cracks. The recent focus on the flexural design of traditional single-piece force balances revolves around the design of these elements such that stress concentrations are minimized, with the overall goal of increasing the fatigue life of the balance. Recent research in the area of using conic shaped fillets in the highly stressed regions of traditional force balances will be discussed, with preliminary numerical and experimental data results. A case study will be presented which discusses integration of this knowledge into a new high-capacity semi-span force balance.

  1. Flexural Fillet Geometry Optimization for Design of Force Transducers Used in Aeronautics Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynn, Keith C.; Dixon, Genevieve

    2014-01-01

    Force transducer designs used in the ground testing aeronautics community have seen minimal change over the last few decades. With increased focus on data quality and long- term performance capabilities over the life of these instruments, it is critical to investigate new methods that improve these designs. One area of focus in the past few years at NASA has been on the design of the exural elements of traditional force balance transducers. Many of the heritage balances that have been heavily used over the last few decades have started to develop fatigue cracks. The recent focus on the exural design of traditional single-piece force balances revolves around the design of these elements such that stress concentrations are minimized, with the overall goal of increasing the fatigue life of the balance. Recent research in the area of using conic shaped llets in the highly stressed regions of traditional force balances will be discussed, with preliminary numerical and experimental data results. A case study will be presented which discusses integration of this knowledge into a new high-capacity semi-span force balance

  2. An Update of the Nation's Long-Term Strategic Needs for NASA's Aeronautics Test Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anton, Philip S.; Raman, Raj; Osburg, Jan; Kallimani, James G.

    2009-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) major wind tunnel (WT), propulsion test (PT), and simulation facilities exist to serve NASA's and the nation's aeronautics needs. RAND Corporation researchers conducted a prior study of these facilities from 2002 to 2003, identifying (1) NASA's continuing ability to serve national needs, (2) which facilities appear strategically important from an engineering perspective given the vehicle classes the nation investigates and produces, and (3) management challenges and issues. This documented briefing (DB) is the final report from a new, one-year study (conducted from September 2006 through January 2008), partially updating the prior assessment. The study focuses on updating the list of facilities in the prior study that were deemed to be strategically important (again, from an engineering perspective) in serving those needs. This update also adds a new assessment of national needs for six major aeronautics simulators at NASA and lists those deemed strategically important.

  3. Marshall Space Flight Center Test Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Jeffrey T.

    2005-01-01

    The Test Laboratory at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has over 50 facilities across 400+ acres inside a secure, fenced facility. The entire Center is located inside the boundaries of Redstone Arsenal, a 40,000 acre military reservation. About 150 Government and 250 contractor personnel operate facilities capable of all types of propulsion and structural testing, from small components to engine systems and structural strength, structural dynamic and environmental testing. We have tremendous engineering expertise in research, evaluation, analysis, design and development, and test of space transportation systems, subsystems, and components.

  4. Tonopah Test Range capabilities: technical manual

    SciTech Connect

    Manhart, R.L.

    1982-11-01

    This manual describes Tonopah Test Range (TTR), defines its testing capabilities, and outlines the steps necessary to schedule tests on the Range. Operated by Sandia National Laboratories, TTR is a major test facility for DOE-funded weapon programs. The Range presents an integrated system for ballistic test vehicle tracking and data acquisition. Multiple radars, optical trackers, telemetry stations, a central computer complex, and combined landline/RF communications systems assure full Range coverage for any type of test. Range operations are conducted by a department within Sandia's Field Engineering Directorate. While the overall Range functions as a complete system, it is operationally divided into the Test Measurements, Instrumentation Development, and Range Operations divisions. The primary function of TTR is to support DOE weapons test activities. Management, however, encourages other Government agencies and their contractors to schedule tests on the Range which can make effective use of its capabilities. Information concerning Range use by organizations outside of DOE is presented. Range instrumentation and support facilities are described in detail. This equipment represents the current state-of-the-art and reflects a continuing commitment by TTR management to field the most effective tracking and data acquisition system available.

  5. National Aeronautics Research, Development, Test and Evaluation (RDT&E) Infrastructure Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    strict sense . For example, wind tunnels may be used for testing wind turbines , automotive vehicles, or other prod- ucts. Thus, aeronautics R&D is...Icing Test Facilities A greater understanding of the impact that icing conditions have on turbine engine opera- tions is needed to develop enhanced...necessary to develop monitoring strategies for safe turbine engine operations . While there currently is a shortfall in the ability to conduct this

  6. Demonstration of Hazardous Hypervelocity Test Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriquez, Karen M.

    1991-01-01

    NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) participated in a joint test program with NASA JSC Hypervelocity Impact Research Laboratory (HIRL) to determine if JSC was capable of performing hypervelocity impact tests on hazardous targets. Seven pressurized vessels were evaluated under hypervelocity impact conditions. The vessels were tested with various combinations of liquids and gasses at various pressures. Results from the evaluation showed that vessels containing 100-percent pressurized gas sustained more severe damage and had a higher potential for damaging nearby equipment, than vessels containing 75-percent liquid, 25-percent inert pressurized gas. Two water-filled test vessels, one of which was placed behind an aluminum shield, failed by bulging and splitting open at the impact point; pressure was relieved without the vessel fragmenting or sustaining internal damage. An additional water-filled test vessel, placed a greater distance behind an aluminum shield, sustained damage that resembled a shotgun blast, but did not bulge or split open; again, pressure was relieved without the vessel fragmenting. Two test vessels containing volatile liquids (nitro methane and hydrazine) also failed by bulging and splitting open; neither liquid detonated under hypervelocity test conditions. A test vessel containing nitrogen gas failed by relieving pressure through a circular entry hole; multiple small penetrations opposite the point of entry provided high velocity target debris to surrounding objects. A high-pressure oxygen test vessel fragmented upon impact; the ensuing fire and high velocity fragments caused secondary damage to surrounding objects. The results from the evaluation of the pressurized vessels indicated that JSC is capable of performing hypervelocity impact tests on hazardous targets.

  7. Joint demilitarization technology test and demonstration capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, S.M.; Byrd, E.R.; Decker, M.W.

    1998-12-31

    This paper provides a review of the two components of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Demilitarization test and demonstration capabilities. Part one is a general discussion of the NTS and the many assets it offers to the Demilitarization community; and more specifically, a discussion of the NTS Open Burn/Open Detonation (OB/OD) test facility. The NTS Joint Demilitarization Technology (JDT) OB/OD Test Chamber is located at the X Tunnel facility which as been designed and constructed to contain and characterize the effluent from demilitarization activities. X Tunnel consists of a large test chamber capable of withstanding a 3,000 pound net explosive weight detonation or up to a static pressure of well over 100 pounds per square inch. The test chamber is fully instrumented to measure and collect gas and particulate samples as well as to monitor shock phenomenology. Part two is a discussion of the NTS Tactical Demilitarization Demonstration (TaDD) program currently planned for the Area 11 Technical Facility. This project will produce equipment that can dispose of unneeded tactical military rocket motors in a safe, environmentally-friendly, and timely fashion. The initial effort is the development of a demilitarization system for the disposal of excess Shillelagh missiles at the Anniston Army Depot. The prototype for this system will be assembled at the Area 11 facility taking advantage of the inherent infrastructure and proximity to numerous existing structures. Upon completion of testing, the prototype facility will become the test bed for future tactical disposal development activities. It is expected that the research and development techniques, prototype testing and production processes, and expertise developed during the Shillelagh disposal program will be applicable to follow-on tactical missile disposal programs, but with significant cost and schedule advantages.

  8. Fused Reality for Enhanced Flight Test Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachelder, Ed; Klyde, David

    2011-01-01

    The feasibility of using Fused Reality-based simulation technology to enhance flight test capabilities has been investigated. In terms of relevancy to piloted evaluation, there remains no substitute for actual flight tests, even when considering the fidelity and effectiveness of modern ground-based simulators. In addition to real-world cueing (vestibular, visual, aural, environmental, etc.), flight tests provide subtle but key intangibles that cannot be duplicated in a ground-based simulator. There is, however, a cost to be paid for the benefits of flight in terms of budget, mission complexity, and safety, including the need for ground and control-room personnel, additional aircraft, etc. A Fused Reality(tm) (FR) Flight system was developed that allows a virtual environment to be integrated with the test aircraft so that tasks such as aerial refueling, formation flying, or approach and landing can be accomplished without additional aircraft resources or the risk of operating in close proximity to the ground or other aircraft. Furthermore, the dynamic motions of the simulated objects can be directly correlated with the responses of the test aircraft. The FR Flight system will allow real-time observation of, and manual interaction with, the cockpit environment that serves as a frame for the virtual out-the-window scene.

  9. Sensor test facilities and capabilities at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, W.B.; Burke, L.J.; Gomez, B.J.; Livingston, L.; Nelson, D.S.; Smathers, D.C.

    1996-12-31

    Sandia National Laboratories has recently developed two major field test capabilities for unattended ground sensor systems at the Department of energy`s Nevada Test Site (NTS). The first capability utilizes the NTS large area, varied terrain, and intrasite communications systems for testing sensors for detecting and tracking vehicular traffic. Sensor and ground truth data can be collected at either of two secure control centers. This system also includes an automated ground truth capability that consists of differential Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) receivers on test vehicles and live TV coverage of critical road sections. Finally there is a high-speed, secure computer network link between the control centers and the Air Force`s Theater Air Command and Control Simulation Facility in Albuquerque NM. The second capability is Bunker 2-300. It is a facility for evaluating advanced sensor systems for monitoring activities in underground cut-and-cover facilities. The main part of the facility consists of an underground bunker with three large rooms for operating various types of equipment. This equipment includes simulated chemical production machinery and controlled seismic and acoustic signal sources. There has been a thorough geologic and electromagnetic characterization of the region around the bunker. Since the facility is in a remote location, it is well-isolated from seismic, acoustic, and electromagnetic interference.

  10. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) Capability Roadmap Development for Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagdigian, Robert M.; Carrasquillo, Robyn L.; Metcalf, Jordan; Peterson, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    NASA is considering a number of future human space exploration mission concepts. Although detailed requirements and vehicle architectures remain mostly undefined, near-term technology investment decisions need to be guided by the anticipated capabilities needed to enable or enhance the mission concepts. This paper describes a roadmap that NASA has formulated to guide the development of Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) capabilities required to enhance the long-term operation of the International Space Station (ISS) and enable beyond-Low Earth Orbit (LEO) human exploration missions. Three generic mission types were defined to serve as a basis for developing a prioritized list of needed capabilities and technologies. Those are 1) a short duration micro gravity mission; 2) a long duration transit microgravity mission; and 3) a long duration surface exploration mission. To organize the effort, ECLSS was categorized into three major functional groups (atmosphere, water, and solid waste management) with each broken down into sub-functions. The ability of existing, flight-proven state-of-the-art (SOA) technologies to meet the functional needs of each of the three mission types was then assessed. When SOA capabilities fell short of meeting the needs, those "gaps" were prioritized in terms of whether or not the corresponding capabilities enable or enhance each of the mission types. The resulting list of enabling and enhancing capability gaps can be used to guide future ECLSS development. A strategy to fulfill those needs over time was then developed in the form of a roadmap. Through execution of this roadmap, the hardware and technologies needed to enable and enhance exploration may be developed in a manner that synergistically benefits the ISS operational capability, supports Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) development, and sustains long-term technology investments for longer duration missions. This paper summarizes NASA s ECLSS capability roadmap

  11. 10 CFR 26.123 - Testing facility capabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Testing facility capabilities. 26.123 Section 26.123 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Licensee Testing Facilities § 26.123 Testing facility capabilities. Each licensee testing facility shall have the capability, at the...

  12. 10 CFR 26.123 - Testing facility capabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Testing facility capabilities. 26.123 Section 26.123 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Licensee Testing Facilities § 26.123 Testing facility capabilities. Each licensee testing facility shall have the capability, at the...

  13. 10 CFR 26.123 - Testing facility capabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Testing facility capabilities. 26.123 Section 26.123 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Licensee Testing Facilities § 26.123 Testing facility capabilities. Each licensee testing facility shall have the capability, at the...

  14. 10 CFR 26.123 - Testing facility capabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Testing facility capabilities. 26.123 Section 26.123 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Licensee Testing Facilities § 26.123 Testing facility capabilities. Each licensee testing facility shall have the capability, at the...

  15. 10 CFR 26.123 - Testing facility capabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Testing facility capabilities. 26.123 Section 26.123 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Licensee Testing Facilities § 26.123 Testing facility capabilities. Each licensee testing facility shall have the capability, at the...

  16. A PC program for estimating measurement uncertainty for aeronautics test instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumenthal, Philip Z.

    1995-01-01

    A personal computer program was developed which provides aeronautics and operations engineers at Lewis Research Center with a uniform method to quickly provide values for the uncertainty in test measurements and research results. The software package used for performing the calculations is Mathcad 4.0, a Windows version of a program which provides an interactive user interface for entering values directly into equations with immediate display of results. The error contribution from each component of the system is identified individually in terms of the parameter measured. The final result is given in common units, SI units, and percent of full scale range. The program also lists the specifications for all instrumentation and calibration equipment used for the analysis. It provides a presentation-quality printed output which can be used directly for reports and documents.

  17. Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) Mission Control Gold Room During X-29 Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The mission control Gold room is seen here during a research flight of the X-29 at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. All aspects of a research mission are monitored from one of two of these control rooms at Dryden. Dryden and its control rooms are part of the Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR). The WATR consists of a highly automated complex of computer controlled tracking, telemetry, and communications systems and control room complexes that are capable of supporting any type of mission ranging from system and component testing, to sub-scale and full-scale flight tests of new aircraft and reentry systems. Designated areas are assigned for spin/dive tests; corridors are provided for low, medium, and high-altitude supersonic flight; and special STOL/VSTOL facilities are available at Ames Moffett and Crows Landing. Special use airspace, available at Edwards, covers approximately twelve thousand square miles of mostly desert area. The southern boundary lies to the south of Rogers Dry Lake, the western boundary lies midway between Mojave and Bakersfield, the northern boundary passes just south of Bishop, and the eastern boundary follows about 25 miles west of the Nevada border except in the northern areas where it crosses into Nevada. Two X-29 aircraft, featuring one of the most unusual designs in aviation history, flew at the Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California) from 1984 to 1992. The fighter-sized X-29 technology demonstrators explored several concepts and technologies including: the use of advanced composites in aircraft construction; variable-camber wing surfaces; a unique forward- swept wing and its thin supercritical airfoil; strakes; close-coupled canards; and a computerized fly-by-wire flight control system used to maintain control of the otherwise unstable aircraft. Research results showed that the configuration of forward-swept wings, coupled with movable canards, gave

  18. Capabilities Report 2012, West Desert Test Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-12

    atmospheric conditions over the primary test ranges are very stable with the absence of storms , producing a consistent and reliable wind pattern...WSLAT methodology will determine if reliable agent-to-simulant correlation is maintained from chamber test data to field testing. Once operational...ovalbumin (OV), and smoke and dust . Although testing within the JABT does not replace field testing, it provides a controlled facility for instrument

  19. Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) Mission Control Gold Room During X-29 Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The mission control Gold room is seen here during a research flight of the X-29 at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. All aspects of a research mission are monitored from one of two of these control rooms at Dryden. Dryden and its control rooms are part of the Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR). The WATR consists of a highly automated complex of computer controlled tracking, telemetry, and communications systems and control room complexes that are capable of supporting any type of mission ranging from system and component testing, to sub-scale and full-scale flight tests of new aircraft and reentry systems. Designated areas are assigned for spin/dive tests; corridors are provided for low, medium, and high-altitude supersonic flight; and special STOL/VSTOL facilities are available at Ames Moffett and Crows Landing. Special use airspace, available at Edwards, covers approximately twelve thousand square miles of mostly desert area. The southern boundary lies to the south of Rogers Dry Lake, the western boundary lies midway between Mojave and Bakersfield, the northern boundary passes just south of Bishop, and the eastern boundary follows about 25 miles west of the Nevada border except in the northern areas where it crosses into Nevada. Two X-29 aircraft, featuring one of the most unusual designs in aviation history, flew at the Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California) from 1984 to 1992. The fighter-sized X-29 technology demonstrators explored several concepts and technologies including: the use of advanced composites in aircraft construction; variable-camber wing surfaces; a unique forward- swept wing and its thin supercritical airfoil; strakes; close-coupled canards; and a computerized fly-by-wire flight control system used to maintain control of the otherwise unstable aircraft. Research results showed that the configuration of forward-swept wings, coupled with movable canards, gave

  20. Wind Tunnel and Propulsion Test Facilities: An Assessment of NASA's Capabilities to Serve National Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anton, Philip S.; Gritton, Eugene C.; Mesic, Richard; Steinberg, Paul; Johnson, Dana J.

    2004-01-01

    This monograph reveals and discusses the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) wind tunnel and propulsion test facility management issues that are creating real risks to the United States' competitive aeronautics advantage.

  1. Package testing capabilities at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.M.

    1993-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the package testing capabilities at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). In the past all of the package testing that was performed at PNL was done on prototype or mocked up radioactive material packaging. Presently, we are developing the capability to perform testing on non-radioactive material packaging. The testing on the non-radioactive material packaging will be done to satisfy the new performance oriented packaging requirements (DOT Docket HM-181, 1991). This paper describes the equipment used to perform the performance oriented packaging tests and also describes some testing capability for testing radioactive material packaging.

  2. Package testing capabilities at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the package testing capabilities at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). In the past all of the package testing that was performed at PNL was done on prototype or mocked up radioactive material packaging. Presently, we are developing the capability to perform testing on non-radioactive material packaging. The testing on the non-radioactive material packaging will be done to satisfy the new performance oriented packaging requirements (DOT Docket HM-181, 1991). This paper describes the equipment used to perform the performance oriented packaging tests and also describes some testing capability for testing radioactive material packaging.

  3. Test and evaluation capabilities at NAVELEXCEN Charleston

    SciTech Connect

    Stalvey, T.W.; Anderson, G.B.; Hinson, T.L.

    1993-12-31

    The Environmental Systems and Instrumentation Engineering Department is located within the Special Programs Directorate of the Naval Electronic Systems Engineering Center (NAVELEXCEN Charleston). This Center is an echelon 4 Command under the Naval Command Control and Ocean Surveillance Center, San Diego (NCCOSC). NCCOSC is an echelon 3 Command under the Space and Warfare Systems Command (SPAWAR) which is located in Washington DC. Radiation Detection, Indication and Computation (RDIAC) equipment life-cycle management for the entire Navy falls under the auspices of the Naval Sea Systems Command (SEA 04R). The RADIAC Program provides centralized management for the execution of research, development, test, evaluation, maintenance, procurement, allowance, and equipment support for all Navy RADIAC instrumentation and assigned special monitoring equipments. RADIAC equipment is used throughout the Navy to support various functions associated with radioactivity, potential contamination, and personnel exposure to sources of ionizing radiation. Common sources in today`s Navy include nuclear reactors, nuclear weapons, industrial radiography, and nuclear medicine. Types of radiation includes gamma, x-ray, alpha, and beta.

  4. An inventory of aeronautical ground research facilities. Volume 2: Air breathing engine test facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirrello, C. J.; Hardin, R. D.; Heckart, M. V.; Brown, K. R.

    1971-01-01

    The inventory covers free jet and direct connect altitude cells, sea level static thrust stands, sea level test cells with ram air, and propulsion wind tunnels. Free jet altitude cells and propulsion wind tunnels are used for evaluation of complete inlet-engine-exhaust nozzle propulsion systems under simulated flight conditions. These facilities are similar in principal of operation and differ primarily in test section concept. The propulsion wind tunnel provides a closed test section and restrains the flow around the test specimen while the free jet is allowed to expand freely. A chamber of large diameter about the free jet is provided in which desired operating pressure levels may be maintained. Sea level test cells with ram air provide controlled, conditioned air directly to the engine face for performance evaluation at low altitude flight conditions. Direct connect altitude cells provide a means of performance evaluation at simulated conditions of Mach number and altitude with air supplied to the flight altitude conditions. Sea level static thrust stands simply provide an instrumented engine mounting for measuring thrust at zero airspeed. While all of these facilities are used for integrated engine testing, a few provide engine component test capability.

  5. NASA's Role in Aeronautics: A Workshop. Volume VI - Aeronautical Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Assembly of Engineering.

    The central task of a 1980 workshop on the role of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in aeronautics was to examine the relationship of NASA's research capabilities to the state of U.S. aviation and to make recommendations about NASA's future role in aeronautics. Following a brief introduction, the Overview Panel on…

  6. NASA thesaurus aeronautics vocabulary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The controlled vocabulary used by the NASA Scientific and Technical Information effort to index documents in the area of aeronautics is presented. The terms comprise a subset of the 1988 edition of the NASA Thesaurus and its supplements issued through the end of 1990. The Aeronautics Vocabulary contains over 4700 terms presented in a hierarchical display format. In addition to aeronautics per se, the vocabulary covers supporting terminology from areas such as fluid dynamics, propulsion engineering, and test facilities and instrumentation.

  7. NASA Dryden: Flight Loads Lab Capabilities and Mass Properties Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, David Michael; Bakalyar, John A.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation covers the basic capabilities of the Dryden Flight Loads Lab. It also covers in detail the mass properties capabilities of the loads lab, focusing on the recent mass properties testing of the X-48B, and the recent tests of the Dynamic Inertia Measurement method (DIMM). Presentation focuses on the test methods and issues discovered during the mass properties testing of the X-48B leading to the requirement of new instrumentation on all conventional mass properties testing. Presentation also focuses on development of DIMM for replacement of conventional mass properties tests.

  8. Advances in Engine Test Capabilities at the NASA Glenn Research Center's Propulsion Systems Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pachlhofer, Peter M.; Panek, Joseph W.; Dicki, Dennis J.; Piendl, Barry R.; Lizanich, Paul J.; Klann, Gary A.

    2006-01-01

    The Propulsion Systems Laboratory at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center is one of the premier U.S. facilities for research on advanced aeropropulsion systems. The facility can simulate a wide range of altitude and Mach number conditions while supplying the aeropropulsion system with all the support services necessary to operate at those conditions. Test data are recorded on a combination of steady-state and highspeed data-acquisition systems. Recently a number of upgrades were made to the facility to meet demanding new requirements for the latest aeropropulsion concepts and to improve operational efficiency. Improvements were made to data-acquisition systems, facility and engine-control systems, test-condition simulation systems, video capture and display capabilities, and personnel training procedures. This paper discusses the facility s capabilities, recent upgrades, and planned future improvements.

  9. Quench Module Insert Capabilities and Development Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carswell, B.; Crouch, M.; Farmer, J.; Breeding, S.; Rose, F.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Quench Module Insert is a directional solidification furnace, which will fly in the Materials Science Research Facility. The QMI provides high thermal gradient and quench capabilities for processing metals and alloys in microgravity. This paper will describe the capabilities and present of on-going analysis and development testing.

  10. Mammalian Toxicology Testing: Problem Definition Study. Capability Modules.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    AD-A112 9 LIFE SYSTEMS INC CLEVELAND OH F/S 6/90 MAM4ALIAN TOXICO.OY TESTING $ PROBLLM DEFINITION STUDY. CAPABL--ETC(U) APR t R A WYNVEEN, R V ALBAN...11111 .25 1-4 1.6 *fl*Ifl- ii, MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATIONAL BURLAU OF STANDARDS 1963 A AD LSI TR-47-191 MAMMALIAN TOXICOLOGY TESTING : PROBLEM...REPORT & PERIOD COVEREDw MAMMALIAN TOXICOLOGY TESTING : PROBLEM Supporting Document DEFINITION STUDY, CAPABILITY MODULES 15 December 1980-5 April 1981

  11. Providing the Nation a Significant "High-Test Peroxide" Propulsion Test Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruce, R.; Taylor, G.; Beckmeyer, D.; Warren, S.; Dracon, S.; Powell, B.; Goodwin, D.; Rieder, P.; Nichols, R.

    1999-01-01

    Renewed interest in high-test peroxide, as a propellant, required the development of a facility capable of testing rocket propulsion systems. The development of this capability at the NASA Stennis Space Center (SSC), MS, focused on meeting this requirement. The challenges, accomplishments, and lessons learned associated with developing the SSC E3 Test Facility's high-test peroxide capability are presented herein.

  12. Past and Present Large Solid Rocket Motor Test Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalski, Robert R.; Owen, David B., II

    2011-01-01

    A study was performed to identify the current and historical trends in the capability of solid rocket motor testing in the United States. The study focused on test positions capable of testing solid rocket motors of at least 10,000 lbf thrust. Top-level information was collected for two distinct data points plus/minus a few years: 2000 (Y2K) and 2010 (Present). Data was combined from many sources, but primarily focused on data from the Chemical Propulsion Information Analysis Center s Rocket Propulsion Test Facilities Database, and heritage Chemical Propulsion Information Agency/M8 Solid Rocket Motor Static Test Facilities Manual. Data for the Rocket Propulsion Test Facilities Database and heritage M8 Solid Rocket Motor Static Test Facilities Manual is provided to the Chemical Propulsion Information Analysis Center directly from the test facilities. Information for each test cell for each time period was compiled and plotted to produce a graphical display of the changes for the nation, NASA, Department of Defense, and commercial organizations during the past ten years. Major groups of plots include test facility by geographic location, test cells by status/utilization, and test cells by maximum thrust capability. The results are discussed.

  13. Quench Module Insert Capabilities and Development Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carswell, William E.; Crouch, M. R.; Farmer, J.; Breeding, S.; Rose, F.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Quench Module Insert is a directional solidification furnace that will operate in the Materials Science Research Rack (MSRR) on the International Space Station. It will provide high thermal gradient and quench capabilities for processing metals and alloys in microgravity. Numerical analyses and breadboard testing conducted to date show that the QMI can produce an axial temperature gradient approaching 150 C per centimeter in a 1 centimeter diameter aluminum sample with a maximum molten sample temperature of 1100 C. Breadboard testing and analysis have also shown that the quench capabilities of the furnace are sufficient to rapidly solidify at least a 5mm axial portion of a 1 centimeter diameter molten aluminum sample in significantly less than the required 2 seconds and prevent significant backmelt. This paper presents the furnace requirements and capabilities and a status of the associated development testing and analyses.

  14. Marshall Space Flight Center's Impact Testing Facility Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finchum, Andy; Hubbs, Whitney; Evans, Steve

    2008-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center s (MSFC) Impact Testing Facility (ITF) serves as an important installation for space and missile related materials science research. The ITF was established and began its research in spacecraft debris shielding in the early 1960s, then played a major role in the International Space Station debris shield development. As NASA became more interested in launch debris and in-flight impact concerns, the ITF grew to include research in a variety of impact genres. Collaborative partnerships with the DoD led to a wider range of impact capabilities being relocated to MSFC as a result of the closure of Particle Impact Facilities in Santa Barbara, California. The Particle Impact Facility had a 30 year history in providing evaluations of aerospace materials and components during flights through rain, ice, and solid particle environments at subsonic through hypersonic velocities. The facility s unique capabilities were deemed a "National Asset" by the DoD. The ITF now has capabilities including environmental, ballistic, and hypervelocity impact testing utilizing an array of air, powder, and two-stage light gas guns to accommodate a variety of projectile and target types and sizes. Numerous upgrades including new instrumentation, triggering circuitry, high speed photography, and optimized sabot designs have been implemented. Other recent research has included rain drop demise characterization tests to obtain data for inclusion in on-going model development. The current and proposed ITF capabilities range from rain to micrometeoroids allowing the widest test parameter range possible for materials investigations in support of space, atmospheric, and ground environments. These test capabilities including hydrometeor, single/multi-particle, ballistic gas guns, exploding wire gun, and light gas guns combined with Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics Code (SPHC) simulations represent the widest range of impact test capabilities in the country.

  15. Capabilities of electrodynamic shakers when used for mechanical shock testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keegan, W. B.

    1973-01-01

    The results of a research task to investigate the capabilities of electrodynamic vibrators (shakers) to perform mechanical shock tests are presented. The simulation method employed was that of developing a transient whose shock response spectrum matched the desired shock response spectrum. Areas investigated included the maximum amplitude capabilities of the shaker systems, the ability to control the shape of the resultant shock response spectrum, the response levels induced at frequencies outside the controlled bandwidth, and the nonlinearities in structural response induced by a change in test level.

  16. Assessing cardiac pumping capability by exercise testing and inotropic stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Tan, L B; Bain, R J; Littler, W A

    1989-01-01

    In heart failure both functional capacity and prognosis are primarily determined by the degree of pump dysfunction. Although data on haemodynamic function at rest may indicate impaired cardiac function, they do not assess the capacity of the heart to respond to stress. Maximal bicycle ergometry and incremental intravenous inotropic stimulation in 31 patients with moderately severe heart failure were evaluated as methods of stressing the heart to determine cardiac pumping capability, which is defined as the cardiac power obtained during maximal stimulation. There was good agreement between the cardiac pumping capabilities assessed by these two methods. Maximal cardiac power output was better than maximal cardiac output and left ventricular stroke work index in representing cardiac pumping capability, because it was less dependent on the type of stimulation used during evaluation. Inotropic challenge is at least as effective as exercise testing in assessing cardiac pumping capability in heart failure, and may be a better method in patients who find physical exercise difficult. PMID:2757870

  17. Aeronautic instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everling, E; Koppe, H

    1924-01-01

    The development of aeronautic instruments. Vibrations, rapid changes of the conditions of flight and of atmospheric conditions, influence of the air stream all call for particular design and construction of the individual instruments. This is shown by certain examples of individual instruments and of various classes of instruments for measuring pressure, change of altitude, temperature, velocity, inclination and turning or combinations of these.

  18. A DMA Instrument with Versatile Capabilities For Rubber Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perier, Laurent; Favier, Arnaud

    2010-06-01

    Following a development of 40 years, 01dB-Metravib is proposing a set of powerful instruments, including innovative and unique capabilities. The different instruments are covering a unique frequency range from static up to 10,000Hz. Additionnaly to standard DMA tests, thanks to high force capabilities (up to +/-450N), it is possible to understand strain dependence of the material up to very high dynamic strain (+/-300% and higher) and also to propose on the same instrument, complementary tests such as: fatigue, heat build up, crack growth, excitation waveform control, automated glass transition detection and optimization of measurement, …. This presentation illustrates some of the capability of the DMA+ range of instrument applied to different kind of rubbers and elastomers material.

  19. Aeronautical facilities assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penaranda, F. E. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    A survey of the free world's aeronautical facilities was undertaken and an evaluation made on where the relative strengths and weaknesses exist. Special emphasis is given to NASA's own capabilities and needs. The types of facilities surveyed are: Wind Tunnels; Airbreathing Propulsion Facilities; and Flight Simulators

  20. Marshall Space Flight Center's Impact Testing Facility Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Steve; Finchum, Andy; Hubbs, Whitney; Gray, Perry

    2008-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Impact Testing Facility (ITF) serves as an important installation for space and missile related materials science research. The ITF was established and began its research in spacecraft debris shielding in the early 1960s, then played a major role in the International Space Station debris shield development. As NASA became more interested in launch debris and in-flight impact concerns, the ITF grew to include research in a variety of impact genres. Collaborative partnerships with the DoD led to a wider range of impact capabilities being relocated to MSFC as a result of the closure of Particle Impact Facilities in Santa Barbara, California, The Particle Impact Facility had a 30 year history in providing evaluations of aerospace materials and components during flights through rain, ice, and solid particle environments at subsonic through hypersonic velocities. The facility's unique capabilities were deemed a 'National Asset' by the DoD, The ITF now has capabilities including environmental, ballistic, and hypervelocity impact testing utilizing an array of air, powder, and two-stage light gas guns to accommodate a variety of projectile and target types and sizes. Relocated test equipment was dated and in need of upgrade. Numerous upgrades including new instrumentation, triggering circuitry, high speed photography, and optimized sabot designs have been implemented. Other recent research has included rain drop demise characterization tests to obtain data for inclusion in on-going model development. Future ITF improvements will be focused on continued instrumentation and performance enhancements. These enhancements will allow further, more in-depth, characterization of rain drop demise characterization and evaluation of ice crystal impact. Performance enhancements also include increasing the upper velocity limit of the current environmental guns to allow direct environmental simulation for missile components. The current and proposed

  1. Marshall Space Flight Center's Impact Testing Facility Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Steve; Finchum, Andy; Hubbs, Whitney

    2008-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Impact Testing Facility (ITF) serves as an important installation for space and missile related materials science research. The ITF was established and began its research in spacecraft debris shielding in the early 1960% then played a major role in the International Space Station debris shield development. As NASA became more interested in launch debris and in-flight impact concerns, the ITF grew to include research in a variety of impact genres. Collaborative partnerships with the DoD led to a wider range of impact capabilities being relocated to MSFC as a result of the closure of Particle Impact Facilities in Santa Barbara, California. The Particle Impact Facility had a 30 year history in providing evaluations of aerospace materials and components during flights through rain, ice, and solid particle environments at subsonic through hypersonic velocities. The facility's unique capabilities were deemed a "National Asset" by the DoD. The ITF now has capabilities including environmental, ballistic, and hypervelocity impact testing utilizing an array of air, powder, and two-stage light gas guns to accommodate a variety of projectile and target types and sizes. Relocated test equipment was dated and in need of upgrade. Numerous upgrades including new instrumentation, triggering circuitry, high speed photography, and optimized sabot designs have been implemented. Other recent research has included rain drop demise characterization tests to obtain data for inclusion in on-going model development. Future ITF improvements will be focused on continued instrumentation and performance enhancements. These enhancements will allow further, more in-depth, characterization of rain drop demise characterization and evaluation of ice crystal impact. Performance enhancements also include increasing the upper velocity limit of the current environmental guns to allow direct environmental simulation for missile components. The current and proposed

  2. Experimental Validation: Subscale Aircraft Ground Facilities and Integrated Test Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Roger M.; Hostetler, Robert W., Jr.; Barnes, Kevin N.; Belcastro, Celeste M.; Belcastro, Christine M.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental testing is an important aspect of validating complex integrated safety critical aircraft technologies. The Airborne Subscale Transport Aircraft Research (AirSTAR) Testbed is being developed at NASA Langley to validate technologies under conditions that cannot be flight validated with full-scale vehicles. The AirSTAR capability comprises a series of flying sub-scale models, associated ground-support equipment, and a base research station at NASA Langley. The subscale model capability utilizes a generic 5.5% scaled transport class vehicle known as the Generic Transport Model (GTM). The AirSTAR Ground Facilities encompass the hardware and software infrastructure necessary to provide comprehensive support services for the GTM testbed. The ground facilities support remote piloting of the GTM aircraft, and include all subsystems required for data/video telemetry, experimental flight control algorithm implementation and evaluation, GTM simulation, data recording/archiving, and audio communications. The ground facilities include a self-contained, motorized vehicle serving as a mobile research command/operations center, capable of deployment to remote sites when conducting GTM flight experiments. The ground facilities also include a laboratory based at NASA LaRC providing near identical capabilities as the mobile command/operations center, as well as the capability to receive data/video/audio from, and send data/audio to the mobile command/operations center during GTM flight experiments.

  3. NASA's New High Intensity Solar Environment Test Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Wright, Kenneth H.

    2012-01-01

    Across the world, new spaceflight missions are being designed and executed that will place spacecraft and instruments into challenging environments throughout the solar system. To aid in the successful completion of these new missions, NASA has developed a new flexible space environment test platform. The High Intensity Solar Environment Test (HISET) capability located at NASA fs Marshall Space Flight Center provides scientists and engineers with the means to test spacecraft materials and systems in a wide range of solar wind and solar photon environments. Featuring a solar simulator capable of delivering approximately 1 MW/m2 of broad spectrum radiation at maximum power, HISET provides a means to test systems or components that could explore the solar corona. The solar simulator consists of three high-power Xenon arc lamps that can be operated independently over a range of power to meet test requirements; i.e., the lamp power can be greatly reduced to simulate the solar intensity at several AU. Integral to the HISET capability are charged particle sources that can provide a solar wind (electron and proton) environment. Used individually or in combination, the charged particle sources can provide fluxes ranging from a few nA/cm2 to 100s of nA/cm2 over an energy range of 50 eV to 100 keV for electrons and 100 eV to 30 keV for protons. Anchored by a high vacuum facility equipped with a liquid nitrogen cold shroud for radiative cooling scenarios, HISET is able to accommodate samples as large as 1 meter in diameter. In this poster, details of the HISET capability will be presented, including the wide ]ranging configurability of the system.

  4. Radioactive material package testing capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Uncapher, W.L.; Hohnstreiter, G.F.

    1995-12-31

    Evaluation and certification of radioactive and hazardous material transport packages can be accomplished by subjecting these packages to normal transport and hypothetical accident test conditions. The regulations allow package designers to certify packages using analysis, testing, or a combination of analysis and testing. Testing can be used to substantiate assumptions used in analytical models and to demonstrate package structural and thermal response. Regulatory test conditions include impact, puncture, crush, penetration, water spray, immersion, and thermal environments. Testing facilities are used to simulate the required test conditions and provide measurement response data. Over the past four decades, comprehensive testing facilities have been developed at Sandia National Laboratories to perform a broad range of verification and certification tests on hazardous and radioactive material packages or component sections. Sandia`s facilities provide an experience base that has been established during the development and certification of many package designs. These unique facilities, along with innovative instrumentation data collection capabilities and techniques, simulate a broad range of testing environments. In certain package designs, package testing can be an economical alternative to complex analysis to resolve regulatory questions or concerns.

  5. Nondestructive Testing of Aeronautic Bearing Ceramic Balls by Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, S.; Duquennoy, M.; Ouaftouh, M.; Deneuville, F.; Jenot, F.; Ourak, M.

    2005-04-01

    Although ceramic balls are used for bearings in the aerospace industries, defects in ceramic material could be dangerous, particularly if such defects are located close to the surface. We propose a non-destructive testing method for silicon nitride balls, based on ultrasonic resonance spectroscopy. From their elastic vibrations, it is possible to characterize the balls. The proposed methodology can both excite and detect vibrations over a large frequency range, in order to estimate the velocity of surface waves, which permits cortical areas to be tested specifically.

  6. Light Initiated High Explosives (LIHE) Test Technique and Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covert, Timothy

    2009-06-01

    The Light Initiated High Explosives (LIHE) test facility has been re-established and chartered to impart impulsive loads to a variety of targets. This loading is achieved through the detonation of a primary explosive applied directly to the target surface using a robotic spraying system. Using light as the initiating mechanism ensures virtually simultaneous loading. Uniform, discontinuous, or graded explosive loading conditions are achievable over complex shapes with the LIHE process. This direct detonation technique is a demonstrated capability at the LIHE facility. Test results will be presented. In addition to the direct detonation technique, the LIHE facility is developing the capability to explosively accelerate a thin flyer plate to impact various test targets. This explosively accelerated flyer plate (X-Flyer) will enable pressure control during impulsive loading. By controlling flyer density (material), thickness, velocity, and acceleration gap, the impact pressure amplitude and pulse duration can be controlled. Similar to the direct detonation technique, a primary explosive is robotically sprayed onto the flyer plate and subsequently detonated using an intense flash of light. Through the control of the explosive deposition and flyer gap, virtually simultaneous impact is achievable for either uniform or graded loading conditions. X-Flyer test results will be presented.

  7. Test Facilities Capability Handbook: Volume 1 - Stennis Space Center (SSC); Volume 2 - Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hensarling, Paula L.

    2007-01-01

    The John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC) is located in Southern Mississippi near the Mississippi-Louisiana state line. SSC is chartered as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Center of Excellence for large space transportation propulsion system testing. This charter has led to many unique test facilities, capabilities and advanced technologies provided through the supporting infrastructure. SSC has conducted projects in support of such diverse activities as liquid, and hybrid rocket testing and development; material development; non-intrusive plume diagnostics; plume tracking; commercial remote sensing; test technology and more. On May 30, 1996 NASA designated SSC the lead center for rocket propulsion testing, giving the center total responsibility for conducting and/or managing all NASA rocket engine testing. Test services are now available not only for NASA but also for the Department of Defense, other government agencies, academia, and industry. This handbook was developed to provide a summary of the capabilities that exist within SSC. It is intended as a primary resource document, which will provide the reader with the top-level capabilities and characteristics of the numerous test facilities, test support facilities, laboratories, and services. Due to the nature of continually evolving programs and test technologies, descriptions of the Center's current capabilities are provided. Periodic updates and revisions of this document will be made to maintain its completeness and accuracy.

  8. Quantitative impact characterization of aeronautical CFRP materials with non-destructive testing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefel, Denis; Stoessel, Rainer; Grosse, Christian

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, an increasing number of safety-relevant structures are designed and manufactured from carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP) in order to reduce weight of airplanes by taking the advantage of their specific strength into account. Non-destructive testing (NDT) methods for quantitative defect analysis of damages are liquid- or air-coupled ultrasonic testing (UT), phased array ultrasonic techniques, and active thermography (IR). The advantage of these testing methods is the applicability on large areas. However, their quantitative information is often limited on impact localization and size. In addition to these techniques, Airbus Group Innovations operates a micro x-ray computed tomography (μ-XCT) system, which was developed for CFRP characterization. It is an open system which allows different kinds of acquisition, reconstruction, and data evaluation. One main advantage of this μ-XCT system is its high resolution with 3-dimensional analysis and visualization opportunities, which enables to gain important quantitative information for composite part design and stress analysis. Within this study, different NDT methods will be compared at CFRP samples with specified artificial impact damages. The results can be used to select the most suitable NDT-method for specific application cases. Furthermore, novel evaluation and visualization methods for impact analyzes are developed and will be presented.

  9. Quantitative impact characterization of aeronautical CFRP materials with non-destructive testing methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kiefel, Denis E-mail: Rainer.Stoessel@airbus.com; Stoessel, Rainer E-mail: Rainer.Stoessel@airbus.com; Grosse, Christian

    2015-03-31

    In recent years, an increasing number of safety-relevant structures are designed and manufactured from carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP) in order to reduce weight of airplanes by taking the advantage of their specific strength into account. Non-destructive testing (NDT) methods for quantitative defect analysis of damages are liquid- or air-coupled ultrasonic testing (UT), phased array ultrasonic techniques, and active thermography (IR). The advantage of these testing methods is the applicability on large areas. However, their quantitative information is often limited on impact localization and size. In addition to these techniques, Airbus Group Innovations operates a micro x-ray computed tomography (μ-XCT) system, which was developed for CFRP characterization. It is an open system which allows different kinds of acquisition, reconstruction, and data evaluation. One main advantage of this μ-XCT system is its high resolution with 3-dimensional analysis and visualization opportunities, which enables to gain important quantitative information for composite part design and stress analysis. Within this study, different NDT methods will be compared at CFRP samples with specified artificial impact damages. The results can be used to select the most suitable NDT-method for specific application cases. Furthermore, novel evaluation and visualization methods for impact analyzes are developed and will be presented.

  10. Overview of US fast-neutron facilities and testing capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, E.A.; Cox, C.M.; Jackson, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    Rather than attempt a cataloging of the various fast neutron facilities developed and used in this country over the last 30 years, this paper will focus on those facilities which have been used to develop, proof test, and explore safety issues of fuels, materials and components for the breeder and fusion program. This survey paper will attempt to relate the evolution of facility capabilities with the evolution of development program which use the facilities. The work horse facilities for the breeder program are EBR-II, FFTF and TREAT. For the fusion program, RTNS-II and FMIT were selected.

  11. Enhanced capability of the Combustion-Heated Scramjet Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rock, Kenneth E.; Andrews, Earl H.; Eggers, James M.

    1991-01-01

    The Combustion-Heated Scramjet Test Facility (CHSTF) is described together with its modifications. The expanded simulation capabilities of the facility are documented. Nozzle exit surveys and tunnel calibration information are presented. It is noted that these modifications included a new heat-sink nickel liner heater, a new Mach 4.7 nozzle, and a new 70-ft vacuum sphere exhaust system. It is found that the facility in the air ejector mode of operation performed similarly to that prior to the addition of the vacuum sphere ducting.

  12. In-Situ Creep Testing Capability for the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    B. G. Kim; J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; K. G. Condie; B. H. Sencer

    2012-09-01

    An instrumented creep testing capability is being developed for specimens irradiated in Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) coolant conditions at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The test rig has been developed such that samples will be subjected to stresses ranging from 92 to 350 MPa at temperatures between 290 and 370 °C up to at least 2 dpa (displacement per atom). The status of Idaho National Laboratory (INL) efforts to develop the test rig in-situ creep testing capability for the ATR is described. In addition to providing an overview of in-pile creep test capabilities available at other test reactors, this paper reports efforts by INL to evaluate a prototype test rig in an autoclave at INL’s High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL). Initial data from autoclave tests with 304 stainless steel (304 SS) specimens are reported.

  13. Flight test results of ladar brownout look-through capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelmash, Stephen; Münsterer, Thomas; Kramper, Patrick; Samuelis, Christian; Bühler, Daniel; Wegner, Matthias; Sheth, Sagar

    2015-06-01

    The paper discusses recent results of flight tests performed with the Airbus Defence and Space ladar system at Yuma Proving Grounds. The ladar under test was the SferiSense® system which is in operational use as an in-flight obstacle warning and avoidance system on the NH90 transport helicopter. Just minor modifications were done on the sensor firmware to optimize its performance in brownout. Also a new filtering algorithm fitted to segment dust artefacts out of the collected 3D data in real-time was employed. The results proved that this ladar sensor is capable to detect obstacles through brownout dust clouds with a depth extending up to 300 meters from the landing helicopter.

  14. Plasma Propulsion Testing Capabilities at Arnold Engineering Development Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Dawbarn, Albert; Moeller, Trevor

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a series of experiments aimed at quantifying the plasma propulsion testing capabilities of a 12-ft diameter vacuum facility (12V) at USAF-Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC). Vacuum is maintained in the 12V facility by cryogenic panels lining the interior of the chamber. The pumping capability of these panels was shown to be great enough to support plasma thrusters operating at input electrical power >20 kW. In addition, a series of plasma diagnostics inside the chamber allowed for measurement of plasma parameters at different spatial locations, providing information regarding the chamber's effect on the global plasma thruster flowfield. The plasma source used in this experiment was Hall thruster manufactured by Busek Co. The thruster was operated at up to 20 kW steady-state power in both a lower current and higher current mode. The vacuum level in the chamber never rose above 9 x 10(exp -6) torr during the course of testing. Langmuir probes, ion flux probes, and Faraday cups were used to quantify the plasma parameters in the chamber. We present the results of these measurements and estimates of pumping speed based on the background pressure level and thruster propellant mass flow rate.

  15. Development and Testing of EFIT 3D Equilibrium Reconstruction Capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lao, L. L.; Ferraro, N. M.; Strait, E. J.; Turnbull, A. D.; King, J. D.

    2014-10-01

    Recent development and testing of EFIT capability to reconstruct tokamak 3D perturbed equilibrium are described. The 3D extension is based on an expansion of the MHD equations to account for the 3D effects. EFIT uses the cylindrical coordinate system and can include magnetic island and stochastic effects. Several linearization schemes are being explored to improve the EFIT 3D perturbed solutions. Algorithms are also being developed to allow EFIT to reconstruct 3D perturbed equilibria directly making use of plasma response to 3D perturbations from the MARS or M3D-C1 MHD codes. Other efforts include testing of the new EFIT 3D capability using simulated magnetic data based on response calculations from MARS and M3D-C1, and performing detailed benchmarking calculations against other 3D codes such as VMEC/V3FIT. Reconstruction examples using EFIT and the new DIII-D 3D magnetic measurements to reconstruct 3D perturbed experimental equilibria using well-diagnosed discharges from DIII-D error field, RWM, and RMP experiments will be presented. Work supported by the US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698 and DE-FG02-95ER54309.

  16. [Exploring Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Brandi

    2004-01-01

    This summer I have been working with the N.A.S.A. Project at Cuyahoga Community College (Tri-C) under the title of Exploring Aeronautics Project Leader. The class that I have worked with is comprised of students that will enter the eighth grade in the fall of 2004. The program primarily focuses upon math proficiency and individualized class projects. My duties have encompassed both realms. During the first 2-3 weeks of my internship, I worked at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) researching, organizing, and compiling information for weekly Scholastic Challenges and the Super Scholastic Challenge. I was able to complete an overview of Scholastic Challenge and staff responsibilities regarding the competition; a proposal for an interactive learning system, Quizdom; a schedule for challenge equipment, as well as a schedule listing submission deadlines for the staff. Also included in my tasks, during these first 2-3 weeks, were assisting Tammy Allen and Candice Thomas with the student application review and interview processes for student applicants. For the student and parent orientation, I was assigned publications and other varying tasks to complete before the start of the program. Upon the commencement of the program, I changed location from NASA GRC to Tri-C Metro Campus, where student classes for the Cleveland site are held. During the duration of the program, I work with the instructor for the Exploring Aeronautics class, kkkk, assisting in classroom management, daily attendance, curriculum, project building, and other tasks as needed. These tasks include the conducting of the weekly competition, known as Scholastic Challenge. As a Project Leader, I am also responsible for one subject area of the Scholastic Challenge aspect of the N.A.S.A. Project curriculum. Each week I have to prepare a mission that the participants will take home the following Monday and at least 10 questions that will be included in the pool of questions used for the Scholastic Challenge

  17. The applicability and availability of Former Soviet Union (FSU) space-related capabilities and facilities to energy-related space activities of Department of Energy, Department of Defense and National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellechi, M.

    1993-01-01

    A senior-level Department of Energy (DOE), Department of Defense (DoD), and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) team visited the former Soviet Union (FSU) from 16-28 Oct. 1992. The purpose of the visit was to investigate the applicability and availability of FSU space-related capabilities and facilities to the energy-related space activities of the three agencies. This included renewable energy, nuclear power and propulsion, radiation effects, remote sensing, optics, and lasers. The U.S. delegation was successful in identifying some capabilities that would be useful to the three organizations. Efforts to utilize some of the FSU capabilities viewed are being initiated. Concurrently, there will be a technical assessment performed on the information gained from this and other recent visits to the FSU relative to space research.

  18. Background: Preflight Screening, In-flight Capabilities, and Postflight Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Charles Robert; Duncan, James

    2009-01-01

    Recommendations for minimal in-flight capabilities: Retinal Imaging - provide in-flight capability for the visual monitoring of ocular health (specifically, imaging of the retina and optic nerve head) with the capability of downlinking video/still images. Tonometry - provide more accurate and reliable in-flight capability for measuring intraocular pressure. Ultrasound - explore capabilities of current on-board system for monitoring ocular health. We currently have limited in-flight capabilities on board the International Space Station for performing an internal ocular health assessment. Visual Acuity, Direct Ophthalmoscope, Ultrasound, Tonometry(Tonopen):

  19. Improved CPAS Photogrammetric Capabilities for Engineering Development Unit (EDU) Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Eric S.; Bretz, David R.

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on two key improvements to the photogrammetric analysis capabilities of the Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) for the Orion vehicle. The Engineering Development Unit (EDU) system deploys Drogue and Pilot parachutes via mortar, where an important metric is the muzzle velocity. This can be estimated using a high speed camera pointed along the mortar trajectory. The distance to the camera is computed from the apparent size of features of known dimension. This method was validated with a ground test and compares favorably with simulations. The second major photogrammetric product is measuring the geometry of the Main parachute cluster during steady-state descent using onboard cameras. This is challenging as the current test vehicles are suspended by a single-point attachment unlike earlier stable platforms suspended under a confluence fitting. The mathematical modeling of fly-out angles and projected areas has undergone significant revision. As the test program continues, several lessons were learned about optimizing the camera usage, installation, and settings to obtain the highest quality imagery possible.

  20. Langley Aerothermodynamic Facilities Complex: Enhancements and Testing Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micol, J. R.

    1998-01-01

    Description, capabilities, recent upgrades, and utilization of the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) Aerothermodynamic Facilities Complex (AFC) are presented. The AFC consists of five hypersonic, blow-down-to-vacuum wind tunnels that collectively provide a range of Mach number from 6 to 20, unit Reynolds number from 0.04 to 22 million per foot and, most importantly for blunt configurations, normal shock density ratio from 4 to 12. These wide ranges of hypersonic simulation parameters are due, in part, to the use of three different test gases (air, helium, and tetrafluoromethane), thereby making several of the facilities unique. The Complex represents nearly three-fourths of the conventional (as opposed to impulse)-type hypersonic wind tunnels operational in this country. AFC facilities are used to assess and optimize the hypersonic aerodynamic performance and aeroheating characteristics of aerospace vehicle concepts and to provide benchmark aerodynamic/aeroheating data fr generating the flight aerodynamic databook and final design of the thermal protection system (TPS) (e.g., establishment of flight limitations not to exceed TPS design limits). Modifications and enhancements of AFC hardware components and instrumentation have been pursued to increase capability, reliability, and productivity in support of programmatic goals. Examples illustrating facility utilization in recent years to generate essentially all of the experimental hypersonic aerodynamic and aeroheating information for high-priority, fast-paced Agency programs are presented. These programs include Phase I of the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Advanced Technology Demonstrator, X-33 program, PHase II of the X-33 program, X-34 program, the Hyper-X program ( a Mach 5,7, and 10 airbreathing propulsion flight experiment), and the X-38 program (Experimental Crew Return Vehicle, X-CRV). Current upgrades/enchancements and future plans for the AFC are discussed.

  1. Air Force Academy Aeronautics Digest.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-01

    map the external flow field on the upper surface of the wing and fuselage, *Major, USAF, Associate Professor of Aeronautics, DFAN 2 7...research effort at the USAF Academy to establish the capabilities and limitations of the seven-hole pressure probe in mapping unknown flow fields. The ... map their locations. III. Apparatus A. Wind Tunnel The Subsonic Wind Tunnel in the Aeronautics Laboratory of

  2. Aeronautical Engineering: A continuing bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    This bibliography lists 347 reports, articles and other documents introduced into the scientific and technical information system. Documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated compounds, equipment, and systems are included. Research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles are also included.

  3. Advanced E-O test capability for Army Next-Generation Automated Test System (NGATS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Errea, S.; Grigor, J.; King, D. F.; Matis, G.; McHugh, S.; McKechnie, J.; Nehring, B.

    2015-05-01

    The Future E-O (FEO) program was established to develop a flexible, modular, automated test capability as part of the Next Generation Automatic Test System (NGATS) program to support the test and diagnostic needs of currently fielded U.S. Army electro-optical (E-O) devices, as well as being expandable to address the requirements of future Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force E-O systems. Santa Barbara infrared (SBIR) has designed, fabricated, and delivered three (3) prototype FEO for engineering and logistics evaluation prior to anticipated full-scale production beginning in 2016. In addition to presenting a detailed overview of the FEO system hardware design, features and testing capabilities, the integration of SBIR's EO-IR sensor and laser test software package, IRWindows 4™, into FEO to automate the test execution, data collection and analysis, archiving and reporting of results is also described.

  4. Development and Capabilities of Unique Structural Seal Test Rigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeMange, Jeffrey J.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Breen, Daniel P.; Robbie, Malcolm G.

    2002-01-01

    High temperature structural seals are necessary in many aerospace and aeronautical applications to minimize any detrimental effects originating from undesired leakage. The NASA Glenn Research Center has been and continues to be a pioneer in the development and evaluation of these types of seals. The current focus for the development of structural seals is for the 3rd Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV), which is scheduled to replace the current space shuttle system around 2025. Specific areas of development under this program include seals for propulsion systems (such as the hypersonic air-breathing ISTAR engine concept based upon Rocket Based Combined Cycle technology) and control surface seals for spacecraft including the autonomous rescue X-38 Crew Return Vehicle and the X-37 Space Maneuver Vehicle.

  5. NGNP Component Test Capability Design Code of Record

    SciTech Connect

    S.L. Austad; D.S. Ferguson; L.E. Guillen; C.W. McKnight; P.J. Petersen

    2009-09-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project is conducting a trade study to select a preferred approach for establishing a capability whereby NGNP technology development testing—through large-scale, integrated tests—can be performed for critical HTGR structures, systems, and components (SSCs). The mission of this capability includes enabling the validation of interfaces, interactions, and performance for critical systems and components prior to installation in the NGNP prototype.

  6. White Sands Missile Range Overview & Introduction: Test Capabilities Briefing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-07

    Full Authority of FAA  FAA Certified Control Center Manned it ll t it f tifi t l t DoD Restricted Airspace with full command & control...Capabilities • Unique variety / breadth of ground & air targets are available • DFCS (Drone Flight Control System) can simultaneously control 6...Boresight inspections Non-Destructive T &E Laboratory  Laboratory Certifications • ORELAP • TNI Accreditation (ISO 17025) • EPA Analysis

  7. Advanced Capabilities for Wind Tunnel Testing in the 21st Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kegelman, Jerome T.; Danehy, Paul M.; Schwartz, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    Wind tunnel testing methods and test technologies for the 21st century using advanced capabilities are presented. These capabilities are necessary to capture more accurate and high quality test results by eliminating the uncertainties in testing and to facilitate verification of computational tools for design. This paper discusses near term developments underway in ground testing capabilities, which will enhance the quality of information of both the test article and airstream flow details. Also discussed is a selection of new capability investments that have been made to accommodate such developments. Examples include advanced experimental methods for measuring the test gas itself; using efficient experiment methodologies, including quality assurance strategies within the test; and increasing test result information density by using extensive optical visualization together with computed flow field results. These points could be made for both major investments in existing tunnel capabilities or for entirely new capabilities.

  8. Fundamental Aeronautics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay

    2009-01-01

    The Overarching Mission of NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) is: To advance U.S. technological leadership in aeronautics in partnership with industry, academia, and other government agencies that conduct aeronautics-related research. ARMD supports the Agency's goal of developing a balanced overall program of science, exploration, and aeronautics, and ARMD's research plans also directly support the National Aeronautics R&D Policy and accompanying Executive Order 131419.

  9. NASA's Role in Aeronautics: A Workshop. Volume I--Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Assembly of Engineering.

    The central task of the workshop summarized in this report was to examine the relationship of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) aeronautical research capabilities to the state of U.S. aviation and to make recommendations about NASA's future roles in aeronautics. Topics include NASA's role in: (1) aeronautics research and…

  10. Results and conclusions test capabilities task group summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Bomber, T.; Pierce, K.; Easterling, R.; Rogers, J.

    1996-12-01

    This annotated briefing documents an economic analysis of Sandia`s system-level test facilities maintained and operated by the Design, Evaluation, and Test Technology Center 9700. The study was divided into four primary sub-tasks: (1) Estimation of the future system-level test workload, (2) Development of a consistent economic model to estimate the cost of maintaining and operating the test facilities, (3) Determination of the availability of viable alternative test sites, and (4) Assessment of the potential savings through reduction of excess capacity under various facility-closure scenarios. The analysis indicated that potential savings from closing all facilities could approach $6 million per year. However, large uncertainties in these savings remove any sound economic arguments for such closure: it is possible that testing at alternative sites could cost more than maintaining the current set of system-level test facilities. Finally, a number of programmatic risks incurred by facility closure were identified. Consideration of facility closure requires a careful weighing of any projected economic benefit against these programmatic risks. This summary report covers the briefing given to upper management. A more detailed discussion of the data and analyses is given in the full report, available for internal use from the technical library.

  11. F/A-18 FAST Offers Advanced System Test Capability

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center has modified an F/A-18A Hornet aircraft with additional research flight control computer systems for use as a Full-scale Advanced Systems Test Bed. Previously f...

  12. Testing the Delayed Gamma Capability in MCNP6

    SciTech Connect

    Weldon, Robert A.; Fensin, Michael L.; McKinney, Gregg W.

    2015-10-28

    The mission of the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office is to quickly and reliably detect unauthorized attempts to import or transport special nuclear material for use against the United States. Developing detection equipment to meet this objective requires accurate simulation of both the detectable signature and detection mechanism. A delayed particle capability was initially added to MCNPX 2.6.A in 2005 to sample the radioactive fission product parents and emit decay particles resulting from the decay chain. To meet the objectives of detection scenario modeling, the capability was designed to sample a particular time for emitting particular multiplicity of a particular energy. Because the sampling process of selecting both time and energy is interdependent, to linearize the time and emission sampling, atom densities are computed at several discrete time steps, and the time-integrated production is computed by multiplying the atom density by the decay constant and time step size to produce a cumulative distribution function for sampling the emission time, energy, and multiplicity. The delayed particle capability was initially given a time-bin structure to help reasonably reproduce, from a qualitative sense, a fission benchmark by Beddingfield, which examined the delayed gamma emission. This original benchmark was only qualitative and did not contain the magnitudes of the actual measured data but did contain relative graphical representation of the spectra. A better benchmark with measured data was later provided by Hunt, Mozin, Reedy, Selpel, and Tobin at the Idaho Accelerator Center; however, because of the complexity of the benchmark setup, sizable systematic errors were expected in the modeling, and initial results compared to MCNPX 2.7.0 showed errors outside of statistical fluctuation. Presented in this paper is a more simplified approach to benchmarking, utilizing closed form analytic solutions to the granddaughter equations for particular sets of decay systems

  13. Operational Testing: From Basics To System-Of-Systems Capabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    1992. Kirtland, AFB, NM: Air Force Operational Test and Evaluation Center. Castells , Manuel . 2000. The rise of the network society. Malden, MA...spot, where they are most crucial ( Castells 2000). Companies now look for others who have the core expertise to perform parts of their operations for

  14. Operational Testing: From Basics to System-of-Systems Capabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    organization, and policy.’’ December 1992. Kirtland, AFB, NM: Air Force Operational Test and Evaluation Center. Castells , Manuel . 2000. The rise of the network...to make decisions on the spot, where they are most crucial ( Castells 2000). Companies now look for others who have the core expertise to perform parts

  15. Vibration Test Demonstrated Dynamic Capability of an Operating Stirling Convertor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center and the U.S. Department of Energy are currently developing a high-efficiency, long-life, free piston Stirling convertor for use as an advanced spacecraft power system for future NASA missions. As part of this development, a Stirling Technology Demonstrator Converter (TDC), developed by Stirling Technology Company for the Department of Energy, was vibration tested at Glenn's Structural Dynamics Laboratory in November and December 1999. This testing demonstrated that the Stirling TDC is able to withstand the harsh random vibration (20 to 2000 Hz) seen during a typical spacecraft launch and to survive with no structural damage or functional power performance degradation, thereby enabling its use in future spacecraft power systems. Glenn and Stirling personnel conducted tests on a single 55 We TDC. The purpose was to characterize the TDC's structural response to vibration and to determine if the TDC could survive the vibration criteria established by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for launch environments. The TDC was operated at full-stroke and full power conditions during the vibration testing.

  16. Ground Testing for Hypervelocity Flow, Capabilities and Limitations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-29

    NOTES See also ADA569031. Aerothermodynamic Design, Review on Ground Testing and CFD (Conception aerothermodynamique, revue sur les essais au sol et...reservoir enthalpy corresponding to a flow speed of 6 km/s is 18 MJ/kg, which, at a reservoir pressure of 100 MPa, implies a temperature of nearly 9000 K...in air. The high pressure is necessary to ensure that the chemical reaction rates occur at the right speed for correct simulation of nonequilibrium

  17. Review of Full-Scale Docking Seal Testing Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; Penney, Nicholas; Wasowski, Janice L.; Daniels, Christopher C.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2008-01-01

    NASA is developing a new docking system to support future space exploration missions to low-Earth orbit, the Moon, and Mars. This mechanism, called the Low Impact Docking System (LIDS), is designed to connect pressurized space vehicles and structures including the Crew Exploration Vehicle, International Space Station, and lunar lander. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is playing a key role in developing the main interface seal for this new docking system. These seals will be approximately 147 cm (58 in.) in diameter. To evaluate the performance of the seals under simulated operating conditions, NASA GRC is developing two new test rigs: a non-actuated version that will be used to measure seal leak rates and an actuated test rig that will be able to measure both seal leak rates and loads. Both test rigs will be able to evaluate the seals under seal-on-seal or seal-on-plate configurations at temperatures from -50 to 50 C (-58 to 122 F) under operational and pre-flight checkout pressure gradients in both aligned and misaligned conditions.

  18. Capabilities and Testing of the Fission Surface Power Primary Test Circuit (FSP-PTC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garber, Anne E.

    2007-01-01

    An actively pumped alkali metal flow circuit, designed and fabricated at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, is currently undergoing testing in the Early Flight Fission Test Facility (EFF-TF). Sodium potassium (NaK), which was used in the SNAP-10A fission reactor, was selected as the primary coolant. Basic circuit components include: simulated reactor core, NaK to gas heat exchanger, electromagnetic (EM) liquid metal pump, liquid metal flowmeter, load/drain reservoir, expansion reservoir, test section, and instrumentation. Operation of the circuit is based around a 37-pin partial-array core (pin and flow path dimensions are the same as those in a full core), designed to operate at 33 kWt. NaK flow rates of greater than 1 kg/sec may be achieved, depending upon the power applied to the EM pump. The heat exchanger provides for the removal of thermal energy from the circuit, simulating the presence of an energy conversion system. The presence of the test section increases the versatility of the circuit. A second liquid metal pump, an energy conversion system, and highly instrumented thermal simulators are all being considered for inclusion within the test section. This paper summarizes the capabilities and ongoing testing of the Fission Surface Power Primary Test Circuit (FSP-PTC).

  19. Extrasolar planet searches at the TUG: Test observations and capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yılmaz, M.; Selam, S. O.; Sato, B.; Izumiura, H.; Bikmaev, I.; Ando, H.; Kambe, E.; Keskin, V.

    2013-04-01

    A small group of collaborators was established at the end of 2007 with the objective of starting an extrasolar planet search at the TÜBİTAK National Observatory of Turkey. High resolution spectra of some radial velocity standards and planet-harbouring stars have since been obtained using an iodine (I2) absorption cell placed in front of the entrance slit of the Coude Echelle Spectrograph (CES) in the 1.5-m Russian-Turkish Telescope (RTT150). To determine precise radial velocity measurements for these stars, a new computer code was developed by one of the collaborators (MY) using an IDL (Interactive Data Language) programing platform specific to the RTT150's CES + I2-cell data. This paper summarises the technical setup, the new code, the test observation results and the precision achieved in the radial velocity measurements. The results from radial velocity standards and planet-harbouring stars show that a precision of approximately 10 m s-1 was achieved with the CES on the RTT150 during the three years of test observations. In addition, the instrumental profile (IP) characteristics of the CES on the RTT150 in this study were derived by modelling the observed B-star + I2 spectra. The observed instrumental profiles were a typical Gaussian shape and exhibited small variations that depended on the position on the CCD and also varied between exposures, which affected the precision of the radial velocity measurements.

  20. Achieving Aeronautics Leadership: Aeronautics Strategic Enterprise Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Today, more than ever, aggressive leadership is required to ensure that our national investments in aeronautical research, technology, and facilities are shaped into a coordinated, and high-impact, strategy. Under the auspices of the National Science and Technology Council, and in conjunction with the domestic industry, universities, the Department of Defense, and the Federal Aviation Administration - our partners in aeronautics - we propose to provide that leadership, and this document is our plan.

  1. Simulation and Flight Test Capability for Testing Prototype Sense and Avoid System Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Charles T.; Stock, Todd M.; Verstynen, Harry A.; Wehner, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) and The MITRE Corporation (MITRE) have developed, and successfully demonstrated, an integrated simulation-to-flight capability for evaluating sense and avoid (SAA) system elements. This integrated capability consists of a MITRE developed fast-time computer simulation for evaluating SAA algorithms, and a NASA LaRC surrogate unmanned aircraft system (UAS) equipped to support hardware and software in-the-loop evaluation of SAA system elements (e.g., algorithms, sensors, architecture, communications, autonomous systems), concepts, and procedures. The fast-time computer simulation subjects algorithms to simulated flight encounters/ conditions and generates a fitness report that records strengths, weaknesses, and overall performance. Reviewed algorithms (and their fitness report) are then transferred to NASA LaRC where additional (joint) airworthiness evaluations are performed on the candidate SAA system-element configurations, concepts, and/or procedures of interest; software and hardware components are integrated into the Surrogate UAS research systems; and flight safety and mission planning activities are completed. Onboard the Surrogate UAS, candidate SAA system element configurations, concepts, and/or procedures are subjected to flight evaluations and in-flight performance is monitored. The Surrogate UAS, which can be controlled remotely via generic Ground Station uplink or automatically via onboard systems, operates with a NASA Safety Pilot/Pilot in Command onboard to permit safe operations in mixed airspace with manned aircraft. An end-to-end demonstration of a typical application of the capability was performed in non-exclusionary airspace in October 2011; additional research, development, flight testing, and evaluation efforts using this integrated capability are planned throughout fiscal year 2012 and 2013.

  2. Space Power Facility-Capabilities for Space Environmental Testing Within a Single Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorge, Richard N.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the current and near-term environmental test capabilities of the NASA Glenn Research Center's Space Power Facility (SPF) located at Sandusky, Ohio. The paper will present current and near-term capabilities for conducting electromagnetic interference and compatibility testing, base-shake sinusoidal vibration testing, reverberant acoustic testing, and thermal-vacuum testing. The paper will also present modes of transportation, handling, ambient environments, and operations within the facility to conduct those tests. The SPF is in the midst of completing and activating new or refurbished capabilities which, when completed, will provide the ability to conduct most or all required full-scale end-assembly space simulation tests at a single test location. It is envisioned that the capabilities will allow a customer to perform a wide range of space simulation tests in one facility at reasonable cost.

  3. Space Environmental Effects (SEE) Testing Capability: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWittBurns, H.; Crave, Paul; Finckenor, Miria; Finchum, Charles; Nehls, Mary; Schneider, Todd; Vaughn, Jason

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the effects of the space environment on materials and systems is fundamental and essential for mission success. If not properly understood and designed for, the space environment can lead to materials degradation, reduction of functional lifetime, and system failure. Ground based testing is critical in predicting performance NASA/MSFC's expertise and capabilities make up the most complete SEE testing capability available.

  4. An Update of the Nation’s Long-Term Strategic Needs for NASA’s Aeronautics Test Facilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Intelligent Flight Deck Acronyms and Abbreviations xvii IOC initial operational capability IRAC Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control IRT Icing Research...Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) • Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control ( IRAC ) • Integrated Intelligent Flight Deck (IIFD) – Next-Generation Air

  5. Small-scale rotor test rig capabilities for testing vibration alleviation algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacklin, Stephen A.; Leyland, Jane Anne

    1987-01-01

    A test was conducted to assess the capabilities of a small scale rotor test rig for implementing higher harmonic control and stability augmentation algorithms. The test rig uses three high speed actuators to excite the swashplate over a range of frequencies. The actuator position signals were monitored to measure the response amplitudes at several frequencies. The ratio of response amplitude to excitation amplitude was plotted as a function of frequency. In addition to actuator performance, acceleration from six accelerometers placed on the test rig was monitored to determine whether a linear relationship exists between the harmonics of N/Rev control input and the least square error (LSE) identification technique was used to identify local and global transfer matrices for two rotor speeds at two batch sizes each. It was determined that the multicyclic control computer system interfaced very well with the rotor system and kept track of the input accelerometer signals and their phase angles. However, the current high speed actuators were found to be incapable of providing sufficient control authority at the higher excitation frequencies.

  6. Application of the Iridium Satellite System to Aeronautical Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Meza, Mike; Gupta, Om

    2008-01-01

    The next generation air transportation system will require greater air-ground communications capacity to accommodate more air traffic with increased safety and efficiency. Communications will remain primarily terrestrially based, but satellite communications will have an increased role. Inmarsat s aeronautical services have been approved and are in use for aeronautical safety communications provided by geostationary satellites. More recently the approval process for the Iridium low earth orbit constellation is nearing completion. The current Iridium system will be able to provide basic air traffic services communications suitable for oceanic, remote and polar regions. The planned second generation of the Iridium system, called Iridium NEXT, will provide enhanced capabilities and enable a greater role in the future of aeronautical communications. This paper will review the potential role of satellite communications in the future of air transportation, the Iridium approval process and relevant system testing, and the potential role of Iridium NEXT.

  7. Nomenclature for Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1927-01-01

    This nomenclature for aeronautics was prepared by a Special Conference on Aeronautical Nomenclature by the executive committee of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics at a meeting held on August 19, 1924, at which meeting Dr. Joseph S. Ames was appointed chairman of the conference. The conference was composed of representatives of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics and specially appointed representatives officially designated by the Army Air Service, the Bureau of Aeronautics of the Navy Department, the Bureau of Standards, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the Society of Automotive Engineers, and the Aeronautical Chamber of Commerce. The purpose of the committee in the preparation and publication of this report is to secure uniformity in the official documents of the government and, as far as possible, in technical and other commercial publications

  8. Progress in aeronautical research and technology applicable to civil air transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bower, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Recent progress in the aeronautical research and technology program being conducted by the United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration is discussed. Emphasis is on computational capability, new testing facilities, drag reduction, turbofan and turboprop propulsion, noise, composite materials, active controls, integrated avionics, cockpit displays, flight management, and operating problems. It is shown that this technology is significantly impacting the efficiency of the new civil air transports. The excitement of emerging research promises even greater benefits to future aircraft developments.

  9. Nomenclature for Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1923-01-01

    This nomenclature for aeronautics was prepared by a special conference on aeronautical nomenclature, composed of representatives of the Army and Navy Air Services, the Air Mail Service, the Bureau of Standards, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, and private life. This report supersedes all previous publications of the committee on this subject. It is published with the intention of securing greater uniformity and accuracy in official documents of the government, and, as far as possible, in technical and other commercial publications. (author)

  10. Nomenclature for Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1924-01-01

    This nomenclature for aeronautics was prepared by a special conference on aeronautical nomenclature by the Executive Committee of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics at a meeting held August 11, 1933. This publication supersedes all previous publications of the committee on this subject. The purpose of the committee in the preparation and publication of this report is to secure uniformity in the official documents of the government and, as far as possible, in technical and other commercial publications.

  11. Advanced Test Reactor -- Testing Capabilities and Plans AND Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility -- Partnerships and Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Frances M. Marshall

    2008-07-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is one of the world’s premier test reactors for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The physical configuration of the ATR, a 4-leaf clover shape, allows the reactor to be operated at different power levels in the corner “lobes” to allow for different testing conditions for multiple simultaneous experiments. The combination of high flux (maximum thermal neutron fluxes of 1E15 neutrons per square centimeter per second and maximum fast [E>1.0 MeV] neutron fluxes of 5E14 neutrons per square centimeter per second) and large test volumes (up to 122 cm long and 12.7 cm diameter) provide unique testing opportunities. For future research, some ATR modifications and enhancements are currently planned. In 2007 the US Department of Energy designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR for material testing research by a broader user community. This paper provides more details on some of the ATR capabilities, key design features, experiments, and plans for the NSUF.

  12. NASA aeronautics. [fact sheet on NASA programs for aeronautical research and aircraft development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A fact sheet depicting the NASA programs involving aircraft development and aeronautics is presented. The fact sheet consists of artist concepts of the various aircraft which represent specific programs. Among the subjects discussed in the concise explanatory notes are: (1) the YF-12 aircraft, (2) hypersonic drag tests in wind tunnels, (3) augmentor wing concepts, (4) rotary wing development, (5) fly-by-wire aircraft control, (6) supercritical wings, (7) the quiet engine program for noise and emission abatement, (8) flight capabilities of lifting bodies, (9) tilt rotor concepts for improved helicopter performance, and (10) flight safety improvements for general aviation aircraft.

  13. Fundamental Aeronautics Program. Subsonic Rotary Wing Project: SRW Aeromechanics Overview/UH-60 Airloads Wind Tunnel Test Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: a) Advance the understanding of phenomena in aerodynamics, dynamics, and active control of rotorcraft. b) Develop and validate first-principles tools. c) Acquire data for tool validation from small and large-scale testing of existing and novel rotorcraft configurations. Recent Accomplishments include: (CFD) - Made significant improvements in structured and unstructured rotorcraft CFD methods (OVERFLOW and FUN3D). (Icing) - a) Continued development of high-fidelity icing analysis tools. b) Completed test of oscillating airfoil in Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). c) Developed plans and began detailed preparations for subscale rotor test in IRT.

  14. Nomenclature for aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1920-01-01

    Report defines the principal terms which have come into use in the development of aeronautics. It was prepared in cooperation with a committee engaged upon a similar undertaking in Great Britain. As a result this nomenclature is in substantial agreement with the one which has been adopted by the aeronautical authorities of Great Britain.

  15. Space Environmental Effects Testing Capability at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWittBurns, H.; Craven, Paul; Finckenor, Miria; Nehls, Mary; Schneider, Todd; Vaughn, Jason

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the effects of the space environment on materials and systems is fundamental and essential for mission success. If not properly understood and designed for, the effects of the environment can lead to degradation of materials, reduction of functional lifetime, and system failure. In response to this need, the Marshall Space Flight Center has developed world class Space Environmental Effects (SEE) expertise and test facilities to simulate the space environment. Capabilities include multiple unique test systems comprising the most complete SEE testing capability available. These test capabilities include charged particle radiation (electrons, protons, ions), ultraviolet radiation (UV), vacuum ultraviolet radiation (VUV), atomic oxygen, plasma effects, space craft charging, lunar surface and planetary effects, vacuum effects, and hypervelocity impacts as well as the combination of these capabilities. In addition to the uniqueness of the individual test capabilities, MSFC is the only NASA facility where the effects of the different space environments can be tested in one location. Combined with additional analytical capabilities for pre- and post-test evaluation, MSFC is a one-stop shop for materials testing and analysis. The SEE testing and analysis are performed by a team of award winning experts nationally recognized for their contributions in the study of the effects of the space environment on materials and systems. With this broad expertise in space environmental effects and the variety of test systems and equipment available, MSFC is able to customize tests with a demonstrated ability to rapidly adapt and reconfigure systems to meet customers needs. Extensive flight experiment experience bolsters this simulation and analysis capability with a comprehensive understanding of space environmental effects.

  16. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography. Supplement 421

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP#2000-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles.

  17. Bibliography of Aeronautics: 1926

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockett, Paul

    1928-01-01

    This Bibliography of Aeronautics for 1926 covers the aeronautical literature published from January 1 to December 31, 1926. The first Bibliography of Aeronautics was published by the Smithsonian Institution as volume 55 of the Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections and covered the material published prior to June 30, 1909. Supplementary volumes of the Bibliography of Aeronautics for the subsequent years have been published by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. The last preceding volume was for the calendar year 1925. As in the previous volumes, citations of the publications of all nations are included in the languages in which these publications originally appeared. The arrangement is dictionary form with author find subject entry, and one alphabetical arrangement. Detail in the matter of subject reference has been omitted on aCC01.mt of the cost of presentation, but an attempt has been made to give sufficient cross reference for research in special lines.

  18. Bibliography of Aeronautics: 1932

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1935-01-01

    This Bibliography of Aeronautics for 1932 covers the aeronautical literature published from January 1 to December 31, 1932. The first Bibliography of Aeronautics was published by the Smithsonian Institution as volume 55 of the Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections and covered the material published prior to June 30, 1909. Supplementary volumes of the Bibliography of Aeronautics for the subsequent years have been published by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. The last preceding volume was for the calendar year 1931. As in the previous volumes, citations of the publications of all nations are included in the languages in which these publications originally appeared. The arrangement is in dictionary form with author and subject entry and one alphabetical arrangement. Detail in the matter of subject reference has been omitted on account of the cost of presentation, but an attempt has been made to give sufficient cross-reference for research in special lines.

  19. Bibliography of Aeronautics: 1928

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockett, Paul

    1928-01-01

    This Bibliography of Aeronautics for 1928 covers the aeronautical literature published from January 1 to December 31, 1928. The first Bibliography of Aeronautics was published by the Smithsonian Institution as volume 55 of the Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections and covered the material published prior to June 30, 1909. Supplementary volumes of the Bibliography of Aeronautics for the subsequent years have been published by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. The last preceding volume was for the calendar year 1927. As in the previous volumes, citations of the publications of all nations are included in the languages in which these publications originally appeared. The arrangement is in dictionary form with author and subject entry, and one alphabetical arrangement. Detail in the matter of subject reference has been omitted on account of the cost of presentation, but an attempt has been made to give sufficient cross reference for research in special lines.

  20. Bibliography of Aeronautics, 1929

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockett, Paul

    1930-01-01

    This Bibliography of Aeronautics for 1929 covers the aeronautical literature published from January 1 to December 31, 1929. The first Bibliography of Aeronautics was published by the Smithsonian Institution as Volume 55 of the Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections and covered the material published prior to June 30, 1909. Supplementary volumes of the Bibliography of Aeronautics for the subsequent years have been published by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. The last preceding volume was for the calendar year 1928. As in the previous volumes, citations of the pUblications of all nations are included in th.e languages in which. these publications originally appeared. The arrangement is in dictionary form with author and subject entry, and one alphabetical arrangement. Detail in the matter of subject reference has been omitted on account of the cost of presentation, but an attempt has been made to give sufficient cross reference for research in special lines.

  1. F-35 Joint Strike Fighter: Problems Completing Software Testing May Hinder Delivery of Expected Warfighting Capabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    its findings with the Congress and military services prior to July 2015. DOD concurred with this recommendation. What GAO Found Delays in...basic flying capabilities. Challenges in development and testing of mission systems software continued through 2013, due largely to delays in software...Operational Test and Evaluation (DOT&E) predicts delivery of warfighting capabilities could be delayed by as much as 13 months. Delays of this magnitude

  2. NASA's Role in Aeronautics: A Workshop. Volume V - Rotorcraft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Assembly of Engineering.

    The central task of a 1980 workshop on the role of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in aeronautics was to examine the relationship of NASA's research capabilities to the state of U.S. aviation and to make recommendations about NASA's future role in aeronautics. Following an introduction, findings and recommendations of the…

  3. NASA's Role in Aeronautics: A Workshop. Volume II - Military Aviation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Assembly of Engineering.

    The central task of a 1980 workshop on the role of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in aeronautics was to examine the relationship of NASA's research capabilities to the state of U.S. aviation and to make recommendations about NASA's future role in aeronautics. The findings and recommendations of the Panel on Military…

  4. NASA's Role in Aeronautics: A Workshop. Volume IV - General Aviation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Assembly of Engineering.

    The central task of a 1980 workshop on the role of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in aeronautics was to examine the relationship of NASA's research capabilities to the state of U.S. aviation and to make recommendations about NASA's future role in aeronautics. The findings and recommendations of the Panel on General…

  5. NASA's Role in Aeronautics: A Workshop. Volume III - Transport Aircraft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Assembly of Engineering.

    The central task of a 1980 workshop on the role of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in aeronautics was to examine the relationship of NASA's research capabilities to the state of U.S. aviation and to make recommendations about NASA's future role in aeronautics. The specific task of the Panel on Transport Aircraft was to…

  6. Review of Aeronautical Wind Tunnel Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The nation's aeronautical wind tunnel facilities constitute a valuable technological resource and make a significant contribution to the global supremacy of U.S. aircraft, both civil and military. At the request of NASA, the National Research Council's Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board organized a commitee to review the state of repair, adequacy, and future needs of major aeronautical wind tunnel facilities in meeting national goals. The comittee identified three main areas where actions are needed to sustain the capability of NASA's aeronautical wind tunnel facilities to support the national aeronautical research and development activities: tunnel maintenance and upgrading, productivity enhancement, and accommodation of new requirements (particularly in hypersonics). Each of these areas are addressed and the committee recommendations for appropriate actions presented.

  7. Progress Toward National Aeronautics Goals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russo, Carlo J.; Sehra, Arun K.

    1999-01-01

    NASA has made definitive progress towards achieving several bold U.S. goals in aeronautics related to air breathing engines. The advanced technologies developed towards these goals span applications from general aviation to large subsonic and supersonic aircraft. The proof of successful technology development is demonstrated through successful technology transfer to U.S. industry and projected fleet impact. Specific examples of progress are discussed that quantifies the achievement towards these goals. In addition, a more detailed vision for NASA aeronautics is defined and key strategic issues are explored which invite international and national debate and involvement especially in reduced environmental impact for subsonic and supersonic aircraft, dramatic new capabilities in general aviation engines, and reduced development cycle time and costs.

  8. [Importance, especially in aeronautics, of color perception tests under dynamic conditions. Study of a suitable experimental apparatus].

    PubMed

    Linzi, S; Modugno, G C; Bollini, M

    1977-12-15

    Following a review of the most recent opinion on the physiology of colour vision, a device for examining it in dynamic, i.e. real-life conditions is described. The apparatus consist of two projectors which flash two absolutely identical pictures on to the screen, one of them is upside down. It appears at fixed but adjustable intervals so that the exposure time of the intelligible image can be varied. Subjects were also controlled with Ishihara charts and Nägel anomaloscope. The results are compared and point to the higher sensitivity of the dynamic test to even slight degrees of dyschromatopsia.

  9. Overview of the Orion Vibroacoustic Test Capability at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.; Hozman, Aron D.; McNelis, Mark E.; Otten, Kim D.

    2008-01-01

    In order to support the environmental test needs for our new Orion and Constellation program, NASA is developing unique world-class test facilities. To optimize this testing of spaceflight hardware while minimizing transportation issues, a one-stop, under one roof test capability is being developed at the Space Power Facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center's Plum Brook Station. This facility will provide the capability to perform the following environmental testing: (1) reverberation acoustic testing, (2) mechanical base-shake sine testing, (3) modal testing, (4) thermal-vacuum testing, and (5) EMI/EMC (electromagnetic interference and compatibility) testing. An overview of this test capability will be provided in this presentation, with special focus on the two new vibroacoustic test facilities currently being designed and built, the Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) and the Mechanical Vibration Facility (MVF). Testing of the engineering developmental hardware and qualification hardware of the Orion (Crew Exploration Vehicle) will commence shortly after the facilities are commissioned.

  10. Nomenclature for Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1939-01-01

    The nomenclature for aeronautics presented in this Report No. 474 is a revision of the last previous report on this subject (i.e., Report no. 240.) This report is published for the purpose of encouraging greater uniformity and precision in the use of terms relating to aeronautics, both in official documents of the Government and in commercial publications. Terms in general use in other branches of engineering have been included only where they have some special significance in aeronautics, or form an integral part of its terminology.

  11. Results from the Operational Testing of the Eaton Smart Grid Capable Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Brion

    2014-10-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory conducted testing and analysis of the Eaton smart grid capable electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE), which was a deliverable from Eaton for the U.S. Department of Energy FOA-554. The Idaho National Laboratory has extensive knowledge and experience in testing advanced conductive and wireless charging systems though INL’s support of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity. This document details the findings from the EVSE operational testing conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory on the Eaton smart grid capable EVSE. The testing conducted on the EVSE included energy efficiency testing, SAE J1772 functionality testing, abnormal conditions testing, and charging of a plug-in vehicle.

  12. Results from Operational Testing of the Siemens Smart Grid-Capable Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Brion

    2015-05-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory conducted testing and analysis of the Siemens smart grid capable electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE), which was a deliverable from Siemens for the U.S. Department of Energy FOA-554. The Idaho National Laboratory has extensive knowledge and experience in testing advanced conductive and wireless charging systems though INL’s support of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity. This document details the findings from the EVSE operational testing conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory on the Siemens smart grid capable EVSE. The testing conducted on the EVSE included energy efficiency testing, SAE J1772 functionality testing, abnormal conditions testing, and charging of a plug-in vehicle.

  13. The New Heavy Gas Testing Capability in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Stanley R.; Rivera, Jose A., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) has provided a unique capability for aeroelastic testing for over thirty-five years. The facility has a rich history of significant contributions to the design of many United States commercial transports and military aircraft. The facility has many features which contribute to its uniqueness for aeroelasticity testing; however, perhaps the most important facility capability is the use of a heavy gas test medium to achieve higher test densities. Higher test medium densities substantially improve model building requirements and therefore simplify the fabrication process for building aeroelastically scaled wind-tunnel models. The heavy gas also provides other testing benefits, including reduction in the power requirements to operate the facility during testing. Unfortunately, the use of the original heavy gas has been curtailed due to environmental concerns. A new gas, referred to as R-134a, has been identified as a suitable replacement for the former TDT heavy gas. The TDT is currently undergoing a facility upgrade to allow testing in R-134a heavy gas. This replacement gas will result in an operational test envelope, model scaling advantages, and general testing capabilities similar to those available with the former TDT heavy gas. As such, the TDT is expected to remain a viable facility for aeroelasticity research and aircraft dynamic clearance testing well into the 21st century. This paper describes the anticipated advantages and facility calibration plans for the new heavy gas and briefly reviews several past test programs that exemplify the possible benefits of heavy gas testing.

  14. Aeronautics and space report of the President

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the activities and accomplishments of all agencies of the United States in the fields of aeronautics and space science during FY 1994. Activity summaries are presented for the following areas: space launch activities, space science, space flight and space technology, space communications, aeronuatics, and studies of the planet Earth. Several appendices providing data on U.S. launch activities, the Federal budget for space and aeronautics, remote sensing capabilities, and space policy are included.

  15. Unique Testing Capabilities of the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel, an Exercise in Aeroelastic Scaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanco, Thomas G.

    2013-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center's Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) is the world's most capable aeroelastic test facility. Its large size, transonic speed range, variable pressure capability, and use of either air or R-134a heavy gas as a test medium enable unparalleled manipulation of flow-dependent scaling quantities. Matching these scaling quantities enables dynamic similitude of a full-scale vehicle with a sub-scale model, a requirement for proper characterization of any dynamic phenomenon, and many static elastic phenomena. Select scaling parameters are presented in order to quantify the scaling advantages of TDT and the consequence of testing in other facilities. In addition to dynamic testing, the TDT is uniquely well-suited for high risk testing or for those tests that require unusual model mount or support systems. Examples of recently conducted dynamic tests requiring unusual model support are presented. In addition to its unique dynamic test capabilities, the TDT is also evaluated in its capability to conduct aerodynamic performance tests as a result of its flow quality. Results of flow quality studies and a comparison to a many other transonic facilities are presented. Finally, the ability of the TDT to support future NASA research thrusts and likely vehicle designs is discussed.

  16. Langley Research Center's Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel: Testing Capabilities and Recent Modernization Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micol, John R.

    2001-01-01

    Description, capabilities, initiatives, and utilization of the NASA Langley Research Center's Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel are presented. A brief overview of the facility's operational capabilities and testing techniques is provided. A recent Construction of Facilities (Car) project to improve facility productivity and efficiency through facility automation has been completed and is discussed. Several new and maturing thrusts are underway that include systematic efforts to provide credible assessment for data quality, modifications to the new automation control system for increased compatibility with the Modern Design of Experiments (MDOE) testing methodology, and process improvements for better test coordination, planning, and execution.

  17. Langley Research Center's Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel: Testing Capabilities and Recent Modernization Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micol, John R.

    2001-01-01

    Description, capabilities, initiatives, and utilization of the NASA Langley Research Center's Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel are presented. A brief overview of the facility's operational capabilities and testing techniques is provided. A recent Construction of Facilities (CoF) project to improve facility productivity and efficiency through facility automation has been completed and is discussed. Several new and maturing thrusts are underway that include systematic efforts to provide credible assessment for data quality, modifications to the new automation control system for increased compatibility with the Modern Design Of Experiments (MDOE) testing methodology, and process improvements for better test coordination, planning, and execution.

  18. Internet Protocol Over Telemetry Testing for Earth Science Capability Demo Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franz, Russ; Pestana, Mark; Bessent, Shedrick; Hang, Richard; Ng, Howard

    2006-01-01

    The development and flight tests described here focused on utilizing existing pulse code modulation (PCM) telemetry equipment to enable on-vehicle networks of instruments and computers to be a simple extension of the ground station network. This capability is envisioned as a necessary component of a global range that supports test and development of manned and unmanned airborne vehicles.

  19. Calibration and test capabilities of the Langley 7- by 10- foot high speed tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, C. H., Jr.; Huffman, J. K.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a new subsonic calibration of the Langley 7 by 10 foot high speed tunnel with the test section in a solid wall configuration are presented. A description of the test capabilities of the 7 by 10 foot high speed tunnel is also given.

  20. Curriculum for modern aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, L.

    1975-01-01

    Methods for improving the university training of aeronautical engineering students are discussed. Specific topics considered are: (1) the kind of students which should be developed through aeronautical engineering education, (2) to what extent should aerospace engineering be prepared for diversity and change, (3) to what extent should theory be emphasized as compared with practical engineering and design, and (4) a suggestion for NASA/Industry/University collaboration.

  1. Test Capabilities and Recent Experiences in the NASA Langley 8-Foot High Temperature Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, Jeffrey S.; Harvin, Stephen F.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Langley 8-Foot High Temperature Tunnel is a combustion-heated hypersonic blowdown-to-atmosphere wind tunnel that provides flight enthalpy simulation for Mach numbers of 4, 5, and 7 through an altitude range from 50,000 to 120,000 feet. The open-.jet test section is 8-ft. in diameter and 12-ft. long. The test section will accommodate large air-breathing hypersonic propulsion systems as well as structural and thermal protection system components. Stable wind tunnel test conditions can be provided for 60 seconds. Additional test capabilities are provided by a radiant heater system used to simulate ascent or entry heating profiles. The test medium is the combustion products of air and methane that are burned in a pressurized combustion chamber. Oxygen is added to the test medium for air-breathing propulsion tests so that the test gas contains 21 percent molar oxygen. The facility was modified extensively in the late 1980's to provide airbreathing propulsion testing capability. In this paper, a brief history and general description of the facility are presented along with a discussion of the types of supported testing. Recently completed tests are discussed to explain the capabilities this facility provides and to demonstrate the experience of the staff.

  2. Analytically Quantifying Gains in the Test and Evaluation Process through Capabilities-Based Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    Situational Awareness for Surveillance and Interdiction Operations SBT &E Specifications-Based Test & Evaluation SME Subject Matter Expert SoS System...testing as Specifications-Based Test and Evaluation ( SBT &E). This limits the ability of modern, complex systems to satisfy the capability...interoperability (Defense Science Board Task Force, 2008). The use of SBT &E under these conditions has contributed to the failure of many new systems

  3. Green Propellant Test Capabilities of the Altitude Combustion Stand at the NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubiak, Jonathan M.; Arnett, Lori A.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is committed to providing simulated altitude rocket test capabilities to NASA programs, other government agencies, private industry partners, and academic partners. A primary facility to support those needs is the Altitude Combustion Stand (ACS). ACS provides the capability to test combustion components at a simulated altitude up to 100,000 ft. (approx.0.2 psia/10 Torr) through a nitrogen-driven ejector system. The facility is equipped with an axial thrust stand, gaseous and cryogenic liquid propellant feed systems, data acquisition system with up to 1000 Hz recording, and automated facility control system. Propellant capabilities include gaseous and liquid hydrogen, gaseous and liquid oxygen, and liquid methane. A water-cooled diffuser, exhaust spray cooling chamber, and multi-stage ejector systems can enable run times up to 180 seconds to 16 minutes. The system can accommodate engines up to 2000-lbf thrust, liquid propellant supply pressures up to 1800 psia, and test at the component level. Engines can also be fired at sea level if needed. The NASA GRC is in the process of modifying ACS capabilities to enable the testing of green propellant (GP) thrusters and components. Green propellants are actively being explored throughout government and industry as a non-toxic replacement to hydrazine monopropellants for applications such as reaction control systems or small spacecraft main propulsion systems. These propellants offer increased performance and cost savings over hydrazine. The modification of ACS is intended to enable testing of a wide range of green propellant engines for research and qualification-like testing applications. Once complete, ACS will have the capability to test green propellant engines up to 880 N in thrust, thermally condition the green propellants, provide test durations up to 60 minutes depending on thrust class, provide high speed control and data acquisition, as well as provide advanced imaging and

  4. Improved Testing Capability and Adaptability Through the Use of Wireless Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solano, Wanda M.

    2003-01-01

    From the first Saturn V rocket booster (S-II-T) testing in 1966 and the routine Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) testing beginning in 1975, to more recent test programs such as the X-33 Aerospike Engine, the Integrated Powerhead Development (IPD) program, and the Hybrid Sounding Rocket (HYSR), Stennis Space Center (SSC) continues to be a premier location for conducting large-scale testing. Central to each test program is the capability for sensor systems to deliver reliable measurements and high quality data, while also providing a means to monitor the test stand area to the highest degree of safety and sustainability. Sensor wiring is routed along piping and through cable trenches, making its way from the engine test area, through the test stand area and to the signal conditioning building before final transfer to the test control center. When sensor requirements lie outside the reach of the routine sensor cable routing, the use of wireless sensor networks becomes particularly attractive due to their versatility and ease of installation. As part of an on-going effort to enhance the testing capabilities of Stennis Space Center, the Test Technology and Development group has found numerous applications for its sensor-adaptable wireless sensor suite. While not intended for critical engine measurements or control loops, in-house hardware and software development of the sensor suite can provide improved testing capability for a range of applications including the safety monitoring of propellant storage barrels and as an experimental test-bed for embedded health monitoring paradigms.

  5. Diaphragms for Aeronautic Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersey, M D

    1924-01-01

    This investigation was carried out at the request of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics and comprises an outline of historical developments and theoretical principles, together with a discussion of expedients for making the most effective use of existing diaphragms actuated by the hydrostatic pressure form an essential element of a great variety instruments for aeronautic and other technical purposes. The various physical data needed as a foundation for rational methods of diaphragm design have not, however, been available hitherto except in the most fragmentary form.

  6. The Advanced Test Reactor Irradiation Capabilities Available as a National Scientific User Facility

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover

    2008-09-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. The ATR is a very versatile facility with a wide variety of experimental test capabilities for providing the environment needed in an irradiation experiment. These capabilities include simple capsule experiments, instrumented and/or temperature-controlled experiments, and pressurized water loop experiment facilities. Monitoring systems have also been utilized to monitor different parameters such as fission gases for fuel experiments, to measure specimen performance during irradiation. ATR’s control system provides a stable axial flux profile throughout each reactor operating cycle, and allows the thermal and fast neutron fluxes to be controlled separately in different sections of the core. The ATR irradiation positions vary in diameter from 16 mm to 127 mm over an active core height of 1.2 m. This paper discusses the different irradiation capabilities with examples of different experiments and the cost/benefit issues related to each capability. The recent designation of ATR as a national scientific user facility will make the ATR much more accessible at very low to no cost for research by universities and possibly commercial entities.

  7. Development of a Semi-Span Test Capability at the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatlin, G. M.; Parker, P. A.; Owens, L. R., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    A need for low-speed, high Reynolds number test capabilities has been identified for the design and development of advanced subsonic transport high-lift systems. In support of this need, multiple investigations have been conducted in the National Transonic Facility (NTF) at the NASA Langley Research Center to develop a semi-span testing capability that will provide the low-speed, flight Reynolds number data currently unattainable using conventional sting-mounted, full-span models. Although a semi-span testing capability will effectively double the Reynolds number capability over full-span models, it does come at the expense of contending with the issue of the interaction of the flow over the model with the windtunnel wall boundary layer. To address this issue the size and shape of the semi-span model mounting geometry have been investigated, and the results are presented herein. The cryogenic operating environment of the NTF produced another semi-span test technique issue in that varying thermal gradients have developed on the large semi-span balance. The suspected cause of these thermal gradients and methods to eliminate them are presented. Data are also presented that demonstrate the successful elimination of these varying thermal gradients during cryogenic operations.

  8. Application of Mobile-ip to Space and Aeronautical Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, Kent; Shell, Dan; Ivancic, William D.; Stewart, David H.; Bell, Terry L.; Kachmar, Brian A.

    2001-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is interested in applying mobile Internet protocol (mobile-ip) technologies to its space and aeronautics programs. In particular, mobile-ip will play a major role in the Advanced Aeronautic Transportation Technology (AAT-F), the Weather Information Communication (WINCOMM), and the Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS) aeronautics programs. This paper describes mobile-ip and mobile routers--in particular, the features, capabilities, and initial performance of the mobile router are presented. The application of mobile-router technology to NASA's space and aeronautics programs is also discussed.

  9. Recent Advances in Hydrogen Peroxide Propulsion Test Capability at NASA's Stennis Space Center E-Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacks, Thomas E.; Beisler, Michele

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, the rocket propulsion test capability at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center's (SSC) E-Complex has been enhanced to include facilitization for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) based ground testing. In particular, the E-3 test stand has conducted numerous test projects that have been reported in the open literature. These include combustion devices as simple as small-scale catalyst beds, and larger devices such as ablative thrust chambers and a flight-type engine (AR2-3). Consequently, the NASA SSC test engineering and operations knowledge base and infrastructure have grown considerably in order to conduct safe H2O2 test operations with a variety of test articles at the component and engine level. Currently, the E-Complex has a test requirement for a hydrogen peroxide based stage test. This new development, with its unique set of requirements, has motivated the facilitization for hydrogen peroxide propellant use at the E-2 Cell 2 test position in addition to E-3. Since the E-2 Cell 2 test position was not originally designed as a hydrogen peroxide test stand, a facility modernization-improvement project was planned and implemented in FY 2002-03 to enable this vertical engine test stand to accomodate H2O2. This paper discusses the ongoing enhancement of E-Complex ground test capability, specifically at the E-3 stand (Cell 1 and Cell 2) and E-2 Cell 2 stand, that enable current and future customers considerable test flexibility and operability in conducting their peroxide based rocket R&D efforts.

  10. Expanding Hydrogen Peroxide Propulsion Test Capability at NASA's Stennis Space Center E-Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacks, Thomas E.; Beisler, Michele

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, the rocket propulsion test capability at NASA s John C. Stennis Space Center's (SSC) E-Complex has been enhanced to include facilitization for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) based ground testing. In particular, the E-3 test stand has conducted numerous test projects that have been reported in the open literature. These include combustion devices as simple at small-scale catalyst beds, and larger devices such as ablative thrust chambers and a flight-type engine (AR2-3). Consequently, the NASA SSC test engineering and operations knowledge base and infrastructure have grown considerably in order to conduct safe H2O2 test operations with a variety of test articles at the component and engine level. Currently, the E-Complex has a test requirement for a hydrogen peroxide based stage test. This new development, with its unique set of requirements, has motivated the facilitization for hydrogen peroxide propellant use at the E-2 Cell 2 test position in addition to E-3. Since the E-2 Cell 2 test position was not originally designed as a hydrogen peroxide test stand, a facility modernization- improvement project was planned and implemented in FY 2002-03 to enable this vertical engine test stand to accommodate H2O2. This paper discusses the ongoing enhancement of E-Complex ground test capability, specifically at the E-3 stand (Cell 1 and Cell 2) and E-2 Cell 2 stand, that enable current and future customers considerable test flexibility and operability in conducting their peroxide based rocket R&D efforts.

  11. University research in aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duberg, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    The contributions which universities can make to aeronautical research projects are discussed. The activities of several facilities are presented to show the effectiveness of the educational and research programs. Reference is made to the Intergovernmental Personnel Act of 1970 which permits an exchange of federal agency personnel with state and local governments and with public and private higher education schools.

  12. ARMD Fundamental Aeronautics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dryer, Jay; DelRosario, Ruben

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation focuses work of the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) with particular interest on the work being done to address the environmental and energy efficiency challenges. Particular interest is on the Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) project, though there is discussion of the rotorcraft and the supersonics environmental challenges.

  13. ACTS broadband aeronautical experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbe, Brian S.; Jedrey, Thomas C.; Estabrook, Polly; Agan, Martin J.

    1993-01-01

    In the last decade, the demand for reliable data, voice, and video satellite communication links between aircraft and ground to improve air traffic control, airline management, and to meet the growing demand for passenger communications has increased significantly. It is expected that in the near future, the spectrum required for aeronautical communication services will grow significantly beyond that currently available at L-band. In anticipation of this, JPL is developing an experimental broadband aeronautical satellite communications system that will utilize NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) as a satellite of opportunity and the technology developed under JPL's ACTS Mobile Terminal (AMT) Task to evaluate the feasibility of using K/Ka-band for these applications. The application of K/Ka-band for aeronautical satellite communications at cruise altitudes is particularly promising for several reasons: (1) the minimal amount of signal attenuation due to rain; (2) the reduced drag due to the smaller K/Ka-band antennas (as compared to the current L-band systems); and (3) the large amount of available bandwidth. The increased bandwidth available at these frequencies is expected to lead to significantly improved passenger communications - including full-duplex compressed video and multiple channel voice. A description of the proposed broadband experimental system will be presented including: (1) applications of K/Ka-band aeronautical satellite technology to U.S. industry; (2) the experiment objectives; (3) the experiment set-up; (4) experimental equipment description; and (5) industrial participation in the experiment and the benefits.

  14. Advanced Civilian Aeronautical Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, Dennis M.

    1996-01-01

    Paper discusses alternatives to currently deployed systems which could provide revolutionary improvements in metrics applicable to civilian aeronautics. Specific missions addressed include subsonic transports, supersonic transports and personal aircraft. These alternative systems and concepts are enabled by recent and envisaged advancements in electronics, communications, computing and Designer Fluid Mechanics in conjunction with a design approach employing extensive synergistic interactions between propulsion, aerodynamics and structures.

  15. Hypervelocity Capability of the HYPULSE Shock-Expansion Tunnel for Scramjet Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foelsche, Robert O.; Rogers, R. Clayton; Tsai, Ching-Yi; Bakos, Robert J.; Shih, Ann T.

    2001-01-01

    New hypervelocity capabilities for scramjet testing have recently been demonstrated in the HYPULSE Shock-Expansion Tunnel (SET). With NASA's continuing interests in scramjet testing at hypervelocity conditions (Mach 12 and above), a SET nozzle was designed and added to the HYPULSE facility. Results of tests conducted to establish SET operational conditions and facility nozzle calibration are presented and discussed for a Mach 15 (M15) flight enthalpy. The measurements and detailed computational fluid dynamics calculations (CFD) show the nozzle delivers a test gas with sufficiently wide core size to be suitable for free-jet testing of scramjet engine models of similar scale as, those tested in conventional low Mach number blow-down test facilities.

  16. Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC) Quick Response System (QRS) Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Eileen; Villani, James A.; Ritter, Paul

    1997-01-01

    This document is the Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC) Quick Response System (QRS) Test Report. The purpose of this document is to present the results of the QRS unit and system tests in support of the ASAC QRS development effort. This document contains an overview of the project background and scope, defines the QRS system and presents the additions made to the QRS this year, explains the assumptions, constraints, and approach used to conduct QRS Unit and System Testing, and presents the schedule used to perform QRS Testing. The document also presents an overview of the Logistics Management Institute (LMI) Test Facility and testing environment and summarizes the QRS Unit and System Test effort and results.

  17. A Capable and Temporary Test Facility on a Shoestring Budget: The MSL Touchdown Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Christopher V.; Frankovich, John K.; Yates, Philip; Wells, George, Jr.; Robert, Losey

    2008-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory mission (MSL) has undertaken a developmental Touchdown Test Program that utilizes a full-scale rover vehicle and an overhead winch system to replicate the skycrane landing event. Landing surfaces consisting of flat and sloped granular media, planar, rigid surfaces, and various combinations of rocks and slopes were studied. Information gathered from these tests was vital for validating the rover analytical model, validating certain design or system behavior assumptions, and for exploring events and phenomenon that are either very difficult or too costly to model in a credible way. This paper describes this test program, with a focus on the creation of test facility, daily test operations, and some of the challenges faced and lessons learned along the way.

  18. Test Capability Enhancements to the NASA Langley 8-Foot High Temperature Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvin, S. F.; Cabell, K. F.; Gallimore, S. D.; Mekkes, G. L.

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Langley 8-Foot High Temperature Tunnel produces true enthalpy environments simulating flight from Mach 4 to Mach 7, primarily for airbreathing propulsion and aerothermal/thermo-structural testing. Flow conditions are achieved through a methane-air heater and nozzles producing aerodynamic Mach numbers of 4, 5 or 7 and have exit diameters of 8 feet or 4.5 feet. The 12-ft long free-jet test section, housed inside a 26-ft vacuum sphere, accommodates large test articles. Recently, the facility underwent significant upgrades to support hydrocarbon fueled scramjet engine testing and to expand flight simulation capability. The upgrades were required to meet engine system development and flight clearance verification requirements originally defined by the joint NASA-Air Force X-43C Hypersonic Flight Demonstrator Project and now the Air Force X-51A Program. Enhancements to the 8-Ft. HTT were made in four areas: 1) hydrocarbon fuel delivery; 2) flight simulation capability; 3) controls and communication; and 4) data acquisition/processing. The upgrades include the addition of systems to supply ethylene and liquid JP-7 to test articles; a Mach 5 nozzle with dynamic pressure simulation capability up to 3200 psf, the addition of a real-time model angle-of-attack system; a new programmable logic controller sub-system to improve process controls and communication with model controls; the addition of MIL-STD-1553B and high speed data acquisition systems and a classified data processing environment. These additions represent a significant increase to the already unique test capability and flexibility of the facility, and complement the existing array of test support hardware such as a model injection system, radiant heaters, six-component force measurement system, and optical flow field visualization hardware. The new systems support complex test programs that require sophisticated test sequences and precise management of process fluids. Furthermore, the new systems, such

  19. SSE software test management STM capability: Using STM in the Ground Systems Development Environment (GSDE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Church, Victor E.; Long, D.; Hartenstein, Ray; Perez-Davila, Alfredo

    1992-01-01

    This report is one of a series discussing configuration management (CM) topics for Space Station ground systems software development. It provides a description of the Software Support Environment (SSE)-developed Software Test Management (STM) capability, and discusses the possible use of this capability for management of developed software during testing performed on target platforms. This is intended to supplement the formal documentation of STM provided by the SEE Project. How STM can be used to integrate contractor CM and formal CM for software before delivery to operations is described. STM provides a level of control that is flexible enough to support integration and debugging, but sufficiently rigorous to insure the integrity of the testing process.

  20. The AEDC aerospace chamber 7V: An advanced test capability for infrared surveillance and seeker sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, W. R.

    1994-01-01

    An advanced sensor test capability is now operational at the Air Force Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) for calibration and performance characterization of infrared sensors. This facility, known as the 7V, is part of a broad range of test capabilities under development at AEDC to provide complete ground test support to the sensor community for large-aperture surveillance sensors and kinetic kill interceptors. The 7V is a state-of-the-art cryo/vacuum facility providing calibration and mission simulation against space backgrounds. Key features of the facility include high-fidelity scene simulation with precision track accuracy and in-situ target monitoring, diffraction limited optical system, NIST traceable broadband and spectral radiometric calibration, outstanding jitter control, environmental systems for 20 K, high-vacuum, low-background simulation, and an advanced data acquisition system.

  1. NASA GRC's High Pressure Burner Rig Facility and Materials Test Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. Craig

    1999-01-01

    The High Pressure Burner Rig (HPBR) at NASA Glenn Research Center is a high-velocity. pressurized combustion test rig used for high-temperature environmental durability studies of advanced materials and components. The facility burns jet fuel and air in controlled ratios, simulating combustion gas chemistries and temperatures that are realistic to those in gas turbine engines. In addition, the test section is capable of simulating the pressures and gas velocities representative of today's aircraft. The HPBR provides a relatively inexpensive. yet sophisticated means for researchers to study the high-temperature oxidation of advanced materials. The facility has the unique capability of operating under both fuel-lean and fuel-rich gas mixtures. using a fume incinerator to eliminate any harmful byproduct emissions (CO, H2S) of rich-burn operation. Test samples are easily accessible for ongoing inspection and documentation of weight change, thickness, cracking, and other metrics. Temperature measurement is available in the form of both thermocouples and optical pyrometery. and the facility is equipped with quartz windows for observation and video taping. Operating conditions include: (1) 1.0 kg/sec (2.0 lbm/sec) combustion and secondary cooling airflow capability: (2) Equivalence ratios of 0.5- 1.0 (lean) to 1.5-2.0 (rich), with typically 10% H2O vapor pressure: (3) Gas temperatures ranging 700-1650 C (1300-3000 F): (4) Test pressures ranging 4-12 atmospheres: (5) Gas flow velocities ranging 10-30 m/s (50-100) ft/sec.: and (6) Cyclic and steady-state exposure capabilities. The facility has historically been used to test coupon-size materials. including metals and ceramics. However complex-shaped components have also been tested including cylinders, airfoils, and film-cooled end walls. The facility has also been used to develop thin-film temperature measurement sensors.

  2. Expanded operational capabilities of the Langley Mach 7 Scramjet test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, S. R.; Guy, R. W.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental research program conducted to expand the operational capabilities of the NASA Langley Mach 7 Scramjet Test Facility is described. Previous scramjet testing in this facility was limited to a single simulated flight condition of Mach 6.9 at an altitude of 115,300 ft. The arc heater research demonstrates the potential of the facility for scramjet testing at simulated flight conditions from Mach 4 (at altitudes from 77,000 to 114,000 ft) to Mach 7 (at latitudes from 108,000 to 149,000 ft). Arc heater electrical characteristics, operational problems, measurements of nitrogen oxide contaminants, and total-temperature profiles are discussed.

  3. A New High-Speed, High-Cycle, Gear-Tooth Bending Fatigue Test Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stringer, David B.; Dykas, Brian D.; LaBerge, Kelsen E.; Zakrajsek, Andrew J.; Handschuh, Robert F.

    2011-01-01

    A new high-speed test capability for determining the high cycle bending-fatigue characteristics of gear teeth has been developed. Experiments were performed in the test facility using a standard spur gear test specimens designed for use in NASA Glenn s drive system test facilities. These tests varied in load condition and cycle-rate. The cycle-rate varied from 50 to 1000 Hz. The loads varied from high-stress, low-cycle loads to near infinite life conditions. Over 100 tests were conducted using AISI 9310 steel spur gear specimen. These results were then compared to previous data in the literature for correlation. Additionally, a cycle-rate sensitivity analysis was conducted by grouping the results according to cycle-rate and comparing the data sets. Methods used to study and verify load-path and facility dynamics are also discussed.

  4. Remote sensing and field test capabilities at U.S. Army Dugway Proving Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, James T.; Herron, Joshua P.; Marshall, Martin S.

    2012-05-01

    U.S. Army Dugway Proving Ground (DPG) is a Major Range and Test Facility Base (MRTFB) with the mission of testing chemical and biological defense systems and materials. DPG facilities include state-of-the-art laboratories, extensive test grids, controlled environment calibration facilities, and a variety of referee instruments for required test measurements. Among these referee instruments, DPG has built up a significant remote sensing capability for both chemical and biological detection. Technologies employed for remote sensing include FTIR spectroscopy, UV spectroscopy, Raman-shifted eye-safe lidar, and other elastic backscatter lidar systems. These systems provide referee data for bio-simulants, chemical simulants, toxic industrial chemicals (TICs), and toxic industrial materials (TIMs). In order to realize a successful large scale open-air test, each type of system requires calibration and characterization. DPG has developed specific calibration facilities to meet this need. These facilities are the Joint Ambient Breeze Tunnel (JABT), and the Active Standoff Chamber (ASC). The JABT and ASC are open ended controlled environment tunnels. Each includes validation instrumentation to characterize simulants that are disseminated. Standoff systems are positioned at typical field test distances to measure characterized simulants within the tunnel. Data from different types of systems can be easily correlated using this method, making later open air test results more meaningful. DPG has a variety of large scale test grids available for field tests. After and during testing, data from the various referee instruments is provided in a visual format to more easily draw conclusions on the results. This presentation provides an overview of DPG's standoff testing facilities and capabilities, as well as example data from different test scenarios.

  5. Remote sensing and field test capabilities at U.S. Army Dugway Proving Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, James T.; Herron, Joshua P.; Marshall, Martin S.

    2011-11-01

    U.S. Army Dugway Proving Ground (DPG) is a Major Range and Test Facility Base (MRTFB) with the mission of testing chemical and biological defense systems and materials. DPG facilities include state-of-the-art laboratories, extensive test grids, controlled environment calibration facilities, and a variety of referee instruments for required test measurements. Among these referee instruments, DPG has built up a significant remote sensing capability for both chemical and biological detection. Technologies employed for remote sensing include FTIR spectroscopy, UV spectroscopy, Raman-shifted eye-safe lidar, and other elastic backscatter lidar systems. These systems provide referee data for bio-simulants, chemical simulants, toxic industrial chemicals (TICs), and toxic industrial materials (TIMs). In order to realize a successful large scale open-air test, each type of system requires calibration and characterization. DPG has developed specific calibration facilities to meet this need. These facilities are the Joint Ambient Breeze Tunnel (JABT), and the Active Standoff Chamber (ASC). The JABT and ASC are open ended controlled environment tunnels. Each includes validation instrumentation to characterize simulants that are disseminated. Standoff systems are positioned at typical field test distances to measure characterized simulants within the tunnel. Data from different types of systems can be easily correlated using this method, making later open air test results more meaningful. DPG has a variety of large scale test grids available for field tests. After and during testing, data from the various referee instruments is provided in a visual format to more easily draw conclusions on the results. This presentation provides an overview of DPG's standoff testing facilities and capabilities, as well as example data from different test scenarios.

  6. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography. Supplment 385

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-1998-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract.

  7. Development of HWIL Testing Capabilities for Satellite Target Emulation at AEDC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, H.; Crider, D.; Burns, J.; Thompson, R.; Goldsmith, G., II; Sholes, W.

    Programs involved in Space Situational Awareness (SSA) need the capability to test satellite sensors in a Hardware-in-the-Loop (HWIL) environment. Testing in a ground system avoids the significant cost of on-orbit test targets and the resulting issues such as debris mitigation, and in-space testing implications. The space sensor test facilities at AEDC consist of cryo-vacuum chambers that have been developed to project simulated targets to air-borne, space-borne, and ballistic platforms. The 7V chamber performs calibration and characterization of surveillance and seeker systems, as well as some mission simulation. The 10V chamber is being upgraded to provide real-time target simulation during the detection, acquisition, discrimination, and terminal phases of a seeker mission. The objective of the Satellite Emulation project is to upgrade this existing capability to support the ability to discern and track other satellites and orbital debris in a HWIL capability. It would provide a baseline for realistic testing of satellite surveillance sensors, which would be operated in a controlled environment. Many sensor functions could be tested, including scene recognition and maneuvering control software, using real interceptor hardware and software. Statistically significant and repeatable datasets produced by the satellite emulation system can be acquired during such test and saved for further analysis. In addition, the robustness of the discrimination and tracking algorithms can be investigated by a parametric analysis using slightly different scenarios; this will be used to determine critical points where a sensor system might fail. The radiometric characteristics of satellites are expected to be similar to the targets and decoys that make up a typical interceptor mission scenario, since they are near ambient temperature. Their spectral reflectivity, emissivity, and shape must also be considered, but the projection systems employed in the 7V and 10V chambers should be

  8. NASA Stennis Space Center Integrated System Health Management Test Bed and Development Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa, Fernando; Holland, Randy; Coote, David

    2006-01-01

    Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) is a capability that focuses on determining the condition (health) of every element in a complex System (detect anomalies, diagnose causes, prognosis of future anomalies), and provide data, information, and knowledge (DIaK)-not just data-to control systems for safe and effective operation. This capability is currently done by large teams of people, primarily from ground, but needs to be embedded on-board systems to a higher degree to enable NASA's new Exploration Mission (long term travel and stay in space), while increasing safety and decreasing life cycle costs of spacecraft (vehicles; platforms; bases or outposts; and ground test, launch, and processing operations). The topics related to this capability include: 1) ISHM Related News Articles; 2) ISHM Vision For Exploration; 3) Layers Representing How ISHM is Currently Performed; 4) ISHM Testbeds & Prototypes at NASA SSC; 5) ISHM Functional Capability Level (FCL); 6) ISHM Functional Capability Level (FCL) and Technology Readiness Level (TRL); 7) Core Elements: Capabilities Needed; 8) Core Elements; 9) Open Systems Architecture for Condition-Based Maintenance (OSA-CBM); 10) Core Elements: Architecture, taxonomy, and ontology (ATO) for DIaK management; 11) Core Elements: ATO for DIaK Management; 12) ISHM Architecture Physical Implementation; 13) Core Elements: Standards; 14) Systematic Implementation; 15) Sketch of Work Phasing; 16) Interrelationship Between Traditional Avionics Systems, Time Critical ISHM and Advanced ISHM; 17) Testbeds and On-Board ISHM; 18) Testbed Requirements: RETS AND ISS; 19) Sustainable Development and Validation Process; 20) Development of on-board ISHM; 21) Taxonomy/Ontology of Object Oriented Implementation; 22) ISHM Capability on the E1 Test Stand Hydraulic System; 23) Define Relationships to Embed Intelligence; 24) Intelligent Elements Physical and Virtual; 25) ISHM Testbeds and Prototypes at SSC Current Implementations; 26) Trailer

  9. CFD Simulations for Arc-Jet Panel Testing Capability Development Using Semi-Elliptical Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokcen, Tahir; Balboni, John A.; Hartman, G. Joseph

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports computational simulations in support of arc-jet panel testing capability development using semi-elliptical nozzles in a high enthalpy arc-jet facility at NASA Ames Research Center. Two different semi-elliptical nozzle configurations are proposed for testing panel test articles. Computational fluid dynamics simulations are performed to provide estimates of achievable panel surface conditions and useful test area for each configuration. The present analysis comprises three-dimensional simulations of the nonequilibrium flowfields in the semi-elliptical nozzles, test box and flowfield over the panel test articles. Computations show that useful test areas for the proposed two nozzle options are 20.32 centimeters by 20.32 centimeters (8 inches by 8 inches) and 43.18 centimeters by 43.18 centimeters (17 inches by 17 inches). Estimated values of the maximum cold-wall heat flux and surface pressure are 155 watts per centimeters squared and 39 kilopascals for the smaller panel test option, and 44 watts per centimeters squared and 7 kilopascals for the larger panel test option. Other important properties of the predicted flowfields are presented, and factors that limit the useful test area in the semi-free jet test configuration are discussed.

  10. High heat flux testing capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories - New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Youchison, D.L.; McDonald, J.M.; Wold, L.S.

    1994-12-31

    High heat flux testing for the United States fusion power program is the primary mission of the Plasma Materials Test Facility (PMTF) located at Sandia National Laboratories - New Mexico. This facility, which is owned by the United States Department of Energy, has been in operation for over 17 years and has provided much of the high heat flux data used in the design and evaluation of plasma facing components for many of the world`s magnetic fusion, tokamak experiments. In addition to domestic tokamaks such as Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at Princeton and the DIII-D tokamak at General Atomics, components for international experiments like TEXTOR, Tore-Supra, and JET also have been tested at the PMTF. High heat flux testing spans a wide spectrum including thermal shock tests on passively cooled materials, thermal response and thermal fatigue tests on actively cooled components, critical heat flux-burnout tests, braze reliability tests and safety related tests. The objective of this article is to provide a brief overview of the high heat flux testing capabilities at the PMTF and describe a few of the experiments performed over the last year.

  11. Development and implementation of a propeller test capability for GL-10 "Greased Lightning" propeller design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duvall, Brian Edward

    Interest in small unmanned aerial vehicles has increased dramatically in recent years. Hybrid vehicles which allow forward flight as a fixed wing aircraft and a true vertical landing capability have always had applications. Management of the available energy and noise associated with electric propeller propulsion systems presents many challenges. NASA Langley has developed the Greased Lightning 10 (GL-10) vertical takeoff, unmanned aerial vehicle with ten individual motors and propellers. All are used for propulsion during takeoff and contribute to acoustic noise pollution which is an identified nuisance to the surrounding users. A propeller test capability was developed to gain an understanding of how the noise can be reduced while meeting minimum thrust requirements. The designed propeller test stand allowed for various commercially available propellers to be tested for potential direct replacement of the current GL-10 propellers and also supported testing of a newly designed propeller provided by the Georgia Institute of Technology. Results from the test program provided insight as to which factors affect the noise as well as performance characteristics. The outcome of the research effort showed that the current GL-10 propeller still represents the best choice of all the candidate propellers tested.

  12. Aeronautical Knowledge (Selected Articles),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-14

    UNCLASSIFIED FTD-ID RSN -12348 Nm m ED I FTD-ID(RS)T-1234-80-- FOREIGN TECHNOLOGY DIVISION AERONAUTICAL KNOWLEDGE (Selected Articles) * DTIC cm. ’- D...of the spacecraft cabin, went through the structure of the eyes of the astronauts, and caused them to see flahig-. The frequency of the flashing was...to tell space travelers of the existence of belts of high radiation end alert them to the danger. Present and future missins must clarify the

  13. Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) Synthetic Instrument Capabilities Assessment and Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.; Bradish, Martin A.

    2011-01-01

    The role of synthetic instruments (SIs) for Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) is to provide an external lower-level diagnostic and functional test capability beyond the built-in-test capabilities of spacecraft electronics. Built-in diagnostics can report faults and symptoms, but isolating the root cause and performing corrective action requires specialized instruments. Often a fault can be revealed by emulating the operation of external hardware. This implies complex hardware that is too massive to be accommodated in spacecraft. The SI strategy is aimed at minimizing complexity and mass by employing highly reconfigurable instruments that perform diagnostics and emulate external functions. In effect, SI can synthesize an instrument on demand. The SI architecture section of this document summarizes the result of a recent program diagnostic and test needs assessment based on the International Space Station. The SI architecture addresses operational issues such as minimizing crew time and crew skill level, and the SI data transactions between the crew and supporting ground engineering searching for the root cause and formulating corrective actions. SI technology is described within a teleoperations framework. The remaining sections describe a lab demonstration intended to show that a single SI circuit could synthesize an instrument in hardware and subsequently clear the hardware and synthesize a completely different instrument on demand. An analysis of the capabilities and limitations of commercially available SI hardware and programming tools is included. Future work in SI technology is also described.

  14. Wireless Sensor Applications in Extreme Aeronautical Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William C.; Atkinson, Gary M.

    2013-01-01

    NASA aeronautical programs require rigorous ground and flight testing. Many of the testing environments can be extremely harsh. These environments include cryogenic temperatures and high temperatures (greater than 1500 C). Temperature, pressure, vibration, ionizing radiation, and chemical exposure may all be part of the harsh environment found in testing. This paper presents a survey of research opportunities for universities and industry to develop new wireless sensors that address anticipated structural health monitoring (SHM) and testing needs for aeronautical vehicles. Potential applications of passive wireless sensors for ground testing and high altitude aircraft operations are presented. Some of the challenges and issues of the technology are also presented.

  15. Air Force electronic warfare evaluation simulator (AFEWES) infrared test and evaluation capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Seth D.

    2003-09-01

    The Air Force Electronic Warfare Evaluation Simulator (AFEWES) Infrared Countermeasures (IRCM) test facility currently has the ability to simulate a complete IRCM test environment, including IR missiles in flight, aircraft in flight, and various IR countermeasures including maneuvers, point-source flares and lamp- and LASER-based jammer systems. The simulations of IR missiles in flight include missile seeker hardware mounted on a six degree-of-freedom flight simulation table. This paper will focus on recent developments and upgrades to the AFEWES IR capability.

  16. In-situ Creep Testing Capability Development for Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    B. G. Kim; J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; K. G. Condie; B. H. Sencer

    2010-08-01

    Creep is the slow, time-dependent strain that occurs in a material under a constant strees (or load) at high temperature. High temperature is a relative term, dependent on the materials being evaluated. A typical creep curve is shown in Figure 1-1. In a creep test, a constant load is applied to a tensile specimen maintained at a constant temperature. Strain is then measured over a period of time. The slope of the curve, identified in the figure below, is the strain rate of the test during Stage II or the creep rate of the material. Primary creep, Stage I, is a period of decreasing creep rate due to work hardening of the material. Primary creep is a period of primarily transient creep. During this period, deformation takes place and the resistance to creep increases until Stage II, Secondary creep. Stage II creep is a period with a roughly constant creep rate. Stage II is referred to as steady-state creep because a balance is achieved between the work hardening and annealing (thermal softening) processes. Tertiary creep, Stage III, occurs when there is a reduction in cross sectional area due to necking or effective reduction in area due to internal void formation; that is, the creep rate increases due to necking of the specimen and the associated increase in local stress.

  17. An aeronautical mobile satellite experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedrey, T. C.; Dessouky, K. I.; Lay, N. E.

    1990-01-01

    The various activities and findings of a NASA/FAA/COMSAT/INMARSAT collaborative aeronautical mobile satellite experiment are detailed. The primary objective of the experiment was to demonstrate and evaluate an advanced digital mobile satellite terminal developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory under the NASA Mobile Satellite Program. The experiment was a significant milestone for NASA/JPL, since it was the first test of the mobile terminal in a true mobile satellite environment. The results were also of interest to the general mobile satellite community because of the advanced nature of the technologies employed in the terminal.

  18. Development, Test, and Evaluation of Microwave Radar Water Level (MWWL) Sensors' Wave Measurement Capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, S. K.; Heitsenrether, R.

    2015-12-01

    Waves can have a significant impact on many coastal operations including navigational safety, recreation, and even the economy. Despite this, as of 2009, there were only 181 in situ real-time wave observation networks nationwide (IOOS 2009). There has recently been interest in adding real-time wave measurement systems to already existing NOAA Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS) stations. Several steps have already been taken in order to achieve this, such as integrating information from existing wave measurement buoys and initial testing of multiple different wave measurement systems (Heitsenrether et al. 2012). Since wave observations can be derived from high frequency water level changes, we will investigate water level sensors' capability to measure waves. Recently, CO-OPS has been transitioning to new microwave radar water level (MWWL) sensors which have higher resolution and theoretically a greater potential wave measurement capability than the acoustic sensors in stilling wells. In this study, we analyze the wave measurement capability of MWWL sensors at two high energy wave environments, Duck, NC and La Jolla, CA, and compare results to two "reference" sensors (A Nortek acoustic waves and currents profiler (AWAC) at Duck and a single point pressure sensor at La Jolla). A summary of results from the two field test sites will be presented, including comparisons of wave energy spectra, significant wave height, and peak period measured by the test MWWL sensors and both reference AWAC and pressure sensors. In addition, relationships between MWWL versus reference wave sensor differences and specific wave conditions will be discussed. Initial results from spectral analysis and the calculation of bulk wave parameters indicate that MWWL sensors set to the "NoFilter" processing setting can produce wave measurements capability that compare well to the two reference sensors. These results support continued development to enable the

  19. ENHANCED THERMAL VACUUM TEST CAPABILITY FOR RADIOISOTOPE POWER SYSTEMS AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY BETTER SIMULATES ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS OF SPACE

    SciTech Connect

    J. C. Giglio; A. A. Jackson

    2012-03-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is preparing to fuel and test the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), the next generation space power generator. The INL identified the thermal vacuum test chamber used to test past generators as inadequate. A second vacuum chamber was upgraded with a thermal shroud to process the unique needs and to test the full power capability of the new generator. The thermal vacuum test chamber is the first of its kind capable of testing a fueled power system to temperature that accurately simulate space. This paper outlines the new test and set up capabilities at the INL.

  20. An Assessment of Remote Visual Testing System Capabilities for the Detection of Service Induced Cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2005-09-01

    Remote visual testing is typically employed to ascertain the condition of materials in components that are inaccessible for direct examination. In the power and petrochemical industries, remote visual testing is used to assess whether service-related degradation is being manifested that, if left unchecked, may eventually impair the structural reliability of a component. Several codes and standards require that visual examinations be periodically conducted. Many of these inspections must be performed remotely due to harsh environments or design geometries of the subject components. This paper describes the attributes and limitations of remote visual testing, performance demonstration standards for camera systems, typical dimensions for service-induced cracking phenomena, and an assessment of the reliability of remote video camera systems at finding cracks. Because many forms of service-induced cracks have very small crack opening dimensions, the reliability of remote visual testing may not be adequate to ensure component integrity, given the capabilities of current camera systems and application practices.

  1. Capabilities and History of NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Hydrogen Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, T. W.

    2007-01-01

    The Hydrogen Test Facility (HTF) has conducted mechanical testing for aerospace materials at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center for many years. One of the first facilities of its kind to run high-pressure cryogenic permeability tests in liquid hydrogen, HTF is now characterized as a unique national resource capable of overcoming hazardous conditions to perform tests directly in various hydrogen environments. At HTF, custom test systems are operated in eight structurally reinforced test cells from 0 to 68,948 kPa (0 to 10,000 psi) at -253 to 982 C (--423 to 1800 F) in hydrogen, air, helium, and nitrogen, with other environments available upon request. Standard mechanical procedures include compression, fatigue crack growth rate, four-point bend, high/low cycle fatigue, fracture toughness, shear, strain-to-crack, and tensile testing. Cryogenic permeability and thermal conductivity and gaseous creep testing are offered, as well as simulated service under different combinations of operating environment(s), stress, pressure, and ambient-to-extreme temperatures. Advanced tests are routinely developed upon demand, and special component testing is also available. Current efforts include the renovation of two high-pressure gaseous test cells to generate data for a J-2X engine designed for Constellation's Ares I and V vehicles. In the past, HTF has supported other critical NASA programs, such as Apollo, Space Shuttle, and Next Generation Launch Technologies. During the 1990's, hundreds of tests were conducted in liquid hydrogen and liquid nitrogen during development of the Space Shuttle's super lightweight tank, which provided the thrust required to achieve low Earth orbit for the International Space Station. This facility was designed and built in 1963. Originally called the Low Temperature Test Facility, it became known as the Cryogenic Test Facility in the late 1980's and HTF in the early 1990's.

  2. Application of CFD in aeronautics at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maksymiuk, Catherine M.; Enomoto, Francis Y.; Vandalsem, William R.

    1995-01-01

    The role of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) at Ames Research Center has expanded to address a broad range of aeronautical problems, including wind tunnel support, flight test support, design, and analysis. Balancing the requirements of each new problem against the available resources - software, hardware, time, and expertise - is critical to the effective use of CFD. Several case studies of recent applications highlight the depth of CFD capability at Ames, the tradeoffs involved in various approaches, and lessons learned in the use of CFD as an engineering tool.

  3. Capabilities of the Impact Testing Facility at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finchum, Andy; Nehls, Mary; Young, Whitney; Gray, Perry; Suggs, Bart; Lowrey, Nikki M.

    2011-01-01

    The test and analysis capabilities of the Impact Testing Facility at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center are described. Nine different gun systems accommodate a wide range of projectile and target sizes and shapes at velocities from subsonic through hypersonic, to accomplish a broad range of ballistic and hypervelocity impact tests. These gun systems include ballistic and microballistic gas and powder guns, a two-stage light gas gun, and specialty guns for weather encounter studies. The ITF "rain gun" is the only hydrometeor impact gun known to be in existence in the United States that can provide single impact performance data with known raindrop sizes. Simulation of high velocity impact is available using the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamic Code. The Impact Testing Facility provides testing, custom test configuration design and fabrication, and analytical services for NASA, the Department of Defense, academic institutions, international space agencies, and private industry in a secure facility located at Marshall Space Flight Center, on the US Army's Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama. This facility performs tests that are subject to International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) and DoD secret classified restrictions as well as proprietary and unrestricted tests for civil space agencies, academic institutions, and commercial aerospace and defense companies and their suppliers.

  4. NASA's Role in Aeronautics: A Workshop. Volume VII - Background Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Assembly of Engineering.

    Sixteen background papers presented to a plenary session at a 1980 workshop on the role of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in aeronautics are presented. The central task of the workshop was to examine the relationship of NASA's research capabilities to the state of U.S. aviation and to make recommendations about NASA's…

  5. Human Factors in Aeronautics at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mogford, Richard

    2016-01-01

    This is a briefing to a regularly meeting DoD group called the Human Systems Community of Interest: Mission Effectiveness. I was asked to address human factors in aeronautics at NASA. (Exploration (space) human factors has apparently already been covered.) The briefing describes human factors organizations at NASA Ames and Langley. It then summarizes some aeronautics tasks that involve the application of human factors in the development of specific tools and capabilities. The tasks covered include aircrew checklists, dispatch operations, Playbook, Dynamic Weather Routes, Traffic Aware Strategic Aircrew Requests, and Airplane State Awareness and Prediction Technologies. I mention that most of our aeronautics work involves human factors as embedded in development tasks rather than basic research.

  6. Establishing a Ballistic Test Methodology for Documenting the Containment Capability of Small Gas Turbine Engine Compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heady, Joel; Pereira, J. Michael; Ruggeri, Charles R.; Bobula, George A.

    2009-01-01

    A test methodology currently employed for large engines was extended to quantify the ballistic containment capability of a small turboshaft engine compressor case. The approach involved impacting the inside of a compressor case with a compressor blade. A gas gun propelled the blade into the case at energy levels representative of failed compressor blades. The test target was a full compressor case. The aft flange was rigidly attached to a test stand and the forward flange was attached to a main frame to provide accurate boundary conditions. A window machined in the case allowed the projectile to pass through and impact the case wall from the inside with the orientation, direction and speed that would occur in a blade-out event. High-peed, digital-video cameras provided accurate velocity and orientation data. Calibrated cameras and digital image correlation software generated full field displacement and strain information at the back side of the impact point.

  7. DSTYK kinase domain ablation impaired the mice capabilities of learning and memory in water maze test.

    PubMed

    Li, Kui; Liu, Ji-Wei; Zhu, Zhi-Chuan; Wang, Hong-Tao; Zu, Yong; Liu, Yong-Jie; Yang, Yan-Hong; Xiong, Zhi-Qi; Shen, Xu; Chen, Rui; Zheng, Jing; Hu, Ze-Lan

    2014-01-01

    DSTYK (Dual serine/threonine and tyrosine protein kinase) is a putative dual Ser/Thr and Tyr protein kinase with unique structural features. It is proposed that DSTYK may play important roles in brain because of its high expression in most brain areas. In the present study, a DSTYK knockout (KO) mouse line with the ablation of C-terminal of DSTYK including the kinase domain was generated to study the physiological function of DSTYK. The DSTYK KO mice are fertile and have no significant morphological defects revealed by Nissl staining compared with wildtype mice. Open field test and rotarod test showed there is no obvious difference in basic motor and balance capacity between the DSTYK homozygous KO mice and DSTYK heterozygous KO mice. In water maze test, however, the DSTYK homozygous KO mice show impaired capabilities of learning and memory compared with the DSTYK heterozygous KO mice.

  8. Error detection and correction unit with built-in self-test capability for spacecraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timoc, Constantin

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this project was to research and develop a 32-bit single chip Error Detection and Correction unit capable of correcting all single bit errors and detecting all double bit errors in the memory systems of a spacecraft. We designed the 32-bit EDAC (Error Detection and Correction unit) based on a modified Hamming code and according to the design specifications and performance requirements. We constructed a laboratory prototype (breadboard) which was converted into a fault simulator. The correctness of the design was verified on the breadboard using an exhaustive set of test cases. A logic diagram of the EDAC was delivered to JPL Section 514 on 4 Oct. 1988.

  9. Development of in-aquifer heat testing for high resolution subsurface thermal-storage capability characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibertz, Klodwig Suibert Oskar; Chirila, Marian Andrei; Bumberger, Jan; Dietrich, Peter; Vienken, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    The ongoing transition from fossil fuels to alternative energy source provision has resulted in increased geothermal uses as well as storage of the shallow subsurface. Existing approaches for exploration of shallow subsurface geothermal energy storage often lack the ability to provide information concerning the spatial variability of thermal storage parameters. However, parameter distributions have to be known to ensure that sustainable geothermal use of the shallow subsurface can take place - especially when it is subject to intensive usage. In this paper, we test a temperature decay time approach to obtain in situ, direct, qualitative, spatial high-resolution information about the distribution of thermal storage capabilities of the shallow subsurface. To achieve this, temperature data from a high-resolution Fibre-Optic-Distributed-Temperature-Sensing device, as well as data from conventional Pt100-temperature-sensors were collected during a heat injection test. The latter test was used to measure the decay time of temperature signal dissipation of the subsurface. Signal generation was provided by in-aquifer heating with a temperature self-regulating electric heating cable. Heating was carried out for 4.5 days. After this, a cooling period of 1.5 weeks was observed. Temperature dissipation data was also compared to Direct-Push-derived high-resolution (hydro-)geological data. The results show that besides hydraulic properties also the bedding and compaction state of the sediment have an impact on the thermal storage capability of the saturated subsurface. The temperature decay time approach is therefore a reliable method for obtaining information regarding the qualitative heat storage capability of heterogeneous aquifers for the use with closed loop system geothermal storage systems. Furthermore, this approach is advantageous over other commonly used methods, e.g. soil-sampling and laboratory analysis, as even small changes in (hydro-)geological properties lead to

  10. 10 CFR 830 Major Modification Determination for the Advanced Test Reactor Remote Monitoring and Management Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Bohachek, Randolph Charles

    2015-09-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR; TRA-670), which is located in the ATR Complex at Idaho National Laboratory, was constructed in the 1960s for the purpose of irradiating reactor fuels and materials. Other irradiation services, such as radioisotope production, are also performed at ATR. While ATR is safely fulfilling current mission requirements, assessments are continuing. These assessments intend to identify areas to provide defense–in-depth and improve safety for ATR. One of the assessments performed by an independent group of nuclear industry experts recommended that a remote accident management capability be provided. The report stated that: “contemporary practice in commercial power reactors is to provide a remote shutdown station or stations to allow shutdown of the reactor and management of long-term cooling of the reactor (i.e., management of reactivity, inventory, and cooling) should the main control room be disabled (e.g., due to a fire in the control room or affecting the control room).” This project will install remote reactor monitoring and management capabilities for ATR. Remote capabilities will allow for post scram reactor management and monitoring in the event the main Reactor Control Room (RCR) must be evacuated.

  11. Air Force Electronic Warfare Evaluation Simulator (AFEWES) infrared test and evaluation capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Hank D., II; Shepherd, Seth D.

    2004-08-01

    The Air Force Electronic Warfare Evaluation Simulator (AFEWES) Infrared Countermeasures (IRCM) test facility currently has the ability to simulate a complete IRCM test environment, including IR missiles in flight, aircraft in flight, and various IR countermeasures including maneuvers, point-source flares and lamp- and LASER-based jammer systems. The simulations of IR missiles in flight include missile seeker hardware mounted on a six degree-of-freedom flight simulation table. This paper will focus on recent developments and upgrades to the AFEWES IR capability. In particular, current developments in IR scene generation/projection and efforts to optically combining the IR image produced by a resistive array with existing foreground lamp sources.

  12. Air Force electronic warfare evaluation simulator (AFEWES) infrared test and evaluation capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Hank D., II; Blair, Tommy L.; Ensor, Bruce A.; Deyo, Charles R.; Longbottom, Jeff A.; White, Jason C.

    2005-05-01

    The Air Force Electronic Warfare Evaluation Simulator (AFEWES) Infrared Countermeasures (IRCM) test facility currently has the ability to simulate a complete IRCM test environment, including IR missiles in flight, aircraft in flight, and various IR countermeasures including maneuvers, point-source flares, and lamp- and LASER-based jammer systems. The simulations of IR missiles in flight include missile seeker hardware mounted on a six degree-of-freedom flight simulation table. This paper will focus on recent developments and upgrades to the AFEWES IR capability. In particular, current developments in IR scene generation/projection and efforts to optically combining the IR image produced by a resistive array with existing foreground lamp sources.

  13. Air Force Electronic Warfare Evaluation Simulator (AFEWES) infrared test and evaluation capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Hank D., II; Blair, Tommy L.; Ensor, Bruce A.

    2007-04-01

    The Air Force Electronic Warfare Evaluation Simulator (AFEWES) Infrared Countermeasures (IRCM) test facility currently has the ability to simulate a complete IRCM test environment, including IR missiles in flight, aircraft in flight, and various IR countermeasures including maneuvers, point-source flares and lamp- and LASER-based jammer systems. The simulations of IR missiles in flight include missile seeker hardware mounted on a six degree-of-freedom flight simulation table. This paper will focus on recent developments and upgrades to the AFEWES IR capability. In particular, current developments in IR scene generation/projection and efforts to optically combining the IR image produced by a resistive array with existing foreground lamp sources.

  14. Air Force electronic warfare evaluation simulator (AFEWES) infrared test and evaluation capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Hank D., II; Grauvogel, Nathanael L.; Blair, Tommy L.; Ensor, Bruce A.

    2006-05-01

    The Air Force Electronic Warfare Evaluation Simulator (AFEWES) infrared countermeasures (IRCM) test facility currently has the ability to simulate a complete IRCM test environment, including IR missiles in flight, aircraft in flight, and various IR countermeasures including maneuvers, point-source flares, and lamp- and LASER-based jammer systems. The simulations of IR missiles in flight include missile seeker hardware mounted on a six degree-of-freedom flight simulation table. This paper will focus on recent developments and upgrades to the AFEWES IR capability. In particular, current developments in IR scene generation/projection and efforts to optically combine the IR image produced by a resistive array with existing foreground lamp sources.

  15. Large-Scale Testing and High-Fidelity Simulation Capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories to Support Space Power and Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Dobranich, Dean; Blanchat, Thomas K.

    2008-01-21

    Sandia National Laboratories, as a Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Agency, has major responsibility to ensure the safety and security needs of nuclear weapons. As such, with an experienced research staff, Sandia maintains a spectrum of modeling and simulation capabilities integrated with experimental and large-scale test capabilities. This expertise and these capabilities offer considerable resources for addressing issues of interest to the space power and propulsion communities. This paper presents Sandia's capability to perform thermal qualification (analysis, test, modeling and simulation) using a representative weapon system as an example demonstrating the potential to support NASA's Lunar Reactor System.

  16. An Overview of Advanced Elastomeric Seal Development and Testing Capabilities at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, Patrick H.

    2014-01-01

    NASA is developing advanced space-rated elastomeric seals to support future space exploration missions to low Earth orbit, the Moon, near Earth asteroids, and other destinations. This includes seals for a new docking system and vehicle hatches. These seals must exhibit extremely low leak rates to ensure that astronauts have sufficient breathable air for extended missions. Seal compression loads must be below prescribed limits so as not to overload the mechanisms that compress them, and seal adhesion forces must be low to allow the sealed interface to be separated when required (e.g., during undocking or hatch opening). NASA Glenn Research Center has developed a number of unique test fixtures to measure the leak rates and compression and adhesion loads of candidate seal designs under simulated thermal, vacuum, and engagement conditions. Tests can be performed on full-scale seals with diameters on the order of 50 in., subscale seals that are about 12 in. in diameter, and smaller specimens such as O-rings. Test conditions include temperatures ranging from -238 to 662 F (-150 to 350 C), operational pressure gradients, and seal-on-seal or seal-on-flange mating configurations. Nominal and off-nominal conditions (e.g., incomplete seal compression) can also be simulated. This paper describes the main design features and capabilities of each type of test apparatus and provides an overview of advanced seal development activities at NASA Glenn.

  17. Data Acquisition System Architecture and Capabilities at NASA GRC Plum Brook Station's Space Environment Test Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Richard K.; Hill, Gerald M.

    2014-01-01

    Very large space environment test facilities present unique engineering challenges in the design of facility data systems. Data systems of this scale must be versatile enough to meet the wide range of data acquisition and measurement requirements from a diverse set of customers and test programs, but also must minimize design changes to maintain reliability and serviceability. This paper presents an overview of the common architecture and capabilities of the facility data acquisition systems available at two of the world's largest space environment test facilities located at the NASA Glenn Research Center's Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio; namely, the Space Propulsion Research Facility (commonly known as the B-2 facility) and the Space Power Facility (SPF). The common architecture of the data systems is presented along with details on system scalability and efficient measurement systems analysis and verification. The architecture highlights a modular design, which utilizes fully-remotely managed components, enabling the data systems to be highly configurable and support multiple test locations with a wide-range of measurement types and very large system channel counts.

  18. Data Acquisition System Architecture and Capabilities At NASA GRC Plum Brook Station's Space Environment Test Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Richard K.; Hill, Gerald M.

    2012-01-01

    Very large space environment test facilities present unique engineering challenges in the design of facility data systems. Data systems of this scale must be versatile enough to meet the wide range of data acquisition and measurement requirements from a diverse set of customers and test programs, but also must minimize design changes to maintain reliability and serviceability. This paper presents an overview of the common architecture and capabilities of the facility data acquisition systems available at two of the world?s largest space environment test facilities located at the NASA Glenn Research Center?s Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio; namely, the Space Propulsion Research Facility (commonly known as the B-2 facility) and the Space Power Facility (SPF). The common architecture of the data systems is presented along with details on system scalability and efficient measurement systems analysis and verification. The architecture highlights a modular design, which utilizes fully-remotely managed components, enabling the data systems to be highly configurable and support multiple test locations with a wide-range of measurement types and very large system channel counts.

  19. An Overview of Advanced Elastomeric Seal Development and Testing Capabilities at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    NASA is developing advanced space-rated elastomeric seals to support future space exploration missions to low Earth orbit, the Moon, near Earth asteroids, and other destinations. This includes seals for a new docking system and vehicle hatches. These seals must exhibit extremely low leak rates to ensure that astronauts have sufficient breathable air for extended missions. Seal compression loads must be below prescribed limits so as not to overload the mechanisms that compress them, and seal adhesion forces must be low to allow the sealed interface to be separated when required (e.g., during undocking or hatch opening). NASA Glenn Research Center has developed a number of unique test fixtures to measure the leak rates and compression and adhesion loads of candidate seal designs under simulated thermal, vacuum, and engagement conditions. Tests can be performed on full-scale seals with diameters on the order of 50 in., subscale seals that are about 12 in. in diameter, and smaller specimens such as O-rings. Test conditions include temperatures ranging from -238 to +662F (-150 to +350C), operational pressure gradients, and seal-on-seal or seal-on-flange mating configurations. Nominal and off-nominal conditions (e.g., incomplete seal compression) can also be simulated. This paper describes the main design features and capabilities of each test apparatus and provides an overview of advanced seal development activities at NASA Glenn.

  20. An Overview of Advanced Elastomeric Seal Development and Testing Capabilities at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    NASA is developing advanced space-rated elastomeric seals to support future space exploration missions to low Earth orbit, the Moon, near Earth asteroids, and other destinations. This includes seals for a new docking system and vehicle hatches. These seals must exhibit extremely low leak rates to ensure that astronauts have sufficient breathable air for extended missions. Seal compression loads must be below prescribed limits so as not to overload the mechanisms that compress them, and seal adhesion forces must be low to allow the sealed interface to be separated when required (e.g., during undocking or hatch opening). NASA Glenn Research Center has developed a number of unique test fixtures to measure the leak rates and compression and adhesion loads of candidate seal designs under simulated thermal, vacuum, and engagement conditions. Tests can be performed on fullscale seals with diameters on the order of 50 in., subscale seals that are about 12 in. in diameter, and smaller specimens such as O-rings. Test conditions include temperatures ranging from -238 to 662degF (-150 to 350degC), operational pressure gradients, and seal-on-seal or seal-on-flange mating configurations. Nominal and off-nominal conditions (e.g., incomplete seal compression) can also be simulated. This paper describes the main design features and capabilities of each type of test apparatus and provides an overview of advanced seal development activities at NASA Glenn.

  1. Design, implementation, and testing of a cryogenic loading capability on an engineering neutron diffractometer.

    PubMed

    Woodruff, T R; Krishnan, V B; Clausen, B; Sisneros, T; Livescu, V; Brown, D W; Bourke, M A M; Vaidyanathan, R

    2010-06-01

    A novel capability was designed, implemented, and tested for in situ neutron diffraction measurements during loading at cryogenic temperatures on the spectrometer for materials research at temperature and stress at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This capability allowed for the application of dynamic compressive forces of up to 250 kN on standard samples controlled at temperatures between 300 and 90 K. The approach comprised of cooling thermally isolated compression platens that in turn conductively cooled the sample in an aluminum vacuum chamber which was nominally transparent to the incident and diffracted neutrons. The cooling/heat rate and final temperature were controlled by regulating the flow of liquid nitrogen in channels inside the platens that were connected through bellows to the mechanical actuator of the load frame and by heaters placed on the platens. Various performance parameters of this system are reported here. The system was used to investigate deformation in Ni-Ti-Fe shape memory alloys at cryogenic temperatures and preliminary results are presented.

  2. LWR codes capability to address SFR BDBA scenarios: Modeling of the ABCOVE tests

    SciTech Connect

    Herranz, L. E.; Garcia, M.; Morandi, S.

    2012-07-01

    The sound background built-up in LWR source term analysis in case of a severe accident, make it worth to check the capability of LWR safety analysis codes to model accident SFR scenarios, at least in some areas. This paper gives a snapshot of such predictability in the area of aerosol behavior in containment. To do so, the AB-5 test of the ABCOVE program has been modeled with 3 LWR codes: ASTEC, ECART and MELCOR. Through the search of a best estimate scenario and its comparison to data, it is concluded that even in the specific case of in-containment aerosol behavior, some enhancements would be needed in the LWR codes and/or their application, particularly with respect to consideration of particle shape. Nonetheless, much of the modeling presently embodied in LWR codes might be applicable to SFR scenarios. These conclusions should be seen as preliminary as long as comparisons are not extended to more experimental scenarios. (authors)

  3. Definition of Capabilities Needed for a Single Event Effects Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Riemer, Bernie; Gallmeier, Franz X.

    2014-12-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is contemplating new regulations mandating testing of the vulnerability of flight-critical avionics to single event effects (SEE). A limited number of high-energy neutron test facilities currently serve the SEE industrial and institutional research community. The FAA recognizes that existing facilities have insufficient test capacity to meet new demand from such mandates; it desires more flexible irradiation capabilities to test complete, large systems and would like capabilities to address greater concerns for thermal neutrons. For this reason, the FAA funded this study by Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) staff with the ultimate aim of developing options for SEE test facilities using high-energy neutrons at the SNS complex. After an investigation of current SEE test practices and assessment of future testing requirements, three concepts were identified covering a range of test functionality, neutron flux levels, and fidelity to the atmospheric neutron spectrum. The costs and times required to complete each facility were also estimated. SEE testing is generally performed by accelerating the event rate to a point where the effects are still dominated by single events and double event causes of failures are negligible. In practice, acceleration factors of as high as 106 are applicable for component testing, whereas for systems testing acceleration factors of 104 seem to be the upper limit. It is strongly desirable that the irradiation facility be tunable over a large range of high-energy neutron fluxes of 102 - 104 n/cm²/s for systems testing and from 104 - 107 n/cm²/s for components testing. The most capable, most flexible, and highest-test-capacity option is a new stand-alone target station named the High-Energy neutron Test Station (HETS). It is also the most expensive option, with a cost to complete of approximately $100 million. Dual test enclosures would

  4. An Overview of High Temperature Seal Development and Testing Capabilities at the NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demange, Jeffrey J.; Taylor, Shawn C.; Dunlap, Patrick H.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Finkbeiner, Joshua R.; Proctor, Margaret P.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), partnering with the University of Toledo, has a long history of developing and testing seal technologies for high-temperature applications. The GRC Seals Team has conducted research and development on high-temperature seal technologies for applications including advanced propulsion systems, thermal protection systems (airframe and control surface thermal seals), high-temperature preloading technologies, and other extreme-environment seal applications. The team has supported several high-profile projects over the past 30 years and has partnered with numerous organizations, including other government entities, academic institutions, and private organizations. Some of these projects have included the National Aerospace Space Plane (NASP), Space Shuttle Space Transport System (STS), the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV), and the Dream Chaser Space Transportation System, as well as several high-speed vehicle programs for other government organizations. As part of the support for these programs, NASA GRC has developed unique seal-specific test facilities that permit evaluations and screening exercises in relevant environments. The team has also embarked on developing high-temperature preloaders to help maintain seal functionality in extreme environments. This paper highlights several propulsion-related projects that the NASA GRC Seals Team has supported over the past several years and will provide an overview of existing testing capabilities

  5. Aeronautical Engineering: 1983 cumulative index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    This bibliography is a cumulative index to the abstracts contained in NASA SP-7037 (158) through NASA SP-7037 (169) of Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography. NASA SP-7037 and its supplements have been compiled through the cooperative efforts of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). This cumulative index includes subject, personal author, corporate source, contract, report number, and accession number indexes.

  6. Capabilities and Facilities Available at the Advanced Test Reactor to Support Development of the Next Generation Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover; Raymond V. Furstenau

    2005-10-01

    The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. It is a very versatile facility with a wide variety of experimental test capabilities for providing the environment needed in an irradiation experiment. These different capabilities include passive sealed capsule experiments, instrumented and/or temperature-controlled experiments, and pressurized water loop experiment facilities. The Irradiation Test Vehicle (ITV) installed in 1999 enhanced these capabilities by providing a built in experiment monitoring and control system for instrumented and/or temperature controlled experiments. This built in control system significantly reduces the cost for an actively monitored/temperature controlled experiments by providing the thermocouple connections, temperature control system, and temperature control gas supply and exhaust systems already in place at the irradiation position. Although the ITV in-core hardware was removed from the ATR during the last core replacement completed in early 2005, it (or a similar facility) could be re-installed for an irradiation program when the need arises. The proposed Gas Test Loop currently being designed for installation in the ATR will provide additional capability for testing of not only gas reactor materials and fuels but will also include enhanced fast flux rates for testing of materials and fuels for other next generation reactors including preliminary testing for fast reactor fuels and materials. This paper discusses the different irradiation capabilities available and the cost benefit issues related to each capability.

  7. Aeronautics in NACA and NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Initiated in 1915, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics/National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NACA/NASA) aeronautical programs have been the keystone of a sustained U.S. Government, industry, and university research effort which has been a primary factor in the development of our remarkable air transportation systems, the country's largest positive trade balance component, and the world's finest military Air Force. This overview summarizes the flow of events, and the major trends, that have led from the NACA origins to the present NASA Aeronautics program, and indicates some important directions for the years ahead.

  8. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with indexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    This bibliography lists 426 reports, articles and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in August 1984. Reports are cited in the area of Aeronautical Engineering. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing operation and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment and systems.

  9. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-1999-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. The NASA CASI price code table, addresses of organizations, and document availability information are included before the abstract section. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  10. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. The NASA CASI price code table, addresses of organizations, and document availability information are included before the abstract section. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  11. Application of the European Test of Olfactory Capabilities in patients with olfactory impairment.

    PubMed

    Joussain, P; Bessy, M; Faure, F; Bellil, D; Landis, B N; Hugentobler, M; Tuorila, H; Mustonen, S; Vento, S I; Delphin-Combe, F; Krolak-Salmon, P; Rouby, C; Bensafi, M

    2016-02-01

    A central issue in olfaction concerns the characterization of loss of olfactory function: partial (hyposmia) or total (anosmia). This paper reports the application in a clinical setting of the European Test of Olfactory Capabilities (ETOC), combining odor detection and identification. The study included three phases. In phase 1, anosmics, hyposmics and controls were tested with the 16-items version of the ETOC. In phase 2, a short version of the ETOC was developed: patients with and controls without olfactory impairment were tested on a 6-items ETOC. In phase 3, to predict olfactory impairments in new individuals, the 16-items ETOC was administered on samples of young and older adults, and the 6-items version was applied in samples of young, elderly participants and Alzheimer patients. In phase 1, linear discriminant analysis (LDA) of ETOC scores classified patients and controls with 87.5 % accuracy. In phase 2, LDA provided 84 % correct classification. Results of phase 3 revealed: (1) 16-items ETOC: whereas in young adults, 10 % were classified as hyposmic and 90 % as normosmic, in elderly, 1 % were classified as anosmic, 39 % hyposmic and 60 % normosmic; (2) 6-items ETOC: 15 % of the young adults were classified as having olfactory impairment, compared to 28 % in the older group and 83 % in Alzheimer patients. In conclusion, the ETOC enables characterizing the prevalence of olfactory impairment in young subjects and in normal and pathological aging. Whereas the 16-items ETOC is more discriminant, the short ETOC may provide a fast (5-10 min) tool to assess olfaction in clinical settings.

  12. Design and Testing of an Active Heat Rejection Radiator with Digital Turn-Down Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunada, Eric; Birur, Gajanana C.; Ganapathi, Gani B.; Miller, Jennifer; Berisford, Daniel; Stephan, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    NASA's proposed lunar lander, Altair, will be exposed to vastly different external environment temperatures. The challenges to the active thermal control system (ATCS) are compounded by unfavorable transients in the internal waste heat dissipation profile: the lowest heat load occurs in the coldest environment while peak loads coincide with the warmest environment. The current baseline for this fluid is a 50/50 inhibited propylene glycol/water mixture with a freeze temperature around -35 C. While the overall size of the radiator's heat rejection area is dictated by the worst case hot scenario, a turn-down feature is necessary to tolerate the worst case cold scenario. A radiator with digital turn-down capability is being designed as a robust means to maintain cabin environment and equipment temperatures while minimizing mass and power consumption. It utilizes active valving to isolate and render ineffective any number of parallel flow tubes which span across the ATCS radiator. Several options were assessed in a trade-study to accommodate flow tube isolation and how to deal with the stagnant fluid that would otherwise remain in the tube. Bread-board environmental tests were conducted for options to drain the fluid from a turned-down leg as well an option to allow a leg to freeze/thaw. Each drain option involved a positive displacement gear pump with different methods of providing a pressure head to feed it. Test results showed that a start-up heater used to generate vapor at the tube inlet held the most promise for tube evacuation. Based on these test results and conclusions drawn from the trade-study, a full-scale radiator design is being worked for the Altair mission profile.

  13. Evaluating CMA Equalization of SOQPSK-TG for Aeronautical Telemetry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    Aeronautical Telemetry March 2015 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release: distribution unlimited. Test Resource Management...Equalization of SOQPK-TG Data for Aeronautical Telemetry 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER: W900KK-13-C-0026 5b. GRANT NUMBER: N/A 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...This standard is defined and used for aeronautical telemetry. Based on the iNET-packet structure, the adaptive block processing CMA equalizer can be

  14. Assessment of Radiated Fan Noise Prediction Capabilities Using Static Engine Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nark, Douglas M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes further assessment of the CDUCT-LaRC code via comparison with static engine test data. In an effort to improve confidence in the use of CDUCT-LaRC for liner optimization studies addressing realistic three-dimensional geometries, inlet radiated fan noise predictions were performed at 54% and 87% engine speed settings. Predictions were then compared with far-field measurements to assess the approach and implementation. The particular configurations were chosen to exercise the three-dimensional capability of CDUCT-LaRC and it s applicability to realistic configurations and conditions. At the 54% engine speed setting, the predictions capture the general directivity and acoustic treatment effects quite well. Comparisons of the predicted and measured directivity at the 87% power setting were more problematic. This was likely due in part to the difficulties in source specification and possibly the nonlinear nature of buzz-saw tones at this engine operating condition. Overall, the approach captured the basic trends and provided a conservative estimate of liner effects from which relative performance metrics could be inferred.

  15. Development of explosive event scale model testing capability at Sandia`s large scale centrifuge facility

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchat, T.K.; Davie, N.T.; Calderone, J.J.

    1998-02-01

    Geotechnical structures such as underground bunkers, tunnels, and building foundations are subjected to stress fields produced by the gravity load on the structure and/or any overlying strata. These stress fields may be reproduced on a scaled model of the structure by proportionally increasing the gravity field through the use of a centrifuge. This technology can then be used to assess the vulnerability of various geotechnical structures to explosive loading. Applications of this technology include assessing the effectiveness of earth penetrating weapons, evaluating the vulnerability of various structures, counter-terrorism, and model validation. This document describes the development of expertise in scale model explosive testing on geotechnical structures using Sandia`s large scale centrifuge facility. This study focused on buried structures such as hardened storage bunkers or tunnels. Data from this study was used to evaluate the predictive capabilities of existing hydrocodes and structural dynamics codes developed at Sandia National Laboratories (such as Pronto/SPH, Pronto/CTH, and ALEGRA). 7 refs., 50 figs., 8 tabs.

  16. Oil-Free Turbomachinery Research Enhanced by Thrust Bearing Test Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, Steven W.

    2003-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center s Oil-Free Turbomachinery research team is developing aircraft turbine engines that will not require an oil lubrication system. Oil systems are required today to lubricate rolling-element bearings used by the turbine and fan shafts. For the Oil-Free Turbomachinery concept, researchers combined the most advanced foil (air) bearings from industry with NASA-developed high-temperature solid lubricant technology. In 1999, the world s first Oil-Free turbocharger was demonstrated using these technologies. Now we are working with industry to demonstrate Oil-Free turbomachinery technology in a small business jet engine, the EJ-22 produced by Williams International and developed during Glenn s recently concluded General Aviation Propulsion (GAP) program. Eliminating the oil system in this engine will make it simpler, lighter (approximately 15 percent), more reliable, and less costly to purchase and maintain. Propulsion gas turbines will place high demands on foil air bearings, especially the thrust bearings. Up until now, the Oil-Free Turbomachinery research team only had the capability to test radial, journal bearings. This research has resulted in major improvements in the bearings performance, but journal bearings are cylindrical, and can only support radial shaft loads. To counteract axial thrust loads, thrust foil bearings, which are disk shaped, are required. Since relatively little research has been conducted on thrust foil air bearings, their performance lags behind that of journal bearings.

  17. Binomial Test Method for Determining Probability of Detection Capability for Fracture Critical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, Edward R.

    2011-01-01

    The capability of an inspection system is established by applications of various methodologies to determine the probability of detection (POD). One accepted metric of an adequate inspection system is that for a minimum flaw size and all greater flaw sizes, there is 0.90 probability of detection with 95% confidence (90/95 POD). Directed design of experiments for probability of detection (DOEPOD) has been developed to provide an efficient and accurate methodology that yields estimates of POD and confidence bounds for both Hit-Miss or signal amplitude testing, where signal amplitudes are reduced to Hit-Miss by using a signal threshold Directed DOEPOD uses a nonparametric approach for the analysis or inspection data that does require any assumptions about the particular functional form of a POD function. The DOEPOD procedure identifies, for a given sample set whether or not the minimum requirement of 0.90 probability of detection with 95% confidence is demonstrated for a minimum flaw size and for all greater flaw sizes (90/95 POD). The DOEPOD procedures are sequentially executed in order to minimize the number of samples needed to demonstrate that there is a 90/95 POD lower confidence bound at a given flaw size and that the POD is monotonic for flaw sizes exceeding that 90/95 POD flaw size. The conservativeness of the DOEPOD methodology results is discussed. Validated guidelines for binomial estimation of POD for fracture critical inspection are established.

  18. NASA/LMSC coherent LIDAR airborne shear sensor: System capabilities and flight test plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Paul

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of the NASA/LMSC Coherent Lidar Airborne Shear Sensor (CLASS) system flight tests is to evaluate the capability of an airborne coherent lidar system to detect, measure, and predict hazardous wind shear ahead of the aircraft with a view to warning flight crew of any impending dangers. On NASA's Boeing 737 Transport Systems Research Vehicle, the CLASS system will be used to measure wind velocity fields and, by incorporating such measurements with real-time aircraft state parameters, identify regions of wind shear that may be detrimental to the aircraft's performance. Assessment is to be made through actual wind shear encounters in flight. Wind shear measurements made by the class system will be compared to those made by the aircraft's in situ wind shear detection system as well as by ground-based Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) and airborne Doppler radar. By examining the aircraft performance loss (or gain) due to wind shear that the lidar predicts with that actually experienced by the aircraft, the performance of the CLASS system as a predictive wind shear detector will be assessed.

  19. DRAGON-NG: a configurable and capable AO test-bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharmal, Nazim A.; Bitenc, Urban; Bramall, David G.; Dipper, Nigel A.; Dubbeldam, Cornelis M.; Reeves, Andrew P.; Dunlop, Colin; Rolt, Stephen; Younger, Eddy J.; Myers, Richard M.

    2016-07-01

    An astronomical adaptive optics test-bench, designed to replicate the conditions of a 4 m-class telescope, is presented. Named DRAGON-Next Generation, it is constructed primarily from commercial off-the-shelf components with minimal customization (approximately a 90:10 ratio). This permits an optical design which is modular and this leads to a reconfigurability. DRAGON-NG has been designed for operation for the following modes: (high-order) SCAO, (twin-DM) MOAO, and (twin-DM) MCAO. It is capable of open-loop or closed-loop operation, with (3) natural and (3) laser guide-star emulation at loop rates of up to 200Hz. Field angles of up-to 2.4 arcmin (4m pupil emulation) can pass through the system. The design is dioptric and permits long cable runs to a compact real-time control system which is on-sky compatible. Therefore experimental validation can be carried out on DRAGON-NG before transferring to an on-sky system, which is a significant risk mitigation.

  20. Infrastructure Development of Single Cell Testing Capability at A0 Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Dhanaraj, Nandhini; Padilla, R.; Reid, J.; Khabiboulline, T.; Ge, M.; Mukherjee, A.; Rakhnov, I.; Ginsburg, C.; Wu, G.; Harms, E.; Carter, H.; /Fermilab

    2009-09-01

    The objective of this technical note is to document the details of the infrastructure development process that was realized at the A0 photo injector facility to establish RF cold testing capability for 1.3 GHz superconducting niobium single cell cavities. The activity began the last quarter of CY 2006 and ended the first quarter of CY 2009. The whole process involved addressing various aspects such as design of vertical insert and lifting fixture, modification of existing RF test station and design of new couplers, development of a Temperature Mapping (T-Map) system, radiation considerations for the test location (north cave), update of existing High Pressure Rinse (HPR) system, preparation of necessary safety documents and eventually obtaining an Operational Readiness Clearance (ORC). Figure 1 illustrates the various components of the development process. In the past, the north cave test station at A0 has supported the cold testing 3.9 GHz nine cell and single cell cavities, thus some of the components were available for use and some needed modification. The test dewar had the capacity to accommodate 1.3 GHz single cells although a new vertical insert that could handle both cavity types (1.3 and 3.9 GHz) had to be designed. The existing cryogenic system with an average capacity of {approx} 0.5 g/sec was deemed sufficient. The RF system was updated with broadband components and an additional amplifier with higher power capacity to handle higher gradients usually achieved in 1.3 GHz cavities. The initial testing phase was arbitrated to proceed with fixed power coupling. A new temperature mapping system was developed to provide the diagnostic tool for hot spot studies, quench characterization and field emission studies. The defining feature of this system was the use of diode sensors instead of the traditional carbon resistors as sensing elements. The unidirectional current carrying capacity (forward bias) of the diodes provided for the ease of multiplexing of the

  1. EPRI automated telephotometer: field test, color-measuring capability, and data analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, W.E.; Viezee, W.

    1982-05-01

    The objective of the work described was to continue the development of the prototype EPRI automated telephotometer to yield an instrument that can routinely monitor daytime atmospheric visibility and visibility impairment, including visual discoloration of scenic targets with emphasis on pristine areas. During Fall 1980, the prototype system was operated by SRI at Sunshine, Arizona, to test and validate its overall performance under field conditions. The system was programmed to monitor nine visibility targets on a daily routine basis. No malfunctions occurred, and a large data base of brightness measurements was recorded. Initial measurements of scene color were also made. A multispectral (color) capability was developed after the field test. The color camera has a motor-driven 15.9-cm-diameter filter wheel that can accommodate four replaceable filters. The Reticon linear sensor array and associated interface electronics are nearly identical to those used for the photopic system. Upgraded operating software acquires and organizes the color measurements. A complete set of vertical color-scans at a given azimuth is acquired in one second with either four narrow-band or three broad-band filters. A large matrix of spectral data can be recorded for automated analysis of the psychological aspects of the viewed color scene. Current analysis and interpretation procedures follow the methods of tristimulus colorimetry. Data analysis software for the photopic system was developed. The system can now routinely monitor such classical measures of visibility as horizon contrast, visual range, and prevailing visibility, and can also quantify other indices of atmospheroic clarity such as terrain detail and structure. The assembled prototype instrument has been charactrized and documented, and is available in photopic or color mode.

  2. NASA Aeronautics Research: An Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. air transportation system is vital to the economic well-being and security of the United States. To support continued U.S. leadership in aviation, Congress and NASA requested that the National Research Council undertake a decadal survey of civil aeronautics research and technology (R&T) priorities that would help NASA fulfill its responsibility to preserve U.S. leadership in aeronautics technology. In 2006, the National Research Council published the Decadal Survey of Civil Aeronautics. That report presented a set of six strategic objectives for the next decade of aeronautics R&T, and it described 51 high-priority R&T challenges--characterized by five common themes--for both NASA and non-NASA researchers. The National Research Council produced the present report, which assesses NASA's Aeronautics Research Program, in response to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Authorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109-155). This report focuses on three sets of questions: 1. How well does NASA's research portfolio implement appropriate recommendations and address relevant high-priority research and technology challenges identified in the Decadal Survey of Civil Aeronautics? If gaps are found, what steps should be taken by the federal government to eliminate them? 2. How well does NASA's aeronautics research portfolio address the aeronautics research requirements of NASA, particularly for robotic and human space exploration? How well does NASA's aeronautics research portfolio address other federal government department/agency non-civil aeronautics research needs? If gaps are found, what steps should be taken by NASA and/or other parts of the federal government to eliminate them? 3. Will the nation have a skilled research workforce and research facilities commensurate with the requirements in (1) and (2) above? What critical improvements in workforce expertise and research facilities, if any, should NASA and the nation make to achieve the goals of NASA

  3. Results from the Operational Testing of the General Electric Smart Grid Capable Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE)

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Barney Carlson; Don Scoffield; Brion Bennett

    2013-12-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory conducted testing and analysis of the General Electric (GE) smart grid capable electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE), which was a deliverable from GE for the U.S. Department of Energy FOA-554. The Idaho National Laboratory has extensive knowledge and experience in testing advanced conductive and wireless charging systems though INL’s support of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity. This document details the findings from the EVSE operational testing conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory on the GE smart grid capable EVSE. The testing conducted on the EVSE included energy efficiency testing, SAE J1772 functionality testing, abnormal conditions testing, and charging of a plug-in vehicle.

  4. Partnership for the Revitalization of National Wind Tunnel Force Measurement Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhew, Ray D.; Skelley, Marcus L.; Woike, Mark R.; Bader, Jon B.; Marshall, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    Lack of funding and lack of focus on research over the past several years, coupled with force measurement capabilities being decentralized and distributed across the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) research centers, has resulted in a significant erosion of (1) capability and infrastructure to produce and calibrate force measurement systems; (2) NASA s working knowledge of those systems; and (3) the quantity of high-quality, full-capability force measurement systems available for use in aeronautics testing. Simultaneously, and at proportional rates, the capability of industry to design, manufacture, and calibrate these test instruments has been eroding primarily because of a lack of investment by the aeronautics community. Technical expertise in this technology area is a core competency in aeronautics testing; it is highly specialized and experience-based, and it represents a niche market for only a few small precision instrument shops in the United States. With this backdrop, NASA s Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) chartered a team to examine the issues and risks associated with the problem, focusing specifically on strain- gage balances. The team partnered with the U.S. Air Force s Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) to exploit their combined capabilities and take a national level government view of the problem. This paper describes the team s approach, its findings, and its recommendations, and the current status for revitalizing the government s balance capability with respect to designing, fabricating, calibrating, and using the instruments.

  5. NASA's Role in Aeronautics: A Workshop. Volume 6: Aeronautical research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    While each aspect of its aeronautical technology program is important to the current preeminence of the United States in aeronautics, the most essential contributions of NASA derive from its research. Successes and challenges in NASA's efforts to improve civil and military aviation are discussed for the following areas: turbulence, noise, supercritical aerodynamics, computational aerodynamics, fuels, high temperature materials, composite materials, single crystal components, powder metallurgy, and flight controls. Spin offs to engineering and other sciences explored include NASTRAN, lubricants, and composites.

  6. NASA's Role in Aeronautics: A Workshop. Volume 7: Background papers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The nature and implications of the current state of U.S. aviation in a world setting are examined as well as their significance for NASA's role in the nation's aeronautical future. The outlook for the 1980's is examined from the point of view of legislation, economics and finance; petroleum; manpower, metallic materials, general aviation; military aviation; transport aircraft developments; and helicopters. Possible NASA assistance to DOD and the FAA is examined and the evolution of NACA and NASA in aeronautics and of NASA's aeronautics capabilities are described.

  7. Update on the Development and Capabilities of Unique Structural Seal Test Rigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeMange, Jeffrey J.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Breen, Daniel P.; Robbie, Malcolm G.

    2003-01-01

    High temperature structural seals are necessary in many aerospace and aeronautical applications to minimize any detrimental effects originating from undesired leakage. The NASA Glenn Research Center has been and continues to be a pioneer in the development and evaluation of these types of seals. The current focus for the development of structural seals is for the 3rd Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV), which is scheduled to replace the current space shuttle system by 2025. Specific areas of development under this program include seals for propulsion systems (such as the hypersonic air-breathing ISTAR engine concept based upon Rocket Based Combined Cycle technology) and control surface seals for spacecraft including the autonomous rescue X-38 Crew Return Vehicle and the X-37 Space Maneuver Vehicle.

  8. Aeronautical engineering: A continuing bibliography with indexes (supplement 324)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This bibliography lists 149 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in December 1995. Subject coverage includes engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles.

  9. Aeronautical engineering: A continuing bibliography with indexes (supplement 319)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This report lists 349 reports, articles and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles.

  10. Aeronautical engineering: A continuing bibliography with indexes (supplement 284)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This bibliography lists 974 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in Oct. 1992. The coverage includes documents on design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles.

  11. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography With Indexes. Supplement 392

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This report lists reports, articles and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles.

  12. Aeronautical engineering: A continuing bibliography with indexes (supplement 310)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This bibliography lists 29 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in Nov. 1994. Subject coverage includes: engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction,evaluation testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles.

  13. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. SUPPL-422

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This report lists reports, articles and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles.

  14. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 405

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This report lists reports, articles and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles.

  15. 1978 Aeronautics and Space Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    These highlights include the space shuttle, new astronauts, Pioneers to Venus, Voyagers to Jupiter and Saturn, High Energy Astronomy Observatories Space Telescope, Landsat/Seasat, space applications, wind energy research, and aeronautics.

  16. [Burns in an aeronautic environment].

    PubMed

    Rigotti, G

    1979-10-27

    Following an examination of the aetiology of burns in aeronautic environments, the physiopathology, classification and general and local treatment of the burn case is discussed. Special mention is then made of aircraft as an extremely useful means of transport.

  17. NASA's Aeronautics Vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenney, Darrel R.

    2004-01-01

    Six long-term technology focus areas are: 1. Environmentally Friendly, Clean Burning Engines. Focus: Develop innovative technologies to enable intelligent turbine engines that significantly reduce harmful emissions while maintaining high performance and increasing reliability. 2. New Aircraft Energy Sources and Management. Focus: Discover new energy sources and intelligent management techniques directed towards zero emissions and enable new vehicle concepts for public mobility and new science missions. 3. Quiet Aircraft for Community Friendly Service. Focus: Develop and integrate noise reduction technology to enable unrestricted air transportation service to all communities. 4. Aerodynamic Performance for Fuel Efficiency. Focus: Improve aerodynamic efficiency,structures and materials technologies, and design tools and methodologies to reduce fuel burn and minimize environmental impact and enable new vehicle concepts and capabilities for public mobility and new science missions. 5. Aircraft Weight Reduction and Community Access. Focus: Develop ultralight smart materials and structures, aerodynamic concepts, and lightweight subsystems to increase vehicle efficiency, leading to high altitude long endurance vehicles, planetary aircraft, advanced vertical and short takeoff and landing vehicles and beyond. 6. Smart Aircraft and Autonomous Control. Focus: Enable aircraft to fly with reduced or no human intervention, to optimize flight over multiple regimes, and to provide maintenance on demand towards the goal of a feeling, seeing, sensing, sentient air vehicle.

  18. Information Systems for NASA's Aeronautics and Space Enterprises

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutler, Paul

    1998-01-01

    The aerospace industry is being challenged to reduce costs and development time as well as utilize new technologies to improve product performance. Information technology (IT) is the key to providing revolutionary solutions to the challenges posed by the increasing complexity of NASA's aeronautics and space missions and the sophisticated nature of the systems that enable them. The NASA Ames vision is to develop technologies enabling the information age, expanding the frontiers of knowledge for aeronautics and space, improving America's competitive position, and inspiring future generations. Ames' missions to accomplish that vision include: 1) performing research to support the American aviation community through the unique integration of computation, experimentation, simulation and flight testing, 2) studying the health of our planet, understanding living systems in space and the origins of the universe, developing technologies for space flight, and 3) to research, develop and deliver information technologies and applications. Information technology may be defined as the use of advance computing systems to generate data, analyze data, transform data into knowledge and to use as an aid in the decision-making process. The knowledge from transformed data can be displayed in visual, virtual and multimedia environments. The decision-making process can be fully autonomous or aided by a cognitive processes, i.e., computational aids designed to leverage human capacities. IT Systems can learn as they go, developing the capability to make decisions or aid the decision making process on the basis of experiences gained using limited data inputs. In the future, information systems will be used to aid space mission synthesis, virtual aerospace system design, aid damaged aircraft during landing, perform robotic surgery, and monitor the health and status of spacecraft and planetary probes. NASA Ames through the Center of Excellence for Information Technology Office is leading the

  19. Journal of Aeronautics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-21

    the Coffin - Manson model relationship such as formulas (1) and (2) express. Literature (i, and(2) separately, from theory and actual tests, pose and...reason for the macroscopic quantity 1 2 Ag. and fatigue life Nf in accord with the Coffin - Manson relation. Following the reduction of strain quantity...alike S’ can have advancement towards the formation of fatigue crack veins, creat- ing divergence to the Coffin - Manson relation. As Fig. 5 and Fig. 6

  20. Fabrics for aeronautic construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walen, E D

    1918-01-01

    The Bureau of Standards undertook the investigation of airplane fabrics with the view of finding suitable substitutes for the linen fabrics, and it was decided that the fibers to be considered were cotton, ramie, silk, and hemp. Of these, the cotton fiber was the logical one to be given primary consideration. Report presents the suitability, tensibility and stretching properties of cotton fabric obtained by laboratory tests.

  1. Lightning in aeronautics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lago, F.

    2014-11-01

    It is generally accepted that a civilian aircraft is struck, on average, once or twice per year. This number tends to indicate that a lightning strike risk is far from being marginal and so requires that aircraft manufacturers have to demonstrate that their aircraft is protected against lightning. The first generation of aircrafts, which were manufactured mainly in aluminium alloy and had electromechanical and pneumatic controls, had a natural immunity to the effects of lightning. Nowadays, aircraft structures are made primarily with composite materials and flight controls are mostly electronic. This aspect of the "more composite and more electric" aircraft demands to aircraft manufacturers to pay a particular attention to the lightning protection and to its certification by testing and/or analysis. It is therefore essential to take this risk into account when designing the aircraft. Nevertheless, it is currently impossible to reproduce the entire lightning phenomenon in testing laboratories and the best way to analyse the lightning protection is to reproduce its effects. In this context, a number of standards and guides are produced by standards committees to help laboratories and aircraft manufacturers to perform realistic tests. Although the environment of a laboratory is quite different from those of a storm cloud, the rules of aircraft design, the know-how of aircraft manufacturers, the existence of international work leading to a better understanding of the lightning phenomenon and standards more precise, permit, today, to consider the risk as properly controlled.

  2. NASA ATP Force Measurement Technology Capability Strategic Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhew, Ray D.

    2008-01-01

    The Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) initiated a strategic planning effort to re-vitalize the force measurement capability within NASA. The team responsible for developing the plan included members from three NASA Centers (Langley, Ames and Glenn) as well as members from the Air Force s Arnold Engineering and Development Center (AEDC). After visiting and discussing force measurement needs and current capabilities at each participating facility as well as selected force measurement companies, a strategic plan was developed to guide future NASA investments. This paper will provide the details of the strategic plan and include asset management, organization and technology research and development investment priorities as well as efforts to date.

  3. Compressibility Effects in Aeronautical Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stack, John

    1941-01-01

    Compressible-flow research, while a relatively new field in aeronautics, is very old, dating back almost to the development of the first firearm. Over the last hundred years, researches have been conducted in the ballistics field, but these results have been of practically no use in aeronautical engineering because the phenomena that have been studied have been the more or less steady supersonic condition of flow. Some work that has been done in connection with steam turbines, particularly nozzle studies, has been of value, In general, however, understanding of compressible-flow phenomena has been very incomplete and permitted no real basis for the solution of aeronautical engineering problems in which.the flow is likely to be unsteady because regions of both subsonic and supersonic speeds may occur. In the early phases of the development of the airplane, speeds were so low that the effects of compressibility could be justifiably ignored. During the last war and immediately after, however, propellers exhibited losses in efficiency as the tip speeds approached the speed of sound, and the first experiments of an aeronautical nature were therefore conducted with propellers. Results of these experiments indicated serious losses of efficiency, but aeronautical engineers were not seriously concerned at the time became it was generally possible. to design propellers with quite low tip. speeds. With the development of new engines having increased power and rotational speeds, however, the problems became of increasing importance.

  4. System Engineering Program Applicability for the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Component Test Capability (CTC)

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Bryan

    2009-06-01

    This white paper identifies where the technical management and systems engineering processes and activities to be used in establishing the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) Component Test Capability (CTC) should be addressed and presents specific considerations for these activities under each CTC alternative

  5. Testing of an Arcjet Thruster with Capability of Direct-Drive Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Adam K.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Eskridge, Richard H.; Smith, James W.; Schoenfeld, Michael P.; Riley, Daniel P.

    2015-01-01

    Electric thrusters typically require a power processing unit (PPU) to convert the spacecraft provided power to the voltage-current that a thruster needs for operation. Testing has been initiated to study whether an arcjet thruster can be operated directly with the power produced by solar arrays without any additional conversion. Elimination of the PPU significantly reduces system-level complexity of the propulsion system, and lowers developmental cost and risk. The work aims to identify and address technical questions related to power conditioning and noise suppression in the system and heating of the thruster in long-duration operation. The apparatus under investigation has a target power level from 400-1,000 W. However, the proposed direct-drive arcjet is potentially a highly scalable concept, applicable to solar-electric spacecraft with up to 100's of kW and beyond. A direct-drive electric propulsion system would be comprised of a thruster that operates with the power supplied directly from the power source (typically solar arrays) with no further power conditioning needed between those two components. Arcjet thrusters are electric propulsion devices, with the power supplied as a high current at low voltage; of all the different types of electric thruster, they are best suited for direct drive from solar arrays. One advantage of an arcjet over Hall or gridded ion thrusters is that for comparable power the arcjet is a much smaller device and can provide more thrust and orders of magnitude higher thrust density (approximately 1-10 N/sq m), albeit at lower I(sub sp) (approximately 800-1000 s). In addition, arcjets are capable of operating on a wide range of propellant options, having been demonstrated on H2, ammonia, N2, Ar, Kr, Xe, while present SOA Hall and ion thrusters are primarily limited to Xe propellant. Direct-drive is often discussed in terms of Hall thrusters, but they require 250-300 V for operation, which is difficult even with high-voltage solar

  6. Verification, validation, and accreditation issues related to a new IR sensor test capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elrod, Parker D.; Lowry, Heard S.; Mattasits, Gary R.

    1994-07-01

    The Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) has developed new test technologies and methodologies for realistic mission simulations testing of IR space-based sensors. These technologies and methodologies have been combined into an integrated approach for space sensor testing. Direct write scene generation plays a critical role in this integrated approach and is being applied in two new AEDC test facilities. Prior to performing the first test in such a new facility, a critical but often overlooked process must be completed. This critical process demonstrates that the test facility can indeed provide a realistic, NIST traceable simulation of a sensor's mission. This process is complex and must be uniquely tailored for each individual test facility and sensor mission. Such a process can be designed to address both developmental test and evaluation and operational test and evaluation concerns. A case study based on AEDC's direct write scene generation technology will be used to illustrate the issues related to the validation, verification, and accreditation process.

  7. Comparative Training Capabilities and Test Concepts for Selected Tank Gunnery Training Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    provide reliable range estimation data. EDGAR M4, JOHNS N Technical Director Accession For NTIS GRAAI DTIC TAB Unannounced Q Justificatio By Distribution...other, called the Conditionally Eye-Safe Simulated Laser Rangefinder (CESSLR), is safe beyond a specified distance (300m unaided vision ; 3100m aided... vision ). These filters are mounted over the exit window of the LRF. A field evaluation of the range estimation capability of the LRF with each filter

  8. Missile Defense: Ballistic Missile Defense System Testing Delays Affect Delivery of Capabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-28

    and control , battle management, and communications, to enable the warfighter to destroy enemy missiles before they can reach their targets. The...launched, sensors and interceptors are coordinated via the command and control , battle management, and communications system to enable the warfighter to...capabilities using a radar, command and control , and Standard Missile-3 (SM-3) interceptors. • Aegis BMD Standard Missile-3 (SM-3) Block IB Aegis

  9. National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1938-01-01

    NASA was created from the National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics in 1958. This is a photo of the members of the advisory board of NACA in 1938. NACA was the governmental organization charged with the supervision and conduct of scientific laboratory research in aeronautics. Its laboratories located at Langley Field, Virginia, provide new knowledge underlying the continuous improvement in the performance, efficiency, and safety of American aircraft. At this meeting Dr. Joesph S. Ames, President Emeritus of John Hopkins University, was re-elected Chairman, and Dr. Vannevar Bush, President- elect of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, was elected Vice Chairman. Dr. Ames' re-election as chairman was a recognition of his outstanding contributions to the science of aeronautics. He has been the leading scientific member of the Committee for over twenty-three years and chairman for eleven years. Under his visionary leadership the great laboratories of the N.A.C.A. at Langley Field have been developed. Left to Right: Hon. C. M. Hester, Administrator, Civil Aeronautics Authority Captain S. M. Kraus, U.S.N. Brig. General A. W. Robins, Chief, Materiel Division, Army Air Corps. Dr. L.J. Biggs, Director, National Bureau of Standards Dr. E.P. Warner Dr. Orville Wright Dr. Joesph S. Ames, Chairman Dr. C.J. Abbot, Secretary, Smithsonian Institution J.F. Victory, Secretary Rear Adm. A.B. Cook, U.S.N., Chief, Bureau Aeronautics Authority Dr. Vannevar Bush Dr. J.C. Hunsaker Dr. G.W. Lewis, Director of Aeronautical Research. Absent: Col. Charles A. Lindbergh and Maj. Gen. H. 'Hap' Arnold, Chief, Army Air Corps. One Vacany: U.S. Weather Bureau.

  10. Aeronautical engineering: A continuing bibliography with indexes (supplement 294)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This issue of Aeronautical Engineering - A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes lists 590 reports, journal articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspect of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. The bibliographic series is compiled through the cooperative efforts of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Seven indexes are included: subject, personal author, corporate source, foreign technology, contract number, report number, and accession number.

  11. Capability of the Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory at the NASA Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broerman, Craig; Jimenez, Javier; Sweterlitsch, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    The Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory is an integral part of the testing performed at the NASA Johnson Space Center. The Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory is a high performance laboratory providing real time analytical instruments to support manned and unmanned testing. The lab utilizes precision gas chromatographs, gas analyzers and spectrophotometers to support the technology development programs within the NASA community. The Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory works with a wide variety of customers and provides engineering support for user-specified applications in compressed gas, chemical analysis, general and research laboratory.

  12. Capability of the Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory at the NASA Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broerman, Craig; Jimenez, Javier; Sweterlitsch, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    The Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory is an integral part of the testing performed at the NASA Johnson Space Center. The Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory is a high performance laboratory providing real time analytical instruments to support manned and unmanned testing. The lab utilizes precision gas chromatographs, gas analyzers and spectrophotometers to support the technology development programs within the NASA community. The Gas Analysis and Testing Laboratory works with a wide variety of customers and provides engineering support for user-specified applications in compressed gas, chemical analysis, general and research laboratory

  13. Aeronautic Instruments. Section II : Altitude Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mears, A H; Henrickson, H B; Brombacher, W G

    1923-01-01

    This report is Section two of a series of reports on aeronautic instruments (Technical Report nos. 125 to 132, inclusive). This section discusses briefly barometric altitude determinations, and describes in detail the principal types of altimeters and barographs used in aeronautics during the recent war. This is followed by a discussion of performance requirements for such instruments and an account of the methods of testing developed by the Bureau of Standards. The report concludes with a brief account of the results of recent investigations. For accurate measurements of altitude, reference must also be made to thermometer readings of atmospheric temperature, since the altitude is not fixed by atmospheric pressure alone. This matter is discussed in connection with barometric altitude determination.

  14. 14 CFR 145.215 - Capability list.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Capability list. 145.215 Section 145.215 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES REPAIR STATIONS Operating Rules § 145.215 Capability list. (a)...

  15. High-performance computational and geostatistical experiments for testing the capabilities of 3-d electrical tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Carle, S. F.; Daily, W. D.; Newmark, R. L.; Ramirez, A.; Tompson, A.

    1999-01-19

    This project explores the feasibility of combining geologic insight, geostatistics, and high-performance computing to analyze the capabilities of 3-D electrical resistance tomography (ERT). Geostatistical methods are used to characterize the spatial variability of geologic facies that control sub-surface variability of permeability and electrical resistivity Synthetic ERT data sets are generated from geostatistical realizations of alluvial facies architecture. The synthetic data sets enable comparison of the "truth" to inversion results, quantification of the ability to detect particular facies at particular locations, and sensitivity studies on inversion parameters

  16. Analysis and Testing of a Bistatic Radar Cross Section Measurement Capability for the AFIT Anechoic Chamber

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    aspect angle. The system actually measures the complex return signal, and is thus capable of inverse fourier transforming the data to generate the...used for calibration purposes in the AFIT chamber. It is important to remember that the system does not actually measure the RCS of the target, but...Polarization 101 10- S _10__ -25, P~i -15leDfrato -20 -25 -30* 0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360 Theta (degrees) squar 10 flat_ plt, 15, 0c etica oarzto 00 In W4

  17. Armstrong Flight Research Center Flight Test Capabilities and Opportunities for the Applications of Wireless Data Acquisition Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hang, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The presentation will overview NASA Armstrong Flight Research Centers flight test capabilities, which can provide various means for flight testing of passive and active wireless sensor systems, also, it will address the needs of the wireless data acquisition solutions for the centers flight instrumentation issues such as additional weight caused by added instrumentation wire bundles, connectors, wire cables routing, moving components, etc., that the Passive Wireless Sensor Technology Workshop may help. The presentation shows the constraints and requirements that the wireless sensor systems will face in the flight test applications.

  18. 1997 NASA Academy in Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrisani, Dominick, II

    1998-01-01

    The NASA Academy in Aeronautics at the Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) was a ten-week summer leadership training program conducted for the first time in the summer of 1997. Funding was provided by a contract between DFRC and Purdue University. Mr. Lee Duke of DFRC was the contract monitor, and Professor Dominick Andrisani was the principal investigator. Five student research associates participated in the program. Biographies of the research associates are given in Appendix 1. Dominick Andrisani served as Dean of the NASA Academy in Aeronautics. NASA Academy in Aeronautics is a unique summer institute of higher learning that endeavors to provide insight into all of the elements that make NASA aeronautical research possible. At the same time the Academy assigns the research associate to be mentored by one of NASA!s best researchers so that they can contribute towards an active flight research program. Aeronautical research and development are an investment in the future, and NASA Academy is an investment in aeronautical leaders of the future. The Academy was run by the Indiana Space Grant Consortium at Purdue in strategic partnership with the National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program. Research associates at the Academy were selected with help from the Space Grant Consortium that sponsored the research associate. Research associate stipend and travel to DFRC were paid by the students' Space Grant Consortium. All other student expenses were paid by the Academy. Since the Academy at DFRC had only five students the opportunity for individual growth and attention was unique in the country. About 30% of the working time and most of the social time of the students were be spent as a "group" or "team." This time was devoted to exchange of ideas, on forays into the highest levels of decision making, and in executing aeronautical research. This was done by interviewing leaders throughout the aerospace industry, seminars, working dinners, and informal

  19. Aeronautics. America in Space: The First Decade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderton, David A.

    The major research and developments in aeronautics during the late 1950's and 1960's are reviewed descriptively with a minimum of technical content. Topics covered include aeronautical research, aeronautics in NASA, The National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, the X-15 Research Airplane, variable-sweep wing design, the Supersonic Transport…

  20. 14 CFR 77.35 - Aeronautical studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Aeronautical studies. 77.35 Section 77.35 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRSPACE OBJECTS AFFECTING NAVIGABLE AIRSPACE (Eff. until 1-18-11) Aeronautical Studies of Effect of...

  1. 14 CFR 77.35 - Aeronautical studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aeronautical studies. 77.35 Section 77.35 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRSPACE OBJECTS AFFECTING NAVIGABLE AIRSPACE Aeronautical Studies of Effect of Proposed Construction on...

  2. Unified Instrumentation: Examining the Simultaneous Application of Advanced Measurement Techniques for Increased Wind Tunnel Testing Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, Gary A. (Editor); Bartram, Scott M.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Jordan, Jeffrey D.; Lee, Joseph W.; Leighty, Bradley D.; Meyers, James F.; South, Bruce W.; Cavone, Angelo A.; Ingram, JoAnne L.

    2002-01-01

    A Unified Instrumentation Test examining the combined application of Pressure Sensitive Paint, Projection Moire Interferometry, Digital Particle Image Velocimetry, Doppler Global Velocimetry, and Acoustic Microphone Array has been conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center. The fundamental purposes of conducting the test were to: (a) identify and solve compatibility issues among the techniques that would inhibit their simultaneous application in a wind tunnel, and (b) demonstrate that simultaneous use of advanced instrumentation techniques is feasible for increasing tunnel efficiency and identifying control surface actuation / aerodynamic reaction phenomena. This paper provides summary descriptions of each measurement technique used during the Unified Instrumentation Test, their implementation for testing in a unified fashion, and example results identifying areas of instrument compatibility and incompatibility. Conclusions are drawn regarding the conditions under which the measurement techniques can be operated simultaneously on a non-interference basis. Finally, areas requiring improvement for successfully applying unified instrumentation in future wind tunnel tests are addressed.

  3. NASA/University Conference on Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The proceedings of a conference on the future of aeronautics are presented. The subjects discussed include the following: (1) aeronautics and the education of the engineer, (2) technical trends in aeronautics, and (3) the role of the university in aeronautics. The technical trends in aeronautics are concerned with aircraft noise control, the effect of the aircraft on the environment, airborne electronics for automated flight, and trends in aircraft design.

  4. Comparison of the analytical capabilities of the BAC Datamaster and Datamaster DMT forensic breath testing devices.

    PubMed

    Glinn, Michele; Adatsi, Felix; Curtis, Perry

    2011-11-01

    The State of Michigan uses the Datamaster as an evidential breath testing device. The newest version, the DMT, will replace current instruments in the field as they are retired from service. The Michigan State Police conducted comparison studies to test the analytical properties of the new instrument and to evaluate its response to conditions commonly cited in court defenses. The effects of mouth alcohol, objects in the mouth, and radiofrequency interference on paired samples from drinking subjects were assessed on the DMT. The effects of sample duration and chemical interferents were assessed on both instruments, using drinking subjects and wet-bath simulators, respectively. Our testing shows that Datamaster and DMT results are essentially identical; the DMT gave accurate readings as compared with measurements made using simulators containing standard ethanol solutions and that the DMT did not give falsely elevated breath alcohol results from any of the influences tested.

  5. Ongoing Capabilities and Developments of Re-Entry Plasma Ground Tests at EADS-ASTRIUM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jullien, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    During re-entry, spacecrafts are subjected to extreme thermal loads. On mars, they may go through dust storms. These external heat loads are leading the design of re-entry vehicles or are affecting it for spacecraft facing solid propellant jet stream. Sizing the Thermal Protection System require a good knowledge of such solicitations and means to model and reproduce them on earth. Through its work on European projects, ASTRIUM has developed the full range of competences to deal with such issues. For instance, we have designed and tested the heat-shield of the Huygens probe which landed on Titan. In particular, our plasma generators aim to reproduce a wide variety of re-entry conditions. Heat loads are generated by the huge speed of the probes. Such conditions cannot be fully reproduced. Ground tests focus on reproducing local aerothermal loads by using slower but hotter flows. Our inductive plasma torch enables to test little samples at low TRL. Amongst the arc-jets, one was design to test architecture design of ISS crew return system and others fit more severe re-entry such as sample returns or Venus re-entry. The last developments aimed in testing samples in seeded flows. First step was to design and test the seeding device. Special diagnostics characterizing the resulting flow enabled us to fit it to the requirements.

  6. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 413

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-2000-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  7. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 420

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-2000-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  8. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography With Indexes. Supplement 406

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-1999-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  9. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 419

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-2000-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  10. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography With Indexes. Supplement 398

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. The NASA CASI price code table, addresses of organizations, and document availability information are included before the abstract section. Two indexes - subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  11. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 389

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-1998-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract.

  12. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 396

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-1999-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  13. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography With Indexes. Supplement 404

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-1999-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  14. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography With Indexes. Supplement 418

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-2000-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  15. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 387

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-1998-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract.

  16. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 386

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-1998-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract.

  17. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 391

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-1999-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract.

  18. Air Monitoring Network at Tonopah Test Range: Network Description, Capabilities, and Analytical Results

    SciTech Connect

    Hartwell, William T.; Daniels, Jeffrey; Nikolich, George; Shadel, Craig; Giles, Ken; Karr, Lynn; Kluesner, Tammy

    2012-01-01

    During the period April to June 2008, at the behest of the Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO); the Desert Research Institute (DRI) constructed and deployed two portable environmental monitoring stations at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) as part of the Environmental Restoration Project Soils Activity. DRI has operated these stations since that time. A third station was deployed in the period May to September 2011. The TTR is located within the northwest corner of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR), and covers an area of approximately 725.20 km2 (280 mi2). The primary objective of the monitoring stations is to evaluate whether and under what conditions there is wind transport of radiological contaminants from Soils Corrective Action Units (CAUs) associated with Operation Roller Coaster on TTR. Operation Roller Coaster was a series of tests, conducted in 1963, designed to examine the stability and dispersal of plutonium in storage and transportation accidents. These tests did not result in any nuclear explosive yield. However, the tests did result in the dispersal of plutonium and contamination of surface soils in the surrounding area.

  19. Air Monitoring Network at Tonopah Test Range: Network Description and Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Tappen; George Nikolich; Ken Giles; David Shafer; Tammy Kluesner

    2010-05-18

    During the period April to June 2008, at the behest of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO); the Desert Research Institute (DRI) constructed and deployed two portable environmental monitoring stations at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) as part of the Environmental Restoration Project Soils Sub-Project. The TTR is located within the boundaries of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) near the northern edge, and covers an area of approximately 725.20 km2 (179,200 acres). The primary objective of the monitoring stations is to evaluate whether and under what conditions there is wind transport of radiological contaminants from one of the three Soil Sub-Project Corrective Action Units (CAUs) associated with Operation Roller Coaster on TTR. Operation Roller Coaster was a series of tests, conducted in 1963, designed to examine the stability and dispersal of plutonium in storage and transportation accidents. These tests did not result in any nuclear explosive yield. However, the tests did result in the dispersal of plutonium and contamination of surface soils in the surrounding area.

  20. Development of a Free-to-Roll Transonic Test Capability (Invited)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, F. J.; Owens, D. B.; Hall, R. M.

    2003-01-01

    As part of the NASA/Navy Abrupt Wing Stall Program, a relatively low-cost, rapid-access wind-tunnel free-to-roll rig was developed. This rig combines the use of conventional models and test apparatuses to evaluate both transonic performance and wing-drop/rock tendencies in a single tunnel entry. A description of the test hardware as well as a description of the experimental procedures is given. The free-to-roll test rig has been used successfully to assess the static and dynamic characteristics of three different configurations--two configurations that exhibit uncommanded lateral motions, (pre-production F/A-18E and AV-8B), and one that did not (F/A-18C).

  1. Testing the refurbished 30-inch Leuschner telescope and its exoplanet detection capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzales, Eileen; Fries, Adam; Cool, Adrienne

    2015-01-01

    The 30-inch Ritchey-Chretien telescope at Leuschner Observatory has recently been refurbished through a collaboration between San Francisco State University (SFSU) and UC Berkeley. The telescope is equipped with an SBIG STL-11000M CCD and is now being operated remotely from both campuses. We have carried out observations from SFSU to test the telescope's performance and to characterize the site in Lafayette, CA. We present the results of photometric calibrations in B, V and R filters carried out using Landolt standards, and of tests of the pointing and tracking accuracy of the refitted mount. We have also monitored the seeing at the site and measured the sky brightness in B, V and R filters. Finally, using observations of the open star cluster M34, we test the accuracy with which we can measure relative magnitudes, with the goal of using this telescope to detect exoplanet transits.

  2. Directed Design of Experiments for Validating Probability of Detection Capability of a Testing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, Edward R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method of validating a probability of detection (POD) testing system using directed design of experiments (DOE) includes recording an input data set of observed hit and miss or analog data for sample components as a function of size of a flaw in the components. The method also includes processing the input data set to generate an output data set having an optimal class width, assigning a case number to the output data set, and generating validation instructions based on the assigned case number. An apparatus includes a host machine for receiving the input data set from the testing system and an algorithm for executing DOE to validate the test system. The algorithm applies DOE to the input data set to determine a data set having an optimal class width, assigns a case number to that data set, and generates validation instructions based on the case number.

  3. Analysis and testing of a bistatic radar cross section measurement capability for the AFIT anechoic chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCool, Timothy D.

    1990-12-01

    This research effort examined the feasibility of performing bistatic radar cross section (RCS) measurements in the AFIT anechoic chamber. The capability was established to measure the bistatic RCS of a target versus frequency and versus target azimuth angle. In either case, one of three bistatic angles (angle between transmit and receive antennas) is available: 45, 90, and 135 degrees. Accurate bistatic RCS measurements were obtained using a CW radar and utilizing background subtraction, bistatic calibration, and software range gating. Simple targets were selected for validation purposes since their bistatic RCS could be predicted. These consisted of spheres and flat plates (square, triangle, and five sided). Several computer codes were utilized for system validation. Two codes based on the uniform theory of diffraction were used to predict the scattering from the flat plates. A program using a Mie series solution provided the exact scattering from the flat plates. A program using a Mie series solution provided the exact scattering for the spheres, which were used for both RCS predictions and system calibrations.

  4. 75 FR 36722 - Aeronautics Science and Technology Subcommittee; Committee on Technology; National Science and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-28

    ... development of the draft National Aeronautics Research, Development, Test and Evaluation (RDT&E... Development Plan. The proposed structure and draft content (to date) of the National Aeronautics RDT&E... further development of the draft National Aeronautics RDT&E Infrastructure Plan. Dates and Addresses:...

  5. Aeronautical engineering. A continuing bibliography with indexes, supplement 127, October 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A bibliography containing 431 abstracts addressing various topics in aeronautical engineering is given. The coverage includes engineering and theoretical aspects of design. construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles.

  6. CitySpace Air Sensor Network Project Conducted to Test New Monitoring Capabilities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The CitySpace project is a new research effort by EPA to field test new, lower-cost air pollution sensors in a mid-sized city to understand how this emerging technology can add valuable information on air pollution patterns in neighboorhoods.

  7. Canadian aeronautical mobile data trials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedersen, Allister; Pearson, Andrea

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a series of aeronautical mobile data trials conducted on small aircraft (helicopters and fixed wing) utilizing a low-speed store-and-forward mobile data service. The paper outlines the user requirements for aeronautical mobile satellite communications. 'Flight following' and improved wide-area dispatch communications were identified as high priority requirements. A 'proof-of-concept' trial in a Cessna Skymaster aircraft is described. This trial identified certain development work as essential to the introduction of commercial service including antenna development, power supply modifications and doppler software modifications. Other improvements were also proposed. The initial aeronautical mobile data service available for pre-operational (Beta) trials is outlined. Pre-operational field trials commenced in October 1992 and consisted of installations on a Gralen Communications Inc. Cessna 177 and an Aerospatiale Astar 350 series light single engine helicopter. The paper concludes with a discussion of desirable near term mobile data service developments, commercial benefits, current safety benefits and potential future applications for improved safety.

  8. Direction and Integration of Experimental Ground Test Capabilities and Computational Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Steven C.

    2016-01-01

    This paper groups and summarizes the salient points and findings from two AIAA conference panels targeted at defining the direction, with associated key issues and recommendations, for the integration of experimental ground testing and computational methods. Each panel session utilized rapporteurs to capture comments from both the panel members and the audience. Additionally, a virtual panel of several experts were consulted between the two sessions and their comments were also captured. The information is organized into three time-based groupings, as well as by subject area. These panel sessions were designed to provide guidance to both researchers/developers and experimental/computational service providers in defining the future of ground testing, which will be inextricably integrated with the advancement of computational tools.

  9. Major International R and D Ranges and Test Facilities. Summary of Capabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    61.31.38.38 Air Borne Transport of Equipment Classic Air Dropping of Equipment (G ravity Ejection) 49 France Air Dropping at Low and Ultra Low Attitudes...Deception Materials in the Visual, Ultra Cold Weather Test Violet and Infrared Ranges Antenna Support Structures Construction Materials Vibration... Pedro River. munication systems. Major complexes are interconnected Shrubs and some grasses grow in low areas. Grass is heavier with a multichannel

  10. Experimental Studies in a Reconfigurable C4 Test-bed for Network Enabled Capability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    Cross1, Dr R. Houghton1, and Mr R. McMaster1 Defence Technology Centre for Human factors Integration (DTC HFI ) BITlab, School of Engineering and Design...NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Defence Technology Centre for Human factors Integration (DTC HFI ) BITlab, School of...studies into NEC by the Human Factors Integration Defence Technology Centre ( HFI -DTC). DEVELOPMENT OF THE TESTBED In brief, the C4 test-bed

  11. Test and Analysis Capabilities of the Space Environment Effects Team at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finckenor, M. M.; Edwards, D. L.; Vaughn, J. A.; Schneider, T. A.; Hovater, M. A.; Hoppe, D. T.

    2002-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center has developed world-class space environmental effects testing facilities to simulate the space environment. The combined environmental effects test system exposes temperature-controlled samples to simultaneous protons, high- and low-energy electrons, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation, and near-ultraviolet (NUV) radiation. Separate chambers for studying the effects of NUV and VUV at elevated temperatures are also available. The Atomic Oxygen Beam Facility exposes samples to atomic oxygen of 5 eV energy to simulate low-Earth orbit (LEO). The LEO space plasma simulators are used to study current collection to biased spacecraft surfaces, arcing from insulators and electrical conductivity of materials. Plasma propulsion techniques are analyzed using the Marshall magnetic mirror system. The micro light gas gun simulates micrometeoroid and space debris impacts. Candidate materials and hardware for spacecraft can be evaluated for durability in the space environment with a variety of analytical techniques. Mass, solar absorptance, infrared emittance, transmission, reflectance, bidirectional reflectance distribution function, and surface morphology characterization can be performed. The data from the space environmental effects testing facilities, combined with analytical results from flight experiments, enable the Environmental Effects Group to determine optimum materials for use on spacecraft.

  12. Capabilities of NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center's Impact Testing Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovater, Mary; Hubbs, Whitney; Finchum, Andy; Evans, Steve; Nehls, Mary

    2006-01-01

    The Impact Testing Facility (ITF) serves as an important installation for materials science at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). With an array of air, powder, and two-stage light gas guns, a variety of projectile and target types and sizes can be accommodated. The ITF allows for simulation of impactors from rain to micrometeoroids and orbital debris on materials being investigated for space, atmospheric, and ground use. Expendable, relatively simple launch assemblies are used to obtain well-documented results for impact conditions comparable to those from ballistic and rocket sled ranges at considerably lower cost. In addition, for applications requiring study of impacts at speeds in excess of those attainable by gun launches, hydrocode simulations, validated by test data, can be used to extend the velocity range. In addition to serving various NASA directorates, the ITF has performed testing on behalf of the European and Russian space agencies, as well as the Department of Defense, and academic institutions. The m s contributions not only enable safer space flight for NASA s astronauts, but can help design materials and structures to protect soldiers and civilians on Earth, through advances in body armor, aircraft survivability, and a variety of other applications.

  13. Development of Detonation Modeling Capabilities for Rocket Test Facilities: Hydrogen-Oxygen-Nitrogen Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allgood, Daniel C.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the presented work was to develop validated computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based methodologies for predicting propellant detonations and their associated blast environments. Applications of interest were scenarios relevant to rocket propulsion test and launch facilities. All model development was conducted within the framework of the Loci/CHEM CFD tool due to its reliability and robustness in predicting high-speed combusting flow-fields associated with rocket engines and plumes. During the course of the project, verification and validation studies were completed for hydrogen-fueled detonation phenomena such as shock-induced combustion, confined detonation waves, vapor cloud explosions, and deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) processes. The DDT validation cases included predicting flame acceleration mechanisms associated with turbulent flame-jets and flow-obstacles. Excellent comparison between test data and model predictions were observed. The proposed CFD methodology was then successfully applied to model a detonation event that occurred during liquid oxygen/gaseous hydrogen rocket diffuser testing at NASA Stennis Space Center.

  14. Aeronautical engineering: A continuing bibliography with indexes (supplement 282)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This bibliography lists 623 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in Aug. 1992. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles.

  15. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 397

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This report lists reports, articles and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract.

  16. Aeronautical Engineering, a special bibliography with indexes, supplement 15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This special bibliography lists 363 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in January 1972. Emphasis is placed on engineering and theoretical aspects for design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment and systems. Also included are entries on research and development in aeronautics and aerodynamics and research and ground support for aeronautical vehicles.

  17. Aeronautical engineering: A continuing bibliography with indexes (supplement 119)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    This bibliography lists 341 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in January 1980. Abstracts on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems are presented. Research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles are also presented.

  18. Aeronautical Engineering: A special bibliography with indexes, supplement 13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This special bibliography lists 283 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in December, 1971. Emphasis is placed on engineering and theoretical aspects for design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines), and associated components, equipment and systems. Also included are entries on research and development in aeronautics and aerodynamics and research and ground support for aeronautical vehicles.

  19. A Vision in Aeronautics: The K-12 Wind Tunnel Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A Vision in Aeronautics, a project within the NASA Lewis Research Center's Information Infrastructure Technologies and Applications (IITA) K-12 Program, employs small-scale, subsonic wind tunnels to inspire students to explore the world of aeronautics and computers. Recently, two educational K-12 wind tunnels were built in the Cleveland area. During the 1995-1996 school year, preliminary testing occurred in both tunnels.

  20. Flight test of a low-altitude helicopter guidance system with obstacle avoidance capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelenka, Richard E.; Clark, Raymond F.; Branigan, Robert G.

    1995-01-01

    Military aircraft regularly conduct missions that include low-atltitude, near-terrain flight in order to increase covertness and payload effectiveness. Civilian applications include airborne fire fighting, police surveillance, search and rescue, and helicopter emergency medical service. Several fixed-wing aircraft now employ terrain elevation maps and forward-pointed radars to achieve automated terrain following or terrain avoidance flight. Similar systems specialized to helicopters and their flight regime have not received as much attention. A helicopter guidance system relying on digitized terrain elevation maps has been developed that employs airborne navigation, mission requirements, aircraft performance limits, and radar altimeter returns to generate a valley-seeking, low-altitude trajectory between waypoints. The guidance trajectory is symbolically presented to the pilot on a helmet mounted display. This system has been flight tested to 150 ft (45.7 m) above ground level altitude at 80 kts, and is primarily limited by the ability of the pilot to perform manual detection and avoidance of unmapped hazards. In this study, a wide field of view laser radar sensor has been incorporated into this guidance system to assist the pilot in obstacle detection and avoidance, while expanding the system's operational flight envelope. The results from early flight tests of this system are presented. Low-altitude missions to 100 ft (30.5 m) altitude at 80n kts in the presence of unmapped natural and man-made obstacles were demonstrated while the pilot maintained situational awareness and tracking of the guidance trajectory. Further reductions in altitude are expected with continued flight testing.

  1. An aeronautical-mobile satellite experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedrey, Thomas C.; Dessouky, Khaled I.; Lay, Norman E.

    1991-01-01

    The various activities and findings of a NASA/FAA/COMSAT/INMARSAT collaborative aeronautical mobile-satellite experiment are detailed. The primary objective of the experiment was to demonstrate and evaluate an advanced digital mobile-satellite terminal developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory under the NASA Mobile Satellite Program. The experiment was a significant milestone for NASA/JPL, since it was the first test of the mobile terminal in a true mobile-satellite environment. The results were also of interest to the general mobile-satellite community because of the advanced nature of the technologies employed in the terminal.

  2. Graduate engineering research participation in aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, A. S., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Graduate student engineering research in aeronautics at Old Dominion University is surveyed. Student participation was facilitated through a NASA sponsored university program which enabled the students to complete degrees. Research summaries are provided and plans for the termination of the grant program are outlined. Project topics include: Failure modes for mechanically fastened joints in composite materials; The dynamic stability of an earth orbiting satellite deploying hinged appendages; The analysis of the Losipescu shear test for composite materials; and the effect of boundary layer structure on wing tip vortex formation and decay.

  3. NASA Aeronautics: Research and Technology Program Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This report contains numerous color illustrations to describe the NASA programs in aeronautics. The basic ideas involved are explained in brief paragraphs. The seven chapters deal with Subsonic aircraft, High-speed transport, High-performance military aircraft, Hypersonic/Transatmospheric vehicles, Critical disciplines, National facilities and Organizations & installations. Some individual aircraft discussed are : the SR-71 aircraft, aerospace planes, the high-speed civil transport (HSCT), the X-29 forward-swept wing research aircraft, and the X-31 aircraft. Critical disciplines discussed are numerical aerodynamic simulation, computational fluid dynamics, computational structural dynamics and new experimental testing techniques.

  4. Aeronautical applications of high-temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turney, George E.; Luidens, Roger W.; Uherka, Kenneth; Hull, John

    1989-01-01

    The successful development of high-temperature superconductors (HTS) could have a major impact on future aeronautical propulsion and aeronautical flight vehicle systems. A preliminary examination of the potential application of HTS for aeronautics indicates that significant benefits may be realized through the development and implementation of these newly discovered materials. Applications of high-temperature superconductors (currently substantiated at 95 k) were envisioned for several classes of aeronautical systems, including subsonic and supersonic transports, hypersonic aircraft, V/STOL aircraft, rotorcraft, and solar, microwave and laser powered aircraft. Introduced and described are the particular applications and potential benefits of high-temperature superconductors as related to aeronautics and/or aeronautical systems.

  5. Aeronautical applications of high-temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turney, George E.; Luidens, Roger W.; Uherka, Kenneth; Hull, John

    1989-01-01

    The successful development of high-temperature superconductors (HTS) could have a major impact on future aeronautical propulsion and aeronautical flight vehicle systems. A preliminary examination of the potential application of HTS for aeronautics indicates that significant benefits may be realized through the development and implementation of these newly discovered materials. Applications of high-temperature superconductors (currently substantiated at 95 K) were envisioned for several classes of aeronautical systems, including subsonic and supersonic transports, hypersonic aircraft, V/STOL aircraft, rotorcraft, and solar, microwave and laser powered aircraft. Introduced and described are the particular applications and potential benefits of high-temperature superconductors as related to aeronautics and/or aeronautical systems.

  6. Defect Localization Capabilities of a Global Detection Scheme: Spatial Pattern Recognition Using Full-field Vibration Test Data in Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saleeb, A. F.; Prabhu, M.; Arnold, S. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Recently, a conceptually simple approach, based on the notion of defect energy in material space has been developed and extensively studied (from the theoretical and computational standpoints). The present study focuses on its evaluation from the viewpoint of damage localization capabilities in case of two-dimensional plates; i.e., spatial pattern recognition on surfaces. To this end, two different experimental modal test results are utilized; i.e., (1) conventional modal testing using (white noise) excitation and accelerometer-type sensors and (2) pattern recognition using Electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI), a full field method capable of analyzing the mechanical vibration of complex structures. Unlike the conventional modal testing technique (using contacting accelerometers), these emerging ESPI technologies operate in a non-contacting mode, can be used even under hazardous conditions with minimal or no presence of noise and can simultaneously provide measurements for both translations and rotations. Results obtained have clearly demonstrated the robustness and versatility of the global NDE scheme developed. The vectorial character of the indices used, which enabled the extraction of distinct patterns for localizing damages proved very useful. In the context of the targeted pattern recognition paradigm, two algorithms were developed for the interrogation of test measurements; i.e., intensity contour maps for the damaged index, and the associated defect energy vector field plots.

  7. Air Force electronic warfare evaluation simulator (AFEWES) infrared test and evaluation capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Seth D.

    2002-07-01

    The Air Force Electronic Warfare Evaluation Simulator IR Countermeasures test facility currently has the ability to simulate a complete IRCM test environment, including IR missiles in flight, aircraft in flight, and various IR countermeasures including maneuvers, LASERs, flares and lamp-based jammer systems. The simulations of IR missiles in flight include real missile seeker hardware mounted in a six degree-of-freedom flight simulation table. The simulations of aircraft signatures and IR countermeasures are accomplished by using up to eight xenon arc lamps, located in 9 inch X 3 inch cylindrical housings, in the presentation foreground. A mirror system keeps the high intensity IR sources in the missile field of view. Range closure is simulated in the background by zooming in on the scene and int eh foreground by separating and controlling the irises of the arc lamp sources for property spatial and intensity characteristics. Al relative motion and range closure is controlled by missile flyout software and aircraft flight-profile software models.

  8. The application of artificial intelligence technology to aeronautical system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouchard, E. E.; Kidwell, G. H.; Rogan, J. E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the automation of one class of aeronautical design activity using artificial intelligence and advanced software techniques. Its purpose is to suggest concepts, terminology, and approaches that may be useful in enhancing design automation. By understanding the basic concepts and tasks in design, and the technologies that are available, it will be possible to produce, in the future, systems whose capabilities far exceed those of today's methods. Some of the tasks that will be discussed have already been automated and are in production use, resulting in significant productivity benefits. The concepts and techniques discussed are applicable to all design activity, though aeronautical applications are specifically presented.

  9. Recent Developments in the Design, Capabilities and Autonomous Operations of a Lightweight Surface Manipulation System and Test-bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsey, John T.; Jones, Thomas C.; Doggett, W. R.; Brady, Jeffrey S.; Berry, Felecia C.; Ganoe, George G.; Anderson, Eric; King, Bruce D.; Mercer, David C.

    2011-01-01

    The first generation of a versatile high performance device for performing payload handling and assembly operations on planetary surfaces, the Lightweight Surface Manipulation System (LSMS), has been designed and built. Over the course of its development, conventional crane type payload handling configurations and operations have been successfully demonstrated and the range of motion, types of operations and the versatility greatly expanded. This enhanced set of 1st generation LSMS hardware is now serving as a laboratory test-bed allowing the continuing development of end effectors, operational techniques and remotely controlled and automated operations. This paper describes the most recent LSMS and test-bed development activities, that have focused on two major efforts. The first effort was to complete a preliminary design of the 2nd generation LSMS that has the capability for limited mobility and can reposition itself between lander decks, mobility chassis, and fixed base locations. A major portion of this effort involved conducting a study to establish the feasibility of, and define, the specifications for a lightweight cable-drive waist joint. The second effort was to continue expanding the versatility and autonomy of large planetary surface manipulators using the 1st generation LSMS as a test-bed. This has been accomplished by increasing manipulator capabilities and efficiencies through both design changes and tool and end effector development. A software development effort has expanded the operational capabilities of the LSMS test-bed to include; autonomous operations based on stored paths, use of a vision system for target acquisition and tracking, and remote command and control over a communications bridge.

  10. Air Force electronic warfare evaluation simulator (AFEWES) infrared test and evaluation capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Seth D.

    2001-08-01

    The Air Force Electronic Warfare Evaluation Simulator Infrared Countermeasures (IRCM) lab currently has the ability to simulate a complete IRCM test environment, including IR missiles in flight, aircraft in flight, and various IR countermeasures including maneuvers, LASERs, flares, and lamp-based jammer systems. The simulations of IR missiles in flight include real missile seeker hardware mounted in a six degree-of-freedom flight simulation table. The simulations of aircraft signatures and IR countermeasures are accomplished by using eight xenon arc lamps, located in 9' X 3' cylindrical housings, in the presentation foreground. A mirror system keeps the high intensity IR sources in the missile field of view. Range closure is simulated in the background by zooming in on the scene and in the foreground by separating and controlling the irises of the arc lamp sources for proper spatial and intensity characteristics. All relative motion and range closure is controlled by missile flyout software and aircraft flight-profile software models.

  11. Bioaugmentation of an Aerobic Culture Capable of Chlorinated Solvent Cometabolism to a Subsurface Test Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolan, M. E.; Semprini, L.; McCarty, P. L.; Hopkins, G.

    2002-12-01

    A butane-utilizing culture able to cometabolize chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) was bioaugmented into an aquifer test zone at Moffett Federal Airfield, CA. Microcosm bioaugmentation tests conducted with groundwater and aquifer solids collected from the test site indicated a strong potential for viability of the bioaugmented culture in the site subsurface. Microcosms bioaugmented with the butane-utilizing culture were able to degrade aqueous concentrations of 1,1-dichloroethylene (1,1-DCE) up to 1 mg/L and could successfully transform mixtures of 1,1-DCE, 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA) and 1,1-dichloroethane (DCA) when fed butane. T-RFLP analyses showed the presence of bioaugmented organisms within the microcosms throughout the 10-month test period. An isolate from the butane-utilizing culture was grown in batch bottles containing mineral media and a butane-in-air headspace. Approximately 4 g dry weight of culture was harvested and bioaugmented to the field site. The site consisted of two parallel well legs, each with an injection well, two fully penetrating monitoring wells containing solid support media, three groundwater monitoring wells and an extraction well. One well leg was bioaugmented with the isolate and the other was used as an indigenous control leg. A mixture of 1,1-DCE, TCA and DCA (~50 ug/L, 135 ug/L and 150 ug/L respectively) was continuously pumped through both well legs with alternate pulses of dissolved oxygen and butane. Fifty percent removal of 1,1-DCE occurred within one day in the bioaugmented leg; however, it took about 6 days to achieve complete butane utilization and 1,1-DCE removal to below 2 ug/L. During this period DCA and TCA were reduced by 70- 90 percent and 30-50 percent respectively. When the butane/oxygen pulses were changed from a 1-hr cycle to a 24-hr cycle 1,1-DCE removal fell to 50 percent and DCA and TCA concentrations increased to influent levels. Upon returning to short pulse cycles, 1,1-DCE removal efficiency

  12. Overview of Space Environment Effects on Materials and GRC's Test Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Miller, Sharon K. R.

    2006-01-01

    The Electro-Physics Branch at NASA Glenn Research Center has been involved with evaluating the durability of materials and understanding environment interactions for over 20 years. A combination of flight experiments, ground based exposure facilities, and environmental modeling provide a well rounded approach to material durability evaluation and prediction for future missions. Ground based testing includes atomic oxygen exposure facilities (large and small area thermal facilities and directed atomic oxygen with and without VUV radiation, VUV and NUV exposure facility, and thermal cycling facility with and without UV radiation. A lunar dust exposure facility is also being brought on-line. Material reactions in these facilities is compared to that observed in space.

  13. Capability of EnKF to assimilate tracer test data at the lower detection limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruckmann, Johanna; Vogt, Christian; Clauser, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    We model water flow and estimate permeability distribution to improve regional groundwater management for a tectonically limited hard-rock aquifer. Management of groundwater resources for drinking water supply requires understanding and quantifying of the regional groundwater flow and groundwater budget which depends largely on the petrophysical transport properties (e. g., porosity and permeability) of the underground. We study a structurally complex and thus highly heterogeneous area on a regional scale: the Hastenrather Graben 15 km northeast of Aachen, Germany. Here, groundwater is produced from a carbonate aquifer for drinking water supply. However, direct data on the geometry and petrophysical properties of the underground are sparse and most data are only one-dimensional. For overcoming this limitation and coping with the heterogeneity of the underground we use the Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) for stochastic parameter estimation and statistical ensemble analysis. Assimilating time-dependent tracer test data will help estimating permeability. The fact that the aquifer is used for drinking water supply prevents using of any artificial tracer such as radioactive or fluorescent tracer. Instead, drinking water with a lower salinity compared to the groundwater (e.g., dam water) will be used. The detection limit will be relatively low due to the low salinity contrast between reservoir water and tracer. It might even be in the range of measuring error. For studying the sensitivity of EnKF at the limit of detection we set up a synthetic scenario based on the conditions in our study area. Performing EnKF assimilation runs based on perturbed observations characterized by different measurement error levels yields information on the acceptable signal-to-noise-ratio required by EnKF for successful estimates of the given synthetic permeability distribution. This, in turn, provides information on the limits of the real-world's tracer test at low salinity contrast.

  14. Testing the Rapid Detection Capabilities of the Quake-Catcher Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, A. I.; Cochran, E.; Yildirim, B.; Christensen, C. M.; Kaiser, A. E.; Lawrence, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    The Quake-Catcher Network (QCN) is a versatile network of MEMS accelerometers that are used in combination with distributed volunteer computing to detect earthquakes around the world. Using a dense network of QCN stations installed in Christchurch, New Zealand after the 2010 M7.1 Darfield earthquake, hundreds of events in the Christchurch area were detected and rapidly characterized. When the M6.3 Christchurch event occurred on 21 February 2011, QCN sensors recorded the event and calculated its magnitude, location, and created a map of estimated shaking intensity within 7 seconds of the earthquake origin time. Successive iterations improved the calculations and, within 24 seconds of the earthquake, magnitude and location values were calculated that were comparable to those provided by GeoNet. We have rigorously tested numerous methods to create a working magnitude scaling relationship. In this presentation, we show a drastic improvement in the magnitude estimates using the maximum acceleration at the time of the first trigger and updated ground accelerations from one to three seconds after the initial trigger. 75% of the events rapidly detected and characterized by QCN are within 0.5 magnitude units of the official GeoNet reported magnitude values, with 95% of the events within 1 magnitude unit. We also test the QCN detection algorithms using higher quality data from the SCSN network in Southern California. We examine a dataset of M5 and larger earthquakes that occurred since 1995. We present the performance of the QCN algorithms for this dataset, including time to detection as well as location and magnitude accuracy.

  15. In-house fabrication and testing capabilities for Li and Li-ion 18650 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasubramanian, G.

    2010-04-01

    For over 10 years Sandia Labs have been involved in an US DOE-funded program aimed at developing electric vehicle batteries for transportation applications. Currently this program is called "Advanced Battery Research (ABR)." In this effort we were preparing 18650 cells with electrodes supplied by or purchased from private companies for thermal abuse and electrical characterization studies. Lately, we are coating our own electrodes, building cells and evaluating performance. This paper describes our extensive in-house facilities for slurry making, electrode coating, cell winding etc. In addition, facilities for electrical testing and thermal abuse will be described. This facility allows us to readjust our focus quickly to the changing demands of the still evolving ABR program. Additionally, we continue to make cells for our internal use. We made several 18650 cells both primary (Li-CFx) and secondary (Li-ion) and evaluated performance. For example Li-CFx cells gave ~2.9Ahr capacity at room temperature. Our high voltage Li-ion cells consisting of carbon anode and cathode based on LiNi 0.4Mn 0.3Co 0.3O2 in organic electrolytes exhibited reproducible behavior and gave capacity on the order of 1Ahr. Performance of Li-ion cells at different temperatures and thermal abuse characteristics will be presented.

  16. Initial operational capability of the ASTREX large space structures test bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, G. A.

    1989-01-01

    Future DOD, NASA, and SDI space systems will be larger than any spacecraft flown before. The economics of placing these large space systems (LSS) into orbit dictates that they be as low in mass as possible. The combination of very large size and relatively low mass produces systems which possess little structural rigidity. This flexibility causes severe technical problems when combined with the precise shape and pointing requirements associated with many future LSS missions. Development of new control technologies which can solve these problems and enable future LSS missions is under way, but a test bed is needed for demonstration and evaluation of the emerging control hardware (sensors and actuators) and methodologies. In particular, the need exists for a facility which enables both large angle slewing and subsequent pointing/shape control of a variety of flexible bodies. The Air Force Astronautics Laboratory (AFAL) has conceived the Advanced Space Structures Technology Research Experiments (ASTREX) facility to fill this need. An overview of the ASTREX facility is given.

  17. Test Fixture for Determination of Energy Absorbing Capabilities of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavoie, J. Andre (Inventor); Jackson, Karen E. (Inventor); Morton, John (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a fixture for supporting an elongated specimen for crush testing. The fixture comprises a base plate. four guiding rods, a sliding plate, four support rods and two collars. The guiding rods connect to the base plate and extend in a direction substantially perpendicular to the base plate. The sliding plate has linear bearings which encircle the guiding rods and enable translation of the sliding plate along the axis of each guiding rod. The four supporting rods mount to the base plate and also extend in a direction substantially perpendicular to the base plate. Each support rod has a keyway for a wedge which contacts the elongated specimen and holds the specimen in place during crushing. Each collar lies above the sliding plate and holds a pair of support rods on their ends opposite the ends connected to the base plate. A spherical bearing sits on top of the sliding plate and transfers an applied load to the sliding plate, which moves downward and crushes the elongated specimen.

  18. Aeronautical record : no. 1 (to June, 1923)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1923-01-01

    "...considerations have prompted us to pay special attention to the development of aeronautical industries and aerial navigation as a commercial enterprise and to publish an analytical review of events in the aeronautical world and of the attendant problems."

  19. Program of Research in Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A prospectus of the educational and research opportunities available at the Joint Institute for Advancement of Flight Sciences, operated at NASA Langley Research Center in conjunction with George Washington University's School of Engineering and Applied Sciences is presented. Requirements of admission to various degree programs are given as well as the course offerings in the areas of acoustics, aeronautics, environmental modelling, materials science, and structures and dynamics. Research facilities for each field of study are described. Presentations and publications (including dissertations and theses) generated by each program are listed as well as faculty members visting scientists and engineers.

  20. Prototype results of a phase-shifting interferometer capable of measuring the complex index and profile of a test surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogala, Eric W.; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2002-09-01

    Results are presented from a prototype phase-shifting interferometer capable of measuring both the real and the imaginary part of the complex index of refraction and the surface profile of a test surface. The three parameters of interest are extracted from the measured data by maximum-likelihood estimation theory. The performance of the system is quantitatively assessed with Cramer-Rao lower bounds. The results are shown to be strongly dependent on the quantization of the interferograms from the 8-bit CCD camera, the incident electric field amplitude, and the relative amplitude and phase difference of each polarized component through each arm of the interferometer.

  1. NASA's aeronautics research and technology base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    NASA's research technology base in aeronautics is assessed in terms of: (1) US aeronautical technology needs and requirements in the future; (2) objectives of the aeronautics program; (3) magnitude and scope of the program; and (4) research and technology performed by NASA and other research organizations.

  2. Questions & Answers about Aeronautics and Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    Answers to 27 questions about aeronautics, space, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are provided in this pamphlet. Among the topics dealt with in these questions are: costs of the space program; NASA's role in aeronautics; benefits received from the space program; why the United States hasn't developed means of rescuing…

  3. 14 CFR 61.105 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Aeronautical knowledge. 61.105 Section 61.105 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... log ground training from an authorized instructor or complete a home-study course on the...

  4. 14 CFR 61.97 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aeronautical knowledge. 61.97 Section 61.97 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN... ground training from an authorized instructor or complete a home-study course on the...

  5. 14 CFR 61.97 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Aeronautical knowledge. 61.97 Section 61.97 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN... ground training from an authorized instructor or complete a home-study course on the...

  6. 14 CFR 61.125 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aeronautical knowledge. 61.125 Section 61.125 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... log ground training from an authorized instructor, or complete a home-study course, on...

  7. 14 CFR 61.105 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aeronautical knowledge. 61.105 Section 61.105 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... log ground training from an authorized instructor or complete a home-study course on the...

  8. 14 CFR 61.125 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Aeronautical knowledge. 61.125 Section 61.125 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... log ground training from an authorized instructor, or complete a home-study course, on...

  9. Magnetic Test Performance Capabilities at the Goddard Space Flight Center as Applied to the Global Geospace Science Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Darryl R.

    1997-01-01

    Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Spacecraft Magnetic Test Facility (SMTF) is a historic test facility that has set the standard for all subsequent magnetic test facilities. The SMTF was constructed in the early 1960's for the purpose of simulating geomagnetic and interplanetary magnetic fields. Additionally, the facility provides the capability for measuring spacecraft generated magnetic fields as well as calibrating magnetic attitude control systems and science magnetometers. The SMTF was designed for large, spacecraft level tests and is currently the second largest spherical coil system in the world. The SMTF is a three-axis Braunbek system composed of four coils on each of three orthogonal axes. The largest coils are 12.7 meters (41.6 feet) in diameter. The three-axis Braunbek configuration provides a highly uniform cancellation of the geomagnetic field over the central 1.8 meter (6 foot) diameter primary test volume. Cancellation of the local geomagnetic field is to within +/-0.2 nanotesla with a uniformity of up to 0.001% within the 1.8 meter (6 foot) diameter primary test volume. Artificial magnetic field vectors from 0-60,000 nanotesla can be generated along any axis with a 0.1 nanotesla resolution. Oscillating or rotating field vectors can also be produced about any axis with a frequency of up to 100 radians/second. Since becoming fully operational in July of 1967, the SMTF has been the site of numerous spacecraft magnetics tests. Spacecraft tested at the SMTF include: the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM), Magsat, LANDSAT-D, the Fast Aurora] Snapshot (FAST) Explorer and the Sub-millimeter-Wave-Astronomy Satellite (SWAS) among others. This paper describes the methodology and sequencing used for the Global Geospace Science (GGS) initiative magnetic testing program in the Goddard Space Flight Center's SMTF. The GGS initiative provides an exemplary model of a strict and comprehensive magnetic control program.

  10. Aeronautical audio broadcasting via satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tzeng, Forrest F.

    1993-01-01

    A system design for aeronautical audio broadcasting, with C-band uplink and L-band downlink, via Inmarsat space segments is presented. Near-transparent-quality compression of 5-kHz bandwidth audio at 20.5 kbit/s is achieved based on a hybrid technique employing linear predictive modeling and transform-domain residual quantization. Concatenated Reed-Solomon/convolutional codes with quadrature phase shift keying are selected for bandwidth and power efficiency. RF bandwidth at 25 kHz per channel, and a decoded bit error rate at 10(exp -6) with E(sub b)/N(sub o) at 3.75 dB are obtained. An interleaver, scrambler, modem synchronization, and frame format were designed, and frequency-division multiple access was selected over code-division multiple access. A link budget computation based on a worst-case scenario indicates sufficient system power margins. Transponder occupancy analysis for 72 audio channels demonstrates ample remaining capacity to accommodate emerging aeronautical services.

  11. Proposed Development of NASA Glenn Research Center's Aeronautical Network Research Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Thanh C.; Kerczewski, Robert J.; Wargo, Chris A.; Kocin, Michael J.; Garcia, Manuel L.

    2004-01-01

    Accurate knowledge and understanding of data link traffic loads that will have an impact on the underlying communications infrastructure within the National Airspace System (NAS) is of paramount importance for planning, development and fielding of future airborne and ground-based communications systems. Attempting to better understand this impact, NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), through its contractor Computer Networks & Software, Inc. (CNS, Inc.), has developed an emulation and test facility known as the Virtual Aircraft and Controller (VAC) to study data link interactions and the capacity of the NAS to support Controller Pilot Data Link Communications (CPDLC) traffic. The drawback of the current VAC test bed is that it does not allow the test personnel and researchers to present a real world RF environment to a complex airborne or ground system. Fortunately, the United States Air Force and Navy Avionics Test Commands, through its contractor ViaSat, Inc., have developed the Joint Communications Simulator (JCS) to provide communications band test and simulation capability for the RF spectrum through 18 GHz including Communications, Navigation, and Identification and Surveillance functions. In this paper, we are proposing the development of a new and robust test bed that will leverage on the existing NASA GRC's VAC and the Air Force and Navy Commands JCS systems capabilities and functionalities. The proposed NASA Glenn Research Center's Aeronautical Networks Research Simulator (ANRS) will combine current Air Traffic Control applications and physical RF stimulation into an integrated system capable of emulating data transmission behaviors including propagation delay, physical protocol delay, transmission failure and channel interference. The ANRS will provide a simulation/stimulation tool and test bed environment that allow the researcher to predict the performance of various aeronautical network protocol standards and their associated waveforms under varying

  12. Recent Investments by NASA's National Force Measurement Technology Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Commo, Sean A.; Ponder, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    The National Force Measurement Technology Capability (NFMTC) is a nationwide partnership established in 2008 and sponsored by NASA's Aeronautics Evaluation and Test Capabilities (AETC) project to maintain and further develop force measurement capabilities. The NFMTC focuses on force measurement in wind tunnels and provides operational support in addition to conducting balance research. Based on force measurement capability challenges, strategic investments into research tasks are designed to meet the experimental requirements of current and future aerospace research programs and projects. This paper highlights recent and force measurement investments into several areas including recapitalizing the strain-gage balance inventory, developing balance best practices, improving calibration and facility capabilities, and researching potential technologies to advance balance capabilities.

  13. Performance and endurance testing of a prototype carbon dioxide and humidity control system for Space Shuttle extended mission capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. H.; Cusick, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    An advanced flight prototype regenerable CO2 and humidity control system was delivered to NASA-JSC in February 1980. It is pointed out that this system offers substantial weight savings compared with the Shuttle Orbiter expendable lithium hydroxide CO2 removal system for extended duration missions. The present paper provides a brief description of the 4- to 10-man regenerable CO2 and humidity control system. The potential advantages which can be realized for an extended duration Shuttle mission are considered along with the results of extensive testing conducted at JSC. The performance evaluation and endurance tests show that the system is capable of long-term operation (up to 60 days) without maintenance.

  14. Final report on testing of TOPAZ II unit Ya-21u: Output power characteristics and system capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Luchau, D.W.; Sinkevich, V.G.; Wernsman, B.; Mulder, D.M.

    1996-03-01

    A final report on the output power characteristics and capabilities of the TOPAZ II Space Nuclear Power Unit Ya-21u is presented. Results showed that after a total of almost 8,000 hours of system testing in the U.S. and Russia, several emergency cooldowns, and three inadvertent air introductions to the interelectrode gap (IEG) that the TOPAZ II demonstrates the potential for providing reliable power in a space environment. Output power optimizations and system characteristics following a shock and vibration test are shown. These tests were performed using electrical heaters that simulate nuclear fuel heating. This paper will focus primarily on the changes in output power characteristics over the lifetime of Ya-21u. All U.S. testing was conducted at the Thermionic System Evaluation Test (TSET) Facility of the New Mexico Engineering Research Institute (NMERI) as a part of the TOPAZ International Program (TIP). TIP is managed by the Air Force Phillips Laboratory (PL) for the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO). {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Capabilities and Choices: Do They Make Sen'se for Understanding Objective and Subjective Well-Being? An Empirical Test of Sen's Capability Framework on German and British Panel Data.

    PubMed

    Muffels, Ruud; Headey, Bruce

    2013-02-01

    In Sen's Capability Approach (CA) well-being can be defined as the freedom of choice to achieve the things in life which one has reason to value most for his or her personal life. Capabilities are in Sen's vocabulary therefore the real freedoms people have or the opportunities available to them. In this paper we examine the impact of capabilities alongside choices on well-being. There is a lot of theoretical work on Sen's capability framework but still a lack of empirical research in measuring and testing his capability model especially in a dynamic perspective. The contribution of the paper is first to test Sen's theoretical CA approach empirically using 25 years of German and 18 years of British data. Second, to examine to what extent the capability approach can explain long-term changes in well-being and third to view the impact on subjective as well as objective well-being in two clearly distinct welfare states. Three measures of well-being are constructed: life satisfaction for subjective well-being and relative income and employment security for objective well-being. We ran random and fixed effects GLS models. The findings strongly support Sen's capabilities framework and provide evidence on the way capabilities, choices and constraints matter for objective and subjective well-being. Capabilities pertaining to human capital, trust, altruism and risk taking, and choices to family, work-leisure, lifestyle and social behaviour show to strongly affect long-term changes in subjective and objective well-being though in a different way largely depending on the type of well-being measure used.

  16. Aeronautical Research Engineer Milt Thompson computing data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1956-01-01

    Milton O. Thompson was hired as an engineer at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics' High-Speed Flight Station (later renamed the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Dryden Flight Research Center) on March 19, 1956. In 1958 he became a research pilot, but in this photo Milt is working on data from another pilot's research flight. Thompson began flying with the U.S. Navy as a pilot trainee at the age of 19. He subsequently served during World War II, with duty in China and Japan. Following six years of active naval service, he entered the University of Washington, in Seattle, Washington. Milt graduated in 1953 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering. He remained in the Naval Reserves during college, and continued flying--not only naval aircraft but crop dusters and forest-spraying aircraft. After college graduation, Milt became a flight test engineer for the Boeing Aircraft Company in Seattle, where he was employed for two years before coming to the High-Speed Flight Station.

  17. Testing the Predictive Capability of the High-Fidelity Generalized Method of Cells Using an Efficient Reformulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Steven M. (Technical Monitor); Bansal, Yogesh; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy

    2004-01-01

    The High-Fidelity Generalized Method of Cells is a new micromechanics model for unidirectionally reinforced periodic multiphase materials that was developed to overcome the original model's shortcomings. The high-fidelity version predicts the local stress and strain fields with dramatically greater accuracy relative to the original model through the use of a better displacement field representation. Herein, we test the high-fidelity model's predictive capability in estimating the elastic moduli of periodic composites characterized by repeating unit cells obtained by rotation of an infinite square fiber array through an angle about the fiber axis. Such repeating unit cells may contain a few or many fibers, depending on the rotation angle. In order to analyze such multi-inclusion repeating unit cells efficiently, the high-fidelity micromechanics model's framework is reformulated using the local/global stiffness matrix approach. The excellent agreement with the corresponding results obtained from the standard transformation equations confirms the new model's predictive capability for periodic composites characterized by multi-inclusion repeating unit cells lacking planes of material symmetry. Comparison of the effective moduli and local stress fields with the corresponding results obtained from the original Generalized Method of Cells dramatically highlights the original model's shortcomings for certain classes of unidirectional composites.

  18. Relating children's attentional capabilities to intelligence, memory, and academic achievement: a test of construct specificity in children with asthma.

    PubMed

    Annett, Robert D; Bender, Bruce G; Gordon, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between attention, intelligence, memory, achievement, and behavior in a large population (N = 939) of children without neuropsychologic problems was investigated in children with mild and moderate asthma. It was hypothesized that different levels of children's attentional capabilities would be associated with different levels of intellectual, memory, and academic abilities. Children ages 6-12 at the eight clinical centers of the Childhood Asthma Management Program (CAMP) were enrolled in this study. Standardized measures of child neuropsychological and behavioral performance were administered to all participants, with analyses examining both the developmental trajectory of child attentional capabilities and the associations between Continuous Performance Test (CPT) scores and intellectual functioning, and measures of memory, academic achievement, and behavioral functioning. Findings demonstrated that correct responses on the CPT increase significantly with age, while commission errors decrease significantly with age. Performance levels on the CPT were associated with differences in child intellectual function, memory, and academic achievement. Overall these findings reveal how impairments in child attention skills were associated with normal levels of performance on measures of children's intelligence, memory, academic achievement, and behavioral functioning, suggesting that CPT performance is a salient marker of brain function.

  19. NASA Langley's AirSTAR Testbed: A Subscale Flight Test Capability for Flight Dynamics and Control System Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Thomas L.; Bailey, Roger M.

    2008-01-01

    As part of the Airborne Subscale Transport Aircraft Research (AirSTAR) project, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has developed a subscaled flying testbed in order to conduct research experiments in support of the goals of NASA s Aviation Safety Program. This research capability consists of three distinct components. The first of these is the research aircraft, of which there are several in the AirSTAR stable. These aircraft range from a dynamically-scaled, twin turbine vehicle to a propeller driven, off-the-shelf airframe. Each of these airframes carves out its own niche in the research test program. All of the airplanes have sophisticated on-board data acquisition and actuation systems, recording, telemetering, processing, and/or receiving data from research control systems. The second piece of the testbed is the ground facilities, which encompass the hardware and software infrastructure necessary to provide comprehensive support services for conducting flight research using the subscale aircraft, including: subsystem development, integrated testing, remote piloting of the subscale aircraft, telemetry processing, experimental flight control law implementation and evaluation, flight simulation, data recording/archiving, and communications. The ground facilities are comprised of two major components: (1) The Base Research Station (BRS), a LaRC laboratory facility for system development, testing and data analysis, and (2) The Mobile Operations Station (MOS), a self-contained, motorized vehicle serving as a mobile research command/operations center, functionally equivalent to the BRS, capable of deployment to remote sites for supporting flight tests. The third piece of the testbed is the test facility itself. Research flights carried out by the AirSTAR team are conducted at NASA Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) on the Eastern Shore of Virginia. The UAV Island runway is a 50 x 1500 paved runway that lies within restricted airspace at Wallops Flight Facility. The

  20. Tribology needs for future space and aeronautical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, Robert L.

    1991-01-01

    Future aeronautical and space missions will push tribology technology beyond its current capability. The objective is to discuss the current state of the art of tribology as it is applied to advanced aircraft and spacecraft. Areas of discussion include materials lubrication mechanisms, factors affecting lubrication, current and future tribological problem areas, potential new lubrication techniques, and perceived technology requirements that need to be met in order to solve these tribology problems.

  1. Load carrying walking test and its relationships to endurance and neuromuscular capabilities in women and men of different ages.

    PubMed

    Holviala, J; Häkkinen, A; Nyman, K; Aho, J; Karavirta, L; Häkkinen, K

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine load carrying walking test (TMload) performance on the treadmill and its associations to endurance and neuromuscular capabilities in women and men of different ages. Sixty participants (aged 28 to 71 years) were divided into young, middle-aged and old groups of both genders. Clinical stress test was performed by stationary cycle ergometer (CEload). Peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), heart rate and lactate concentration were measured using maximal TMload test. Isometric strength and EMG-activity of upper and lower extremities were measured before and after TMload. VO2peak of TMload correlated significantly with TMload exercise time (ET) in all other groups (r=0.67 to 0.91 and p ≤ 0.05 to p<0.001) except old men. Leg extension force decreased (p ≤ 0.05 to p<0.001) after TMload in all groups, grip force in young groups (p ≤ 0.05), while plantar flexion force and all EMGs remained unchanged. In men VO2peak explained 81% and in women VO2peak and age explained 87% of the total variation of the TMload ET. In conclusion, ET of TMload is associated with high VO2peak, but not with muscle strength or its changes during the loading. The present load carrying walking test may be used for testing workers with heavy loading in their occupation or in rehabilitation purposes. Further research is needed to examine in more detailed the loading model of the present study as well as the effects of different types of training on load carrying performance.

  2. Recommended Test Methods and Pass/Fail Criteria for a Respirator Fit Capability Test of Half-Mask Air-Purifying Respirators.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Ziqing; Bergman, Michael; Lei, Zhipeng; Niezgoda, George; Shaffer, Ronald

    2017-02-25

    This study assessed key test parameters and pass/fail criteria options for developing a respirator fit capability (RFC) test for half-mask air-purifying particulate respirators. Using a 25-subject test panel, benchmark RFC data were collected for 101 National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health-certified respirator models. These models were further grouped into 61 one-, two- or three-size families. Fit testing was done using a PortaCount® Plus with N95-Companion accessory and an Occupational Safety and Health Administration-accepted quantitative fit test protocol. Three repeated tests (donnings) per subject/respirator model combination were performed. The panel passing rate (PPR) (number or percentage of the 25-subject panel achieving acceptable fit) was determined for each model using five different alternative criteria for determining acceptable fit. When the 101 models are evaluated individually (i.e., not grouped by families), the percentages of models capable of fitting > 75% (19/25 subjects) of the panel were 29% and 32% for subjects achieving a fit factor ≥ 100 for at least one of the first two donnings and at least one of three donnings, respectively. When the models are evaluated grouped into families and using > 75% of panel subjects achieving a fit factor ≥ 100 for at least one of two donnings as the PPR pass/fail criterion, 48% of all models can pass. When > 50% (13/25 subjects) of panel subjects was the PPR criterion, the percentage of passing models increased to 70%. Testing respirators grouped into families and evaluating the first two donnings for each of two respirator sizes provided the best balance between meeting end user expectations and creating a performance bar for manufacturers. Specifying the test criterion for a subject obtaining acceptable fit as achieving a fit factor ≥ 100 on at least one out of the two donnings is reasonable because a majority of existing respirator families can achieve an PPR of > 50% using this

  3. Implementation of the Enhanced Flight Termination System at National Aeronautics and Space Administration Dryden Flight Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tow, David

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the methodology, requirements, tests, and results of the implementation of the current operating capability for the Enhanced Flight Termination System (EFTS) at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC). The implementation involves the development of the EFTS at NASA DFRC starting from the requirements to system safety review to full end to end system testing, and concluding with the acceptance of the system as an operational system. The paper discusses the first operational usage and subsequent flight utilizing EFTS successfully.

  4. Mobile-ip Aeronautical Network Simulation Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Tran, Diepchi T.

    2001-01-01

    NASA is interested in applying mobile Internet protocol (mobile-ip) technologies to its space and aeronautics programs. In particular, mobile-ip will play a major role in the Advanced Aeronautic Transportation Technology (AATT), the Weather Information Communication (WINCOMM), and the Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS) aeronautics programs. This report presents the results of a simulation study of mobile-ip for an aeronautical network. The study was performed to determine the performance of the transmission control protocol (TCP) in a mobile-ip environment and to gain an understanding of how long delays, handoffs, and noisy channels affect mobile-ip performance.

  5. 14 CFR 61.125 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and effects of exceeding aircraft performance limitations; (9) Use of aeronautical charts and a..., and emergency operations appropriate to the aircraft; (14) Night and high-altitude operations;...

  6. 14 CFR 61.125 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... and effects of exceeding aircraft performance limitations; (9) Use of aeronautical charts and a..., and emergency operations appropriate to the aircraft; (14) Night and high-altitude operations;...

  7. 14 CFR 61.125 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and effects of exceeding aircraft performance limitations; (9) Use of aeronautical charts and a..., and emergency operations appropriate to the aircraft; (14) Night and high-altitude operations;...

  8. 76 FR 16643 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics... Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces...

  9. 77 FR 61432 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics... Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces...

  10. 75 FR 50782 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics... Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces...

  11. 76 FR 40753 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics... Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces...

  12. 75 FR 41240 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics... Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces...

  13. What Is at Stake in Knowing the Content and Capabilities of Children's Minds?: A Case for Basing High Stakes Tests on Cognitive Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Stephen P.; Leighton, Jacqueline P.; Phillips, Linda M.

    2004-01-01

    Many significant changes in perspective have to take place before efforts to learn the content and capabilities of children's minds can hold much sway in educational testing. The language of testing, especially of high stakes testing, remains firmly in the realm of "behaviors", "performance" and "competency" defined…

  14. Life prediction technologies for aeronautical propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgaw, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    Fatigue and fracture problems continue to occur in aeronautical gas turbine engines. Components whose useful life is limited by these failure modes include turbine hot-section blades, vanes, and disks. Safety considerations dictate that catastrophic failures be avoided, while economic considerations dictate that catastrophic failures be avoided, while economic considerations dictate that noncatastrophic failures occur as infrequently as possible. Therefore, the decision in design is making the tradeoff between engine performance and durability. LeRC has contributed to the aeropropulsion industry in the area of life prediction technology for over 30 years, developing creep and fatigue life prediction methodologies for hot-section materials. At the present time, emphasis is being placed on the development of methods capable of handling both thermal and mechanical fatigue under severe environments. Recent accomplishments include the development of more accurate creep-fatigue life prediction methods such as the total strain version of LeRC's strain-range partitioning (SRP) and the HOST-developed cyclic damage accumulation (CDA) model. Other examples include the development of a more accurate cumulative fatigue damage rule - the double damage curve approach (DDCA), which provides greatly improved accuracy in comparison with usual cumulative fatigue design rules. Other accomplishments in the area of high-temperature fatigue crack growth may also be mentioned. Finally, we are looking to the future and are beginning to do research on the advanced methods which will be required for development of advanced materials and propulsion systems over the next 10-20 years.

  15. Life prediction technologies for aeronautical propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgaw, Michael A.

    1987-01-01

    Fatigue and fracture problems continue to occur in aeronautical gas turbine engines. Components whose useful life is limited by these failure modes include turbine hot-section blades, vanes and disks. Safety considerations dictate that catastrophic failures be avoided, while economic considerations dictate that noncatastrophic failures occur as infrequently as possible. The design decision is therefore in making the tradeoff between engine performance and durability. The NASA Lewis Research Center has contributed to the aeropropulsion industry in the areas of life prediction technology for 30 years, developing creep and fatigue life prediction methodologies for hot-section materials. Emphasis is placed on the development of methods capable of handling both thermal and mechanical fatigue under severe environments. Recent accomplishments include the development of more accurate creep-fatigue life prediction methods such as the total strain version of Lewis' Strainrange Partitioning (SRP) and the HOST-developed Cyclic Damage Accumulation (CDA) model. Other examples include the Double Damage Curve Approach (DDCA), which provides greatly improved accuracy for cumulative fatigue design rules.

  16. The effect of different operations modes on science capabilities during the 2010 Desert RATS test: Insights from the geologist crewmembers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleacher, Jacob E.; Hurtado, José M.; Young, Kelsey E.; Rice, James W.; Garry, W. Brent

    2013-10-01

    The 2010 Desert RATS field test utilized two Space Exploration Vehicles (prototype planetary rovers) and four crewmembers (2 per rover) to conduct a geologic traverse across northern Arizona while testing continuous and twice-per-day communications paired with operation modes of separating and exploring individually (Divide & Conquer) and exploring together (Lead & Follow), respectively. This report provides qualitative conclusions from the geologist crewmembers involved in this test as to how these modes of communications and operations affected our ability to conduct field geology. Each mode of communication and operation provided beneficial capabilities that might be further explored for future Human Spaceflight Missions to other solar system objects. We find that more frequent interactions between crews and an Apollo-style Science Team on the Earth best enables scientific progress during human exploration. However, during multiple vehicle missions, this communication with an Earth-based team of scientists, who represent "more minds on the problem", should not come at the exclusion of (or significantly decrease) communication between the crewmembers in different vehicles who have the "eyes on the ground". Inter-crew communications improved when discussions with a backroom were infrequent. Both aspects are critical and cannot be mutually exclusive. Increased vehicle separation distances best enable encounters with multiple geologic units. However, seemingly redundant visits by multiple vehicles to the same feature can be utilized to provide improved process-related observations about the development and modification of the local terrain. We consider the value of data management, transfer, and accessibility to be the most important lesson learned. Crews and backrooms should have access to all data and related interpretations within the mission in as close to real-time conditions as possible. This ensures that while on another planetary surface, crewmembers are as

  17. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography With Indexes. Supplement 414

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This report lists reports, articles and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. The NASA CASI price code table, addresses of organizations, and document availability information are included before the abstract section. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  18. Reynolds number influences in aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, Dennis M.; Yip, Long P.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Lin, John C.; Lawing, Pierce L.; Batina, John T.; Hardin, Jay C.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Fenbert, James W.; Domack, Christopher S.

    1993-01-01

    Reynolds number, a measure of the ratio of inertia to viscous forces, is a fundamental similarity parameter for fluid flows and therefore, would be expected to have a major influence in aerodynamics and aeronautics. Reynolds number influences are generally large, but monatomic, for attached laminar (continuum) flow; however, laminar flows are easily separated, inducing even stronger, non-monatomic, Reynolds number sensitivities. Probably the strongest Reynolds number influences occur in connection with transitional flow behavior. Transition can take place over a tremendous Reynolds number range, from the order of 20 x 10(exp 3) for 2-D free shear layers up to the order of 100 x 10(exp 6) for hypersonic boundary layers. This variability in transition behavior is especially important for complex configurations where various vehicle and flow field elements can undergo transition at various Reynolds numbers, causing often surprising changes in aerodynamics characteristics over wide ranges in Reynolds number. This is further compounded by the vast parameterization associated with transition, in that any parameter which influences mean viscous flow development (e.g., pressure gradient, flow curvature, wall temperature, Mach number, sweep, roughness, flow chemistry, shock interactions, etc.), and incident disturbance fields (acoustics, vorticity, particulates, temperature spottiness, even electro static discharges) can alter transition locations to first order. The usual method of dealing with the transition problem is to trip the flow in the generally lower Reynolds number wind tunnel to simulate the flight turbulent behavior. However, this is not wholly satisfactory as it results in incorrectly scaled viscous region thicknesses and cannot be utilized at all for applications such as turbine blades and helicopter rotors, nacelles, leading edge and nose regions, and High Altitude Long Endurance and hypersonic airbreathers where the transitional flow is an innately critical

  19. Aeronautical engineering: A continuing bibliography with indexes (supplement 316)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This bibliography lists 413 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in April 1995. Subject coverage includes: aeronautics; mathematical and computer sciences; chemistry and material sciences; geosciences; design, construction and testing of aircraft and aircraft engines; aircraft components, equipment, and systems; ground support systems; and theoretical and applied aspects of aerodynamics and general fluid dynamics.

  20. Aeronautical engineering: A special bibliography with indexes, supplement 49

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The bibliography contains 368 abstract citations of reports, journal articles, and other documents concerned with the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. Research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment are also treated. Subject, personal, and contract number indexes are included for ease of access.

  1. Evaluation of testing capabilities for the determination of melamine in milk through an interlaboratory proficiency test programme during the melamine crisis.

    PubMed

    Chan, M; Lo, C K; Cheng, L S; Cheung, T C; Wong, Y C

    2009-11-01

    An interlaboratory proficiency testing programme for melamine in milk was organized for field laboratories in Hong Kong, China, during the melamine crisis in late September 2008. One blank test sample and three homogenous samples prepared by gravimetric spiking of melamine at the concentration range of zero to 4.5 mg kg(-1) were given to participants in this programme. A total of 13 participants returned the results to the organizer and they used either liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) or gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for their determinations. The performance of the participants was assessed by determining z-scores, calculated from the bias from the assigned reference values and Horwitz standard deviation. The median values of pooled data were found to be in good agreement with the reference values and the majority of the participants demonstrated their capabilities in the quantitative measurement of melamine in milk samples. However, four participants gave false-positive results for the blank test sample, probably due to cross-contamination from other samples, and they were requested to investigate the actual causes. In summary, eight participants (or 62%) demonstrated their competence for all the four test samples.

  2. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplment 394

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-1999-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. The NASA CASI price code table, addresses of organizations, and document availability information are included before the abstract section. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  3. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography With Indexes. Supplement 407

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-1999-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. The NASA CASI price code table, addresses of organizations, and document availability information are included before the abstract section. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  4. Aeronautical engineering, a special bibliography, September 1971 (supplement 10)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    This supplement to Aeronautical Engineering-A Special Bibliography (NASA SP-7037) lists 413 reports, journal articles, and other documents originally announced in September 1971 in Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports (STAR) or in International Aerospace Abstracts (IAA). The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the bibliography consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied by an abstract. The listing of the entries is arranged in two major sections, IAA Entries and STAR Entries in that order. The citations and abstracts are reproduced exactly as they appeared originally in IAA or STAR, including the original accession numbers from the respective announcement journals.

  5. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 415

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-2000-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. The NASA CASI price code table, addresses of organizations, and document availability information are included before the abstract section. Two indexes-subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  6. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 411

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-2000-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. The NASA CASI price code table, addresses of organizations, and document availability information are included before the abstract section. Two indexes- subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  7. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes. Supplement 408

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, a Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP#1999-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract. The NASA CASI price code table, addresses of organizations, and document availability information are included before the abstract section. Two indexes#subject and author are included after the abstract section.

  8. Economic analysis of aeronautical research and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gellman, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    The appropriateness of government intervention in the civilian market for aeronautics research and technology (R&T) is examined. The economic rationale for government intervention is examined. The conclusion is that the institutional role played by NASA in civilian aeronautics R&T markets is economically justified.

  9. Multibeam satellite EIRP adaptability for aeronautical communications.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinal, G. V.; Bisaga, J. J.

    1973-01-01

    EIRP enhancement and management techniques, emphasizing aeronautical communications and adaptable multibeam concepts, are classified and characterized. User requirement and demand characteristics that exploit the improvement available from each technique are identified, and the relative performance improvement of each is discussed. It is concluded that aeronautical satellite communications could benefit greatly by the employment of these techniques.

  10. Hierarchical sulfur electrodes as a testing platform for understanding the high-loading capability of Li-S batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Sheng-Heng; Chang, Chi-Hao; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2016-12-01

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries are considered as an attractive electrochemical energy storage system due to the high theoretical capacity of sulfur (1,675 mA h g-1). However, high-loading sulfur cathodes would need to be employed for the Li-S cells to be practical, but the resulting poor cell cyclability and severe electrode degradation hamper their development. Here, we present a hierarchical sulfur cathode as a testing platform for understanding the high-loading capability of Li-S batteries. The hierarchical cathode presents good electrochemical utilization of above 70%, stable cyclability for 500-1,000 cycles, and high sulfur loadings of 4.2-10.0 mg cm-2. The exploration of the activation and the polysulfide-retention processes of the high-loading cathodes illustrates that the electrochemical stability mainly results from the stabilization of dissolved polysulfides within the cathode region as the electrochemically active catholyte. Therefore, the utilization of stabilized polysulfide migration might be a meaningful opportunity for designing high-loading cathodes and further improving their electrochemical stability and long-term cyclability.

  11. Fasting and acquired capability for suicide: a test of the interpersonal-psychological theory of suicide in an undergraduate sample.

    PubMed

    Zuromski, Kelly L; Witte, Tracy K

    2015-03-30

    Though some preliminary research within the framework of the interpersonal-psychological theory of suicide (IPTS; Joiner, 2005) has postulated that restrictive eating may contribute to increased risk for suicide through its effect on the acquired capability for suicide (ACS; i.e., increased fearlessness about death and heightened physical pain tolerance), existing studies have not conducted direct tests of this relationship. To enhance understanding of this relationship, we compared undergraduates who endorsed one form of restrictive eating, fasting, (n = 99) to controls endorsing no forms of eating pathology over the lifetime (n = 94). We hypothesized that the fasting group would have higher ACS and higher likelihood of suicide attempt history. Contrary to hypotheses, no differences emerged between groups on ACS, and frequency of fasting within the fasting group was not significantly associated with ACS. Consistent with hypotheses, the fasting group was more likely to have suicide attempt history. Though results were not entirely consistent with hypotheses, the current study represents the first attempt at isolating and examining one form of restrictive eating (i.e., fasting) within the context of the IPTS. Results suggest that, in isolation, fasting may not be directly contributing to increases in ACS.

  12. Aeronautical Facilities Catalogue. Volume 1: Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penaranda, F. E. (Compiler); Freda, M. S. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    Domestic and foreign wind tunnel facilities are enumerated and their technical parameters are described. Data pertinent to managers and engineers are presented. Facilities judged comparable in testing capability are noted and grouped together. Several comprehensive cross-indexes and charts are included.

  13. Proficiency testing for bacterial whole genome sequencing: an end-user survey of current capabilities, requirements and priorities.

    PubMed

    Moran-Gilad, Jacob; Sintchenko, Vitali; Pedersen, Susanne Karlsmose; Wolfgang, William J; Pettengill, James; Strain, Errol; Hendriksen, Rene S

    2015-04-03

    The advent of next-generation sequencing (NGS) has revolutionised public health microbiology. Given the potential impact of NGS, it is paramount to ensure standardisation of 'wet' laboratory and bioinformatic protocols and promote comparability of methods employed by different laboratories and their outputs. Therefore, one of the ambitious goals of the Global Microbial Identifier (GMI) initiative (http://www.globalmicrobialidentifier.org/) has been to establish a mechanism for inter-laboratory NGS proficiency testing (PT). This report presents findings from the survey recently conducted by Working Group 4 among GMI members in order to ascertain NGS end-use requirements and attitudes towards NGS PT. The survey identified the high professional diversity of laboratories engaged in NGS-based public health projects and the wide range of capabilities within institutions, at a notable range of costs. The priority pathogens reported by respondents reflected the key drivers for NGS use (high burden disease and 'high profile' pathogens). The performance of and participation in PT was perceived as important by most respondents. The wide range of sequencing and bioinformatics practices reported by end-users highlights the importance of standardisation and harmonisation of NGS in public health and underpins the use of PT as a means to assuring quality. The findings of this survey will guide the design of the GMI PT program in relation to the spectrum of pathogens included, testing frequency and volume as well as technical requirements. The PT program for external quality assurance will evolve and inform the introduction of NGS into clinical and public health microbiology practice in the post-genomic era.

  14. Chemical Gas Sensors for Aeronautic and Space Applications 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, G. W.; Chen, L. Y.; Neudeck, P. G.; Knight, D.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.; Zhou, H. J.; Makel, D.; Liu, M.; Rauch, W. A.

    1998-01-01

    Aeronautic and Space applications require the development of chemical sensors with capabilities beyond those of commercially available sensors. Areas of most interest include launch vehicle safety monitoring emission monitoring and fire detection. This paper discusses the needs of aeronautic and space applications and the point-contact sensor technology being developed to address these needs. The development of these sensor is based on progress two types of technology: 1) Micro-machining and micro-fabrication technology to fabricate miniaturized sensors. 2) The development of high temperature semiconductors, especially silicon carbide. Sensor development for each application involves its own challenges in the fields of materials science and fabrication technology. The number of dual-use commercial applications of this micro-fabricated gas sensor technology make this area of sensor development a field of significant interest.

  15. Chemical Gas Sensors for Aeronautic and Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Chen, Liang-Yu; Neudeck, Philip G.; Knight, Dak; Liu, Chung-Chiun; Wu, Quing-Hai; Zhou, Huan-Jun

    1997-01-01

    Aeronautic and space applications require the development of chemical sensors with capabilities beyond those of commercially available sensors. Two areas of particular interest are safety monitoring and emission monitoring. In safety monitoring, detection of low concentrations of hydrogen at potentially low temperatures is important while for emission monitoring the detection of nitrogen oxides, hydrogen, hydrocarbons and oxygen is of interest. This paper discusses the needs of aeronautic and space applications and the point-contact sensor technology being developed to address these needs. The development of these sensors is based on progress in two types of technology: (1) Micromachining and microfabrication technology to fabricate miniaturized sensors. (2) The development of high temperature semiconductors, especially silicon carbide. The detection of each type of gas involves its own challenges in the fields of materials science and fabrication technology. The number of dual-use commercial applications of this microfabricated gas sensor technology make this general area of sensor development a field of significant interest.

  16. Chemical Gas Sensors for Aeronautic and Space Applications 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Chen, Liong-Yu; Neudeck, Phil G.; Knight, Dale; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.; Zhou, H. J.; Makel, Darby; Liu, M.; Rauch, W. A.

    1998-01-01

    Aeronautic and space applications require the development of chemical sensors with capabilities beyond those of commercially available sensors. Areas of interest include launch vehicle safety monitoring, emission monitoring, and fire detection. This paper discusses the needs of aeronautic and space applications and the point-contact sensor technology being developed to address these needs. The development of these sensors is based on progress in two types of technology: 1) Micromachining and microfabrication technology to fabricate miniaturized sensors. 2) The development of high temperature semiconductors, especially silicon carbide. Sensor development for each application involves its own challenges in the fields of materials science and fabrication technology. The number of dual-use commercial applications of this microfabricated gas sensor technology make this area of sensor development a field of significant interest.

  17. Chemical Gas Sensors for Aeronautics and Space Applications III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, G. W.; Neudeck, P. G.; Chen, L. Y.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.; Sawayda, M. S.; Jin, Z.; Hammond, J.; Makel, D.; Liu, M.; Rauch, W. A.; Hall, G.

    1999-01-01

    Aeronautic and space applications require the development of chemical sensors with capabilities beyond those of commercially available sensors. Areas of interest include launch vehicle safety monitoring, emission monitoring, and fire detection. This paper discusses the needs of aeronautic and space applications and the point-contact sensor technology being developed to address these needs. The development of these sensors is based on progress in two types of technology: 1) Micromachining and microfabrication technology to fabricate miniaturized sensors. 2) The development of high temperature semiconductors, especially silicon carbide. Sensor development for each application involves its own challenges in the fields of materials science and fabrication technology. The number of dual-use commercial applications of this microfabricated gas sensor technology make this area of sensor development a field of significant interest.

  18. Survey of needs and capabilities for wind tunnel testing of dynamic stability of aircraft at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlik-Ruckemann, K. J.

    1973-01-01

    A survey was conducted relative to future requirements for dynamic stability information for such aerospace vehicles as the space shuttle and advanced high performance military aircraft. High-angle-of-attack and high-Reynolds number conditions were emphasized. A review was made of the wind-tunnel capabilities in North America for measuring dynamic stability derivatives, revealing an almost total lack of capabilities that could satisfy these requirements. Recommendations are made regarding equipment that should be constructed to remedy this situation. A description is given of some of the more advanced existing capabilities, which can be used to at least partly satisfy immediate demands.

  19. Using a Simple Binomial Model to Assess Improvement in Predictive Capability: Sequential Bayesian Inference, Hypothesis Testing, and Power Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sigeti, David E.; Pelak, Robert A.

    2012-09-11

    We present a Bayesian statistical methodology for identifying improvement in predictive simulations, including an analysis of the number of (presumably expensive) simulations that will need to be made in order to establish with a given level of confidence that an improvement has been observed. Our analysis assumes the ability to predict (or postdict) the same experiments with legacy and new simulation codes and uses a simple binomial model for the probability, {theta}, that, in an experiment chosen at random, the new code will provide a better prediction than the old. This model makes it possible to do statistical analysis with an absolute minimum of assumptions about the statistics of the quantities involved, at the price of discarding some potentially important information in the data. In particular, the analysis depends only on whether or not the new code predicts better than the old in any given experiment, and not on the magnitude of the improvement. We show how the posterior distribution for {theta} may be used, in a kind of Bayesian hypothesis testing, both to decide if an improvement has been observed and to quantify our confidence in that decision. We quantify the predictive probability that should be assigned, prior to taking any data, to the possibility of achieving a given level of confidence, as a function of sample size. We show how this predictive probability depends on the true value of {theta} and, in particular, how there will always be a region around {theta} = 1/2 where it is highly improbable that we will be able to identify an improvement in predictive capability, although the width of this region will shrink to zero as the sample size goes to infinity. We show how the posterior standard deviation may be used, as a kind of 'plan B metric' in the case that the analysis shows that {theta} is close to 1/2 and argue that such a plan B should generally be part of hypothesis testing. All the analysis presented in the paper is done with a general

  20. Technicians at General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., (GA-ASI) facility at Adelanto, Calif., ca

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Technicians at General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., (GA-ASI) facility at Adelanto, Calif., carefully thread control lines through a bulkhead during engine installation on NASA's Altair aircraft. General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., is developing the Altair version of its Predator B unmanned reconnaissance aircraft under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. NASA plans to use the Altair as a technology demonstrator to validate a variety of command and control technologies for UAVs, as well as demonstrate the capability to perform a variety of Earth science missions. The Altair is designed to carry an 700-lb. payload of scientific instruments and imaging equipment for as long as 32 hours at up to 52,000 feet altitude. Eleven-foot extensions have been added to each wing, giving the Altair an overall wingspan of 86 feet with an aspect ratio of 23. It is powered by a 700-hp. rear-mounted TPE-331-10 turboprop engine, driving a three-blade propeller. Altair is scheduled to begin flight tests in the fourth quarter of 2002, and be acquired by NASA following successful completion of basic airworthiness tests in early 2003 for evaluation of over-the-horizon control, detect, see and avoid and other technologies required to allow UAVs to operate safely with other aircraft in the national airspace.

  1. Technicians at General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., (GA-ASI) facility at Adelanto, Calif., ca

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Technicians at General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., (GA-ASI) facility at Adelanto, Calif., carefully install a turboprop engine to the rear fuselage of NASA's Altair aircraft during final assembly operations. General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., is developing the Altair version of its Predator B unmanned reconnaissance aircraft under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. NASA plans to use the Altair as a technology demonstrator to validate a variety of command and control technologies for UAVs, as well as demonstrate the capability to perform a variety of Earth science missions. The Altair is designed to carry an 700-lb. payload of scientific instruments and imaging equipment for as long as 32 hours at up to 52,000 feet altitude. Eleven-foot extensions have been added to each wing, giving the Altair an overall wingspan of 86 feet with an aspect ratio of 23. It is powered by a 700-hp. rear-mounted TPE-331-10 turboprop engine, driving a three-blade propeller. Altair is scheduled to begin flight tests in the fourth quarter of 2002, and be acquired by NASA following successful completion of basic airworthiness tests in early 2003 for evaluation of over-the-horizon control, detect, see and avoid and other technologies required to allow UAVs to operate safely with other aircraft in the national airspace.

  2. Center for Aeronautics and Space Information Sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes the research done during 1991/92 under the Center for Aeronautics and Space Information Science (CASIS) program. The topics covered are computer architecture, networking, and neural nets.

  3. Astronautics and aeronautics, 1977: A chronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritchie, E. H.

    1986-01-01

    This publication is a chronology of events during the year 1977 in the fields of aeronautical and space research, development, activity, and policy. It includes appendixes, an index, and illustrations. Chronological entries list sources for further inquiry.

  4. NASA Aeronautics: A New Strategic Vision

    NASA Video Gallery

    The aviation landscape is shifting. Emerging global trends are creating challenges that are changing the face of aviation for the next 20-40 years. How is NASA Aeronautics responding? With a new st...

  5. NASA Aeronautics Showcased at Balloon Fiesta

    NASA Video Gallery

    Visitors at the 2010 International Balloon Fiesta in Albuquerque, N.M., got visual stimulation from hundreds of colorful hot-air balloons soaring skyward, but also learned about NASA's aeronautics ...

  6. Aeronautical Wind Tunnels, Europe and Asia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    AERONAUTICAL WIND TUNNELS EUROPE AND ASIA Researchers: Katarina David Jenele Gorham Sarah Kim Patrick Miller... Wind Tunnels Europe and Asia 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f...18 Library of Congress – Federal Research Division Aeronautical Wind Tunnels Europe and Asia PREFACE 1 This catalog is a compilation of data on

  7. The Concorde and aeronautical research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salmon, M.

    1983-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental work carried out in various research centers, and particularly at ONERA, which led to the conception and to the main technical solutions included in the design of Concorde: plane form, twist and camber of the wing, lift augmentation by upper surface vortices, kinetic heating, air intakes and jet exhausts, materials, aeroelasticity. The development of research, and the numerous tests carried out for the benefit of the designers since the beginning of the project, are also outlined.

  8. Comparison of VDL Modes in the Aeronautical Telecommunications Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bretmersky, Steven; Konangi, Vijay K.; Kerczewski, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    VHF Digital Link (VDL) has been identified as a method of communication between aircraft and ground stations in the Aeronautical Telecommunications Network (ATN). Three different modes of VDL have been suggested for implementation. Simulations were conducted to compare the data transfer capabilities of VDL Modes 2, 3, and 4. These simulations focus on up to 50 aircraft communicating with a single VDL ground station. The data traffic is generated by the standard File Transfer Protocol (FTP) and Hyper Text Transfer Protocol (HTTP) applications in the aircraft. Comparisons of the modes are based on the number of files and pages transferred and the response time.

  9. The NASA Dryden Flight Research Center Unmanned Aircraft System Service Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Over 60 years of Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) expertise at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Dryden Flight Research Center are being leveraged to provide capability and expertise to the international UAS community. The DFRC brings together technical experts, UAS, and an operational environment to provide government and industry a broad capability to conduct research, perform operations, and mature systems, sensors, and regulation. The cornerstone of this effort is the acquisition of both a Global Hawk (Northrop Grumman Corporation, Los Angeles, California) and Predator B (General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., San Diego, California) unmanned aircraft system (UAS). In addition, a test range for small UAS will allow developers to conduct research and development flights without the need to obtain approval from civil authorities. Finally, experts are available to government and industry to provide safety assessments in support of operations in civil airspace. These services will allow developers to utilize limited resources to their maximum capability in a highly competitive environment.

  10. Civilian Aeronautical Futures - The Responsibly Imaginable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, Dennis M.

    2006-01-01

    Since 1940 Aeronautics has had an immense impact upon Global Human lifestyles and affairs - in both the Civilian and Military arenas. During this period Long distance Train and Ship passenger transport were largely supplanted by Air Travel and Aviation assumed a dominant role in warfare. The early 1940 s to the mid 1970 s was a particularly productive period in terms of Aeronautical Technology. What is interesting is that, since the mid 1970 s, the rate of Aeronautical Technological Progress has been far slower, the basic technology in nearly all of our current Aero Systems dates from the mid 70 s or earlier. This is especially true in terms of Configuration Aerodynamics, Aeronautics appears to have "settled" on the 707, double delta and rotary wing as the approach of choice for Subsonic long haul, supersonic cruise and VTOL respectively. Obviously there have been variants and some niche digression from this/these but in the main Aeronautics, particularly civilian Aeronautics, has become a self-professed "mature", Increasingly "Commodity", Industry. The Industry is far along an existing/deployed technology curve and focused, now for decades, on incremental/evolutionary change - largely Appliers vs. developers of technology. This is, of course, in sharp contrast to the situation in the early-to-later 20th century where Aeronautics was viewed as A Major Technological Engine, much the way IT/Bio/Nano/Energetics/Quantum Technologies are viewed today. A search for Visionary Aeronautical "Futures" papers/projections indicates a decided dearth thereof over the last 20 plus years compared to the previous quarter Century. Aeronautics is part of Aerospace and Aerospace [including Aeronautics] has seen major cutbacks over the last decades. Some numbers for the U.S. Aerospace Industry serve as examples. Order of 600,000 jobs lost, with some 180,000 more on the block over the next 10 years. Approximately 25% of the Aerospace workforce is eligible to retire and the average

  11. Update: Partnership for the Revitalization of National Wind Tunnel Force Measurement Technology Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhew, Ray D.

    2010-01-01

    NASA's Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) chartered a team to examine the issues and risks associated with the lack of funding and focus on force measurement over the past several years, focusing specifically on strain-gage balances. NASA partnered with the U.S. Air Force's Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) to exploit their combined capabilities and take a national level government view of the problem and established the National Force Measurement Technology Capability (NFMTC) project. This paper provides an update on the team's status for revitalizing the government's balance capability with respect to designing, fabricating, calibrating, and using the these critical measurement devices.

  12. Assessment of Impact Detection Techniques for Aeronautical Application: ANN vs. LSSVM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, N.; Sharif Khodaei, Z.

    2016-10-01

    The impact localization in composite panels is assessed using two machine learning techniques: least square support vector machines (LSSVM) and artificial neural networks (ANN) with local strain signals from piezoelectric sensors. Sensor signals from impact experiments on a composite plate as well as signals simulated by a finite element model are used to train and test models. A comparative study shows that LSSVM achieves better accuracy than ANN on identifying location of impacts for a combination of large mass impact and small mass impact, in particular when less data is available for training which is more appropriate for real aeronautical application. Additionally, LSSVM is more capable of identifying new impact events which have not been considered in the training process.

  13. A Description of the Development, Capabilities, and Operational Status of the Test SLATE Data Acquisition System at the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, Christopher J.; Wright, James D.; Simmons, Scott A.; Bobbitt, Lynn E.; DeMoss, Joshua A.

    2015-01-01

    The paper will present a brief background of the previous data acquisition system at the National Transonic Facility (NTF) and the reasoning and goals behind the upgrade to the current Test SLATE (Test Software Laboratory and Automated Testing Environments) data acquisition system. The components, performance characteristics, and layout of the Test SLATE system within the NTF control room will be discussed. The development, testing, and integration of Test SLATE within NTF operations will be detailed. The operational capabilities of the system will be outlined including: test setup, instrumentation calibration, automatic test sequencer setup, data recording, communication between data and facility control systems, real time display monitoring, and data reduction. The current operational status of the Test SLATE system and its performance during recent NTF testing will be highlighted including high-speed, frame-by-frame data acquisition with conditional sampling post-processing applied. The paper concludes with current development work on the system including the capability for real-time conditional sampling during data acquisition and further efficiency enhancements to the wind tunnel testing process.

  14. Quarterly Bulletin of the Division of Mechanical Engineering and the National Aeronautical Establishment, Ottawa, 1 July to 30 September 1978.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    FOREIGN TECHNOLOGY, DATA PROCESSING, YAW, REAL TIME, SHOCK WAVES, CANADA, AERONAUTICS, MODEL TESTS, MECHANICAL ENGINEERING , GAS DISCHARGES, NAVAL ARCHITECTURE, HYDRODYNAMICS, SHOCK TUBES, LASER TRACKING, RAILROAD CARS.

  15. Quarterly Bulletin of the Division of Mechanical Engineering and the National Aeronautical Establishment, Ottawa, 1 April to 30 June, 1976.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN, PSYCHOMOTOR FUNCTION, CANADA, TEST METHODS, MODULES(ELECTRONICS), PATTERNS, MECHANICAL ENGINEERING , SYSTEMS ANALYSIS, HANDBOOKS, AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING, SLEEP, FATIGUE(PHYSIOLOGY).

  16. 75 FR 54221 - Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-03

    ... Administration (FAA) Aeronautical Charting Forum (ACF) to discuss informational content and design of aeronautical charts and related products, as well as instrument flight procedures development policy and design... Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice...

  17. Using short vignettes to disentangle perceived capability from motivation: a test using walking and resistance training behaviors.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Ryan E; Williams, David M; Mistry, Chetan D

    2016-07-01

    Self-efficacy is arguably the strongest correlate of physical activity, yet some researchers suggest this is because the construct confounds ability with motivation. We examine a more circumscribed construct, called perceived capability (PC), meant to measure ability but not motivation and propose that the construct will not be related to unskilled physical activities but may be linked to skilled behaviors. The purpose of this paper was to examine whether a PC construct can be stripped of motivation using a vignette approach in both walking and resistance training behaviors. Participants were a random sample of 248 university students, who were then randomly assigned to either answer resistance training or walking behavior questions. Both groups completed a PC measure and reasons for their answer before and after reading a vignette that clarified the phrasing of capability to a literal use of the term. PC was significantly (p < .01) higher post- compared to pre-vignette and the differences were greater (p < .01) for walking than for resistance training. PC had significantly (p < .01) smaller correlations with intention and self-reported behavior post-disambiguation, which resulted in a null relationship with walking but a small correlation with resistance training behavior. When PC was combined with intention to predict behavior, however, there was no significant (p > .05) difference in the amount of variance explained pre- to post-vignette. Thought listing showed that participants did not report capability barriers to walking and over half of the sample construed capability as motivation/other priorities pre-vignette. The findings support use of a vignette approach for researchers who wish to disentangle the assessment of PC from motivation while creating no overall loss in explained variance of physical activity.

  18. Aeronautics and space report of the President: 1981 activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Achievements in the aeronautics and space program by function are summarized. Activities in communications, Earth's resources and environment, space science, space transportation, international activities, and aeronautics are included.

  19. Capability Disillusionment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    Defense AT&L: July–August 2011 22 Capability Disillusionment Cochrane is an operations research analyst and has worked for the past 6 years at the... Disillusionment 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7...unsup- ported by either academic investigation or practical utility. The definition of “capability” in the literature suggests that capabilities are

  20. Emerging Options and Opportunities in Civilian Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, Dennis M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses the major problems/issues with civilian aeronautics going forward, the contextual ongoing technology revolutions, the several emerging civilian aeronautical "Big Ideas" and associated enabling technological approaches. The ongoing IT Revolution is increasingly providing, as 5 senses virtual presence/reality becomes available, along with Nano/Molecular Manufacturing, virtual alternatives to Physical transportation for both people and goods. Paper examines the potential options available to aeronautics to maintain and perhaps grow "market share" in the context of this evolving competition. Many of these concepts are not new, but the emerging technology landscape is enhancing their viability and marketability. The concepts vary from the "interesting" to the truly revolutionary and all require considerable research. Paper considers the speed range from personal/general aviation to supersonic transports and technologies from energetics to fabrication.

  1. The Application of a Trade Study Methodology to Determine Which Capabilities to Implement in a Test Facility Data Acquisition System Upgrade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDougal, Kristopher J.

    2008-01-01

    More and more test programs are requiring high frequency measurements. Marshall Space Flight Center s Cold Flow Test Facility has an interest in acquiring such data. The acquisition of this data requires special hardware and capabilities. This document provides a structured trade study approach for determining which additional capabilities of a VXI-based data acquisition system should be utilized to meet the test facility objectives. The paper is focused on the trade study approach detailing and demonstrating the methodology. A case is presented in which a trade study was initially performed to provide a recommendation for the data system capabilities. Implementation details of the recommended alternative are briefly provided as well as the system s performance during a subsequent test program. The paper then addresses revisiting the trade study with modified alternatives and attributes to address issues that arose during the subsequent test program. Although the model does not identify a single best alternative for all sensitivities, the trade study process does provide a much better understanding. This better understanding makes it possible to confidently recommend Alternative 3 as the preferred alternative.

  2. Inmarsat aeronautical mobile satellite system: Internetworking issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sengupta, Jay R.

    1990-01-01

    The Inmarsat Aeronautical Mobile Satellite System (AMSS) provides air-ground and air-air communications services to aero-mobile users on a global basis. Communicating parties may be connected either directly, or more commonly, via interconnecting networks to the Inmarsat AMSS, in order to construct end-to-end communications circuits. The aircraft earth station (AES) and the aeronautical ground earth station (GES) are the points of interconnection of the Inmarsat AMSS to users, as well as to interconnecting networks. This paper reviews the internetworking aspects of the Inmarsat AMSS, by introducing the Inmarsat AMSS network architecture and services concepts and then discussing the internetwork address/numbering and routing techniques.

  3. Faecal hydrogen production in vitro as an indicator for in vivo hydrogen producing capability in the breath hydrogen test.

    PubMed

    Robb, T A; Goodwin, D A; Davidson, G P

    1985-11-01

    In the assessment of carbohydrate malabsorption, it is important to determine if a flat breath hydrogen test is a false negative result. Currently, the only reliable way to do this is with a lactulose test. We determined the reliability of assessing faecal hydrogen production as an indicator of an adequate in vivo hydrogen producing colonic bacterial flora. Unfortunately, the results clearly show that the incidence of falsely positive and negative faecal hydrogen production, when compared with in vivo lactulose testing, is so high that the simple faeces screening test is unsuitable for routine use. Until a simpler alternative is found, centres using the breath hydrogen test to determine carbohydrate malabsorption must continue to rely on lactulose breath testing when it is necessary to exclude potential false negative results.

  4. Implementation of aeronautic image compression technology on DSP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yujing; Gao, Xueqiang; Wang, Mei

    2007-11-01

    According to the designed characteristics and demands of aeronautic image compression system, lifting scheme wavelet and SPIHT algorithm was selected as the key part of software implementation, which was introduced with details. In order to improve execution efficiency, border processing was simplified reasonably and SPIHT (Set Partitioning in Hierarchical Trees) algorithm was also modified partly. The results showed that the selected scheme has a 0.4dB improvement in PSNR(peak-peak-ratio) compared with classical Shaprio's scheme. To improve the operating speed, the hardware system was then designed based on DSP and many optimization measures were then applied successfully. Practical test showed that the system can meet the real-time demand with good quality of reconstruct image, which has been used in an aeronautic image compression system practically.

  5. The Effects of Safety Information on Aeronautical Decision Making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jang R.; Fanjoy, Richard O.; Dillman, Brian G.

    2005-01-01

    The importance of aeronautical decision making (ADM) has been considered one of the most critical issues of flight education for future professional pilots. Researchers have suggested that a safety information system based on information from incidents and near misses is an important tool to improve the intelligence and readiness of pilots. This paper describes a study that examines the effect of safety information on aeronautical decision making for students in a collegiate flight program. Data was collected from study participants who were exposed to periodic information about local aircraft malfunctions. Participants were then evaluated using a flight simulator profile and a pen and pencil test of situational judgment. Findings suggest that regular access to the described safety information program significantly improves decision making of student pilots.

  6. Development of a large-scale, outdoor, ground-based test capability for evaluating the effect of rain on airfoil lift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bezos, Gaudy M.; Campbell, Bryan A.

    1993-01-01

    A large-scale, outdoor, ground-based test capability for acquiring aerodynamic data in a simulated rain environment was developed at the Langley Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility (ALDF) to assess the effect of heavy rain on airfoil performance. The ALDF test carriage was modified to transport a 10-ft-chord NACA 64210 wing section along a 3000-ft track at full-scale aircraft approach speeds. An overhead rain simulation system was constructed along a 525-ft section of the track with the capability of producing simulated rain fields of 2, 10, 30, and 40 in/hr. The facility modifications, the aerodynamic testing and rain simulation capability, the design and calibration of the rain simulation system, and the operational procedures developed to minimize the effect of wind on the simulated rain field and aerodynamic data are described in detail. The data acquisition and reduction processes are also presented along with sample force data illustrating the environmental effects on data accuracy and repeatability for the 'rain-off' test condition.

  7. Evaluating practical vs. theoretical inspection system capability with a new programmed defect test mask designed for 3X and 4X technology nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasser, Joshua; Pratt, Tim

    2008-10-01

    Programmed defect test masks serve the useful purpose of evaluating inspection system sensitivity and capability. It is widely recognized that when evaluating inspection system capability, it is important to understand the actual sensitivity of the inspection system in production; yet unfortunately we have observed that many test masks are a more accurate judge of theoretical sensitivity rather than real-world usable capability. Use of ineffective test masks leave the purchaser of inspection equipment open to the risks of over-estimating the capability of their inspection solution and overspecifying defect sensitivity to their customers. This can result in catastrophic yield loss for device makers. In this paper we examine some of the lithography-related technology advances which place an increasing burden on mask inspection complexity, such as MEEF, defect printability estimation, aggressive OPC, double patterning, and OPC jogs. We evaluate the key inspection system component contributors to successful mask inspection, including what can "go wrong" with these components. We designed and fabricated a test mask which both (a) more faithfully represents actual production use cases; and (b) stresses the key components of the inspection system. This mask's patterns represent 32nm, 36nm, and 45nm logic and memory technology including metal and poly like background patterns with programmed defects. This test mask takes into consideration requirements of advanced lithography, such as MEEF, defect printability, assist features, nearly-repetitive patterns, and data preparation. This mask uses patterns representative of 32nm, 36nm, and 45nm logic, flash, and DRAM technology. It is specifically designed to have metal and poly like background patterns with programmed defects. The mask is complex tritone and was designed for annular immersion lithography.

  8. Weapons Evaluation Test Laboratory at Pantex: Testing and data handling capabilities of Sandia National Laboratories at the Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, W.R.

    1993-08-01

    The Weapons Evaluation Test Laboratory (WETL), operated by Sandia Laboratories at the Pantex Plant in Amarillo, Texas, is engaged primarily in the testing of weapon systems in the stockpile or of newly produced weapon systems for the Sandia Surety Assessment Center. However, the WETL`s unique testing equipment and data-handling facilities are frequently used to serve other organizations. Service to other organizations includes performing special tests on weapon components, subassemblies, and systems for purposes such as basic development and specific problem investigation. The WETL staff also sends equipment to other laboratories for specific tests that cannot be performed at Pantex. For example, we modified and sent equipment to Brookhaven National Laboratory for testing with their Neutral Particle Beam. WETL supplied the engineering expertise to accomplish the needed modifications to the equipment and the technicians to help perform many special tests at Brookhaven. A variety of testing is possible within the WETL, including: Accelerometer, decelerometer, and G-switch g-level/closure testing; Neutron generator performance testing; weapon systems developmental tests; weapon system component testing; weapon system failure-mode-duplication tests; simultaneity measurements; environmental extreme testing; parachute deployment testing; permissive action link (PAL) testing and trajectory-sensing signal generator (TSSG) testing. WETL`s existing equipment configurations do not restrict the testing performed at the WETL. Equipment and facilities are adapted to specific requirements. The WETL`s facilities can often eliminate the need to build or acquire new test equipment, thereby saving time and expense.

  9. Astronautics and aeronautics, 1974: A chronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brun, N. L.

    1977-01-01

    The 14th volume in the NASA series of day-by-day records of aeronautical and space events has somewhat narrowed its scope and selectivity in its brief accounts from immediately available, open sources. This year the emphasis is even more directly focused on concrete air and space activities. The text continues to reflect some events in other agencies and countries.

  10. Experiment In Aeronautical-Mobile/Satellite Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedrey, Thomas C.; Lay, Norman E.; Dessouky, Khaled

    1992-01-01

    Report describes study of performance of digital mobile/satellite communication terminals of advanced design intended for use in ground stations and airplanes in aeronautical-mobile service. Study was collaboration of NASA, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Communications Satellite Corp. (COMSAT), and International Maritime Satellite System (INMARSAT).

  11. Developing a global aeronautical satellite system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dement, Donald K.

    1988-01-01

    Arinc, an airline industry-owned and operated company in the United States, has taken steps toward establishing a global aeronautical satellite communications system. Plans call for initiation of a thin-route data operation in 1989, upgrading to establish voice communications via shared spot-beam transponders carried on other satellites, and deploying a worldwide network using dedicated satellites by 1994.

  12. Aeronautical mobile satellite service: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigley, Jack

    Successful flight trials of Aeronautical Mobile Satellite Services (AMSS) were first carried out in the 1960's but it is only in the past few years that plans to implement such a system have achieved any degree of certainty. System architecture has been agreed upon by users, service providers, and manufacturers. Detailed avionic characteristics have been approved and the International Civil Aviation Organization is currently preparing AMSS standards which will ensure the safety and regularity of international air traffic. In this paper, a review is provided of the history of AMSS, especially of Canadian participation, and a description of the technical and operational features of the system are given. The system will use the 1545-1555 and 1646.5-1656.5 MHz bands for satellite to aircraft and aircraft to satellite communication. Different categories of communication including air traffic control, aeronautical operational control, aeronautical administrative communications, and aeronautical passenger communication, will be assigned different priorities. A set of radio frequency (RF) channels have been defined to accommodate all foreseen traffic types. Standards for the avionics required for large passenger planes have been developed by the Airlines Electronic Engineering Committee.

  13. The history of aeronautical medicine in Venezuela

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iriarte, D. R.

    1986-01-01

    The Aerial Medical Service of the Ministry of Transportation and Communications of Venezuela was created on June 1949, and later became the Department of Aeronautical Medicine. Its functions include the medical examinations of future pilots, navigators and flight engineers. The importance of good mental and physical health in all flight and ground personnel to ensure the safety of air travel is discussed.

  14. Astronautics and aeronautics, 1978: A chronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janson, Bette R.

    1986-01-01

    This is the 18th in a series of annual chronologies of significant events in the fields of astronautics and aeronautics. Events covered are international as well as national and political as well as scientific and technical. This series is a reference work for historians, NASA personnel, government agencies, congressional staffs, and the media.

  15. Astronautics and aeronautics, 1976. A chronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritchie, E. H.

    1984-01-01

    A chronology of events concerning astronautics and aeronautics for the year 1976 is presented. Some of the many and varied topics include the aerospace industry, planetary exploration, space transportation system, defense department programs, politics, and aerospace medicine. The entries are organized by the month and presented in a news release format.

  16. Astronautics and aeronautics, 1985: A chronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janson, Bette R.

    1988-01-01

    This book is part of a series of annual chronologies of significant events in the fields of astronautics and aeronautics. Events covered are international as well as national, in political as well as scientific and technical areas. This series is an important reference work used by historians, NASA personnel, government agencies, and congressional staffs, as well as the media.

  17. Exploring Aeronautics and Space Technology. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buck, Sue; And Others

    This curriculum guide contains six units of instruction for an introduction to the technology systems in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Designed to be used either as a stand-alone publication or to be infused into the instruction and activities of an existing technology education program, this publication describes the…

  18. Aeronautical engineering. A continuing bibliography with indexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    This bibliography lists 326 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in January 1982. Topics on aeronautical engineering and aerodynamics such as flight control systems, avionics, computer programs, computational fluid dynamics and composite structures are covered.

  19. Dr. Alexander H. Flax: Technologist of Aeronautics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    aeronautics. (82:19) The ability to apply theory made the difference in the spectacular aviation feats of this time--Lindbergh, Wiley Post, 6 Amelia ... Earhart and Howard Hughes. Of these, the Lindbergh flight was perceived by the popular imagination as the event of the century. The plane had one motor

  20. 14 CFR 61.105 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... intended use, data on takeoff and landing distances, weather reports and forecasts, and fuel requirements...) Recognition of critical weather situations from the ground and in flight, windshear avoidance, and the procurement and use of aeronautical weather reports and forecasts; (7) Safe and efficient operation...

  1. 14 CFR 61.105 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... intended use, data on takeoff and landing distances, weather reports and forecasts, and fuel requirements...) Recognition of critical weather situations from the ground and in flight, windshear avoidance, and the procurement and use of aeronautical weather reports and forecasts; (7) Safe and efficient operation...

  2. 14 CFR 61.105 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... intended use, data on takeoff and landing distances, weather reports and forecasts, and fuel requirements...) Recognition of critical weather situations from the ground and in flight, windshear avoidance, and the procurement and use of aeronautical weather reports and forecasts; (7) Safe and efficient operation...

  3. 14 CFR 61.97 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... takeoff and landing distances, weather reports and forecasts, and fuel requirements; and (ii) How to plan... using pilotage with the aid of a magnetic compass; (5) Recognition of critical weather situations from the ground and in flight, windshear avoidance, and the procurement and use of aeronautical...

  4. 14 CFR 61.97 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... takeoff and landing distances, weather reports and forecasts, and fuel requirements; and (ii) How to plan... using pilotage with the aid of a magnetic compass; (5) Recognition of critical weather situations from the ground and in flight, windshear avoidance, and the procurement and use of aeronautical...

  5. 14 CFR 61.97 - Aeronautical knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... takeoff and landing distances, weather reports and forecasts, and fuel requirements; and (ii) How to plan... using pilotage with the aid of a magnetic compass; (5) Recognition of critical weather situations from the ground and in flight, windshear avoidance, and the procurement and use of aeronautical...

  6. Bibliography of Aeronautics, 1920-1921

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockett, Paul

    1925-01-01

    This work covers the literatme published from January 1, 1920, to December 31, 1921, and continues the work of the Smithsonian Institution issued as Volume 55 of the Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections, which covered the material published prior to June 30, 1909, and the work of Lhe National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics as published in the Bibliography of Aeronautics for the years 1909 to 1916 and 1917 to 1919. As in the Smithsonian volume and in the Bibliography of Aeronautics for the years 1909 to 1916 and 1917 to 1919, citations of the publications of all nations have been included in the languages in which these publications originally appeared. The arrangement is in dictionary form with author and subject entry and one alphabetical arrangement. Detail in the matter of subject reference has been omitted on account of the cost of presentation, but an attempt has been made to give sufficient cross reference for research in special lines. The National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics will next present a bibliography for the year 1922.

  7. 14 CFR 77.29 - Evaluating aeronautical effect.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Evaluating aeronautical effect. 77.29 Section 77.29 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRSPACE SAFE, EFFICIENT USE, AND PRESERVATION OF THE NAVIGABLE AIRSPACE Aeronautical Studies...

  8. 14 CFR 77.29 - Evaluating aeronautical effect.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Evaluating aeronautical effect. 77.29 Section 77.29 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRSPACE SAFE, EFFICIENT USE, AND PRESERVATION OF THE NAVIGABLE AIRSPACE Aeronautical Studies...

  9. 14 CFR 77.29 - Evaluating aeronautical effect.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Evaluating aeronautical effect. 77.29 Section 77.29 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRSPACE SAFE, EFFICIENT USE, AND PRESERVATION OF THE NAVIGABLE AIRSPACE Aeronautical Studies...

  10. 78 FR 69885 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-21

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics... meeting of the Aeronautics Committee of the NASA Advisory Council. This Committee reports to the NAC. The... for the Aeronautics Committee, NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC 20546, (202) 358-0566, or...

  11. Capabilities of wind tunnels with two-adaptive walls to minimize boundary interference in 3-D model testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebstock, Rainer; Lee, Edwin E., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    An initial wind tunnel test was made to validate a new wall adaptation method for 3-D models in test sections with two adaptive walls. First part of the adaptation strategy is an on-line assessment of wall interference at the model position. The wall induced blockage was very small at all test conditions. Lift interference occurred at higher angles of attack with the walls set aerodynamically straight. The adaptation of the top and bottom tunnel walls is aimed at achieving a correctable flow condition. The blockage was virtually zero throughout the wing planform after the wall adjustment. The lift curve measured with the walls adapted agreed very well with interference free data for Mach 0.7, regardless of the vertical position of the wing in the test section. The 2-D wall adaptation can significantly improve the correctability of 3-D model data. Nevertheless, residual spanwise variations of wall interference are inevitable.

  12. Propulsion system tests on a full scale Centaur vehicle to investigate 3-burn mission capability of the D-lT configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groesbeck, W. A.; Baud, K. M.; Lacovic, R. F.; Tabata, W. K.; Szabo, S. V., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Propulsion system tests were conducted on a full scale Centaur vehicle to investigate system capability of the proposed D-lT configuration for a three-burn mission. This particular mission profile requires that the engines be capable of restarting and firing for a final maneuver after a 5-1/2-hour coast to synchronous orbit. The thermal conditioning requirements of the engine and propellant feed system components for engine start under these conditions were investigated. Performance data were also obtained on the D-lT type computer controlled propellant tank pressurization system. The test results demonstrated that the RL-10 engines on the Centaur vehicle could be started and run reliably after being thermally conditioned to predicted engine start conditions for a one, two and three burn mission. Investigation of the thermal margins also indicated that engine starts could be accomplished at the maximum predicted component temperature conditions with prestart durations less than planned for flight.

  13. Conversion of the Aeronautics Interactive Workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riveras, Nykkita L.

    2004-01-01

    This summer I am working in the Educational Programs Office. My task is to convert the Aeronautics Interactive Workstation from a Macintosh (Mac) platform to a Personal Computer (PC) platform. The Aeronautics Interactive Workstation is a workstation in the Aerospace Educational Laboratory (AEL), which is one of the three components of the Science, Engineering, Mathematics, and Aerospace Academy (SEMAA). The AEL is a state-of-the-art, electronically enhanced, computerized classroom that puts cutting-edge technology at the fingertips of participating students. It provides a unique learning experience regarding aerospace technology that features activities equipped with aerospace hardware and software that model real-world challenges. The Aeronautics Interactive Workstation, in particular, offers a variety of activities pertaining to the history of aeronautics. When the Aeronautics Interactive Workstation was first implemented into the AEL it was designed with Macromedia Director 4 for a Mac. Today it is being converted to Macromedia DirectorMX2004 for a PC. Macromedia Director is the proven multimedia tool for building rich content and applications for CDs, DVDs, kiosks, and the Internet. It handles the widest variety of media and offers powerful features for building rich content that delivers red results, integrating interactive audio, video, bitmaps, vectors, text, fonts, and more. Macromedia Director currently offers two programmingkripting languages: Lingo, which is Director's own programmingkripting language and JavaScript. In the workstation, Lingo is used in the programming/scripting since it was the only language in use when the workstation was created. Since the workstation was created with an older version of Macromedia Director it hosted significantly different programming/scripting protocols. In order to successfully accomplish my task, the final product required correction of Xtra and programming/scripting errors. I also had to convert the Mac platform

  14. Reliability program requirements for aeronautical and space system contractors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    General reliability program requirements for NASA contracts involving the design, development, fabrication, test, and/or use of aeronautical and space systems including critical ground support equipment are prescribed. The reliability program requirements require (1) thorough planning and effective management of the reliability effort; (2) definition of the major reliability tasks and their place as an integral part of the design and development process; (3) planning and evaluating the reliability of the system and its elements (including effects of software interfaces) through a program of analysis, review, and test; and (4) timely status indication by formal documentation and other reporting to facilitate control of the reliability program.

  15. Synopsis of aeronautic radiator investigations for years 1917 and 1918

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, H C; Kleinschmidt, R V

    1920-01-01

    Extensive series of experiments have been conducted at the Bureau of Standards to determine the properties of cooling radiator cores manufactured for airplanes and to develop improvements in design. The analysis of the problem on which this work was based, and consequently the experimental method employed, is different from that commonly used. Instead of attempting to test complete radiators, either full size or in model, uniform sections representing different types of core construction have been tested and an analysis of the results made with a view to determining independently the various factors which influence its performance. This report describes referenced method of analysis in predicting the performance of radiators designed for aeronautic use.

  16. SRM Internal Flow Tests and Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis. Volume 4; Cold Flow Analyses and CFD Analysis Capability Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    An evaluation of the effect of model inlet air temperature drift during a test run was performed to aid in the decision on the need for and/or the schedule for including heaters in the SRMAFTE. The Sverdrup acceptance test data was used to determine the drift in air temperature during runs over the entire range of delivered flow rates and pressures. The effect of this temperature drift on the model Reynolds number was also calculated. It was concluded from this study that a 2% change in absolute temperature during a test run could be adequately accounted for by the data analysis program. A handout package of these results was prepared and presented to ED35 management.

  17. Aeronautics and Aviation Science: Careers and Opportunities Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Texter, P. Cardie

    1998-01-01

    standards for quality of teaching, and an educational agenda that promotes high standards for all students, Aeronautics and Aviation Science: Careers and Opportunities had as its aim to deliver products to schools, both in and outside the project sites, which attempt to incorporate multi-disciplined approaches in the presentation of a curriculum which would be appropriate in any classroom, while also aiming to appeal to young women and minorities. The curriculum was developed to provide students with fundamentals of aeronautics and aviation science. The curriculum also encouraged involving students and teachers in research projects, and further information gathering via electronic bulletin boards and internet capabilities. Though not entirely prescriptive, the curriculum was designed to guide teachers through recommended activities to supplement MCET's live telecast video presentations. Classroom teachers were encouraged to invite local pilots, meteorologists, and others from the field of aviation and aeronautics, particularly women and minorities to visit schools and to field questions from the students.

  18. Lessons Learned from Applying Design Thinking in a NASA Rapid Design Study in Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGowan, Anna-Maria; Bakula, Casey; Castner, Raymond

    2017-01-01

    In late 2015, NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) funded an experiment in rapid design and rapid teaming to explore new approaches to solving challenging design problems in aeronautics in an effort to cultivate and foster innovation. This report summarizes several lessons learned from the rapid design portion of the study. This effort entailed learning and applying design thinking, a human-centered design approach, to complete the conceptual design for an open-ended design challenge within six months. The design challenge focused on creating a capability to advance experimental testing of autonomous aeronautics systems, an area of great interest to NASA, the US government as a whole, and an entire ecosystem of users and developers around the globe. A team of nine civil servant researchers from three of NASA's aeronautics field centers with backgrounds in several disciplines was assembled and rapidly trained in design thinking under the guidance of the innovation and design firm IDEO. The design thinking process, while used extensively outside the aerospace industry, is less common and even counter to many practices within the aerospace industry. In this report, several contrasts between common aerospace research and development practices and design thinking are discussed, drawing upon the lessons learned from the NASA rapid design study. The lessons discussed included working towards a design solution without a set of detailed design requirements, which may not be practical or even feasible for management to ascertain for complex, challenging problems. This approach allowed for the possibility of redesigning the original problem statement to better meet the needs of the users. Another lesson learned was to approach problems holistically from the perspective of the needs of individuals that may be affected by advances in topic area instead of purely from a technological feasibility viewpoint. The interdisciplinary nature of the design team also

  19. The NASA Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel: Historical Overview, Facility Description, Calibration, Flow Characteristics, and Test Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, Francis J.; Bangert, Linda S.; Asbury, Scott C.; Mills, Charles T. L.; Bare, E. Ann

    1995-01-01

    The Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel is a closed-circuit single-return atmospheric wind tunnel that has a slotted octagonal test section with continuous air exchange. The wind tunnel speed can be varied continuously over a Mach number range from 0.1 to 1.3. Test-section plenum suction is used for speeds above a Mach number of 1.05. Over a period of some 40 years, the wind tunnel has undergone many modifications. During the modifications completed in 1990, a new model support system that increased blockage, new fan blades, a catcher screen for the first set of turning vanes, and process controllers for tunnel speed, model attitude, and jet flow for powered models were installed. This report presents a complete description of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel and auxiliary equipment, the calibration procedures, and the results of the 1977 and the 1990 wind tunnel calibration with test section air removal. Comparisons with previous calibrations showed that the modifications made to the wind tunnel had little or no effect on the aerodynamic characteristics of the tunnel. Information required for planning experimental investigations and the use of test hardware and model support systems is also provided.

  20. Suicidal Desire and the Capability for Suicide: Tests of the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicidal Behavior among Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Orden, Kimberly A.; Witte, Tracy K.; Gordon, Kathryn H.; Bender, Theodore W.; Joiner, Thomas E., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    The interpersonal-psychological theory of suicidal behavior (T. E. Joiner, 2005) proposes that an individual will not die by suicide unless he or she has both the desire to die by suicide and the ability to do so. Three studies test the theory's hypotheses. In Study 1, the interaction of thwarted belongingness and perceived burdensomeness…

  1. Graphene-Based Filters and Supercapacitors for Space and Aeronautical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Carlos I.

    2015-01-01

    Overview of the capabilities of graphene for selective filters and for energy storage with a general description of the work being done at NASA Kennedy Space Center in collaboration with the University of California Los Angeles for space and aeronautical applications.

  2. The Development of a CO2 Test Capability in the NASA JSC ARCJet for Mars Reentry Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DelPapa, Steven V.; Suess, Leonard; Shafer, Brian

    2011-01-01

    The Atmospheric Reentry Materials and Structures Evaluation Facility (ARMSEF) located at NASA Johnson Space Center is used for simulating the extreme environment experienced upon reentry for the development and certification of thermal protection systems (TPS). The facility supports a large variety of programs and was heavily leveraged for the certification and operational support of the TPS for the Orbiter and, more recently, the development of the heat shield for CEV. This paper will provide more detail into the heritage of the facility. Unique attributes of the facility include a modular aerodynamically stabilized arc heater and independently controlled O2 and N2 for the test gases. When combining the O2 and N2 in a 23:77 mass ratio respectively the Earth s atmosphere is accurately simulated and via modification of this ratio the investigation of the effects of atomic oxygen on a material s response is possible. In the summer of 2010 a development effort was started to add CO2 as a third independently controlled test gas such that, when combined with N2, opens up the possibility of accurately simulating a Martian reentry environment. This paper will discuss the test facility, especially the arc heater, in more detail. Initial testing involved relatively low concentrations of CO2 combined with N2 for the primary purpose of gathering data to answer two pressing safety concerns. The first being the rate of production of carbon monoxide (CO) within the ejector vacuum system. The main concern was that CO can be flammable and possibly explosive at high enough concentrations and pressures. The hazard control during the development phase involved the use of injecting N2 inside the test chamber diffuser to dilute and reduce the concentration of any and all CO present. A residual gas analyzer (RGA) was used to determine the relative amount of CO in the exhaust gas and provide a conversion rate of CO2 to CO. This paper will discuss in more detail the results of the RGA

  3. Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes, Supplement 410. Supplement 410

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This supplemental issue of Aeronautical Engineering, A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes (NASA/SP-1999-7037) lists reports, articles, and other documents recently announced in the NASA STI Database. The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical vehicles. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied, in most cases, by an abstract.

  4. Analysis of the boreal forest-tundra ecotone: A test of AVIRIS capabilities in the Eastern Canadian subarctic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goward, Samuel N.; Petzold, Donald E.

    1989-01-01

    A comparison was conducted between ground reflectance spectra collected in Schefferville, Canada and imaging spectrometer observations acquired by the AVIRIS sensor in a flight of the ER-2 Aircraft over the same region. The high spectral contrasts present in the Canadian Subarctic appeared to provide an effective test of the operational readiness of the AVIRIS sensor. Previous studies show that in this location various land cover materials possess a wide variety of visible/near infrared reflectance properties. Thus, this landscape served as an excellent test for the sensing variabilities of the newly developed AVIRIS sensor. An underlying hypothesis was that the unique visible/near infrared spectral reflectance patterns of Subarctic lichens could be detected from high altitudes by this advanced imaging spectrometer. The relation between lichen occurrence and boreal forest-tundra ecotone dynamics was investigated.

  5. The 7 by 10 Foot Wind Tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Thomas A

    1933-01-01

    This report presents a description of the 7 by 10 foot wind tunnel and associated apparatus of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. Included also are calibration test results and characteristic test data of both static force tests and autorotation tests made in the tunnel.

  6. Aeronautics and Space Report of the President

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Nineteen eighty-eight marked the United States' return to space flight with two successful space shuttle launches in September and December, as well as six successful expendable rocket launches. Meanwhile, many other less spectacular but important contributions were made in aeronautics and space by the 14 participating government organizations. Each organization's aeronautics and/or space activities for the year are presented. The organizations involved include: (1) NASA; (2) Department of Defense; (3) Department of Commerce; (4) Department of Energy; (5) Department of the Interior; (6) Department of Agriculture; (7) Federal Communications Commission; (8) Department of Transportation; (9) Environmental Protection Agency; (10) National Science Foundation; (11) Smithsonian Institution; (12) Department of State; (13) Arms Control and Disarmament Agency; and (14) United States Information Agency.

  7. The history and importance of aeronautic dentistry.

    PubMed

    Rai, Balwant; Kaur, Jasdeep

    2011-06-01

    Current projected missions to Mars will require 18 to 24 months of exposure to microgravity conditions, which might have serious effects on human physiology, including that of the oral cavity. Very few studies have been published on the effect of microgravity on the oral cavity, although it has been reported that microgravity increases the prevalence of periodontitis, dental caries, bone loss and fracture in the jaw bone, pain and numbness in teeth and oral cavity tissue, salivary duct stones, and oral cancer. Aeronautic dentistry is a new field, so further study of the effects of microgravity are required. In this article, we review the role of aeronautic dentistry in space missions and offer our recommendations for the future growth of this field.

  8. World-wide aeronautical satellite communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Peter; Smith, Keith

    1988-01-01

    INMARSAT decided to expand the spectrum covered by its new generation of satellites, INMARSAT-2, to include 1 MHz (subsequently increased to 3 MHz) of the spectrum designed for aeronautical use. It began a design study that led to the specifications for the system that is now being implemented. Subsequently, INMARSAT awarded contracts for the design of avionics and high gain antennas to a number of manufactures, while several of the signatories that provide ground equipment for communicating with the INMARSAT satellites are modifying their earth stations to work with the avionic equipment. As a resullt of these activities, a world-wide aeronautical satellite system supporting both voice and data will become operational in 1989.

  9. Aeronautics and Space Report of the President

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The years 1989 to 1990 activities are reported including human space flight, unmanned expendable launch vehicles, space science and applications, space communications operations, space research and technology, and aeronautics research and technology. Contributions made by the 14 participating government organizations are outline. Each organization's aeronautics and/or space activities for the year are presented. The organizations involved include: (1) NASA; (2) Dept. of Defense; (3) Dept. of Commerce; (4) Dept. of Energy; (5) Dept. of the Interior; (6) Dept. of Agriculture; (7) Federal Communications Commission; (8) Dept. of Transportation; (9) Environmental Protection Agency; (10) National Science Foundation; (11) Smithsonian Institution; (12) Dept. of State; (13) Arms Control and Disarmament; and (14) United States Information Agency.

  10. Future Aeronautical Communication Infrastructure Technology Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Tricia; Jin, Jenny; Bergerm Jason; Henriksen, Steven

    2008-01-01

    This National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Contractor Report summarizes and documents the work performed to investigate technologies that could support long-term aeronautical mobile communications operating concepts for air traffic management (ATM) in the timeframe of 2020 and beyond, and includes the associated findings and recommendations made by ITT Corporation and NASA Glenn Research Center to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The work was completed as the final phase of a multiyear NASA contract in support of the Future Communication Study (FCS), a cooperative research and development program of the United States FAA, NASA, and EUROCONTROL. This final report focuses on an assessment of final five candidate technologies, and also provides an overview of the entire technology assessment process, including final recommendations.

  11. Technology Assessment for the Future Aeronautical Communications System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budinger, James M. (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    To address emerging saturation in the VHF aeronautical bands allocated internationally for air traffic management communications, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) has requested development of a common global solution through its Aeronautical Communications Panel (ACP). In response, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and Eurocontrol initiated a joint study, with the support of NASA and U.S. and European contractors, to provide major findings on alternatives and recommendations to the ICAO ACP Working Group C (WG-C). Under an FAA/Eurocontrol cooperative research and development agreement, ACP WG-C Action Plan 17 (AP-17), commonly referred to as the Future Communications Study (FCS), NASA Glenn Research Center is responsible for the investigation of potential communications technologies that support the long-term mobile communication operational concepts of the FCS. This report documents the results of the first phase of the technology assessment and recommendations referred to in the Technology Pre-Screening Task 3.1 of AP-17. The prescreening identifies potential technologies that are under development in the industry and provides an initial assessment against a harmonized set of evaluation criteria that address high level capabilities, projected maturity for the time frame for usage in aviation, and potential applicability to aviation. A wide variety of candidate technologies were evaluated from several communications service categories including: cellular telephony; IEEE-802.xx standards; public safety radio; satellite and over-the-horizon communications; custom narrowband VHF; custom wideband; and military communications.

  12. Development and Testing of a Device Capable of Placing Model Piles by Driving and Pushing in the Centrifuge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-01

    of the pile in the soil as long as the model capacity was measured at the appropriate test gravity level. Ryan ?83 ) and ’i ,’an I)85,-enz ion tne...modulus of the pile material and tip dimensions are known. Measurement of the tip pressure by a load cell dictates all seoarat on of :ne tip from the...iamer ,is .... cr ao :. :r the above reasons 3s .,el] as 4n -,-e determina ion f the oenetration of the oile after impact. Using ,the stecoer motor in its

  13. The development of a capability for aerodynamic testing of large-scale wing sections in a simulated natural rain environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bezos, Gaudy M.; Cambell, Bryan A.; Melson, W. Edward

    1989-01-01

    A research technique to obtain large-scale aerodynamic data in a simulated natural rain environment has been developed. A 10-ft chord NACA 64-210 wing section wing section equipped with leading-edge and trailing-edge high-lift devices was tested as part of a program to determine the effect of highly-concentrated, short-duration rainfall on airplane performance. Preliminary dry aerodynamic data are presented for the high-lift configuration at a velocity of 100 knots and an angle of attack of 18 deg. Also, data are presented on rainfield uniformity and rainfall concentration intensity levels obtained during the calibration of the rain simulation system.

  14. Long-duration exposure facility - A new capability for space testing and basic research. [satellite-borne experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dibattista, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    The reusable Long-Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), which can accommodate experiments requiring large exposure surface areas, large volumes and/or massive hardware, offers to researchers a new inexpensive opportunity to conduct extended technology and basic research testing in the space environment. Many researchers with interest varying from medical research to astrophysics research will have their experiments performed in the 80 large experiment trays on the first LDEF flight. This paper describes the LDEF and a number of experiments now being developed for the first mission. In particular, this paper illustrates the value of the LDEF features which allow the return of the experiment hardware and repeated flights.

  15. The K-8 Aeronautics Internet Textbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The following report is broken down into two components. First, a status report covering the period from August 15, 1998 to October 30, 1998. The remainder of the report summarizes all project accomplishments of the K-8 Aeronautics Internet Textbook over the period of June 19, 1995 through October 30, 1998. The report also discusses observations and lessons learned in the undertaking of the project.

  16. Molecular test to determine toxigenic capabilities in GDH-positive, toxin-negative samples: evaluation of the Portrait toxigenic C. difficile assay.

    PubMed

    Finch, L S; Duncan, C M

    2013-01-01

    New recommendations for testing and reporting of Clostridium difficile were introduced in the NHS in 2012. These guidelines have improved identification of potential C. difficile infection (CDI) cases, but questions remain around the management of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH)-positive, toxin-negative patients. This study aims to assess the introduction of the Portrait C. difficile assay as the third step to identify the presence of the toxigenic C. difficile B (tcdB) gene and thus determine toxigenic capability. Stool samples with a GDH-positive, toxin-negative result were tested using the Portrait analyser to detect the presence of tcdB. A retrospective evaluation was performed, assessing the clinical course of patients who were isolated as a result of the current algorithm using GDH enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and toxin EIA. Of the stool samples tested, 40% carried the tcdB gene. Four tcdB-positive stool samples initially toxin A/B-negative subsequently became positive. Thirteen patients were isolated, four of which did not have the tcdB gene. The total time to 'process' a positive CDI case was 102 hours and cost pounds 592. The additional time and cost of incorporating the Portrait toxigenic C. difficile assay was 105-115 minutes and pounds 46.48 to pounds 51.88. This study confirms that toxigenic capabilities in GDH-positive, toxin-negative specimens can facilitate effective treatment and infection prevention, and results show there is potential value in repeat toxin testing.

  17. Smart Aeronautical Chart Management System Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakdil, M. E.; Celik, R. N.; Kaya, Ö.; Konak, Y. C.; Guney, C.

    2015-10-01

    Civil aviation is developing rapidly, and the number of domestic and international operations is increasing exponentially every year than the previous one. Airline companies with increased air traffic and the number of passengers increase the demand of new aircrafts. An aircraft needs not only fuel but also pilot and aeronautical information (charts, digital navigation information, flight plan, and etc.) to perform flight operation. One of the most important components in aeronautical information is the terminal chart. Authorized institution in every state is responsible to publish their terminal charts for certain periods. Although these charts are produced in accordance with ICAO's Annex 4 and Annex 15, cartographic representation and page layout differs in each state's publication. This situation makes difficult to read them by pilots. In this paper, standard instrument departure (SID) charts are analysed to produce by use of cutting-edge and competitive technologies instead of classical computer-aided drawing and vector based graphic applications that are currently used by main chart producers. The goal is to design efficient and commercial chart management system that is able to produce aeronautical charts with same cartographic representation for all states.

  18. Development of a New Analog Test System Capable of Modeling Tectonic Deformation Incorporating the Effects of Pore Fluid Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Nakajima, H.; Takeda, M.; Aung, T. T.

    2005-12-01

    Understanding and predicting the tectonic deformation within geologic strata has been a very important research subject in many fields such as structural geology and petroleum geology. In recent years, such research has also become a fundamental necessity for the assessment of active fault migration, site selection for geological disposal of radioactive nuclear waste and exploration for methane hydrate. Although analog modeling techniques have played an important role in the elucidation of the tectonic deformation mechanisms, traditional approaches have typically used dry materials and ignored the effects of pore fluid pressure. In order for analog models to properly depict the tectonic deformation of the targeted, large-prototype system within a small laboratory-scale configuration, physical properties of the models, including geometry, force, and time, must be correctly scaled. Model materials representing brittle rock behavior require an internal friction identical to the prototype rock and virtually zero cohesion. Granular materials such as sand, glass beads, or steel beads of dry condition have been preferably used for this reason in addition to their availability and ease of handling. Modeling protocols for dry granular materials have been well established but such model tests cannot account for the pore fluid effects. Although the concept of effective stress has long been recognized and the role of pore-fluid pressure in tectonic deformation processes is evident, there have been few analog model studies that consider the effects of pore fluid movement. Some new applications require a thorough understanding of the coupled deformation and fluid flow processes within the strata. Taking the field of waste management as an example, deep geological disposal of radioactive waste has been thought to be an appropriate methodology for the safe isolation of the wastes from the human environment until the toxicity of the wastes decays to non-hazardous levels. For the

  19. Ontogenetic investigation of underwater hearing capabilities in loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) using a dual testing approach.

    PubMed

    Lavender, Ashley L; Bartol, Soraya M; Bartol, Ian K

    2014-07-15

    Sea turtles reside in different acoustic environments with each life history stage and may have different hearing capacity throughout ontogeny. For this study, two independent yet complementary techniques for hearing assessment, i.e. behavioral and electrophysiological audiometry, were employed to (1) measure hearing in post-hatchling and juvenile loggerhead sea turtles Caretta caretta (19-62 cm straight carapace length) to determine whether these migratory turtles exhibit an ontogenetic shift in underwater auditory detection and (2) evaluate whether hearing frequency range and threshold sensitivity are consistent in behavioral and electrophysiological tests. Behavioral trials first required training turtles to respond to known frequencies, a multi-stage, time-intensive process, and then recording their behavior when they were presented with sound stimuli from an underwater speaker using a two-response forced-choice paradigm. Electrophysiological experiments involved submerging restrained, fully conscious turtles just below the air-water interface and recording auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) when sound stimuli were presented using an underwater speaker. No significant differences in behavior-derived auditory thresholds or AEP-derived auditory thresholds were detected between post-hatchling and juvenile sea turtles. While hearing frequency range (50-1000/1100 Hz) and highest sensitivity (100-400 Hz) were consistent in audiograms pooled by size class for both behavior and AEP experiments, both post-hatchlings and juveniles had significantly higher AEP-derived than behavior-derived auditory thresholds, indicating that behavioral assessment is a more sensitive testing approach. The results from this study suggest that post-hatchling and juvenile loggerhead sea turtles are low-frequency specialists, exhibiting little differences in threshold sensitivity and frequency bandwidth despite residence in acoustically distinct environments throughout ontogeny.

  20. Review of CFD Capabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    growth in wind tunnel testing requirements – Increasingly sensitive/complex designs require more testing/analysis for success … – But, for fixed- wing ...been used to maintain an essentially constant number of wind tunnel test hours for the last 30 years. Also, while the number of different wing designs...not addressed directly • This study did not evaluate wind tunnel facilities or their capabilities – Comparisons between CFD and wind tunnel testing

  1. Portable device for use in starting air-start-units for aircraft and having cable lead testing capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosier, W. R.; Volk, G. G. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A portable device for starting aircraft engines and the like is disclosed. The device includes a lead testing and motor starting circuit characterized by: (1) a direct current voltage source, (2) a pair of terminal plugs connected with the circuit (each being characterized by a first, second, and third terminal) (3) a pair of manually operable switches for connecting the first terminal of each plug of the pair to the positive side of the voltage source, (4) a circuit lead connecting to the second terminal of each plug the negative side of said source, (5) a pair of electrical cables adapted to connect said first and second terminals of each plug to an air-start unit, and means for connecting each cable of the pair of cables between the first terminal of one plug and the third terminal of the other plug of the pair, and (6) a second pair of manually operable switches for selectivity connecting the third terminal of each plug of the pair to the negative side of the voltage source.

  2. Testing prediction capabilities of an 131I terrestrial transport model by using measurements collected at the Hanford nuclear facility.

    PubMed

    Apostoaei, A Iulian

    2005-05-01

    A model describing transport of 131I in the environment was developed by SENES Oak Ridge, Inc., for assessment of radiation doses and excess lifetime risk from 131I atmospheric releases from Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and from Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory in southeast Idaho. This paper describes the results of an exercise designed to test the reliability of this model and to identify the main sources of uncertainty in doses and risks estimated by this model. The testing of the model was based on materials published by the International Atomic Energy Agency BIOMASS program, specifically environmental data collected after the release into atmosphere of 63 curies of 131I during 2-5 September 1963, after an accident at the Hanford PUREX Chemical Separations Plant, in Hanford, Washington. Measurements of activity in air, vegetation, and milk were collected in nine counties around Hanford during the first couple of months after the accident. The activity of 131I in the thyroid glands of two children was measured 47 d after the accident. The model developed by SENES Oak Ridge, Inc., was used to estimate concentrations of 131I in environmental media, thyroid doses for the general population, and the activity of 131I in thyroid glands of the two children. Predicted concentrations of 131I in pasture grass and milk and thyroid doses were compared with similar estimates produced by other modelers. The SENES model was also used to estimate excess lifetime risk of thyroid cancer due to the September 1963 releases of 131I from Hanford. The SENES model was first calibrated and then applied to all locations of interest around Hanford without fitting the model parameters to a given location. Predictions showed that the SENES model reproduces satisfactorily the time-dependent and the time-integrated measured concentrations in vegetation and milk, and provides reliable estimates of 131I activity in thyroids of children. SENES model

  3. Effect of the 6-minute walk test on plantar loading and capability to produce ankle plantar flexion forces.

    PubMed

    Vie, Bruno; Griffon, Patricia; Bijoux, Audrey; Cadiere, Julie; Weber, Jean Paul; Jammes, Yves

    2016-09-01

    The six-minute walk test (6MWT) is used to evaluate the ambulatory capacity of patients suffering from respiratory disorders, obesity or neuromuscular diseases. Our primary aim was to evaluate the effects of the 6MWT on the postural sway and the ankle plantar flexion forces in healthy subjects. We measured the ankle plantar flexion forces and the plantar contact area before and after a 6MWT in normal weight and overweight subjects with no history of respiratory, cardiac, and neuromuscular disorders. A post-6MWT sensation of bodily fatigue was evaluated by Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI) and Pichot fatigue scales. A computerized pedobarographic platform was used to collect the mean plantar contact area, the changes of the center of pressure (CoP) surface and its medial and lateral deviations. In a limited number of subjects, the reproducibility of all the measurements was explored. In both groups, the 6MWT elicited a sensation of bodily fatigue. It also significantly reduced the ankle plantar flexion forces, and increased both the mean plantar contact area and the CoP surface, the changes being not apparent after 10min. The post-6MWT lateral CoP deviations were accentuated in normal weight subjects, while an increase in medial CoP deviations occurred in overweight ones. The 6MWT-induced changes in the plantar flexion force and pedobarographic variables were reproducible. Because this study clearly showed some post-6MWT alterations of the subjects' posture sway of our subjects, we questioned the possible mechanisms occurring that could explain the altered muscle force and the transient destabilization of posture after the 6MWT.

  4. Capabilities and Choices: Do They Make Sen'se for Understanding Objective and Subjective Well-Being? An Empirical Test of Sen's Capability Framework on German and British Panel Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muffels, Ruud; Headey, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    In Sen's Capability Approach (CA) well-being can be defined as the freedom of choice to achieve the things in life which one has reason to value most for his or her personal life. Capabilities are in Sen's vocabulary therefore the real freedoms people have or the opportunities available to them. In this paper we examine the impact of capabilities…

  5. Satellite Communications for Aeronautics Applications: Technology Development and Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Hoder, Douglas J.; Zakrajsek, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is performing research and development to improve the safety and increase the capacity of the National Airspace System (NAS). Improved communications, especially to and from the aircraft flight deck, has been identified as an essential enabling technology for future improvements to the air traffic management system and aviation safety. NASA's Glenn Research Center is engaged in research and development of satellite communications technologies for aeronautical applications. A mobile aero terminal has been developed for use with Ku band commercial communications satellites. This experimental terminal will be used in mobile ground and air-based tests and demonstrations during 2000-2004. This paper will describe the basic operational parameters of the Ku Band aero terminal, the communications architecture it is intended to demonstrate, and the key technology issues being addressed in the tests and demonstrations. The design of the Ku Band aero terminal and associated ground testbed, planned tests and demonstrations, and results to date will be presented.

  6. Overview of the NASA Subsonic Rotary Wing Aeronautics Research Program in Rotorcraft Crashworthiness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Fuchs, Yvonne T.; Kellas, Sotiris

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of rotorcraft crashworthiness research being conducted at NASA Langley Research Center under sponsorship of the Subsonic Rotary Wing (SRW) Aeronautics Program. The research is focused in two areas: development of an externally deployable energy attenuating concept and improved prediction of rotorcraft crashworthiness. The deployable energy absorber (DEA) is a composite honeycomb structure, with a unique flexible hinge design that allows the honeycomb to be packaged and remain flat until needed for deployment. The capabilities of the DEA have been demonstrated through component crush tests and vertical drop tests of a retrofitted fuselage section onto different surfaces or terrain. The research on improved prediction of rotorcraft crashworthiness is focused in several areas including simulating occupant responses and injury risk assessment, predicting multi-terrain impact, and utilizing probabilistic analysis methods. A final task is to perform a system-integrated simulation of a full-scale helicopter crash test onto a rigid surface. A brief description of each research task is provided along with a summary of recent accomplishments.

  7. Overview of the NASA Subsonic Rotary Wing Aeronautics Research Program in Rotorcraft Crashworthiness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Kellas, Sotiris; Fuchs, Yvonne T.

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of rotorcraft crashworthiness research being conducted at NASA Langley Research Center under sponsorship of the Subsonic Rotary Wing (SRW) Aeronautics Program. The research is focused in two areas: development of an externally deployable energy attenuating concept and improved prediction of rotorcraft crashworthiness. The deployable energy absorber (DEA) is a composite honeycomb structure, with a unique flexible hinge design that allows the honeycomb to be packaged and remain flat until needed for deployment. The capabilities of the DEA have been demonstrated through component crush tests and vertical drop tests of a retrofitted fuselage section onto different surfaces or terrain. The research on improved prediction of rotorcraft crashworthiness is focused in several areas including simulating occupant responses and injury risk assessment, predicting multi-terrain impact, and utilizing probabilistic analysis methods. A final task is to perform a system-integrated simulation of a full-scale helicopter crash test onto a rigid surface. A brief description of each research task is provided along with a summary of recent accomplishments.

  8. KSC Technical Capabilities Website

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nufer, Brian; Bursian, Henry; Brown, Laurette L.

    2010-01-01

    This document is the website pages that review the technical capabilities that the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has for partnership opportunities. The purpose of this information is to make prospective customers aware of the capabilities and provide an opportunity to form relationships with the experts at KSC. The technical capabilities fall into these areas: (1) Ground Operations and Processing Services, (2) Design and Analysis Solutions, (3) Command and Control Systems / Services, (4) Materials and Processes, (5) Research and Technology Development and (6) Laboratories, Shops and Test Facilities.

  9. 77 FR 38091 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-26

    ...: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Building 34, Room 120B, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Meeting. AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal...

  10. 77 FR 50759 - Government/Industry Aeronautical Charting Forum Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-22

    ...This notice announces the bi-annual meeting of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Aeronautical Charting Forum (ACF) to discuss informational content and design of aeronautical charts and related products, as well as instrument flight procedures development policy and design...

  11. Solar energy and the aeronautics industry. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benedek, L.

    1985-01-01

    An introduction to the physical aspects of solar energy, incidental energy and variations in solar flux is presented, along with an explanation of the physical principles of obtaining solar energy. The history of the application of solar energy to aeronautics, including the Gossamer Penguin and the Solar Challenger is given. Finally, an analysis of the possibilities of using a reaction motor with hybrid propulsion combining solar energy with traditional fuels as well as calculations of the proposed cycle and its mode of operation are given.

  12. Fundamentals of Aeronautical and Aerospace Medical Science,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-17

    184) -I & A0A1 8 F ORE IGN TIC.iOLOY DIV UUIAN?-PAT?1m5 APA ON i tFUND~AMENTALS OF AERONAUTICAL AND AEROSPACE MEDICAL SCtEC.j (UlIJUL lI MC 01*0. A...xysel, con- rSin.- more than 1/5 of the air, is essential for human metabolism. Since human beings have lived constantly under norma " air pressure...Temperature under different air flow rate, research subjects wearing norma ; indoor clothing: 1) dry bulb temperature, C; 9) air flow, m/sec; 3) wet

  13. Solar energy and the aeronautics industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedek, L.

    1985-11-01

    An introduction to the physical aspects of solar energy, incidental energy and variations in solar flux is presented, along with an explanation of the physical principles of obtaining solar energy. The history of the application of solar energy to aeronautics, including the Gossamer Penguin and the Solar Challenger is given. Finally, an analysis of the possibilities of using a reaction motor with hybrid propulsion combining solar energy with traditional fuels as well as calculations of the proposed cycle and its mode of operation are given.

  14. The K-8 Aeronautics Internet Textbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Efforts were focused on web site migration, from UC (University of California) Davis to the National Business Aviation Association's (NBAA) web site. K8AIT (K-8 Aeronautics Internet Textbook), which has remained an unadvertised web site, receives almost two million hits per month. Project continuation funding with the National Business Aviation Association is being pursued. A Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between NASA Ames LTP (Learning Technologies Project) and Cislunar has been drafted and approved by NASA's legal department. Additional web content on space flight and the Wright brothers has been added in English and Spanish.

  15. MSAT aeronautical mobile satellite communications terminal development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, C. A.; Sydor, J. T.

    1995-01-01

    CAL has undertaken the development of a new aeronautical mobile terminal for the North American MSAT market. The terminal is to meet the MSAT standard and is aimed in particular at the 300,000 general aviation and business aircraft in North America. The terminals are therefore relatively low cost and small in size when compared to those currently being produced for larger airline aircraft. The terminal incorporates a top mounted mechanical steered antenna and a unique antenna steering subsystem. An overview of the terminal design is presented.

  16. Graduate engineering research participation in aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, A. S., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The Aeronautics Graduate Research Program commenced in 1971, with the primary goal of engaging students who qualified for regular admission to the Graduate School of Engineering at Old Dominion University in a graduate engineering research and study program in collaboration with NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. The format and purposes of this program are discussed. Student selection and program statistics are summarized. Abstracts are presented in the folowing areas: aircraft design, aerodynamics, lift/drag characteristics; avionics; fluid mechanics; solid mechanics; instrumentation and measurement techniques; thermophysical properties experiments; large space structures; earth orbital dynamics; and environmental engineering.

  17. A History of Full-Scale Testing of Aircraft Structures at the National Aeronautical Establishment (L’Histoire de l’Evaluation en Laboratorie de Structures d’Aeronefs a l’Etablissement Aeronautique National)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    204, Montreal Road, Ottawa, Ontario KIA 0R6 ETABLISSEMENT AERONAUTIQUE NATIONAL PUPLICATIONS SCIENTIFIQUES ET TECHNIQUES RIAPPORTS D’AERONAUTIQUE...rubber base cement . A group of patches was. o,-led bv a sinale iack through a series of links and beams known as "whiffletrees". Structural steel...was the first full-scale test in the Structures Laboratory to use electrical resistance strain gauges. These gauges, which were manufactured in the

  18. Who should conduct aeronautical R and D for the Federal Government?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Album, H. H.

    1977-01-01

    It was found that Government laboratories, and especially NASA laboratories, should be the prime national producers of applied research in aeronautics. American aeronautic needs the new stimulus of markedly increased outputs of broad-based innovative research from NASA laboratories more than it needs most of the technology advancement and development-oriented programs currently underway in these laboratories. The Government should use manufacturing companies for the vast bulk of development and most technology advancement. However, the Government will have to implement programs to encourage the transfer of full information on technology and research advancements, from the companies that do this work for the Government, to competing companies. Universities should be the primary sources of basic research. Service R&D companies and non-profit R&D institutions provide valuable, specialized, supplementary technical capabilities and other unique attributes, which together span the entire spectrum of aeronautical R&D.

  19. Hypersonic ground test capabilities for T and E testing above mach 8 ''a case where S and T meets T and E''

    SciTech Connect

    Constantino, M; Miles, R; Brown, G; Laster, M; Nelson, G

    1999-10-05

    Simulation of hypersonic flight in ground test and evaluation (T and E) facilities is a challenging and formidable task, especially to fully duplicate the flight environment above approximately Mach 8 for most all hypersonic flight systems that have been developed, conceived, or envisioned. Basically, and for many years, the enabling technology to build such a ground test wind tunnel facility has been severely limited in the area of high-temperature, high-strength materials and thermal protection approaches. To circumvent the problems, various approaches have been used, including partial simulation and use of similarity laws and reduced test time. These approaches often are not satisfactory, i.e. operability and durability testing for air-breathing propulsion development and thermal protection development of many flight systems. Thus, there is a strong need for science and technology (S and T) community involvement in technology development to address these problems. This paper discusses a specific case where this need exists and where significant S and T involvement has made and continues to make significant contributions. The case discussed will be an Air Force research program currently underway to develop enabling technologies for a Mach 8-15 hypersonic true temperature wind tunnel with relatively long run time. The research is based on a concept proposed by princeton University using radiant or beamed energy into the supersonic nozzle flow.

  20. 14 CFR 61.159 - Aeronautical experience: Airplane category rating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Aeronautical experience: Airplane category... Transport Pilots § 61.159 Aeronautical experience: Airplane category rating. (a) Except as provided in... certificate with an airplane category and class rating must have at least 1,500 hours of total time as a...