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Sample records for aeronet aerosol robotic

  1. AERONET: The Aerosol Robotic Network

    DOE Data Explorer

    The AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) program is a federation of ground-based remote sensing aerosol networks established by NASA and LOA-PHOTONS (CNRS) and is greatly expanded by collaborators from national agencies, institutes, universities, individual scientists, and partners. The program provides a long-term, continuous and readily accessible public domain database of aerosol optical, mircrophysical and radiative properties for aerosol research and characterization, validation of satellite retrievals, and synergism with other databases. The network imposes standardization of instruments, calibration, processing and distribution. AERONET collaboration provides globally distributed observations of spectral aerosol optical Depth (AOD), inversion products, and precipitable water in diverse aerosol regimes. Aerosol optical depth data are computed for three data quality levels: Level 1.0 (unscreened), Level 1.5 (cloud-screened), and Level 2.0 (cloud screened and quality-assured). Inversions, precipitable water, and other AOD-dependent products are derived from these levels and may implement additional quality checks.[Copied from http://aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov/new_web/system_descriptions.html

  2. Black Carbon Concentration from Worldwide Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, Greg; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent; Clothiaux, Eugene

    2008-01-01

    Worldwide black carbon concentration measurements are needed to assess the efficacy of the carbon emissions inventory and transport model output. This requires long-term measurements in many regions, as model success in one region or season does not apply to all regions and seasons. AERONET is an automated network of more than 180 surface radiometers located throughout the world. The sky radiance measurements obtained by AERONET are inverted to provide column-averaged aerosol refractive indices and size distributions for the AERONET database, which we use to derive column-averaged black carbon concentrations and specific absorptions that are constrained by the measured radiation field. This provides a link between AERONET sky radiance measurements and the elemental carbon concentration of transport models without the need for an optics module in the transport model. Knowledge of both the black carbon concentration and aerosol absorption optical depth (i.e., input and output of the optics module) will enable improvements to the transport model optics module.

  3. Dominant Aerosol Particle Type/Mixture Identification at Worldwide Locations Using the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, D. M.; Holben, B.; Eck, T. F.; Sinyuk, A.; Smirnov, A.; Slutsker, I.; Dickerson, R. R.; Thompson, A. M.; Schafer, J. S.

    2011-12-01

    Aerosol absorption results in atmospheric heating for various forms of particulate matter - we address means of partitioning mineral dust, pollution (e.g., black and brown carbon), and mixtures of the two using remote sensing techniques. Remotely sensed spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA) derived from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun photometer measurements can be used to calculate the absorption aerosol optical depth (AAOD) at 440, 675, and 870 nm. The spectral change in AAOD with wavelength on logarithmic scales provides the absorption Angstrom exponent (AAE). Recently, a few studies have shown that the relationship between aerosol absorption (i.e., AAE or SSA) and aerosol size [i.e., Angstrom exponent (AE) or fine mode fraction (FMF) of the AOD] can estimate the dominant aerosol particle types/mixtures (i.e., dust, pollution, and dust and pollution mixtures) [Bergstrom et al., 2007; Russell et al., 2010; Lee et al. 2010; Giles et al., 2011]. To evaluate these methods, approximately 20 AERONET sites were grouped into various aerosol categories (i.e., dust, mixed, urban/industrial, and biomass burning) based on aerosol types/mixtures identified in previous studies. For data collected between 1999 and 2010, the long-term data set was analyzed to determine the magnitude of spectral AAOD, perform a sensitivity study on AAE by varying the spectral AOD and SSA, and identify dominant aerosol particle types/mixtures. An assessment of the spectral AAOD showed, on average, that the mixed (dust and pollution) category had the highest absorption (AAE ~1.5) followed by biomass burning (AAE~1.3), dust (AAE~1.7), and urban/industrial (AAE~1.2) categories with AAOD (440 nm) varying between 0.03 and 0.09 among these categories. Perturbing input parameters based on the expected uncertainties for AOD (±0.01) and SSA [±0.03; for cases where AOD(440 nm)>0.4], the sensitivity study showed the perturbed AAE mean varied from the unperturbed

  4. Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) Global Aerosol Optical Depth Validation Based on 2 Years of Coincident Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph A.; Gaitley, Barbara J.; Martonchik, John V.; Diner, David J.; Crean, Kathleen A.; Holben, Brent

    2005-01-01

    Performance of the Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) early postlaunch aerosol optical thickness (AOT) retrieval algorithm is assessed quantitatively over land and ocean by comparison with a 2-year measurement record of globally distributed AERONET Sun photometers. There are sufficient coincident observations to stratify the data set by season and expected aerosol type. In addition to reporting uncertainty envelopes, we identify trends and outliers, and investigate their likely causes, with the aim of refining algorithm performance. Overall, about 2/3 of the MISR-retrieved AOT values fall within [0.05 or 20% x AOT] of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). More than a third are within [0.03 or 10% x AOT]. Correlation coefficients are highest for maritime stations (approx.0.9), and lowest for dusty sites (more than approx.0.7). Retrieved spectral slopes closely match Sun photometer values for Biomass burning and continental aerosol types. Detailed comparisons suggest that adding to the algorithm climatology more absorbing spherical particles, more realistic dust analogs, and a richer selection of multimodal aerosol mixtures would reduce the remaining discrepancies for MISR retrievals over land; in addition, refining instrument low-light-level calibration could reduce or eliminate a small but systematic offset in maritime AOT values. On the basis of cases for which current particle models are representative, a second-generation MISR aerosol retrieval algorithm incorporating these improvements could provide AOT accuracy unprecedented for a spaceborne technique.

  5. Statistical characteristics of atmospheric aerosol as determined from AERONET measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jongmin; Kokhanovsky, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    Seasonal means and standard deviations of column-integrated aerosol optical properties (e.g. spectral aerosol optical thickness (AOT), single scattering albedo, phase function, Ångström exponent, volume particle size distribution, complex refractive index, absorbing aerosol optical thickness) from several Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites located in typical aerosol source and background regions are investigated (Holben et al., 1998). The AERONET program is an inclusive network of ground-based sun-photometers that measure atmospheric aerosol optical properties (http://aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov/). The results can be used for improving the accuracy of satellite-retrieved AOT, assessments of the global aerosol models, studies of atmospheric pollution and aerosol radiative forcing on climate. We have paid a special attention to several AERONET sites that are Mexico_City (Mexico), Alta_Floresta (Brazil), Avignon (France), Solar_Village (Saudi Arabia), and Midway_Island (Pacific) representative for industrial/urban, biomass burning, rural, desert dust and oceanic aerosols, respectively. We have found that the optical and microphysical aerosol properties are highly dependent on the local aerosol emission sources and seasonal meteorological conditions.

  6. Type of Aerosols Determination Over Malaysia by AERONET Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, H.; Tan, F.; Abdullah, K.; Holben, B. N.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosols are one of the most interesting studies by the researchers due to the complicated of their characteristic and are not yet well quantified. Besides that there still have huge uncertainties associated with changes in Earth's radiation budget. The previous study by other researchers shown a lot of difficulties and challenges in quantifying aerosol influences arise. As well as the heterogeneity from the aerosol loading and properties: spatial, temporal, size, and composition. In this study, we were investigated the aerosol characteristics over two regions with different environmental conditions and aerosol sources contributed. The study sites are Penang and Kuching, Malaysia where ground-based AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) sun-photometer was deployed. The types of the aerosols for both study sites were identified by analyzing aerosol optical depth, angstrom parameter and spectral de-convolution algorithm product from sun-photometer. The analysis was carried out associated with the in-situ meteorological data of relative humidity, visibility and air pollution index. The major aerosol type over Penang found in this study was hydrophobic aerosols. Whereas the hydrophilic type of the aerosols was highly distributed in Kuching. The major aerosol size distributions for both regions were identified in this study. The result also shows that the aerosol optical properties were affected by the types and characteristic of aerosols. Therefore, in this study we generated an algorithm to determine the aerosols in Malaysia by considered the environmental factors. From this study we found that the source of aerosols should always being consider in to retrieve the accurate information of aerosol for air quality study.

  7. MODIS and AERONET characterization of the global aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Remer, L. A.; Tanre, D.

    2002-05-01

    Recently produced daily MODIS aerosol data for the whole year of 2001 are used to show the concentration and dynamics of aerosol over ocean and large parts of the continents. The data were validated against the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measurements over land and ocean. Monthly averages and a movie based on the daily data are produced and used to demonstrate the spatial and temporal evolution of aerosol. The MODIS wide spectral range is used to distinguish fine smoke and pollution aerosol from coarse dust and salt. The movie produced from the MODIS data provides a new dimension to aerosol observations by showing the dynamics of the system. For example in February smoke and dust emitted from the Sahel and West Africa is shown to travel to the North-East Atlantic. In April heavy dust and pollution from East Asia is shown to travel to North America. In May-June pollution and dust play a dynamical dance in the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal. In Aug-September smoke from South Africa and South America is shown to pulsate in tandem and to periodically to be transported to the otherwise pristine Southern part of the Southern Hemisphere. To use the MODIS data for global assessment of aerosol forcing AERONET data are used to answer some key critical questions: - Are MODIS data collected at 10:30 am representative of the daily forcing? - What is the concentration and properties of background aerosol and that of anthropogenic aerosol These questions and more will be answered in the talk

  8. A New Web-based Tool for Aerosol Data Analysis: the AERONET Data Synergy Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Slutsker, I.; Welton, E. J.; Chin, M.; Schmaltz, J.; Kucsera, T.; Diehl, T.

    2006-12-01

    The Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) provides important aerosol microphysical and optical properties via an extensive distribution of continental sites and sparsely-distributed coastal and oceanic sites among the major oceans and inland seas. These data provide only spatial point measurements while supplemental data are needed for a complete aerosol analysis. Ancillary data sets (e.g., MODIS true color imagery and back trajectory analyses) are available by navigating to several web data sources. In an effort to streamline aerosol data discovery and analysis, a new web data tool called the "AERONET Data Synergy Tool" was launched from the AERONET web site. This tool provides access to ground-based (AERONET and MPLNET), satellite (MODIS, SeaWiFS, TOMS, and OMI) and model (GOCART and back trajectory analyses) databases via one web portal. The Data Synergy Tool user can access these data sources to obtain properties such as the optical depth, composition, absorption, size, spatial and vertical distribution, and source region of aerosols. AERONET Ascension Island and COVE platform site data will be presented to highlight the Data Synergy Tool capabilities in analyzing urban haze, smoke, and dust aerosol events over the ocean. Future development of the AERONET Data Synergy Tool will include the expansion of current data sets as well as the implementation of other Earth Science data sets pertinent to advancing aerosol research.

  9. AERONET data investigation of the aerosol mixtures over Iasi area, One-year time scale overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazacu, Mihai Marius; Timofte, Adrian; Unga, Florin; Albina, Bogdan; Gurlui, Silviu

    2015-03-01

    In order to analyze the troposphere dynamics under particular conditions in North-East region of Romania, various types of aerosols chemical compositions have been studied using complementary techniques. Thus, the seasonal trends of aerosols and its external influences have been studied using aerosol optical properties retrieved from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). Complementary studies were taken into account by using several meteorological factors, computational models and meteorological data. Moreover, this paper presents optical properties analysis of different types of aerosols and the seasonal variability of them in one year of measurements. The major categories of aerosol types are evidenced, such as urban/industrial aerosol, biomass burning and mineral dust.

  10. An AERONET-based aerosol classification using the Mahalanobis distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamill, Patrick; Giordano, Marco; Ward, Carolyne; Giles, David; Holben, Brent

    2016-09-01

    We present an aerosol classification based on AERONET aerosol data from 1993 to 2012. We used the AERONET Level 2.0 almucantar aerosol retrieval products to define several reference aerosol clusters which are characteristic of the following general aerosol types: Urban-Industrial, Biomass Burning, Mixed Aerosol, Dust, and Maritime. The classification of a particular aerosol observation as one of these aerosol types is determined by its five-dimensional Mahalanobis distance to each reference cluster. We have calculated the fractional aerosol type distribution at 190 AERONET sites, as well as the monthly variation in aerosol type at those locations. The results are presented on a global map and individually in the supplementary material. Our aerosol typing is based on recognizing that different geographic regions exhibit characteristic aerosol types. To generate reference clusters we only keep data points that lie within a Mahalanobis distance of 2 from the centroid. Our aerosol characterization is based on the AERONET retrieved quantities, therefore it does not include low optical depth values. The analysis is based on "point sources" (the AERONET sites) rather than globally distributed values. The classifications obtained will be useful in interpreting aerosol retrievals from satellite borne instruments.

  11. MODIS and AERONET Characterization of the Global Aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram; Reme, Lorraine; Tanre, Didier; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Recently produced daily MODIS aerosol data for the whole year of 2001 are used to show the concentration and dynamics of aerosol over ocean and large parts of the continents. The data were validated against the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measurements over land and ocean. Monthly averages and a movie based on the daily data are produced and used to demonstrate the spatial and temporal evolution of aerosol. The MODIS wide spectral range is used to distinguish fine smoke and pollution aerosol from coarse dust and salt. The movie produced from the MODIS data provides a new dimension to aerosol observations by showing the dynamics of the system. For example in February smoke and dust emitted from the Sahel and West Africa is shown to travel to the North-East Atlantic. In April heavy dust and pollution from East Asia is shown to travel to North America. In May-June pollution and dust play a dynamical dance in the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal. In Aug-September smoke from South Africa and South America is shown to pulsate in tandem and to periodically to be transported to the otherwise pristine Southern part of the Southern Hemisphere.

  12. Synergic use of TOMS and AERONET observations for characterization of aerosol absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, O.; Sinyuk, A.; Bhartia, P. K.; Dubovik, O.; Holben, B.

    2003-04-01

    The role of aerosol absorption on the radiative transfer balance of the earth-atmosphere system is one of the largest sources of uncertainty in the analysis of global climate change. Global measurements of aerosol single scattering albedo are, therefore, necessary to properly assess the radiative forcing effect of aerosols. Remote sensing of aerosol absorption is currently carried out using both ground (Aerosol Robotic Network) and space (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) based observations. The satellite technique uses measurements of backscattered near ultraviolet radiation. Carbonaceous aerosols, resulting from the combustion of biomass, are one of the most predominant absorbing aerosol types in the atmosphere. In this presentation, TOMS and AERONET retrievals of single scattering albedo of carbonaceous aerosols, are compared for different environmental conditions: agriculture related biomass burning in South America and Africa and peat fires in Eastern Europe. The AERONET and TOMS derived aerosol absorption information are in good quantitative agreement. The most absorbing smoke is detected over the African Savanna. Aerosol absorption over the Brazilian rain forest is less absorbing. Absorption by aerosol particles resulting from peat fires in Eastern Europe is weaker than the absorption measured in Africa and South America. This analysis shows that the near UV satellite method of aerosol absorption characterization has the sensitivity to distinguish different levels of aerosol absorption. The analysis of the combined AERONET-TOMS observations shows a high degree of synergy between satellite and ground based observations.

  13. Synergic use of TOMS and Aeronet Observations for Characterization of Aerosol Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, O.; Bhartia, P. K.; Dubovik, O.; Holben, B.; Siniuk, A.

    2003-01-01

    The role of aerosol absorption on the radiative transfer balance of the earth-atmosphere system is one of the largest sources of uncertainty in the analysis of global climate change. Global measurements of aerosol single scattering albedo are, therefore, necessary to properly assess the radiative forcing effect of aerosols. Remote sensing of aerosol absorption is currently carried out using both ground (Aerosol Robotic Network) and space (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) based observations. The satellite technique uses measurements of backscattered near ultraviolet radiation. Carbonaceous aerosols, resulting from the combustion of biomass, are one of the most predominant absorbing aerosol types in the atmosphere. In this presentation, TOMS and AERONET retrievals of single scattering albedo of carbonaceous aerosols, are compared for different environmental conditions: agriculture related biomass burning in South America and Africa and peat fires in Eastern Europe. The AERONET and TOMS derived aerosol absorption information are in good quantitative agreement. The most absorbing smoke is detected over the African Savanna. Aerosol absorption over the Brazilian rain forest is less absorbing. Absorption by aerosol particles resulting from peat fires in Eastern Europe is weaker than the absorption measured in Africa and South America. This analysis shows that the near UV satellite method of aerosol absorption characterization has the sensitivity to distinguish different levels of aerosol absorption. The analysis of the combined AERONET-TOMS observations shows a high degree of synergy between satellite and ground based observations.

  14. Maritime Aerosol Network (MAN) as a component of AERONET - first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A.

    2009-04-01

    The paper presents a concept and the current status of the Maritime Aerosol Network (MAN), which has been developed as a component of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). The proposed activity includes deployment of hand-held sunphotometers at sea and measurements from various ships of opportunity. Overall MAN will complement island-based AERONET measurements and will expand AERONET program to acquire additional data over the oceans. Scientific objectives of this kind of activity are primarily climate change studies (direct and indirect forcing); satellite retrievals validation; validation of global aerosol transport model simulations; and atmospheric correction in ocean color studies. MAN deploys Microtops hand-held sunphotometers and utilizes the calibration procedure and data processing (Version 2) traceable to AERONET. A web site (http://aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov/new_web/maritime_aerosol_network.html) dedicated to the MAN activity is described. A brief historical perspective is given to aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements over the oceans. Accomplished cruises included transects from Northern to Southern Atlantic, from Northern to Southern Pacific, from New Zealand to Japan, measurements in Southern Indian Ocean, in the Tropical Atlantic, along the western coast of South America, near the coast of Antarctica, in the Mediterranean, Arabian, Beafort, Bering, Barents, Greenland Seas and in the Bay of Bengal. First results are presented. MAN ship-based aerosol optical depth compare well to simultaneous island and near-coastal AERONET site AOD. We believe that the Maritime Aerosol Network will provide the scientific community with valuable information on aerosol optical properties over the oceans. Employing simple, standard and commercially available instrumentation, traceable calibration, a scientifically sound processing scheme and easily accessible web-based public data archive, the network has strong growth potential. Expanded spatial coverage will contribute

  15. AERONET - Aerosol Climatology From Megalopolis Aerosol Source Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holben, B. N.; Eck, T. F.; Dubovik, O.; Smirnov, A.; Slutsker, I.; Artaxo, P.; Leyva, A.; Lu, D.; Sano, I.; Singh, R. P.; Quel, E.; Tanre, D.; Zibordi, G.

    2002-05-01

    AERONET is a globally distributed network of ~170 identical sun and sky scanning spectral radiometers expanded by federation with collaborating investigators that contribute to the AERONET public domain data-base. We will detail the current distribution and plans for expanded collaboration. Recent products available through the project database are important for assessment of human health as well as climate forcing issues. We will illustrate a summary of aerosol optical properties measured in Indian, East Asian, North American, South American and European megalopolis source regions. We will present monthly mean fine and coarse particle aerosol optical depth, particle size distributions and single scattering albedos. Each region represents a population in excess of 10 million inhabitants within a 200 km radius of the observation site that dictate the anthropogenic aerosol sources contributing to significantly diverse aerosol properties as a function of economic development and seasonally dependent meteorological processes. The diversity of the measured optical properties of urban aerosols illustrates the need for long-term regional monitoring that contribute to comparative assessments for health and climate change investigations.

  16. The AERONET network: atmospheric aerosol research in Ukraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milinevsky, G. P.

    2013-12-01

    The AERONET network is one of the most developed ground-based networks for aerosol monitoring. Solar radiance extinction, aureole brightness and sky light polarization measurements are used by the AERONET inversion retrieval algorithm to derive a variety of aerosol particle properties and parameters that are important for estimations of aerosol influences on air quality and climate change. In 2008 the AERONET has been extended in Ukraine: in addition to Sevastopol site (operated since 2006) the sunphotometer CIMEL CE318-2 has been installed at Kyiv site. New generation of sunphotometer (CE318N) has been used widely since 2011 in various sites of Ukraine as mobile station together with portable sunphotometer Microtops II. This article presents a short description of the AERONET, its development in Ukraine and prospects for future atmospheric research.

  17. An Analysis of AERONET Aerosol Absorption Properties and Classifications Representative of Aerosol Source Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, David M.; Holben, Brent N.; Eck, Thomas F.; Sinyuk, Aliaksandr; Smirnov, Alexander; Slutsker, Ilya; Dickerson, R. R.; Thompson, A. M.; Schafer, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    Partitioning of mineral dust, pollution, smoke, and mixtures using remote sensing techniques can help improve accuracy of satellite retrievals and assessments of the aerosol radiative impact on climate. Spectral aerosol optical depth (tau) and single scattering albedo (omega (sub 0) ) from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measurements are used to form absorption [i.e., omega (sub 0) and absorption Angstrom exponent (alpha(sub abs))] and size [i.e., extinction Angstrom exponent (alpha(sub ext)) and fine mode fraction of tau] relationships to infer dominant aerosol types. Using the long-term AERONET data set (1999-2010), 19 sites are grouped by aerosol type based on known source regions to: (1) determine the average omega (sub 0) and alpha(sub abs) at each site (expanding upon previous work); (2) perform a sensitivity study on alpha(sub abs) by varying the spectral omega (sub 0); and (3) test the ability of each absorption and size relationship to distinguish aerosol types. The spectral omega (sub 0) averages indicate slightly more aerosol absorption (i.e., a 0.0 < delta omega (sub 0) <= 0.02 decrease) than in previous work and optical mixtures of pollution and smoke with dust show stronger absorption than dust alone. Frequency distributions of alpha(sub abs) show significant overlap among aerosol type categories and at least 10% of the alpha(sub abs) retrievals in each category are below 1.0. Perturbing the spectral omega (sub 0) by +/- 0.03 induces significant alpha(sub abs) changes from the unperturbed value by at least approx. +/- 0.6 for Dust, approx. +/-0.2 for Mixed, and approx. +/-0.1 for Urban/Industrial and Biomass Burning. The omega (sub 0)440nm and alpha(sub ext) 440-870nm relationship shows the best separation among aerosol type clusters, providing a simple technique for determining aerosol type from surface- and future space-based instrumentation.

  18. Aerosol characterization at the Saharan AERONET site Tamanrasset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guirado, C.; Cuevas, E.; Cachorro, V. E.; Toledano, C.; Alonso-Pérez, S.; Bustos, J. J.; Basart, S.; Romero, P. M.; Camino, C.; Mimouni, M.; Zeudmi, L.; Goloub, P.; Baldasano, J. M.; de Frutos, A. M.

    2014-11-01

    More than 2 years of columnar atmospheric aerosol measurements (2006-2009) at the Tamanrasset site (22.79° N, 5.53° E, 1377 m a.s.l.), in the heart of the Sahara, are analysed. Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) level 2.0 data were used. The KCICLO (K is the name of a constant and ciclo means cycle in Spanish) method was applied to a part of the level 1.5 data series to improve the quality of the results. The annual variability of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Ångström exponent (AE) has been found to be strongly linked to the convective boundary layer (CBL) thermodynamic features. The dry-cool season (autumn and winter) is characterized by a shallow CBL and very low mean turbidity (AOD ~ 0.09 at 440 nm, AE ~ 0.62). The wet-hot season (spring and summer) is dominated by high turbidity of coarse dust particles (AE ~ 0.28, AOD ~ 0.39 at 440 nm) and a deep CBL. The aerosol-type characterization shows desert mineral dust as the prevailing aerosol. Both pure Saharan dust and very clear sky conditions are observed depending on the season. However, several case studies indicate an anthropogenic fine mode contribution from the industrial areas in Libya and Algeria. The concentration weighted trajectory (CWT) source apportionment method was used to identify potential sources of air masses arriving at Tamanrasset at several heights for each season. Microphysical and optical properties and precipitable water vapour were also investigated.

  19. Evaluation of an assimilated aerosol climatology using AERONET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, W. D.; Rasch, P. J.; Conley, A.

    2002-05-01

    The estimates of multi-wavelength aerosol optical depth and optical properties from AERONET represent a valuable data set for evaluating aerosol models. We have analyzed the fidelity of a new aerosol climatology using the AERONET network. An aerosol climatology for 1995-2000 has been created using an aerosol assimilation model. The model produces global three-dimensional distributions of major aerosol species at six-hourly intervals (Collins et al, 2001; Rasch et al, 2001). The atmospheric state and dynamical fields are obtained from the NCEP meteorological reanalysis for 1979 to the present. The model is adjusted to reduce discrepancies relative to retrievals of aerosol optical depth from the AVHRR imagers on board NOAA polar-orbiting satellites. While these adjustments improve the realism of modeled optical depths over ocean regions (e.g., Collins et al, 2001), the satellite observations do not constrain the model over continental surfaces close to major aerosol source regions. We compare the predictions of the assimilation model to selected AERONET observations of aerosol optical depths and single-scattering albedos at multiple wavelengths. The results will be used to improve the treatment of aerosol sources and optical properties in subsequent versions of the climatology.

  20. An algorithm for retrieving fine and coarse aerosol microphysical properties from AERONET-type photopolarimetric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X.; Wang, J.; Zeng, J.; Spurr, R. J. D.; Liu, X.; Dubovik, O.; Li, Z.; Li, L.; Holben, B. N.; Mishchenko, M. I.

    2014-12-01

    A new retrieval algorithm has been developed to retrieve both fine and coarse modal aerosol properties from multi-spectral and multi-angular solar polarimetric radiation fields such as those measured by the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) but with additional channels of polarization observations (hereafter AEROENT-type measurements). Most AERONET sites lack the capability to measure light polarization, though a few measure polarization only at 870 nm. From both theory and real cases, we show that adding multi-spectral polarization data can allow a mode-resolved inversion of aerosol microphysical parameters. In brief, the retrieval algorithm incorporates AERONET-type measurements in conjunction with advanced vector radiative transfer model specifically designed for studying the inversion problems in aerosol remote sensing. It retrieves aerosol parameters associated to a bi-lognormal particle size distribution (PSD) including aerosol volume concentrations, effective radius and variance, and complex indices of aerosol refraction. Our algorithm differs from the current AERONET inversion algorithm in two major aspects. First, it retrieves effective radius and variance and total volume by assuming a bi-modal lognormal PSD, while AERONET one retrieves aerosol volumes of 22 size bins. Second, our algorithm retrieves spectral refractive indices for both fine and coarse modes. Mode-resolved refractive indices can improve the estimate of single scattering albedo (SSA) for each mode, which also benefits the evaluation for satellite products and chemistry transport models. While bi-lognormal PSD can well represent aerosol size spectrum in most cases, future research efforts will include implementation for tri-modal aerosol mixtures in situations of cloud-formation or volcanic aerosols. Applying the algorithm to a suite of real cases over Beijing_RADI site, we found that our retrievals are overall consistent with AERONET inversion products, but can offer mode

  1. Identifying Aerosol Type/Mixture from Aerosol Absorption Properties Using AERONET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Eck, T. F.; Sinyuk, A.; Dickerson, R. R.; Thompson, A. M.; Slutsker, I.; Li, Z.; Tripathi, S. N.; Singh, R. P.; Zibordi, G.

    2010-01-01

    Aerosols are generated in the atmosphere through anthropogenic and natural mechanisms. These sources have signatures in the aerosol optical and microphysical properties that can be used to identify the aerosol type/mixture. Spectral aerosol absorption information (absorption Angstrom exponent; AAE) used in conjunction with the particle size parameterization (extinction Angstrom exponent; EAE) can only identify the dominant absorbing aerosol type in the sample volume (e.g., black carbon vs. iron oxides in dust). This AAE/EAE relationship can be expanded to also identify non-absorbing aerosol types/mixtures by applying an absorption weighting. This new relationship provides improved aerosol type distinction when the magnitude of absorption is not equal (e.g, black carbon vs. sulfates). The Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data provide spectral aerosol optical depth and single scattering albedo - key parameters used to determine EAE and AAE. The proposed aerosol type/mixture relationship is demonstrated using the long-term data archive acquired at AERONET sites within various source regions. The preliminary analysis has found that dust, sulfate, organic carbon, and black carbon aerosol types/mixtures can be determined from this AAE/EAE relationship when applying the absorption weighting for each available wavelength (Le., 440, 675, 870nm). Large, non-spherical dust particles absorb in the shorter wavelengths and the application of 440nm wavelength absorption weighting produced the best particle type definition. Sulfate particles scatter light efficiently and organic carbon particles are small near the source and aggregate over time to form larger less absorbing particles. Both sulfates and organic carbon showed generally better definition using the 870nm wavelength absorption weighting. Black carbon generation results from varying combustion rates from a number of sources including industrial processes and biomass burning. Cases with primarily black carbon showed

  2. Factors for inconsistent aerosol single scattering albedo between SKYNET and AERONET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatri, P.; Takamura, T.; Nakajima, T.; Estellés, V.; Irie, H.; Kuze, H.; Campanelli, M.; Sinyuk, A.; Lee, S.-M.; Sohn, B. J.; Pandithurai, G.; Kim, S.-W.; Yoon, S. C.; Martinez-Lozano, J. A.; Hashimoto, M.; Devara, P. C. S.; Manago, N.

    2016-02-01

    SKYNET and Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) retrieved aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA) values of four sites, Chiba (Japan), Pune (India), Valencia (Spain), and Seoul (Korea), were compared to understand the factors behind often noted large SSA differences between them. SKYNET and AERONET algorithms are found to produce nearly same SSAs for similarity in input data, suggesting that SSA differences between them are primarily due to quality of input data due to different calibration and/or observation protocols as well as difference in quality assurance criteria. The most plausible reason for high SSAs in SKYNET is found to be underestimated calibration constant for sky radiance (ΔΩ). The disk scan method (scan area: 1° × 1° area of solar disk) of SKYNET is noted to produce stable wavelength-dependent ΔΩ values in comparison to those determined from the integrating sphere used by AERONET to calibrate sky radiance. Aerosol optical thickness (AOT) difference between them can be the next important factor for their SSA difference, if AOTs between them are not consistent. Inconsistent values of surface albedo while analyzing data of SKYNET and AERONET can also bring SSA difference between them, but the effect of surface albedo is secondary. The aerosol nonsphericity effect is found to be less important for SSA difference between these two networks.

  3. Analysis of the weekly cycle of aerosol optical depth using AERONET and MODIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Xiangao; Eck, Tom F.; Holben, Brent N.; Phillippe, Goloub; Chen, Hongbin

    2008-07-01

    Multi-year Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aerosol optical depth (AOD) data are used to study AOD weekly variations at the global scale. A clear weekly cycle of AOD is observed in the United States (U.S.) and Central Europe. AOD during the weekday is larger than that during the weekend in 36 out of 43 AERONET sites in the U.S. The average U.S. weekend effect (the percent difference in AOD during the weekday and the weekend) is 3.8%. A weekly periodicity with lower AODs on Sunday and Monday and higher AODs from Wednesday until Saturday is revealed over Central Europe and the average weekend effect there is 4.0%. The weekly cycle in urban sites is greater than that in rural sites. AOD during the weekday is also significantly larger than that during the weekend in urban AERONET sites in South America and South Korea. However, a reversed AOD weekly cycle is observed in the Middle East and India. AODs on Thursday and Friday, the "weekend" for Middle East cultures, are relatively lower than AODs on other days. There is no clear weekly variation of AOD over eastern China. The striking feature in this region is the occurrence of much higher AOD on Sunday and this phenomenon is independent of season. The analysis of MODIS aerosol data is in good agreement with that of AERONET data.

  4. Aerosol Optical Properties in Southeast Asia From AERONET Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Boonjawat, J.; Le, H. V.; Schafer, J. S.; Reid, J. S.; Dubovik, O.; Smirnov, A.

    2003-12-01

    There is little published data available on measured optical properties of aerosols in the Southeast Asian region. The AERONET project and collaborators commenced monitoring of aerosol optical properties in February 2003 at four sites in Thailand and two sites in Viet Nam to measure the primarily anthropogenic aerosols generated by biomass burning and fossil fuel combustion/ industrial emissions. Automatic sun/sky radiometers at each site measured spectral aerosol optical depth in 7 wavelengths from 340 to 1020 nm and combined with directional radiances in the almucantar, retrievals were made of spectral single scattering albedo and aerosol size distributions. Angstrom exponents, size distributions and spectral single scattering albedo of primarily biomass burning aerosols at rural sites are compared to measurements made at AERONET sites in other major biomass burning regions in tropical southern Africa, South America, and in boreal forest regions. Additionally, the aerosol single scattering albedo and size distributions measured in Bangkok, Thailand are compared with those measured at other urban sites globally. The influences of aerosols originating from other regions outside of Southeast Asia are analyzed using trajectory analyses. Specifically, cases of aerosol transport and mixing from Southern China and from India are presented.

  5. Identification of columnar aerosol types under high aerosol optical depth conditions for a single AERONET site in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yongjoo; Ghim, Young Sung; Holben, B. N.

    2016-02-01

    Dominant aerosol types were classified using level 2 inversion products for the Anmyon Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) site in Korea for the period 1999-2007. The aerosol types were mineral dust (MD), MD mixed with carbon, and black carbon mixed coarse particles (BCCP) for coarse mode aerosols, black carbon (BC), organic carbon (OC), and secondary inorganic ions (SII) for fine mode aerosols, and mixed particles between. The classification was carried out using a clustering method based on parameters, including single scattering albedo (SSA), absorption Angstrom exponent (AAE), and fine mode volume fraction (FMVF). Among the seven aerosol types, MD was distinct, with the highest AAE and a very low FMVF and SII with the highest SSA and FMVF. BCCP was introduced to designate coarse particles mixed with BC, of which the AAE was lower than 1, despite a low FMVF. In addition to a large difference in AAE between BC and OC, the SSA of OC was larger than that of BC, indicating the effects of the white smoke produced from the smoldering phase of biomass burning. Monthly variations of the aerosol types were well interpreted by meteorology and emissions and coincided with those in the previous studies. Applying our results to well-characterized global AERONET sites, we confirmed that the aerosol types at Anmyon were valid at other sites. However, the results also showed that the mean properties for aerosol types were influenced by the specific aerosols prevalent at the study sites.

  6. Application of AERONET Single Scattering Albedo and Absorption Angstrom Exponent to Classify Dominant Aerosol Types during DRAGON Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Eck, T. F.; Schafer, J.; Crawford, J. H.; Kim, J.; Sano, I.; Liew, S.; Salinas Cortijo, S. V.; Chew, B. N.; Lim, H.; Smirnov, A.; Sorokin, M.; Kenny, P.; Slutsker, I.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosols can have major implications on human health by inducing respiratory diseases due to inhalation of fine particles from biomass burning smoke or industrial pollution and on radiative forcing whereby the presence of absorbing aerosol particles (e.g., black carbon) increases atmospheric heating. Aerosol classification techniques have utilized aerosol loading and aerosol properties derived from multi-spectral and multi-angle observations by ground-based (e.g., AERONET) and satellite instrumentation (e.g., MISR). Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data have been utilized to determine aerosol types by implementing various combinations of measured aerosol optical depth or retrieved size and absorption aerosol properties (e.g., Gobbi et al., 2007; Russell et al., 2010). Giles et al. [2012] showed single scattering albedo (SSA) relationship with extinction Angstrom exponent (EAE) can provide an estimate of the general classification of dominant aerosol types (i.e., desert dust, urban/industrial pollution, biomass burning smoke, and mixtures) based on data from ~20 AERONET sites located in known aerosol source regions. In addition, the absorption Angstrom exponent relationship with EAE can provide an indication of the dominant absorbing aerosol type such as dust, black carbon, brown carbon, or mixtures of them. These classification techniques are applied to the AERONET Level 2.0 quality assured data sets collected during Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observational Network (DRAGON) campaigns in Maryland (USA), Japan, South Korea, Singapore, Penang (Malaysia), and California (USA). An analysis of aerosol type classification for DRAGON sites is performed as well as an assessment of the spatial variability of the aerosol types for selected DRAGON campaigns. Giles, D. M., B. N. Holben, T. F. Eck, A. Sinyuk, A. Smirnov, I. Slutsker, R. R. Dickerson, A. M. Thompson, and J. S. Schafer (2012), An analysis of AERONET aerosol absorption properties and classifications

  7. Fog and Cloud Induced Aerosol Modification Observed by AERONET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Reid, J. S.; Giles, D. M.; Rivas, M. A.; Singh, R. P.; Tripathi, S. N.; Bruegge, C. J.; Platnick, S. E.; Arnold, G. T.; Krotkov, N. A.; Carn, S. A.; Sinyuk, A.; Dubovik, O.; Arola, A.; Schafer, J. S.; Artaxo, P.; Smirnov, A.; Chen, H.; Goloub, P.

    2011-01-01

    Large fine mode (sub-micron radius) dominated aerosols in size distributions retrieved from AERONET have been observed after fog or low-altitude cloud dissipation events. These column-integrated size distributions have been obtained at several sites in many regions of the world, typically after evaporation of low altitude cloud such as stratocumulus or fog. Retrievals with cloud processed aerosol are sometimes bimodal in the accumulation mode with the larger size mode often approx.0.4 - 0.5 microns radius (volume distribution); the smaller mode typically approx.0.12 to aprrox.0.20 microns may be interstitial aerosol that were not modified by incorporation in droplets and/or aerosol that are less hygroscopic in nature. Bimodal accumulation mode size distributions have often been observed from in situ measurements of aerosols that have interacted with clouds, and AERONET size distribution retrievals made after dissipation of cloud or fog are in good agreement with particle sizes measured by in situ techniques for cloud-processed aerosols. Aerosols of this type and large size range (in lower concentrations) may also be formed by cloud processing in partly cloudy conditions and may contribute to the shoulder of larger size particles in the accumulation mode retrievals, especially in regions where sulfate and other soluble aerosol are a significant component of the total aerosol composition. Observed trends of increasing aerosol optical depth (AOD) as fine mode radius increased suggests higher AOD in the near cloud environment and therefore greater aerosol direct radiative forcing than typically obtained from remote sensing, due to bias towards sampling at low cloud fraction.

  8. Spatial Variability of AERONET Aerosol Optical Properties and Satellite Data in South Korea during NASA DRAGON-Asia Campaign.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyung Joo; Son, Youn-Suk

    2016-04-01

    We investigated spatial variability in aerosol optical properties, including aerosol optical depth (AOD), fine-mode fraction (FMF), and single scattering albedo (SSA), observed at 21 Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites and satellite remote sensing data in South Korea during the spring of 2012. These dense AERONET networks established in a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) field campaign enabled us to examine the spatially detailed aerosol size distribution and composition as well as aerosol levels. The springtime particle air quality was characterized by high background aerosol levels and high contributions of coarse-mode aerosols to total aerosols. We found that between-site correlations and coefficient of divergence for AOD and FMF strongly relied on the distance between sites, particularly in the south-north direction. Higher AOD was related to higher population density and lower distance from highways, and the aerosol size distribution and composition reflected source-specific characteristics. The ratios of satellite NO2 to AOD, which indicate the relative contributions of local combustion sources to aerosol levels, represented higher local contributions in metropolitan Seoul and Pusan. Our study demonstrates that the aerosol levels were determined by both local and regional pollution and that the relative contributions of these pollutions to aerosols generated spatial heterogeneity in the particle air quality.

  9. Spatial Variability of AERONET Aerosol Optical Properties and Satellite Data in South Korea during NASA DRAGON-Asia Campaign.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyung Joo; Son, Youn-Suk

    2016-04-01

    We investigated spatial variability in aerosol optical properties, including aerosol optical depth (AOD), fine-mode fraction (FMF), and single scattering albedo (SSA), observed at 21 Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites and satellite remote sensing data in South Korea during the spring of 2012. These dense AERONET networks established in a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) field campaign enabled us to examine the spatially detailed aerosol size distribution and composition as well as aerosol levels. The springtime particle air quality was characterized by high background aerosol levels and high contributions of coarse-mode aerosols to total aerosols. We found that between-site correlations and coefficient of divergence for AOD and FMF strongly relied on the distance between sites, particularly in the south-north direction. Higher AOD was related to higher population density and lower distance from highways, and the aerosol size distribution and composition reflected source-specific characteristics. The ratios of satellite NO2 to AOD, which indicate the relative contributions of local combustion sources to aerosol levels, represented higher local contributions in metropolitan Seoul and Pusan. Our study demonstrates that the aerosol levels were determined by both local and regional pollution and that the relative contributions of these pollutions to aerosols generated spatial heterogeneity in the particle air quality. PMID:26953969

  10. Retrieval of Aerosol Microphysical Properties from AERONET Photo-Polarimetric Measurements. 2: A New Research Algorithm and Case Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Xiaoguang; Wang, Jun; Zeng, Jing; Spurr, Robert; Liu, Xiong; Dubovik, Oleg; Li, Li; Li, Zhengqiang; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Siniuk, Aliaksandr; Holben, Brent N.

    2015-01-01

    A new research algorithm is presented here as the second part of a two-part study to retrieve aerosol microphysical properties from the multispectral and multiangular photopolarimetric measurements taken by Aerosol Robotic Network's (AERONET's) new-generation Sun photometer. The algorithm uses an advanced UNified and Linearized Vector Radiative Transfer Model and incorporates a statistical optimization approach.While the new algorithmhas heritage from AERONET operational inversion algorithm in constraining a priori and retrieval smoothness, it has two new features. First, the new algorithmretrieves the effective radius, effective variance, and total volume of aerosols associated with a continuous bimodal particle size distribution (PSD) function, while the AERONET operational algorithm retrieves aerosol volume over 22 size bins. Second, our algorithm retrieves complex refractive indices for both fine and coarsemodes,while the AERONET operational algorithm assumes a size-independent aerosol refractive index. Mode-resolved refractive indices can improve the estimate of the single-scattering albedo (SSA) for each aerosol mode and thus facilitate the validation of satellite products and chemistry transport models. We applied the algorithm to a suite of real cases over Beijing_RADI site and found that our retrievals are overall consistent with AERONET operational inversions but can offer mode-resolved refractive index and SSA with acceptable accuracy for the aerosol composed by spherical particles. Along with the retrieval using both radiance and polarization, we also performed radiance-only retrieval to demonstrate the improvements by adding polarization in the inversion. Contrast analysis indicates that with polarization, retrieval error can be reduced by over 50% in PSD parameters, 10-30% in the refractive index, and 10-40% in SSA, which is consistent with theoretical analysis presented in the companion paper of this two-part study.

  11. Retrieval of aerosol microphysical properties from AERONET photopolarimetric measurements: 2. A new research algorithm and case demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaoguang; Wang, Jun; Zeng, Jing; Spurr, Robert; Liu, Xiong; Dubovik, Oleg; Li, Li; Li, Zhengqiang; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Siniuk, Aliaksandr; Holben, Brent N.

    2015-07-01

    A new research algorithm is presented here as the second part of a two-part study to retrieve aerosol microphysical properties from the multispectral and multiangular photopolarimetric measurements taken by Aerosol Robotic Network's (AERONET's) new-generation Sun photometer. The algorithm uses an advanced UNified and Linearized Vector Radiative Transfer Model and incorporates a statistical optimization approach. While the new algorithm has heritage from AERONET operational inversion algorithm in constraining a priori and retrieval smoothness, it has two new features. First, the new algorithm retrieves the effective radius, effective variance, and total volume of aerosols associated with a continuous bimodal particle size distribution (PSD) function, while the AERONET operational algorithm retrieves aerosol volume over 22 size bins. Second, our algorithm retrieves complex refractive indices for both fine and coarse modes, while the AERONET operational algorithm assumes a size-independent aerosol refractive index. Mode-resolved refractive indices can improve the estimate of the single-scattering albedo (SSA) for each aerosol mode and thus facilitate the validation of satellite products and chemistry transport models. We applied the algorithm to a suite of real cases over Beijing_RADI site and found that our retrievals are overall consistent with AERONET operational inversions but can offer mode-resolved refractive index and SSA with acceptable accuracy for the aerosol composed by spherical particles. Along with the retrieval using both radiance and polarization, we also performed radiance-only retrieval to demonstrate the improvements by adding polarization in the inversion. Contrast analysis indicates that with polarization, retrieval error can be reduced by over 50% in PSD parameters, 10-30% in the refractive index, and 10-40% in SSA, which is consistent with theoretical analysis presented in the companion paper of this two-part study.

  12. A study of aerosol properties over Lahore (Pakistan) by using AERONET data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Muhammad; Tariq, Salman; Mahmood, Khalid; Daud, Asim; Batool, Adila; Zia-ul-Haq

    2014-02-01

    It is well established that aerosols affect the climate in a variety of ways. In order to understand these effects, we require an insight into the properties of aerosols. In this paper we present a study of aerosol properties such as aerosol optical depth (AOD), single scattering albedo (SSA) and aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) over mega city of Lahore (Pakistan). The data from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) have been used for the period December 2009 to October 2011. The seasonal average values of AOD, asymmetry parameter (ASY) and volume size distribution in coarse mode were observed to be highest in summer. On the other hand, the average values of Angstrom exponent (AE) and imaginary part of refractive index (RI) were found to be maximum in winter. The average value of real part of RI was found to be higher in spring than in all other seasons. The SSA exhibited an increasing trend with wavelength in the range 440 nm-1020 nm in spring, summer and fall indicating the dominance of coarse particles (usually dust). However, a decreasing trend was found in winter in the range 675 nm-1020 nm pointing towards the dominance of biomass and urban/industrial aerosols. As far as aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) is concerned, we have found that during the spring season ARF was lowest at the surface of Earth and highest at top of the atmosphere (TOA). This indicates that the atmosphere was warmer in spring than in all the remaining seasons.

  13. Aerosol Daytime Variations over North and South America Derived from Multiyear AERONET Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Yan; Yu, Hongbin; Eck, Tom F.; Smirnov, Alexander; Chin, Mian; Remer, Lorraine A.; Bian, Huisheng; Tan, Qian; Levy, Roberrt; Holben, Brent N.

    2012-01-01

    This study analyzes the daytime variation of aerosol with seasonal distinction by using multi-year measurements from 54 of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites over North America, South America, and islands in surrounding oceans. The analysis shows a wide range of daily variability of aerosol optical depth (AOO) and Angstrom exponent depending on location and season. Possible reasons for daytime variations are given. The largest AOO daytime variation range at 440 nm, up to 75%, occurs in Mexico City, with maximum AOO in the afternoon. Large AOO daily variations are also observed in the polluted mid-Atlantic U.S. and U.S. West Coast with maximum AOO occurring in the afternoon in the mid-Atlantic U.S., but in the morning in the West Coast. In South American sites during the biomass burning season (August to October), maximum AOO generally occurs in the afternoon. But the daytime variation becomes smaller when sites are influenced more by long-range transported smoke than by local burning. Islands show minimum AOO in the morning and maximum AOO in the afternoon. The diverse patterns of aerosol daytime variation suggest that geostationary satellite measurements would be invaluable for characterizing aerosol temporal variations on regional and continental scales. In particular, simultaneous measurements of aerosols and aerosol precursors from a geostationary satellite would greatly aid in understanding the evolution of aerosol as determined by emissions, chemical transformations, and transport processes.

  14. Analysis of the Interaction and Transport of Aerosols with Cloud or Fog in East Asia from AERONET and Satellite Remote Sensing: 2012 DRAGON Campaigns and Climatological Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Reid, J. S.; Lynch, P.; Schafer, J.; Giles, D. M.; Kim, J.; Kim, Y. J.; Sano, I.; Arola, A. T.; Munchak, L. A.; O'Neill, N. T.; Lyapustin, A.; Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. Y. C.; Randles, C. A.; da Silva, A. M., Jr.; Govindaraju, R.; Hyer, E. J.; Pickering, K. E.; Crawford, J. H.; Sinyuk, A.; Smirnov, A.

    2015-12-01

    Ground-based remote sensing observations from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun-sky radiometers have recently shown several instances where cloud-aerosol interaction had resulted in modification of aerosol properties and/or in difficulty identifying some major pollution transport events due to aerosols being imbedded in cloud systems. Major Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON) field campaigns involving multiple AERONET sites in Japan and South Korea during Spring of 2012 have yielded observations of aerosol transport associated with clouds and/or aerosol properties modification as a result of fog interaction. Analysis of data from the Korean and Japan DRAGON campaigns shows that major fine-mode aerosol transport events are sometimes associated with extensive cloud cover and that cloud-screening of observations often filter out significant pollution aerosol transport events. The Spectral De-convolution Algorithm (SDA) algorithm was utilized to isolate and analyze the fine-mode aerosol optical depth (AODf) signal from AERONET data for these cases of persistent and extensive cloud cover. Satellite retrievals of AOD from MODIS sensors (from Dark Target, Deep Blue and MAIAC algorithms) were also investigated to assess the issue of detectability of high AOD events associated with high cloud fraction. Underestimation of fine mode AOD by the Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS) and by the NASA Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis For Research And Applications Aerosol Re-analysis (MERRAaero) models at very high AOD at sites in China and Korea was observed, especially for observations that are cloud screened by AERONET (Level 2 data). Additionally, multi-year monitoring at several AERONET sites are examined for climatological statistics of cloud screening of fine mode aerosol events. Aerosol that has been affected by clouds or the near-cloud environment may be more prevalent than AERONET data suggest due to inherent difficulty in

  15. Validation of Long-Term Global Aerosol Climatology Project Optical Thickness Retrievals Using AERONET and MODIS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geogdzhayev, Igor V.; Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive set of monthly mean aerosol optical thickness (AOT) data from coastal and island AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) stations is used to evaluate Global Aerosol Climatology Project (GACP) retrievals for the period 1995-2009 during which contemporaneous GACP and AERONET data were available. To put the GACP performance in broader perspective, we also compare AERONET and MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Aqua level-2 data for 2003-2009 using the same methodology. We find that a large mismatch in geographic coverage exists between the satellite and ground-based datasets, with very limited AERONET coverage of open-ocean areas. This is especially true of GACP because of the smaller number of AERONET stations at the early stages of the network development. Monthly mean AOTs from the two over-the-ocean satellite datasets are well-correlated with the ground-based values, the correlation coefficients being 0.81-0.85 for GACP and 0.74-0.79 for MODIS. Regression analyses demonstrate that the GACP mean AOTs are approximately 17%-27% lower than the AERONET values on average, while the MODIS mean AOTs are 5%-25% higher. The regression coefficients are highly dependent on the weighting assumptions (e.g., on the measure of aerosol variability) as well as on the set of AERONET stations used for comparison. Comparison of over-the-land and over-the-ocean MODIS monthly mean AOTs in the vicinity of coastal AERONET stations reveals a significant bias. This may indicate that aerosol amounts in coastal locations can differ significantly from those in adjacent open-ocean areas. Furthermore, the color of coastal waters and peculiarities of coastline meteorological conditions may introduce biases in the GACP AOT retrievals. We conclude that the GACP and MODIS over-the-ocean retrieval algorithms show similar ranges of discrepancy when compared to available coastal and island AERONET stations. The factors mentioned above may limit the performance of the

  16. MPL-Net Measurements of Aerosol and Cloud Vertical Distributions at Co-Located AERONET Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; Campbell, James R.; Berkoff, Timothy A.; Spinhirne, James D.; Tsay, Si-Chee; Holben, Brent; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In the early 1990s, the first small, eye-safe, and autonomous lidar system was developed, the Micropulse Lidar (MPL). The MPL acquires signal profiles of backscattered laser light from aerosols and clouds. The signals are analyzed to yield multiple layer heights, optical depths of each layer, average extinction-to-backscatter ratios for each layer, and profiles of extinction in each layer. In 2000, several MPL sites were organized into a coordinated network, called MPL-Net, by the Cloud and Aerosol Lidar Group at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) using funding provided by the NASA Earth Observing System. tn addition to the funding provided by NASA EOS, the NASA CERES Ground Validation Group supplied four MPL systems to the project, and the NASA TOMS group contributed their MPL for work at GSFC. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) also agreed to make their data available to the MPL-Net project for processing. In addition to the initial NASA and ARM operated sites, several other independent research groups have also expressed interest in joining the network using their own instruments. Finally, a limited amount of EOS funding was set aside to participate in various field experiments each year. The NASA Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies (SIMBIOS) project also provides funds to deploy their MPL during ocean research cruises. All together, the MPL-Net project has participated in four major field experiments since 2000. Most MPL-Net sites and field experiment locations are also co-located with sunphotometers in the NASA Aerosol Robotic Network. (AERONET). Therefore, at these locations data is collected on both aerosol and cloud vertical structure as well as column optical depth and sky radiance. Real-time data products are now available from most MPL-Net sites. Our real-time products are generated at times of AERONET aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements. The AERONET AOD is used as input to our

  17. Monitoring of urban air pollution from MODIS and AERONET Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tijani, K.; Chiaradia, M.; Guerriero, L.; Pasquariello, G.; Morea, A.; Nutricato, R.; Preziosa, G.

    2012-12-01

    Air pollution, caused by fuel industries and urban traffic and its environmental impact, are of considerable interest to studies in air quality. In this paper, the monitoring of the air pollution over urban areas in Italy through Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) data retrieved from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measurements is presented. The high spatio-temporal frequency of MODIS AOT products (twice per day at 470nm, 1km full resolution) demonstrates that this satellite can be potentially used to routinely monitor the air pollution over land, especially urban area, which is the main source of aerosol particles. In this work AOT data derived by MODIS from November 2010 to February 2011 (winter period) and from May 2011 to August 2011 (summer period) were compared with AOT measurements from 6 different Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) stations over Italy (Bari, Lecce, Roma, Ispra, Potenza, Etna). The statistical analysis shows a good agreement between the ground based AOT measurements and the values retrieved using space based sensors, as shown in Figure 1. For all the stations the mean error is negligible, with a correlation ranging from 0.725 (in the worst case) to 0.96 (see Table 1). Moreover, LANDSAT-panchromatic images were used to discriminate urban and rural areas, based on the typical finger-like projections of urban land uses. The results of this study will be presented and commented. Acknowledgements This work was funded by Apulian Region in the framework of the ECOURB project. (Analisi e Modelli di inquinamento atmosferico e termico per sistemi di ECOlabeling URBano, 2009-2012). Figure 1: Scatter plot between AOT derived from MODIS and AERONET for Lecce City in summer period from May 2011 to August 2011. Y = - 0.023+0.86x (fit) ; Table 1: Statistical Analysis Report on the difference between AOT derived from MODIS and AERONET from May 2011 to August 2011 (summer period) for 6 different Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) stations

  18. Retrieval of aerosol microphysical properties from AERONET photopolarimetric measurements: 1. Information content analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaoguang; Wang, Jun

    2015-07-01

    This paper is the first part of a two-part study that aims to retrieve aerosol particle size distribution (PSD) and refractive index from the multispectral and multiangular polarimetric measurements taken by the new-generation Sun photometer as part of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). It provides theoretical analysis and guidance to the companion study in which we have developed an inversion algorithm for retrieving 22 aerosol microphysical parameters associated with a bimodal PSD function from real AERONET measurements. Our theoretical analysis starts with generating the synthetic measurements at four spectral bands (440, 675, 870, and 1020 nm) with a Unified Linearized Vector Radiative Transfer Model for various types of spherical aerosol particles. Subsequently, the quantitative information content for retrieving aerosol parameters is investigated in four observation scenarios, i.e., I1, I2, P1, and P2. Measurements in the scenario (I1) comprise the solar direct radiances and almucantar radiances that are used in the current AERONET operational inversion algorithm. The other three scenarios include different additional measurements: (I2) the solar principal plane radiances, (P1) the solar principal plane radiances and polarization, and (P2) the solar almucantar polarization. Results indicate that adding polarization measurements can increase the degree of freedom for signal by 2-5 in the scenario P1, while not as much of an increase is found in the scenarios I2 and P2. Correspondingly, smallest retrieval errors are found in the scenario P1: 2.3% (2.9%) for the fine-mode (coarse-mode) aerosol volume concentration, 1.3% (3.5%) for the effective radius, 7.2% (12%) for the effective variance, 0.005 (0.035) for the real-part refractive index, and 0.019 (0.068) for the single-scattering albedo. These errors represent a reduction from their counterparts in scenario I1 of 79% (57%), 76% (49%), 69% (52%), 66% (46%), and 49% (20%), respectively. We further

  19. Global Assessment of OMI Aerosol Single-scattering Albedo Using Ground-based AERONET and SKYNET Inversions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jethva, Hiren; Torres, Omar; Ahn, Changwoo

    2014-01-01

    We compare the aerosol single-scattering albedo (SSA) retrieved by the near-UV two-channel algorithm (OMAERUV) applied to the Aura-Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) measurements with an equivalent inversion made by the ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). This work is the first comprehensive effort to globally compare the OMI-retrieved SSA with that of AERONET using all available sites spanning the regions of biomass burning, dust, and urban pollution. An analysis of the co-located retrievals over 269 sites reveals that about 46 percent (69 percent) of OMI-AERONET matchups agree within the absolute difference of plus or minus 0.03 (plus or minus 0.05) for all aerosol types. The comparison improves to 52 percent (77 percent) when only 'smoke' and 'dust' aerosol types were identified by the OMAERUV algorithm. Regionally, the agreement between the two inversions was robust over the biomass burning sites of South America, Sahel, Indian subcontinent, and oceanic-coastal sites followed by a reasonable agreement over north-east Asia. Over the desert regions, OMI tends to retrieve higher SSA, particularly over the Arabian Peninsula. Globally, the OMI-AERONET matchups agree mostly within plus or minus 0.03 for the aerosol optical depth (440 nanometers) and UV-aerosol index larger than 0.4 and 1.0, respectively. We also compare the OMAERUV SSA against the inversion made by an independent network of ground-based radiometer called SKYNET with its operating sites in Japan, China, South-East Asia, India, and Europe. The advantage of the SKYNET database over AERONET is that it performs retrieval at near-UV wavelengths which facilitate the direct comparison of OMI retrievals with the equivalent ground-based inversion. Comparison of OMI and SKYNET over currently available sites reveals a good agreement between the two where more than 70 percent of matchups agree within the absolute difference of 0.05.

  20. Aerosol characterization at the Saharan AERONET site Tamanrasset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guirado, C.; Cuevas, E.; Cachorro, V. E.; Toledano, C.; Alonso-Pérez, S.; Bustos, J. J.; Basart, S.; Romero, P. M.; Camino, C.; Mimouni, M.; Zeudmi, L.; Goloub, P.; Baldasano, J. M.; de Frutos, A. M.

    2014-06-01

    More than two years of columnar atmospheric aerosol measurements (2006-2009) at Tamanrasset site, in the heart of the Sahara desert, are analysed. AERONET level 2.0 data were used. The KCICLO method was applied to a part of level 1.5 data series to improve the quality of the results. The annual variability of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Angstrom exponent (AE) has been found to be strongly linked to the Convective Boundary Layer (CBL) thermodynamic features. The dry-cool season (autumn and winter time) is characterized by a shallow CBL and very low mean turbidity (AOD ~ 0.09 at 440 nm, AE ~ 0.62). The wet-hot season (spring and summer time) is dominated by high turbidity of coarse dust particles (AE ~ 0.28, AOD ~ 0.39 at 440 nm) and a deep CBL. The aerosol-type characterization shows desert mineral dust as prevailing aerosol. Both pure Saharan dust and very clear sky conditions are observed depending on the season. However, several case studies indicate an anthropogenic fine mode contribution from Libya and Algeria's industrial areas. The Concentration Weighted Trajectory (CWT) source apportionment method was used to identify potential sources of air masses arriving at Tamanrasset at several heights for each season. Microphysical and optical properties and precipitable water vapour were also investigated.

  1. MISR Global Aerosol Product Assessment by Comparison with AERONET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph A.; Gaitley, Barbara J.; Garay, Michael J.; Diner, David J.; Eck, Thomas F.; Smirnov, Alexander; Holben, Brent N.

    2010-01-01

    A statistical approach is used to assess the quality of the MISR Version 22 (V22) aerosol products. Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) retrieval results are improved relative to the early post- launch values reported by Kahn et al. [2005a], varying with particle type category. Overall, about 70% to 75% of MISR AOD retrievals fall within 0.05 or 20% AOD of the paired validation data, and about 50% to 55% are within 0.03 or 10% AOD, except at sites where dust, or mixed dust and smoke, are commonly found. Retrieved particle microphysical properties amount to categorical values, such as three groupings in size: "small," "medium," and "large." For particle size, ground-based AERONET sun photometer Angstrom Exponents are used to assess statistically the corresponding MISR values, which are interpreted in terms of retrieved size categories. Coincident Single-Scattering Albedo (SSA) and fraction AOD spherical data are too limited for statistical validation. V22 distinguishes two or three size bins, depending on aerosol type, and about two bins in SSA (absorbing vs. non-absorbing), as well as spherical vs. non-spherical particles, under good retrieval conditions. Particle type sensitivity varies considerably with conditions, and is diminished for mid-visible AOD below about 0.15 or 0.2. Based on these results, specific algorithm upgrades are proposed, and are being investigated by the MISR team for possible implementation in future versions of the product.

  2. Aerosol Seasonal Variations over Urban-Industrial Regions in Ukraine According to AERONET and POLDER Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milinevsky, G.; Danylevsky, V.; Bovchaliuk, V.; Bovchaliuk, A.; Goloub, Ph.; Dubovik, O.; Kabashnikov, V.; Chaikovsky, A.; Miatselskaya, N.; Mishchenko, M.; Sosonkin, M.

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents an investigation of aerosol seasonal variations in several urban-industrial regions in Ukraine. Our analysis of seasonal variations of optical and physical aerosol parameters is based on the sun-photometer 2008-2013 data from two urban ground-based AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) sites in Ukraine (Kyiv, Lugansk) as well as on satellite POLDER instrument data for urban-industrial areas in Ukraine. We also analyzed the data from one AERONET site in Belarus (Minsk) in order to compare with the Ukrainian sites. Aerosol amount and optical depth (AOD) values in the atmosphere columns over the large urbanized areas like Kyiv and Minsk have maximum values in the spring (April-May) and late summer (August), whereas minimum values are observed in late autumn. The results show that fine-mode particles are most frequently detected during the spring and late summer seasons. The analysis of the seasonal AOD variations over the urban-industrial areas in the eastern and central parts of Ukraine according to both ground-based and POLDER data exhibits the similar traits. The seasonal variation similarity in the regions denotes the resemblance in basic aerosol sources that are closely related to properties of aerosol particles. The behavior of basic aerosol parameters in the western part of Ukraine is different from eastern and central regions and shows an earlier appearance of the spring and summer AOD maxima. Spectral single-scattering albedo, complex refractive index and size distribution of aerosol particles in the atmosphere column over Kyiv have different behavior for warm (April-October) and cold seasons. The seasonal features of fine and coarse aerosol particle behavior over the Kyiv site were analyzed. A prevailing influence of the fine-mode particles on the optical properties of the aerosol layer over the region has been established. The back-trajectory and cluster analysis techniques were applied to study the seasonal back trajectories and prevailing

  3. Aerosol seasonal variations over urban-industrial regions in Ukraine according to AERONET and POLDER measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milinevsky, G.; Danylevsky, V.; Bovchaliuk, V.; Bovchaliuk, A.; Goloub, Ph.; Dubovik, O.; Kabashnikov, V.; Chaikovsky, A.; Miatselskaya, N.; Mishchenko, M.; Sosonkin, M.

    2014-05-01

    The paper presents an investigation of aerosol seasonal variations in several urban-industrial regions in Ukraine. Our analysis of seasonal variations of optical and physical aerosol parameters is based on the sun-photometer 2008-2013 data from two urban ground-based AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) sites in Ukraine (Kyiv, Lugansk) as well as on satellite POLDER instrument data for urban-industrial areas in Ukraine. We also analyzed the data from one AERONET site in Belarus (Minsk) in order to compare with the Ukrainian sites. Aerosol amount and optical depth (AOD) values in the atmosphere columns over the large urbanized areas like Kyiv and Minsk have maximum values in the spring (April-May) and late summer (August), whereas minimum values are observed in late autumn. The results show that fine-mode particles are most frequently detected during the spring and late summer seasons. The analysis of the seasonal AOD variations over the urban-industrial areas in the eastern and central parts of Ukraine according to both ground-based and POLDER data exhibits the similar traits. The seasonal variation similarity in the regions denotes the resemblance in basic aerosol sources that are closely related to properties of aerosol particles. The behavior of basic aerosol parameters in the western part of Ukraine is different from eastern and central regions and shows an earlier appearance of the spring and summer AOD maxima. Spectral single-scattering albedo, complex refractive index and size distribution of aerosol particles in the atmosphere column over Kyiv have different behavior for warm (April-October) and cold seasons. The seasonal features of fine and coarse aerosol particle behavior over the Kyiv site were analyzed. A prevailing influence of the fine-mode particles on the optical properties of the aerosol layer over the region has been established. The back-trajectory and cluster analysis techniques were applied to study the seasonal back trajectories and prevailing

  4. Spatial boundaries of Aerosol Robotic Network observations over the Mediterranean basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, A. K.; Rudich, Y.; Koren, I.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate knowledge of aerosol variability on a relatively high spatiotemporal scale is needed for better assessment of aerosol radiative effects and aerosol-climate interactions. We investigated the spatial boundaries of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) observations over the Mediterranean basin using a statistical approach. We used 13 years (2002-2014) of aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and 15 AERONET sites around the Mediterranean basin. The gridded correlation maps show moderate to high correlations (R > 0.5) around each AERONET site up to ~200-500 km radius depending on location. Such analyses provide information on the spatial domain in which the AERONET measurements can be reliably used per site. The statistical model provides a better daytime AOD product on finer temporal resolution with higher spatial coverage as compared to using AERONET/MODIS observations separately. The findings from this study can be useful for the assimilation-based model forecasting of aerosol properties.

  5. Observations of Aerosol Optical Properties over 15 AERONET Sites in Southeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, J. D.; Lagrosas, N.; Uy, S. N.; Holben, B. N.; Dorado, S.; Tobias, V., Jr.; Anh, N. X.; Po-Hsiung, L.; Janjai, S.; Salinas Cortijo, S. V.; Liew, S. C.; Lim, H. S.; Lestari, P.

    2014-12-01

    Mean column-integrated optical properties from ground sun photometers of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) are studied to provide an overview of the characteristics of aerosols over the region as part of the 7 Southeast Asian Studies (7-SEAS) mission. The 15 AERONET sites with the most available level 2 data products are selected from Thailand (Chiang Mai, Mukdahan, Songkhla and Silpakorn University), Malaysia (University Sains Malaysia), Laos (Vientiane), Vietnam (Bac Giang, Bac Lieu and Nha Trang), Taiwan (National Cheng Kung University and Central Weather Bureau Taipei), Singapore, Indonesia (Bandung) and the Philippines (Manila Observatory and Notre Dame of Marbel University). For all 15 sites, high angstrom exponent values (α>1) have been observed. Chiang Mai and USM have the highest mean Angstrom exponent indicating the dominance of fine particles that can be ascribed to biomass burning and urbanization. Sites with the lowest Angstrom exponent values include Bac Lieu (α=1.047) and Manila Observatory (α=1.021). From the average lognormal size distribution curves, Songkhla and NDMU show the smallest annual variation in the fine mode region, indicating the observed fine aerosols are local to the sites. The rest of the sites show high variation which could be due to large scale forcings (e.g., monsoons and biomass burnings) that affect aerosol properties in these sites. Both high and low single scattering albedo at 440 nm (ω0440) values are found in sites located in major urban areas. Silpakorn University, Manila Observatory and Vientiane have all mean ω0440 < 0.90. Singapore and CWB Taipei have ω0440 > 0.94. The discrepancy in ω0 suggests different types of major emission sources present in urban areas. The absorptivity of urban aerosols can vary depending on the strength of traffic emissions, types of fuel combusted and automobile engines used, and the effect of biomass burning aerosols during the dry season. High aerosol optical depth values (τa550

  6. Dynamics and Properties of Global Aerosol using MODIS, AERONET and GOCART Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram; Chin, Mian; Reme, Lorraine; Tanre, Didier; Mattoo, Shana

    2002-01-01

    Recently produced daily Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aerosol data for the whole year of 2001 are used to show the concentration and dynamics of aerosol over ocean and large parts of the continents. The data were validated against the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measurements over land and ocean in a special issue in GRL now in press. Monthly averages and a movie based on the daily data are produced and used to demonstrate the spatial and temporal evolution of aerosol. The MODIS wide spectral range is used to distinguish fine smoke and pollution aerosol from coarse dust and salt. The aerosol is observed above ocean and land. The movie produced from the MODIS data provides a new dimension to aerosol observations by showing the dynamics of the system. For example in February smoke and dust emitted from the Sahel and West Africa is shown to travel to the North-East Atlantic. In April heavy dust and pollution from East Asia is shown to travel to North America. In May-June pollution and dust play a dynamical dance in the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal. In Aug-September smoke from South Africa and South America is shown to pulsate in tandem and to periodically to be transported to the otherwise pristine Southern part of the Southern Hemisphere. The MODIS data are compared with the Georgia Tech/Goddard Global Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation Transport (GOCART) model to test and adjust source and sink strengths in the model and to study the effect of clouds on the representation of the satellite data.

  7. AERONET-based microphysical and optical properties of smoke-dominated aerosol near source regions and transported over oceans, and implications for satellite retrievals of aerosol optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.; Eck, T. F.; Smirnov, A.; Holben, B. N.

    2013-09-01

    Smoke aerosols from biomass burning are an important component of the global aerosol cycle. Analysis of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) retrievals of size distribution and refractive index reveals variety between biomass burning aerosols in different global source regions, in terms of aerosol particle size and single scatter albedo (SSA). Case studies of smoke transported to coastal/island AERONET sites also mostly lie within the range of variability at near-source sites. Two broad ''families'' of aerosol properties are found, corresponding to sites dominated by boreal forest burning (larger, broader fine mode, with midvisible SSA ∼0.95), and those influenced by grass, shrub, or crop burning with additional forest contributions (smaller, narrower particles with SSA ∼0.88-0.9 in the midvisible). The strongest absorption is seen in southern African savannah at Mongu (Zambia), with average SSA ∼0.85 in the midvisible. These can serve as candidate sets of aerosol microphysical/optical properties for use in satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieval algorithms. The models presently adopted by these algorithms over ocean are often insufficiently absorbing to represent these biomass burning aerosols. A corollary of this is an underestimate of AOD in smoke outflow regions, which has important consequences for applications of these satellite datasets.

  8. Aeronet-based Microphysical and Optical Properties of Smoke-dominated Aerosol near Source Regions and Transported over Oceans, and Implications for Satellite Retrievals of Aerosol Optical Depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.; Eck, T. F.; Smirnov, A.; Holben, B. N.

    2013-01-01

    Smoke aerosols from biomass burning are an important component of the global aerosol cycle. Analysis of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) retrievals of size distribution and refractive index reveals variety between biomass burning aerosols in different global source regions, in terms of aerosol particle size and single scatter albedo (SSA). Case studies of smoke transported to coastal/island AERONET sites also mostly lie within the range of variability at near-source sites. Two broad families of aerosol properties are found, corresponding to sites dominated by boreal forest burning (larger, broader fine mode, with midvisible SSA 0.95), and those influenced by grass, shrub, or crop burning with additional forest contributions (smaller, narrower particles with SSA 0.88-0.9 in the midvisible). The strongest absorption is seen in southern African savanna at Mongu (Zambia), with average SSA 0.85 in the midvisible. These can serve as candidate sets of aerosol microphysicaloptical properties for use in satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieval algorithms. The models presently adopted by these algorithms over ocean are often insufficiently absorbing to represent these biomass burning aerosols. A corollary of this is an underestimate of AOD in smoke outflow regions, which has important consequences for applications of these satellite datasets.

  9. Analysis of the Interaction and Transport of Aerosols with Cloud or Fog during DRAGON Campaigns in Asia from AERONET and Satellite Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, Thomas; Holben, Brent; Reid, Jeffrey; Lynch, Peng; Schafer, Joel; Giles, David; Kim, Jhoon; Kim, Young; Sano, Itaru; Platnick, Steven; Arnold, George; Lyapustin, Alexei; Pickering, Kenneth; Crawford, James; Siniuk, Alexander; Smirnov, Alexander; Wang, Pucai; Xia, Xiangao; Li, Zhanqing

    2015-04-01

    Ground-based remote sensing observations from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun-sky radiometers have recently shown several instances where cloud-aerosol interaction had resulted in modification of aerosol properties and/or in difficulty identifying some major pollution transport events due to aerosols being imbedded in cloud systems. AERONET has established Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON) during field campaigns that are short-term (~2-3 months) relatively dense spatial networks of ~15 to 45 sun and sky scanning photometers. Major DRAGON field campaigns in Japan and South Korea during Spring of 2012 have yielded observations of aerosol transport associated with clouds and/or aerosol properties modification as a result of fog interaction. Analysis of data from the Korean and Japan DRAGON campaigns shows that major fine-mode aerosol transport events are sometimes associated with extensive cloud cover and that cloud-screening of observations often filter out significant pollution aerosol transport events. The Spectral De-convolution Algorithm (SDA) algorithm was utilized to isolate and analyze the fine-mode aerosol optical depth (AOD) signal from AERONET data for these cases of persistent and extensive cloud cover. Satellite retrievals of AOD from MODIS sensors (from both dark target and MAIAC algorithms) were also investigated to assess the issue of detectability of high AOD events associated with high cloud fraction. Cloud properties retrieved from MODIS are also investigated in relation to the AERONET and satellite measurements of AOD. Underestimation of AOD by the Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS) model at very high AOD at sites in China and Korea was observed, especially for observations that are cloud screened by AERONET (L2 data). Additionally, extensive fog that was coincident with aerosol layer height on some days in Korea resulted in large increases in fine mode aerosol radius, with a mode of cloud

  10. Aerosol single-scattering albedo over the global oceans: Comparing PARASOL retrievals with AERONET, OMI, and AeroCom models estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Lacagnina, Carlo; Hasekamp, Otto P.; Bian, Huisheng; Curci, Gabriele; Myhre, Gunnar; van Noije, Twan; Schulz, Michael; Skeie, Ragnhild B.; Takemura, Toshihiko; Zhang, Kai

    2015-09-27

    The aerosol Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) over the global oceans is evaluated based on polarimetric measurements by the PARASOL satellite. The retrieved values for SSA and Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) agree well with the ground-based measurements of the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET). The global coverage provided by the PARASOL observations represents a unique opportunity to evaluate SSA and AOD simulated by atmospheric transport model runs, as performed in the AeroCom framework. The SSA estimate provided by the AeroCom models is generally higher than the SSA retrieved from both PARASOL and AERONET. On the other hand, the mean simulated AOD is about right or slightly underestimated compared with observations. An overestimate of the SSA by the models would suggest that these simulate an overly strong aerosol radiative cooling at top-of-atmosphere (TOA) and underestimate it at surface. This implies that aerosols have a potential stronger impact within the atmosphere than currently simulated.

  11. Columnar aerosol optical properties at AERONET sites in central eastern Asia and aerosol transport to the tropical mid-Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Dubovik, O.; Smirnov, A.; Goloub, P.; Chen, H. B.; Chatenet, B.; Gomes, L.; Zhang, X.-Y.; Tsay, S.-C.; Ji, Q.; Giles, D.; Slutsker, I.

    2005-03-01

    The column-integrated optical properties of aerosol in the central eastern region of Asia and midtropical Pacific were investigated based on Sun/sky radiometer measurements made at Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites in these regions. Characterization of aerosol properties in the Asian region is important due to the rapid growth of both population and economic activity, with associated increases in fossil fuel combustion, and the possible regional and global climatic impacts of related aerosol emissions. Multiyear monitoring over the complete annual cycle at sites in China, Mongolia, South Korea, and Japan suggest spring and/or summer maximum in aerosol optical depth (τa) and a winter minimum; however, more monitoring is needed to establish accurate climatologies. The annual cycle of Angstrom wavelength exponent (α) showed a springtime minimum associated with dust storm activity; however, the monthly mean α440-870 was >0.8 even for the peak dust season at eastern Asian sites suggesting that fine mode pollution aerosol emitted from population centers in eastern Asia dominates the monthly aerosol optical influence even in spring as pollution aerosol mixes with coarse mode dust originating in western source regions. Aerosol optical depth peaks in spring in the tropical mid-Pacific Ocean associated with seasonal shifts in atmospheric transport from Asia, and ˜35% of the springtime τa500 enhancement occurs at altitudes above 3.4 km. For predominately fine mode aerosol pollution cases, the average midvisible (˜550 nm) single scattering albedo (ω0) at two continental urban sites in China averaged ˜0.89, while it was significantly higher, ˜0.93, at two relatively rural coastal sites in South Korea and Japan. Differences in fine mode absorption between these regions may result from a combination of factors including aerosol aging during transport, relative humidity differences, sea salt at coastal sites, and fuel type and combustion differences in the two

  12. Observations of the Interaction and/or Transport of Aerosols with Cloud or Fog during DRAGON Campaigns from AERONET Ground-Based Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, Thomas; Holben, Brent; Schafer, Joel; Giles, David; Kim, Jhoon; Kim, Young; Sano, Itaru; Reid, Jeffrey; Pickering, Kenneth; Crawford, James; Sinyuk, Alexander; Trevino, Nathan

    2014-05-01

    Ground-based remote sensing observations from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun-sky radiometers have recently shown several instances where cloud-aerosol interaction had resulted in modification of aerosol properties and/or in difficulty identifying some major pollution transport events due to aerosols being imbedded in cloud systems. AERONET has established Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON) during field campaigns that are short-term (~2-3 months) relatively dense spatial networks of ~15 to 45 sun and sky scanning photometers. Recent major DRAGON field campaigns in Japan and South Korea (Spring 2012) and California (Winter 2013) have yielded observations of aerosol transport associated with clouds and/or aerosol properties modification as a result of fog interaction. Analysis of data from the Korean and Japan DRAGON campaigns shows that major fine-mode aerosol transport events are sometimes associated with extensive cloud cover and that cloud-screening of observations often filter out significant pollution aerosol transport events. The Spectral De-convolution Algorithm (SDA) algorithm was utilized to isolate and analyze the fine-mode aerosol optical depth signal for these cases of persistent and extensive cloud cover. Additionally, extensive fog that was coincident with aerosol layer height on some days in both Korea and California resulted in large increases in fine mode aerosol radius, with a mode of cloud-processed or residual aerosol of radius ~0.4-0.5 micron sometimes observed. Cloud processed aerosol may occur much more frequently than AERONET data suggest due to inherent difficulty in observing aerosol properties near clouds from remote sensing observations. These biases of aerosols associated with clouds would likely be even greater for satellite remote sensing retrievals of aerosol properties near clouds due to 3-D effects and sub-pixel cloud contamination issues.

  13. Using the Aerosol Single Scattering Albedo and Angstrom Exponent from AERONET to Determine Aerosol Origins and Mixing States over the Indo-Gangetic Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Eck, T. F.; Sinyuk, A.; Slutsker, I.; Smirnov, A.; Schafer, J. S.; Dickerson, R. R.; Thompson, A. M.; Tripathi, S. N.; Singh, R. P.; Ghauri, B.

    2012-12-01

    Aerosol mixtures—whether dominated by dust, carbon, sulfates, nitrates, sea salt, or mixtures of them—complicate the retrieval of remotely sensed aerosol properties from satellites and possibly increase the uncertainty of the aerosol radiative impact on climate. Major aerosol source regions in South Asia include the Thar Desert as well as agricultural lands, Himalayan foothills, and large urban centers in and near the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP). Over India and Pakistan, seasonal changes in meteorology, including the monsoon (June-September), significantly affect the transport, lifetime, and type of aerosols. Strong monsoonal winds can promote long range transport of dust resulting in mixtures of dust and carbonaceous aerosols, while more stagnant synoptic conditions (e.g., November-January) can prolong the occurrence of urban/industrial pollution, biomass burning smoke, or mixtures of them over the IGP. Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) Sun/sky radiometer data are analyzed to show the aerosol optical depth (AOD) seasonality and aerosol dominant mixing states. The Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) and extinction Angstrom exponent (EAE) relationship has been shown to provide sound clustering of dominant aerosol types using long term AERONET site data near known source regions [Giles et al., 2012]. In this study, aerosol type partitioning using the SSA (440 nm) and EAE (440-870 nm) relationship is further developed to quantify the occurrence of Dust, Mixed (e.g., dust and carbonaceous aerosols), Urban/Industrial (U/I) pollution, and Biomass Burning (BB) smoke. Based on EAE thresholds derived from the cluster analysis (for AOD440nm>0.4), preliminary results (2001-2010) for Kanpur, India, show the overall contributions of each dominant particle type (rounded to the nearest 10%): 10% for Dust (EAE≤0.25), 60% for Mixed (0.251.25). In the IGP, BB aerosols may have varying sizes (e.g., corresponding to 1.2

  14. Evidence of a Weakly Absorbing Intermediate Mode of Aerosols in AERONET Data from Saharan and Sahelian Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gianelli, Scott M.; Lacis, Andrew A.; Carlson, Barbara E.; Hameed, Sultan

    2013-01-01

    Accurate retrievals of aerosol size distribution are necessary to estimate aerosols' impact on climate and human health. The inversions of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) usually retrieve bimodal distributions. However, when the inversion is applied to Saharan and Sahelian dust, an additional mode of intermediate size between the coarse and fine modes is sometimes seen. This mode explains peculiarities in the behavior of the Angstrom exponent, along with the fine mode fraction retrieved using the spectral deconvolution algorithm, observed in a March 2006 dust storm. For this study, 15 AERONET sites in northern Africa and on the Atlantic are examined to determine the frequency and properties of the intermediate mode. The mode is observed most frequently at Ilorin in Nigeria. It is also observed at Capo Verde and multiple sites located within the Sahel but much less frequently at sites in the northern Sahara and the Canary Islands. The presence of the intermediate mode coincides with increases in Angstrom exponent, fine mode fraction, single-scattering albedo, and to a lesser extent percent sphericity. The Angstrom exponent decreases with increasing optical depth at most sites when the intermediate mode is present, but the fine mode fraction does not. Single-scattering albedo does not steadily decrease with fine mode fraction when the intermediate mode is present, as it does in typical mixtures of dust and biomass-burning aerosols. Continued investigation is needed to further define the intermediate mode's properties, determine why it differs from most Saharan dust, and identify its climate and health effects.

  15. Comparison of aerosol optical depth (AOD) determined from UVMRP and AERONET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Manyi; Liu, Chaoshun; Shi, Runhe; Gao, Wei

    2013-09-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD) is critically important for a better understanding of how Earth's climate is radiatively forced. To compensate for the conventional satellite observations, several types of ground-based radiometers are operated by AOD measurement programs. This study compares the Bratts Lake climate station's long-term AOD measurements from 1999 to 2012 which are derived from two ground-based programs with high accuracy: the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) UV-B Monitoring and Research Program (UVMRP) and the AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) program. The comparison shows that, in the 14-year period, the AOD values have an excellent agreement at six wavelengths (368, 415, 500, 610, 665, and 860 nm) with varying slopes (ranging from 0.95763 to 1.04089), intercepts (ranging from 0.0219 to 0.03945), correlation coefficients (R) (ranging from 0.82005 to 0.96155), and root mean square errors (RMSE) (ranging from 0.02639 to 0.03663). The correlations of both monthly and hourly averaged AOD measurements are highly consistent for each band. Specifically, the shorter (with larger AOD values) the wavelength is, the better the correlation is. Also, the results show that the peaks of relative errors generally occur in summer each year, and at noon each day. Our analyses suggest that AOD products derived from UVMRP are accurate and can serve as an alternative ground-based validation source for satellite AOD measurements.

  16. Premonsoon aerosol optical properties from AERONET retrievals and its probable source fields in Eastern India urban environment (Kolkata): evaluating spatial variability and its comparison with MODIS retrievals.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    B, P.; Verma, S.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol characteristics were examined using Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and MODIS retrievals (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) during the period, February to June 2009 in Eastern India, Kolkata (KOL). AERONET retrievals results for the study period manifested an aerosol optical depth - AOD (Angstrom exponent - α) in the range 0.65 - 0.81 (0.66 - 0.97) with an intermittent influence of dust. A substantial dominance of finer (coarser) particles were found in February (April) and an equal dominance of both in June. Aerosol size distribution (ASD) revealed a high volume in fine mode during June and that in April for the coarse mode. A few areas of in and around KOL, Odisha, and Sikkim influenced AOD ascertained using the Potential source contribution function (PSCF). Cluster analysis revealed preferred pathway as continental during February and both continental and marine during March to June. Episodic days identified for dust occurrence was examined and was further corroborated by MODIS Rapid response images. Further, comparative results of seven collateral AERONET sites in India, revealed a high AOD (α) at KOL during February to May (March and April) with Fine mode - FM (Coarse mode - CM) AOD of KOL being high during March and April (February to April) than other locations. Single scattering albedo (SSA) at 0.67 μm at KOL was slightly lower during February and March, with being equivalent and or higher than other sites during April to June. Comparison of AERONET - MODIS AOD at 0.55 µm for KOL (entire study period) for the collateral days revealed underestimation of MODIS during February to April and overestimation during May and June than AERONET. AERONET - MODIS AOD comparison for seven locations, during low (February) and high (June) aerosol loading, showed good agreement for few stations and divulged discrepancy for other sites.

  17. A Critical Examination of Spatial Biases Between MODIS and MISR Aerosol Products - Application for Potential AERONET Deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Y.; Zhang, J.; Reid, J. S.; Hyer, E. J.; Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Kahn, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) data are the primary benchmark for evaluating satellite-retrieved aerosol properties. However, despite its extensive coverage, the representativeness of the AERONET data is rarely discussed. Indeed, many studies have shown that satellite retrieval biases have a significant degree of spatial correlation that may be problematic for higher-level processes or inverse-emissions-modeling studies. To consider these issues and evaluate relative performance in regions of few surface observations, cross-comparisons between the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) products of operational MODIS Collection 5.1 Dark Target (DT) and operational MODIS Collection 5.1 Deep Blue (DB) with MISR version 22 were conducted. Through such comparisons, we can observe coherent spatial features of the AOD bias while side-stepping the full analysis required for determining when or where either retrieval is more correct. We identify regions where MODIS to MISR AOD ratios were found to be above 1.4 and below 0.7. Regions where lower boundary condition uncertainty is likely to be a dominant factor include portions of Western North America, the Andes mountains, Saharan Africa, the Arabian Peninsula, and Central Asia. Similarly, microphysical biases may be an issue in South America, and specific parts of Southern Africa, India Asia, East Asia, and Indonesia. These results help identify high-priority locations for possible future deployments of both in situ and ground based remote sensing measurements. The Supplement includes a km1 file.

  18. Validation of MODIS aerosol product with in-situ AERONET data (a study case in Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdes, M.; Leyva-Contreras, A.; Bonifaz, R.; Llamas, R.

    2009-12-01

    The aerosol optical thickness (AOT) is known as blocking particles which avoid the transmission of solar radiation coming from the Sun, and is defined as the integral of the coefficient of extinction over a vertical column of the Atmosphere. This coefficient of extinction is also defined as the limited fraction of the irradiance over the trajectory at a specific wavelength. The MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) sensor provides aerosol data products all over the planet. However this data requires constant evaluation and validation using in-situ data such as the provided by the network of photometers managed by AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network). In this work, the procedure of validation of the MODIS AOT data using AERONET data in the wavelengths of 660 and 675 nm is presented. It is expected that using validate remote sensing data which provides spatial and temporal information about the AOT will help to a better understanding of the behavior of the complex atmospheric conditions which characterize the NW of Mexico and SW of the US such as the Mexican monsoon.

  19. Statistical variability comparison in MODIS and AERONET derived aerosol optical depth over Indo-Gangetic Plains using time series modeling.

    PubMed

    Soni, Kirti; Parmar, Kulwinder Singh; Kapoor, Sangeeta; Kumar, Nishant

    2016-05-15

    A lot of studies in the literature of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) done by using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) derived data, but the accuracy of satellite data in comparison to ground data derived from ARrosol Robotic NETwork (AERONET) has been always questionable. So to overcome from this situation, comparative study of a comprehensive ground based and satellite data for the period of 2001-2012 is modeled. The time series model is used for the accurate prediction of AOD and statistical variability is compared to assess the performance of the model in both cases. Root mean square error (RMSE), mean absolute percentage error (MAPE), stationary R-squared, R-squared, maximum absolute percentage error (MAPE), normalized Bayesian information criterion (NBIC) and Ljung-Box methods are used to check the applicability and validity of the developed ARIMA models revealing significant precision in the model performance. It was found that, it is possible to predict the AOD by statistical modeling using time series obtained from past data of MODIS and AERONET as input data. Moreover, the result shows that MODIS data can be formed from AERONET data by adding 0.251627 ± 0.133589 and vice-versa by subtracting. From the forecast available for AODs for the next four years (2013-2017) by using the developed ARIMA model, it is concluded that the forecasted ground AOD has increased trend. PMID:26925737

  20. Multi-peak accumulation and coarse modes observed from AERONET retrieved aerosol volume size distribution in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Li, Zhengqiang; Zhang, Yuhuan; Chen, Yu; Cuesta, Juan; Ma, Yan

    2016-08-01

    We present characteristic peaks of atmospheric columnar aerosol volume size distribution retrieved from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) ground-based Sun-sky radiometer observation, and their correlations with aerosol optical properties and meteorological conditions in Beijing over 2013. The results show that the aerosol volume particle size distribution (VPSD) can be decomposed into up to four characteristic peaks, located in accumulation and coarse modes, respectively. The mean center radii of extra peaks in accumulation and coarse modes locate around 0.28 (±0.09) to 0.38 (±0.11) and 1.25 (±0.56) to 1.47 (±0.30) μm, respectively. The multi-peak size distributions are found in different aerosol loading conditions, with the mean aerosol optical depth (440 nm) of 0.58, 0.49, 1.18 and 1.04 for 2-, 3-I/II and 4-peak VPSD types, while the correspondingly mean relative humidity values are 58, 54, 72 and 67 %, respectively. The results also show the significant increase (from 0.25 to 0.40 μm) of the mean extra peak median radius in the accumulation mode for the 3-peak-II cases, which agrees with aerosol hygroscopic growth related to relative humidity and/or cloud or fog processing.

  1. Intercomparison of MODIS, MISR, OMI, and CALIPSO aerosol optical depth retrievals for four locations on the Indo-Gangetic plains and validation against AERONET data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibi, Humera; Alam, Khan; Chishtie, Farrukh; Bibi, Samina; Shahid, Imran; Blaschke, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    This study provides an intercomparison of aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals from satellite-based Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR), Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) instrumentation over Karachi, Lahore, Jaipur, and Kanpur between 2007 and 2013, with validation against AOD observations from the ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). Both MODIS Deep Blue (MODISDB) and MODIS Standard (MODISSTD) products were compared with the AERONET products. The MODISSTD-AERONET comparisons revealed a high degree of correlation for the four investigated sites at Karachi, Lahore, Jaipur, and Kanpur, the MODISDB-AERONET comparisons revealed even better correlations, and the MISR-AERONET comparisons also indicated strong correlations, as did the OMI-AERONET comparisons, while the CALIPSO-AERONET comparisons revealed only poor correlations due to the limited number of data points available. We also computed figures for root mean square error (RMSE), mean absolute error (MAE) and root mean bias (RMB). Using AERONET data to validate MODISSTD, MODISDB, MISR, OMI, and CALIPSO data revealed that MODISSTD data was more accurate over vegetated locations than over un-vegetated locations, while MISR data was more accurate over areas close to the ocean than over other areas. The MISR instrument performed better than the other instruments over Karachi and Kanpur, while the MODISSTD AOD retrievals were better than those from the other instruments over Lahore and Jaipur. We also computed the expected error bounds (EEBs) for both MODIS retrievals and found that MODISSTD consistently outperformed MODISDB in all of the investigated areas. High AOD values were observed by the MODISSTD, MODISDB, MISR, and OMI instruments during the summer months (April-August); these ranged from 0.32 to 0.78, possibly due to human activity and biomass burning. In

  2. Aerosol climatology using a tunable spectral variability cloud screening of AERONET data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Gobbi, Gian Paolo; Koren, Ilan

    2005-01-01

    Can cloud screening of an aerosol data set, affect the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) climatology? Aerosols, humidity and clouds are correlated. Therefore, rigorous cloud screening can systematically bias towards less cloudy conditions, underestimating the average AOT. Here, using AERONET data we show that systematic rejection of variable atmospheric optical conditions can generate such bias in the average AOT. Therefore we recommend (1) to introduce more powerful spectral variability cloud screening and (2) to change the philosophy behind present aerosol climatologies: Instead of systematically rejecting all cloud contaminations, we suggest to intentionally allow the presence of cloud contamination, estimate the statistical impact of the contamination and correct for it. The analysis, applied to 10 AERONET stations with approx. 4 years of data, shows almost no change for Rome (Italy), but up to a change in AOT of 0.12 in Beijing (PRC). Similar technique may be explored for satellite analysis, e.g. MODIS.

  3. Aerosol Optical Depths over Oceans: a View from MISR Retrievals and Collocated MAN and AERONET in Situ Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witek, Marcin L.; Garay, Michael J.; Diner, David J.; Smirnov, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    In this study, aerosol optical depths over oceans are analyzed from satellite and surface perspectives. Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) aerosol retrievals are investigated and validated primarily against Maritime Aerosol Network (MAN) observations. Furthermore, AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) data from 19 island and coastal sites is incorporated in this study. The 270 MISRMAN comparison points scattered across all oceans were identified. MISR on average overestimates aerosol optical depths (AODs) by 0.04 as compared to MAN; the correlation coefficient and root-mean-square error are 0.95 and 0.06, respectively. A new screening procedure based on retrieval region characterization is proposed, which is capable of substantially reducing MISR retrieval biases. Over 1000 additional MISRAERONET comparison points are added to the analysis to confirm the validity of the method. The bias reduction is effective within all AOD ranges. Setting a clear flag fraction threshold to 0.6 reduces the bias to below 0.02, which is close to a typical ground-based measurement uncertainty. Twelve years of MISR data are analyzed with the new screening procedure. The average over ocean AOD is reduced by 0.03, from 0.15 to 0.12. The largest AOD decrease is observed in high latitudes of both hemispheres, regions with climatologically high cloud cover. It is postulated that the screening procedure eliminates spurious retrieval errors associated with cloud contamination and cloud adjacency effects. The proposed filtering method can be used for validating aerosol and chemical transport models.

  4. Analysis of the Interaction and Transport of Aerosols with Cloud or Fog during Dragon Campaigns from Aeronet and Satellite Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Reid, J. S.; Schafer, J.; Giles, D. M.; Kim, J.; Kim, Y. J.; Sano, I.; Lynch, P.; Pickering, K. E.; Crawford, J. H.; Sinyuk, A.; Smirnov, A.; Trevino, N.

    2014-12-01

    Ground-based remote sensing observations from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun-sky radiometers have recently shown several instances where cloud-aerosol interaction had resulted in modification of aerosol properties and/or in difficulty identifying some major pollution transport events due to aerosols being imbedded in cloud systems. AERONET has established Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON) during field campaigns that are short-term (~2-3 months) relatively dense spatial networks of ~15 to 45 sun and sky scanning photometers. Recent major DRAGON field campaigns in Japan and South Korea (Spring 2012) and California (Winter 2013) have yielded observations of aerosol transport associated with clouds and/or aerosol properties modification as a result of fog interaction. Analysis of data from the Korean and Japan DRAGON campaigns shows that major fine-mode aerosol transport events are sometimes associated with extensive cloud cover and that cloud-screening of observations often filter out significant pollution aerosol transport events. The Spectral De-convolution Algorithm (SDA) algorithm was utilized to isolate and analyze the fine-mode aerosol optical depth signal for these cases of persistent and extensive cloud cover. Satellite retrievals of AOD from MODIS sensors were also investigated to assess the issue of detectability of high AOD events associated with high cloud fraction. AERONET is updating the cloud-screening algorithm applied to AOD data in the upcoming Version 3 database. Comparisons of cloud screening from Versions 2 and 3 of cases with high AOD associated with clouds will be studied. Additionally, extensive fog that was coincident with aerosol layer height on some days in both Korea and California resulted in large increases in fine mode aerosol radius, with a mode of cloud-processed or residual aerosol of radius ~0.4-0.5 micron sometimes observed. Cloud processed aerosol may occur much more frequently than AERONET

  5. AERONET-based models of smoke-dominated aerosol near source regions and transported over oceans, and implications for satellite retrievals of aerosol optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.; Eck, T. F.; Smirnov, A.; Holben, B. N.

    2014-10-01

    Smoke aerosols from biomass burning are an important component of the global aerosol system. Analysis of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) retrievals of aerosol microphysical/optical parameters at 10 sites reveals variety between biomass burning aerosols in different global source regions, in terms of aerosol particle size and single scatter albedo (SSA). Case studies of smoke observed at coastal/island AERONET sites also mostly lie within the range of variability at the near-source sites. Differences between sites tend to be larger than variability at an individual site, although optical properties for some sites in different regions can be quite similar. Across the sites, typical midvisible SSA ranges from ~ 0.95-0.97 (sites dominated by boreal forest or peat burning, typically with larger fine-mode particle radius and spread) to ~ 0.88-0.9 (sites most influenced by grass, shrub, or crop burning, typically smaller fine-mode particle radius and spread). The tropical forest site Alta Floresta (Brazil) is closer to this second category, although with intermediate SSA ~ 0.92. The strongest absorption is seen in southern African savannah at Mongu (Zambia), with average midvisible SSA ~ 0.85. Sites with stronger absorption also tend to have stronger spectral gradients in SSA, becoming more absorbing at longer wavelengths. Microphysical/optical models are presented in detail so as to facilitate their use in radiative transfer calculations, including extension to UV (ultraviolet) wavelengths, and lidar ratios. One intended application is to serve as candidate optical models for use in satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieval algorithms. The models presently adopted by these algorithms over ocean often have insufficient absorption (i.e. too high SSA) to represent these biomass burning aerosols. The underestimates in satellite-retrieved AOD in smoke outflow regions, which have important consequences for applications of these satellite data sets, are consistent with

  6. Validation and expected error estimation of Suomi-NPP VIIRS aerosol optical thickness and Ångström exponent with AERONET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jingfeng; Kondragunta, Shobha; Laszlo, Istvan; Liu, Hongqing; Remer, Lorraine A.; Zhang, Hai; Superczynski, Stephen; Ciren, Pubu; Holben, Brent N.; Petrenko, Maksym

    2016-06-01

    The new-generation polar-orbiting operational environmental sensor, the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on board the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) satellite, provides critical daily global aerosol observations. As older satellite sensors age out, the VIIRS aerosol product will become the primary observational source for global assessments of aerosol emission and transport, aerosol meteorological and climatic effects, air quality monitoring, and public health. To prove their validity and to assess their maturity level, the VIIRS aerosol products were compared to the spatiotemporally matched Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measurements. Over land, the VIIRS aerosol optical thickness (AOT) environmental data record (EDR) exhibits an overall global bias against AERONET of -0.0008 with root-mean-square error (RMSE) of the biases as 0.12. Over ocean, the mean bias of VIIRS AOT EDR is 0.02 with RMSE of the biases as 0.06. The mean bias of VIIRS Ocean Ångström Exponent (AE) EDR is 0.12 with RMSE of the biases as 0.57. The matchups between each product and its AERONET counterpart allow estimates of expected error in each case. Increased uncertainty in the VIIRS AOT and AE products is linked to specific regions, seasons, surface characteristics, and aerosol types, suggesting opportunity for future modifications as understanding of algorithm assumptions improves. Based on the assessment, the VIIRS AOT EDR over land reached Validated maturity beginning 23 January 2013; the AOT EDR and AE EDR over ocean reached Validated maturity beginning 2 May 2012, excluding the processing error period 15 October to 27 November 2012. These findings demonstrate the integrity and usefulness of the VIIRS aerosol products that will transition from S-NPP to future polar-orbiting environmental satellites in the decades to come and become the standard global aerosol data set as the previous generations' missions come to an end.

  7. Maritime Aerosol Network (MAN) as a Component of AERONET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smirnov, A.; Holben, B. N.; Slutsker, I.; Giles, D. M.; McClain, C. R.; Eck, T. F.; Sakerin, S. M.; Macke, A.; Croot, P.; Zibordi, G.; Quinn, P. K.

    2008-01-01

    The World Ocean produces a large amount of natural aerosols that have all impact on the Earth's albedo and climate. Sea-salt is the major contributor to aerosol optical depth over the oceans. [Mahowald et al. 2006; Chin et al. 2002; Satheesh et al. 1999; Winter and Chylek, 1997] and therefore affects the radiative balance over the ocean through the direct [Haywood et al. 1999] and indirect aerosol effect [O'Dowd et al. 1999]. Aerosols over the oceans (produced marine and advected from land sources) are important for various atmospheric processes [Lewis and Schwartz, 2004] and remote sensing studies [Gordon, 1997].

  8. Fog Induced Aerosol Modification Observed by AERONET, Including Occurrences During Major Air Pollution Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Reid, J. S.; Giles, D. M.; Rivas, M.; Singh, R. P.; Tripathi, S. N.; Bruegge, C. J.; Li, Z.; Platnick, S. E.; Arnold, T.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Burton, S. P.; Kim, J.; Kim, Y. J.; Sinyuk, A.; Dubovik, O.; Arola, A. T.; Schafer, J.; Artaxo, P.; Smirnov, A.; Chen, H.; Goloub, P.

    2014-12-01

    The modification of aerosol optical properties due to interaction with fog is examined from measurements made by sun/sky radiometers at several AERONET sites. Retrieved total column volume size distributions for cases identified as aerosol modified by fog often show very a large 'middle mode' submicron radius (~0.4 to 0.5 microns), which is typically seen as a component of a bimodal sub-micron distribution. These middle mode sized particles are often called cloud-processed or residual aerosol. This bimodal accumulation mode distribution may be due to one mode (the larger one) from fog-processed aerosol and the other from interstitial aerosol, or possibly from two different aerosol species (differing chemical composition) with differing hygroscopic growth factors. The size of the fine mode particles from AERONET retrieved for these cases exceeds the size of sub-micron sized particles retrieved for nearly all other aerosol types, suggesting significant modification of aerosols within the fog or cloud environment. In-situ measured aerosol size distributions made during other fog events are compared to the AERONET retrievals, and show close agreement in the residual mode particle size. Almucantar retrievals are analyzed from the Kanpur site in the Indo-Gangetic Plain in India (fog in January), Beijing (fog in winter), Fresno, CA in the San Joaquin Valley (fog in winter), South Korea (Yellow Sea fog in spring), Arica on the northern coast of Chile (stratocumulus), and several other sites with aerosol observations made after fog dissipated. Additionally, several major air pollution events are discussed where extremely high aerosol concentrations were measured at the surface and during which fog also occurred, resulting in the detection very large fine mode aerosols (residual mode) from AERONET retrievals in some of these events. Low wind speeds that occurred during these events were conducive to both pollutant accumulation and also fog formation. The presence of fog then

  9. Fog Induced Aerosol Modification Observed by AERONET, Including Occurrences During Major Air Pollution Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Reid, J. S.; Giles, D. M.; Rivas, M.; Singh, R. P.; Tripathi, S. N.; Bruegge, C. J.; Li, Z.; Platnick, S. E.; Arnold, T.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Burton, S. P.; Kim, J.; Kim, Y. J.; Sinyuk, A.; Dubovik, O.; Arola, A. T.; Schafer, J.; Artaxo, P.; Smirnov, A.; Chen, H.; Goloub, P.

    2015-12-01

    The modification of aerosol optical properties due to interaction with fog is examined from measurements made by sun/sky radiometers at several AERONET sites. Retrieved total column volume size distributions for cases identified as aerosol modified by fog often show very a large 'middle mode' submicron radius (~0.4 to 0.5 microns), which is typically seen as a component of a bimodal sub-micron distribution. These middle mode sized particles are often called cloud-processed or residual aerosol. This bimodal accumulation mode distribution may be due to one mode (the larger one) from fog-processed aerosol and the other from interstitial aerosol, or possibly from two different aerosol species (differing chemical composition) with differing hygroscopic growth factors. The size of the fine mode particles from AERONET retrieved for these cases exceeds the size of sub-micron sized particles retrieved for nearly all other aerosol types, suggesting significant modification of aerosols within the fog or cloud environment. In-situ measured aerosol size distributions made during other fog events are compared to the AERONET retrievals, and show close agreement in the residual mode particle size. Almucantar retrievals are analyzed from the Kanpur site in the Indo-Gangetic Plain in India (fog in January), Beijing (fog in winter), Fresno, CA in the San Joaquin Valley (fog in winter), South Korea (Yellow Sea fog in spring), Arica on the northern coast of Chile (stratocumulus), and several other sites with aerosol observations made after fog dissipated. Additionally, several major air pollution events are discussed where extremely high aerosol concentrations were measured at the surface and during which fog also occurred, resulting in the detection very large fine mode aerosols (residual mode) from AERONET retrievals in some of these events. Low wind speeds that occurred during these events were conducive to both pollutant accumulation and also fog formation. The presence of fog then

  10. Evidence of a weakly absorbing intermediate mode of aerosols in AERONET data from Saharan and Sahelian sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianelli, Scott M.; Lacis, Andrew A.; Carlson, Barbara E.; Hameed, Sultan

    2013-11-01

    Accurate retrievals of aerosol size distribution are necessary to estimate aerosols' impact on climate and human health. The inversions of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) usually retrieve bimodal distributions. However, when the inversion is applied to Saharan and Sahelian dust, an additional mode of intermediate size between the coarse and fine modes is sometimes seen. This mode explains peculiarities in the behavior of the Ångström exponent, along with the fine mode fraction retrieved using the spectral deconvolution algorithm, observed in a March 2006 dust storm. For this study, 15 AERONET sites in northern Africa and on the Atlantic are examined to determine the frequency and properties of the intermediate mode. The mode is observed most frequently at Ilorin in Nigeria. It is also observed at Capo Verde and multiple sites located within the Sahel but much less frequently at sites in the northern Sahara and the Canary Islands. The presence of the intermediate mode coincides with increases in Ångström exponent, fine mode fraction, single-scattering albedo, and to a lesser extent percent sphericity. The Ångström exponent decreases with increasing optical depth at most sites when the intermediate mode is present, but the fine mode fraction does not. Single-scattering albedo does not steadily decrease with fine mode fraction when the intermediate mode is present, as it does in typical mixtures of dust and biomass-burning aerosols. Continued investigation is needed to further define the intermediate mode's properties, determine why it differs from most Saharan dust, and identify its climate and health effects.

  11. Evidence of the aerosol core-shell mixing state over Europe during the heat wave of summer 2003 by using CHIMERE simulations and AERONET inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Péré, J. C.; Mallet, M.; Bessagnet, B.; Pont, V.

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this work consists to infer the most probable mixing state of aerosols over the European continent during the heat wave of summer 2003, where large concentrations of biomass burning and anthropogenic aerosols have been observed. The methodology presented here is based on the Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) sensitivity to the mixing state of particles. Three different mixing cases; external mixing, internal mixing, and core-shell type mixing have been considered. Composite SSA has been computed for this intense pollution event over Europe and are compared with the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) retrieved SSA values. The most probable mixing state seems to be core-shell mixing, with secondary aerosols coating over primary soot and mineral dust. This work underlines clearly that this specific representation should be used in modeling exercises for simulating anthropogenic and/or biomass burning direct and semi-direct aerosol effects and climate impact over the European region.

  12. Response to "Toward Unified Satellite Climatology of Aerosol Properties. 3. MODIS Versus MISR Versus AERONET"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph A.; Garay, Michael J.; Nelson, David L.; Levy, Robert C.; Bull, Michael A.; Diner, David J.; Martonchik, John V.; Hansen, Earl G.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Tanre, Didier

    2010-01-01

    A recent paper by Mishchenko et al. compares near-coincident MISR, MODIS, and AERONET aerosol optical depth (AOD) products, and reports much poorer agreement than that obtained by the instrument teams and others. We trace the reasons for the discrepancies primarily to differences in (1) the treatment of outliers, (2) the application of absolute vs. relative criteria for testing agreement, and (3) the ways in which seasonally varying spatial distributions of coincident retrievals are taken into account.

  13. Reduction of Aerosol Absorption in Beijing Since 2007 from MODIS and AERONET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyapustin, A.; Smirnov, A.; Holben, B.; Chin, M.; Streets, D. G.; Lu, Z.; Kahn, R.; Slutsker, I.; Laszlo, I.; Kondragunta, S.; Tanre, D.; Dubovik, O.; Goloub, P.; Chen, H.-B.; Sinyuk, A.; Wang, Y.; Korkin, S.

    2011-01-01

    An analysis of the time series of MODIS-based and AERONET aerosol records over Beijing reveals two distinct periods, before and after 2007. The MODIS data from both the Terra and Aqua satellites were processed with the new Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) algorithm. A comparison of MAIAC and AERONET AOT shows that whereas MAIAC consistently underestimated peak AOT values by 10-20% in the prior period, the bias mostly disappears after mid- 2007. Independent analysis of the AERONET dataset reveals little or no change in the effective radii of the fine and coarse fractions and of the Angstrom exponent. At the same time, it shows an increasing trend in the single scattering albedo, by 0.02 in 9 years. As MAIAC was using the same aerosol model for the entire 2000-2010 period, the decrease in AOT bias after 2007 can be explained only by a corresponding decrease of aerosol absorption caused by a reduction in local black carbon emissions. The observed changes correlate in time with the Chinese government's broad measures to improve air quality in Beijing during preparations for the Summer Olympics of 2008.

  14. Reduction of Aerosol Absorption in Beijing Since 2007 from MODIS and AERONET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyapustin, A.; Smirnov, A.; Holben, B.; Chin, M.; Streets, D. G.; Lu, Z.; Kahn, R.; Slutsker, I.; Laszlo, I.; Kondragunta, S.; Tanre, D.; Dubovik, O.; Goloub, P.; Chen, H.-B.; Sinyuk, A.; Wang, Y.; Korkin, S.

    2011-01-01

    An analysis of the time series of MODIS-based and AERONET aerosol records over Beijing reveals two distinct periods, before and after 2007. The MODIS data from both the Terra and Aqua satellites were processed with the new Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) algorithm. A comparison of MAIAC and AERONET AOT shows that whereas MAIAC consistently underestimated peak AOT values by 10-20% in the prior period, the bias mostly disappears after mid-2007. Independent analysis of the AERONET dataset reveals little or no change in the effective radii of the fine and coarse fractions and of the Angstrom exponent. At the same time, it shows an increasing trend in the single scattering albedo, by approx.0.02 in 9 years. As MAIAC was using the same aerosol model for the entire 2000-2010 period, the decrease in AOT bias after 2007 can be explained only by a corresponding decrease of aerosol absorption caused by a reduction in local black carbon emissions. The observed changes correlate in time with the Chinese government's broad measures to improve air quality in Beijing during preparations for the Summer Olympics of 2008.

  15. Reduction of aerosol absorption in Beijing since 2007 from MODIS and AERONET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyapustin, A.; Smirnov, A.; Holben, B.; Chin, M.; Streets, D. G.; Lu, Z.; Kahn, R.; Slutsker, I.; Laszlo, I.; Kondragunta, S.; Tanré, D.; Dubovik, O.; Goloub, P.; Chen, H.-B.; Sinyuk, A.; Wang, Y.; Korkin, S.

    2011-05-01

    An analysis of the time series of MODIS-based and AERONET aerosol records over Beijing reveals two distinct periods, before and after 2007. The MODIS data from both the Terra and Aqua satellites were processed with the new Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) algorithm. A comparison of MAIAC and AERONET AOT shows that whereas MAIAC consistently underestimated peak AOT values by 10-20% in the prior period, the bias mostly disappears after mid-2007. Independent analysis of the AERONET dataset reveals little or no change in the effective radii of the fine and coarse fractions and of the Ångström exponent. At the same time, it shows an increasing trend in the single scattering albedo, by ˜0.02 in 9 years. As MAIAC was using the same aerosol model for the entire 2000-2010 period, the decrease in AOT bias after 2007 can be explained only by a corresponding decrease of aerosol absorption caused by a reduction in local black carbon emissions. The observed changes correlate in time with the Chinese government's broad measures to improve air quality in Beijing during preparations for the Summer Olympics of 2008.

  16. Assessment of aerosol optics, microphysics, and transport process of biomass-burning haze over northern SE Asia: 7-SEAS AERONET observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Giles, D. M.; Eck, T. F.; Lin, N.; Tsay, S.; Holben, B. N.

    2013-12-01

    Initiated in 2007, the Seven South East Asian Studies (7-SEAS) is aimed to facilitate an interdisciplinary research on the aerosol environment in SE Asia (SEA) as a whole, promote international collaboration, and further enhance scientific understanding of the impact of biomass burning on clouds, atmospheric radiation, hydrological cycle, and region climates. One of the key measurements proposed in the 7-SEAS is the NASA/AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) observation, which provides helpful information on columnar aerosol optical properties and allows us consistently to examine biomass-burning aerosols across northern SEA from ground-based remote-sensing point of view. In this presentation, we will focus on the two 7-SEAS field deployments, i.e. the 2012 Son La Experiment and the 2013 BASELInE (Biomass-burning Aerosols & Stratocumulus Environment: Lifecycles and Interactions Experiment). We analyze the daytime variation of aerosol by using consistent measurements from 15 of AERONET sites over Indochina, the South China Sea, and Taiwan. Spatiotemporal characteristics of aerosol optical properties (e.g., aerosol optical depth (AOD), fine/coarse mode AOD, single-scattering albedo, asymmetry factor) will be discussed. Strong diurnal variation of aerosol optical properties was observed to be attributed to planetary boundary layer (PBL) dynamics. A comparison between aerosol loading (i.e. AOD) and surface PM2.5 concentration will be presented. Our results demonstrate that smoke aerosols emitted from agriculture burning that under certain meteorological conditions can degrade regional air quality 3000 km from the source region, with additional implications for aerosol radiative forcing and regional climate change over northern SE Asia.

  17. Assessment of the MODIS-Terra Collection 006 aerosol optical depth data over the greater Mediterranean basin and inter-comparison against MODIS C005 and AERONET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betsikas, Marios; Hatzianastassiou, Nikos; Papadimas, Christos D.; Gkikas, Antonis; Matsoukas, Christos; Sayer, Andrew; Hsu, Christina; Vardavas, Ilias

    2016-04-01

    Aerosols are one of the key factors determining the Earth's solar radiation budget. The aerosol radiative effects are strongly dependent on aerosol optical depth (AOD) which is a good measure of atmospheric aerosol loading. Therefore, understanding better the spatial and temporal patterns of AOD at both global and regional scales is important for more accurate estimations of aerosol radiative effects. Nowadays, improved globally distributed AOD products are available largely based on satellite observations. Currently, one of the most acknowledged accurate AOD dataset is the one derived from measurements of the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument onboard the twin Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra and Aqua satellite platforms. The MODIS aerosol retrieval algorithm, which is used to produce AOD data, is continuously improved and updated, leading to releases of successive series, named as Collections. Recently, MODIS Collection 6 (C006) dataset has been made available. Despite their advantages, satellite AOD products have to be assessed through comparisons against ground based AOD products, such as those from AERosol Robotic Network (AERONET). The aim of the present study is to assess the newest MODIS C006 AOD product over the greater Mediterranean basin. The assessment is performed through comparisons of the MODIS-Terra C006 Level-3 AOD data against corresponding data from the previous C005 MODIS dataset, as well as versus AOD data from AERONET stations within the study region. The study period extends from 2001 to 2012 and our comparisons are performed on a monthly basis. Emphasis is given on differences between the MODIS C006 AOD data and corresponding previous C005 data, as to their spatial and temporal, seasonal and inter-annual, patterns. The results show a better agreement of MODIS C006 than C005 AOD data with AERONET, while the C006 data offer a complete spatial coverage of the study region, specifically over the northern African

  18. Improvement of Aerosol Optical Depth Retrieval from MODIS Spectral Reflectance over the Global Ocean Using New Aerosol Models Archived from AERONET Inversion Data and Tri-axial Ellipsoidal Dust Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J.; Kim, J.; Yang, P.; Hsu, N. C.

    2012-01-01

    New over-ocean aerosol models are developed by integrating the inversion data from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun/sky radiometers with a database for the optical properties of tri-axial ellipsoid particles. The new aerosol models allow more accurate retrieval of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) in the case of high AOD (AOD greater than 0.3). The aerosol models are categorized by using the fine-mode fraction (FMF) at 550 nm and the singlescattering albedo (SSA) at 440 nm from the AERONET inversion data to include a variety of aerosol types found around the globe. For each aerosol model, the changes in the aerosol optical properties (AOPs) as functions of AOD are considered to better represent aerosol characteristics. Comparisons of AODs between AERONET and MODIS for the period from 2003 to 2010 show that the use of the new aerosol models enhances the AOD accuracy with a Pearson coefficient of 0.93 and a regression slope of 0.99 compared to 0.92 and 0.85 calculated using the MODIS Collection 5 data. Moreover, the percentage of data within an expected error of +/-(0.03 + 0.05xAOD) is increased from 62 percent to 64 percent for overall data and from 39 percent to 51 percent for AOD greater than 0.3. Errors in the retrieved AOD are further characterized with respect to the Angstrom exponent (AE), scattering angle, SSA, and air mass factor (AMF). Due to more realistic AOPs assumptions, the new algorithm generally reduces systematic errors in the retrieved AODs compared with the current operational algorithm. In particular, the underestimation of fine-dominated AOD and the scattering angle dependence of dust-dominated AOD are significantly mitigated as results of the new algorithm's improved treatment of aerosol size distribution and dust particle nonsphericity.

  19. Aerosol remote sensing in East Asia : Motivation for NASA/AERONET/DRAGON-Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, S.; Nakata, M.; Sano, I.; Holben, B. N.

    2013-12-01

    It is known that the air pollution in East Asia becomes to be severe due to both the increasing emissions of the anthropogenic aerosols associated with economic growth and the complicated behavior of natural aerosols. Furthermore, air quality in the big cities is worse in comparison with that in remote area because of the industries and auto mobiles. Then high resolved measurements of atmospheric aerosols in spatial- and temporal- scale are desired in Asian urban cities. NASA/Dragon-Asia practiced in the spring of 2012 is really meaningful accordingly. In recent years, heavy air pollutants as well as Asian dusts, i.e. yellow dust storm, transport to neighbor countries from the continent of China throughout year. These aerosol episodes, which mean dense concentrations of aerosols in the atmosphere, severely influence for the environment and human health. This work focuses on the aerosol remote sensing in the case of serious aerosol episodes detected by both satellite and ground measurements in East Asia. It is reasonable to consider for aerosol remote sensing that precise simulations of multiple light scattering processes ( cslled radiative transfer hereafter) in coupled Earth-atmosphere-surface model are necessary and need a long computational time especially for an optically thick atmosphere model such as an aerosol episode. Thus efficient and practical algorithms for radiative transfer are indispensable to retrieve aerosol properties from space. It is shown here that dense aerosol episodes can be well simulated by a semi-infinite radiation model composed of the proposed aerosol models, which are compiled from the accumulated measurements during more than ten years provided with the world wide aerosol monitoring network (NASA/AERONET). In addition the efficient procedure to solve the radiative transfer problem for semi-infinite medium named MSOS (Method of Successive Order of Scattering) is examined in practice around Beijing by using Aqua/MODIS data.

  20. Parametric retrieval model for estimating aerosol size distribution via the AERONET, LAGOS station.

    PubMed

    Emetere, Moses Eterigho; Akinyemi, Marvel Lola; Akin-Ojo, Omololu

    2015-12-01

    The size characteristics of atmospheric aerosol over the tropical region of Lagos, Southern Nigeria were investigated using two years of continuous spectral aerosol optical depth measurements via the AERONET station for four major bands i.e. blue, green, red and infrared. Lagos lies within the latitude of 6.465°N and longitude of 3.406°E. Few systems of dispersion model was derived upon specified conditions to solve challenges on aerosols size distribution within the Stokes regime. The dispersion model was adopted to derive an aerosol size distribution (ASD) model which is in perfect agreement with existing model. The parametric nature of the formulated ASD model shows the independence of each band to determine the ASD over an area. The turbulence flow of particulates over the area was analyzed using the unified number (Un). A comparative study via the aid of the Davis automatic weather station was carried out on the Reynolds number, Knudsen number and the Unified number. The Reynolds and Unified number were more accurate to describe the atmospheric fields of the location. The aerosols loading trend in January to March (JFM) and August to October (ASO) shows a yearly 15% retention of aerosols in the atmosphere. The effect of the yearly aerosol retention can be seen to partly influence the aerosol loadings between October and February. PMID:26452005

  1. Towards identification of relevant variables in the observed aerosol optical depth bias between MODIS and AERONET observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malakar, N. K.; Lary, D. J.; Gencaga, D.; Albayrak, A.; Wei, J.

    2013-08-01

    Measurements made by satellite remote sensing, Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), and globally distributed Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) are compared. Comparison of the two datasets measurements for aerosol optical depth values show that there are biases between the two data products. In this paper, we present a general framework towards identifying relevant set of variables responsible for the observed bias. We present a general framework to identify the possible factors influencing the bias, which might be associated with the measurement conditions such as the solar and sensor zenith angles, the solar and sensor azimuth, scattering angles, and surface reflectivity at the various measured wavelengths, etc. Specifically, we performed analysis for remote sensing Aqua-Land data set, and used machine learning technique, neural network in this case, to perform multivariate regression between the ground-truth and the training data sets. Finally, we used mutual information between the observed and the predicted values as the measure of similarity to identify the most relevant set of variables. The search is brute force method as we have to consider all possible combinations. The computations involves a huge number crunching exercise, and we implemented it by writing a job-parallel program.

  2. Characterisation of dust aerosols in the infrared from IASI and comparison with PARASOL, MODIS, MISR, CALIOP, and AERONET observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyridieu, S.; Chédin, A.; Capelle, V.; Tsamalis, C.; Pierangelo, C.; Armante, R.; Crevoisier, C.; Crépeau, L.; Siméon, M.; Ducos, F.; Scott, N. A.

    2013-06-01

    Infrared Atmospheric Sounder Interferometer (IASI) observations covering the period from July 2007 to December 2011 are interpreted in terms of monthly mean, 1°×1°, 10 μm dust Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD), mean altitude and coarse mode effective radius. The geographical study area includes the northern tropical Atlantic and the northwest Arabian Sea, both characterised by strong, regular dust events. The method developed relies on the construction of Look-Up-Tables computed for a large selection of atmospheric situations and observing conditions. At a regional scale, a good agreement is found between IASI-retrieved 10 μm AOD and total visible optical depth at 550 nm from either the Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS/Aqua or Terra), or the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), or the Polarization and Anisotropy of Reflectances for Atmospheric Science coupled with Observations from a Lidar (PARASOL). Taking into account the ratio existing between infrared and visible AODs, the diversity between the different 550 nm AODs is similar to the difference between these and the IASI AODs. The infrared AOD to visible AOD ratio, partly reflecting the varying distribution of the dust layer between the dust coarse mode particles seen by IASI, and the fine mode seen by the other instruments, is found to vary with the region observed with values close to already published values. Comparisons between the climatologies of the 10 μm IASI AOD and of the PARASOL non-spherical coarse mode AOD at 865 nm, both expected to be representative of the dust coarse mode, lead to conclusions differing according to the region considered. These differences are discussed in the light of the MODIS Angström exponent (865-550 nm). At local scale, around six Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites, close or far from the dust sources, a similar satisfactory agreement is found between IASI and the visible AODs and the differences between these products are shown and

  3. Characterization of dust aerosols in the infrared from IASI and comparison with PARASOL, MODIS, MISR, CALIOP, and AERONET observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyridieu, S.; Chédin, A.; Capelle, V.; Tsamalis, C.; Pierangelo, C.; Armante, R.; Crevoisier, C.; Crépeau, L.; Siméon, M.; Ducos, F.; Scott, N. A.

    2012-09-01

    Infrared Atmospheric Sounder Interferometer (IASI) observations covering the period from July 2007 to December 2011 are interpreted in terms of monthly mean, 1°×1°, 10 μm dust Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD), mean altitude and coarse mode effective radius. The geographical study area includes the northern tropical Atlantic and the north-west Arabian Sea, both characterized by strong, regular dust events. The method developed relies on the construction of Look-Up-Tables computed for a large selection of atmospheric situations and observing conditions. At regional scale, a good agreement is found between IASI-retrieved 10 μm AOD and total visible optical depth at 550 nm from either the Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS/Aqua or Terra), or the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), or the Polarization and Anisotropy of Reflectances for Atmospheric Science coupled with Observations from a Lidar (PARASOL). Taking into account the ratio existing between infrared and visible AODs, the diversity between the different 550 nm AODs is similar to the difference between these and the IASI AODs. The infrared AOD to visible AOD ratio, partly reflecting the varying distribution of the dust layer between the dust coarse mode particles seen by IASI, and the fine mode seen by the other instruments, is found to vary with the region observed with values close to already published values. Comparisons between the climatologies of the 10 μm IASI AOD and of the PARASOL non-spherical coarse mode AOD at 865 nm, both expected to be representative of the dust coarse mode, lead to conclusions differing according to the region considered. These differences are discussed in the light of the MODIS Angström exponent (865-550 nm). At local scale, around six Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites, close or far from the dust sources, a similar satisfactory agreement is found between IASI and the visible AODs and the differences between these products are shown and analysed

  4. Toward Unified Satellite Climatology of Aerosol Properties. 3. MODIS Versus MISR Versus AERONET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Liu, Li; Geogdzhayev, Igor V.; Travis, Larry D.; Cairns, Brian; Lacis, Andrew A.

    2010-01-01

    We use the full duration of collocated pixel-level MODIS-Terra and MISR aerosol optical thickness (AOT) retrievals and level 2 cloud-screened quality-assured AERONET measurements to evaluate the likely individual MODIS and MISR retrieval accuracies globally over oceans and land. We show that the use of quality-assured MODIS AOTs as opposed to the use of all MODIS AOTs has little effect on the resulting accuracy. The MODIS and MISR relative standard deviations (RSTDs) with respect to AERONET are remarkably stable over the entire measurement record and reveal nearly identical overall AOT performances of MODIS and MISR over the entire suite of AERONET sites. This result is used to evaluate the likely pixel-level MODIS and MISR performances on the global basis with respect to the (unknown) actual AOTs. For this purpose, we use only fully compatible MISR and MODIS aerosol pixels. We conclude that the likely RSTDs for this subset of MODIS and MISR AOTs are 73% over land and 30% over oceans. The average RSTDs for the combined [AOT(MODIS)+AOT(MISR)]/2 pixel-level product are close to 66% and 27%, respectively, which allows us to recommend this simple blend as a better alternative to the original MODIS and MISR data. These accuracy estimates still do not represent the totality of MISR and quality-assured MODIS pixel-level AOTs since an unaccounted for and potentially significant source of errors is imperfect cloud screening. Furthermore, many collocated pixels for which one of the datasets reports a retrieval, whereas the other one does not may also be problematic.

  5. Trend analysis of the Aerosol Optical Thickness and Ångström Exponent derived from the global AERONET spectral observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, J.; von Hoyningen-Huene, W.; Kokhanovsky, A. A.; Vountas, M.; Burrows, J. P.

    2011-08-01

    Regular aerosol observations based on well-calibrated instruments have led to a better understanding of the aerosol radiative budget on Earth. In recent years, these instruments have played an important role in the determination of the increase of anthropogenic aerosols by means of long-term studies. Only few investigations regarding long-term trends of aerosol optical characteristics (e.g. Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) and Ångström Exponent (ÅE)) have been derived from ground-based observations. This paper aims to derive and discuss linear trends of AOT (440, 675, 870, and 1020 nm) and ÅE (440-870 nm) using AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) spectral observations. Additionally, temporal trends of Coarse- and Fine-mode dominant AOTs (CAOT and FAOT) have been estimated by applying an aerosol classification based on accurate ÅE and Ångström Exponent Difference (ÅED). In order to take into account the fact that cloud disturbance is having a significant influence on the trend analysis of aerosols, we introduce a weighted least squares regression depending on two weights: (1) monthly standard deviation and (2) Number of Observations (NO) per month. Temporal increase of FAOTs prevails over regions dominated by emerging economy or slash-burn agriculture in East Asia and South Africa. On the other hand, insignificant or negative trends for FAOTs are detected over Western Europe and North America. Over desert regions, both increase and decrease of CAOTs are observed depending on meteorological conditions.

  6. Trend analysis of aerosol optical thickness and Ångström exponent derived from the global AERONET spectral observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, J.; von Hoyningen-Huene, W.; Kokhanovsky, A. A.; Vountas, M.; Burrows, J. P.

    2012-06-01

    Regular aerosol observations based on well-calibrated instruments have led to a better understanding of the aerosol radiative budget on Earth. In recent years, these instruments have played an important role in the determination of the increase of anthropogenic aerosols by means of long-term studies. Only few investigations regarding long-term trends of aerosol optical characteristics (e.g. aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and Ångström exponent (ÅE)) have been derived from ground-based observations. This paper aims to derive and discuss linear trends of AOT (440, 675, 870, and 1020 nm) and ÅE (440-870 nm) using AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) level 2.0 spectral observations. Additionally, temporal trends of coarse- and fine-mode dominant AOTs (CdAOT and FdAOT) have been estimated by applying an aerosol classification based on accurate ÅE and Ångström exponent difference (ÅED). In order to take into account the fact that cloud disturbance is having a significant influence on the trend analysis of aerosols, we introduce a weighted least squares regression depending on two weights: (1) monthly standard deviation (σt) and (2) number of observations per month (nt). Temporal increase of FdAOTs (440 nm) prevails over newly industrializing countries in East Asia (weighted trends; +6.23% yr-1 at Beijing) and active agricultural burning regions in South Africa (+1.89% yr-1 at Mongu). On the other hand, insignificant or negative trends for FdAOTs are detected over Western Europe (+0.25% yr-1 at Avignon and -2.29% yr-1 at Ispra) and North America (-0.52% yr-1 for GSFC and -0.01% yr-1 at MD_Science_Center). Over desert regions, both increase and decrease of CdAOTs (+3.37% yr-1 at Solar_Village and -1.18% yr-1 at Ouagadougou) are observed depending on meteorological conditions.

  7. Maritime Aerosol Network as a Component of AERONET - First Results and Comparison with Global Aerosol Models and Satellite Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smirnov, A.; Holben, B. N.; Giles, D. M.; Slutsker, I.; O'Neill, N. T.; Eck, T. F.; Macke, A.; Croot, P.; Courcoux, Y.; Sakerin, S. M.; Smyth, T. J.; Zielinski, T.; Zibordi, G.; Goes, J. I.; Harvey, M. J.; Quinn, P. K.; Nelson, N. B.; Radionov, V. F.; Duarte, C. M.; Remer, L. A.; Kahn, R. A.; Kleidman, R. G.; Gaitley, B. J.; Tan, Q.; Diehl, T. L.

    2011-01-01

    The Maritime Aerosol Network (MAN) has been collecting data over the oceans since November 2006. Over 80 cruises were completed through early 2010 with deployments continuing. Measurement areas included various parts of the Atlantic Ocean, the Northern and Southern Pacific Ocean, the South Indian Ocean, the Southern Ocean, the Arctic Ocean and inland seas. MAN deploys Microtops handheld sunphotometers and utilizes a calibration procedure and data processing traceable to AERONET. Data collection included areas that previously had no aerosol optical depth (AOD) coverage at all, particularly vast areas of the Southern Ocean. The MAN data archive provides a valuable resource for aerosol studies in maritime environments. In the current paper we present results of AOD measurements over the oceans, and make a comparison with satellite AOD retrievals and model simulations.

  8. Response to Toward Unified Satellite Climatology of Aerosol Properties. 3; MODIS versus MISR versus AERONET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph A.; Garay, Michael J.; Nelson, David L.; Levy, Robert C.; Bull, Michael A.; Diner, David J.; Martonchik, John V.; Hansen, Earl G.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Tanre, Didler

    2010-01-01

    A recent paper by Mishchenko et al. compares near-coincident MISR, MODIS, and AERONET aerosol optical depth (AOD), and gives a much less favorable impression of the utility of the satellite products than that presented by the instrument teams and other groups. We trace the reasons for the differing pictures to whether known and previously documented limitations of the products are taken into account in the assessments. Specifically, the analysis approaches differ primarily in (1) the treatment of outliers, (2) the application of absolute vs. relative criteria for testing agreement, and (3) the ways in which seasonally varying spatial distributions of coincident retrievals are taken into account. Mishchenko et al. also do not distinguish between observational sampling differences and retrieval algorithm error. We assess the implications of the different analysis approaches, and cite examples demonstrating how the MISR and MODIS aerosol products have been applied successfully to a range of scientific investigations.

  9. Shortwave radiative forcing and efficiency of key aerosol types using AERONET data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, O. E.; Díaz, J. P.; Expósito, F. J.; Díaz, A. M.; Dubovik, O.; Derimian, Y.; Dubuisson, P.; Roger, J.-C.

    2011-12-01

    The shortwave radiative forcing (ΔF) and the radiative forcing efficiency (ΔFeff) of natural and anthropogenic aerosols have been analyzed using estimates of radiation both at the top (TOA) and at the bottom of atmosphere (BOA) modeled based on AERONET aerosol retrievals. In this study we have considered six main types of atmospheric aerosols: desert mineral dust, biomass burning, urban-industrial, continental background, oceanic and free troposphere. The ΔF averages obtained vary from -148 ± 44 Wm-2 (aerosol optical depth, AOD, at 0.55 μm, 0.85 ± 0.45) at the BOA for the mixture of desert mineral dust and biomass burning aerosols in Central Africa and -42 ± 22 Wm-2 (AOD = 0.86 ± 0.51) at the TOA for the pure mineral dust also in this region up to -6 ± 3 Wm-2 and -4 ± 2 Wm-2 (AOD = 0.03 ± 0.02) at the BOA and the TOA, respectively, for free troposphere conditions. This last result may be taken as reference on a global scale. Furthermore, we observe that the more absorbing aerosols are overall more efficient at the BOA in contrast to at the TOA, where they backscatter less solar energy into the space. The analysis of the radiative balance at the TOA shows that, together with the amount of aerosols and their absorptive capacity, it is essential to consider the surface albedo of the region on which they are. Thus, we document that in regions with high surface reflectivity (deserts and snow conditions) atmospheric aerosols lead to a warming of the Earth-atmosphere system, contributing to the greenhouse gas effect.

  10. Shortwave radiative forcing and efficiency of key aerosol types using AERONET data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, O. E.; Díaz, J. P.; Expósito, F. J.; Díaz, A. M.; Dubovik, O.; Derimian, Y.; Dubuisson, P.; Roger, J.-C.

    2012-06-01

    The shortwave radiative forcing (ΔF) and the radiative forcing efficiency (ΔFeff) of natural and anthropogenic aerosols have been analyzed using estimates of radiation both at the Top (TOA) and at the Bottom Of Atmosphere (BOA) modeled based on AERONET aerosol retrievals. Six main types of atmospheric aerosols have been compared (desert mineral dust, biomass burning, urban-industrial, continental background, oceanic and free troposphere) in similar observational conditions (i.e., for solar zenith angles between 55° and 65°) in order to compare the nearly same solar geometry. The instantaneous ΔF averages obtained vary from -122 ± 37 Wm-2 (aerosol optical depth, AOD, at 0.55 μm, 0.85 ± 0.45) at the BOA for the mixture of desert mineral dust and biomass burning aerosols in West Africa and -42 ± 22 Wm-2 (AOD = 0.9 ± 0.5) at the TOA for the pure mineral dust also in this region up to -6 ± 3 Wm-2 and -4 ± 2 Wm-2 (AOD = 0.03 ± 0.02) at the BOA and the TOA, respectively, for free troposphere conditions. This last result may be taken as reference on a global scale. Furthermore, we observe that the more absorbing aerosols are overall more efficient at the BOA in contrast to at the TOA, where they backscatter less solar energy into the space. The analysis of the radiative balance at the TOA shows that, together with the amount of aerosols and their absorptive capacity, it is essential to consider the surface albedo of the region on which they are. Thus, we document that in regions with high surface reflectivity (deserts and snow conditions) atmospheric aerosols lead to a warming of the Earth-atmosphere system.

  11. Comparison of aerosol optical depth of UV-B monitoring and research program (UVMRP), AERONET and MODIS over continental united states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Hongzhao; Chen, Maosi; Davis, John; Gao, Wei

    2013-06-01

    The concern about the role of aerosols as to their effect in the Earth-Atmosphere system requires observation at multiple temporal and spatial scales. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiameters (MODIS) is the main aerosol optical depth (AOD) monitoring satellite instrument, and its accuracy and uncertainty need to be validated against ground based measurements routinely. The comparison between two ground AOD measurement programs, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Ultraviolet-B Monitoring and Research Program (UVMRP) and the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) program, confirms the consistency between them. The intercomparison between the MODIS AOD, the AERONET AOD, and the UVMRP AOD suggests that the UVMRP AOD measurements are suited to be an alternative ground-based validation source for satellite AOD products. The experiments show that the spatial-temporal dependency between the MODIS AOD and the UVMRP AOD is positive in the sense that the MODIS AOD compare more favorably with the UVMRP AOD as the spatial and temporal intervals are increased. However, the analysis shows that the optimal spatial interval for all time windows is defined by an angular subtense of around 1° to 1.25°, while the optimal time window is around 423 to 483 minutes at most spatial intervals. The spatial-temporal approach around 1.25° & 423 minutes shows better agreement than the prevalent strategy of 0.25° & 60 minutes found in other similar investigations.

  12. Aerosol seasonal variations over urban sites in Ukraine and Belarus according to AERONET and POLDER measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milinevsky, G.; Danylevsky, V.; Bovchaliuk, V.; Bovchaliuk, A.; Goloub, Ph.; Dubovik, O.; Kabashnikov, V.; Chaikovsky, A.; Mishchenko, M.; Sosonkin, M.

    2013-12-01

    The paper presents an investigation of aerosol seasonal variations in several urban sites in the East European region. Our analysis of seasonal variations of optical and physical aerosol parameters is based on the sun-photometer 2008-2012 data from three urban ground-based AERONET sites in Ukraine (Kyiv, Kyiv-AO, and Lugansk) and one site in Belarus (Minsk), as well as on satellite POLDER instrument data for urban areas in Ukraine. Aerosol amount and optical thickness values exhibit peaks in the spring (April-May) and late summer (August), whereas minimum values are seen in late autumn over the Kyiv and Minsk sites. The results show that aerosol fine mode particles are most frequently detected during the spring and late summer seasons. The seasonal variation similarity in the two regions points to the resemblance in basic aerosol sources which are closely related to properties of aerosol particles. However the aerosol amount and properties change noticeably from year to year and from region to region. The analysis of seasonal aerosol optical thickness variations over the urban sites in the eastern and western parts of Ukraine according to both ground-based and POLDER data exhibits the same traits. In particular, over Kyiv, the values of the Angstrom exponent are lower in April of 2011 than in 2009 and 2010, while aerosol optical thickness values are almost the same, which can be explained by an increase in the amount of coarse mode particles in the atmosphere, such as Saharan dust. Moreover, the coarse mode particles prevailed over suburbs and the center of Kyiv during a third of all available days of observation in 2012. In general, the fine and coarse mode particles' modal radii averaged over 2008-2012 range from 0.1 to 0.2 μm and 2 to 5 μm, respectively, during the period from April to September. The single scattering albedo and refractive index values of these particles correspond to a mix of urban-industrial, biomass burning, and dust aerosols. In addition

  13. Variability and Trends of Aerosol Properties over Kanpur, Northern India using AERONET Data (2001-10)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaskaoutis, Dimitris G.; Singh, Ramesh.P.; Gautam, Ritesh; Sharma, Manish; Kosmopoulos, P. G.; Tripathi, S. N.

    2012-01-01

    Natural and anthropogenic aerosols over northern India play an important role in influencing the regional radiation budget, causing climate implications to the overall hydrological cycle of South Asia. In the context of regional climate change and air quality, we discuss aerosol loading variability and trends at Kanpur AERONET station located in the central part of the Indo-Gangetic plains (IGP), during the last decade (2001-10). Ground-based radiometric measurements show an overall increase in column-integrated aerosol optical depth (AOD) on a yearly basis. This upward trend is mainly due to a sustained increase in the seasonal/monthly averaged AOD during the winter (Dec-Feb) and post-monsoon (Oct-Nov) seasons (dominated by anthropogenic emissions). In contrast, a neutral to weak declining trend is observed during late pre-monsoon (Mar-May) and monsoon (Jun-Sep) months, mainly influenced by inter-annual variations of dust outbreaks. A general decrease in coarse-mode aerosols associated with variable dust activity is observed, whereas the statistically significant increasing post-monsoon/winter AOD is reflected in a shift of the columnar size distribution towards relatively larger particles in the accumulation mode. Overall, the present study provides an insight into the pronounced seasonal behavior in aerosol loading trends and, in general, is in agreement with that associating the findings with those recently reported by satellite observations (MODIS and MISR) over northern India. Our results further suggest that anthropogenic emissions (due mainly to fossil-fuel and biomass combustion) over the IGP have continued to increase in the last decade.

  14. Black Carbon Concentration from Worldwide Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, Gregory L.; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent N.; Clothiaux, Eugene E.

    2006-01-01

    The carbon emissions inventories used to initialize transport models and general circulation models are highly parameterized, and created on the basis of multiple sparse datasets (such as fuel use inventories and emission factors). The resulting inventories are uncertain by at least a factor of 2, and this uncertainty is carried forward to the model output. [Bond et al., 1998, Bond et al., 2004, Cooke et al., 1999, Streets et al., 2001] Worldwide black carbon concentration measurements are needed to assess the efficacy of the carbon emissions inventory and transport model output on a continuous basis.

  15. Light absorption, optical and microphysical properties of trajectory-clustered aerosols at two AERONET sites in West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawole, O. G.; Cai, X.; MacKenzie, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol remote sensing techniques and back-trajectory modeling can be combined to identify aerosol types. We have clustered 7 years of AERONET aerosol signals using trajectory analysis to identify dominant aerosol sources at two AERONET sites in West Africa: Ilorin (4.34 oE, 8.32 oN) and Djougou (1.60 oE, 9.76 oN). Of particular interest are air masses that have passed through the gas flaring region in the Niger Delta area, of Nigeria, en-route the AERONET sites. 7-day back trajectories were calculated using the UK UGAMP trajectory model driven by ECMWF wind analyses data. Dominant sources identified, using literature classifications, are desert dust (DD), Biomass burning (BB) and Urban-Industrial (UI). Below, we use a combination of synoptic trajectories and aerosol optical properties to distinguish a fourth source: that due to gas flaring. Gas flaring, (GF) the disposal of gas through stack in an open-air flame, is believed to be a prominent source of black carbon (BC) and greenhouse gases. For these different aerosol source signatures, single scattering albedo (SSA), refractive index , extinction Angstrom exponent (EEA) and absorption Angstrom exponent (AAE) were used to classify the light absorption characteristics of the aerosols for λ = 440, 675, 870 and1020 nm. A total of 1625 daily averages of aerosol data were collected for the two sites. Of which 245 make up the GF cluster for both sites. For GF cluster, the range of fine-mode fraction is 0.4 - 0.7. Average values SSA(λ), for the total and GF clusters are 0.90(440), 0.93(675), 0.95(870) and 0.96(1020), and 0.93(440), 0.92(675), 0.9(870) and 0.9(1020), respectively. Values of for the GF clusters for both sites are 0.62 - 1.11, compared to 1.28 - 1.66 for the remainder of the clusters, which strongly indicates the dominance of carbonaceous particles (BC), typical of a highly industrial area. An average value of 1.58 for the real part of the refractive index at low SSA for aerosol in the GF cluster is also

  16. Robots on the Roof

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) is one of the first places that scientists turn when volcanoes, wildfires, pollution plumes, dust storms and many other phenomena—both natural and manmade—...

  17. Utilization of AERONET polarimetric measurements for improving retrieval of aerosol microphysics: GSFC, Beijing and Dakar data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedarenka, Anton; Dubovik, Oleg; Goloub, Philippe; Li, Zhengqiang; Lapyonok, Tatyana; Litvinov, Pavel; Barel, Luc; Gonzalez, Louis; Podvin, Thierry; Crozel, Didier

    2016-08-01

    The study presents the efforts on including the polarimetric data to the routine inversion of the radiometric ground-based measurements for characterization of the atmospheric aerosols and analysis of the obtained advantages in retrieval results. First, to operationally process the large amount of polarimetric data the data preparation tool was developed. The AERONET inversion code adapted for inversion of both intensity and polarization measurements was used for processing. Second, in order to estimate the effect from utilization of polarimetric information on aerosol retrieval results, both synthetic data and the real measurements were processed using developed routine and analyzed. The sensitivity study has been carried out using simulated data based on three main aerosol models: desert dust, urban industrial and urban clean aerosols. The test investigated the effects of utilization of polarization data in the presence of random noise, bias in measurements of optical thickness and angular pointing shift. The results demonstrate the advantage of polarization data utilization in the cases of aerosols with pronounced concentration of fine particles. Further, the extended set of AERONET observations was processed. The data for three sites have been used: GSFC, USA (clean urban aerosol dominated by fine particles), Beijing, China (polluted industrial aerosol characterized by pronounced mixture of both fine and coarse modes) and Dakar, Senegal (desert dust dominated by coarse particles). The results revealed considerable advantage of polarimetric data applying for characterizing fine mode dominated aerosols including industrial pollution (Beijing). The use of polarization corrects particle size distribution by decreasing overestimated fine mode and increasing the coarse mode. It also increases underestimated real part of the refractive index and improves the retrieval of the fraction of spherical particles due to high sensitivity of polarization to particle shape

  18. Aerosol Optical Thickness comparisons between NASA LaRC Airborne HSRL and AERONET during the DISCOVER-AQ field campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarino, A. J.; Ferrare, R. A.; Burton, S. P.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Rogers, R. R.; Berkoff, T.; Cook, A. L.; Harper, D. B.; Hoff, R. M.; Holben, B. N.; Schafer, J.; McGill, M. J.; Yorks, J. E.; Lantz, K. O.; Michalsky, J. J.; Hodges, G.

    2013-12-01

    The first- and second-generation NASA airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidars (HSRL-1 and HSRL-2) have been deployed on board the NASA Langley Research Center King Air aircraft during the Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and VERtically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) field campaigns. These included deployments during July 2011 over Washington, D.C. and Baltimore, MD and during January and February 2013 over the San Joaquin Valley (SJV) of California and also a scheduled deployment during September 2013 over Houston, TX. Measurements of aerosol extinction, backscatter, and depolarization are available from both HSRL-1 and HSRL-2 in coordination with other participating research aircraft and ground sites. These measurements constitute a diverse data set for use in characterizing the spatial and temporal distribution of aerosols, aerosol optical thickness (AOT), as well as the Mixing Layer Height (MLH). HSRL AOT is compared to AOT measured by the Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON) and long-term AERONET sites. For the 2011 campaign, comparisons of AOT at 532nm between HSRL-1 and AERONET showed excellent agreement (r = 0.98, slope = 1.01, intercept = 0.037) when the King Air flights were within 2.5 km of the ground site and 10 min from the retrieval time. The comparison results are similar for the 2013 DISCOVER-AQ campaign in the SJV. Additional ground-based (MPL) and airborne (CPL) lidar data were used to help screen for clouds in the AERONET observations during the SJV portion. AOT values from a Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) located at the Porterville, CA site during the SJV campaign are also compared to HSRL-2 AOT. Lastly, using the MLH retrieved from HSRL aerosol backscatter profiles, we describe the distribution of AOT relative to the MLH.

  19. Bias Correction of high resolution MODIS Aerosol Optical Depth in urban areas using the Dragon AERONET Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malakar, N. K.; Atia, A.; Gross, B.; Moshary, F.; Ahmed, S. A.; Lary, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD) is widely used parameter used to quantify aerosol abundance. Satellite retrievals of aerosols over land is fundamentally more complex than aerosol retrieval over oceans. Due to wide coverage and the extensive validation the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), on board the Terra and Aqua satellites is the workhorse instrument used to retrieve AOD from space. However, satellite algorithms of AOD are extremely complex and depends strongly on sun/view geometry, spectral surface albedo, aerosol model assumptions and surface heterogeneity. This issue becomes even more severe when considering the new MODIS 3 km aerosol retrieval products within version 6. To assess satellite retrievals of these high resolution 3 km products, we use the summer 2011 Dragon AERONET data to assess accuracy as well as major retrieval bias that can occur in MODIS measurements. In this study, we explore in detail the factors that can drive these biases statistically. As discussed above, our considers multiple conditions such as surface reflectivity at various wavelengths, solar and sensor zenith angles, the solar and sensor azimuth, scattering angles as well as meteorological factors and aerosol type (angstrom coefficient) etc which are used inputs are used to train neural network in regression mode to compensate for biases against the Dragon AERONET AOD values. In particular, we confirm the results of previous studies where the land cover (urban fraction) appears to be a strong factor in AOD bias and develop a NN estimator which includes land cover directly. The algorithm will be tested not only in the Baltimore/Washington area but assessed in the general North East US where urban biases in the NYC area have been previously identified.

  20. Analysis of aerosol optical properties over Korea during the 2015 MAPS-Seoul campaign using AERONET and GOCI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Choi, M.; Lee, J.; Lee, S.; Holben, B. N.; Eck, T. F.; KIM, M.

    2015-12-01

    To investigate aerosol characteristics over East Asia, many campaigns using in-situ measurements, ground and satellite based remote sensing, and air quality modeling have been conducted as ACE-Asia in 2001, ABC-EAREX in 2005, and DRAGON-NE Asia in 2012, and planned KORUS-AQ in 2016. Planned KORUS-AQ 2016 campaigns provides excellent opportunity to monitor and analyze air quality including aerosol and trace gases from diverse platform including ground-based, airborne, shipborne and satellite platform. Prior to the upcoming KORUS-AQ campaign, the Megacity Air Pollution Studies (MAPS)-Seoul campaign was held from May 18 to June14, 2015. During the campaign, total 8 AERONET sunphotometers are deployed over Korea. GOCI Yonsei aerosol retrieval (YAER) algorithm was developed, improved and evaluated through the DRAGON-NE Asia campaign. GOCI YAER AOD at 550 nm with spatial resolution of 6 km showed good agreement with AERONET AOD (R > 0.88) during the DRAGON-NE Asia campaign. In this study, aerosol optical properties from AERONET and GOCI are analyzed together during the MAPS-Seoul campaign. Mean AERONET AOD at 550 nm over a megacity site, Seoul and a coastal site Gosan shows the lowest values in 2015 as 0.338 and 0.214, respectively, compared with values during the same period from 2011 to 2014 (0.557-0.645 at Seoul, and 0.447-0.618 at Gosan). GOCI YAER algorithm uses the minimum reflectivity technique from the composited Rayleigh-corrected reflectance during a month thus low AOD increase a possibility to find clear pixels to obtain accurate surface reflectance. To improve surface reflectance quality, multi-year GOCI data are also analyzed. Furthermore higher spatial resolution retrieval in 3 km is tested to detect small-scale aerosol features and point sources in megacities. DRAGON-NE Asia in 2012, MAPS-Seoul in 2015, and planned KORUS-AQ in 2016 field campaigns contribute to the continuous assessment of GOCI YAER algorithm performance for the improvements.

  1. Remote sensing of aerosol optical depth over central Europe from MSG-SEVIRI data and accuracy assessment with ground-based AERONET measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popp, C.; Hauser, A.; Foppa, N.; Wunderle, S.

    2007-12-01

    In this study, the remote sensing of aerosol optical depth (τa) from the geostationary Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) is demonstrated. The proposed method is based on the analysis of a time series of SEVIRI's 0.6 μm channel images. Top-of-atmosphere reflectance is precorrected for the effect of atmospheric gases and a background aerosol amount. Subsequently, surface reflectance for each pixel is estimated by determining its lowest precorrected reflectance within the observed time period for each satellite observation time of the day. The resulting diurnal surface reflectance curve in combination with the radiative transfer code SMAC are finally used to derive τa. This approach is applied to SEVIRI subscenes of central Europe (40.8-51.3°N, 0.3°W-19.9°E) from August 2004, daily acquired between 0612 and 1712 UTC in intervals of 15 min. SEVIRI τa are related to Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) Sun photometer measurements from nine sites. About 3200 instantaneous SEVIRI and Sun photometer τa are compared. An overall correlation of 0.9 and a root mean square error of 0.08 are obtained. Further, the spatial distribution of SEVIRI τa maps for August 2004 represent expectable features like higher concentrations in industrialized regions or lower loading in higher altitudes. It is concluded that the described method is able to provide an estimate of τa from MSG-SEVIRI data. Such aerosol maps of high temporal frequency could be of interest to atmospheric related sciences, e.g., to track aerosol particle transport.

  2. Near Real-Time Automatic Data Quality Controls for the AERONET Version 3 Database: An Introduction to the New Level 1.5V Aerosol Optical Depth Data Product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Smirnov, A.; Eck, T. F.; Slutsker, I.; Sorokin, M. G.; Espenak, F.; Schafer, J.; Sinyuk, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) has provided a database of aerosol optical depth (AOD) measured by surface-based Sun/sky radiometers for over 20 years. AERONET provides unscreened (Level 1.0) and automatically cloud cleared (Level 1.5) AOD in near real-time (NRT), while manually inspected quality assured (Level 2.0) AOD are available after instrument field deployment (Smirnov et al., 2000). The growing need for NRT quality controlled aerosol data has become increasingly important. Applications of AERONET NRT data include the satellite evaluation (e.g., MODIS, VIIRS, MISR, OMI), data synergism (e.g., MPLNET), verification of aerosol forecast models and reanalysis (e.g., GOCART, ICAP, NAAPS, MERRA), input to meteorological models (e.g., NCEP, ECMWF), and field campaign support (e.g., KORUS-AQ, ORACLES). In response to user needs for quality controlled NRT data sets, the new Version 3 (V3) Level 1.5V product was developed with similar quality controls as those applied by hand to the Version 2 (V2) Level 2.0 data set. The AERONET cloud screened (Level 1.5) NRT AOD database can be significantly impacted by data anomalies. The most significant data anomalies include AOD diurnal dependence due to contamination or obstruction of the sensor head windows, anomalous AOD spectral dependence due to problems with filter degradation, instrument gains, or non-linear changes in calibration, and abnormal changes in temperature sensitive wavelengths (e.g., 1020nm) in response to anomalous sensor head temperatures. Other less common AOD anomalies result from loose filters, uncorrected clock shifts, connection and electronic issues, and various solar eclipse episodes. Automatic quality control algorithms are applied to the new V3 Level 1.5 database to remove NRT AOD anomalies and produce the new AERONET V3 Level 1.5V AOD product. Results of the quality control algorithms are presented and the V3 Level 1.5V AOD database is compared to the V2 Level 2.0 AOD database.

  3. The regime of aerosol asymmetry parameter over Europe, Mediterranean and Middle East based on MODIS satellite data: evaluation against surface AERONET measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korras-Carraca, M. B.; Hatzianastassiou, N.; Matsoukas, C.; Gkikas, A.; Papadimas, C. D.

    2014-09-01

    Atmospheric particulates are a significant forcing agent for the radiative energy budget of the Earth-atmosphere system. The particulates' interaction with radiation, which defines their climate effect, is strongly dependent on their optical properties. In the present work, we study one of the most important optical properties of aerosols, the asymmetry parameter (gaer), in the region comprised of North Africa, the Arabian peninsula, Europe, and the Mediterranean basin. These areas are of great interest, because of the variety of aerosol types they host, both anthropogenic and natural. Using satellite data from the collection 051 of MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, Terra and Aqua), we investigate the spatio-temporal characteristics of the asymmetry parameter. We generally find significant spatial variability, with larger values over regions dominated by larger size particles, e.g. outside the Atlantic coasts of north-western Africa, where desert-dust outflow is taking place. The gaer values tend to decrease with increasing wavelength, especially over areas dominated by small particulates. The intra-annual variability is found to be small in desert-dust areas, with maximum values during summer, while in all other areas larger values are reported during the cold season and smaller during the warm. Significant intra-annual and inter-annual variability is observed around the Black Sea. However, the inter-annual trends of gaer are found to be generally small. Although satellite data have the advantage of broad geographical coverage, they have to be validated against reliable surface measurements. Therefore, we compare satellite-based values with gaer values measured at 69 stations of the global surface network AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network), located within our region of interest. This way, we provide some insight on the quality and reliability of MODIS data. We report generally better agreement at the wavelength of 870 nm (correlation coefficient

  4. The regime of aerosol asymmetry parameter over Europe, the Mediterranean and the Middle East based on MODIS satellite data: evaluation against surface AERONET measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korras-Carraca, M. B.; Hatzianastassiou, N.; Matsoukas, C.; Gkikas, A.; Papadimas, C. D.

    2015-11-01

    Atmospheric particulates are a significant forcing agent for the radiative energy budget of the Earth-atmosphere system. The particulates' interaction with radiation, which defines their climate effect, is strongly dependent on their optical properties. In the present work, we study one of the most important optical properties of aerosols, the asymmetry parameter (gaer), over sea surfaces of the region comprising North Africa, the Arabian Peninsula, Europe, and the Mediterranean Basin. These areas are of great interest, because of the variety of aerosol types they host, both anthropogenic and natural. Using satellite data from the collection 051 of MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, Terra and Aqua), we investigate the spatiotemporal characteristics of the asymmetry parameter. We generally find significant spatial variability, with larger values over regions dominated by larger size particles, e.g., outside the Atlantic coasts of northwestern Africa, where desert-dust outflow takes place. The gaer values tend to decrease with increasing wavelength, especially over areas dominated by small particulates. The intra-annual variability is found to be small in desert-dust areas, with maximum values during summer, while in all other areas larger values are reported during the cold season and smaller during the warm. Significant intra-annual and inter-annual variability is observed around the Black Sea. However, the inter-annual trends of gaer are found to be generally small. Although satellite data have the advantage of broad geographical coverage, they have to be validated against reliable surface measurements. Therefore, we compare satellite-measured values with gaer values measured at 69 stations of the global surface AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network), located within our region of interest. This way, we provide some insight on the quality and reliability of MODIS data. We report generally better agreement at the wavelength of 860 nm (correlation

  5. AERONET, Twenty-five years of development to the Version 3 Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holben, B. N.; Eck, T. F.; Slutsker, I.; Smirnov, A.; Schafer, J.; Sorokin, M. G.; Giles, D. M.; Sinyuk, A.; Rodriguez, J.; Scully, A.; Kraft, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Aerosol Robotic Network program (AERONET) developed twenty-five years ago under Diane Wickland's program management to provide a database that could be applied to atmospheric corrections of remotely sensed data and to help quantify aerosol carbon emissions generated from biomass burning. From that initial support by Dr. Wickland and through BOREAS and LBA-Ecology, AERONET has grown to a globally distributed network making significant contributions to land, ocean and atmospheric remote sensing. In recognition of Diane's insight for the need of aerosol measurements and creating an opportunity for making these measurements, this presentation will trace the development and contributions of AERONET from the formative years to the present. It will conclude with the details of the release of Version 3 AERONET processing and plans for the future.

  6. Smoke aerosol properties and ageing effects for Northern temperate and boreal regions derived from AERONET source and age attribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikonovas, Tadas; North, Peter; Doerr, Stefan H.

    2015-04-01

    Particulate emissions from wildfires impact human health and have a large but uncertain effect on climate. Modelling schemes depend on information about emission factors, emitted particle microphysical and optical properties and ageing effects, while satellite retrieval algorithms make use of characteristic aerosol models to improve retrieval. Ground based remote sensing provides detailed aerosol characterisation, but does not contain information on source. A new method is presented to estimate plume origin land cover type and age for AERONET aerosol observations, employing trajectory modelling using the HYSPLIT model, and satellite active fire and aerosol optical thickness (AOT) observations from MODIS and AATSR. It is applied to AERONET stations located in or near Northern temperate and boreal forests, for the period 2002-2013. The results from 629 fire attributions indicate significant differences insize distributions and particle optical properties between different land cover types. Smallest fine mode median radius are attributed to plumes from cropland/natural vegetation mosaic (0.143 μm) and grasslands (0.147 μm) fires. Evergreen needleleaf forest emissions show a significantly smaller fine mode median radius (0.164 μm) than plumes from woody savannas (0.184 μm) and mixed forest (0.193 μm) fires. Smoke plumes are predominantly scattering for all of the classes with median single scattering albedo at 440 nm (SSA(440)) values close to 0.95 except the cropland emissions which have SSA(440) value of 0.9. Overall fine mode volume median radius increase rate is 0.0095μm per day for the first 4 days of ageing and 0.0084 μm per day for seven days of ageing. Changes in size were consistent with a decrease in Angstrom Exponent and increase in Asymmetry parameter. No significant changes in SSA(λ) with ageing were found. The implications of this work for improved modeling of aerosol radiative effects, which are relevant to both climate modelling and satellite

  7. Smoke aerosol properties and ageing effects for Northern temperate and boreal regions derived from AERONET source and age attribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikonovas, T.; North, P. R. J.; Doerr, S. H.

    2015-03-01

    Particulate emissions from wildfires impact human health and have a large but uncertain effect on climate. Modelling schemes depend on information about emission factors, emitted particle microphysical and optical properties and ageing effects, while satellite retrieval algorithms make use of characteristic aerosol models to improve retrieval. Ground based remote sensing provides detailed aerosol characterisation, but does not contain information on source. Here, a method is presented to estimate plume origin land cover type and age for AERONET aerosol observations, employing trajectory modelling using the HYSPLIT model, and satellite active fire and aerosol optical thickness (AOT) observations from MODIS and AATSR. It is applied to AERONET stations located in or near Northern temperate and boreal forests, for the period 2002-2013. The results from 629 fire attributions indicate significant differences in size distributions and particle optical properties between different land cover types. Smallest fine mode median radius are attributed to plumes from cropland - natural vegetation mosaic (0.143 μm) and grasslands (0.147 μm) fires. Evergreen needleleaf forest emissions show a significantly smaller fine mode median radius (0.164 μm) than plumes from woody savannas (0.184 μm) and mixed forest (0.193 μm) fires. Smoke plumes are predominantly scattering for all of the classes with median single scattering albedo at 440 nm (SSA(440)) values close to 0.95 except the cropland emissions which have a SSA(440) value of 0.9. Overall fine mode volume median radius increase rate is 0.0095 μm per day for the first 4 days of ageing and 0.0084 μm per day for seven days of ageing. Changes in size were consistent with a decrease in Angstrom Exponent and increase in Asymmetry parameter. No significant changes in SSA(λ) with ageing were found. These estimates have implications for

  8. Aerosol Optical Thickness in the Presence and Absence of African Dust using AERONET and Microtops II Sunphotometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, A.; Raizada, S.; Tepley, C. A.; Venero, I.; Zurcher, F.; Mayol-Bracero, O. L.

    2011-12-01

    As part of the Puerto Rico African Dust and Cloud Study (PRADACS) Project, we present a comparison of the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) between the AERONET sunphotometer (CIMEL Electronique 318A) located at Cape San Juan (CSJ, 18° 23' N, 65° 37' E), Puerto Rico, and the radiometers (Microtops II) of the Arecibo Observatory. Data were collected at CSJ during the summer period of 2011, when African dust was present most of the time. Preliminary results showed, for both instruments, AOT values around of 0.4 when there were high concentrations of African dust over the island Puerto Rico. The AOT correlations between the two instruments were very good, with a slope of 0.8 and r2 of 0.9 for all wavelengths. The main differences observed were on the values above 0.6. We will show the temporal behavior of AOT for the two instruments and the spatial differences between them.

  9. A COMPARISON OF CMAQ-BASED AEROSOL PROPERTIES WITH IMPROVE, MODIS, AND AERONET DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    We compare select aerosol Properties derived from the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model-simulated aerosol mass concentrations with routine data from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) satellite-borne Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer...

  10. Monthly Averages of Aerosol Properties: A Global Comparison Among Models, Satellite Data, and AERONET Ground Data

    SciTech Connect

    Kinne, S.; Lohmann, U; Feichter, J; Schulz, M.; Timmreck, C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Easter, Richard C.; Chin, M; Ginoux, P.; Takemura, T.; Tegen, I.; Koch, D; Herzog, M.; Penner, J.; Pitari, G.; Holben, B. N.; Eck, T.; Smirnov, A.; Dubovik, O.; Slutsker, I.; Tanre, D.; Torres, O.; Mishchenko, M.; Geogdzhayev, I.; Chu, D. A.; Kaufman, Yoram J.

    2003-10-21

    Aerosol introduces the largest uncertainties in model-based estimates of anthropogenic sources on the Earth's climate. A better representation of aerosol in climate models can be expected from an individual processing of aerosol type and new aerosol modules have been developed, that distinguish among at least five aerosol types: sulfate, organic carbon, black carbon, sea-salt and dust. In this study intermediate results of aerosol mass and aerosol optical depth of new aerosol modules from seven global models are evaluated. Among models, differences in predicted mass-fields are expected with differences to initialization and processing. Nonetheless, unusual discrepancies in source strength and in removal rates for particular aerosol types were identified. With simultaneous data for mass and optical depth, type conversion factors were compared. Differences among the tested models cover a factor of 2 for each, even hydrophobic, aerosol type. This is alarming and suggests that efforts of good mass-simulations could be wasted or that conversions are misused to cover for poor mass-simulations. An individual assessment, however, is difficult, as only part of the conversion determining factors (size assumption, permitted humidification and prescribed ambient relative humidity) were revealed. These differences need to be understood and minimized, if conclusions on aerosol processing in models can be drawn from comparisons to aerosol optical depth measurements.

  11. Application of Spectral Analysis Techniques in the Intercomparison of Aerosol Data. Part II: Using Maximum Covariance Analysis to Effectively Compare Spatiotemporal Variability of Satellite and AERONET Measured Aerosol Optical Depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jing; Carlson, Barbara E.; Lacis, Andrew A.

    2014-01-01

    Moderate Resolution Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MODIS) and Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiomater (MISR) provide regular aerosol observations with global coverage. It is essential to examine the coherency between space- and ground-measured aerosol parameters in representing aerosol spatial and temporal variability, especially in the climate forcing and model validation context. In this paper, we introduce Maximum Covariance Analysis (MCA), also known as Singular Value Decomposition analysis as an effective way to compare correlated aerosol spatial and temporal patterns between satellite measurements and AERONET data. This technique not only successfully extracts the variability of major aerosol regimes but also allows the simultaneous examination of the aerosol variability both spatially and temporally. More importantly, it well accommodates the sparsely distributed AERONET data, for which other spectral decomposition methods, such as Principal Component Analysis, do not yield satisfactory results. The comparison shows overall good agreement between MODIS/MISR and AERONET AOD variability. The correlations between the first three modes of MCA results for both MODIS/AERONET and MISR/ AERONET are above 0.8 for the full data set and above 0.75 for the AOD anomaly data. The correlations between MODIS and MISR modes are also quite high (greater than 0.9). We also examine the extent of spatial agreement between satellite and AERONET AOD data at the selected stations. Some sites with disagreements in the MCA results, such as Kanpur, also have low spatial coherency. This should be associated partly with high AOD spatial variability and partly with uncertainties in satellite retrievals due to the seasonally varying aerosol types and surface properties.

  12. Smoke aerosol properties and ageing effects for northern temperate and boreal regions derived from AERONET source and age attribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikonovas, T.; North, P. R. J.; Doerr, S. H.

    2015-07-01

    Particulate emissions from wildfires impact human health and have a large but uncertain effect on climate. Modelling schemes depend on information about emission factors, emitted particle microphysical and optical properties and ageing effects, while satellite retrieval algorithms make use of characteristic aerosol models to improve retrieval. Ground-based remote sensing provides detailed aerosol characterisation, but does not contain information on source. Here, a method is presented to estimate plume origin land cover type and age for AERONET aerosol observations, employing trajectory modelling using the HYSPLIT model, and satellite active fire and aerosol optical thickness (AOT) observations from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Along Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR). It is applied to AERONET stations located in or near northern temperate and boreal forests for the period 2002-2013. The results from 629 fire attributions indicate significant differences in size distributions and particle optical properties between different land cover types and plume age. Smallest fine mode median radius (Rfv) are attributed to plumes from cropland and/or natural vegetation mosaic (0.143 μm) and grassland (0.157 μm) fires. North American evergreen needleleaf forest emissions show a significantly smaller Rfv (0.164 μm) than plumes from Eurasian mixed forests (0.193 μm) and plumes attributed to the land cover types with sparse tree cover - open shrubland (0.185 μm) and woody savannas (0.184 μm). The differences in size distributions are related to inferred variability in plume concentrations between the land cover types. Significant differences are observed between day and night emissions, with daytime emissions showing larger particle sizes. Smoke is predominantly scattering for all of the classes with median single scattering albedo at 440 nm (SSA(440)) values close to 0

  13. Evaluation of MODIS columnar aerosol retrievals using AERONET in semi-arid Nevada and California, U.S.A., during the summer of 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loría-Salazar, S. Marcela; Holmes, Heather A.; Patrick Arnott, W.; Barnard, James C.; Moosmüller, Hans

    2016-11-01

    Satellite characterization of local aerosol pollution is desirable because of the potential for broad spatial coverage, enabling transport studies of pollution from major sources, such as biomass burning events. However, retrieval of quantitative measures of air pollution such as Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) from satellite measurements is challenging over land because the underlying surface albedo may be heterogeneous in space and time. Ground-based sunphotometer measurements of AOD are unaffected by surface albedo and are crucial in enabling evaluation, testing, and further development of satellite instruments and retrieval algorithms. Columnar aerosol optical properties from ground-based sunphotometers (Cimel CE-318) as part of AERONET and MODIS aerosol retrievals from Aqua and Terra satellites were compared over semi-arid California and Nevada during the summer season of 2012. Sunphotometer measurements were used as a 'ground truth' to evaluate the current state of satellite retrievals in this spatiotemporal domain. Satellite retrieved (MODIS Collection 6) AOD showed the presence of wildfires in northern California during August. During the study period, the dark-target (DT) retrieval algorithm appears to overestimate AERONET AOD by an average factor of 3.85 in the entire study domain. AOD from the deep-blue (DB) algorithm overestimates AERONET AOD by an average factor of 1.64. Low AOD correlation was also found between AERONET, DT, and DB retrievals. Smoke from fires strengthened the aerosol signal, but MODIS versus AERONET AOD correlation hardly increased during fire events (r2∼0.1-0.2 during non-fire periods and r2∼0-0.31 during fire periods). Furthermore, aerosol from fires increased the normalized mean bias (NMB) of MODIS retrievals of AOD (NMB∼23%-154% for non-fire periods and NMB∼77%-196% for fire periods). Ångström Extinction Exponent (AEE) from DB for both Terra and Aqua did not correlate with AERONET observations. High surface reflectance and

  14. Multi-modal analysis of aerosol robotic network size distributions for remote sensing applications: dominant aerosol type cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M.; Kazadzis, S.; Gerasopoulos, E.

    2014-03-01

    To date, size distributions obtained from the aerosol robotic network (AERONET) have been fit with bi-lognormals defined by six secondary microphysical parameters: the volume concentration, effective radius, and the variance of fine and coarse particle modes. However, since the total integrated volume concentration is easily calculated and can be used as an accurate constraint, the problem of fitting the size distribution can be reduced to that of deducing a single free parameter - the mode separation point. We present a method for determining the mode separation point for equivalent-volume bi-lognormal distributions based on optimization of the root mean squared error and the coefficient of determination. The extracted secondary parameters are compared with those provided by AERONET's Level 2.0 Version 2 inversion algorithm for a set of benchmark dominant aerosol types, including desert dust, biomass burning aerosol, urban sulphate and sea salt. The total volume concentration constraint is then also lifted by performing multi-modal fits to the size distribution using nested Gaussian mixture models, and a method is presented for automating the selection of the optimal number of modes using a stopping condition based on Fisher statistics and via the application of statistical hypothesis testing. It is found that the method for optimizing the location of the mode separation point is independent of the shape of the aerosol volume size distribution (AVSD), does not require the existence of a local minimum in the size interval 0.439 μm ≤ r ≤ 0.992 μm, and shows some potential for optimizing the bi-lognormal fitting procedure used by AERONET particularly in the case of desert dust aerosol. The AVSD of impure marine aerosol is found to require three modes. In this particular case, bi-lognormals fail to recover key features of the AVSD. Fitting the AVSD more generally with multi-modal models allows automatic detection of a statistically significant number of aerosol

  15. AERONET Version 3 processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holben, B. N.; Slutsker, I.; Giles, D. M.; Eck, T. F.; Smirnov, A.; Sinyuk, A.; Schafer, J.; Rodriguez, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) database has evolved in measurement accuracy, data quality products, availability to the scientific community over the course of 21 years with the support of NASA, PHOTONS and all federated partners. This evolution is periodically manifested as a new data version release by carefully reprocessing the entire database with the most current algorithms that fundamentally change the database and ultimately the data products used by the community. The newest processing, Version 3, will be released in 2015 after the entire database is reprocessed and real-time data processing becomes operational. All V 3 algorithms have been developed, individually vetted and represent four main categories: aerosol optical depth (AOD) processing, inversion processing, database management and new products. The primary trigger for release of V 3 lies with cloud screening of the direct sun observations and computation of AOD that will fundamentally change all data available for analysis and all subsequent retrieval products. This presentation will illustrate the innovative approach used for cloud screening and assesses the elements of V3 AOD relative to the current version. We will also present the advances in the inversion product processing with emphasis on the random and systematic uncertainty estimates. This processing will be applied to the new hybrid measurement scenario intended to provide inversion retrievals for all solar zenith angles. We will introduce automatic quality assurance criteria that will allow near real time quality assured aerosol products necessary for real time satellite and model validation and assimilation. Last we will introduce the new management structure that will improve access to the data database. The current version 2 will be supported for at least two years after the initial release of V3 to maintain continuity for on going investigations.

  16. Characterization of dust coarse mode aerosols in the infrared from IASI and comparison with PARASOL and AERONET observations over the tropics (sea and land).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelle, Virginie; Chédin, Alain; Siméon, Mathilde; Tsamalis, Christoforos; Clémence, Pierangelo; Fabrice, Ducos

    2013-04-01

    Infrared Atmospheric Sounder Interferometer (IASI) observations covering the period from July 2007 to December 2012 have been interpreted in terms of monthly mean, 1°x1°, 10 μm dust Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD), mean altitude and coarse mode effective radius. The method developed relies on the construction of Look-Up-Tables computed for a large selection of atmospheric situations and observing conditions. Originally developed for retrievals over sea, the method has been recently updated and may now be applied to observations over land and in particular over desert. For this new development, surface temperature and emissivity have to be taken into account carefully. Comparisons will be presented between IASI 10 µm AOD and visible dust coarse mode optical depth retrieved from AERONET and PARASOL. Comparisons are done at local scale, around several AERONET tropical sites, close or far from the dust sources with a special focus on Sahara. Satisfactory agreement is found between IASI and the visible coarse mode AODs and the differences between these products are analysed. IASI-retrieved dust layer mean altitudes also compare well with CALIOP/CALIPSO aerosol altitudes and comparisons between IASI dust coarse mode effective radius and retrievals from AERONET at the sites studied lead to a satisfactory agreement apart from an almost systematic bias of about +0.35 µm (IASI-AERONET) not yet fully understood.

  17. Variability of aerosol and spectral lidar and backscatter and extinction ratios of key aerosol types derived from selected Aerosol Robotic Network locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattrall, Christopher; Reagan, John; Thome, Kurt; Dubovik, Oleg

    2005-05-01

    The lidar (extinction-to-backscatter) ratios at 0.55 and 1.02 μm and the spectral lidar, extinction, and backscatter ratios of climatically relevant aerosol species are computed on the basis of selected retrievals of aerosol properties from 26 Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites across the globe. The values, obtained indirectly from sky radiance and solar transmittance measurements, agree very well with values from direct observations. Low mean values of the lidar ratio, Sa, at 0.55 μm for maritime (27 sr) aerosols and desert dust (42 sr) are clearly distinguishable from biomass burning (60 sr) and urban/industrial pollution (71 sr). The effects of nonsphericity of mineral dust are shown, demonstrating that particle shape must be taken into account in any spaceborne lidar inversion scheme. A new aerosol model representing pollution over Southeast Asia is introduced since lidar (58 sr), color lidar, and extinction ratios in this region are distinct from those over other urban/industrial centers, owing to a greater number of large particles relative to fine particles. This discrimination promises improved estimates of regional climate forcing by aerosols containing black carbon and is expected to be of utility to climate modeling and remote sensing communities. The observed variability of the lidar parameters, combined with current validated aerosol data products from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), will afford improved accuracy in the inversion of spaceborne lidar data over both land and ocean.

  18. Identification of absorbing organic (brown carbon) aerosols through Sun Photometry: results from AEROCAN / AERONET stations in high Arctic and urban Locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, G. H.; Chaubey, J. P.; O'Neill, N. T.; Hayes, P.; Atkinson, D. B.

    2014-12-01

    Light absorbing organic aerosols or brown carbon (BrC) aerosols are prominent species influencing the absorbing aerosol optical depth (AAOD) of the total aerosol optical depth (AOD) in the UV wavelength region. They, along with dust, play an important role in modifying the spectral AAOD and the spectral AOD in the UV region: this property can be used to discriminate BrC aerosols from both weakly absorbing aerosols such as sulfates as well as strongly absorbing aerosols such as black carbon (BC). In this study we use available AERONET inversions (level 1.5) retrieved for the measuring period from 2009 to 2013, for the Arctic region (Eureka, Barrow and Hornsund), Urban/ Industrial regions (Kanpur, Beijing), and the forest regions (Alta Foresta and Mongu), to identify BrC aerosols. Using Dubovik's inversion algorithm results, we analyzed parameters that were sensitive to BrC presence, notably AAOD, AAODBrC estimated using the approach of Arola et al. [2011], the fine-mode-aerosol absorption derivative (αf, abs) and the fine-mode-aerosol absorption 2nd derivative (αf, abs'), all computed at a near UV wavelength (440 nm). Temporal trends of these parameters were investigated for all test stations and compared to available volume sampling surface data as a means of validating / evaluating the sensitivity of ostensible sunphotometer indicators of BrC aerosols to the presence of BrC as measured using independent indicators. Reference: Arola, A., Schuster, G., Myhre, G., Kazadzis, S., Dey, S., and Tripathi, S. N.: Inferring absorbing organic carbon content from AERONET data, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 11, 215-225, doi:10.5194/acp-11-215-2011, 2011

  19. Validation of MODIS Aerosol Retrieval Over Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, Lorraine A.; Tanre, Didier; Kaufman, Yoram J.; Ichoku, Charles; Mattoo, Shana; Levy, Robert; Chu, D. Allen; Holben, Brent N.; Dubovik, Oleg; Ahmad, Ziauddin; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) algorithm for determining aerosol characteristics over ocean is performing with remarkable accuracy. A two-month data set of MODIS retrievals co-located with observations from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) ground-based sunphotometer network provides the necessary validation. Spectral radiation measured by MODIS (in the range 550 - 2100 nm) is used to retrieve the aerosol optical thickness, effective particle radius and ratio between the submicron and micron size particles. MODIS-retrieved aerosol optical thickness at 660 nm and 870 nm fall within the expected uncertainty, with the ensemble average at 660 nm differing by only 2% from the AERONET observations and having virtually no offset. MODIS retrievals of aerosol effective radius agree with AERONET retrievals to within +/- 0.10 micrometers, while MODIS-derived ratios between large and small mode aerosol show definite correlation with ratios derived from AERONET data.

  20. Transport and Microphysics of Aerosols Released by Collapse and Fire of the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001 as Observed by AERONET and MISR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenchikov, G. L.; Diner, D.; Kahn, R.; Smirnov, A.; Holben, B.

    2005-12-01

    Atmospheric pollution has been studied intensively during the last several decades for its impact on climate, visibility, atmospheric chemistry, and public health. Here we consider the aftermath of the catastrophic aerosol release produced by the collapse of the World Trade Center (WTC) in New York City (NYC) on September 11, 2001. The north and south WTC buildings were attacked at 0846 EDT and 0903 EDT, respectively, on September 11, 2001. The collapse of the WTC South Tower at 0959 EDT followed by the crash of the North Tower at 1029 EDT instantaneously pulverized a vast amount of building material, that was reduced to dust and smoke in nearby streets and the atmosphere above. The remains of the WTC complex covered a 16-acre area known as Ground Zero. Intensive combustion continued until September 14, with temperatures occasionally exceeding 1000 C, producing a steady, elevated source of hazardous gases and aerosols. A detailed spatial and temporal description of the pollution fields' evolution is needed to fully understand their environmental and health impact, but many existing in situ aerosol monitoring stations in the vicinity of the WTC were completely plugged with dust immediately after the collapse. However, the aerosol plume was remotely sensed from the ground and from space. Here we combine numerical modeling of micrometeorological fields and pollution transport using the RAMS/HYPACT modeling system with AERONET and MISR retrievals, to realistically reconstruct plume evolution. AERONET collected plume data in NYC from the roof of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) in Upper Manhattan. In NYC, aerosol optical depth was rather low until 1800 UTC on September 12; then it increased to ~0.3 (at 440 nm) by 2130 UTC. On September 13, the optical depth was slightly elevated in the morning and increased further beginning at 1700 UTC, reaching ~0.30 by 2000-2200 UTC. The angstrom exponent increased from 1.8 on September 12 to 2.2 in the late afternoon

  1. Vertical Profiles of Light-Absorbing Aerosol: A Combination of In-situ and AERONET Observations during NASA DISCOVER-AQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemba, L. D.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Chen, G.; Corr, C.; Crumeyrolle, S.; Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Hudgins, C.; Martin, R.; Moore, R.; Shook, M.; Thornhill, K. L., II; Winstead, E.; Anderson, B. E.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the vertical profile of atmospheric aerosols plays a vital role in utilizing spaceborne, column-integrated satellite observations. The properties and distribution of light-absorbing aerosol are particularly uncertain despite significant air quality and climate ramifications. Advanced retrieval algorithms are able to derive complex aerosol properties (e.g., wavelength-dependent absorption coefficient and single scattering albedo) from remote-sensing measurements, but quantitative relationships to surface conditions remain a challenge. Highly systematic atmospheric profiling during four unique deployments for the NASA DISCOVER-AQ project (Baltimore, MD, 2011; San Joaquin Valley, CA, 2013; Houston, TX, 2013; Denver, CO, 2014) allow statistical assessment of spatial, temporal, and source-related variability for light-absorbing aerosol properties in these distinct regions. In-situ sampling in conjunction with a dense network of AERONET sensors also allows evaluation of the sensitivity, limitations, and advantages of remote-sensing data products over a wide range of conditions. In-situ aerosol and gas-phase observations were made during DISCOVER-AQ aboard the NASA P-3B aircraft. Aerosol absorption coefficients were measured by a Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP). Approximately 200 profiles for each of the four deployments were obtained, from the surface (25-300m altitude) to 5 km, and are used to calculate absorption aerosol optical depths (AAODs). These are quantitatively compared to AAOD derived from AERONET Level 1.5 retrievals to 1) explore discrepancies between measurements, 2) quantify the fraction of AAOD that exists directly at the surface and is often missed by airborne sampling, and 3) evaluate the potential for deriving ground-level black carbon (BC) concentrations for air quality prediction. Aerosol size distributions are used to assess absorption contributions from mineral dust, both at the surface and aloft. SP2 (Single Particle Soot

  2. Remote sensing measurements of biomass burning aerosol optical properties during the 2015 Indonesian burning season from AERONET and MODIS satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-04-01

    The strong El Nino event in 2015 resulted in below normal rainfall leading to very dry conditions throughout Indonesia from August though October 2015. These conditions in turn allowed for exceptionally large numbers of biomass burning fires with very high emissions of aerosols. Over the island of Borneo, three AERONET sites (Palangkaraya, Pontianak, and Kuching) measured monthly mean fine mode aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 500 nm from the spectral deconvolution algorithm in September and October ranging from 1.6 to 3.7, with daily average AOD as high as 6.1. In fact, the AOD was sometimes too high to obtain any significant signal in the mid-visible wavelengths, therefore a previously developed new algorithm in the AERONET Version 3 database was invoked to retain the measurements in as many of the red and near-infrared wavelengths (675, 870, 1020, and 1640 nm) as possible to analyze the AOD in those wavelengths. These AOD at longer wavelengths are then utilized to provide some estimate the AOD in the mid-visible. Additionally, satellite retrievals of AOD at 550 nm from MODIS sensor data and the Dark Target, Beep Blue, and MAIAC algorithms were also analyzed and compared to AERONET measured AOD. Not surprisingly, the AOD was often too high for the satellite algorithms to also measure accurate AOD on many days in the densest smoke regions. The AERONET sky radiance inversion algorithm was utilized to analyze retrievals of the aerosol optical properties of complex refractive indices and size distributions. Since the AOD was often extremely high there was sometimes insufficient direct sun signal for the larger solar zenith angles (> 50 degrees) required for almucantar retrievals. However, the new hybrid sky radiance scan can attain sufficient scattering angle range even at small solar zenith angles when 440 nm direct beam irradiance can be accurately measured, thereby allowing for many more retrievals and also at higher AOD levels during this event. Due to extreme

  3. The NASA Micro-Pulse Lidar Network (MPLNET): Co-location of Lidars with AERONET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; Campbell, James R.; Berkoff, Timothy A.; Spinhirne, James D.; Holben, Brent; Tsay, Si-Chee

    2004-01-01

    We present the formation of a global-ground based eye-safe lidar network, the NASA Micro-Pulse Lidar Network (MPLNET). The aim of MPLNET is to acquire long-term observations of aerosol and cloud vertical profiles at unique geographic sites within the NASA Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). Network growth follows a federated approach, pioneered by AERONET, wherein independent research groups may join MPLNET with their own instrument and site. MPLNET utilizes standard instrumentation and data processing algorithms for efficient network operations and direct comparison of data between each site. The micro-pulse lidar is eye-safe, compact, and commercially available, and most easily allows growth of the network without sacrificing standardized instrumentation gods. Red-time data products (next-day) are available, and include Level 1 daily lidar signal images from the surface to -2Okm, and Level 1.5 aerosol extinction provides at times co-incident with AERONET observations. Testing of our quality assured aerosol extinction products, Level 2, is near completion and data will soon be available. Level 3 products, continuous daylight aerosol extinction profiles, are under development and testing has begun. An overview of h4PL" will be presented. Successful methods of merging standardized lidar operations with AERONET will also be discussed, with the first 4 years of MPLNET results serving as an example.

  4. Evaluation of Air Pollution Applications of AERONET and MODIS Aerosol Column Optical Depth by Comparison with In Situ Measurements of Aerosol Light Scattering and Absorption for Reno, NV, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loria Salazar, S.; Arnott, W. P.; Moosmuller, H.; Colucci, D.

    2012-12-01

    Reno, Nevada, USA is subject to typical urban aerosol, wind-blown dust, and occasional biomass burning smoke from anthropogenic and natural fires. Reno has complex air flow at levels relevant for aerosol transport. At times recirculating mountain and urban flow arrives from the Sierra Nevada, San Francisco, CA and Sacramento, CA. The urban plumes are further modified by biogenic forest emissions and secondary aerosol formation during transport over the Sierra Nevada Mountains to Reno. This complicates the use of MODIS aerosol optical depth (AOD) for air quality measurements in Reno. Our laboratory at the University of Nevada Reno has collocated multispectral photoacoustic instruments and reciprocal nephelometers to measure light absorption and light scattering coefficients as well as an AERONET operated CIMEL CE-318 ground-based sunphotometer. Preliminary measurements from August 2011 indicate substantially larger Cimel AOD than could be accounted for by use of the in situ aerosol extinction measurements combined with mixing height estimate. This poster presents new results comparing AERONET AOD and single scattering albedo and MODIS AOD with in situ measurements for summer and fall 2012, along with extensive back trajectory analysis, to evaluate conditions when satellite measurement may be useful for air pollution applications in Reno.

  5. Dust transport over the eastern Mediterranean derived from Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer, Aerosol Robotic Network, and surface measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalivitis, N.; Gerasopoulos, E.; Vrekoussis, M.; Kouvarakis, G.; Kubilay, N.; Hatzianastassiou, N.; Vardavas, I.; Mihalopoulos, N.

    2007-02-01

    Multiyear surface PM10 measurements performed on Crete Island, Greece, have been used in conjunction with satellite (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS)) and ground-based remote sensing measurements (Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET)) to enhance our understanding of the evolution of mineral dust events over the eastern Mediterranean. An analysis of southerly air masses at altitudes of 1000 and 3000 m over a 5 year period (2000-2005), showed that dust can potentially arrive over Crete, either simultaneously in the lower free troposphere and inside the boundary layer (vertical extended transport (VET)) or initially into the free troposphere with the heavier particles gradually being scavenged inside the boundary layer (free troposphere transport (FTT)). Both pathways present significant seasonal variations but on an annual basis contribute almost equally to the dust transport in the area. During VET the aerosol index (AI) derived from TOMS was significantly correlated with surface PM10, and in general AI was found to be adequate for the characterization of dust loadings over the eastern Mediterranean on a climatological basis. A significant covariance between PM10 and AOT was observed during VET as well, indicating that AOT levels from AERONET may be estimated by PM10 levels at the surface. Surface measurements are thus crucial for the validation of remote sensing measurements and hence are a powerful tool for the investigation of the impact of aerosols on climate.

  6. Comparison of Aerosol Optical and Microphysical Retrievals from HSRL-2, AERONET, and In-situ Measurements During DISCOVER-AQ 2013 (California and Texas)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawamura, P.; Mueller, D.; Chemyakin, E.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Scarino, A. J.; Burton, S. P.; Hair, J. W.; Rogers, R. R.; Berkoff, T.; Cook, A. L.; Harper, D. B.; Seaman, S. T.

    2014-12-01

    The second-generation NASA airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-2) is the first airborne multiwavelength HSRL system to provide 3β + 2α datasets (i.e. backscatter coefficient at 355, 532, and 1064 nm and extinction coefficient at 355 and 532 nm) which are used in an unsupervised and automated inversion algorithm to retrieve optical and microphysical properties of aerosols. HSRL-2 was deployed onboard NASA Langley King Air on the DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and VERtically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) field mission over San Joaquin Valley, California between January and February 2013 and over Houston, Texas in September 2013. Vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties, hygroscopicity, and size distributions were obtained from in-situ instruments onboard the NASA Langley P-3B over a number of DRAGON (Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Network) AERONET ground stations. As HSRL-2 flew over those same ground stations, measurements and retrievals of optical depth, and microphysical aerosol properties were obtained by all three platforms. We will present the results of this intercomparison and discuss the challenges inherent to such comparisons.

  7. Spectral Discrimination of Fine and Coarse Mode Aerosol Optical Depth from AERONET Direct Sun Data of Singapore and South-East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas Cortijo, S.; Chew, B.; Liew, S.

    2009-12-01

    Aerosol optical depth combined with the Angstrom exponent and its derivative, are often used as a qualitative indicator of aerosol particle size, with Angstrom exp. values greater than 2 indicating small (fine mode) particles associated with urban pollution and bio-mass burning. Around this region, forest fires are a regular occurrence during the dry season, specially near the large land masses of Sumatra and Borneo. The practice of clearing land by burning the primary and sometimes secondary forest, results in a smog-like haze covering large areas of regional cities such as cities Singapore, Kuala Lumpur and sometimes the south of Thailand, often reducing visibility and increasing health problems for the local population. In Singapore, the sources of aerosols are mostly from fossil fuel burning (energy stations, incinerators, urban transport etc.) and from the industrial and urban areas. The proximity to the sea adds a possible oceanic source. However, as stated above and depending on the time of the year, there can be a strong bio-mass component coming from forest fires from various regions of the neighboring countries. Bio-mass related aerosol particles are typically characterized by showing a large optical depth and small, sub-micron particle size distributions. In this work, we analyze three years of direct Sun measurements performed with a multi-channel Cimel Sun-Photometer (part of the AERONET network) located at our site. In order to identify bio-mass burning events in this region, we perform a spectral discrimination between coarse and fine mode optical depth; subsequently, the fine mode parameters such as optical depth, optical ratio and fine mode Angstrom exponents (and its derivative) are used to identify possible bio-mass related events within the data set.

  8. Direct radiative forcing of urban aerosols over Pretoria (25.75°S, 28.28°E) using AERONET Sunphotometer data: first scientific results and environmental impact.

    PubMed

    Adesina, Ayodele Joseph; Kumar, Kanike Raghavendra; Sivakumar, Venkataraman; Griffith, Derek

    2014-12-01

    The present study uses the data collected from Cimel Sunphotometer of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) for the period from January to December, 2012 over an urban site, Pretoria (PTR; 25.75°S, 28.28°E, 1449 m above sea level), South Africa. We found that monthly mean aerosol optical depth (AOD, τ(a)) exhibits two maxima that occurred in summer (February) and winter (August) having values of 0.36 ± 0.19 and 0.25 ± 0.14, respectively, high-to-moderate values in spring and thereafter, decreases from autumn with a minima in early winter (June) 0.12 ± 0.07. The Angstrom exponents (α440-870) likewise, have its peak in summer (January) 1.70 ± 0.21 and lowest in early winter (June) 1.38 ± 0.26, while the columnar water vapor (CWV) followed AOD pattern with high values (summer) at the beginning of the year (February, 2.10 ± 0.37 cm) and low values (winter) in the middle of the year (July, 0.66 ± 0.21 cm). The volume size distribution (VSD) in the fine-mode is higher in the summer and spring seasons, whereas in the coarse mode the VSD is higher in the winter and lower in the summer due to the hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles. The single scattering albedo (SSA) ranged from 0.85 to 0.96 at 440 nm over PTR for the entire study period. The averaged aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) computed using SBDART model at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) was -8.78 ± 3.1 W/m², while at the surface it was -25.69 ± 8.1 W/m² leading to an atmospheric forcing of +16.91 ± 6.8 W/m², indicating significant heating of the atmosphere with a mean of 0.47K/day.

  9. Trend estimates of AERONET-observed and model-simulated AOT percentiles between 1993 and 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jongmin; Pozzer, Andrea; Chang, Dong Yeong; Lelieveld, Jos

    2016-04-01

    Recent Aerosol Optical thickness (AOT) trend studies used monthly or annual arithmetic means that discard details of the generally right-skewed AOT distributions. Potentially, such results can be biased by extreme values (including outliers). This study additionally uses percentiles (i.e., the lowest 5%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 95% of the monthly cumulative distributions fitted to Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET)-observed and ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC)-model simulated AOTs) that are less affected by outliers caused by measurement error, cloud contamination and occasional extreme aerosol events. Since the limited statistical representativeness of monthly percentiles and means can lead to bias, this study adopts the number of observations as a weighting factor, which improves the statistical robustness of trend estimates. By analyzing the aerosol composition of AERONET-observed and EMAC-simulated AOTs in selected regions of interest, we distinguish the dominant aerosol types and investigate the causes of regional AOT trends. The simulated and observed trends are generally consistent with a high correlation coefficient (R = 0.89) and small bias (slope±2σ = 0.75 ± 0.19). A significant decrease in EMAC-decomposed AOTs by water-soluble compounds and black carbon is found over the USA and the EU due to environmental regulation. In particular, a clear reversal in the AERONET AOT trend percentiles is found over the USA, probably related to the AOT diurnal cycle and the frequency of wildfires.

  10. Analysis of Fine and Coarse mode Aerosol Distributions from AERONET's mini-DRAGON Set-up at Singapore 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas Cortijo, S. V.; Chew, B. N.; Muller, A.; Liew, S.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosol optical depth combined with the Angstrom exponent and its derivative, are often used as a qualitative indicator of aerosol type and particle size regime. In Singapore, the sources of aerosols are mostly from fossil fuel burning (energy stations, incinerators, urban transport etc.) and from industrial and urban areas. However, depending on the time of the year (July-October), there can be a strong bio-mass component originated from uncontrolled forest/plantation fires from the neighboring land masses of Sumatra and Borneo. Unlike urban/fossil fuel aerosols, smoke or bio-mass related aerosol particles are typically characterized by showing a large optical depth and small, sub-micron particle size distributions. Trans-boundary smoke episodes has become an annual phenomenon in this region. Severe episodes were recorded in 1997 and 2006 and other minor episodes happened during 2002, 2004, 2010 and more recently on 2013. On August-September 2012, as part of CRISP participation on the August-September ground campaign of the Southeast Asia Composition, Cloud Climate Coupling Regional Study (SEAC4RS), a Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON) set of six CIMEL CE-318A automatic Sun-tracking photometers have been deployed at sites located at North (Yishun ITE), East (Temasek Poly), West (NUS and Pandan Reservoir), Central (NEA) and South (St. John's island) of Singapore. In order to fully discriminate bio-mass burning events over other local sources, we perform a spectral discrimination of fine/coarse mode particle regime to all DRAGON sites; subsequently, the fine mode parameters such as optical depth, optical ratio and fine mode Angstrom exponent are used to identify possible bio-mass related events within the data set. Spatio-temporal relationship between sites are also investigated.

  11. Estimate of the radiative effect of brown carbon using AERONET products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitkänen, Mikko RA; Schuster, Gregory L.; Dubovik, Oleg; Lindfors, Anders V.; Lehtinen, Kari EJ; Arola, Antti

    2014-05-01

    The AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) provides aerosol size distributions and complex refractive index at four wavelengths (440, 675, 870, and 1020 nm). This information is used in the method of Schuster et al. 2013 to retrieve the relative proportions of brown carbon BrC, black carbon BC, dust mineral and scattering host, separately for fine and coarse modes. The absorbing part of fine mode is initially assumed to consist of BC and BrC, but dust is added if necessary. Likewise, the absorbing coarse mode is initially assumed to consist of mineral dust, but BC and BrC are added if necessary. We estimated the direct radiative effect ADRE of BrC by using the volume fractions of BrC retrieved by Schuster et al. 2013 for all available AERONET sites. The effect of BrC at TOA was estimated as the difference between net fluxes for all aerosols and non-BrC aerosols using the radiative transfer package libRadtran. Non-sphericity of mineral dust was taken into account using the spheroid aerosol model by Dubovik et al. (2006). The aerosol components retrieval from AERONET suggests that the highest amounts of brown carbon appear in locations close to intense aerosols sources eg. in China and India, but notably the fraction of BrC compared to other absorbing species (here BC and dust) can be comparably high at locations with lesser aerosol loading. According to our initial results the higher BrC content does not automatically translate into a significant BrC ADRE (all aerosols - non-BrC), but the presence of other absorbing species and the albedo also play a significant role. Annual BrC ADRE seems to vary from -0.8 W/m2 to 0.8 W/m2 and monthly averages can vary in a much larger range for locations with high BrC volume fraction and loading.

  12. Global atmospheric black carbon inferred from AERONET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Makiko; Hansen, James; Koch, Dorothy; Lacis, Andrew; Ruedy, Reto; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent; Chin, Mian; Novakov, Tica

    2003-05-01

    AERONET, a network of well calibrated sunphotometers, provides data on aerosol optical depth and absorption optical depth at >250 sites around the world. The spectral range of AERONET allows discrimination between constituents that absorb most strongly in the UV region, such as soil dust and organic carbon, and the more ubiquitously absorbing black carbon (BC). AERONET locations, primarily continental, are not representative of the global mean, but they can be used to calibrate global aerosol climatologies produced by tracer transport models. We find that the amount of BC in current climatologies must be increased by a factor of 2-4 to yield best agreement with AERONET, in the approximation in which BC is externally mixed with other aerosols. The inferred climate forcing by BC, regardless of whether it is internally or externally mixed, is 1 W/m2, most of which is probably anthropogenic. This positive forcing (warming) by BC must substantially counterbalance cooling by anthropogenic reflective aerosols. Thus, especially if reflective aerosols such as sulfates are reduced, it is important to reduce BC to minimize global warming. aerosols | air pollution | climate change

  13. Global atmospheric black carbon inferred from AERONET

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Makiko; Hansen, James; Koch, Dorothy; Lacis, Andrew; Ruedy, Reto; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent; Chin, Mian; Novakov, Tica

    2003-01-01

    AERONET, a network of well calibrated sunphotometers, provides data on aerosol optical depth and absorption optical depth at >250 sites around the world. The spectral range of AERONET allows discrimination between constituents that absorb most strongly in the UV region, such as soil dust and organic carbon, and the more ubiquitously absorbing black carbon (BC). AERONET locations, primarily continental, are not representative of the global mean, but they can be used to calibrate global aerosol climatologies produced by tracer transport models. We find that the amount of BC in current climatologies must be increased by a factor of 2–4 to yield best agreement with AERONET, in the approximation in which BC is externally mixed with other aerosols. The inferred climate forcing by BC, regardless of whether it is internally or externally mixed, is ≈1 W/m2, most of which is probably anthropogenic. This positive forcing (warming) by BC must substantially counterbalance cooling by anthropogenic reflective aerosols. Thus, especially if reflective aerosols such as sulfates are reduced, it is important to reduce BC to minimize global warming. PMID:12746494

  14. Estimate of the radiative effect of brown carbon using AERONET products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitkänen, M. R.; Schuster, G. L.; Dubovik, O.; Lindfors, A. V.; Lehtinen, K. E.; Arola, A. T.

    2013-12-01

    The AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) provides aerosol size distributions and complex refractive index at four wavelengths (440, 675, 870, and 1020 nm). This information is used in the method of Schuster et al. 2013 to retrieve the relative proportions of absorbing OC, BC, free iron and scattering host, separately for fine and coarse modes. The absorbing part of fine mode is initially assumed to consist of BC and BrC, but dust is added if necessary. Likewise, the absorbing coarse mode is initially assumed to consist of mineral dust, but BC and BrC are added if necessary. We estimated the direct radiative effect of absorbing OC (Brown Carbon, BrC) by using the volume fractions of BrC retrieved by Schuster et al. 2013 for all available AERONET sites. The volume fractions of BrC were used to form the refractive index and size distributions for aerosol composition without BrC. Then the effect by absorbing OC at TOA was estimated as the difference between net fluxes with and without BrC (i.e. all aerosols and non-BrC aerosols). We used radiative transfer package libRadtran, and the non-sphericity of mineral dust was taken into account using the spheroid model by Dubovik et al. (2006). Chung et al. 2012 also proposed a method to estimate the fraction of BrC from AERONET measurements, separating dust and carbonaceous aerosols based on AAE (Absorption Angstrom Exponent). However, Schuster et al. 2013 demonstrated that dust and biomass burning aerosols are well separated by imaginary refractive indices, but not by AAE. Therefore, we additionally applied the approach of Chung et al. 2012 to calculate the direct effect by BrC and compared with our estimates.

  15. Trend Estimates of AERONET-Observed and Model-Simulated AOTs Between 1993 and 2013

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoon, J.; Pozzer, A.; Chang, D. Y.; Lelieveld, J.; Kim, J.; Kim, M.; Lee, Y. G.; Koo, J.-H.; Lee, J.; Moon, K. J.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, temporal changes in Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) have been investigated based on model simulations, satellite and ground-based observations. Most AOT trend studies used monthly or annual arithmetic means that discard details of the generally right-skewed AOT distributions. Potentially, such results can be biased by extreme values (including outliers). This study additionally uses percentiles (i.e., the lowest 5%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 95% of the monthly cumulative distributions fitted to Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET)-observed and ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC)-model simulated AOTs) that are less affected by outliers caused by measurement error, cloud contamination and occasional extreme aerosol events. Since the limited statistical representativeness of monthly percentiles and means can lead to bias, this study adopts the number of observations as a weighting factor, which improves the statistical robustness of trend estimates. By analyzing the aerosol composition of AERONET-observed and EMAC-simulated AOTs in selected regions of interest, we distinguish the dominant aerosol types and investigate the causes of regional AOT trends. The simulated and observed trends are generally consistent with a high correlation coefficient (R = 0.89) and small bias (slope+/-2(sigma) = 0.75 +/- 0.19). A significant decrease in EMAC-decomposed AOTs by water-soluble compounds and black carbon is found over the USA and the EU due to environmental regulation. In particular, a clear reversal in the AERONET AOT trend percentiles is found over the USA, probably related to the AOT diurnal cycle and the frequency of wildfires. In most of the selected regions of interest, EMAC-simulated trends are mainly attributed to the significant changes of the dominant aerosols; e.g., significant decrease in sea salt and water soluble compounds over Central America, increase in dust over Northern Africa and Middle East, and decrease in black carbon and organic carbon over

  16. Trend estimates of AERONET-observed and model-simulated AOTs between 1993 and 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, J.; Pozzer, A.; Chang, D. Y.; Lelieveld, J.; Kim, J.; Kim, M.; Lee, Y. G.; Koo, J.-H.; Lee, J.; Moon, K. J.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, temporal changes in Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) have been investigated based on model simulations, satellite and ground-based observations. Most AOT trend studies used monthly or annual arithmetic means that discard details of the generally right-skewed AOT distributions. Potentially, such results can be biased by extreme values (including outliers). This study additionally uses percentiles (i.e., the lowest 5%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 95% of the monthly cumulative distributions fitted to Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET)-observed and ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC)-model simulated AOTs) that are less affected by outliers caused by measurement error, cloud contamination and occasional extreme aerosol events. Since the limited statistical representativeness of monthly percentiles and means can lead to bias, this study adopts the number of observations as a weighting factor, which improves the statistical robustness of trend estimates. By analyzing the aerosol composition of AERONET-observed and EMAC-simulated AOTs in selected regions of interest, we distinguish the dominant aerosol types and investigate the causes of regional AOT trends. The simulated and observed trends are generally consistent with a high correlation coefficient (R = 0.89) and small bias (slope±2σ = 0.75 ± 0.19). A significant decrease in EMAC-decomposed AOTs by water-soluble compounds and black carbon is found over the USA and the EU due to environmental regulation. In particular, a clear reversal in the AERONET AOT trend percentiles is found over the USA, probably related to the AOT diurnal cycle and the frequency of wildfires. In most of the selected regions of interest, EMAC-simulated trends are mainly attributed to the significant changes of the dominant aerosols; e.g., significant decrease in sea salt and water soluble compounds over Central America, increase in dust over Northern Africa and Middle East, and decrease in black carbon and organic carbon over Australia.

  17. Mixing weight determination for retrieving optical properties of polluted dust with MODIS and AERONET data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Kuo-En; Hsiao, Ta-Chih; Hsu, N. Christina; Lin, Neng-Huei; Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Liu, Gin-Rong; Liu, Chian-Yi; Lin, Tang-Huang

    2016-08-01

    In this study, an approach in determining effective mixing weight of soot aggregates from dust-soot aerosols is proposed to improve the accuracy of retrieving properties of polluted dusts by means of satellite remote sensing. Based on a pre-computed database containing several variables (such as wavelength, refractive index, soot mixing weight, surface reflectivity, observation geometries and aerosol optical depth (AOD)), the fan-shaped look-up tables can be drawn out accordingly for determining the mixing weights, AOD and single scattering albedo (SSA) of polluted dusts simultaneously with auxiliary regional dust properties and surface reflectivity. To validate the performance of the approach in this study, 6 cases study of polluted dusts (dust-soot aerosols) in Lower Egypt and Israel were examined with the ground-based measurements through AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET). The results show that the mean absolute differences could be reduced from 32.95% to 6.56% in AOD and from 2.67% to 0.83% in SSA retrievals for MODIS aerosol products when referenced to AERONET measurements, demonstrating the soundness of the proposed approach under different levels of dust loading, mixing weight and surface reflectivity. Furthermore, the developed algorithm is capable of providing the spatial distribution of the mixing weights and removing the requirement to assume that the dust plume properties are uniform. The case study further shows the spatially variant dust-soot mixing weight would improve the retrieval accuracy in AODmixture and SSAmixture about 10.0% and 1.4% respectively.

  18. Mixing weight determination for retrieving optical properties of polluted dust with MODIS and AERONET data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Kuo-En; Hsiao, Ta-Chih; Hsu, N. Christina; Lin, Neng-Huei; Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Liu, Gin-Rong; Liu, Chian-Yi; Lin, Tang-Huang

    2016-08-01

    In this study, an approach in determining effective mixing weight of soot aggregates from dust–soot aerosols is proposed to improve the accuracy of retrieving properties of polluted dusts by means of satellite remote sensing. Based on a pre-computed database containing several variables (such as wavelength, refractive index, soot mixing weight, surface reflectivity, observation geometries and aerosol optical depth (AOD)), the fan-shaped look-up tables can be drawn out accordingly for determining the mixing weights, AOD and single scattering albedo (SSA) of polluted dusts simultaneously with auxiliary regional dust properties and surface reflectivity. To validate the performance of the approach in this study, 6 cases study of polluted dusts (dust–soot aerosols) in Lower Egypt and Israel were examined with the ground-based measurements through AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET). The results show that the mean absolute differences could be reduced from 32.95% to 6.56% in AOD and from 2.67% to 0.83% in SSA retrievals for MODIS aerosol products when referenced to AERONET measurements, demonstrating the soundness of the proposed approach under different levels of dust loading, mixing weight and surface reflectivity. Furthermore, the developed algorithm is capable of providing the spatial distribution of the mixing weights and removing the requirement to assume that the dust plume properties are uniform. The case study further shows the spatially variant dust–soot mixing weight would improve the retrieval accuracy in AODmixture and SSAmixture about 10.0% and 1.4% respectively.

  19. Evaluation of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer aerosol products at two Aerosol Robotic Network stations in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mi, Wen; Li, Zhanqing; Xia, Xiangao; Holben, Brent; Levy, Robert; Zhao, Fengsheng; Chen, Hongbin; Cribb, Maureen

    2007-11-01

    Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aerosol products have been used to address aerosol climatic issues in many parts of the world, but their quality has yet to be determined over China. This paper presents a thorough evaluation of aerosol optical depth (AOD) data retrieved from MODIS collections 4 (C004) and 5 (C005) at two AERONET sites in northern and southeastern China. Established under the aegis of the East Asian Study of Tropospheric Aerosols: An International Regional Experiment (EAST-AIRE) project, the two sites, Xianghe and Taihu, have distinct ecosystems and climate regimes, resulting in differences in retrieval performance. At the rural northeastern site (Xianghe), MODIS C004 retrievals generally overestimate AOD at 550 nm during clean days, with the largest errors occurring during winter. In the warm and humid regions of southeastern China (Taihu), MODIS C004 retrievals overestimate AOD throughout the year. The systematic error at Xianghe is primarily due to the fixed surface reflectance ratio, while as the error at Taihu is mainly caused by the choice of the single scattering albedo (SSA) for the fine model aerosols. Both problems are alleviated considerably in the C005. The comparisons between C005 retrievals and AERONET data show much higher correlation coefficient, lower offset and a slope closer to unity. Also, the variability of AOD retrieval among neighboring pixels is reduced by several factors. The strong overestimation problem at small AOD values was fixed by using dynamic reflectance ratios that vary with the vegetation index and scattering angle. However, significant uncertainties remain because of the use of highly simplified aerosol models.

  20. Long-term variability of aerosol optical thickness in Eastern Europe over 2001-2014 according to the measurements at the Moscow MSU MO AERONET site with additional cloud and NO2 correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubarova, N. Y.; Poliukhov, A. A.; Gorlova, I. D.

    2015-07-01

    The aerosol properties of the atmosphere were obtained within the framework of the AERONET program at the Moscow State University Meteorological Observatory (Moscow MSU MO) over 2001-2014 period. The quality data control has revealed the necessity of their additional cloud and NO2 correction. The application of cloud correction according to hourly visual cloud observations provides a decrease in average aerosol optical thickness (AOT) at 500 nm of up to 0.03 compared with the standard dataset. We also show that the additional NO2 correction of the AERONET data is needed in large megalopolis, like Moscow, with 12 million residents and the NOx emission rates of about 100 kt yr-1. According to the developed method we estimated monthly mean NO2 content, which provides an additional decrease of 0.01 for AOT at 340 nm, and of about 0.015 - for AOT at 380 and 440 nm. The ratios of NO2 optical thickness to AOT at 380 and 440 nm are about 5-6 % in summer and reach 15-20 % in winter when both factors have similar effects on UV irradiance. Seasonal cycle of AOT at 500 nm is characterized by a noticeable summer and spring maxima, and minimum in winter conditions, changing from 0.08 in December and January up to 0.3 in August. The application of the additional cloud correction removes a local AOT maximum in February, and lowered the December artificial high AOT values. The pronounced negative AOT trends of about -1-5 % yr-1 have been obtained for most months, which could be attributed to the negative trends in emissions (E) of different aerosol precursors of about 116 Gg yr-2 in ESOx, 78 Gg yr-2 in ENMVOC, and 272 Gg yr-2 in ECO over European territory of Russia. No influence of natural factors on temporal AOT variations has been revealed.

  1. Validation of the New VIIRS Deep Blue Algorithm with AERONET in Dust Source and Sink Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carletta, N.; Hsu, N. Y. C.; Sayer, A. M.; Bettenhausen, C.; Lee, J.

    2015-12-01

    With the impacts dust aerosols have on our climate and air quality it is important to measure them. One such satellite data set is Deep Blue, which provides aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements over land and ocean surfaces. This is valuable when tracking dust aerosols that travel over a variety of different surfaces between their source and sink. Deep Blue has a data record from 1997 to present provided by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) and two Moderate Imaging Spectroradiometers (MODIS). These instruments are now either well past their life expectancy (MODIS) or no longer in operation (SeaWiFS). To continue the record, the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument, which has similar capabilities to MODIS, will be used. This presentation presents validation results of the new version 1 VIIRS Deep Blue aerosol products, using data from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET). A diverse set of locations, from dust source to sink over land and ocean, have been selected for this validation, which demonstrates reliable performance of Deep Blue products for various surface conditions.

  2. Dust Optical Properties Over North Africa and Arabian Peninsula Derived from the AERONET Dataset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, D.; Chin, M.; Yu, H.; Eck, T. F.; Sinyuk, A.; Smirnov, A.; Holben, B. N.

    2011-01-01

    Dust optical properties over North Africa and the Arabian Peninsula are extracted from the quality assured multi-year datasets obtained at 14 sites of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). We select the data with (a) large aerosol optical depth (AOD >= 0.4 at 440 nm) and (b) small Angstrom exponent (A(sub ext)<= 0.2) for retaining high accuracy and reducing interference of non-dust aerosols. The result indicates that the major fraction of high aerosol optical depth days are dominated by dust over these sites even though it varies depending on location and time. We have found that the annual mean and standard deviation of single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, real refractive index, and imaginary refractive index for Saharan and Arabian desert dust is 0.944 +/- 0.005, 0.752 +/- 0.014, 1.498 +/- 0.032, and 0.0024 +/- 0.0034 at 550 nm wavelength, respectively. Dust aerosol selected by this method is less absorbing than the previously reported values over these sites. The weaker absorption of dust from this study is consistent with the studies using remote sensing techniques from satellite. These results can help to constrain uncertainties in estimating global dust shortwave radiative forcing.

  3. Comparison of concentrations of selected aerosol components estimated using the AERONET data set with those from continuous/semi-continuous measurements on the ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Y.; Ghim, Y.

    2013-12-01

    A CIEMEL sunphotometer was operated in 2012 starting from March as a part of the DRAGON (Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks) campaign. The site is Hankuk_UFS (Hankuk University of Foreign Studies; 37.02 °N, 127.16 °E, 167 m above sea level) located about 35 km southeast of downtown Seoul. We also measured inorganic ions using PILS (Particle-Into-Liquid Sampler, ADI 2081, Applikon) at intervals of 25 minutes in spring and winter and BC (black carbon) using MAAP (Multiangle Absorption Photometer, Model 5012, Thermo) at intervals of 10 minutes throughout the study period. Concentrations of major chemical components were estimated from effective real and imaginary refractory indices for a mixture assuming the Maxwell-Garnett mixing of four components such as mineral dust, organic and black carbons, and ammonium sulfate (as a surrogate of secondary ions) embedded in water host. We compare ammonium sulfate of column aerosols estimated from the refractive indices with secondary ions of surface aerosols from PILS and BC of column aerosols estimated from the refractive indices with that of surface aerosols from MAAP. Since the measurement intervals are different between sunphotometer and surface instruments, we compare the concentrations when the measurement time coincides within 5 minutes.

  4. Seasonal and inter-annual variability of aerosol single scattering albedo over Amazonia from satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, O.; Eck, T. F.; Jethva, H. T.

    2013-05-01

    The Amazon Basin is one of the world's largest sources of carbonaceous aerosols. Black and organic carbon in carbonaceous aerosols produced by biomass burning absorb a fraction of the incoming solar radiation and contribute to the warming of the atmosphere. The aerosol absorption potential is generally quantified in terms of the single scattering albedo (SSA) which is currently measured at the ground by the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) observations, and from space by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). We will explain recent upgrades to the OMI near-UV aerosol algorithm that have enabled the accurate SSA retrieval, assess the satellite retrievals by comparison to AERONET's ground based observations, and discuss the SSA inter-annual, seasonal and spatial variability over Amazonia.

  5. Remote Sensing of Atmospheric Aerosol over Indo-Gangetic Basin during 2005-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Singh, A. K.; Singh, R. P.

    2012-12-01

    The Indo-Gangetic Basin (IGB) is one of the largest river basin in the world, it extends 2000 km in length along NW - SE and has 400 km width, in north the basin is bounded by towering Himalaya. High Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) is observed over the IGB throughout the year. The Himalaya restricts the transport of aerosols across Tibet and China. The aerosol loading in IGB gets enhanced during pre-monsoon season (April-June) every year due to major dust storms, originated from western arid and Desert regions. To study the variability of aerosol over the IGB we have used ground based Kanpur and Gandhi college Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) stations and Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Terra level-3 AOD products for the years 2005-2009. An increase in both satellite-derived as well as ground observed aerosol loading during 2005-2009 has been found over major cities located in the IGB. The correlation coefficients between Kanpur AERONET and MISR data are found to be 0.70, 0.36 0.82, in contrast the correlation coefficients between Kanpur AERONET and MODIS 0.49, 0.68, and 0.43, respectively during summer, winter and monsoon seasons. The AOD estimation using MISR is found to be close to AERONET data during summer and monsoon seasons, in contrast MODIS estimation is better during winter season. Keywords: Aerosols, AERONET, MISR, MODIS, Indo-Gangetic Basin. Validation of level 3 MISR and MODIS AOD over Kanpur using quality assured level 2 AERONET AOD, at 550 nm, during the summer (April-June, 2005-2009) winter (Nov.-Feb., 2005-2009) and monsoon season (July-October, 2005-2009).

  6. Cloud Droplet Size and Liquid Water Path Retrievals From Zenith Radiance Measurements: Examples From the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program and the Aerosol Robotic Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, J. C.; Marshak, A.; Huang, C.-H.; Varnai, T.; Hogan, R. J.; Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Knyazikhin, Y.; O'Connor, E. J.; Wiscombe, W. J.

    2012-01-01

    The ground-based Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) and NASA Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) routinely monitor clouds using zenith radiances at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. Using the transmittance calculated from such measurements, we have developed a new retrieval method for cloud effective droplet size and conducted extensive tests for non-precipitating liquid water clouds. The underlying principle is to combine a water-absorbing wavelength (i.e. 1640 nm) with a nonwater-absorbing wavelength for acquiring information on cloud droplet size and optical depth. For simulated stratocumulus clouds with liquid water path less than 300 g/sq m and horizontal resolution of 201m, the retrieval method underestimates the mean effective radius by 0.8 m, with a root-mean-squared error of 1.7 m and a relative deviation of 13 %. For actual observations with a liquid water path less than 450 gm.2 at the ARM Oklahoma site during 2007-2008, our 1.5 min-averaged retrievals are generally larger by around 1 m than those from combined ground-based cloud radar and microwave radiometer at a 5min temporal resolution. We also compared our retrievals to those from combined shortwave flux and microwave observations for relatively homogeneous clouds, showing that the bias between these two retrieval sets is negligible, but the error of 2.6 m and the relative deviation of 22% are larger than those found in our simulation case. Finally, the transmittance-based cloud effective droplet radii agree to better than 11% with satellite observations and have a negative bias of 1 m. Overall, the retrieval method provides reasonable cloud effective radius estimates, which can enhance the cloud products of both ARM and AERONET.

  7. Coherent Evaluation of Aerosol Data Products from Multiple Satellite Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichoku, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Aerosol retrieval from satellite has practically become routine, especially during the last decade. However, there is often disagreement between similar aerosol parameters retrieved from different sensors, thereby leaving users confused as to which sensors to trust for answering important science questions about the distribution, properties, and impacts of aerosols. As long as there is no consensus, and the inconsistencies are not well characterized and understood, there will be no way of developing reliable model inputs and climate data records from satellite aerosol measurements. Fortunately, the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) is providing well-calibrated globally representative ground-based aerosol measurements corresponding to the satellite-retrieved products. Through a recently developed web-based Multi-sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System (MAPSS), we are utilizing the advantages offered by collocated AERONET and satellite products to characterize and evaluate aerosol retrieval from multiple sensors. Indeed, MAPSS and its companion statistical tool AeroStat are facilitating detailed comparative uncertainty analysis of satellite aerosol measurements from Terra-MODIS, Aqua-MODIS, Terra-MISR, Aura-OMI, Parasol-POLDER, and Calipso-CALIOP. In this presentation, we will describe the strategy of the MAPSS system, its potential advantages for the aerosol community, and the preliminary results of an integrated comparative uncertainly analysis of aerosol products from multiple satellite sensors.

  8. Improvement of Aerosol Optical Depth Retrieval over Hong Kong from a Geostationary Meteorological Satellite Using Critical Reflectance with Background Optical Depth Correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Mijin; Kim, Jhoon; Wong, Man Sing; Yoon, Jongmin; Lee, Jaehwa; Wu, Dong L.; Chan, P.W.; Nichol, Janet E.; Chung, Chu-Yong; Ou, Mi-Lim

    2014-01-01

    Despite continuous efforts to retrieve aerosol optical depth (AOD) using a conventional 5-channelmeteorological imager in geostationary orbit, the accuracy in urban areas has been poorer than other areas primarily due to complex urban surface properties and mixed aerosol types from different emission sources. The two largest error sources in aerosol retrieval have been aerosol type selection and surface reflectance. In selecting the aerosol type from a single visible channel, the season-dependent aerosol optical properties were adopted from longterm measurements of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun-photometers. With the aerosol optical properties obtained fromthe AERONET inversion data, look-up tableswere calculated by using a radiative transfer code: the Second Simulation of the Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6S). Surface reflectance was estimated using the clear sky composite method, awidely used technique for geostationary retrievals. Over East Asia, the AOD retrieved from the Meteorological Imager showed good agreement, although the values were affected by cloud contamination errors. However, the conventional retrieval of the AOD over Hong Kong was largely underestimated due to the lack of information on the aerosol type and surface properties. To detect spatial and temporal variation of aerosol type over the area, the critical reflectance method, a technique to retrieve single scattering albedo (SSA), was applied. Additionally, the background aerosol effect was corrected to improve the accuracy of the surface reflectance over Hong Kong. The AOD retrieved froma modified algorithmwas compared to the collocated data measured by AERONET in Hong Kong. The comparison showed that the new aerosol type selection using the critical reflectance and the corrected surface reflectance significantly improved the accuracy of AODs in Hong Kong areas,with a correlation coefficient increase from0.65 to 0.76 and a regression line change from tMI [basic algorithm] = 0

  9. Aerosol Types using Passive Remote Sensing: Global Distribution, Consistency Check, Total-Column Investigation and Translation into Composition Derived from Climate and Chemical Transport Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacenelenbogen, M. S.; Dawson, K. W.; Johnson, M. S.; Burton, S. P.; Redemann, J.; Hasekamp, O. P.; Hair, J. W.; Ferrare, R. A.; Butler, C. F.; Holben, B. N.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Ziemba, L. D.; Froyd, K. D.; Dibb, J. E.; Shingler, T.; Sorooshian, A.; Jimenez, J. L.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Jacob, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    To improve the predictions of aerosol composition in chemical transport models (CTMs) and global climate models (GCMs), we have developed an aerosol classification algorithm (called Specified Clustering and Mahalanobis Classification, SCMC) that assigns an aerosol type to multi-parameter retrievals by spaceborne, airborne or ground based passive remote sensing instruments [Russell et al., 2014]. The aerosol types identified by our scheme are pure dust, polluted dust, urban-industrial/developed economy, urban-industrial/developing economy, dark biomass smoke, light biomass smoke and pure marine. We apply the SCMC method to two different total-column datasets of aerosol optical properties: inversions from the ground-based AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and retrievals from the space-borne POLDER (Polarization and Directionality of Earth's Reflectances) instrument. The POLDER retrievals that we use differ from the standard POLDER retrievals [Deuzé et al., 2001] as they make full use of multi-angle, multispectral polarimetric data [Hasekamp et al., 2011]. We analyze agreement in the aerosol types inferred from both AERONET and POLDER globally. Then, we investigate how our total-column "effective" SCMC aerosol types relate to different aerosol types within the column (i.e. either a mixture of different types within one layer in the vertical or the stacking of different aerosol types within the vertical column). For that, we compare AERONET-SCMC aerosol types to collocated NASA LaRC HSRL vertically resolved aerosol types [Burton et al., 2012] during the SEAC4RS and DISCOVER-AQ airborne field experiments, mostly over Texas in Aug-Sept 2013. Finally, in order to evaluate the GEOS-Chem CTM aerosol types, we translate each of our SCMC aerosol type into a unique distribution of GEOS-Chem aerosol composition (e.g. biomass burning, dust, sulfate, sea salt). We bridge the gap between remote sensing and model-inferred aerosol types by using multiple years of collocated AERONET

  10. Improving satellite-retrieved aerosol microphysical properties using GOCART data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Kahn, R.; Chin, M.; Garay, M. J.; Liu, Y.

    2015-03-01

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) aboard the NASA Earth Observing System's Terra satellite can provide more reliable aerosol optical depth (AOD) and better constraints on particle size (Ångström exponent, or ANG), sphericity, and single-scattering albedo (SSA) than many other satellite instruments. However, many aerosol mixtures pass the algorithm acceptance criteria, yielding a poor constraint, when the particle-type information in the MISR radiances is low, typically at low AOD. We investigate adding value to the MISR aerosol product under these conditions by filtering the list of MISR-retrieved mixtures based on agreement between the mixture ANG and absorbing AOD (AAOD) values, and simulated aerosol properties from the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model. MISR-GOCART ANG difference and AAOD ratio thresholds for applying GOCART constraints were determined based on coincident AOD, ANG, and AAOD measurements from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET). The results were validated by comparing the adjusted MISR aerosol optical properties over the contiguous USA between 2006 and 2009 with additional AERONET data. The correlation coefficient (r) between the adjusted MISR ANG derived from this study and AERONET improves to 0.45, compared to 0.29 for the MISR Version 22 standard product. The ratio of the adjusted MISR AAOD to AERONET increases to 0.74, compared to 0.5 for the MISR operational retrieval. These improvements occur primarily when AOD < 0.2 for ANG and AOD < 0.5 for AAOD. Spatial and temporal differences among the aerosol optical properties of MISR V22, GOCART, and the adjusted MISR are traced to (1) GOCART underestimation of AOD and ANG in polluted regions; (2) aerosol mixtures lacking in the MISR Version 22 algorithm climatology; (3) low MISR sensitivity to particle type under some conditions; and (4) parameters and thresholds used in our method.

  11. Observed Differences Between Imaging Nephelometer Scattering Measurements and AERONET Retrievals During the Discover-AQ Field Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa, R.; Remer, L. A.; Orozco, D.; Dolgos, G.; Martins, J. V.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosols, clouds, and their interaction play a central role in the climate of our planet. Satellite remote sensing allows for global measurements of aerosol radiative properties; however high confidence in these measurements, and their corresponding retrieval algorithms, requires in situ validation. The Laboratory for Aerosols, Clouds and Optics (LACO) at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) has developed the Imaging Nephelometer, a uniquely accurate instrument concept for the measurement of in situ optical scattering properties. Imaging Nephelometers provide measurements of the scattering coefficient, phase function and polarized phase function over an angular range of 3 to 177 degrees with an angular resolution better than one degree. The first of these instruments, the Polarized Imaging NEPHelometer (PI-NEPH) has taken part in five airborne field experiments and shown high accuracy in a wide variety of validation studies. In 2014 the open path, Open Imaging NEPHhelometer (OI-NEPH), was constructed at UMBC. This instrument provides measurements that are free from size biases introduced by a sampling inlet as well as changes in hydroscopic growth resulting from relative humidity changes. This presentation will provide an intercomparison between the aerosol properties that are measured and retrieved by LACO Imaging Nephelometers and the corresponding remote sensing retrievals obtained during the California and Colorado DISCOVER-AQ field experiments. The primary goal of this work will be to compare the scattering-weighted, column-averaged in situ phase functions measured by Imaging Nephelometers with the corresponding phase function retrievals performed by collocated AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) sun photometers. These comparisons will include profiles with a wide range of aerosol loadings, including cases with low optical depth where the AERONET retrieval is less frequently evaluated and the quality of the resulting products is not well known.

  12. Aerosol Properties Derived from Airborne Sky Radiance and Direct Beam Measurements in Recent NASA and DoE Field Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Flynn, C. J.; Shinozuka, Y.; Russell, P. B.; Kacenelenbogen, M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, M.; Livingston, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Dunagan, S. E.; Johnson, R. R.; LeBlanc, S.; Schmidt, S.; Pilewskie, P.; Song, S.

    2014-01-01

    The AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) ground-based suite of sunphotometers provides measurements of spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD), precipitable water and spectral sky radiance, which can be inverted to retrieve aerosol microphysical properties that are critical to assessments of aerosol-climate interactions. Because of data quality criteria and sampling constraints, there are significant limitations to the temporal and spatial coverage of AERONET data and their representativeness for global aerosol conditions.The 4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research) instrument, jointly developed by NASA Ames and PNNL (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) with NASA Goddard collaboration, combines airborne sun tracking and AERONET-like sky scanning with spectroscopic detection. Being an airborne instrument, 4STAR has the potential to fill gaps in the AERONET data set. The 4STAR instrument operated successfully in the SEAC4RS (Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys) experiment in Aug./Sep. 2013 aboard the NASA DC-8 and in the DoE (Department of Energy)-sponsored TCAP (Two Column Aerosol Project, July 2012 & Feb. 2013) experiment aboard the DoE G-1 aircraft. 4STAR provided direct beam measurements of hyperspectral AOD, columnar trace gas retrievals (H2O, O3, NO2), and the first ever airborne hyperspectral sky radiance scans, which can be inverted to yield the same products as AERONET ground-based observations. In this presentation, we provide an overview of the new 4STAR capabilities, with an emphasis on 26 high-quality sky radiance measurements carried out by 4STAR in SEAC4RS. We compare collocated 4STAR and AERONET sky radiances, as well as their retrievals of aerosol microphysical properties for a subset of the available case studies. We summarize the particle property and air-mass characterization studies made possible by the combined 4STAR direct beam and sky radiance

  13. Aerosol properties derived from airborne sky radiance and direct beam measurements in recent NASA and DoE field campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redemann, J.; Flynn, C. J.; Shinozuka, Y.; Russell, P. B.; Kacenelenbogen, M. S.; Segal-Rosenhaimer, M.; Livingston, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Dunagan, S. E.; Johnson, R. R.; LeBlanc, S. E.; Schmidt, S.; Pilewskie, P.; Song, S.

    2014-12-01

    The AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) ground-based suite of sunphotometers provides measurements of spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD), precipitable water and spectral sky radiance, which can be inverted to retrieve aerosol microphysical properties that are critical to assessments of aerosol-climate interactions. Because of data quality criteria and sampling constraints, there are significant limitations to the temporal and spatial coverage of AERONET data and their representativeness for global aerosol conditions. The 4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research) instrument, jointly developed by NASA Ames and PNNL with NASA Goddard collaboration, combines airborne sun tracking and AERONET-like sky scanning with spectroscopic detection. Being an airborne instrument, 4STAR has the potential to fill gaps in the AERONET data set. The 4STAR instrument operated successfully in the SEAC4RS [Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys] experiment in Aug./Sep. 2013 aboard the NASA DC-8 and in the DoE [Department of Energy]-sponsored TCAP [Two Column Aerosol Project, July 2012 & Feb. 2013] experiment aboard the DoE G-1 aircraft. 4STAR provided direct beam measurements of hyperspectral AOD, columnar trace gas retrievals (H2O, O3, NO2), and the first ever airborne hyperspectral sky radiance scans, which can be inverted to yield the same products as AERONET ground-based observations. In this presentation, we provide an overview of the new 4STAR capabilities, with an emphasis on 26 high-quality sky radiance measurements carried out by 4STAR in SEAC4RS. We compare collocated 4STAR and AERONET sky radiances, as well as their retrievals of aerosol microphysical properties for a subset of the available case studies. We summarize the particle property and airmass characterization studies made possible by the combined 4STAR direct beam and sky radiance observations.

  14. AERONET-OC: Strengths and Weaknesses of a Network for the Validation of Satellite Coastal Radiometric Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zibordi, Giuseppe; Holben, Brent; Slutsker, Ilya; Giles, David; D'Alimonte, Davide; Melin, Frederic; Berthon, Jean-Francois; Vandemark, Doug; Feng, Hui; Schuster, Gregory; Fabbri, Bryan E.; Kaitala, Seppo; Seppala, Jukka

    2008-01-01

    The Ocean Color component of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET-OC) has been implemented to support long-term satellite ocean color investigations through cross-site consistent and accurate measurements collected by autonomous radiometer systems deployed on offshore fixed platforms. The ultimate purpose of AERONET-OC is the production of standardized measurements performed at different sites with identical measuring systems and protocols, calibrated using a single reference source and method, and processed with the same code. The AERONET-OC primary data product is the normalized water leaving radiance determined at center-wavelengths of interest for satellite ocean color applications, with an uncertainty lower than 5% in the blue-green spectral regions and higher than 8% in the red. Measurements collected at 6 sites counting the northern Adriatic Sea, the Baltic Proper, the Gulf of Finland, the Persian Gulf, and, the northern and southern margins of the Middle Atlantic Bay, have shown the capability of producing quality assured data over a wide range of bio-optical conditions including Case-2 yellow substance- and sedimentdominated waters. This work briefly introduces network elements like: deployment sites, measurement method, instrument calibration, processing scheme, quality-assurance, uncertainties, data archive and products accessibility. Emphases is given to those elements which underline the network strengths (i.e., mostly standardization of any network element) and its weaknesses (i.e., the use of consolidated, but old-fashioned technology). The work also addresses the application of AERONET-OC data to the validation of primary satellite radiometric products over a variety of complex coastal waters and finally provides elements for the identification of new deployment sites most suitable to support satellite ocean color missions.

  15. A New "Cloud Mode" for the AERONET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, Alexander; Barker, H.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Wiscombe, W.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A key to predicting climate change is to observe an understand the global distribution of clouds and their physical properties such as optical thickness and droplet size. Since clouds change rapidly over short time and space intervals, they are difficult to simulate in computer models. But it is essential that global climate models predict realistic spatial and temporal distribution of cloud optical depth. The best way to verify these distributions is to infer optical depth from global coverage satellite data. However, satellite methods have many sources of uncertainty; thus, independent and reliable ground-based estimates are essential for validation. For aerosol, there is the AERONET - a ground based monitoring network that consists of identical multi-channel radiometers for assessing aerosol optical properties and validating their satellite retrievals. In addition to AEROSOL, we want the network monitoring CLOUD optical properties. It will use AERONET "time" (inappropriate for aerosol studies) to make basic new measurements related to cloud physics. In the presentation we will report on a new technique that retrieves cloud optical thickness for even broken clouds above green vegetation from surface measurements of zenith radiance in the visible (VIS) and near-IR (NIR) spectral regions. The idea of the method is simple: since green vegetation reflects 40-50% of incoming radiation in the NIR and only 5-10% in the VIS region, ground measurements under thin clouds have little spectral contrast between VIS and NIR, while thick clouds reflect much more of the surface-reflected radiation in the NIR than in VIS. Based on this idea, we use a combination of measurements (spectral indices) in VIS and NIR to estimate cloud optical thickness. By analogy with NDVI, the simplest index that can be defined is the Normalized Difference Cloud Index (NDCI) which is a ratio between the difference and the sum of two radiances measured for two narrow spectral bands in VIS and NIR.

  16. Biomass Burning Aerosol Absorption Measurements with MODIS Using the Critical Reflectance Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Li; Martins, Vanderlei J.; Remer, Lorraine A.

    2010-01-01

    This research uses the critical reflectance technique, a space-based remote sensing method, to measure the spatial distribution of aerosol absorption properties over land. Choosing two regions dominated by biomass burning aerosols, a series of sensitivity studies were undertaken to analyze the potential limitations of this method for the type of aerosol to be encountered in the selected study areas, and to show that the retrieved results are relatively insensitive to uncertainties in the assumptions used in the retrieval of smoke aerosol. The critical reflectance technique is then applied to Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) data to retrieve the spectral aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA) in South African and South American 35 biomass burning events. The retrieved results were validated with collocated Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) retrievals. One standard deviation of mean MODIS retrievals match AERONET products to within 0.03, the magnitude of the AERONET uncertainty. The overlap of the two retrievals increases to 88%, allowing for measurement variance in the MODIS retrievals as well. The ensemble average of MODIS-derived SSA for the Amazon forest station is 0.92 at 670 nm, and 0.84-0.89 for the southern African savanna stations. The critical reflectance technique allows evaluation of the spatial variability of SSA, and shows that SSA in South America exhibits higher spatial variation than in South Africa. The accuracy of the retrieved aerosol SSA from MODIS data indicates that this product can help to better understand 44 how aerosols affect the regional and global climate.

  17. Evaluations of Thin Cirrus Contamination and Screening in Ground Aerosol Observations Using Collocated Lidar Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Jingfeng; Hsu, N. Christina; Tsay, Si-Chee; Holben, Brent N.; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Smirnov, Alexander; Jeong, Myeong-Jae; Hansell, Richard A.; Berkoff, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    Cirrus clouds, particularly sub visual high thin cirrus with low optical thickness, are difficult to be screened in operational aerosol retrieval algorithms. Collocated aerosol and cirrus observations from ground measurements, such as the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and the Micro-Pulse Lidar Network (MPLNET), provide us with an unprecedented opportunity to examine the susceptibility of operational aerosol products to thin cirrus contamination. Quality assured aerosol optical thickness (AOT) measurements were also tested against the CALIPSO vertical feature mask (VFM) and the MODIS-derived thin cirrus screening parameters for the purpose of evaluating thin cirrus contamination. Key results of this study include: (1) Quantitative evaluations of data uncertainties in AERONET AOT retrievals are conducted. Although AERONET cirrus screening schemes are successful in removing most cirrus contamination, strong residuals displaying strong spatial and seasonal variability still exist, particularly over thin cirrus prevalent regions during cirrus peak seasons, (2) Challenges in matching up different data for analysis are highlighted and corresponding solutions proposed, and (3) Estimation of the relative contributions from cirrus contamination to aerosol retrievals are discussed. The results are valuable for better understanding and further improving ground aerosol measurements that are critical for aerosol-related climate research.

  18. Characterizing Uncertainty in Global Aerosol Retrievals from Multiple Spaceborne Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrenko, M.; Smirnov, A.; Ichoku, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Complementary global aerosol products have been routinely available from multiple spaceborne sensors, including MODIS (on Terra and Aqua), MISR, OMI, POLDER, CALIOP, SeaWiFS, and VIIRS. However, a variety of studies suggest that individual aerosol products have significant differences in the geographic distribution of their retrieval uncertainties. Nonetheless, it can be difficult or impractical to track down relevant product validation studies and invest time in mastering the proprietary file formats of these aerosol products. As a result, many studies are performed using data from one or two most familiar products that, oftentimes, may not be optimal for a given region of interest. In this presentation, we will use Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and Maritime Aerosol Network (MAN) data within the framework of the Multi-sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System (MAPSS) to catalog the accuracy of aerosol retrievals from the spaceborne sensors listed above. We will report our findings in analyzing the spatial and temporal distributions of the uncertainties in the global over-land and maritime retrievals of aerosols based on inter-comparing spaceborne data with coincident ground-based measurements from both AERONET and MAN. We will also explain our vision of how this analysis can be used as a base for a multi-sensor aerosol product package that would help end users to make a more informed choice when selecting data for their regions of interest.

  19. In-depth discrimination of aerosol types using multiple clustering techniques over four locations in Indo-Gangetic plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibi, Humera; Alam, Khan; Bibi, Samina

    2016-11-01

    Discrimination of aerosol types is essential over the Indo-Gangetic plain (IGP) because several aerosol types originate from different sources having different atmospheric impacts. In this paper, we analyzed a seasonal discrimination of aerosol types by multiple clustering techniques using AERosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) datasets for the period 2007-2013 over Karachi, Lahore, Jaipur and Kanpur. We discriminated the aerosols into three major types; dust, biomass burning and urban/industrial. The discrimination was carried out by analyzing different aerosol optical properties such as Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD), Angstrom Exponent (AE), Extinction Angstrom Exponent (EAE), Abortion Angstrom Exponent (AAE), Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) and Real Refractive Index (RRI) and their interrelationship to investigate the dominant aerosol types and to examine the variation in their seasonal distribution. The results revealed that during summer and pre-monsoon, dust aerosols were dominant while during winter and post-monsoon prevailing aerosols were biomass burning and urban industrial, and the mixed type of aerosols were present in all seasons. These types of aerosol discriminated from AERONET were in good agreement with CALIPSO (the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation) measurement.

  20. Toward a Coherent Detailed Evaluation of Aerosol Data Products from Multiple Satellite Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichoku, Charles; Petrenko, Maksym; Leptoukh, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols represent one of the greatest uncertainties in climate research. Although satellite-based aerosol retrieval has practically become routine, especially during the last decade, there is often disagreement between similar aerosol parameters retrieved from different sensors, leaving users confused as to which sensors to trust for answering important science questions about the distribution, properties, and impacts of aerosols. As long as there is no consensus and the inconsistencies are not well characterized and understood, there will be no way of developing reliable climate data records from satellite aerosol measurements. Fortunately, the most globally representative well-calibrated ground-based aerosol measurements corresponding to the satellite-retrieved products are available from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). To adequately utilize the advantages offered by this vital resource, an online Multi-sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System (MAPSS) was recently developed. The aim of MAPSS is to facilitate detailed comparative analysis of satellite aerosol measurements from different sensors (Terra-MODIS, Aqua-MODIS, TerraMISR, Aura-OMI, Parasol-POLDER, and Calipso-CALIOP) based on the collocation of these data products over AERONET stations. In this presentation, we will describe the strategy of the MASS system, its potential advantages for the aerosol community, and the preliminary results of an integrated comparative uncertainly analysis of aerosol products from multiple satellite sensors.

  1. The Multi-Sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System (MAPSS) for Integrated Analysis of Satellite Retrieval Uncertainties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichoku, Charles; Petrenko, Maksym; Leptoukh, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    Among the known atmospheric constituents, aerosols represent the greatest uncertainty in climate research. Although satellite-based aerosol retrieval has practically become routine, especially during the last decade, there is often disagreement between similar aerosol parameters retrieved from different sensors, leaving users confused as to which sensors to trust for answering important science questions about the distribution, properties, and impacts of aerosols. As long as there is no consensus and the inconsistencies are not well characterized and understood ', there will be no way of developing reliable climate data records from satellite aerosol measurements. Fortunately, the most globally representative well-calibrated ground-based aerosol measurements corresponding to the satellite-retrieved products are available from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). To adequately utilize the advantages offered by this vital resource,., an online Multi-sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System (MAPSS) was recently developed. The aim of MAPSS is to facilitate detailed comparative analysis of satellite aerosol measurements from different sensors (Terra-MODIS, Aqua-MODIS, Terra-MISR, Aura-OMI, Parasol-POLDER, and Calipso-CALIOP) based on the collocation of these data products over AERONET stations. In this presentation, we will describe the strategy of the MAPSS system, its potential advantages for the aerosol community, and the preliminary results of an integrated comparative uncertainty analysis of aerosol products from multiple satellite sensors.

  2. Assessment of 10-Year Global Record of Aerosol Products from the OMI Near-UV Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, C.; Torres, O.; Jethva, H. T.

    2014-12-01

    Global observations of aerosol properties from space are critical for understanding climate change and air quality applications. The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) onboard the EOS-Aura satellite provides information on aerosol optical properties by making use of the large sensitivity to aerosol absorption and dark surface albedo in the UV spectral region. These unique features enable us to retrieve both aerosol extinction optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA) successfully from radiance measurements at 354 and 388 nm by the OMI near UV aerosol algorithm (OMAERUV). Recent improvements to algorithms in conjunction with the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) carbon monoxide data also reduce uncertainties due to aerosol layer heights and types significantly in retrieved products. We present validation results of OMI AOD against space and time collocated Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measured AOD values over multiple stations representing major aerosol episodes and regimes. We also compare the OMI SSA against the inversion made by AERONET as well as an independent network of ground-based radiometer called SKYNET in Japan, China, South-East Asia, India, and Europe. The outcome of the evaluation analysis indicates that in spite of the "row anomaly" problem, affecting the sensor since mid-2007, the long-term aerosol record shows remarkable sensor stability. The OMAERUV 10-year global aerosol record is publicly available at the NASA data service center web site (http://disc.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/Aura/data-holdings/OMI/omaeruv_v003.shtml).

  3. Improving satellite retrieved aerosol microphysical properties using GOCART data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Kahn, R.; Chin, M.; Garay, M. J.; Chen, L.; Liu, Y.

    2014-09-01

    The Multi-Angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR) instrument on NASA's Terra satellite can provide more reliable Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD, τ) and more particle information, such as constraints on particle size (Angström exponent or ANG, α), particle shape, and single-scattering albedo (SSA, ω), than many other satellite instruments. However, MISR's ability to retrieve aerosol properties is weakened at low AOD levels. When aerosol-type information content is low, many candidate aerosol mixtures can match the observed radiances. We propose an algorithm to improve MISR aerosol retrievals by constraining MISR mixtures' ANG and absorbing AOD (AAOD) with Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model-simulated aerosol properties. To demonstrate this approach, we calculated MISR aerosol optical properties over the contiguous US from 2006 to 2009. Sensitivities associated with the thresholds of MISR-GOCART differences were analyzed according to the agreement between our results (AOD, ANG, and AAOD) and AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) observations. Overall, our AOD has a good agreement with AERONET because the MISR AOD retrieval is not sensitive to different mixtures under many retrieval conditions. The correlation coefficient (r) between our ANG and AERONET improves to 0.45 from 0.29 for the MISR Version 22 standard product and 0.43 for GOCART when all data points are included. However, when only cases having AOD > 0.2, the MISR product itself has r ~ 0.40, and when only AOD > 0.2 and the best-fitting mixture are considered, r ~ 0.49. So as expected, the ANG improvement occurs primarily when the model constraint is applied in cases where the particle type information content of the MISR radiances is low. Regression analysis for AAOD shows that MISR Version 22 and GOCART misestimate AERONET by a ratio (mean retrieved AAOD to mean AERONET AAOD) of 0.5; our method improves this ratio to 0.74. Large discrepancies are found through an inter

  4. Atmospheric correction at AERONET locations: A new science and validation data set

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Y.; Lyapustin, A.I.; Privette, J.L.; Morisette, J.T.; Holben, B.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes an Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET)-based Surface Reflectance Validation Network (ASRVN) and its data set of spectral surface bidirectional reflectance and albedo based on Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) TERRA and AQUA data. The ASRVN is an operational data collection and processing system. It receives 50 ?? 50 km2; subsets of MODIS level 1B (L1B) data from MODIS adaptive processing system and AERONET aerosol and water-vapor information. Then, it performs an atmospheric correction (AC) for about 100 AERONET sites based on accurate radiative-transfer theory with complex quality control of the input data. The ASRVN processing software consists of an L1B data gridding algorithm, a new cloud-mask (CM) algorithm based on a time-series analysis, and an AC algorithm using ancillary AERONET aerosol and water-vapor data. The AC is achieved by fitting the MODIS top-of-atmosphere measurements, accumulated for a 16-day interval, with theoretical reflectance parameterized in terms of the coefficients of the Li SparseRoss Thick (LSRT) model of the bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF). The ASRVN takes several steps to ensure high quality of results: 1) the filtering of opaque clouds by a CM algorithm; 2) the development of an aerosol filter to filter residual semitransparent and subpixel clouds, as well as cases with high inhomogeneity of aerosols in the processing area; 3) imposing the requirement of the consistency of the new solution with previously retrieved BRF and albedo; 4) rapid adjustment of the 16-day retrieval to the surface changes using the last day of measurements; and 5) development of a seasonal backup spectral BRF database to increase data coverage. The ASRVN provides a gapless or near-gapless coverage for the processing area. The gaps, caused by clouds, are filled most naturally with the latest solution for a given pixel. The ASRVN products include three parameters of the LSRT model (kL, kG, and kV), surface albedo

  5. Spatio-temporal variability of satellite derived aerosol optical thickness and ground measurements over East China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Fei; Shi, Tongguang

    2016-04-01

    Two-year records of Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Intermediate Product (IP) data on the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) at 550 nm were evaluated by comparing them with sun-sky radiometer measurements from the Chinese sun hazemeter network (CSHNET) and the aerosol robotic network (AERONET). The monthly and seasonal variations in the aerosol optical properties over eastern China were then investigated using collocated VIIRS IP data and CSHNET and AERONET measurements.Results show that the performances of the current VIIRS IP AOT retrievals at the provisional stage were consistent with ground measurements. Similar characteristics of seasonal and monthly variations were found among the measurements, though the observational methodologies were different, showing maxima in the summer and spring and minima in the winter and autumn.

  6. Impact of particle nonsphericity on the development and properties of aerosol models for East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hao; Cheng, Tianhai; Gu, Xingfa; Wu, Yu

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of aerosol nonsphericity information on the classification of aerosol models and the associated radiative properties over East Asia are investigated. The radiance measurements and inversions of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) are used. Four aerosol models over East Asia are obtained by adding the shape information to the clustering analysis. These four aerosols are identified on the basis of their optical properties. Compared to the results without sphericity parameter, adding the sphericity parameter in the clustering process contributes to the extraction of a strongly absorbing aerosol. Furthermore, the effect of the physical and optical properties of the aerosol on the top of atmospheric (TOA) total reflectance and polarized reflectance are investigated. The results indicate that the addition of the sphericity parameter in the clustering process leads to a change in the total reflectance by up to 16% and a change in the polarized reflectance by up to 100%.

  7. Aerosol properties over the western Mediterranean basin: temporal and spatial variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyamani, H.; Valenzuela, A.; Perez-Ramirez, D.; Toledano, C.; Granados-Muñoz, M. J.; Olmo, F. J.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2015-03-01

    This study focuses on the analysis of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) aerosol data obtained over Alborán Island (35.90° N, 3.03° W, 15 m a.s.l.) in the western Mediterranean from July 2011 to January 2012. Additional aerosol data from the three nearest AERONET stations (Málaga, Oujda and Palma de Mallorca) and the Maritime Aerosol Network (MAN) were also analyzed in order to investigate the temporal and spatial variations of aerosol over this scarcely explored region. High aerosol loads over Alborán were mainly associated with desert dust transport from North Africa and occasional advection of anthropogenic fine particles from central European urban-industrial areas. The fine particle load observed over Alborán was surprisingly similar to that obtained over the other three nearest AERONET stations, suggesting homogeneous spatial distribution of fine particle loads over the four studied sites in spite of the large differences in local sources. The results from MAN acquired over the Mediterranean Sea, Black Sea and Atlantic Ocean from July to November 2011 revealed a pronounced predominance of fine particles during the cruise period.

  8. Aerosol climatology and discrimination of aerosol types retrieved from MODIS, MISR and OMI over Durban (29.88°S, 31.02°E), South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, K. Raghavendra; Yin, Yan; Sivakumar, V.; Kang, Na; Yu, Xingna; Diao, Yiwei; Adesina, A. Joseph; Reddy, R. R.

    2015-09-01

    The present study represents the characteristics of aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieved from multiple satellite sensors (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI)) during 2003-2013 over an urban-coastal region, Durban (DBN; 29.88°S, 31.02°E, 46 m°asl), situated on the east coast of South Africa. An intercomparison and validation of AOD is performed against the AOD measurements from ground-based AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) Sunphotometer. The results revealed that MISR-AERONET comparison indicated strong correlation compared to MODIS-AERONET comparison. Also, the comparison between MODIS and MISR AODs noticed significant positive correlation over DBN with the overestimation of latter by former. Highest AOD characterizes during the spring (September-November) followed by summer (December-February) and autumn (March-May) with the lowest AOD observed during the winter (June-August) season. The Angstrom exponent (AE470-600) indicates predominance of fine-mode aerosols during spring and summer and dominance of coarse-mode aerosols in winter. A HYbrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model is used to locate the origin of airmass transport and understand the variability of aerosol source regions. Finally, the relationship between AOD and AE has been examined to classify different aerosol types and showed seasonal heterogeneity in their contribution depending upon variability in sources. This is the first ever attempt to classify aerosols over this environment.

  9. Validation of Retrieved Aerosol Optical Properties over Northeast Asia for Five Years from GOSAT TANSO-Cloud and Aerosol Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Lee, S.; KIM, M.; Choi, M.; Go, S.; Lim, H.; Goo, T. Y.; Nakajima, T.; Kuze, A.; Shiomi, K.; Yokota, T.

    2015-12-01

    An aerosol retrieval algorithm was developed from Thermal And Near infrared Sensor for carbon Observation-Cloud and Aerosol Imager (TANSO-CAI) onboard the Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT). The algorithm retrieves aerosol optical depth (AOD), size distribution of aerosol, and aerosol type in 0.1 degree grid resolution by look-up tables, which is used in retrieving optical properties of aerosol using inversion products from Aerosol Robotic NETwork (AERONET) sun-photometer observation. To improve the accuracy of aerosol algorithm, first, this algorithm considered the annually estimated radiometric degradation factor of TANSO-CAI suggested by Kuze et al. (2014). Second, surface reflectance was determined by two methods: one using the clear sky composite method from CAI measurements and the other the database from MODerate resolution Imaging Sensor (MODIS) surface reflectance data. At a given pixel, the surface reflectance is selected by using normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) depending on season (Hsu et al., 2013). In this study, the retrieved AODs were compared with those of AERONET and MODIS dataset for different season over five years. Comparisons of AODs between AERONET and CAI show reasonable agreement with correlation coefficients of 0.65 ~ 0.97 and regression slopes between 0.7 and 1.2 for the whole period, depending on season and sites. Moreover, those between MODIS and CAI for the same period show agreements with correlation coefficients of 0.7 ~ 0.9 and regression slopes between 0.7 and 1.0, depending on season and regions. The results show reasonably good correlation, however, the largest error source in aerosol retrieval has been surface reflectance of TANSO-CAI due to its 3-days revisit orbit characteristics.

  10. Estimation of PM10 concentrations over Seoul using multiple empirical models with AERONET and MODIS data collected during the DRAGON-Asia campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, S.; Kim, J.; Lee, H.; Jeong, U.; Kim, W.; Holben, B. N.; Kim, S.-W.; Song, C. H.; Lim, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    The performance of various empirical linear models to estimate the concentrations of surface-level particulate matter with a diameter less than 10 μm (PM10) was evaluated using Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun photometer and Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data collected in Seoul during the Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Network (DRAGON)-Asia campaign from March to May 2012. An observed relationship between the PM10 concentration and the aerosol optical depth (AOD) was accounted for by several parameters in the empirical models, including boundary layer height (BLH), relative humidity (RH), and effective radius of the aerosol size distribution (Reff), which was used here for the first time in empirical modeling. Among various empirical models, the model which incorporates both BLH and Reff showed the highest correlation, which indicates the strong influence of BLH and Reff on the PM10 estimations. Meanwhile, the effect of RH on the relationship between AOD and PM10 appeared to be negligible during the campaign period (spring), when RH is generally low in northeast Asia. A large spatial dependency of the empirical model performance was found by categorizing the locations of the collected data into three different site types, which varied in terms of the distances between instruments and source locations. When both AERONET and MODIS data sets were used in the PM10 estimation, the highest correlations between measured and estimated values (R = 0.76 and 0.76 using AERONET and MODIS data, respectively) were found for the residential area (RA) site type, while the poorest correlations (R = 0.61 and 0.68 using AERONET and MODIS data, respectively) were found for the near-source (NS) site type. Significant seasonal variations of empirical model performances for PM10 estimation were found using the data collected at Yonsei University (one of the DRAGON campaign sites) over a period of 17 months including the DRAGON campaign

  11. Aerosol Models for the CALIPSO Lidar Inversion Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omar, Ali H.; Winker, David M.; Won, Jae-Gwang

    2003-01-01

    We use measurements and models to develop aerosol models for use in the inversion algorithms for the Cloud Aerosol Lidar and Imager Pathfinder Spaceborne Observations (CALIPSO). Radiance measurements and inversions of the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET1, 2) are used to group global atmospheric aerosols using optical and microphysical parameters. This study uses more than 105 records of radiance measurements, aerosol size distributions, and complex refractive indices to generate the optical properties of the aerosol at more 200 sites worldwide. These properties together with the radiance measurements are then classified using classical clustering methods to group the sites according to the type of aerosol with the greatest frequency of occurrence at each site. Six significant clusters are identified: desert dust, biomass burning, urban industrial pollution, rural background, marine, and dirty pollution. Three of these are used in the CALIPSO aerosol models to characterize desert dust, biomass burning, and polluted continental aerosols. The CALIPSO aerosol model also uses the coarse mode of desert dust and the fine mode of biomass burning to build a polluted dust model. For marine aerosol, the CALIPSO aerosol model uses measurements from the SEAS experiment 3. In addition to categorizing the aerosol types, the cluster analysis provides all the column optical and microphysical properties for each cluster.

  12. Aerosol optical, microphysical and radiative properties at regional background insular sites in the western Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicard, Michaël; Barragan, Rubén; Dulac, François; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas; Mallet, Marc

    2016-09-01

    In the framework of the ChArMEx (the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment; http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr/) program, the seasonal variability of the aerosol optical, microphysical and radiative properties derived from AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network; aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov/" target="_blank">http://aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov/) is examined in two regional background insular sites in the western Mediterranean Basin: Ersa (Corsica Island, France) and Palma de Mallorca (Mallorca Island, Spain). A third site, Alborán (Alborán Island, Spain), with only a few months of data is considered for examining possible northeast-southwest (NE-SW) gradients of the aforementioned aerosol properties. The AERONET dataset is exclusively composed of level 2.0 inversion products available during the 5-year period 2011-2015. AERONET solar radiative fluxes are compared with ground- and satellite-based flux measurements. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time that AERONET fluxes are compared with measurements at the top of the atmosphere. Strong events (with an aerosol optical depth at 440 nm greater than 0.4) of long-range transport aerosols, one of the main drivers of the observed annual cycles and NE-SW gradients, are (1) mineral dust outbreaks predominant in spring and summer in the north and in summer in the south and (2) European pollution episodes predominant in autumn. A NE-SW gradient exists in the western Mediterranean Basin for the aerosol optical depth and especially its coarse-mode fraction, which all together produces a similar gradient for the aerosol direct radiative forcing. The aerosol fine mode is rather homogeneously distributed. Absorption properties are quite variable because of the many and different sources of anthropogenic particles in and around the western Mediterranean Basin: North African and European urban areas, the Iberian and Italian peninsulas, most forest fires and

  13. Synthesis of information on aerosol optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongqing; Pinker, R. T.; Chin, M.; Holben, B.; Remer, L.

    2008-04-01

    In a previous study (Liu et al., 2005) obtained are global scale estimates of aerosol optical depth at 0.55 μm based on spatial and temporal variation patterns from models and satellite observations, regulated by the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measurements. In this study an approach is developed to obtain information on global distribution of the single scattering albedo (ω0), the asymmetry parameter (g), and the normalized extinction coefficient over shortwave (SW) spectrum. Since space observations of ω0 are in early stages of development and none are available for g, first an approach was developed to infer them from relevant information from the Global Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model, Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and AERONET retrievals. The single scattering albedo is generated by extending GOCART ω0 at 0.55 μm to the entire SW spectrum using spectral dependence derived from AERONET retrievals. The asymmetry parameter over the solar spectrum is derived from the MODIS Ångström wavelength exponent, utilizing a relationship based on AERONET almucantar observations. The normalized extinction coefficient is estimated from the MODIS Ångström wavelength exponent. The methodology was implemented as a "proof of concept" with one year of data. The approach described here is a step in preparedness for utilizing information from new observing systems (e.g., MISR, A-Train constellation) when available. The impact of the newly derived information on the quality of satellite based estimates of surface radiative fluxes was evaluated and is presented by Liu and Pinker (2008).

  14. Critical reflectance derived from MODIS: Application for the retrieval of aerosol absorption over desert regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Kelley C.; Martins, J. Vanderlei; Remer, Lorraine A.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Stephens, Graeme L.

    2012-02-01

    The determination of aerosol direct radiative forcing over desert regions requires accurate information about the aerosol single-scattering albedo (SSA); however, the brightness of desert surfaces in the visible and near-IR range complicates the retrieval of aerosol optical properties using passive space-based measurements. Here we use the critical reflectance method to retrieve spectral aerosol absorption from space over North Africa, a desert region that is predominantly impacted by absorbing dust and biomass burning aerosol. We examine the sensitivity of the critical reflectance parameter to aerosol physical and optical properties that are representative of the region, and we find that the critical reflectance has low sensitivity to assumptions of aerosol size and refractive index for dust-like particles, except at scattering angles near 180°, which should be avoided with this method. We use our findings to retrieve spectral SSA from critical reflectance derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) reflectances in the vicinity of two Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) stations: Tamanrasset, in the Algerian Sahara, and Banizoumbou, in the Sahel. We retrieve lower aerosol SSAs at Banizoumbou, which is often impacted by dust-smoke mixtures, and higher SSAs at Tamanrasset, where pure desert dust is the dominant aerosol. Our results generally fall within the AERONET uncertainty envelopes, although at Banizoumbou we retrieve a spectral dependence different from that of AERONET. On the basis of our analysis, we expect to be able to retrieve SSA from critical reflectance for pure dust with an uncertainty of 0.02 and to provide spatial and spectral SSA information that will help reduce current uncertainties in the aerosol radiative forcing over desert regions.

  15. A Pure Marine Aerosol Model, for Use in Remote Sensing Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Smirnov, A.; Hsu, N. C.; Holben, B. N.

    2011-01-01

    Retrievals of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and related parameters from satellite measurements typically involve prescribed models of aerosol size and composition, and are therefore dependent on how well these models are able to represent the radiative behaviour of real aerosols, This study uses aerosol volume size distributions retrieved from Sun-photometer measurements at 11 Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) island sites, spread throughout the world's oceans, as a basis to define such a model for unpolluted maritime aerosols. Size distributions are observed to be bimodal and approximately lognormal, although the coarse mode is skewed with a long tail on the low-radius end, The relationship of AOD and size distribution parameters to meteorological conditions is also examined, As wind speed increases, so do coarse-mode volume and radius, The AOD and Angstrom exponent (alpha) show linear relationships with wind speed, although there is considerable scatter in all these relationships, limiting their predictive power. Links between aerosol properties and near-surface relative humidity, columnar water vapor, and sea surface temperature are also explored. A recommended bimodal maritime model, which is able to reconstruct the AERONET AOD with accuracy of order 0.01-0.02, is presented for use in aerosol remote sensing applications. This accuracy holds at most sites and for wavelengths between 340 nm and 1020 nm. Calculated lidar ratios are also provided, and differ significantly from those currently used in Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) processing.

  16. Estimation and Bias Correction of Aerosol Abundance using Data-driven Machine Learning and Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malakar, Nabin K.; Lary, D. L.; Moore, A.; Gencaga, D.; Roscoe, B.; Albayrak, Arif; Petrenko, Maksym; Wei, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Air quality information is increasingly becoming a public health concern, since some of the aerosol particles pose harmful effects to peoples health. One widely available metric of aerosol abundance is the aerosol optical depth (AOD). The AOD is the integrated light extinction coefficient over a vertical atmospheric column of unit cross section, which represents the extent to which the aerosols in that vertical profile prevent the transmission of light by absorption or scattering. The comparison between the AOD measured from the ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) system and the satellite MODIS instruments at 550 nm shows that there is a bias between the two data products. We performed a comprehensive analysis exploring possible factors which may be contributing to the inter-instrumental bias between MODIS and AERONET. The analysis used several measured variables, including the MODIS AOD, as input in order to train a neural network in regression mode to predict the AERONET AOD values. This not only allowed us to obtain an estimate, but also allowed us to infer the optimal sets of variables that played an important role in the prediction. In addition, we applied machine learning to infer the global abundance of ground level PM2.5 from the AOD data and other ancillary satellite and meteorology products. This research is part of our goal to provide air quality information, which can also be useful for global epidemiology studies.

  17. Simultaneous retrieval of aerosol and surface optical properties from combined airborne- and ground-based direct and diffuse radiometric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatebe, C. K.; Dubovik, O.; King, M. D.; Sinyuk, A.

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents a new method for simultaneously retrieving aerosol and surface reflectance properties from combined airborne and ground-based direct and diffuse radiometric measurements. The method is based on the standard Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) method for retrieving aerosol size distribution, complex index of refraction, and single scattering albedo, but modified to retrieve aerosol properties in two layers, below and above the aircraft, and parameters on surface optical properties from combined datasets (Cloud Absorption Radiometer, CAR, and AERONET data). A key advantage of this method is the inversion of all available spectral and angular data at the same time, while accounting for the influence of noise in the inversion procedure using statistical optimization. The wide spectral (0.34-2.30 μm) and angular range (180°) of the CAR instrument, combined with observations from an AERONET sunphotometer, provide sufficient measurement constraints for characterizing aerosol and surface properties with minimal assumptions. The robustness of the method was tested on observations made during four different field campaigns: (a) the Southern African Regional Science Initiative 2000 over Mongu, Zambia, (b) the Intercontinental Transport Experiment-Phase B over Mexico City, Mexico (c) Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Central Facility, Oklahoma, USA, and (d) the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) over Elson Lagoon in Barrow, Alaska, USA. The four areas are dominated by different surface characteristics and aerosol types, and therefore provide good test cases for the new inversion method.

  18. Simultaneous Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Optical Properties from Combined Airborne- and Ground-Based Direct and Diffuse Radiometric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatebe, C. K.; Dubovik, O.; King, M. D.; Sinyuk, A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for simultaneously retrieving aerosol and surface reflectance properties from combined airborne and ground-based direct and diffuse radiometric measurements. The method is based on the standard Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) method for retrieving aerosol size distribution, complex index of refraction, and single scattering albedo, but modified to retrieve aerosol properties in two layers, below and above the aircraft, and parameters on surface optical properties from combined datasets (Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) and AERONET data). A key advantage of this method is the inversion of all available spectral and angular data at the same time, while accounting for the influence of noise in the inversion procedure using statistical optimization. The wide spectral (0.34-2.30 m) and angular range (180 ) of the CAR instrument, combined with observations from an AERONET sunphotometer, provide sufficient measurement constraints for characterizing aerosol and surface properties with minimal assumptions. The robustness of the method was tested on observations made during four different field campaigns: (a) the Southern African Regional Science Initiative 2000 over Mongu, Zambia, (b) the Intercontinental Transport Experiment-Phase B over Mexico City, Mexico (c) Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Central Facility, Oklahoma, USA, and (d) the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) over Elson Lagoon in Barrow, Alaska, USA. The four areas are dominated by different surface characteristics and aerosol types, and therefore provide good test cases for the new inversion method.

  19. GOCI Yonsei Aerosol Retrieval (YAER) algorithm and validation during DRAGON-NE Asia 2012 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, M.; Kim, J.; Lee, J.; Kim, M.; Park, Y. Je; Jeong, U.; Kim, W.; Holben, B.; Eck, T. F.; Lim, J. H.; Song, C. K.

    2015-09-01

    The Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) onboard the Communication, Ocean, and Meteorology Satellites (COMS) is the first multi-channel ocean color imager in geostationary orbit. Hourly GOCI top-of-atmosphere radiance has been available for the retrieval of aerosol optical properties over East Asia since March 2011. This study presents improvements to the GOCI Yonsei Aerosol Retrieval (YAER) algorithm over ocean and land together with validation results during the DRAGON-NE Asia 2012 campaign. Optical properties of aerosol are retrieved from the GOCI YAER algorithm including aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 550 nm, fine-mode fraction (FMF) at 550 nm, single scattering albedo (SSA) at 440 nm, Angstrom exponent (AE) between 440 and 860 nm, and aerosol type from selected aerosol models in calculating AOD. Assumed aerosol models are compiled from global Aerosol Robotic Networks (AERONET) inversion data, and categorized according to AOD, FMF, and SSA. Nonsphericity is considered, and unified aerosol models are used over land and ocean. Different assumptions for surface reflectance are applied over ocean and land. Surface reflectance over the ocean varies with geometry and wind speed, while surface reflectance over land is obtained from the 1-3 % darkest pixels in a 6 km × 6 km area during 30 days. In the East China Sea and Yellow Sea, significant area is covered persistently by turbid waters, for which the land algorithm is used for aerosol retrieval. To detect turbid water pixels, TOA reflectance difference at 660 nm is used. GOCI YAER products are validated using other aerosol products from AERONET and the MODIS Collection 6 aerosol data from "Dark Target (DT)" and "Deep Blue (DB)" algorithms during the DRAGON-NE Asia 2012 campaign from March to May 2012. Comparison of AOD from GOCI and AERONET gives a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.885 and a linear regression equation with GOCI AOD =1.086 × AERONET AOD - 0.041. GOCI and MODIS AODs are more highly correlated

  20. Multi-Sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrenko, M.; Ichoku, C.; Leptoukh, G.

    2011-01-01

    Global and local properties of atmospheric aerosols have been extensively observed and measured using both spaceborne and ground-based instruments, especially during the last decade. Unique properties retrieved by the different instruments contribute to an unprecedented availability of the most complete set of complimentary aerosol measurements ever acquired. However, some of these measurements remain underutilized, largely due to the complexities involved in analyzing them synergistically. To characterize the inconsistencies and bridge the gap that exists between the sensors, we have established a Multi-sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System (MAPSS), which consistently samples and generates the spatial statistics (mean, standard deviation, direction and rate of spatial variation, and spatial correlation coefficient) of aerosol products from multiple spacebome sensors, including MODIS (on Terra and Aqua), MISR, OMI, POLDER, CALIOP, and SeaWiFS. Samples of satellite aerosol products are extracted over Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) locations as well as over other locations of interest such as those with available ground-based aerosol observations. In this way, MAPSS enables a direct cross-characterization and data integration between Level-2 aerosol observations from multiple sensors. In addition, the available well-characterized co-located ground-based data provides the basis for the integrated validation of these products. This paper explains the sampling methodology and concepts used in MAPSS, and demonstrates specific examples of using MAPSS for an integrated analysis of multiple aerosol products.

  1. Resolution and Content Improvements to MISR Aerosol and Land Surface Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garay, M. J.; Bull, M. A.; Diner, D. J.; Hansen, E. G.; Kalashnikova, O. V.

    2015-12-01

    Since early 2000, the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument on NASA's Terra satellite has been providing operational Level 2 (swath-based) aerosol optical depth (AOD) and particle property retrievals at 17.6 km spatial resolution and atmospherically corrected land surface products at 1.1 km resolution. The performance of the aerosol product has been validated against ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) observations, model comparisons, and climatological assessments. This product has played a major role in studies of the impacts of aerosols on climate and air quality. The surface product has found a variety of uses, particularly at regional scales for assessing vegetation and land surface change. A major development effort has led to the release of an update to the operational (Version 22) MISR Level 2 aerosol and land surface retrieval products, which has been in production since December 2007. The new release is designated Version 23. The resolution of the aerosol product has been increased to 4.4 km, allowing more detailed characterization of aerosol spatial variability, especially near local sources and in urban areas. The product content has been simplified and updated to include more robust measures of retrieval uncertainty and other fields to benefit users. The land surface product has also been updated to incorporate the Version 23 aerosol product as input and to improve spatial coverage, particularly over mountainous terrain and snow/ice-covered surfaces. We will describe the major upgrades incorporated in Version 23 and present validation of the aerosol product against both the standard AERONET historical database, as well as high spatial density AERONET-DRAGON deployments. Comparisons will also be shown relative to the Version 22 aerosol and land surface products. Applications enabled by these product updates will be discussed.

  2. A 10-year global gridded Aerosol Optical Thickness Reanalysis for climate and applied applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, P.; Reid, J. S.; Zhang, J.; Westphal, D. L.; Campbell, J. R.; Curtis, C. A.; Hegg, D.; Hyer, E. J.; Sessions, W.; Shi, Y.; Turk, J.

    2013-12-01

    While standalone satellite and model aerosol products see wide utilization, there is a significant need of a best-available fused product on a regular grid for numerous climate and applied applications. Remote sensing and modeling technologies have now advanced to a point where aerosol data assimilation is an operational reality at numerous centers. It is inevitable that, like meteorological reanalyses, aerosol reanalyses will see heavy use in the near future. A first long term, 2003-2012 global 1x1 degree and 6-hourly aerosol optical thickness (AOT) reanalysis product has been generated. The goal of this effort is not only for climate applications, but to generate a dataset that can be used by the US Navy to understand operationally hindering aerosol events, aerosol impacts on numerical weather prediction, and application of electro-optical technologies. The reanalysis utilizes Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS) at its core and assimilates quality controlled collection 5 Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) AOD with minor corrections from Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRaditometer (MISR). A subset of this product includes Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) lidar assimilation since its launch in mid-2006. Surface aerosol sources, including dust and smoke, in the aerosol model have been regionally tuned so that fine and coarse mode AOTs best match those resolve by ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). The AOT difference between the model and satellite AOT is then used to adjust other aerosol processes, eg., sources, dry deposition, etc. Aerosol wet deposition is constrained with satellite-retrieved precipitation. The final AOT reanalysis is shown to exhibit good agreement with AERONET. Here we review the development of the reanalysis and consider issues particular to aerosol reanalyses that make them distinct from standard meteorological reanalyses. Considerations are also made for extending such work

  3. A multi-angle aerosol optical depth retrieval algorithm for geostationary satellite data over the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Lyapustin, A.; Wang, Y.; Kondragunta, S.; Laszlo, I.; Ciren, P.; Hoff, R. M.

    2011-12-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals from geostationary satellites have high temporal resolution compared to the polar orbiting satellites and thus enable us to monitor aerosol motion. However, current Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) have only one visible channel for retrieving aerosols and hence the retrieval accuracy is lower than those from the multichannel polar-orbiting satellite instruments such as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). The operational GOES AOD retrieval algorithm (GOES Aerosol/Smoke Product, GASP) uses 28-day composite images from the visible channel to derive surface reflectance, which can produce large uncertainties. In this work, we develop a new AOD retrieval algorithm for the GOES imager by applying a modified Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) algorithm. The algorithm assumes the surface Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) in the channel 1 of GOES is proportional to seasonal average MODIS BRDF in the 2.1 μm channel. The ratios between them are derived through time series analysis of the GOES visible channel images. The results of AOD and surface reflectance retrievals are evaluated through comparisons against those from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET), GASP, and MODIS. The AOD retrievals from the new algorithm demonstrate good agreement with AERONET retrievals at several sites across the US with correlation coefficients ranges from 0.71 to 0.85 at five out of six sites. At the two western sites Railroad Valley and UCSB, the MAIAC AOD retrievals have correlations of 0.8 and 0.85 with AERONET AOD, and are more accurate than GASP retrievals, which have correlations of 0.7 and 0.74 with AERONET AOD. At the three eastern sites, the correlations with AERONET AOD are from 0.71 to 0.81, comparable to the GASP retrievals. In the western US where surface reflectance is higher than 0.15, the new algorithm also produces larger AOD retrieval coverage

  4. The spatial-temporal variations in optical properties of atmosphere aerosols over China and its application in remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Cheng, T.

    2013-12-01

    The atmospheric and climate response to the aerosol forcing are assessed by climate models regionally and globally under the past, present and future conditions. However, large uncertainties exist because of incomplete knowledge concerning the distribution and the physical and chemical properties of aerosols as well as aerosol-cloud interactions. Reduction in these uncertainties requires long-term monitoring of detailed properties of different aerosol types. China is one of the heavily polluted areas with high concentration of aerosols in the world. The complex source, composition of China aerosol led to the worse accuracy of aerosol radiative forcing assessment in the world, which urgently calls for improvements on the understanding of China regional aerosol properties. The spatial-temporal properties of aerosol types over China are studied using the radiance measurements and inversions data at 4 Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) stations. Five aerosol classes were identified including a coarse-size dominated aerosol type (presumably dust) and four fine-sized dominated aerosol types ranging from non-absorbing to highly absorbing fine aerosols. The mean optical properties of different aerosol types in China and their seasonal variations were also investigated. Based on the cluster analysis, the improved ground-based aerosol model is applied to the MODIS dark target inversion algorithm. Validation with MODIS official product and CE318 is also included.

  5. Lidar Ratio Climatology for Dust, as Computed from AERONET Retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, G. L.; Vaughan, M.; MacDonnell, D.; Su, W.; Winker, D. M.; Trepte, C. R.; Dubovik, O.

    2012-12-01

    Recent Raman lidar measurements by Tesche et al. (2009) and Wandinger et al. (2010) indicate lidar ratios of about 55 sr in Morocco and Cape Verde, which is significantly higher than the value of 40 sr assumed for the CALIPSO aerosol optical depth retrievals. Hence, we investigated the dust lidar ratio by analyzing the aerosol climatology at AERONET sites in the dust belt. In order to limit our analysis to "pure" dust retrievals, we restricted the data to depolarizations of 0.2 or greater and fine volume fractions of 0.05 or less, and thereby focused on 1714 retrievals at 22 AERONET sites in non-Sahel regions of north Africa, Sahel Africa, the Middle East, and India. The AERONET climatology indicates that the real refractive index increases from n=1.49 for 229 retrievals in non-Sahel Africa to n=1.53 for 929 retrievals in the Sahel, and that the largest refractive indices occur in the Middle East and Kanpur, India (n=1.57 for 489 and 67 retrievals, respectively). Dry dust mixtures with refractive indices that are less than about 1.5 require high fractions of illite (which has a refractive index of 1.41), since the other common minerals in dust -- calcite, quartz, gypsum, montmorillonite, kaolinite, and hematite -- all have refractive indices greater than 1.49. Hence, the AERONET refractive indices are consistent with Chester et al. (1972), who measured the relative fraction of illite during a research voyage near the west African coast; they found that illite decreases from a maximum mass fraction of about 0.53 at 15-20 degrees North to a minimum of about 0.09 at 0-5 degrees North. These illite fractions correspond to a refractive index change from 1.48 to 1.54 as the source aerosol region changed from the Sahara to the Sahel (if the average refractive index of the other minerals in the mixture is assumed to be 1.55). We then used the AERONET refractive indices with the AERONET size distributions, "percent spheres," and forward optics code for spheres and spheroids

  6. Relationship between aerosol characteristics and altitude based on multi-measurements and model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, Makiko; Ohshima, Tsubasa; Fujito, Toshiyuki; Sano, Itaru; Mukai, Sonoyo

    2010-10-01

    The suspending particulate matter (PM2.5) is a typical indicator of small particles in the atmosphere. Accordingly in order to monitor the air quality, sampling of PM2.5 has been widely undertaken over the world, especially in the urban cities. On the other hand, it is known that the sun photometry provides us with the aerosol information, e.g. aerosol optical thickness (AOT), aerosol size information and so on. Simultaneous measurements of PM2.5 and the AOT have been performed at a NASA/AERONET (Aerosol Robotics Network) site in urban city of Higashi-Osaka in Japan since March 2004, and successfully provided a linear correlation between PM2.5 and AOT in separately considering with several cases, e.g. usual, anthropogenic aerosols, dust aerosols and so on. This fact suggests that the vertical distribution also should be taken into account separately for each aerosol type. In this work, vertical profiles of atmospheric aerosols are considered based on combination use of photometric data with AERONET, LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) measurements and model simulations.

  7. Observationally-constrained estimates of aerosol optical depths (AODs) over East Asia via data assimilation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K.; Lee, S.; Song, C. H.

    2015-12-01

    Not only aerosol's direct effect on climate by scattering and absorbing the incident solar radiation, but also they indirectly perturbs the radiation budget by influencing microphysics and dynamics of clouds. Aerosols also have a significant adverse impact on human health. With an importance of aerosols in climate, considerable research efforts have been made to quantify the amount of aerosols in the form of the aerosol optical depth (AOD). AOD is provided with ground-based aerosol networks such as the Aerosol Robotic NETwork (AERONET), and is derived from satellite measurements. However, these observational datasets have a limited areal and temporal coverage. To compensate for the data gaps, there have been several studies to provide AOD without data gaps by assimilating observational data and model outputs. In this study, AODs over East Asia simulated with the Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) model and derived from the Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) observation are interpolated via different data assimilation (DA) techniques such as Cressman's method, Optimal Interpolation (OI), and Kriging for the period of the Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON) Campaign (March - May 2012). Here, the interpolated results using the three DA techniques are validated intensively by comparing with AERONET AODs to examine the optimal DA method providing the most reliable AODs over East Asia.

  8. Validation of MODIS Aerosol Optical Depth Retrieval Over Land

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, D. A.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Ichoku, C.; Remer, L. A.; Tanre, D.; Holben, B. N.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Aerosol optical depths are derived operationally for the first time over land in the visible wavelengths by MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) onboard the EOSTerra spacecraft. More than 300 Sun photometer data points from more than 30 AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) sites globally were used in validating the aerosol optical depths obtained during July - September 2000. Excellent agreement is found with retrieval errors within (Delta)tau=+/- 0.05 +/- 0.20 tau, as predicted, over (partially) vegetated surfaces, consistent with pre-launch theoretical analysis and aircraft field experiments. In coastal and semi-arid regions larger errors are caused predominantly by the uncertainty in evaluating the surface reflectance. The excellent fit was achieved despite the ongoing improvements in instrument characterization and calibration. This results show that MODIS-derived aerosol optical depths can be used quantitatively in many applications with cautions for residual clouds, snow/ice, and water contamination.

  9. GOCI Yonsei Aerosol Retrieval (YAER) algorithm and validation during the DRAGON-NE Asia 2012 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Myungje; Kim, Jhoon; Lee, Jaehwa; Kim, Mijin; Park, Young-Je; Jeong, Ukkyo; Kim, Woogyung; Hong, Hyunkee; Holben, Brent; Eck, Thomas F.; Song, Chul H.; Lim, Jae-Hyun; Song, Chang-Keun

    2016-04-01

    The Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) onboard the Communication, Ocean, and Meteorological Satellite (COMS) is the first multi-channel ocean color imager in geostationary orbit. Hourly GOCI top-of-atmosphere radiance has been available for the retrieval of aerosol optical properties over East Asia since March 2011. This study presents improvements made to the GOCI Yonsei Aerosol Retrieval (YAER) algorithm together with validation results during the Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks - Northeast Asia 2012 campaign (DRAGON-NE Asia 2012 campaign). The evaluation during the spring season over East Asia is important because of high aerosol concentrations and diverse types of Asian dust and haze. Optical properties of aerosol are retrieved from the GOCI YAER algorithm including aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 550 nm, fine-mode fraction (FMF) at 550 nm, single-scattering albedo (SSA) at 440 nm, Ångström exponent (AE) between 440 and 860 nm, and aerosol type. The aerosol models are created based on a global analysis of the Aerosol Robotic Networks (AERONET) inversion data, and covers a broad range of size distribution and absorptivity, including nonspherical dust properties. The Cox-Munk ocean bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) model is used over ocean, and an improved minimum reflectance technique is used over land. Because turbid water is persistent over the Yellow Sea, the land algorithm is used for such cases. The aerosol products are evaluated against AERONET observations and MODIS Collection 6 aerosol products retrieved from Dark Target (DT) and Deep Blue (DB) algorithms during the DRAGON-NE Asia 2012 campaign conducted from March to May 2012. Comparison of AOD from GOCI and AERONET resulted in a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.881 and a linear regression equation with GOCI AOD = 1.083 × AERONET AOD - 0.042. The correlation between GOCI and MODIS AODs is higher over ocean than land. GOCI AOD shows better

  10. Sensitivity of aerosol retrieval to geometrical configuration of ground-based sun/sky-radiometer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, B.; Dubovik, O.; Toledano, C.; Berjon, A.; Cachorro, V. E.; Lapyonok, T.; Goloub, P.

    2013-03-01

    A sensitivity study of the aerosol optical properties retrieval to the geometrical configuration of the ground-based sky radiometer observations is carried out through the inversion tests. Specifically, the study is focused on the principal plane and almucantar observation, since these geometries are employed in Aeronet (AErosol RObotic NETwork). The following effects has been analyzed with simulated data for both geometries: sensitivity of the retrieval to variability of the observed scattering angle range, uncertainties in the assumptions of the aerosol vertical distribution and surface reflectance, possible instrument pointing errors and the effects of the finite field of view. The synthetic observations of radiometer in the tests were calculated using a previous climatology data of retrieved aerosol over three Aeronet sites: Mongu (Zambia) for biomass burning aerosol, Goddard Space Flight Center (Maryland-USA) for urban aerosol and Solar Village (Saudi Arabia) for desert dust aerosol. The results show that almucantar retrievals, in general, are more reliable than principal plane retrievals in presence of the analyzed error sources. This fact partially can be explained by to practical advantages of almucantar geometry: the symmetry between its left and right branches that helps to eliminate some observational uncertainties and the constant value of optical mass constant during the measurements that makes almucantar observations nearly independent on vertical variability of aerosol. Nevertheless, almucantar retrievals present instabilities at high sun observations due to the reduction of the scattering angle range coverage resulting in decrease of information content. The last part of the study is devoted to identification of possible differences between the aerosol retrieval results obtained from real Aeronet data using both geometries. In particular, we have compared Aeronet retrievals at three different key sites: Mongu (biomass burning), Beijing (urban) and

  11. Aerosol direct radiative effect over China estimated with visibility measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, K.; Lin, J.

    2012-12-01

    As a short-lived climate forcer, aerosols exhibit strong radiative effects that vary significantly across the space and time. Current understanding of the long-term variability of aerosol climate forcings is however very poor due to lack of relevant atmospheric measurements. Historic records for visibility measurements from thousands of ground meteorological stations offer a plausible tool to study the decadal and multi-decadal variability of aerosol radiative effects. As a first step, this study presents a method to estimate aerosol direct radiative effect over China based on visibility data for 2006. Visibility data from about 400 ground stations are converted to near-surface aerosol extinction coefficients, which are converted then to aerosol optical depth (AOD) based on spatially and temporally varying vertical distributions of aerosol optical properties simulated by the widely used chemical transport model GEOS-Chem. The resulting AOD data are consistent with direct measurements from the China Aerosol Remote Sensing Network (CARSNET) and the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) in regions where visibility and AOD measurement sites are close in distance. Next, the visibility-derived AOD data are combined with other aerosol optical properties adopted from GEOS-Chem, cloud data from ground stations and surface albedo data from moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) to derive the direct radiative effect, by employing the Santa Barbara DISORT Atmospheric Radiative Transfer model (SBDART). Spatial and monthly variations of aerosol radiative effects are examined.

  12. Retrieval and Validation of Aerosol Optical Properties over East Asia from TANSO-Cloud and Aerosol Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sanghee; Kim, Jhoon; Kim, Mijin; Choi, Myungje; Go, Sujung; Lim, HyunKwang; Ou, Mi-Lim; Goo, Tae-Young; Yokota, Tatsuya

    2015-04-01

    Aerosol is a significant component on air quality and climate change. In particular, spatial and temporal distribution of aerosol shows large variability over East Asia, thus has large effect in retrieving carbon dioxide from Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) Thermal And Near infrared Sensor for carbon Observation Fourier Transform Spectrometer (TANSO-FTS). An aerosol retrieval algorithm was developed from TANSO- Cloud and Aerosol Imager (CAI) onboard the GOSAT. The algorithm retrieves aerosol optical depth (AOD), size distribution of aerosol, and aerosol type in 0.1 degree grid resolution and surface reflectance was estimated using the clear sky composite method. To test aerosol absorptivity, the reflectance difference method was considered using channels of TANSO-CAI. In this study, the retrieved aerosol optical depth (AOD) was compared with those of Aerosol Robotic NETwork (AERONET) and MODerate resolution Imaging Sensor (MODIS) dataset from September 2011 and August 2014. Comparisons of AODs between AERONET and CAI show the reasonably good correlation with correlation coefficient of 0.77 and regression slope of 0.87 for the whole period. Moreover, those between MODIS and CAI for the same period show correlations with correlation coefficient of 0.7 ~ 0.9 and regression slope of 0.7 ~ 1.2, depending on season and comparison regions however, the largest error source in aerosol retrieval has been surface reflectance. Over ocean and some Land, surface reflectance tends to be overestimated, and thereby CAI-AOD tends to be underestimated. Based on the results with CAI algorithm developed, the algorithm is continuously improved for better performance.

  13. New Aerosol Models for the Retrieval of Aerosol Optical Thickness and Normalized Water-Leaving Radiances from the SeaWiFS and MODIS Sensors Over Coastal Regions and Open Oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Ziauddin; Franz, Bryan A.; McClain, Charles R.; Kwiatkowska, Ewa J.; Werdell, Jeremy; Shettle, Eric P.; Holben, Brent N.

    2010-01-01

    We describe the development of a new suite of aerosol models for the retrieval of atmospheric and oceanic optical properties from the SeaWiFs and MODIS sensors, including aerosol optical thickness (tau), angstrom coefficient (alpha), and water-leaving radiance (L(sub w)). The new aerosol models are derived from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) observations and have bimodal lognormal distributions that are narrower than previous models used by the Ocean Biology Processing Group. We analyzed AERONET data over open ocean and coastal regions and found that the seasonal variability in the modal radii, particularly in the coastal region, was related to the relative humidity, These findings were incorporated into the models by making the modal radii, as well as the refractive indices, explicitly dependent on relative humidity, From those findings, we constructed a new suite of aerosol models. We considered eight relative humidity values (30%, 50%, 70%, 75%, 80%, 85%, 90%. and 95%) and, for each relative humidity value, we constructed ten distributions by varying the fine-mode fraction from zero to 1. In all. 80 distributions (8Rh x 10 fine-mode fractions) were created to process the satellite data. We. also assumed that the coarse-mode particles were nonabsorbing (sea salt) and that all observed absorptions were entirely due to fine-mode particles. The composition of fine mode was varied to ensure that the new models exhibited the same spectral dependence of single scattering albedo as observed in the AERONET data,

  14. A new method of satellite-based haze aerosol monitoring over the North China Plain and a comparison with MODIS Collection 6 aerosol products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xing; Shi, Wenzhong; Luo, Nana; Zhao, Wenji

    2016-05-01

    With worldwide urbanization, hazy weather has been increasingly frequent, especially in the North China Plain. However, haze aerosol monitoring remains a challenge. In this paper, MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measurements were used to develop an enhanced haze aerosol retrieval algorithm (EHARA). This method can work not only on hazy days but also on normal weather days. Based on 12-year (2002-2014) Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) aerosol property data, empirical single scattering albedo (SSA) and asymmetry factor (AF) values were chosen to assist haze aerosol retrieval. For validation, EHARA aerosol optical thickness (AOT) values, along with MODIS Collection 6 (C6) dark-pixel and deep blue aerosol products, were compared with AERONET data. The results show that the EHARA can achieve greater AOT spatial coverage under hazy conditions with a high accuracy (73% within error range) and work a higher resolution (1-km). Additionally, this paper presents a comprehensive discussion of the differences between and limitations of the EHARA and the MODIS C6 DT land algorithms.

  15. Characteristics of aerosol at a lower atmospheric layer in DRAGON field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KUJI, M.; Azuma, Y.; Kitakoga, S.; Sano, I.; Holben, B. N.

    2013-12-01

    Air pollution arises severely over East Asia with the rapid economic development nowadays. Monitoring the atmospheric environment, as one of the purposes, an intensive field campaign, Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON), was carried out in the spring of year 2012, led by National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). At that time, atmospheric phenomena such as Yellow sand and haze events were observed at Nara in the western part of Japan, as one of the DRAGON observation sites. The atmospheric events were characterized with the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) data. As a result of the data analysis, it was found that more light-absorbing and smaller particles dominated at the lower than upper atmospheric layer for the Kosa event in particular. A backward trajectory analysis suggested that the Yellow sand event traveled over the East Asian industrial cities, which could lead to a mixture of sand and air pollutants with moderate particle size and light-absorptivity. In addition, visibility observation was evaluated quantitatively with AERONET data in the DRAGON campaign since eye observation was inherently semi-quantitative. The extinction coefficient estimated from visibility was compared to that from AERONET. As a result, it was found that the extinction coefficients were generally consistent to each other. But there were some discrepancies, which could be caused with the atmospheric phenomena or aerosol types. It is confirmed that visibility is strongly influenced with aerosols in the case of severe atmospheric phenomena in particular.

  16. Intercomparison of Aerosol Optical Thickness Derived from MODIS and in Situ Ground Datasets over Jaipur, a Semi-arid Zone in India.

    PubMed

    Payra, Swagata; Soni, Manish; Kumar, Anikender; Prakash, Divya; Verma, Sunita

    2015-08-01

    The first detailed seasonal validation has been carried out for the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Terra and Aqua satellites Level 2.0 Collection Version 5.1 AOT (τMODIS) with Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) Level 2.0 AOT (τAERONET) for the years 2009-2012 over semi-arid region Jaipur, northwestern India. The correlation between τMODIS versus τAERONET at 550 nm is determined with different spatial and temporal size windows. The τMODIS overestimates τAERONET within a range of +0.06 ± 0.24 during the pre-monsoon (April-June) season, while it underestimates the τAERONET with -0.04 ± 0.12 and -0.05 ± 0.18 during dry (December-March) and post-monsoon (October-November) seasons, respectively. Correlation without (with) error envelope has been found for pre-monsoon at 0.71 (0.89), post-monsoon at 0.76 (0.94), and dry season at 0.78 (0.95). τMODIS is compared to τAERONET at three more ground AERONET stations in India, i.e., Kanpur, Gual Pahari, and Pune. Furthermore, the performance of MODIS Deep Blue and Aqua AOT550 nm (τDB550 nm and τAqua550 nm) with τAERONET is also evaluated for all considered sites over India along with a U.S. desert site at White Sand, Tularosa Basin, NM. The statistical results reveal that τAqua550 nm performs better over Kanpur and Pune, whereas τDB550 nm performs better over Jaipur, Gual Pahari, and White Sand High Energy Laser Systems Test Facility (HELSTF) (U.S. site).

  17. Parameter sensitivity study of Arctic aerosol vertical distribution in CAM5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, C.; Flanner, M.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic surface temperature response to light-absorbing aerosols (black carbon, brown carbon and dust) depends strongly on their vertical distributions. Improving model simulations of three dimensional aerosol fields in the remote Arctic region will therefore lead to improved projections of the climate change caused by aerosol emissions. In this study, we investigate how different physical parameterizations in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) influence the simulated vertical distribution of Arctic aerosols. We design experiments to test the sensitivity of the simulated aerosol fields to perturbations of selected aerosol process-related parameters in the Modal Aerosol Module with seven lognormal modes (MAM7), such as those govern aerosol aging, in-cloud and below-cloud scavenging, aerosol hygroscopicity and so on. The simulations are compared with observed aerosol vertical distributions and total optical depth to assess model performance and quantify uncertainties associated with these model parameterizations. Observations applied here include Arctic aircraft measurements of black carbon and sulfate vertical profiles, along with Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) optical depth measurements. We also assess the utility of using High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) measurements from the ARM Barrow site to infer vertical profiles of aerosol extinction. The sensitivity study explored here will provide guidance for optimizing global aerosol simulations.

  18. Estimating Marine Aerosol Particle Volume and Number from Maritime Aerosol Network Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Smirnov, A.; Hsu, N. C.; Munchak, L. A.; Holben, B. N.

    2012-01-01

    As well as spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD), aerosol composition and concentration (number, volume, or mass) are of interest for a variety of applications. However, remote sensing of these quantities is more difficult than for AOD, as it is more sensitive to assumptions relating to aerosol composition. This study uses spectral AOD measured on Maritime Aerosol Network (MAN) cruises, with the additional constraint of a microphysical model for unpolluted maritime aerosol based on analysis of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) inversions, to estimate these quantities over open ocean. When the MAN data are subset to those likely to be comprised of maritime aerosol, number and volume concentrations obtained are physically reasonable. Attempts to estimate surface concentration from columnar abundance, however, are shown to be limited by uncertainties in vertical distribution. Columnar AOD at 550 nm and aerosol number for unpolluted maritime cases are also compared with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data, for both the present Collection 5.1 and forthcoming Collection 6. MODIS provides a best-fitting retrieval solution, as well as the average for several different solutions, with different aerosol microphysical models. The average solution MODIS dataset agrees more closely with MAN than the best solution dataset. Terra tends to retrieve lower aerosol number than MAN, and Aqua higher, linked with differences in the aerosol models commonly chosen. Collection 6 AOD is likely to agree more closely with MAN over open ocean than Collection 5.1. In situations where spectral AOD is measured accurately, and aerosol microphysical properties are reasonably well-constrained, estimates of aerosol number and volume using MAN or similar data would provide for a greater variety of potential comparisons with aerosol properties derived from satellite or chemistry transport model data.

  19. Investigation of aerosol optical properties for remote sensing through DRAGON (distributed regional aerosol gridded observation networks) campaign in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jae-Hyun; Ahn, Joon Young; Park, Jin-Soo; Hong, You-Deok; Han, Jin-Seok; Kim, Jhoon; Kim, Sang-Woo

    2014-11-01

    Aerosols in the atmosphere, including dust and pollutants, scatters/absorbs solar radiation and change the microphysics of clouds, thus influencing the Earth's energy budget, climate, air quality, visibility, agriculture and water circulation. Pollutants have also been reported to threaten the human health. The present research collaborated with the U.S. NASA and the U.S. Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) is to study the aerosol characteristics in East Asia and improve the long-distance transportation monitoring technology by analyzing the observations of aerosol characteristics in East Asia during Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON) Campaign (March 2012-May 2012). The sun photometers that measure the aerosol optical characteristics were placed evenly throughout the Korean Peninsula and concentrated in Seoul and the metropolitan area. Observation data are obtained from the DRAGON campaign and the first year (2012) observation data (aerosol optical depth and aerosol spatial distribution) are analyzed. Sun photometer observations, including aerosol optical depth (AOD), are utilized to validate satellite observations from Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Additional analysis is performed associated with the Northeast Asia, the Korean Peninsula in particular, to determine the spatial distribution of the aerosol.

  20. Aerosol, Cloud and Trace Gas Observations Derived from Airborne Hyperspectral Radiance and Direct Beam Measurements in Recent Field Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Flynn, C. J.; Shinozuka, Y.; Kacenelenbogen, M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, M.; LeBlanc, S.; Russell, P. B.; Livingston, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Dunagan, S. E.; Johnson, R. R.

    2014-01-01

    The AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) ground-based suite of sunphotometers provides measurements of spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD), precipitable water and spectral sky radiance, which can be inverted to retrieve aerosol microphysical properties that are critical to assessments of aerosol-climate interactions. Because of data quality criteria and sampling constraints, there are significant limitations to the temporal and spatial coverage of AERONET data and their representativeness for global aerosol conditions. The 4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research) instrument, jointly developed by NASA Ames and PNNL with NASA Goddard collaboration, combines airborne sun tracking and AERONET-like sky scanning with spectroscopic detection. Being an airborne instrument, 4STAR has the potential to fill gaps in the AERONET data set. Dunagan et al. [2013] present results establishing the performance of the instrument, along with calibration, engineering flight test, and preliminary scientific field data. The 4STAR instrument operated successfully in the SEAC4RS [Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys] experiment in Aug./Sep. 2013 aboard the NASA DC-8 and in the DoE [Department of Energy]-sponsored TCAP [Two Column Aerosol Project, July 2012 & Feb. 2013] experiment aboard the DoE G-1 aircraft (Shinozuka et al., 2013), and acquired a wealth of data in support of mission objectives on all SEAC4RS and TCAP research flights. 4STAR provided direct beam measurements of hyperspectral AOD, columnar trace gas retrievals (H2O, O3, NO2; Segal-Rosenheimer et al., 2014), and the first ever airborne hyperspectral sky radiance scans, which can be inverted to yield the same products as AERONET ground-based observations. In addition, 4STAR measured zenith radiances underneath cloud decks for retrievals of cloud optical depth and effective diameter. In this presentation, we provide an overview of the new

  1. Polarized Imaging Nephelometer for Field and Aircraft Measurements of Aerosol Phase Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgos, G.; Martins, J.

    2012-12-01

    Aerosols have a significant impact on the radiative balance and water cycle of our planet through influencing atmospheric radiation. Remote sensing of aerosols relies on scattering phase matrix information to retrieve aerosol properties with frequent global coverage. At the Laboratory for Aerosols, Clouds and Optics (LACO) at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County we developed a new technique to directly measure the aerosol phase function and the degree of linear polarization of the scattered light (two elements of the phase matrix). We designed and built a portable instrument called the Polarized Imaging Nephelometer (PI-Neph). The PI-Neph successfully participated in dozens of flights of the NASA Development and Evaluation of satellite ValidatiOn Tools by Experimenters (DEVOTE) project and the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) project. The ambient aerosol enters the PI-Neph through an inlet and the sample is illuminated by laser light (wavelength of 532 nm); the scattered light is imaged by a stationary wide field of view camera in the scattering angle range of 2° to 178°. (In some cases stray light limited the scattering angle range to 3° to 176°). The PI-Neph measurement of phase function and the AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) retrievals have already been compared in some cases when the aircraft spiraled over AERONET sites, for example at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility, on October 18 2011, as shown in Figure 1. The differences between the PI-Neph and the AERONET retrievals can be attributed to differences between the ambient size distribution and the one sampled inside the aircraft. The data that is resolved with respect to scattering angle is used to compute the volume scattering coefficient. The above mentioned October 18 flight data showed good agreement between the PI-Neph measurements of volume scattering coefficient and the parallel TSI integrating nephelometer measurements. On average the TSI measurements were 1.02 times the PI

  2. Assessment of OMI near-UV aerosol optical depth over Central and East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenhao; Gu, Xingfa; Xu, Hui; Yu, Tao; Zheng, Fengjie

    2016-01-01

    Several essential improvements have been made in recent Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) near-ultraviolet (UV) aerosol retrieval algorithm version (OMAERUV version 1.4.2), but few regional validations for its aerosol optical depth (AOD) product are conducted. This paper assessed the OMAERUV AOD product over Central and East Asia. The OMAERUV Level 2.0 AOD product was compared with Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) Level 2.0 direct Sun AOD measurement over 10 years (2005-2014) at 27 selected AERONET sites. A combined comparison of OMAERUV-AERONET AOD at 25 (2) sites was carried out and yielded correlation coefficient (ρ) of 0.63 (0.77), slope of 0.53 (0.57), y intercept of 0.18 (0.13), and 50.71% (57.24%) OMAERUV AOD fall within the expected uncertainty boundary (larger by 0.1 or ±30%) at 380 nm (440 nm). The more accurate (ρ > 0.70) OMAERUV retrievals are reported over eastern and northern China and South Korea. The two primary reasons for the underestimation of OMAERUV AOD over China are as follows: (1) the use of single-channel (388 nm) retrieval method retrieves scattering AOD and not total AOD, and (2) the spectral dependence of the imaginary part of the refractive index in the near-UV region assumed in the algorithm may not be representative of aerosols found over China. The comparisons for three predominant aerosol types indicate that smoke aerosol exhibits the best performance, followed by dust and nonabsorbing aerosol. It is consistent with the characteristic of near-UV wavelength that it is more sensitive to absorbent particles. The comprehensive yearly (2005-2014) comparison at 25 sites and comparison between two periods (2005-2006 and 2009-2014) at selected four sites show no discernible decrease of temporal trend, which indicates that the OMAERUV algorithm successfully maintains its quality of aerosol product despite post-2008 row anomaly instrument problem.

  3. Development and Applications of a New, High-Resolution, Operational MISR Aerosol Product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garay, M. J.; Diner, D. J.; Kalashnikova, O.

    2014-12-01

    Since early 2000, the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument on NASA's Terra satellite has been providing aerosol optical depth (AOD) and particle property retrievals at 17.6 km spatial resolution. Capitalizing on the capabilities provided by multi-angle viewing, the operational MISR algorithm performs well, with about 75% of MISR AOD retrievals falling within 0.05 or 20% × AOD of the paired validation data from the ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET), and is able to distinguish aerosol particles by size and sphericity, over both land and water. These attributes enable a variety of applications, including aerosol transport model validation and global air quality assessment. Motivated by the adverse impacts of aerosols on human health at the local level, and taking advantage of computational speed advances that have occurred since the launch of Terra, we have implemented an operational MISR aerosol product with 4.4 km spatial resolution that maintains, and sometimes improves upon, the quality of the 17.6 km resolution product. We will describe the performance of this product relative to the heritage 17.6 km product, the global AERONET validation network, and high spatial density AERONET-DRAGON sites. Other changes that simplify product content, and make working with the data much easier for users, will also be discussed. Examples of how the new product demonstrates finer spatial variability of aerosol fields than previously retrieved, and ways this new dataset can be used for studies of local aerosol effects, will be shown.

  4. A study of remotely sensed aerosol properties from ground-based sun and sky scanning radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, David M.

    Aerosol particles impact human health by degrading air quality and affect climate by heating or cooling the atmosphere. The Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) of Northern India, one of the most populous regions in the world, produces and is impacted by a variety of aerosols including pollution, smoke, dust, and mixtures of them. The NASA Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) mesoscale distribution of Sun and sky-pointing instruments in India was established to measure aerosol characteristics at sites across the IGP and around Kanpur, India, a large urban and industrial center in the IGP, during the 2008 pre-monsoon (April-June). This study focused on detecting spatial and temporal variability of aerosols, validating satellite retrievals, and classifying the dominant aerosol mixing states and origins. The Kanpur region typically experiences high aerosol loading due to pollution and smoke during the winter and high aerosol loading due to the addition of dust to the pollution and smoke mixture during the pre-monsoon. Aerosol emissions in Kanpur likely contribute up to 20% of the aerosol loading during the pre-monsoon over the IGP. Aerosol absorption also increases significantly downwind of Kanpur indicating the possibility of the black carbon emissions from aerosol sources such as coal-fired power plants and brick kilns. Aerosol retrievals from satellite show a high bias when compared to the mesoscale distributed instruments around Kanpur during the pre-monsoon with few high quality retrievals due to imperfect aerosol type and land surface characteristic assumptions. Aerosol type classification using the aerosol absorption, size, and shape properties can identify dominant aerosol mixing states of absorbing dust and black carbon particles. Using 19 long-term AERONET sites near various aerosol source regions (Dust, Mixed, Urban/Industrial, and Biomass Burning), aerosol absorption property statistics are expanded upon and show significant differences when compared to previous work

  5. Inferring Absorbing Organic Carbon Content from AERONET Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arola, A.; Schuster, G.; Myhre, G.; Kazadzis, S.; Dey, S.; Tripathi, S. N.

    2011-01-01

    Black carbon, light-absorbing organic carbon (often called brown carbon) and mineral dust are the major light-absorbing aerosols. Currently the sources and formation of brown carbon aerosol in particular are not well understood. In this study we estimated globally the amount of light absorbing organic carbon and black carbon from AERONET measurements. We find that the columnar absorbing organic carbon (brown carbon) levels in biomass burning regions of South-America and Africa are relatively high (about 15-20 magnesium per square meters during biomass burning season), while the concentrations are significantly lower in urban areas in US and Europe. However, we estimated significant absorbing organic carbon amounts from the data of megacities of newly industrialized countries, particularly in India and China, showing also clear seasonality with peak values up to 30-35 magnesium per square meters during the coldest season, likely caused by the coal and biofuel burning used for heating. We also compared our retrievals with the modeled organic carbon by global Oslo CTM for several sites. Model values are higher in biomass burning regions than AERONET-based retrievals, while opposite is true in urban areas in India and China.

  6. Potential of polarization lidar to provide profiles of CCN- and INP-relevant aerosol parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamouri, R. E.; Ansmann, A.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the potential of polarization lidar to provide vertical profiles of aerosol parameters from which cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) and ice nucleating particle (INP) number concentrations can be estimated. We show that height profiles of number concentrations of aerosol particles with radius > 50 nm (APC50, reservoir of favorable CCN) and with radius > 250 nm (APC250, reservoir of favorable INP), as well as profiles of the aerosol particle surface area concentration (ASC, used in INP parameterization) can be retrieved from lidar-derived aerosol extinction coefficients (AEC) with relative uncertainties of a factor of around 2 (APC50), and of about 25-50 % (APC250, ASC). Of key importance is the potential of polarization lidar to identify mineral dust particles and to distinguish and separate the aerosol properties of basic aerosol types such as mineral dust and continental pollution (haze, smoke). We investigate the relationship between AEC and APC50, APC250, and ASC for the main lidar wavelengths of 355, 532 and 1064 nm and main aerosol types (dust, pollution, marine). Our study is based on multiyear Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) photometer observations of aerosol optical thickness and column-integrated particle size distribution at Leipzig, Germany, and Limassol, Cyprus, which cover all realistic aerosol mixtures of continental pollution, mineral dust, and marine aerosol. We further include AERONET data from field campaigns in Morocco, Cabo Verde, and Barbados, which provide pure dust and pure marine aerosol scenarios. By means of a simple relationship between APC50 and the CCN-reservoir particles (APCCCN) and published INP parameterization schemes (with APC250 and ASC as input) we finally compute APCCCN and INP concentration profiles. We apply the full methodology to a lidar observation of a heavy dust outbreak crossing Cyprus with dust up to 8 km height and to a case during which anthropogenic pollution dominated.

  7. Black Carbon Absorption Over Kanpur (an Industrial City in the Indo-Gangetic Basin) Retrieved From AERONET Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, S. N.; Dey, S.; Singh, R. P.

    2004-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) is the main anthropogenic absorbing particles in the atmosphere causing large positive radiative forcing. In India, BC concentration is being monitored by aethalometer at few locations, mostly in campaign modes. However, the Indo-Gangetic basin in northern India, one of the most populated basins in the world is devoid of any such direct measurements. An automatic sun/sky radiometer has been deployed in Kanpur, an industrial city in the heart of the Indo-Gangetic basin, in collaboration with NASA under Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) to monitor aerosol parameters since January 2001. In this paper, we have retrieved column-integrated BC concentration and specific absorption cross section (α _{a}) due to BC using Maxwell Garnett dielectric functions assuming internal mixing of BC with other aerosols. Values of refractive indices (real and imaginary parts) retrieved by AERONET have been used in BC volume fraction calculations. We have considered spherical retrieval for winter (December-February) and post-monsoon (September-November) seasons, spheroid retrieval for pre-monsoon (April-May) and monsoon (June-August) seasons and combined spherical and spheroid retrievals for March and September during the transition months based on the aerosol optical properties. BC concentration over Kanpur is found to be higher during the winter and post-monsoon seasons compared to that during the pre-monsoon and monsoon seasons. Yearly averaged column-integrated BC concentrations over Kanpur are found to be 8.185, 5.564 and 7.723 mg/m2, whereas the corresponding values of \\alphaa are found to be 9.562, 11.976 and 10.07 m2/g at 0.44 μ m wavelength for 2001, 2002 and 2003 respectively. α _{a}$ is found to be higher during the pre-monsoon season due to the preponderance of coarser dust particles. During the post-monsoon to winter seasons, anthropogenic pollutants are transported over the region by northwesterly winds. Spectral signature of single scattering albedo

  8. Global Aerosol Radiative Forcing using Satellite and Surface Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patadia, F.; Christopher, S. A.

    2007-12-01

    Over the industrial period, aerosols have increased due to human activities and their effects on climate are the largest source of uncertainty in the current IPCC estimates of global climate forcing due to human activities. Inhomogeneous distribution of aerosols in space and time poses a challenge in their characterization and requires global measurements to assess their effects and reduce the associated uncertainties. In this paper we use global measurements from both satellite and ground based observations for one year time period to estimate the shortwave aerosol radiative forcing (SWARF) at the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) and discuss the associated uncertainties. For this, aerosol properties (optical depth) derived from AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET), a federation of ground-based remote sensing instruments, are used in this paper in conjunction with measurements of the TOA shortwave flux from CERES instrument (onboard Terra satellite). High spectral and spatial resolution observations from Imager (MODIS) will be used to identify clear sky conditions within CERES foot print and GOCART results will also be used for separating aerosol types. Global aerosol forcing and corresponding radiative forcing efficiencies will be presented as a function of major aerosol types [including anthropogenic (sulfate, soot, black carbon) and natural (dust) aerosols], region and season. This study should serve as a useful constraint for both numerical modeling simulations and satellite based estimates of SWARF.

  9. Global Aerosol Radiative Forcing Using Satellite and Surface Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patadia, F.; Christopher, S. A.

    2008-05-01

    Over the industrial period, aerosols have increased due to human activities and their effects on climate are the largest source of uncertainty in the current IPCC estimates of global climate forcing due to human activities. Inhomogeneous distribution of aerosols in space and time poses a challenge in characterizing their properties and requires global measurements to assess their effects and reduce the associated uncertainties. In this paper we use global measurements from both satellite and ground based observations for one year time period to estimate the shortwave aerosol radiative forcing (SWARF) at the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) and discuss the associated uncertainties. For this, aerosol properties (optical depth) derived from AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET), a federation of ground-based remote sensing instruments, are used in this paper in conjunction with measurements of the TOA shortwave flux from CERES instrument (onboard Terra satellite). High spectral and spatial resolution observations from Imager (MODIS) is used to identify clear sky conditions within CERES foot print and GOCART results will also be used for separating aerosol types. Global aerosol forcing and corresponding radiative forcing efficiencies will be presented as a function of major aerosol types [including anthropogenic (sulfate, soot, black carbon) and natural (dust) aerosols], region and season. This study should serve as a useful constraint for both numerical modeling simulations and satellite based estimates of SWARF.

  10. Robotics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddell, Steve; Doty, Keith L.

    1999-01-01

    "Why Teach Robotics?" (Waddell) suggests that the United States lags behind Europe and Japan in use of robotics in industry and teaching. "Creating a Course in Mobile Robotics" (Doty) outlines course elements of the Intelligent Machines Design Lab. (SK)

  11. Ground-based Network and Supersite Measurements for Studying Aerosol Properties and Aerosol-Cloud Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Si-Chee; Holben, Brent N.

    2008-01-01

    From radiometric principles, it is expected that the retrieved properties of extensive aerosols and clouds from reflected/emitted measurements by satellite (and/or aircraft) should be consistent with those retrieved from transmitted/emitted radiance observed at the surface. Although space-borne remote sensing observations contain large spatial domain, they are often plagued by contamination of surface signatures. Thus, ground-based in-situ and remote-sensing measurements, where signals come directly from atmospheric constituents, the sun, and the Earth-atmosphere interactions, provide additional information content for comparisons that confirm quantitatively the usefulness of the integrated surface, aircraft, and satellite datasets. The development and deployment of AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) sunphotometer network and SMART-COMMIT (Surface-sensing Measurements for Atmospheric Radiative Transfer - Chemical, Optical & Microphysical Measurements of In-situ Troposphere) mobile supersite are aimed for the optimal utilization of collocated ground-based observations as constraints to yield higher fidelity satellite retrievals and to determine any sampling bias due to target conditions. To characterize the regional natural and anthropogenic aerosols, AERONET is an internationally federated network of unique sunphotometry that contains more than 250 permanent sites worldwide. Since 1993, there are more than 480 million aerosol optical depth observations and about 15 sites have continuous records longer than 10 years for annual/seasonal trend analyses. To quantify the energetics of the surface-atmosphere system and the atmospheric processes, SMART-COMMIT instrument into three categories: flux radiometer, radiance sensor and in-situ probe. Through participation in many satellite remote-sensing/retrieval and validation projects over eight years, SMART-COMMIT have gradually refine( and been proven vital for field deployment. In this paper, we will demonstrate the

  12. Aerosol radiative forcing efficiency in the UV-B region over central Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palancar, Gustavo G.; Olcese, Luis E.; Lanzaco, Bethania L.; Achad, Mariana; López, María Laura; Toselli, Beatriz M.

    2016-07-01

    AEROSOL Robotic Network (AERONET), Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and global UV-B (280-315 nm) irradiance measurements and calculations were combined to investigate the effects of aerosol loading on the ultraviolet B radiation (UV-B) reaching the surface under cloudless conditions in Córdoba, Argentina. The aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) and the aerosol forcing efficiency (ARFE) were calculated for an extended period of time (2000-2013) at a ground-based monitoring site affected by different types and loading of aerosols. The ARFE was evaluated by using the aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 340 nm retrieved by AERONET at the Cordoba CETT site. The individual and combined effects of the single scattering albedo (SSA) and the solar zenith angle (SZA) on the ARFE were also analyzed. In addition, and for comparison purposes, the MODIS AOD at 550 nm was used as input in a machine learning method to better characterize the aerosol load at 340 nm and evaluate the ARFE retrieved from AOD satellite measurements. The ARFE at the surface calculated using AOD data from AERONET ranged from (-0.11 ± 0.01) to (-1.76 ± 0.20) Wm-2 with an average of -0.61 Wm-2; however, when using AOD data from MODIS (TERRA/AQUA satellites), it ranged from (-0.22 ± 0.03) to (-0.65 ± 0.07) Wm-2 with an average value of -0.43 Wm-2. At the same SZA and SSA, the maximum difference between ground and satellite-based was 0.22 Wm-2.

  13. Preliminary results of the aerosol optical depth retrieval in Johor, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, H. Q.; Kanniah, K. D.; Lau, A. M. S.

    2014-02-01

    Monitoring of atmospheric aerosols over the urban area is important as tremendous amounts of pollutants are released by industrial activities and heavy traffic flow. Air quality monitoring by satellite observation provides better spatial coverage, however, detailed aerosol properties retrieval remains a challenge. This is due to the limitation of aerosol retrieval algorithm on high reflectance (bright surface) areas. The aim of this study is to retrieve aerosol optical depth over urban areas of Iskandar Malaysia; the main southern development zone in Johor state, using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) 500 m resolution data. One of the important steps is the aerosol optical depth retrieval is to characterise different types of aerosols in the study area. This information will be used to construct a Look Up Table containing the simulated aerosol reflectance and corresponding aerosol optical depth. Thus, in this study we have characterised different aerosol types in the study area using Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data. These data were processed using cluster analysis and the preliminary results show that the area is consisting of coastal urban (65%), polluted urban (27.5%), dust particles (6%) and heavy pollution (1.5%) aerosols.

  14. Evolution of aerosol loading in Santiago de Chile between 1997 and 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pistone, Kristina; Gallardo, Laura

    2015-04-01

    While aerosols produced by major cities are a significant component of anthropogenic climate forcing as well as an important factor in public health, many South American cities have not been a major focus of aerosol studies due in part to relatively few long-term observations in the region. Here we present a synthesis of the available data for the emerging megacity of Santiago, Chile. We report new results from a recent NASA AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) site in the Santiago basin, combining these with previous AERONET observations in Santiago as well as with a new assessment of the 11-station air quality monitoring network currently administered by the Chilean Environment Ministry (MMA, Ministerio del Medio Ambiente) to assess changes in aerosol composition since 1997. While the average surface concentration of pollution components (specifically PM2.5 and PM10) has decreased, no significant change in total aerosol optical depth was observed. However, changes in aerosol size and composition are suggested by the proxy measurements. Previous studies have revealed limitations in purely satellite-based studies over Santiago due to biases from high surface reflection in the region, particularly in summer months (e.g. Escribano et al 2014). To overcome this difficulty and certain limitations in the air quality data, we next incorporate analysis of aerosol products from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument along with those from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument, both on NASA's Terra satellite, to better quantify the high bias of MODIS. Thus incorporating these complementary datasets, we characterize the aerosol over Santiago over the period 1997 to 2014, including the evolution of aerosol properties over time and seasonal dependencies in the observed trends. References: Escribano et al (2014), "Satellite Retrievals of Aerosol Optical Depth over a Subtropical Urban Area: The Role of Stratification and Surface

  15. Analysis of Aerosol Distribution over North East Asia Using a Geostationary Satellite Measurement during Filed Campaigns of DRAGON-Asia 2012 and MAPS-Seoul 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KIM, M.; Kim, J.; Jeong, U.; Kim, W.; Choi, M.; Holben, B. N.; Eck, T. F.; Lim, J.; Ahn, J.

    2015-12-01

    Considering diverse source and high concentration of aerosol, numerous manners have been applied to detect aerosol properties in North East Asia (NEA). Above all, a geostationary orbit satellite, COMS has monitored atmosphere and ocean conditions over the NEA using two payloads of Meteorological Imager (MI) and Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) since 2010. By using the MI measurements, an AOD retrieval algorithm was developed (Kim et al., 2014). Additionally, a number of ground-based network such as Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET), Sky Radiometer Network (SKYNET), and Mie-scattering Light Detector and Ranging (LIDAR) Network have been in operation to capture aerosol variability. And, occasionally, field campaigns were conducted. In 2012 (March to May), the DRAGON-Asia campaign was performed by AERONET science team and NIER (National Institute of Environmental Research), and 40 sun/sky-radiometer was deployed. Subsequently, MAPS-Seoul campaign for detecting air quality was performed with 8 AERONET sites and 6 Pandora instruments in Korea. Those ground-based measurements provide validation dataset for satellite retrieval algorithm, as well as detect detail of aerosol characteristics at each local point. Thus, in this study, the AODs obtained from the aforementioned campaigns were applied to assess and improve the accuracy of MI AOD. For the DRAGON-Asia 2012, the comparison between MI AOD and AERONET AOD shows correlation coefficient of 0.85, regression slope of 1.00 and RMSE of 0.18. Furthermore, AOPs obtained from those field campaign results and the MI AOD were analyzed to understand temporal and spatial variance of aerosol in NEA during spring.

  16. Aerosol Quality Monitor (AQUAM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, X.; Ignatov, A.

    2011-12-01

    ; http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/sod/sst/aquam/) was set up, to check AVHRR (and later, VIIRS) AOD retrievals for self-consistency, and check them for cross-consistency with MOD04_L2 and MYD04_L2 from well-calibrated MODIS sensor. Also, adding in-situ AOD data from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) is currently under way. Finally, GOCART and NAAPS data will be added to AQUAM, and satellite, AERONET, and model AODs will all be checked for cross-consistency. Next step will be comparison of CRTM simulations (with GOCART or NAAPS input) with top-of-atmosphere sensor reflectances. Once consistency in solar reflectance bands is achieved, we will check the effect of aerosols on the thermal bands and correct its effect on SST.

  17. Radiative forcing under mixed aerosol conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GarcíA, O. E.; Expósito, F. J.; DíAz, J. P.; DíAz, A. M.

    2011-01-01

    The mixture of mineral dust with biomass burning or urban-industrial aerosols presents significant differences in optical properties when compared to those of the individual constituents, leading to different impacts on solar radiation levels. This effect is assessed by estimating the direct radiative forcing (ΔF) of these aerosols from solar flux models using the radiative parameters derived from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). These data reveal that, in oceanic and vegetative covers (surface albedo (SA) < 0.30), the aerosol effect at the top of atmosphere (TOA) is always cooling the Earth-atmosphere system, regardless of the aerosol type. The obtained average values of ΔF range between -27 ± 15 Wm-2 (aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 0.55 μm, 0.3 ± 0.3) for mineral dust mixed with urban-industrial aerosols, registered in the East Asia region, and -34 ± 18 Wm-2 (AOD = 0.8 ± 0.4) for the mixture of the mineral dust and biomass burning particles, observed in the Central Africa region. In the intermediate SA range (0.30-0.50) the TOA radiative effect depends on the aerosol absorption properties. Thus, aerosols with single scattering albedo at 0.55 μm lower than ˜0.88 lead to a warming of the system, with ΔF of 10 ± 11 Wm-2 for the mixture of mineral dust and biomass burning. Cases with SA > 0.30 are not present in East Asia region. At the bottom of atmosphere (BOA) the maximum ΔF values are associated with the highest AOD levels obtained for the mixture of mineral dust and biomass burning aerosols (-130 ± 44 Wm-2 with AOD = 0.8 ± 0.4 for SA < 0.30).

  18. Evaluation of aerosol simulation in a global model using multiple-platform observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, X.

    2015-12-01

    Large diversity in the magnitude of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and their spatial distributions is one of key factors contributing to the large uncertainty of the model predicted aerosol radiative forcing (global mean ranging from -0.02 to -0.58W m-2) and its climatic effect. Therefore, evaluation of model performances with respect to AOD is a critical step to improve the model simulations and, thus, reduce the diversities. In this study, multi-year AOD data (2004-2012) from ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measurements and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) satellite retrievals are used to evaluate the performance of a global model, GEOS-Chem-APM, one of global models involved in AeroCom phase II aerosol module inter-comparison project. Comparisons of the modeled AOD with satellite data on spatial distribution, seasonal and inter-annual variations are quantitatively analyzed. In addition, several regions representative of various aerosol dominant species are chose for the detailed evaluations of AOD between the simulation and AERONET observations. The capability and weakness of the model to capture seasonal variation and chemical species is also discussed for further improvement in the future.

  19. Quantitative retrieval of aerosol optical thickness from FY-2 VISSR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Linyan; Xue, Yong; Cao, Chunxiang; Feng, Jianzhong; Zhang, Hao; Guang, Jie; Wang, Ying; Li, Yingjie; Mei, Linlu; Ai, Jianwen

    2009-09-01

    Atmospheric aerosol, as particulate matter suspended in the air, exists in a variety of forms such as dust, fume and mist. It deeply affects climate and land surface environment in both regional and global scales, and furthermore, lead to be hugely much influence on human health. For the sake of effectively monitoring it, many atmospheric aerosol observation networks are set up and provide associated informational services in the wide world, as well-known Aerosol robotic network (AERONET), Canadian Sunphotometer Network (AeroCan) and so forth. Given large-scale atmospheric aerosol monitoring, that satellite remote sensing data are used to inverse aerosol optical depth is one of available and effective approaches. Nowadays, special types of instruments aboard running satellites are applied to obtain related remote sensing data of retrieving atmospheric aerosol. However, atmospheric aerosol real-timely or near real-timely monitoring hasn't been accomplished. Nevertheless, retrievals, using Fengyun-2 VISSR data, are carried out and the above problem resolved to certain extent, especially over China. In this paper, the authors have developed a new retrieving model/mode to retrieve aerosol optical depth, using Fengyun-2 satellite data that were obtained by the VISSR aboard FY-2C and FY-2D. A series of the aerosol optical depth distribution maps with high time resolution were able to obtained, is helpful for understanding the forming mechanism, transport, influence and controlling approach of atmospheric aerosol.

  20. Quantitative retrieval of aerosol optical thickness from FY-2 VISSR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Linyan; Xue, Yong; Cao, Chunxiang; Feng, Jianzhong; Zhang, Hao; Guang, Jie; Wang, Ying; Li, Yingjie; Mei, Linlu; Ai, Jianwen

    2010-11-01

    Atmospheric aerosol, as particulate matter suspended in the air, exists in a variety of forms such as dust, fume and mist. It deeply affects climate and land surface environment in both regional and global scales, and furthermore, lead to be hugely much influence on human health. For the sake of effectively monitoring it, many atmospheric aerosol observation networks are set up and provide associated informational services in the wide world, as well-known Aerosol robotic network (AERONET), Canadian Sunphotometer Network (AeroCan) and so forth. Given large-scale atmospheric aerosol monitoring, that satellite remote sensing data are used to inverse aerosol optical depth is one of available and effective approaches. Nowadays, special types of instruments aboard running satellites are applied to obtain related remote sensing data of retrieving atmospheric aerosol. However, atmospheric aerosol real-timely or near real-timely monitoring hasn't been accomplished. Nevertheless, retrievals, using Fengyun-2 VISSR data, are carried out and the above problem resolved to certain extent, especially over China. In this paper, the authors have developed a new retrieving model/mode to retrieve aerosol optical depth, using Fengyun-2 satellite data that were obtained by the VISSR aboard FY-2C and FY-2D. A series of the aerosol optical depth distribution maps with high time resolution were able to obtained, is helpful for understanding the forming mechanism, transport, influence and controlling approach of atmospheric aerosol.

  1. Using the OMI aerosol index and absorption aerosol optical depth to evaluate the NASA MERRA Aerosol Reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchard, V.; da Silva, A. M.; Colarco, P. R.; Darmenov, A.; Randles, C. A.; Govindaraju, R.; Torres, O.; Campbell, J.; Spurr, R.

    2015-05-01

    A radiative transfer interface has been developed to simulate the UV aerosol index (AI) from the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) aerosol assimilated fields. The purpose of this work is to use the AI and aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) derived from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) measurements as independent validation for the Modern Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications Aerosol Reanalysis (MERRAero). MERRAero is based on a version of the GEOS-5 model that is radiatively coupled to the Goddard Chemistry, Aerosol, Radiation, and Transport (GOCART) aerosol module and includes assimilation of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor. Since AI is dependent on aerosol concentration, optical properties and altitude of the aerosol layer, we make use of complementary observations to fully diagnose the model, including AOD from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), aerosol retrievals from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and attenuated backscatter coefficients from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) mission to ascertain potential misplacement of plume height by the model. By sampling dust, biomass burning and pollution events in 2007 we have compared model-produced AI and AAOD with the corresponding OMI products, identifying regions where the model representation of absorbing aerosols was deficient. As a result of this study over the Saharan dust region, we have obtained a new set of dust aerosol optical properties that retains consistency with the MODIS AOD data that were assimilated, while resulting in better agreement with aerosol absorption measurements from OMI. The analysis conducted over the southern African and South American biomass burning regions indicates that revising the spectrally dependent aerosol absorption properties in the near-UV region improves the modeled-observed AI comparisons

  2. Variations in optical properties of aerosols on monsoon seasonal change and estimation of aerosol optical depth using ground-based meteorological and air quality data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, F.; Lim, H. S.; Abdullah, K.; Yoon, T. L.; Holben, B.

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the optical properties of aerosols in Penang, Malaysia were analyzed for four monsoonal seasons (northeast monsoon, pre-monsoon, southwest monsoon, and post-monsoon) based on data from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) from February 2012 to November 2013. The aerosol distribution patterns in Penang for each monsoonal period were quantitatively identified according to the scattering plots of the aerosol optical depth (AOD) against the Angstrom exponent. A modified algorithm based on the prototype model of Tan et al. (2014a) was proposed to predict the AOD data. Ground-based measurements (i.e., visibility and air pollutant index) were used in the model as predictor data to retrieve the missing AOD data from AERONET because of frequent cloud formation in the equatorial region. The model coefficients were determined through multiple regression analysis using selected data set from in situ data. The predicted AOD of the model was generated based on the coefficients and compared against the measured data through standard statistical tests. The predicted AOD in the proposed model yielded a coefficient of determination R2 of 0.68. The corresponding percent mean relative error was less than 0.33% compared with the real data. The results revealed that the proposed model efficiently predicted the AOD data. Validation tests were performed on the model against selected LIDAR data and yielded good correspondence. The predicted AOD can beneficially monitor short- and long-term AOD and provide supplementary information in atmospheric corrections.

  3. Simulation of aerosol direct radiative forcing with RAMS-CMAQ in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Han, X.; Liu, X.

    2011-12-01

    The air quality modeling system RAMS-CMAQ is developed to assess aerosol direct radiative forcing by linking simulated meteorological parameters and aerosol mass concentration with the aerosol optical properties/radiative transfer module in this study. The module is capable of accounting for important factors that affect aerosol optical properties and radiative effect, such as incident wave length, aerosol size distribution, water uptake, and internal mixture. Subsequently, the modeling system is applied to simulate the temporal and spatial variations in mass burden, optical properties, and direct radiative forcing of diverse aerosols, including sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon, organic carbon, dust, and sea salt over East Asia throughout 2005. Model performance is fully evaluated using various observational data, including satellite monitoring of MODIS and surface measurements of EANET (Acid Deposition Monitoring Network), AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network), and CSHNET (Chinese Sun Hazemeter Network). The correlation coefficients of the comparisons of daily average mass concentrations of sulfate, PM2.5, and PM10 between simulations and EANET measurements are 0.70, 0.61, and 0.64, respectively. It is also determined that the modeled aerosol optical depth (AOD) is in congruence with the observed results from the AERONET, the CSHNET, and the MODIS. The model results suggest that the high AOD values ranging from 0.8 to 1.2 are mainly distributed over the Sichuan Basin as well as over central and southeastern China, in East Asia. The aerosol direct radiative forcing patterns generally followed the AOD patterns. The strongest forcing effect ranging from -12 to -8 W/m2 was mainly distributed over the Sichuan Basin and the eastern China's coastal regions in the all-sky case at TOA, and the forcing effect ranging from -8 to -4 W/m2 could be found over entire eastern China, Korea, Japan, East China Sea, and the sea areas of Japan.

  4. Simulation of aerosol direct radiative forcing with RAMS-CMAQ in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiao; Zhang, Meigen; Han, Zhiwei; Xin, Jinyuan; Liu, Xiaohong

    2011-11-01

    The air quality modeling system RAMS-CMAQ is developed to assess aerosol direct radiative forcing by linking simulated meteorological parameters and aerosol mass concentration with the aerosol optical properties/radiative transfer module in this study. The module is capable of accounting for important factors that affect aerosol optical properties and radiative effect, such as incident wave length, aerosol size distribution, water uptake, and internal mixture. Subsequently, the modeling system is applied to simulate the temporal and spatial variations in mass burden, optical properties, and direct radiative forcing of diverse aerosols, including sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon, organic carbon, dust, and sea salt over East Asia throughout 2005. Model performance is fully evaluated using various observational data, including satellite monitoring of MODIS and surface measurements of EANET (Acid Deposition Monitoring Network), AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network), and CSHNET (Chinese Sun Hazemeter Network). The correlation coefficients of the comparisons of daily average mass concentrations of sulfate, PM2.5, and PM10 between simulations and EANET measurements are 0.70, 0.61, and 0.64, respectively. It is also determined that the modeled aerosol optical depth (AOD) is in congruence with the observed results from the AERONET, the CSHNET, and the MODIS. The model results suggest that the high AOD values ranging from 0.8 to 1.2 are mainly distributed over the Sichuan Basin as well as over central and southeastern China, in East Asia. The aerosol direct radiative forcing patterns generally followed the AOD patterns. The strongest forcing effect ranging from -12 to -8 W m -2 was mainly distributed over the Sichuan Basin and the eastern China's coastal regions in the all-sky case at TOA, and the forcing effect ranging from -8 to -4 W m -2 could be found over entire eastern China, Korea, Japan, East China Sea, and the sea areas of Japan

  5. Simulation of aerosol direct radiative forcing with RAMS-CMAQ in East Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Xiao; Zhang, Meigen; Han, Zhiewi; Xin, Jin-Yuan; Liu, Xiaohong

    2011-11-14

    The air quality modeling system RAMS-CMAQ is developed to assess aerosol direct radiative forcing by linking simulated meteorological parameters and aerosol mass concentration with the aerosol optical properties/radiative transfer module in this study. The module is capable of accounting for important factors that affect aerosol optical properties and radiative effect, such as incident wave length, aerosol size distribution, water uptake, and internal mixture. Subsequently, the modeling system is applied to simulate the temporal and spatial variations in mass burden, optical properties, and direct radiative forcing of diverse aerosols, including sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon, organic carbon, dust, and sea salt over East Asia throughout 2005. Model performance is fully evaluated using various observational data, including satellite monitoring of MODIS and surface measurements of EANET (Acid Deposition Monitoring Network), AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network), and CSHNET (Chinese Sun Hazemeter Network). The correlation coefficients of the comparisons of daily average mass concentrations of sulfate, PM2.5, and PM10 between simulations and EANET measurements are 0.70, 0.61, and 0.64, respectively. It is also determined that the modeled aerosol optical depth (AOD) is in congruence with the observed results from the AERONET, the CSHNET, and the MODIS. The model results suggest that the high AOD values ranging from 0.8 to 1.2 are mainly distributed over the Sichuan Basin as well as over central and southeastern China, in East Asia. The aerosol direct radiative forcing patterns generally followed the AOD patterns. The strongest forcing effect ranging from -12 to -8 W m-2 was mainly distributed over the Sichuan Basin and the eastern China's coastal regions in the all-sky case at TOA, and the forcing effect ranging from -8 to -4 W m-2 could be found over entire eastern China, Korea, Japan, East China Sea, and the sea areas of Japan

  6. Aerosol analysis techniques and results from micro pulse lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hlavka, Dennis L.; Spinhirne, James D.; Campbell, James R.; Reagan, John A.; Powell, Donna

    1998-01-01

    The effect of clouds and aerosol on the atmospheric energy balance is a key global change problem. Full knowledge of aerosol distributions is difficult to obtain by passive sensing alone. Aerosol and cloud retrievals in several important areas can be significantly improved with active remote sensing by lidar. Micro Pulse Lidar (MPL) is an aerosol and cloud profilometer that provides a detailed picture of the vertical structure of boundary layer and elevated dust or smoke plume aerosols. MPL is a compact, fully eyesafe, ground-based, zenith pointing instrument capable of full-time, long-term unattended operation at 523 nm. In October of 1993, MPL began taking full-time measurements for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program at its Southern Great Plains (SGP) site and has since expanded to ARM sites in the Tropical West Pacific (TWP) and the North Slope of Alaska (NSA). Other MPL's are moving out to some of the 60 world-wide Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites which are already equipped with automatic sun-sky scanning spectral radiometers providing total column optical depth measurements. Twelve additional MPL's have been purchased by NASA to add to the aerosol and cloud database of the EOS ground validation network. The original MPL vertical resolution was 300 meters but the newer versions have a vertical resolution of 30 meters. These expanding data sets offer a significant new resource for atmospheric radiation analysis. Under the direction of Jim Spinhirne, the MPL analysis team at NASA/GSFC has developed instrument correction and backscatter analysis techniques for ARM to detect cloud boundaries and analyze vertical aerosol structures. A summary of MPL applications is found in Hlavka (1997). With the aid of independent total column optical depth instruments such as the Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) at the ARM sites or sun photometers at the AERONET sites, the MPL data can be calibrated, and time-resolved vertical profiles of

  7. Evaluation of IASI-derived dust aerosol characteristics over the tropical belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelle, V.; Chédin, A.; Siméon, M.; Tsamalis, C.; Pierangelo, C.; Pondrom, M.; Crevoisier, C.; Crepeau, L.; Scott, N. A.

    2014-09-01

    IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounder Interferometer)-derived monthly mean infrared (10 μm) dust aerosol optical depth (AOD) and altitude are evaluated against ground-based Aerosol RObotic NETwork of sun photometers (AERONET) measurements of the 500 nm coarse-mode AOD and CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) measurements of altitude at 38 AERONET sites (sea and land) within the tropical belt (30° N-30° S). The period covered extends from July 2007 to June 2013. The evaluation goes through the analysis of Taylor diagrams and box-and-whiskers plots, separating situations over oceanic regions and over land. For the AOD, such an evaluation raises the problem of the difference between the two spectral domains used: infrared for IASI and visible for AERONET. Consequently, the two measurements do not share the same metrics. For that reason, AERONET coarse-mode AOD is first "translated" into IASI-equivalent infrared AOD. This is done by the determination, site by site, of an infrared to visible AOD ratio. Because translating visible coarse-mode AOD into infrared AOD requires accurate knowledge of variables, such as the infrared refractive index or the particle size distribution, quantifying the bias between these two sources of AOD is not straightforward. This problem is detailed in this paper, in particular in Appendix A. For the sites over oceanic regions, the overall AOD temporal correlation comes to 0.86 for 786 items (IASI and AERONET monthly mean bins). The overall normalized standard deviation (i.e. ratio of the standard deviation of the test data (IASI) to that of the reference data (AERONET)) is 0.93, close to the desired value of 1. Over land, essentially desert, correlation is 0.74 for 619 items and the normalized standard deviation is 0.86. This slight but significant degradation over land most probably results from the greater complexity of the surface (heterogeneity, elevation) and, to a lesser extent, to the episodic presence of dust

  8. Remote sensing of aerosol properties during CARES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassianov, Evgueni; Barnard, James; Pekour, Mikhail; Flynn, Connor; Ferrare, Richard; Hostetler, Chris; Hair, John; Jobson, Bertram T.

    2011-11-01

    One month of MFRSR data collected at two sites in the central California (USA) region during the CARES campaign are processed and the MFRSR-derived AODs at 500 nm wavelength are compared with available AODs provided by AERONET measurements. We find that the MFRSR and AERONET AODs are small (~0.05) and comparable. A reasonable quantitative agreement between column aerosol size distributions (up to 2 μm) from the MFRSR and AERONET retrievals is illustrated as well. Analysis of the retrieved (MFRSR and AERONET) and in situ measured aerosol size distributions suggests that the contribution of the coarse mode to aerosol optical properties is substantial for several days. The results of a radiative closure experiment performed for the two sites and one-month period show a favorable agreement between the calculated and measured broadband downwelling irradiances (bias does not exceed about 3 Wm-2), and thus imply that the MFRSR-derived aerosol optical properties are reasonable.

  9. Remote Sensing of Aerosol Properties during CARES

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Flynn, Connor J.; Ferrare, R.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hair, John; Jobson, Bertram Thomas

    2011-10-01

    One month of MFRSR data collected at two sites in the central California (USA) region during the CARES campaign are processed and the MFRSR-derived AODs at 500 nm wavelength are compared with available AODs provided by AERONET measurements. We find that the MFRSR and AERONET AODs are small ({approx}0.05) and comparable. A reasonable quantitative agreement between column aerosol size distributions (up to 2 um) from the MFRSR and AERONET retrievals is illustrated as well. Analysis of the retrieved (MFRSR and AERONET) and in situ measured aerosol size distributions suggests that the contribution of the coarse mode to aerosol optical properties is substantial for several days. The results of a radiative closure experiment performed for the two sites and one-month period show a favorable agreement between the calculated and measured broadband downwelling irradiances (bias does not exceed about 3 Wm-2), and thus imply that the MFRSR-derived aerosol optical properties are reasonable.

  10. Towards climatological study on the characteristics of aerosols in Central Africa and Mediterranean sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benkhalifa, Jamel; Chaabane, Mabrouk

    2016-02-01

    The atmosphere contains molecules, clouds and aerosols that are sub-millimeter particles having a large variability in size, shape, chemical composition, lifetime and contents. The aerosols concentration depends greatly on the geographical situation, meteorological and environmental conditions, which makes aerosol climatology difficult to assess. Setting up a solar photometer (automatic, autonomous and portable instrument) on a given site allows carrying out the necessary measurements for aerosol characterization. The particle microphysical and optical properties are obtained from photometric measurements. The objective of this study is to analyze the spatial variability of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) in several Mediterranean regions and Central Africa, we considered a set of simultaneous data in the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) from six sites, two of which are located in Central Africa (Banizoumbou and Zinder Airport) and the rest are Mediterranean sites (Barcelona, Malaga, Lampedusa, and Forth Crete). The results have shown that the physical properties of aerosols are closely linked to the climate nature of the studied site. The optical thickness, single scattering albedo and aerosols size distribution can be due to the aging of the dust aerosol as they are transported over the Mediterranean basin.

  11. Spatial and Temporal Monitoring of Aerosol over Selected Urban Areas in Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokr, Mohammed; El-Tahan, Mohammed; Ibrahim, Alaa

    2015-04-01

    We utilize remote sensing data of atmospheric aerosols from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard the Terra and Aqua satellites to explore spatio-temporal patterns over selected urban sites in Egypt during 2000-2015. High resolution (10 x 10 km^2) Level 2, collection 5, quality-controlled product was used. The selected sites are characterized by different human and industrial activities as well as landscape and meteorological attributes. These have impacts on the dominant types and intensity of aerosols. Aerosol robotic network (AERONET) data were used to validate the calculations from MODIS. The suitability of the MODIS product in terms of spatial and temporal coverage as well as accuracy and robustness has been established. Seasonal patterns of aerosol concentration are identified and compared between the sites. Spatial gradient of aerosol is assessed in the vicinity of major aerosol-emission sites (e.g. Cairo) to determine the range of influence of the generated pollution. Peak aerosol concentrations are explained in terms of meteorological events and land cover. The limited trends found in the temporal records of the aerosol measurements will be confirmed using calibrated long-term ground observations. The study has been conducted under the PEER 2-239 research project titled "The Impact of Biogenic and Anthropogenic Atmospheric Aerosols to Climate in Egypt". Project website is CleanAirEgypt.org

  12. Vertical resolved separation of aerosol types using CALIPSO level-2 product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannakaki, Elina; Balis, Dimitris; Amiridis, Vassilis

    2011-11-01

    A lidar-based method was used to separate profiles of optical parameters due to different aerosol types over different European Aerosol Research LIdar NETwork (EARLINET) stations. The method makes uses of particle backscatter profiles at 532 nm and vertically resolved linear particle depolarization ratio measurements at the same wavelength. Values of particle depolarization ratio of 'pure' aerosol types (Saharan dust, biomass burning aerosols, anthropogenic aerosols, Volcanic ash aerosols) were taken from literature. Cases of CALIPSO space-borne lidar system were selected on the basis of different mixing state of the atmosphere over EARLINET stations. To identify the origin of air-masses four-day air mass back trajectories were computed using HYbrid Single-Particle Langrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model, for different arrival heights, for the location and time under study was used. Also, the Dust REgional Atmospheric Modeling (DREAM) model was used to identify cases where dust from Saharan region was affecting the place under study. For our analysis we have used Atmospheric Volume Description (AVD), Cloud-Aerosol Discrimination (CAD) and extinction Quality Control (QC) flags to screen out CALIOP data. The method was applied for different horizontal resolution of 5, 25, 45 and 105 km. The height-resolved lidar results were finally compared with column-integrated products obtained with Aerosol Robotic Network Sun photometer (AERONET) in order to see to what extent Sun photometer columnar data are representative when different aerosol layers are present in the atmosphere.

  13. Spatial Distribution of Accuracy of Aerosol Retrievals from Multiple Satellite Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrenko, Maksym; Ichoku, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Remote sensing of aerosols from space has been a subject of extensive research, with multiple sensors retrieving aerosol properties globally on a daily or weekly basis. The diverse algorithms used for these retrievals operate on different types of reflected signals based on different assumptions about the underlying physical phenomena. Depending on the actual retrieval conditions and especially on the geographical location of the sensed aerosol parcels, the combination of these factors might be advantageous for one or more of the sensors and unfavorable for others, resulting in disagreements between similar aerosol parameters retrieved from different sensors. In this presentation, we will demonstrate the use of the Multi-sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System (MAPSS) to analyze and intercompare aerosol retrievals from multiple spaceborne sensors, including MODIS (on Terra and Aqua), MISR, OMI, POLDER, CALIOP, and SeaWiFS. Based on this intercomparison, we are determining geographical locations where these products provide the greatest accuracy of the retrievals and identifying the products that are the most suitable for retrieval at these locations. The analyses are performed by comparing quality-screened satellite aerosol products to available collocated ground-based aerosol observations from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) stations, during the period of 2006-2010 when all the satellite sensors were operating concurrently. Furthermore, we will discuss results of a statistical approach that is applied to the collocated data to detect and remove potential data outliers that can bias the results of the analysis.

  14. Assessment of OMI Near-UV Aerosol Optical Depth over Land

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahn, Changwoo; Torres, Omar; Jethva, Hiren

    2014-01-01

    This is the first comprehensive assessment of the aerosol optical depth (AOD) product retrieved from the near-UV observations by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) onboard the Aura satellite. The OMI-retrieved AOD by the ultraviolet (UV) aerosol algorithm (OMAERUV version 1.4.2) was evaluated using collocated Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) level 2.0 direct Sun AOD measurements over 8 years (2005-2012). A time series analysis of collocated satellite and ground-based AOD observations over 8 years shows no discernible drift in OMI's calibration. A rigorous validation analysis over 4 years (2005-2008) was carried out at 44 globally distributed AERONET land sites. The chosen locations are representative of major aerosol types such as smoke from biomass burning or wildfires, desert mineral dust, and urban/industrial pollutants. Correlation coefficient (p) values of 0.75 or better were obtained at 50 percent of the sites with about 33 percent of the sites in the analysis reporting regression line slope values larger than 0.70 but always less than unity. The combined AERONET-OMAERUV analysis of the 44 sites yielded a p of 0.81, slope of 0.79, Y intercept of 0.10, and 65 percent OMAERUV AOD falling within the expected uncertainty range (largest of 30 percent or 0.1) at 440 nanometers. The most accurate OMAERUV retrievals are reported over northern Africa locations where the predominant aerosol type is desert dust and cloud presence is less frequent. Reliable retrievals were documented at many sites characterized by urban-type aerosols with low to moderate AOD values, concentrated in the boundary layer. These results confirm that the near-ultraviolet observations are sensitive to the entire aerosol column. A simultaneous comparison of OMAERUV, Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Deep Blue, and Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) AOD retrievals to AERONET measurements was also carried out to evaluate the OMAERUV accuracy in relation to those of

  15. Comparing MODIS C6 'Deep Blue' and 'Dark Target' Aerosol Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, N. C.; Sayer, A. M.; Bettenhausen, C.; Lee, J.; Levy, R. C.; Mattoo, S.; Munchak, L. A.; Kleidman, R.

    2014-01-01

    The MODIS Collection 6 Atmospheres product suite includes refined versions of both 'Deep Blue' (DB) and 'Dark Target' (DT) aerosol algorithms, with the DB dataset now expanded to include coverage over vegetated land surfaces. This means that, over much of the global land surface, users will have both DB and DT data to choose from. A 'merged' dataset is also provided, primarily for visualization purposes, which takes retrievals from either or both algorithms based on regional and seasonal climatologies of normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). This poster present some comparisons of these two C6 aerosol algorithms, focusing on AOD at 550 nm derived from MODIS Aqua measurements, with each other and with Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data, with the intent to facilitate user decisions about the suitability of the two datasets for their desired applications.

  16. Coherent Uncertainty Analysis of Aerosol Measurements from Multiple Satellite Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrenko, M.; Ichoku, C.

    2013-01-01

    Aerosol retrievals from multiple spaceborne sensors, including MODIS (on Terra and Aqua), MISR, OMI, POLDER, CALIOP, and SeaWiFS altogether, a total of 11 different aerosol products were comparatively analyzed using data collocated with ground-based aerosol observations from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) stations within the Multi-sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System (MAPSS, http://giovanni.gsfc.nasa.gov/mapss/ and http://giovanni.gsfc.nasa.gov/aerostat/). The analysis was performed by comparing quality-screened satellite aerosol optical depth or thickness (AOD or AOT) retrievals during 2006-2010 to available collocated AERONET measurements globally, regionally, and seasonally, and deriving a number of statistical measures of accuracy. We used a robust statistical approach to detect and remove possible outliers in the collocated data that can bias the results of the analysis. Overall, the proportion of outliers in each of the quality-screened AOD products was within 12%. Squared correlation coefficient (R2) values of the satellite AOD retrievals relative to AERONET exceeded 0.6, with R2 for most of the products exceeding 0.7 over land and 0.8 over ocean. Root mean square error (RMSE) values for most of the AOD products were within 0.15 over land and 0.09 over ocean. We have been able to generate global maps showing regions where the different products present advantages over the others, as well as the relative performance of each product over different landcover types. It was observed that while MODIS, MISR, and SeaWiFS provide accurate retrievals over most of the landcover types, multi-angle capabilities make MISR the only sensor to retrieve reliable AOD over barren and snow / ice surfaces. Likewise, active sensing enables CALIOP to retrieve aerosol properties over bright-surface shrublands more accurately than the other sensors, while POLDER, which is the only one of the sensors capable of measuring polarized aerosols, outperforms other sensors in

  17. Comparison of aerosol properties over Beijing and Kanpur: Optical, physical properties and aerosol component composition retrieved from 12 years ground-based Sun-sky radiometer remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhengqiang; Li, Lei; Zhang, Fengxia; Li, Donghui; Xie, Yisong; Xu, Hua

    2015-02-01

    Aerosol mixtures composed of coarse and fine particles occur frequently in metropolitan areas in the world, especially in developing countries. Beijing, China, and Kanpur, India, are both in Asian monsoon regions and experience strong aerosol loading because of increased economic activities, vehicles, and urbanization. Observations originating from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) have played a vital role in the field of aerosol study. In order to understand the variations of aerosol optical, physical properties and component composition over Beijing and Kanpur, we focus on AERONET measurements collected at these two sites from 2002 to 2013 and employ a five-component (including black carbon, BC; mineral dust, DU; brown carbon, BrC; ammonium sulfate like, AS; and aerosol water content, AW) aerosol mixture model to retrieve the aerosol component composition. Particle size distribution, spectral characteristics of single-scattering albedo, and refractive indices of the aerosols over Beijing and Kanpur are found to be distinct and with regular seasonal variations. Correspondingly, aerosol components show distinct temporal characteristics at both sites. In Beijing, BC shows a significant decrease from 2002 to 2013 (especially after 2007) with an average declining rate of 0.69 mg m-2 yr-1. Among the five components, BC and BrC are higher during winter and autumn especially at Beijing, while DU and AS are higher during spring and summer at the two sites. With respect to site differences, BC and BrC are usually higher in Beijing in most of the year, while DU and AS are higher in Kanpur especially from April to June. Moreover, AW is similar and quite comparable at two sites.

  18. Improved aerosol retrieval algorithm using Landsat images and its application for PM10 monitoring over urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Nana; Wong, Man Sing; Zhao, Wenji; Yan, Xing; Xiao, Fei

    2015-02-01

    Aerosol retrieval using MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) has been well researched over the past decade. However, the application is limited to global- and regional-scale studies, which may not be applicable for urban areas due to its low spatial resolution. To overcome the limitation, this paper proposed an improved aerosol retrieval algorithm for Landsat images (ImAero-Landsat) at spatial resolution of 30 m. This ImAero-Landsat algorithm has been improved in the following two aspects: (i) it does not require a comprehensive look up table and thus it is more efficient in AOT retrieval; and (ii) it can be operated in both bright and dark surfaces. The derived aerosol optical thickness (AOT) images were validated with AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) measurements as well as MODIS MOD04 AOT products. Small root mean square errors (RMSEs) of 0.11 and 0.14 and mean absolute difference (MAD) of 0.07 and 0.11 between ImAero-Landsat AOT, with MODIS MOD04 and AERONET products were observed. By correlating with ground based PM10 concentrations, the ImAero-Landsat method outperforms (r2 = 0.32) than MOD04 AOT products (r2 = 0.23). In addition, the accuracy of estimating PM10 can be improved to r2 = 0.55 when the derived AOT was integrated with meteorological parameters. The accuracy is similar to the results derived from AERONET AOT (r2 = 0.62). This study offers a simple and accurate method to investigate aerosol optical thickness at detailed city-scale. Environmental authorities may use the derived methods for deriving aerosol distribution maps and pinpointing the sources of pollutants in urban areas.

  19. Characterization of Speciated Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing Over California

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Chun; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Easter, Richard C.; Hand, Jenny; Avise, J.

    2013-03-16

    A fully coupled meteorology-chemistry model (WRF-Chem) with added capability of diagnosing the spatial and seasonal distribution of radiative forcings for individual aerosol species over California is used to characterize the radiative forcing of speciated aerosols in California. Model simulations for the year of 2005 are evaluated with various observations including meteorological data from California Irrigation Management Information System (CIMIS), aerosol mass concentrations from US EPA Chemical Speciation Network (CSN) and Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE), and aerosol optical depth from AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and satellites. The model well captures the observed seasonal meteorological conditions over California. Overall, the simulation is able to reproduce the observed spatial and seasonal distribution of mass concentration of total PM2.5 and the relative contribution from individual aerosol species, except the model significantly underestimates the surface concentrations of organic matter (OM) and elemental carbon (EC), potentially due to uncertainty in the anthropogenic emissions of OM and EC and the outdated secondary organic aerosol mechanism used in the model. A sensitivity simulation with anthropogenic EC emission doubled significantly reduces the model low bias of EC. The simulation reveals high anthropogenic aerosol loading over the Central Valley and the Los Angeles metropolitan regions and high natural aerosol (dust) loading over southeastern California. The seasonality of aerosol surface concentration is mainly determined by vertical turbulent mixing, ventilation, and photochemical activity, with distinct characteristics for individual aerosol species and between urban and rural areas. The simulations show that anthropogenic aerosols dominate the aerosol optical depth (AOD). The ratio of AOD to AAOD (aerosol absorption optical depth) shows distinct seasonality with a winter maximum and a summer minimum

  20. Evaluation of Present-day Aerosols over China Simulated from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, H.; Chang, W.

    2014-12-01

    High concentrations of aerosols over China lead to strong radiative forcing that is important for both regional and global climate. To understand the representation of aerosols in China in current global climate models, we evaluate extensively the simulated present-day aerosol concentrations and aerosol optical depth (AOD) over China from the 12 models that participated in Atmospheric Chemistry & Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP), by using ground-based measurements and satellite remote sensing. Ground-based measurements of aerosol concentrations used in this work include those from the China Meteorological Administration (CMA) Atmosphere Watch Network (CAWNET) and the observed fine-mode aerosol concentrations collected from the literature. The ground-based measurements of AOD in China are taken from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET), the sites with CIMEL sun photometer operated by Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and from Chinese Sun Hazemeter Network (CSHNET). We find that the ACCMIP models generally underestimate concentrations of all major aerosol species in China. On an annual mean basis, the multi-model mean concentrations of sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon, and organic carbon are underestimated by 63%, 73%, 54%, 53%, and 59%, respectively. The multi-model mean AOD values show low biases of 20-40% at studied sites in China. The ACCMIP models can reproduce seasonal variation of nitrate but cannot capture well the seasonal variations of other aerosol species. Our analyses indicate that current global models generally underestimate the role of aerosols in China in climate simulations.

  1. Simulating aerosols over Arabian Peninsula with CHIMERE: Sensitivity to soil, surface parameters and anthropogenic emission inventories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beegum, S. Naseema; Gherboudj, Imen; Chaouch, Naira; Couvidat, Florian; Menut, Laurent; Ghedira, Hosni

    2016-03-01

    A three dimensional chemistry transport model, CHIMERE, was used to simulate the aerosol optical depths (AOD) over the Arabian Peninsula desert with an offline coupling of Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The simulations were undertaken with: (i) different horizontal and vertical configurations, (ii) new datasets derived for soil/surface properties, and (iii) EDGAR-HTAP anthropogenic emissions inventories. The model performance evaluations were assessed: (i) qualitatively using MODIS (Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) deep blue (DB) AOD data for the two local dust events of August 6th and 23rd (2013), and (ii) quantitatively using AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) AOD observations, CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation) aerosol extinction profiles, and AOD simulations from various forecast models. The model results were observed to be highly sensitive to erodibility and aerodynamic surface roughness length. The use of new datasets on soil erodibility, derived from the MODIS reflectance, and aerodynamic surface roughness length (z0), derived from the ERA-Interim datasets, significantly improved the simulation results. Simulations with the global EDGAR-HTAP anthropogenic emission inventories brought the simulated AOD values closer to the observations. Performance testing of the adapted model for the Arabian Peninsula domain with improved datasets showed good agreement between AERONET AOD measurements and CHIMERE simulations, where the correlation coefficient (R) is 0.6. Higher values of the correlation coefficients and slopes were observed for the dusty periods compared to the non-dusty periods.

  2. The Retrieval of Aerosol Optical Thickness Using the MERIS Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, L.; Rozanov, V. V.; Vountas, M.; Burrows, J. P.; Levy, R. C.; Lotz, W.

    2015-12-01

    Retrieval of aerosol properties for satellite instruments without shortwave-IR spectral information, multi-viewing, polarization and/or high-temporal observation ability is a challenging problem for spaceborne aerosol remote sensing. However, space based instruments like the MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) and the successor, Ocean and Land Colour Instrument (OLCI) with high calibration accuracy and high spatial resolution provide unique abilities for obtaining valuable aerosol information for a better understanding of the impact of aerosols on climate, which is still one of the largest uncertainties of global climate change evaluation. In this study, a new Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) retrieval algorithm (XBAER: eXtensible Bremen AErosol Retrieval) is presented. XBAER utilizes the global surface spectral library database for the determination of surface properties while the MODIS collection 6 aerosol type treatment is adapted for the aerosol type selection. In order to take the surface Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) effect into account for the MERIS reduce resolution (1km) retrieval, a modified Ross-Li mode is used. The AOT is determined in the algorithm using lookup tables including polarization created using Radiative Transfer Model SCIATRAN3.4, by minimizing the difference between atmospheric corrected surface reflectance with given AOT and the surface reflectance calculated from the spectral library. The global comparison with operational MODIS C6 product, Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) product, Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR) aerosol product and the validation using AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) show promising results. The current XBAER algorithm is only valid for aerosol remote sensing over land and a similar method will be extended to ocean later.

  3. Synergism of MODIS Aerosol Remote Sensing from Terra and Aqua

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichoku, Charles; Kaufman, Yoram J.; Remer, Lorraine A.

    2003-01-01

    The MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) sensors, aboard the Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra and Aqua satellites, are showing excellent competence at measuring the global distribution and properties of aerosols. Terra and Aqua were launched on December 18, 1999 and May 4, 2002 respectively, with daytime equator crossing times of approximately 10:30 am and 1:30 pm respectively. Several aerosol parameters are retrieved at 10-km spatial resolution from MODIS daytime data over land and ocean surfaces. The parameters retrieved include: aerosol optical thickness (AOT) at 0.47, 0.55 and 0.66 micron wavelengths over land, and at 0.47, 0.55, 0.66, 0.87, 1.2, 1.6, and 2.1 microns over ocean; Angstrom exponent over land and ocean; and effective radii, and the proportion of AOT contributed by the small mode aerosols over ocean. Since the beginning of its operation, the quality of Terra-MODIS aerosol products (especially AOT) have been evaluated periodically by cross-correlation with equivalent data sets acquired by ground-based (and occasionally also airborne) sunphotometers, particularly those coordinated within the framework of the AErosol Robotic NETwork (AERONET). Terra-MODIS AOT data have been found to meet or exceed pre-launch accuracy expectations, and have been applied to various studies dealing with local, regional, and global aerosol monitoring. The results of these Terra-MODIS aerosol data validation efforts and studies have been reported in several scientific papers and conferences. Although Aqua-MODIS is still young, it is already yielding formidable aerosol data products, which are also subjected to careful periodic evaluation similar to that implemented for the Terra-MODIS products. This paper presents results of validation of Aqua-MODIS aerosol products with AERONET, as well as comparative evaluation against corresponding Terra-MODIS data. In addition, we show interesting independent and synergistic applications of MODIS aerosol data from

  4. An 'In Situ' Calibration-Correction Procedure (KCICLO) Based on AOD Diurnal Cycle: Comparative Results Between AERONET and Reprocessed (KCICLO method) AOD-Alpha Data Series at El Arenosillo, Spain

    SciTech Connect

    Cachorro, V. E.; Toledano, C.; Sorribas, M.; Berjon, A.; de Frutos, A. M.; Laulainen, Nels S.

    2008-01-31

    A comparative evaluation is carried out for nearly 5 years (February 2000 to May 2004) of data of aerosol optical depth (AOD) measured at the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) site El Arenosillo (Huelva, southwestern Spain). The AERONET database and the reprocessed data set using a new correction procedure, which we call the KCICLO method, are compared with respect to the aerosol local climatology. The cause and necessity of AOD reprocessing were due to the existence of an observed fictitious diurnal cycle (including negative values) because of a deficient calibration as explained in detail in the companion paper (V. E. Cachorro et al., submitted manuscript, 2007). The derived alpha Ångström coefficient is also compared, as it appears to be an excellent indicator of the AOD data quality, because of its sensitivity to AOD variations and errors. Some illustrative cases show the influence of this fictitious diurnal cycle on the shape and values of diurnal variations of the AOD (or alpha), reaching differences as high as 100%, and the improvement resulting from using the KCICLO method. Absolute and relative differences are evaluated from the overall average of AOD and alpha coefficient of AERONET and KCICLO data series, making an exhaustive analysis for each spectral channel and for every photometer separately. Although great variability is shown for each filter and each photometer, apart from photometer 114 data that did not reach level 2.0, the discrepancy in the AOD local climatology in the four filters varies as a whole from 2.3% to 8.5% (2.4% for alpha coefficient). These values show a considerable reduction because of the compensating effect between the different photometers (positive or negative bias), and several jumps that break the continuity of the data series are observed. When monthly and yearly averages are analyzed, the differences are considerably reduced in such a way that the local climatology is not substantially affected, but we must be cautious

  5. Accuracy Assessment of Aqua-MODIS Aerosol Optical Depth Over Coastal Regions: Importance of Quality Flag and Sea Surface Wind Speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. C.; Wang, J.; Zeng, J.; Petrenko, M.; Leptoukh, G. G.; Ichoku, C.

    2012-01-01

    Coastal regions around the globe are a major source for anthropogenic aerosols in the atmosphere, but the underlying surface characteristics are not favorable for the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) algorithms designed for retrieval of aerosols over dark land or open-ocean surfaces. Using data collected from 62 coastal stations worldwide from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) from approximately 2002-2010, accuracy assessments are made for coastal aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieved from MODIS aboard Aqua satellite. It is found that coastal AODs (at 550 nm) characterized respectively by the MODIS Dark Land (hereafter Land) surface algorithm, the Open-Ocean (hereafter Ocean) algorithm, and AERONET all exhibit a log-normal distribution. After filtering by quality flags, the MODIS AODs respectively retrieved from the Land and Ocean algorithms are highly correlated with AERONET (with R(sup 2) is approximately equal to 0.8), but only the Land algorithm AODs fall within the expected error envelope greater than 66% of the time. Furthermore, the MODIS AODs from the Land algorithm, Ocean algorithm, and combined Land and Ocean product show statistically significant discrepancies from their respective counterparts from AERONET in terms of mean, probability density function, and cumulative density function, which suggest a need for future improvement in retrieval algorithms. Without filtering with quality flag, the MODIS Land and Ocean AOD dataset can be degraded by 30-50% in terms of mean bias. Overall, the MODIS Ocean algorithm overestimates the AERONET coastal AOD by 0.021 for AOD less than 0.25 and underestimates it by 0.029 for AOD greater than 0.25. This dichotomy is shown to be related to the ocean surface wind speed and cloud contamination effects on the satellite aerosol retrieval. The Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) reveals that wind speeds over the global coastal region 25 (with a mean and median

  6. Aerosol Properties over the Indo-Gangetic Plain: A Mesoscale Perspective from the TIGERZ Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, David M.; Holben, Brent N.; Tripathi, Sachchida; Eck, Thomas F.; Newcomb, W. Wayne; Slutsker, Ilya; Dickerson, Russell R.; Thompson, Anne M.; Mattoo, Shana; Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Singh, Remesh P.; Sinyuk, Aliaksandr; Schafer, Joel S.

    2011-01-01

    High aerosol loading over the northern Indian subcontinent can result in poor air quality leading to human health consequences and climate perturbations. The international 2008 TIGERZ experiment intensive operational period (IOP) was conducted in the Indo \\Gangetic Plain (IGP) around the industrial city of Kanpur (26.51degN, 80.23deg E), India, during the premonsoon (April-June). Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) Sun photometers performed frequent measurements of aerosol properties at temporary sites distributed within an area covering 50 sq km around Kanpur to characterize pollution and dust in a region where complex aerosol mixtures and semi \\bright surface effects complicate satellite retrieval algorithms. TIGERZ IOP Sun photometers quantified aerosol optical depth (AOD) increases up to 0.10 within and downwind of the city, with urban emissions accounting for 10 C20% of the IGP aerosol loading on deployment days. TIGERZ IOP area \\averaged volume size distribution and single scattering albedo retrievals indicated spatially homogeneous, uniformly sized, spectrally absorbing pollution and dust particles. Aerosol absorption and size relationships were used to categorize black carbon and dust as dominant absorbers and to identify a third category in which both black carbon and dust dominate absorption.Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) AOD retrievals with the lowest quality assurance (QA > or = 0) flags were biased high with respect to TIGERZ IOP area \\averaged measurements. MODIS AOD retrievals with QA 0 had moderate correlation (R(sup 2) = 0.52-69) with the Kanpur AERONET site, whereas retrievals with QA > 0 were limited in number. Mesoscale \\distributed Sun photometers quantified temporal and spatial variability of aerosol properties, and these results were used to validate satellite retrievals.

  7. Aerosol properties over the Indo-Gangetic Plain: A mesoscale perspective from the TIGERZ experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, David M.; Holben, Brent N.; Tripathi, Sachchida N.; Eck, Thomas F.; Newcomb, W. Wayne; Slutsker, Ilya; Dickerson, Russell R.; Thompson, Anne M.; Mattoo, Shana; Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Singh, Remesh P.; Sinyuk, Aliaksandr; Schafer, Joel S.

    2011-09-01

    High aerosol loading over the northern Indian subcontinent can result in poor air quality leading to human health consequences and climate perturbations. The international 2008 TIGERZ experiment intensive operational period (IOP) was conducted in the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) around the industrial city of Kanpur (26.51°N, 80.23°E), India, during the premonsoon (April-June). Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) Sun photometers performed frequent measurements of aerosol properties at temporary sites distributed within an area covering ˜50 km2 around Kanpur to characterize pollution and dust in a region where complex aerosol mixtures and semi-bright surface effects complicate satellite retrieval algorithms. TIGERZ IOP Sun photometers quantified aerosol optical depth (AOD) increases up to ˜0.10 within and downwind of the city, with urban emissions accounting for ˜10-20% of the IGP aerosol loading on deployment days. TIGERZ IOP area-averaged volume size distribution and single scattering albedo retrievals indicated spatially homogeneous, uniformly sized, spectrally absorbing pollution and dust particles. Aerosol absorption and size relationships were used to categorize black carbon and dust as dominant absorbers and to identify a third category in which both black carbon and dust dominate absorption. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) AOD retrievals with the lowest quality assurance (QA ≥ 0) flags were biased high with respect to TIGERZ IOP area-averaged measurements. MODIS AOD retrievals with QA ≥ 0 had moderate correlation (R2 = 0.52-0.69) with the Kanpur AERONET site, whereas retrievals with QA > 0 were limited in number. Mesoscale-distributed Sun photometers quantified temporal and spatial variability of aerosol properties, and these results were used to validate satellite retrievals.

  8. Microphysical properties of transported biomass burning aerosols in coastal regions, and application to improving retrievals of aerosol optical depth from SeaWiFS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.; Bettenhausen, C.

    2013-05-01

    Due to the limited measurement capabilities of heritage and current spaceborne passive imaging radiometers, algorithms for the retrieval of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and related quantities must make assumptions relating to aerosol microphysical properties and surface reflectance. Over the ocean, surface reflectance can be relatively well-modelled, but knowledge of aerosol properties can remain elusive. Several field campaigns and many studies have examined the microphysical properties of biomass burning (smoke) aerosol. However, these largely focus on properties over land and near to the source regions. In coastal and open-ocean regions the properties of transported smoke may differ, due to factors such as aerosol aging, wet/dry deposition, and mixture with other aerosol sources (e.g. influence of maritime, pollution, or mineral dust aerosols). Hence, models based on near-source aerosol observations may be less representative of such transported smoke aerosols, introducing additional uncertainty into satellite retrievals of aerosol properties. This study examines case studies of transported smoke from select globally-distributed coastal and island Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites. These are used to inform improved models for over-ocean transported smoke aerosol for AOD retrievals from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS). These models are used in an updated version of the SeaWiFS Ocean Aerosol Retrieval (SOAR) algorithm, which has been combined with the Deep Blue algorithm over land to create a 13-year (1997-2010) high-quality record of AOD over land and ocean. Applying these algorithms to other sensors will enable the creation of a long-term global climate data record of spectral AOD.

  9. Radiative characteristics for atmospheric models from lidar sounding and AERONET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapunov, Maxim; Kuznetsov, Anatoly; Efremenko, Dmitry; Bochalov, Valentin; Melnikova, Irina; Samulenkov, Dimity; Vasilyev, Alexander; Poberovsky, Anatoly; Frantsuzova, Inna

    2016-04-01

    Optical models of atmospheric aerosols above of St. Petersburg are constraint on the base of the results of lidar sounding. The lidar system of the Resource Center "Observatory of environmental safety" of the St. Petersburg University Research Park is situated the city center, Vasilievsky Island. The measurements of the vertical profile of velocity and wind direction in the center of St. Petersburg for 2014 -2015 are fulfilled in addition. Height of laser sounding of aerosols is up to 25 km and wind up to 12 km. Observations are accomplished in the daytime and at night and mapped to vertical profiles of temperature, humidity, wind speed and pressure obtained from radiosounding in Voeikovo (St. Petersburg suburb). Results of wind observations are compared with those of upper-air measurements of meteorological service in Voeikovo. The distance between the points of observation is 25 km. Statistics of wind directions at different heights are identified. The comparison is based on the assumption of homogeneity of the wind field on such a scale. In most cases, good agreement between the observed vertical profiles of wind, obtained by both methods is appeared. However, there were several cases, when the results differ sharply or at high altitudes, or, on the contrary, in the surface layer. The analysis of the impact of wind, temperature, and humidity profiles in the atmosphere on the properties and dynamics of solid impurities is implemented. Comparison with AOT results from AERONET observations in St. Petersburg suburb Peterhof is done. It is shown that diurnal and seasonal variations of optical and morphological parameters of atmospheric aerosols in the pollution cap over the city to a large extent determined by the variability of meteorological parameters. The results of the comparison are presented and possible explanation of the differences is proposed. Optical models of the atmosphere in day and night time in different seasons are constructed from lidar and AERONET

  10. Radiative Effects of Carbonaceous and Inorganic Aerosols over California during CalNex and CARES: Observations versus Model Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinoj, V.; Fast, J. D.; Liu, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Aerosols have been identified to be a major contributor to the uncertainty in understanding the present climate. Most of this uncertainty arises due to the lack of knowledge of their micro-physical and chemical properties as well as how to adequately represent their spatial and temporal distributions. Increased process level understanding can be achieved through carefully designed field campaigns and experiments. These measurements can be used to elucidate the aerosol properties, mixing, transport and transformation within the atmosphere and also to validate and improve models that include meteorology-aerosol-chemistry interactions. In the present study, the WRF-Chem model is used to simulate the evolution of carbonaceous and inorganic aerosols and their impact on radiation during May and June of 2010 over California when two field campaigns took place: the California Nexus Experiment (CalNex) and Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES). We merged CalNex and CARES data along with data from operational networks such as, California Air Resources Board (CARB's) air quality monitoring network, the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) network, the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET), and satellites into a common dataset for the Aerosol Modeling Test bed. The resulting combined dataset is used to rigorously evaluate the model simulation of aerosol mass, size distribution, composition, and optical properties needed to understand uncertainties that could affect regional variations in aerosol radiative forcing. The model reproduced many of the diurnal, multi-day, and spatial variations of aerosols as seen in the measurements. However, regionally the performance varied with reasonably good agreement with observations around Los Angeles and Sacramento and poor agreement with observations in the vicinity of Bakersfield (although predictions aloft were much better). Some aerosol species (sulfate and nitrate) were better represented

  11. Characterization of smoke aerosols over the Indochina Peninsula from multi-platform satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, M. J.; Hsu, N. Y. C.; Lee, J.; Sayer, A. M.; Bettenhausen, C.; Huang, J.

    2015-12-01

    Multi-faceted near-simultaneous observations from the sensors aboard multiple satellite platforms, so called the A-Train, are utilized to characterize the spatial distributions and the optical properties of smoke aerosols over the Indochina Peninsula. Observations from the A-Train sensors, especially, MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP), are synthesized to retrieve single-scattering albedo (SSA) and effective aerosol layer height (ALH) of BBS aerosols in the region. The retrieval algorithm extracts the absorption and height information about smoke aerosols, which is lumped into ultraviolet spectra at the top of the atmosphere, by taking the most reliable information contents that each satellite measurement can deliver. The results of retrieved SSA and ALH showed reasonable agreements with in-situ measurements, AEROsol Robotic NETwork (AERONET) data, and lidar-based observations. The uncertainty and sensitivity of the retrieval algorithm are also presented. The retrieved quantities are then used together with other satellite datasets to characterize the three-dimensional distributions of smoke aerosols over the Indochina Peninsular during the boreal spring time. Given the frequent horizontal collocations of smoke and clouds in the region, implication of smoke vertical distributions for long-range transports is also discussed. The results of this study are anticipated to advance our understanding on the climatic impacts of the smoke aerosols in the region.

  12. MODIS Satellite Data and GOCART Model Characterization of the Global Aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram; Chin, Mian; Remer, Lorraine; Tanre, Didier; Lau, William K.-M. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Recently produced daily MODIS aerosol data for the whole year of 2001 are used to show the concentration and dynamics of aerosol over ocean and large parts of the continents. The data were validated against the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measurements over land and ocean. Monthly averages and a movie based on the daily data are produced and used to demonstrate the spatial and temporal evolution of aerosol. The MODIS wide spectral range is used to distinguish fine smoke and pollution aerosol from coarse dust and salt. The aerosol is observed above ocean and land. The movie produced from the MODIS data provides a new dimension to aerosol observations by showing the dynamics of the system. For example in February smoke and dust emitted from the Sahel and West Africa is shown to travel to the North-East Atlantic. In April heavy dust and pollution from East Asia is shown to travel to North America. In May-June pollution and dust play a dynamical dance in the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal. In Aug-September smoke from South Africa and South America is shown to pulsate in tandem and to periodically to be transported to the otherwise pristine Southern part of the Southern Hemisphere. The MODIS data are compared with the GOCART model and used to estimate the first observation based direct anthropogenic radiative forcing of climate by aerosol.

  13. Variation of aerosol characteristics in the detail scale of time and space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, S.; Nakata, M.; Sano, I.

    2012-04-01

    In this work, we intend to demonstrate the spatial and temporal variation of atmospheric aerosols around AERONET/Osaka site. Osaka is the second big city in Japan and a typical Asian urban area. It is well known that the aerosol distribution in Asia is complicated due to the increasing emissions of anthropogenic aerosols in association with economic growth and in addition behavior of natural dusts significantly varies with the seasons. Therefore local spatially and temporally resolved measurements of atmospheric particles in Asian urban city are meaningful. We equip various ground measurement devices of atmosphere in the campus of Kinki University (KU). The data supplied by the Cimel instrument are analyzed with a standard AERONET (Aerosol Robotics Network) processing system. It provides us with Aerosol optical thickness (AOT), the Ångström exponent and so on. We set up a PM sampler and a standard instrument of NIES/LIDAR network attached to our AERONET site. The PM sampler provides particle information about the concentrations of PM2.5, PM10 and OBC separately. In addition to the simultaneous measurements, we make observation of the air quality at several locations in the neighbour-hood using portable sun-photometers (Solar-Light Company Microtops-2). The simultaneous measurements of aerosols and numerical model simulations indicate that the spatial and temporal factors influence the characterization of atmospheric particles especially in dust event. Then we observe the air quality at such several locations within a few 10 km area from KU, as Izumi and Nara, in ordinal days and dust days. Izumi site locates near industrial area and Nara is in the east of KU beyond the mountain-Ikoma. It is found from the simultaneous measurements at these three sites that AOT at Izumi in ordinal days is the highest and Nara's lowest. It indicates that the Ikoma-mountains block off the polluted air from the west. However in dust days, AOT at Nara is as large as that at Higashi

  14. Urban aerosols and their variations with clouds and rainfall: A case study for New York and Houston

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Menglin; Shepherd, J. Marshall; King, Michael D.

    2005-05-01

    Diurnal, weekly, seasonal, and interannual variations of urban aerosols were analyzed with an emphasis on summer months using 4 years of the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) observations, in situ Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) observations, and in situ U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) PM2.5 data for one midlatitude city (New York) and one subtropical city (Houston). Seasonality is evident in aerosol optical thickness measurements, with a minimum in January and a maximum in April to July. The diurnal variations of aerosols, however, are detectable but largely affected by local and regional weather conditions, such as surface and upper-level winds. On calm clear days, aerosols peak during the two rush hours in the morning and evening. Furthermore, the anthropogenic-induced weekly cycles of aerosols and clouds are analyzed, which by themselves are weak, as the anthropogenic signal is mixed with noise of natural weather variability. In addition, corresponding cloud properties observed from MODIS demonstrate an opposite phase to the seasonality of aerosols. Nevertheless, no clear relationship was observed between monthly mean aerosols and rainfall measurements from NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), implying that in the summer the aerosol impact may not be the primary reason for the change of urban rainfall amount.

  15. Effects of data assimilation on the global aerosol key optical properties simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xiaomei; Dai, Tie; Schutgens, Nick A. J.; Goto, Daisuke; Nakajima, Teruyuki; Shi, Guangyu

    2016-09-01

    We present the one month results of global aerosol optical properties for April 2006, using the Spectral Radiation Transport Model for Aerosol Species (SPRINTARS) coupled with the Non-hydrostatic ICosahedral Atmospheric Model (NICAM), by assimilating Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aerosol optical depth (AOD) with Local Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter (LETKF). The simulated AOD, Ångström Exponent (AE) and single scattering albedo (SSA) are validated by independent Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) observations over the global sites. The data assimilation has the strongest positive effect on the AOD simulation and slight positive influences on the AE and SSA simulations. For the time-averaged globally spatial distribution, the data assimilation increases the model skill score (S) of AOD, AE, and SSA from 0.55, 0.92, and 0.75 to 0.79, 0.94, and 0.80, respectively. Over the North Africa (NAF) and Middle East region where the aerosol composition is simple (mainly dust), the simulated AODs are best improved by the data assimilation, indicating the assimilation correctly modifies the wrong dust burdens caused by the uncertainties of the dust emission parameterization. Assimilation also improves the simulation of the temporal variations of the aerosol optical properties over the AERONET sites, with improved S at 60 (62%), 45 (55%) and 11 (50%) of 97, 82 and 22 sites for AOD, AE and SSA. By analyzing AOD and AE at five selected sites with best S improvement, this study further indicates that the assimilation can reproduce short duration events and ratios between fine and coarse aerosols more accurately.

  16. Uncertainty Analysis And Synergy Of Aerosol Products From Multiple Satellite Sensors For Advanced Atmospheric Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichoku, C. M.; Petrenko, M.

    2013-05-01

    Aerosols are tiny particles suspended in the air, and can be made up of wind-blown dust, smoke from fires, and particulate emissions from automobiles, industries, and other natural and man-made sources. Aerosols can have significant impacts on the air quality, and can interact with clouds and solar radiation in such a way as to affect the water cycle and climate. However, the extent and scale of these impacts are still poorly understood, and this represents one of the greatest uncertainties in climate research to date. To fill this gap in our knowledge, the global and local properties of atmospheric aerosols are being extensively observed and measured, especially during the last decade, using both satellite and ground-based instruments, including such spaceborne sensors as MODIS on the Terra and Aqua satellites, MISR on Terra, OMI on Aura, POLDER on PARASOL, CALIOP on CALIPSO, SeaWiFS on SeaStar, and the ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) of sunphotometers. The aerosol measurements collected by these instruments over the last decade contribute to an unprecedented availability of the most complete set of complimentary aerosol measurements ever acquired. Still, to be able to utilize these measurements synergistically, they have to be carefully and uniformly analyzed and inter-compared, in order to understand the uncertainties and limitations of the products - a process that is greatly complicated by the diversity of differences that exist among them. In this presentation, we will show results of a coherent comparative uncertainty analysis of aerosol measurements from the above-named satellite sensors relative to AERONET. We use these results to demonstrate how these sensors perform in different parts of the world over different landcover types as well as their performance relative to one another, thereby facilitating product selection and integration for specific research and applications needs.

  17. The Role of Cloud Contamination, Aerosol Layer Height and Aerosol Model in the Assessment of the OMI Near-UV Retrievals Over the Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasso, Santiago; Torres, Omar

    2016-01-01

    Retrievals of aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 388 nm over the ocean from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) two-channel near-UV algorithm (OMAERUV) have been compared with independent AOD measurements. The analysis was carried out over the open ocean (OMI and MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) AOD comparisons) and over coastal and island sites (OMI and AERONET, the AErosol RObotic NETwork). Additionally, a research version of the retrieval algorithm (using MODIS and CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) information as constraints) was utilized to evaluate the sensitivity of the retrieval to different assumed aerosol properties. Overall, the comparison resulted in differences (OMI minus independent measurements) within the expected levels of uncertainty for the OMI AOD retrievals (0.1 for AOD less than 0.3, 30% for AOD greater than 0.3). Using examples from case studies with outliers, the reasons that led to the observed differences were examined with specific purpose to determine whether they are related to instrument limitations (i.e., pixel size, calibration) or algorithm assumptions (such as aerosol shape, aerosol height). The analysis confirms that OMAERUV does an adequate job at rejecting cloudy scenes within the instrument's capabilities. There is a residual cloud contamination in OMI pixels with quality flag 0 (the best conditions for aerosol retrieval according to the algorithm), resulting in a bias towards high AODs in OMAERUV. This bias is more pronounced at low concentrations of absorbing aerosols (AOD 388 nm approximately less than 0.5). For higher aerosol loadings, the bias remains within OMI's AOD uncertainties. In pixels where OMAERUV assigned a dust aerosol model, a fraction of them (less than 20 %) had retrieved AODs significantly lower than AERONET and MODIS AODs. In a case study, a detailed examination of the aerosol height from CALIOP and the AODs from MODIS, along with sensitivity tests, was carried out by

  18. The role of cloud contamination, aerosol layer height and aerosol model in the assessment of the OMI near-UV retrievals over the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gassó, Santiago; Torres, Omar

    2016-07-01

    Retrievals of aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 388 nm over the ocean from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) two-channel near-UV algorithm (OMAERUV) have been compared with independent AOD measurements. The analysis was carried out over the open ocean (OMI and MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) AOD comparisons) and over coastal and island sites (OMI and AERONET, the AErosol RObotic NETwork). Additionally, a research version of the retrieval algorithm (using MODIS and CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) information as constraints) was utilized to evaluate the sensitivity of the retrieval to different assumed aerosol properties. Overall, the comparison resulted in differences (OMI minus independent measurements) within the expected levels of uncertainty for the OMI AOD retrievals (0.1 for AOD < 0.3, 30 % for AOD > 0.3). Using examples from case studies with outliers, the reasons that led to the observed differences were examined with specific purpose to determine whether they are related to instrument limitations (i.e., pixel size, calibration) or algorithm assumptions (such as aerosol shape, aerosol height). The analysis confirms that OMAERUV does an adequate job at rejecting cloudy scenes within the instrument's capabilities. There is a residual cloud contamination in OMI pixels with quality flag 0 (the best conditions for aerosol retrieval according to the algorithm), resulting in a bias towards high AODs in OMAERUV. This bias is more pronounced at low concentrations of absorbing aerosols (AOD 388 nm ˜ < 0.5). For higher aerosol loadings, the bias remains within OMI's AOD uncertainties. In pixels where OMAERUV assigned a dust aerosol model, a fraction of them (< 20 %) had retrieved AODs significantly lower than AERONET and MODIS AODs. In a case study, a detailed examination of the aerosol height from CALIOP and the AODs from MODIS, along with sensitivity tests, was carried out by varying the different assumed parameters in the

  19. Sensitivity of aerosol retrieval to geometrical configuration of ground-based sun/sky radiometer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, B.; Dubovik, O.; Toledano, C.; Berjon, A.; Cachorro, V. E.; Lapyonok, T.; Litvinov, P.; Goloub, P.

    2014-01-01

    A sensitivity study of aerosol retrievals to the geometrical configuration of the ground-based sky radiometer observations is carried out through inversion tests. Specifically, this study is focused on principal plane and almucantar observations, since these geometries are employed in AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork). The following effects have been analyzed with simulated data for both geometries: sensitivity of the retrieval to variability of the observed scattering angle range, uncertainties in the assumptions of the aerosol vertical distribution, surface reflectance, possible instrument pointing errors, and the effects of the finite field of view. The synthetic observations of radiometer in the tests were calculated using a previous climatology data set of retrieved aerosol properties over three AERONET sites: Mongu (Zambia) for biomass burning aerosol, Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC; Maryland, USA) for urban aerosol and Solar Village (Saudi Arabia) for desert dust aerosol. The results show that almucantar retrievals, in general, are more reliable than principal plane retrievals in presence of the analyzed error sources. This fact partially can be explained by practical advantages of the almucantar geometry: the symmetry between its left and right branches that helps to eliminate some observational uncertainties and the constant value of optical mass during the measurements, that make almucantar observations nearly independent of the vertical variability of aerosol. Nevertheless, almucantar retrievals present instabilities at high sun elevations due to the reduction of the scattering angle range coverage, resulting in decrease of information content. It is in such conditions that principal plane retrievals show a better stability, as shown by the simulation analysis of the three different aerosol models. The last part of the study is devoted to the identification of possible differences between the aerosol retrieval results obtained from real AERONET data

  20. An improved method for retrieving nighttime aerosol optical thickness from the VIIRS Day/Night Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHardy, T. M.; Zhang, J.; Reid, J. S.; Miller, S. D.; Hyer, E. J.; Kuehn, R. E.

    2015-11-01

    Using Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Day/Night Band (DNB) data, a method, dubbed the "variance method", is developed for retrieving nighttime aerosol optical thickness (τ) values through the examination of the dispersion of radiance values above an artificial light source. Based on the improvement of a previous algorithm, this updated method derives a semi-quantitative indicator of nighttime τ using artificial light sources. Nighttime τ retrievals from the newly developed method are inter-compared with an interpolated value from late afternoon and early morning ground observations from four AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) sites as well as column-integrated τ from one High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) site at Huntsville, AL, during the NASA Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) campaign, providing full diel coverage. Sensitivity studies are performed to examine the effects of lunar illumination on VIIRS τ retrievals made via the variance method, revealing that lunar contamination may have a smaller impact than previously thought; however, the small sample size of this study limits the conclusiveness thus far. VIIRS τ retrievals yield a coefficient of determination (r2) of 0.60 and a root-mean-squared error (RMSE) of 0.18 when compared against straddling daytime-averaged AERONET τ values. Preliminary results suggest that artificial light sources can be used for estimating regional and global nighttime aerosol distributions in the future.

  1. Aerosol ultraviolet absorption experiment (2002 to 2004), part 2: absorption optical thickness, refractive index, and single scattering albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krotkov, Nickolay A.; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Herman, Jay R.; Slusser, James R.; Scott, Gwendolyn R.; Labow, Gordon J.; Vasilkov, Alexander P.; Eck, Tom; Doubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent N.

    2005-04-01

    Compared to the visible spectral region, very little is known about aerosol absorption in the UV. Without such information it is impossible to quantify the causes of the observed discrepancy between modeled and measured UV irradiances and photolysis rates. We report results of a 17-month aerosol column absorption monitoring experiment conducted in Greenbelt, Maryland, where the imaginary part of effective refractive index k was inferred from the measurements of direct and diffuse atmospheric transmittances by a UV-multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer [UV-MFRSR, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) UV-B Monitoring and Research Network]. Colocated ancillary measurements of aerosol effective particle size distribution and refractive index in the visible wavelengths [by CIMEL sun-sky radiometers, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET)], column ozone, surface pressure, and albedo constrain the forward radiative transfer model input, so that a unique solution for k is obtained independently in each UV-MFRSR spectral channel. Inferred values of k are systematically larger in the UV than in the visible wavelengths. The inferred k values enable calculation of the single scattering albedo ω, which is compared with AERONET inversions in the visible wavelengths. On cloud-free days with high aerosol loadings [τext(440)>0.4], ω is systematically lower at 368 nm (<ω368>=0.94) than at 440 nm (<ω440>=0.96), however, the mean ω differences (0.02) are within expected uncertainties of ω retrievals (~0.03). The inferred ω is even lower at shorter UV wavelengths (<ω325>~<ω332>=0.92), which might suggest the presence of selectively UV absorbing aerosols. We also find that decreases with decrease in aerosol loading. This could be due to real changes in the average aerosol composition between summer and winter months at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) site.

  2. Model analysis of influences of aerosol mixing state upon its optical properties in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiao; Zhang, Meigen; Zhu, Lingyun; Xu, Liren

    2013-07-01

    The air quality model system RAMS (Regional Atmospheric Modeling System)-CMAQ (Models-3 Community Multi-scale Air Quality) coupled with an aerosol optical/radiative module was applied to investigate the impact of different aerosol mixing states (i.e., externally mixed, half externally and half internally mixed, and internally mixed) on radiative forcing in East Asia. The simulation results show that the aerosol optical depth (AOD) generally increased when the aerosol mixing state changed from externally mixed to internally mixed, while the single scattering albedo (SSA) decreased. Therefore, the scattering and absorption properties of aerosols can be significantly affected by the change of aerosol mixing states. Comparison of simulated and observed SSAs at five AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) sites suggests that SSA could be better estimated by considering aerosol particles to be internally mixed. Model analysis indicates that the impact of aerosol mixing state upon aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF) is complex. Generally, the cooling effect of aerosols over East Asia are enhanced in the northern part of East Asia (Northern China, Korean peninsula, and the surrounding area of Japan) and are reduced in the southern part of East Asia (Sichuan Basin and Southeast China) by internal mixing process, and the variation range can reach ±5 W m-2. The analysis shows that the internal mixing between inorganic salt and dust is likely the main reason that the cooling effect strengthens. Conversely, the internal mixture of anthropogenic aerosols, including sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon, and organic carbon, could obviously weaken the cooling effect.

  3. Estimation of aerosol particle composition using ground-based sun-sky radiometer measurements at typical sites in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Gu, X.; Wang, L.; Li, D.; Xing, X.; Gai, J.; Wang, Q.; Li, K.; Li, L.; Zhang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol affects climate and environment through radiative and health effects determined by its physical and chemical properties. In this study, we modeled aerosol by an internal mixture of different components like water, sulfate and black carbon following Maxwell-Garnett effective medium approximation theory. In order to deal with complex aerosol mixing situation in China, we considered extra mineral dust component in case of large particles. Remote sensing data obtained from ground-based CE318 sun-sky radiometers in typical China sites are used to derive the aerosol mixture model. Measurements are firstly calibrated by using intercomparison and vicarious calibration methods and then retrieved by using AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) inversion algorithm to obtain refractive indices of the mixture, which are then used to yield aerosol component fraction. Results at typical China regions like megacity, industrial, arid, oceanic and background sites show considerable difference between their aerosol particle compositions and agree with a priori information like regional aerosol sources and formation processes.

  4. Retrieval of aerosol optical depth from surface solar radiation measurements using machine learning algorithms, non-linear regression and a radiative transfer-based look-up table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huttunen, Jani; Kokkola, Harri; Mielonen, Tero; Esa Juhani Mononen, Mika; Lipponen, Antti; Reunanen, Juha; Vilhelm Lindfors, Anders; Mikkonen, Santtu; Erkki Juhani Lehtinen, Kari; Kouremeti, Natalia; Bais, Alkiviadis; Niska, Harri; Arola, Antti

    2016-07-01

    In order to have a good estimate of the current forcing by anthropogenic aerosols, knowledge on past aerosol levels is needed. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) is a good measure for aerosol loading. However, dedicated measurements of AOD are only available from the 1990s onward. One option to lengthen the AOD time series beyond the 1990s is to retrieve AOD from surface solar radiation (SSR) measurements taken with pyranometers. In this work, we have evaluated several inversion methods designed for this task. We compared a look-up table method based on radiative transfer modelling, a non-linear regression method and four machine learning methods (Gaussian process, neural network, random forest and support vector machine) with AOD observations carried out with a sun photometer at an Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) site in Thessaloniki, Greece. Our results show that most of the machine learning methods produce AOD estimates comparable to the look-up table and non-linear regression methods. All of the applied methods produced AOD values that corresponded well to the AERONET observations with the lowest correlation coefficient value being 0.87 for the random forest method. While many of the methods tended to slightly overestimate low AODs and underestimate high AODs, neural network and support vector machine showed overall better correspondence for the whole AOD range. The differences in producing both ends of the AOD range seem to be caused by differences in the aerosol composition. High AODs were in most cases those with high water vapour content which might affect the aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA) through uptake of water into aerosols. Our study indicates that machine learning methods benefit from the fact that they do not constrain the aerosol SSA in the retrieval, whereas the LUT method assumes a constant value for it. This would also mean that machine learning methods could have potential in reproducing AOD from SSR even though SSA would have changed during

  5. Aerosol single-scattering albedo retrieval over North Africa using critical reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Kelley C.

    The sign and magnitude of the aerosol radiative forcing over bright surfaces is highly dependent on the absorbing properties of the aerosol. Thus, the determination of aerosol forcing over desert regions requires accurate information about the aerosol single-scattering albedo (SSA). However, the brightness of desert surfaces complicates the retrieval of aerosol optical properties using passive space-based measurements. The aerosol critical reflectance is one parameter that can be used to relate top-of-atmosphere (TOA) reflectance changes over land to the aerosol absorption properties, without knowledge of the underlying surface properties or aerosol loading. Physically, the parameter represents the TOA reflectance at which increased aerosol scattering due to increased aerosol loading is balanced by increased absorption of the surface contribution to the TOA reflectance. It can be derived by comparing two satellite images with different aerosol loading, assuming that the surface reflectance and background aerosol are similar between the two days. In this work, we explore the utility of the critical reflectance method for routine monitoring of spectral aerosol absorption from space over North Africa, a region that is predominantly impacted by absorbing dust and biomass burning aerosol. We derive the critical reflectance from Moderate Resolution Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Level 1B reflectances in the vicinity of two Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) stations: Tamanrasset, a site in the Algerian Sahara, and Banizoumbou, a Sahelian site in Niger. We examine the sensitivity of the critical reflectance parameter to aerosol physical and optical properties, as well as solar and viewing geometry, using the Santa Barbara DISORT Radiative Transfer (SBDART) model, and apply our findings to retrieve SSA from the MODIS critical reflectance values. We compare our results to AERONET-retrieved estimates, as well as to measurements of the TOA albedo and surface fluxes from the

  6. Potential of polarization lidar to provide profiles of CCN- and INP-relevant aerosol parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamouri, Rodanthi-Elisavet; Ansmann, Albert

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the potential of polarization lidar to provide vertical profiles of aerosol parameters from which cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) and ice nucleating particle (INP) number concentrations can be estimated. We show that height profiles of particle number concentrations n50, dry considering dry aerosol particles with radius > 50 nm (reservoir of CCN in the case of marine and continental non-desert aerosols), n100, dry (particles with dry radius > 100 nm, reservoir of desert dust CCN), and of n250, dry (particles with dry radius > 250 nm, reservoir of favorable INP), as well as profiles of the particle surface area concentration sdry (used in INP parameterizations) can be retrieved from lidar-derived aerosol extinction coefficients σ with relative uncertainties of a factor of 1.5-2 in the case of n50, dry and n100, dry and of about 25-50 % in the case of n250, dry and sdry. Of key importance is the potential of polarization lidar to distinguish and separate the optical properties of desert aerosols from non-desert aerosol such as continental and marine particles. We investigate the relationship between σ, measured at ambient atmospheric conditions, and n50, dry for marine and continental aerosols, n100, dry for desert dust particles, and n250, dry and sdry for three aerosol types (desert, non-desert continental, marine) and for the main lidar wavelengths of 355, 532, and 1064 nm. Our study is based on multiyear Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) photometer observations of aerosol optical thickness and column-integrated particle size distribution at Leipzig, Germany, and Limassol, Cyprus, which cover all realistic aerosol mixtures. We further include AERONET data from field campaigns in Morocco, Cabo Verde, and Barbados, which provide pure dust and pure marine aerosol scenarios. By means of a simple CCN parameterization (with n50, dry or n100, dry as input) and available INP parameterization schemes (with n250, dry and sdry as input) we finally compute

  7. Improvements in AOD retrieval from geostationary measurements over Asia with aerosol optical properties derived from the DRAGON-Asia campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, M.; Kim, J.; Jeong, U.; Kim, W.; Holben, B.; Eck, T. F.; Lim, J. H.; Song, C. K.; Lee, S.

    2015-04-01

    An aerosol model optimized for East Asia is improved by applying inversion data from both long-term monitoring of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun photometer and the Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON)-Asia campaign from 2012. This model plays an important role in retrieving accurate aerosol optical depth (AOD) from satellite-based measurements. In particular, the performance of a single visible channel algorithm, limited to a specific aerosol type, from real-time measurements is strongly affected by the assumed aerosol optical properties (AOPs) for the measured scene. In sensitivity tests, a 4% difference in single scattering albedo (SSA) between modeled and measured values can cause a retrieval error in AOD of over 20%, and the overestimation of SSA leads to an underestimation of AOD. Based on the AERONET inversion datasets obtained over East Asia before 2011, seasonally analyzed AOPs can be summarized by SSAs (measured at 675 nm) of 0.92, 0.94, 0.92, and 0.91 for spring (March, April, and May), summer (June, July, and August), autumn (September, October, and November), and winter (December, January, and February), respectively. After DRAGON-Asia 2012, the SSA during spring shows a slight increase to 0.93. The large volume of data and spatially concentrated measurements from this campaign can be used to improve the representative aerosol model for East Asia. Accordingly, the AOD datasets retrieved from a single channel algorithm, which uses a pre-calculated look-up table (LUT) with the new aerosol model, show an improved correlation with the measured AOD during the DRAGON-Asia campaign (March to May 2012). Compared with the correlation of the AOD retrieved using the original aerosol model, the regression slope between the new AOD and the AERONET values is reduced from 1.08 to 1.00, while the change of the y-offset of -0.08 is significant. The correlation coefficients for the comparisons are 0.87 and 0.85, respectively. The

  8. Lidar-Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC) for the retrieval of vertical aerosol properties from combined lidar/radiometer data: development and distribution in EARLINET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaikovsky, A.; Dubovik, O.; Holben, B.; Bril, A.; Goloub, P.; Tanré, D.; Pappalardo, G.; Wandinger, U.; Chaikovskaya, L.; Denisov, S.; Grudo, Y.; Lopatin, A.; Karol, Y.; Lapyonok, T.; Amiridis, V.; Ansmann, A.; Apituley, A.; Allados-Arboledas, L.; Binietoglou, I.; Boselli, A.; D'Amico, G.; Freudenthaler, V.; Giles, D.; Granados-Muñoz, M. J.; Kokkalis, P.; Nicolae, D.; Oshchepkov, S.; Papayannis, A.; Perrone, M. R.; Pietruczuk, A.; Rocadenbosch, F.; Sicard, M.; Slutsker, I.; Talianu, C.; De Tomasi, F.; Tsekeri, A.; Wagner, J.; Wang, X.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a detailed description of LIRIC (LIdar-Radiometer Inversion Code) algorithm for simultaneous processing of coincident lidar and radiometric (sun photometric) observations for the retrieval of the aerosol concentration vertical profiles. As the lidar/radiometric input data we use measurements from European Aerosol Research Lidar Network (EARLINET) lidars and collocated sun-photometers of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). The LIRIC data processing provides sequential inversion of the combined lidar and radiometric data by the estimations of column-integrated aerosol parameters from radiometric measurements followed by the retrieval of height-dependent concentrations of fine and coarse aerosols from lidar signals using integrated column characteristics of aerosol layer as a priori constraints. The use of polarized lidar observations allows us to discriminate between spherical and non-spherical particles of the coarse aerosol mode. The LIRIC software package was implemented and tested at a number of EARLINET stations. Intercomparison of the LIRIC-based aerosol retrievals was performed for the observations by seven EARLNET lidars in Leipzig, Germany on 25 May 2009. We found close agreement between the aerosol parameters derived from different lidars that supports high robustness of the LIRIC algorithm. The sensitivity of the retrieval results to the possible reduction of the available observation data is also discussed.

  9. Lidar-Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC) for the retrieval of vertical aerosol properties from combined lidar/radiometer data: development and distribution in EARLINET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaikovsky, Anatoli; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent; Bril, Andrey; Goloub, Philippe; Tanré, Didier; Pappalardo, Gelsomina; Wandinger, Ulla; Chaikovskaya, Ludmila; Denisov, Sergey; Grudo, Jan; Lopatin, Anton; Karol, Yana; Lapyonok, Tatsiana; Amiridis, Vassilis; Ansmann, Albert; Apituley, Arnoud; Allados-Arboledas, Lucas; Binietoglou, Ioannis; Boselli, Antonella; D'Amico, Giuseppe; Freudenthaler, Volker; Giles, David; José Granados-Muñoz, María; Kokkalis, Panayotis; Nicolae, Doina; Oshchepkov, Sergey; Papayannis, Alex; Perrone, Maria Rita; Pietruczuk, Alexander; Rocadenbosch, Francesc; Sicard, Michaël; Slutsker, Ilya; Talianu, Camelia; De Tomasi, Ferdinando; Tsekeri, Alexandra; Wagner, Janet; Wang, Xuan

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a detailed description of LIRIC (LIdar-Radiometer Inversion Code) algorithm for simultaneous processing of coincident lidar and radiometric (sun photometric) observations for the retrieval of the aerosol concentration vertical profiles. As the lidar/radiometric input data we use measurements from European Aerosol Research Lidar Network (EARLINET) lidars and collocated sun-photometers of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). The LIRIC data processing provides sequential inversion of the combined lidar and radiometric data. The algorithm starts with the estimations of column-integrated aerosol parameters from radiometric measurements followed by the retrieval of height dependent concentrations of fine and coarse aerosols from lidar signals using integrated column characteristics of aerosol layer as a priori constraints. The use of polarized lidar observations allows us to discriminate between spherical and non-spherical particles of the coarse aerosol mode.The LIRIC software package was implemented and tested at a number of EARLINET stations. Intercomparison of the LIRIC-based aerosol retrievals was performed for the observations by seven EARLINET lidars in Leipzig, Germany on 25 May 2009. We found close agreement between the aerosol parameters derived from different lidars that supports high robustness of the LIRIC algorithm. The sensitivity of the retrieval results to the possible reduction of the available observation data is also discussed.

  10. Remote sensing of soot carbon - Part 1: Distinguishing different absorbing aerosol species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, G. L.; Dubovik, O.; Arola, A.

    2016-02-01

    We describe a method of using the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) size distributions and complex refractive indices to retrieve the relative proportion of carbonaceous aerosols and free iron minerals (hematite and goethite). We assume that soot carbon has a spectrally flat refractive index and enhanced imaginary indices at the 440 nm wavelength are caused by brown carbon or hematite. Carbonaceous aerosols can be separated from dust in imaginary refractive index space because 95 % of biomass burning aerosols have imaginary indices greater than 0.0042 at the 675-1020 nm wavelengths, and 95 % of dust has imaginary refractive indices of less than 0.0042 at those wavelengths. However, mixtures of these two types of particles can not be unambiguously partitioned on the basis of optical properties alone, so we also separate these particles by size. Regional and seasonal results are consistent with expectations. Monthly climatologies of fine mode soot carbon are less than 1.0 % by volume for West Africa and the Middle East, but the southern African and South American biomass burning sites have peak values of 3.0 and 1.7 %. Monthly averaged fine mode brown carbon volume fractions have a peak value of 5.8 % for West Africa, 2.1 % for the Middle East, 3.7 % for southern Africa, and 5.7 % for South America. Monthly climatologies of free iron volume fractions show little seasonal variability, and range from about 1.1 to 1.7 % for coarse mode aerosols in all four study regions. Finally, our sensitivity study indicates that the soot carbon retrieval is not sensitive to the component refractive indices or densities assumed for carbonaceous and free iron aerosols, and the retrieval differs by only 15.4 % when these parameters are altered from our chosen baseline values. The total uncertainty of retrieving soot carbon mass is ˜ 50 % (when uncertainty in the AERONET product and mixing state is included in the analysis).

  11. Aerosol variability over East Asia as seen by POLDER space-borne sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, X.; Goloub, P.; Chiapello, I.; Chen, H.; Ducos, F.; Li, Z.

    2010-12-01

    This paper is devoted to analysis of aerosol distribution and variability over East Asia based on PARASOL/POLDER-3 aerosol products over land. We first compared POLDER-3 Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) with fine mode AOD (particles radius ≤ 0.30 μm) computed from AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) inversions over 14 sites. The rather good correlation (R ≈ 0.92) observed over land demonstrates the remarkable sensitivity of POLDER-3 retrievals to the smaller fraction of fine particles, mostly originating from anthropogenic sources. We analyzed the characteristics and seasonal variation of aerosol distribution over East Asia by considering 4 years of POLDER-3 Level 2 data (March 2005 to February 2009). Our study shows that the spatial distribution of fine-mode aerosols over East Asia, as retrieved from POLDER-3, is highly associated with human activities. Our work also evidenced a strong variability of seasonal fine-mode AOD patterns with geographical locations. Finally, the interannual variation during 2003-2009 periods of summer fine-mode AOD over North China, in particular the Beijing City region, was analyzed for the contribution to evaluating the regional impact of emission reduction enforced in Beijing during the 2008 Olympic Summer Games. We found that the summer average of fine-mode AOD exhibited relatively higher values in 2003, 2007, and 2008. The interannual variation patterns of monthly averaged AOD (June to August) shows that June generally exhibits the strongest variation and varies similarly to July, but differs from August. As a reference point, measured total AOD and fine-mode AOD computed from AERONET inversions in summer are also discussed for the Beijing City region.

  12. Evaluation of a size-resolved aerosol model based on satellite and ground observations and its implication on aerosol forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaoyan; Yu, Fangqun

    2016-04-01

    The latest AeroCom phase II experiments have showed a large diversity in the simulations of aerosol concentrations, size distribution, vertical profile, and optical properties among 16 detailed global aerosol microphysics models, which contribute to the large uncertainty in the predicted aerosol radiative forcing and possibly induce the distinct climate change in the future. In the last few years, we have developed and improved a global size-resolved aerosol model (Yu and Luo, 2009; Ma et al., 2012; Yu et al., 2012), GEOS-Chem-APM, which is a prognostic multi-type, multi-component, size-resolved aerosol microphysics model, including state-of-the-art nucleation schemes and condensation of low volatile secondary organic compounds from successive oxidation aging. The model is one of 16 global models for AeroCom phase II and participated in a couple of model inter-comparison experiments. In this study, we employed multi-year aerosol optical depth (AOD) data from 2004 to 2012 taken from ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measurements and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) satellite retrievals to evaluate the performance of the GEOS-Chem-APM in predicting aerosol optical depth, including spatial distribution, reginal variation and seasonal variabilities. Compared to the observations, the modelled AOD is overall good over land, but quite low over ocean possibly due to low sea salt emission in the model and/or higher AOD in satellite retrievals, specifically MODIS and MISR. We chose 72 AERONET sites having at least 36 months data available and representative of high spatial domain to compare with the model and satellite data. Comparisons in various representative regions show that the model overall agrees well in the major anthropogenic emission regions, such as Europe, East Asia and North America. Relative to the observations, the modelled AOD is

  13. The Effect of Aerosol-Cloud-Vegetation Interactions and Intraseasonal Meteorological Variability on Warm Cloud Development during the Amazonian Biomass Burning Season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ten Hoeve, J. E.; Remer, L. A.; Jacobson, M. Z.

    2009-12-01

    The effect of aerosols on the hydrological cycle remains one of the largest uncertainties in our climate system. Biomass burning, from both deforestation and annual agricultural burning, is the largest anthropogenic source of these aerosols in the Southern Hemisphere. Biomass burning aerosols have competing effects on clouds: Depending on the level of aerosol loading and the background cloud characteristics, biomass burning aerosols have been shown in observational studies to invigorate or inhibit cloud formation and/or growth through microphysical and absorptive pathways, respectively. Many of these previous studies have employed all days during the Amazonian burning season months of August through October to formulate aerosol-cloud correlations, assuming relatively constant meteorological conditions exist throughout these months. This study investigates how intraseasonal trends of precipitable water vapor and aerosol loading between August and October impact these aerosol-cloud correlations. Other factors affecting aerosol-cloud relationships, such as atmospheric stability, are also investigated. This study is focused on a small 3 degree NE x 4 degree WE region in Rondonia, Brazil that encompasses extensive, contiguous areas of both forested and deforested land. High resolution aerosol, cloud, water vapor, and atmospheric profile data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra and Aqua satellites, as well as aerosol and water vapor data from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET), are used collectively to explore the effect of aerosols on water vapor loading and warm cloud development over the Amazon. The difference in aerosol effects on the local hydrological cycle over forested and deforested areas is also examined. This final exercise provides insight into the relationship between aerosols, land-atmosphere processes, and warm clouds.

  14. The Angstrom Exponent and Bimodal Aerosol Size Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, Gregory L.; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent H.

    2005-01-01

    Powerlaws have long been used to describe the spectral dependence of aerosol extinction, and the wavelength exponent of the aerosol extinction powerlaw is commonly referred to as the Angstrom exponent. The Angstrom exponent is often used as a qualitative indicator of aerosol particle size, with values greater than two indicating small particles associated with combustion byproducts, and values less than one indicating large particles like sea salt and dust. In this study, we investigate the relationship between the Angstrom exponent and the mode parameters of bimodal aerosol size distributions using Mie theory calculations and Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) retrievals. We find that Angstrom exponents based upon seven wavelengths (0.34, 0.38, 0.44, 0.5, 0.67, 0.87, and 1.02 micrometers) are sensitive to the volume fraction of aerosols with radii less then 0.6 micrometers, but not to the fine mode effective radius. The Angstrom exponent is also known to vary with wavelength, which is commonly referred to as curvature; we show how the spectral curvature can provide additional information about aerosol size distributions for intermediate values of the Angstrom exponent. Curvature also has a significant effect on the conclusions that can be drawn about two-wavelength Angstrom exponents; long wavelengths (0.67, 0.87 micrometers) are sensitive to fine mode volume fraction of aerosols but not fine mode effective radius, while short wavelengths (0.38, 0.44 micrometers) are sensitive to the fine mode effective radius but not the fine mode volume fraction.

  15. Estimation of aerosol optical properties from all-sky imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazantzidis, Andreas; Tzoumanikas, Panagiotis; Salamalikis, Vasilios; Wilbert, Stefan; Prahl, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Aerosols are one of the most important constituents in the atmosphere that affect the incoming solar radiation, either directly through absorbing and scattering processes or indirectly by changing the optical properties and lifetime of clouds. Under clear skies, aerosols become the dominant factor that affect the intensity of solar irradiance reaching the ground. It has been shown that the variability in direct normal irradiance (DNI) due to aerosols is more important than the one induced in global horizontal irradiance (GHI), while the uncertainty in its calculation is dominated by uncertainties in the aerosol optical properties. In recent years, all-sky imagers are used for the detection of cloud coverage, type and velocity in a bouquet of applications including solar irradiance resource and forecasting. However, information about the optical properties of aerosols could be derived with the same instrumentation. In this study, the aerosol optical properties are estimated with the synergetic use of all-sky images, complementary data from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and calculations from a radiative transfer model. The area of interest is Plataforma Solar de Almería (PSA), Tabernas, Spain and data from a 5 month period are analyzed. The proposed methodology includes look-up-tables (LUTs) of diffuse sky radiance of Red (R), Green (G) and Blue (B) channels at several zenith and azimuth angles and for different atmospheric conditions (Angström α and β, single scattering albedo, precipitable water, solar zenith angle). Based on the LUTS, results from the CIMEL photometer at PSA were used to estimate the RGB radiances for the actual conditions at this site. The methodology is accompanied by a detailed evaluation of its robustness, the development and evaluation of the inversion algorithm (derive aerosol optical properties from RGB image values) and a sensitivity analysis about how the pre-mentioned atmospheric parameters affect the results.

  16. Simulation of South Asian aerosols for regional climate studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Vijayakumar S.; Solmon, Fabien; Giorgi, Filippo; Mariotti, Laura; Babu, S. Suresh; Moorthy, K. Krishna

    2012-02-01

    Extensive intercomparison of columnar and near-surface aerosols, simulated over the South Asian domain using the aerosol module included in the regional climate model (RegCM4) of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) have been carried out using ground-based network of Sun/sky Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) radiometers, satellite sensors such as Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR), and ground-based black carbon (BC) measurements made at Aerosol Radiative Forcing over India (ARFI) network stations. In general, RegCM4 simulations reproduced the spatial and seasonal characteristics of aerosol optical depth over South Asia reasonably well, particularly over west Asia, where mineral dust is a major contributor to the total aerosol loading. In contrast, RegCM4 simulations drastically underestimated the BC mass concentrations over most of the stations, by a factor of 2 to 5, with a large spatial variability. Seasonally, the discrepancy between the measured and simulated BC tended to be higher during winter and periods when the atmospheric boundary layer is convectively stable (such as nighttime and early mornings), while during summer season and during periods when the boundary layer is convectively unstable (daytime) the discrepancies were much lower, with the noontime values agreeing very closely with the observations. A detailed analysis revealed that the model does not reproduce the nocturnal high in BC, observed at most of the Indian sites especially during winter, because of the excessive vertical transport of aerosols under stable boundary layer conditions. As far as the vertical distribution was concerned, the simulated vertical profiles of BC agreed well with airborne measurements during daytime. This comprehensive validation exercise reveals the strengths and weaknesses of the model in simulating the spatial and temporal heterogeneities of the aerosol fields over

  17. Monsoonal variations in aerosol optical properties and estimation of aerosol optical depth using ground-based meteorological and air quality data in Peninsular Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, F.; Lim, H. S.; Abdullah, K.; Yoon, T. L.; Holben, B.

    2015-04-01

    Obtaining continuous aerosol-optical-depth (AOD) measurements is a difficult task due to the cloud-cover problem. With the main motivation of overcoming this problem, an AOD-predicting model is proposed. In this study, the optical properties of aerosols in Penang, Malaysia were analyzed for four monsoonal seasons (northeast monsoon, pre-monsoon, southwest monsoon, and post-monsoon) based on data from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) from February 2012 to November 2013. The aerosol distribution patterns in Penang for each monsoonal period were quantitatively identified according to the scattering plots of the Ångström exponent against the AOD. A new empirical algorithm was proposed to predict the AOD data. Ground-based measurements (i.e., visibility and air pollutant index) were used in the model as predictor data to retrieve the missing AOD data from AERONET due to frequent cloud formation in the equatorial region. The model coefficients were determined through multiple regression analysis using selected data set from in situ data. The calibrated model coefficients have a coefficient of determination, R2, of 0.72. The predicted AOD of the model was generated based on these calibrated coefficients and compared against the measured data through standard statistical tests, yielding a R2 of 0.68 as validation accuracy. The error in weighted mean absolute percentage error (wMAPE) was less than 0.40% compared with the real data. The results revealed that the proposed model efficiently predicted the AOD data. Performance of our model was compared against selected LIDAR data to yield good correspondence. The predicted AOD can enhance measured short- and long-term AOD and provide supplementary information for climatological studies and monitoring aerosol variation.

  18. Development studies towards an 11-year global gridded aerosol optical thickness reanalysis for climate and applied applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, P.; Reid, J. S.; Westphal, D. L.; Zhang, J.; Hogan, T. F.; Hyer, E. J.; Curtis, C. A.; Hegg, D. A.; Shi, Y.; Campbell, J. R.; Rubin, J. I.; Sessions, W. R.; Turk, F. J.; Walker, A. L.

    2015-12-01

    While standalone satellite and model aerosol products see wide utilization, there is a significant need in numerous climate and applied applications for a fused product on a regular grid. Aerosol data assimilation is an operational reality at numerous centers, and like meteorological reanalyses, aerosol reanalyses will see significant use in the near future. Here we present a standardized 2003-2013 global 1° × 1° and 6 hourly modal aerosol optical thickness (AOT) reanalysis product. This dataset can be applied to basic and applied earth system science studies of significant aerosol events, aerosol impacts on numerical weather prediction, and electro-optical propagation and sensor performance, among other uses. This paper describes the science of how to develop and score an aerosol reanalysis product. This reanalysis utilizes a modified Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS) at its core and assimilates quality controlled retrievals of AOT from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on Terra and Aqua and the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) on Terra. The aerosol source functions, including dust and smoke, were regionally tuned to obtain the best match between the model fine and coarse mode AOTs and the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) AOTs. Other model processes, including deposition, were tuned to minimize the AOT difference between the model and satellite AOT. Aerosol wet deposition in the tropics is driven with satellite retrieved precipitation, rather than the model field. The final reanalyzed fine and coarse mode AOT at 550 nm is shown to have good agreement with AERONET observations, with global mean root mean square error around 0.1 for both fine and coarse mode AOTs. This paper includes a discussion of issues particular to aerosol reanalyses that make them distinct from standard meteorological reanalyses, considerations for extending such a reanalysis outside of the NASA A-Train era, and examples of how the

  19. An 11-year global gridded aerosol optical thickness reanalysis (v1.0) for atmospheric and climate sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Peng; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Westphal, Douglas L.; Zhang, Jianglong; Hogan, Timothy F.; Hyer, Edward J.; Curtis, Cynthia A.; Hegg, Dean A.; Shi, Yingxi; Campbell, James R.; Rubin, Juli I.; Sessions, Walter R.; Turk, F. Joseph; Walker, Annette L.

    2016-04-01

    While stand alone satellite and model aerosol products see wide utilization, there is a significant need in numerous atmospheric and climate applications for a fused product on a regular grid. Aerosol data assimilation is an operational reality at numerous centers, and like meteorological reanalyses, aerosol reanalyses will see significant use in the near future. Here we present a standardized 2003-2013 global 1 × 1° and 6-hourly modal aerosol optical thickness (AOT) reanalysis product. This data set can be applied to basic and applied Earth system science studies of significant aerosol events, aerosol impacts on numerical weather prediction, and electro-optical propagation and sensor performance, among other uses. This paper describes the science of how to develop and score an aerosol reanalysis product. This reanalysis utilizes a modified Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS) at its core and assimilates quality controlled retrievals of AOT from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on Terra and Aqua and the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) on Terra. The aerosol source functions, including dust and smoke, were regionally tuned to obtain the best match between the model fine- and coarse-mode AOTs and the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) AOTs. Other model processes, including deposition, were tuned to minimize the AOT difference between the model and satellite AOT. Aerosol wet deposition in the tropics is driven with satellite-retrieved precipitation, rather than the model field. The final reanalyzed fine- and coarse-mode AOT at 550 nm is shown to have good agreement with AERONET observations, with global mean root mean square error around 0.1 for both fine- and coarse-mode AOTs. This paper includes a discussion of issues particular to aerosol reanalyses that make them distinct from standard meteorological reanalyses, considerations for extending such a reanalysis outside of the NASA A-Train era, and examples of how

  20. Nocturnal Aerosol Optical Depth Measurements with a Small-Aperture Automated Photometer Using the Moon as a Light Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkoff, Timothy A.; Sorokin, Mikail; Stone, Tom; Eck, Thomas F.; Hoff, Raymond; Welton, Ellsworth; Holben, Brent

    2011-01-01

    A method is described that enables the use of lunar irradiance to obtain nighttime aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements using a small-aperture photometer. In this approach, the U.S. Geological Survey lunar calibration system was utilized to provide high-precision lunar exoatmospheric spectral irradiance predictions for a ground-based sensor location, and when combined with ground measurement viewing geometry, provided the column optical transmittance for retrievals of AOD. Automated multiwavelength lunar measurements were obtained using an unmodified Cimel-318 sunphotometer sensor to assess existing capabilities and enhancements needed for day/night operation in NASA s Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). Results show that even existing photometers can provide the ability for retrievals of aerosol optical depths at night near full moon. With an additional photodetector signal-to-noise improvement of 10-100, routine use over the bright half of the lunar phase and a much wider range of wavelengths and conditions can be achieved. Although the lunar cycle is expected to limit the frequency of observations to 30%-40% compared to solar measurements, nevertheless this is an attractive extension of AERONET capabilities.

  1. Validation of aerosol optical depth and total ozone column in the ultraviolet retrieved from multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chaoshun; Chen, Maosi; Gao, Wei

    2013-09-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD), aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA), and asymmetry factor (g) at seven ultraviolet wavelengths along with total column ozone (TOC) were retrieved based on Bayesian optimal estimation (OE) from the measurements of the UltraViolet Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (UV-MFRSR) deployed at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site during March to November in 2009. To assess the accuracy of the OE technique, the AOD retrievals are compared to both the Beer's law derived ones and the AErosol RObotic Network (AERONET) AOD product; and the TOC retrievals are compared to both the TOC product of the U.S. Department of Agriculture UV-B Monitoring and Research Program (USDA UVMRP) and the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) satellite data. The scatterplots of the AOD estimated by the OE method with the Beer's law derived ones and the collocated AERONET AOD product both show a very good agreement: the correlation coefficients vary between 0.98 and 0.99; the slopes range from 0.95 to 1.0; and the offsets are less than 0.02 at 368 nm. The comparison of TOC also shows a promising accuracy of the OE method: the standard deviations of the difference between the OE derived TOC and other TOC products are about 5 to 6 Dobson Units (DU). The validation of the OE retrievals on the selected dates suggests the OE technique has its merits and is a supplemental tool in analyzing UVMRP data.

  2. Nocturnal aerosol optical depth measurements with a small-aperture automated photometer using the moon as a light source

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berkoff, T.A.; Sorokin, M.; Stone, T.; Eck, T.F.; Hoff, R.; Welton, E.; Holben, B.

    2011-01-01

    A method is described that enables the use of lunar irradiance to obtain nighttime aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements using a small-aperture photometer. In this approach, the U.S. Geological Survey lunar calibration system was utilized to provide high-precision lunar exoatmospheric spectral irradiance predictions for a ground-based sensor location, and when combined with ground measurement viewing geometry, provided the column optical transmittance for retrievals of AOD. Automated multiwavelength lunar measurements were obtained using an unmodified Cimel-318 sunphotometer sensor to assess existing capabilities and enhancements needed for day/night operation in NASA's Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). Results show that even existing photometers can provide the ability for retrievals of aerosol optical depths at night near full moon. With an additional photodetector signal-to-noise improvement of 10-100, routine use over the bright half of the lunar phase and a much wider range of wavelengths and conditions can be achieved. Although the lunar cycle is expected to limit the frequency of observations to 30%-40% compared to solar measurements, nevertheless this is an attractive extension of AERONET capabilities. ?? 2011 American Meteorological Society.

  3. Optical and microphysical properties of column-integrated aerosols at a SKYNET site downwind of Seoul, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Y.; Park, J. S.; Ghim, Y. S.

    2014-12-01

    A skyradiometer (POM-02, Prede Co. Ltd.) has been operated to investigate aerosol properties at a SKYNET (SKYradiometer NETwork) site, YGN (Yongin) for six years starting from November 2008. The site is at the rooftop of a five-story building on the hill, about 35 km southeast of downtown Seoul (37.34 °N, 127.27 °E and 167 m above sea level). POM-02 measures the diffuse radiation at six minute intervals at 11 wavelengths. Using version 5 of the skyrad.pack, aerosol optical (aerosol optical depth and single scattering albedo) and microphysical (volume size distribution) properties were retrieved from the measurements at five wavelengths such as 400, 500, 675, 870 and 1020 nm. In comparison with CIMEL sun photometers used in AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork), another worldwide ground-based network, skyradiometers have an advantage that they can provide larger number of aerosol property data at shorter time intervals. However, standard procedures for instrument operation and data retrieval have not been established. In this study, we first showed how we calibrated the instrument and how we obtained cloud screened and quality assured data. Next, we presented variations in aerosol optical and microphysical properties, depending on air masses and/or meteorological conditions, and examined the characteristic of high aerosol loading episodes including Asian dust storm and smog.

  4. An offline constrained data assimilation technique for aerosols: Improving GCM simulations over South Asia using observations from two satellite sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraskar, Ankit; Bhushan, Mani; Venkataraman, Chandra; Cherian, Ribu

    2016-05-01

    Aerosol properties simulated by general circulation models (GCMs) exhibit large uncertainties due to biases in model processes and inaccuracies in aerosol emission inputs. In this work, we propose an offline, constrained optimization based procedure to improve these simulations by assimilating them with observational data. The proposed approach explicitly incorporates the non-negativity constraint on the aerosol optical depth (AOD) which is a key metric to quantify aerosol distributions. The resulting optimization problem is quadratic programming in nature and can be easily solved by available optimization routines. The utility of the approach is demonstrated by performing offline assimilation of GCM simulated aerosol optical properties and radiative forcing over South Asia (40-120 E, 5-40 N), with satellite AOD measurements from two sensors, namely Moderate Resolution Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MODIS) and Multi-Angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR). Uncertainty in observational data used in the assimilation is computed by developing different error bands around regional AOD observations, based on their quality assurance flags. The assimilation, evaluated on monthly and daily scales, compares well with Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) observations as determined by goodness of fit statistics. Assimilation increased both model predicted atmospheric absorption and clear sky radiative forcing by factors consistent with recent estimates in literature. Thus, the constrained assimilation algorithm helps in systematically reducing uncertainties in aerosol simulations.

  5. Inferring wavelength dependence of AOD and Ångström exponent over a sub-tropical station in South Africa using AERONET data: influence of meteorology, long-range transport and curvature effect.

    PubMed

    Kumar, K Raghavendra; Sivakumar, V; Reddy, R R; Gopal, K Rama; Adesina, A Joseph

    2013-09-01

    Aerosol optical properties over a southern sub-tropical site Skukuza, South Africa were studied to determine the variability of the aerosol characteristics using CIMEL Sunphotometer data as part of the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) from December 2005 to November 2006. Aerosol optical depth (AOD), Ångström exponent (α), and columnar water vapor (CWV) data were collected, analyzed, and compiled. Participating in this network provided a unique opportunity for understanding the sources of aerosols affecting the atmosphere of South Africa (SA) and the regional radiation budget. The meteorological patterns significantly (p<0.05) influenced the amount and size distribution of the aerosols. Results showed that seasonal variation of AOD at 500 nm (AOD500) over the observation site were characterized by low values (0.10-0.13) in autumn, moderate values (0.14-0.16) in summer and winter seasons, and high to very high values (0.18-0.40) during the spring, with an overall mean value of 0.18±0.12. Ångström exponent α(440-870), varied from 0.5 to 2.89, with significant (p<0.0001) seasonal variability. CWV showed a strong annual cycle with maximum values in the summer and autumn seasons. The relationship between AOD, Ångström exponent (α), and CWV showed a strong dependence (p<0.0001) of α on AOD and CWV, while there was no significant correlation between AOD and CWV. Investigation of the adequacy of the simple use of the spectral AOD and Ångström exponent data was used in deriving the curvature (a2) showed to obtain information for determining the aerosol-particle size. The negative a2 values are characterized by aerosol-size dominated by fine-mode (0.1-1 μm), while the positive curvatures indicate abundance of coarse particles (>1 μm). Trajectory cluster analyses revealed that the air masses during the autumn and winter seasons have longer advection pathways, passing over the ocean and continent. This is reflected in the aerosol properties that are derived from

  6. Inferring wavelength dependence of AOD and Ångström exponent over a sub-tropical station in South Africa using AERONET data: influence of meteorology, long-range transport and curvature effect.

    PubMed

    Kumar, K Raghavendra; Sivakumar, V; Reddy, R R; Gopal, K Rama; Adesina, A Joseph

    2013-09-01

    Aerosol optical properties over a southern sub-tropical site Skukuza, South Africa were studied to determine the variability of the aerosol characteristics using CIMEL Sunphotometer data as part of the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) from December 2005 to November 2006. Aerosol optical depth (AOD), Ångström exponent (α), and columnar water vapor (CWV) data were collected, analyzed, and compiled. Participating in this network provided a unique opportunity for understanding the sources of aerosols affecting the atmosphere of South Africa (SA) and the regional radiation budget. The meteorological patterns significantly (p<0.05) influenced the amount and size distribution of the aerosols. Results showed that seasonal variation of AOD at 500 nm (AOD500) over the observation site were characterized by low values (0.10-0.13) in autumn, moderate values (0.14-0.16) in summer and winter seasons, and high to very high values (0.18-0.40) during the spring, with an overall mean value of 0.18±0.12. Ångström exponent α(440-870), varied from 0.5 to 2.89, with significant (p<0.0001) seasonal variability. CWV showed a strong annual cycle with maximum values in the summer and autumn seasons. The relationship between AOD, Ångström exponent (α), and CWV showed a strong dependence (p<0.0001) of α on AOD and CWV, while there was no significant correlation between AOD and CWV. Investigation of the adequacy of the simple use of the spectral AOD and Ångström exponent data was used in deriving the curvature (a2) showed to obtain information for determining the aerosol-particle size. The negative a2 values are characterized by aerosol-size dominated by fine-mode (0.1-1 μm), while the positive curvatures indicate abundance of coarse particles (>1 μm). Trajectory cluster analyses revealed that the air masses during the autumn and winter seasons have longer advection pathways, passing over the ocean and continent. This is reflected in the aerosol properties that are derived from

  7. An Aerosol Extinction-to-Backscatter Ratio Database Derived from the NASA Micro-Pulse Lidar Network: Applications for Space-based Lidar Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; Campbell, James R.; Spinhime, James D.; Berkoff, Timothy A.; Holben, Brent; Tsay, Si-Chee; Bucholtz, Anthony

    2004-01-01

    Backscatter lidar signals are a function of both backscatter and extinction. Hence, these lidar observations alone cannot separate the two quantities. The aerosol extinction-to-backscatter ratio, S, is the key parameter required to accurately retrieve extinction and optical depth from backscatter lidar observations of aerosol layers. S is commonly defined as 4*pi divided by the product of the single scatter albedo and the phase function at 180-degree scattering angle. Values of S for different aerosol types are not well known, and are even more difficult to determine when aerosols become mixed. Here we present a new lidar-sunphotometer S database derived from Observations of the NASA Micro-Pulse Lidar Network (MPLNET). MPLNET is a growing worldwide network of eye-safe backscatter lidars co-located with sunphotometers in the NASA Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). Values of S for different aerosol species and geographic regions will be presented. A framework for constructing an S look-up table will be shown. Look-up tables of S are needed to calculate aerosol extinction and optical depth from space-based lidar observations in the absence of co-located AOD data. Applications for using the new S look-up table to reprocess aerosol products from NASA's Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) will be discussed.

  8. The MODIS Aerosol Algorithm, Products and Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, L. A.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Tanre, D.; Mattoo, S.; Chu, D. A.; Martins, J. V.; Li, R.-R.; Ichoku, C.; Levy, R. C.; Kleidman, R. G.

    2003-01-01

    The MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard both NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites is making near global daily observations of the earth in a wide spectral range. These measurements are used to derive spectral aerosol optical thickness and aerosol size parameters over both land and ocean. The aerosol products available over land include aerosol optical thickness at three visible wavelengths, a measure of the fraction of aerosol optical thickness attributed to the fine mode and several derived parameters including reflected spectral solar flux at top of atmosphere. Over ocean, the aerosol optical thickness is provided in seven wavelengths from 0.47 microns to 2.13 microns. In addition, quantitative aerosol size information includes effective radius of the aerosol and quantitative fraction of optical thickness attributed to the fine mode. Spectral aerosol flux, mass concentration and number of cloud condensation nuclei round out the list of available aerosol products over the ocean. The spectral optical thickness and effective radius of the aerosol over the ocean are validated by comparison with two years of AERONET data gleaned from 133 AERONET stations. 8000 MODIS aerosol retrievals colocated with AERONET measurements confirm that one-standard deviation of MODIS optical thickness retrievals fall within the predicted uncertainty of delta tauapproximately equal to plus or minus 0.03 plus or minus 0.05 tau over ocean and delta tay equal to plus or minus 0.05 plus or minus 0.15 tau over land. 271 MODIS aerosol retrievals co-located with AERONET inversions at island and coastal sites suggest that one-standard deviation of MODIS effective radius retrievals falls within delta r_eff approximately equal to 0.11 microns. The accuracy of the MODIS retrievals suggests that the product can be used to help narrow the uncertainties associated with aerosol radiative forcing of global climate.

  9. Detection of Volcanic Dust by AERONET Sun-Photometers: Puyehue-Cordon Volcano, Chile June 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas Cortijo, S.; Liew, S.

    2011-12-01

    Aerosol optical depth and its first and second spectral derivatives respect to wavelength, are often used to describe the interaction of aerosol particles present on a given size distribution. During volcanic eruptions, large amount of dust particles are emitted into the atmosphere. At source eruption sites, it might be difficult if not impossible to apply photometric measurements due to the high optical depth of volcanic dust and the difficulty of tracking the Sun. However, at receptor sites located at places far enough to allow photometric measurements, it is possible to quantify the particle size distribution of volcanic dust from direct Sun photometry. Our early results based on a comparative analysis between 2009/2011 AERONET data from Trelew (Argentina) site show a noticeable increase in AOD associated with decreasing visibility. Low values of the Angstrom exponent was the first indicator of the presence of volcanic dust particles. Other parameters such as the fine mode AOD, fine Angstrom number and fine mode fraction consistently indicate the presence of larger dust particles associated with this event. Extension of the current analysis to other available AERONET sites across the southern hemisphere is under way.

  10. Variability of aerosol properties over Eastern Europe observed from ground and satellites in the period from 2003 to 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovchaliuk, A.; Milinevsky, G.; Danylevsky, V.; Goloub, P.; Dubovik, O.; Holdak, A.; Ducos, F.; Sosonkin, M.

    2013-07-01

    The paper presents some results of the study on aerosol variability in the period from 2003 to 2011 over the Eastern Europe region, with latitude ranging from 40° N to 60° N and longitude from 20° E to 50° E. The analysis was based on the POLDER/PARASOL and POLDER-2/ADEOS satellites and AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) ground-based sun photometer observations. The aerosol optical thickness (AOT) of the studied area is characterized by values (referenced to 870 nm wavelength) ranging from 0.05 to 0.2, except for in the period of July-August 2010 with strong forest and peat wildfires when the AOT typical values range from 0.3 to 0.5 according to both retrievals. The analysis of seasonal dynamics of aerosol loading has revealed two AOT high value peaks. The spring peak observed in April-May is the result of solitary transportation of Saharan dust in the atmosphere over Eastern Europe, infrequent agricultural fires, transportation of sea salt aerosols by southern winds to Ukraine and Moldova from the Black and Azov seas. The autumn peak in August-September is associated with forest and peat wildfires, considerable transportation of Saharan dust and the presence of soil dust aerosols due to harvesting activity. The maximum values of AOT are observed in May 2006 (0.1-0.15), April 2009 (0.07-0.15) and August 2010 (0.2-0.5). Furthermore, the study has identified a distinct pattern of anthropogenic aerosols over the industrial areas, especially in central Ukraine and eastern Belarus as well as Moscow region in Russia. The comparison of the AOT derived by standard algorithm POLDER/PARASOL with those recomputed from AERONET inversions for fine mode particles with radius < 0.3 μm was performed over several AERONET sites. The correlation coefficients for the POLDER/AERONET AOT retrieval comparisons are equal: 0.78 for Moscow site, 0.76 - Minsk, 0.86 - Belsk, 0.81 - Moldova (period 2005-2009), 0.93 - Kyiv and 0.63 for Sevastopol sites (2008-2009). The deviations are

  11. Air Quality Monitoring and Forecasting Applications of Suomi NPP VIIRS Aerosol Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondragunta, Shobha

    The Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument was launched on October 28, 2011. It provides Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) at two different spatial resolutions: a pixel level (~750 m at nadir) product called the Intermediate Product (IP) and an aggregated (~6 km at nadir) product called the Environmental Data Record (EDR), and a Suspended Matter (SM) EDR that provides aerosol type (dust, smoke, sea salt, and volcanic ash) information. An extensive validation of VIIRS best quality aerosol products with ground based L1.5 Aerosol Robotic NETwork (AERONET) data shows that the AOT EDR product has an accuracy/precision of -0.01/0.11 and 0.01/0.08 over land and ocean respectively. Globally, VIIRS mean AOT EDR (0.20) is similar to Aqua MODIS (0.16) with some important regional and seasonal differences. The accuracy of the SM product, however, is found to be very low (20 percent) when compared to Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and AERONET. Several algorithm updates which include a better approach to retrieve surface reflectance have been developed for AOT retrieval. For dust aerosol type retrieval, a new approach that takes advantage of spectral dependence of Rayleigh scattering, surface reflectance, dust absorption in the deep blue (412 nm), blue (440 nm), and mid-IR (2.2 um) has been developed that detects dust with an accuracy of ~80 percent. For smoke plume identification, a source apportionment algorithm that combines fire hot spots with AOT imagery has been developed that provides smoke plume extent with an accuracy of ~70 percent. The VIIRS aerosol products will provide continuity to the current operational use of aerosol products from Aqua and Terra MODIS. These include aerosol data assimilation in Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) global aerosol model, verification of National Weather Service (NWS) dust and smoke forecasts, exceptional events monitoring by different states

  12. Aerosol Optical Thickness Patterns and their Trend in the Southeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, J. S.; Holben, B. N.; Zhang, J.; Campbell, J. R.; Edgerton, E.; De Gouw, J. A.; Eloranta, E. W.; Hand, J. L.; Holz, R.; Hyer, E. J.; Jacob, D. J.; Kaku, K.; kuang, S.; Lynch, P.; Newchurch, M.; Schichtel, B. A.; Shaw, S. L.; Shi, Y.; Toon, O. B.; Trepte, C. R.

    2013-12-01

    The Southeastern United States (SEUS) has long been known for its large scale regional hazes, fueled by a complex interaction of anthropogenic and biogenic emissions. Chemically, strong zonal gradients in organic to inorganic ratio coupled with high humidity also likely lead to microphysically induced variability in ambient light extinction to dry mass ratios. As part of the Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) and the Southeast Nexus (SENEX) campaigns, a mesonet of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun photometers was deployed across the SEUS in the summer of 2013. The University of Wisconsin HSRL lidar was also placed alongside an Ozone Dial lidar at the University of Alabama Huntsville. We present early results from the 2013 aerosol ground network deployment and relate findings to previous years. AERONET data is combined with MODIS and MISR satellite data along with surface particulate matter measurements to understand the regional extent of the SEUS haze and its relationship to surface particulate matter concentrations. We further examine the apparent downward trend in regional AOT. Special emphasis is placed on applying ground network data to issues of satellite data quality assurance, data assimilation and large scale modeling.

  13. A Climatology of Global Aerosol Mixtures to Support Sentinel-5P and Earthcare Mission Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M.; Kazadzis, S.; Amaridis, V.; Kahn, R. A.

    2015-06-01

    Since constraining aerosol type with satellite remote sensing continues to be a challenge, we present a newly derived global climatology of aerosol mixtures to support atmospheric composition studies that are planned for Sentinel-5P and EarthCARE. The global climatology is obtained via application of iterative cluster analysis to gridded global decadal and seasonal mean values of the aerosol optical depth (AOD) of sulfate, biomass burning, mineral dust and marine aerosol as a proportion of the total AOD at 500nm output from the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART). For both the decadal and seasonal means, the number of aerosol mixtures (clusters) identified is ≈10. Analysis of the percentage contribution of the component aerosol types to each mixture allowed development of a straightforward naming convention and taxonomy, and assignment of primary colours for the generation of true colour-mixing and easy-to-interpret maps of the spatial distribution of clusters across the global grid. To further help characterize the mixtures, aerosol robotic network (AERONET) Level 2.0 Version 2 inversion products were extracted from each cluster's spatial domain and used to estimate climatological values of key optical and microphysical parameters. The aerosol type climatology represents current knowledge that would be enhanced, possibly corrected, and refined by high temporal and spectral resolution, cloud-free observations produced by Sentinel-5P and EarthCARE instruments. The global decadal mean and seasonal gridded partitions comprise a preliminary reference framework and global climatology that can help inform the choice of components and mixtures in aerosol retrieval algorithms used by instruments such as TROPOMI and ATLID, and to test retrieval results.

  14. Ceilometer calibration for retrieval of aerosol optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yoshitaka; Kai, Kenji; Kawai, Kei; Nagai, Tomohiro; Sakai, Tetsu; Yamazaki, Akihiro; Uchiyama, Akihiro; Batdorj, Dashdondog; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Nishizawa, Tomoaki

    2015-03-01

    Ceilometers are durable compact backscatter lidars widely used to detect cloud base height. They are also useful for measuring aerosols. We introduced a ceilometer (CL51) for observing dust in a source region in Mongolia. For retrieving aerosol profiles with a backscatter lidar, the molecular backscatter signal in the aerosol free heights or system constant of the lidar is required. Although the system constant of the ceilometer is calibrated by the manufacturer, it is not necessarily accurate enough for the aerosol retrieval. We determined a correction factor, which is defined as the ratio of true attenuated backscattering coefficient to the measured attenuated backscattering coefficient, for the CL51 ceilometer using a dual-wavelength Mie-scattering lidar in Tsukuba, Japan before moving the ceilometer to Dalanzadgad, Mongolia. The correction factor determined by minimizing the difference between the ceilometer and lidar backscattering coefficients was approximately 1.2±0.1. Applying the correction to the CL51 signals, the aerosol optical depth (AOD) agreed well with the sky-radiometer AOD during the observation period (13-17 February 2013) in Tsukuba (9 ×10-3 of mean square error). After moving the ceilometer to Dalanzadgad, however, the AOD observed with the CL51 (calibrated by the correction factor determined in Tsukuba) was approximately 60% of the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) sun photometer AOD. The possible causes of the lower AOD results are as follows: (1) the limited height range of extinction integration (< 3 km); (2) change in the correction factor during the ceilometer transportation or with the window contamination in Mongolia. In both cases, on-site calibrations by dual-wavelength lidar are needed. As an alternative method, we showed that the backward inversion method was useful for retrieving extinction coefficients if the AOD was larger than 1.5. This retrieval method does not require the system constant and molecular backscatter signals

  15. Evaluation of particle resuspension in young children's breathing zone using stationary and robotic (PIPER) aerosol samplers

    PubMed Central

    Sagona, Jessica A.; Shalat, Stuart L; Wang, Zuocheng; Ramagopal, Maya; Black, Kathleen; Hernandez, Marta; Mainelis, Gediminas

    2015-01-01

    Development of asthma in young children may be associated with high exposure to particulate matter (PM). However, typical stationary samplers may not represent the personal exposure of children ages 3 and younger since they may not detect particles resuspended from the floor as children play, thus reducing our ability to correlate exposure and disease etiology. To address this, an autonomous robot, the Pretoddler Inhalable Particulate Environmental Robotic (PIPER) sampler, was developed to simulate the movements of children as they play on the floor. PIPER and a stationary sampler took simultaneous measurements of particle number concentration in six size channels using an optical particle counter and inhalable PM on filters in 65 homes in New Jersey, USA. To study particle resuspension, for each sampler we calculated the ratio of particle concentration measured while PIPER was moving to the average concentration of particles measured during a reference period when PIPER remained still. For all investigated particle sizes, higher particle resuspension was observed by PIPER compared to the stationary sampler. In 71% of carpeted homes a more significant (at the α = 0.05 level) resuspension of particles larger than 2.5 μm was observed by PIPER compared to the stationary sampler. Typically, particles larger than 2.5 μm were resuspended more efficiently than smaller particles, over both carpeted and bare floors. Additionally, in carpeted homes estimations of PM10 mass from the particle number concentrations measured on PIPER while it was moving were on average a factor of 1.54 higher compared to reference period when PIPER was not moving. For comparison, the stationary sampler measured an increase of PM2.5 mass by a factor of only 1.08 when PIPER was moving compared to a reference period. This demonstrates that PIPER is able to resuspend particles through movement, and provide a better characterization of the resuspended particles than stationary samplers. Accurate

  16. Multi-year Satellite and Surface Observations of AOD in support of Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) Field Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Chand, Duli; Berg, Larry K.; Fast, Jerome D.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Ferrare, R.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hair, John

    2012-11-01

    We use combined multi-year measurements from the surface and space for assessing the spatial and temporal distribution of aerosol properties within a large (~400x400 km) region centered on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, along the East Coast of the United States. The ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measurements at Martha’s Vineyard Coastal Observatory (MVCO) site and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) sensors on board the Terra and Aqua satellites provide horizontal and temporal variations of aerosol optical depth, while the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) offers the altitudes of aerosol-layers. The combined ground-based and satellite measurements indicated several interesting features among which were the large differences in the aerosol properties observed in July and February. We applied the climatology of aerosol properties for designing the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP), which is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. The TCAP field campaign involves 12-month deployment (started July 1, 2012) of the ground-based ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) and Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) on Cape Cod and complimentary aerosol observations from two research aircraft: the DOE Gulfstream-1 (G-1) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) B200 King Air. Using results from the coordinated G-1 and B200 flights during the recent (July, 2012) Intensive Observation Period, we demonstrated that the G-1 in situ measurements and B200 active remote sensing can provide complementary information on the temporal and spatial changes of the aerosol properties off the coast of North America.

  17. A multi-model evaluation of aerosols over South Asia: common problems and possible causes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, X.; Chin, M.; Gautam, R.; Bian, H.; Kim, D.; Colarco, P. R.; Diehl, T. L.; Takemura, T.; Pozzoli, L.; Tsigaridis, K.; Bauer, S.; Bellouin, N.

    2015-05-01

    Atmospheric pollution over South Asia attracts special attention due to its effects on regional climate, water cycle and human health. These effects are potentially growing owing to rising trends of anthropogenic aerosol emissions. In this study, the spatio-temporal aerosol distributions over South Asia from seven global aerosol models are evaluated against aerosol retrievals from NASA satellite sensors and ground-based measurements for the period of 2000-2007. Overall, substantial underestimations of aerosol loading over South Asia are found systematically in most model simulations. Averaged over the entire South Asia, the annual mean aerosol optical depth (AOD) is underestimated by a range 15 to 44% across models compared to MISR (Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer), which is the lowest bound among various satellite AOD retrievals (from MISR, SeaWiFS (Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor), MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) Aqua and Terra). In particular during the post-monsoon and wintertime periods (i.e., October-January), when agricultural waste burning and anthropogenic emissions dominate, models fail to capture AOD and aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) over the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) compared to ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sunphotometer measurements. The underestimations of aerosol loading in models generally occur in the lower troposphere (below 2 km) based on the comparisons of aerosol extinction profiles calculated by the models with those from Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) data. Furthermore, surface concentrations of all aerosol components (sulfate, nitrate, organic aerosol (OA) and black carbon (BC)) from the models are found much lower than in situ measurements in winter. Several possible causes for these common problems of underestimating aerosols in models during the post-monsoon and wintertime periods are identified: the aerosol hygroscopic growth and formation of

  18. Satellite and ground-based remote sensing of aerosols during intense haze event of October 2013 over lahore, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tariq, Salman; Zia, ul-Haq; Ali, Muhammad

    2016-02-01

    Due to increase in population and economic development, the mega-cities are facing increased haze events which are causing important effects on the regional environment and climate. In order to understand these effects, we require an in-depth knowledge of optical and physical properties of aerosols in intense haze conditions. In this paper an effort has been made to analyze the microphysical and optical properties of aerosols during intense haze event over mega-city of Lahore by using remote sensing data obtained from satellites (Terra/Aqua Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO)) and ground based instrument (AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET)) during 6-14 October 2013. The instantaneous highest value of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) is observed to be 3.70 on 9 October 2013 followed by 3.12 on 8 October 2013. The primary cause of such high values is large scale crop residue burning and urban-industrial emissions in the study region. AERONET observations show daily mean AOD of 2.36 which is eight times higher than the observed values on normal day. The observed fine mode volume concentration is more than 1.5 times greater than the coarse mode volume concentration on the high aerosol burden day. We also find high values (~0.95) of Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) on 9 October 2013. Scatter-plot between AOD (500 nm) and Angstrom exponent (440-870 nm) reveals that biomass burning/urban-industrial aerosols are the dominant aerosol type on the heavy aerosol loading day over Lahore. MODIS fire activity image suggests that the areas in the southeast of Lahore across the border with India are dominated by biomass burning activities. A Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model backward trajectory showed that the winds at 1000 m above the ground are responsible for transport from southeast region of biomass burning to Lahore. CALIPSO derived sub-types of

  19. Robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrose, Robert O.

    2007-01-01

    Lunar robotic functions include: 1. Transport of crew and payloads on the surface of the moon; 2. Offloading payloads from a lunar lander; 3. Handling the deployment of surface systems; with 4. Human commanding of these functions from inside a lunar vehicle, habitat, or extravehicular (space walk), with Earth-based supervision. The systems that will perform these functions may not look like robots from science fiction. In fact, robotic functions may be automated trucks, cranes and winches. Use of this equipment prior to the crew s arrival or in the potentially long periods without crews on the surface, will require that these systems be computer controlled machines. The public release of NASA's Exploration plans at the 2nd Space Exploration Conference (Houston, December 2006) included a lunar outpost with as many as four unique mobility chassis designs. The sequence of lander offloading tasks involved as many as ten payloads, each with a unique set of geometry, mass and interface requirements. This plan was refined during a second phase study concluded in August 2007. Among the many improvements to the exploration plan were a reduction in the number of unique mobility chassis designs and a reduction in unique payload specifications. As the lunar surface system payloads have matured, so have the mobility and offloading functional requirements. While the architecture work continues, the community can expect to see functional requirements in the areas of surface mobility, surface handling, and human-systems interaction as follows: Surface Mobility 1. Transport crew on the lunar surface, accelerating construction tasks, expanding the crew s sphere of influence for scientific exploration, and providing a rapid return to an ascent module in an emergency. The crew transport can be with an un-pressurized rover, a small pressurized rover, or a larger mobile habitat. 2. Transport Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) equipment and construction payloads. 3. Transport habitats and

  20. Aerosol optical depth retrievals at the Izaña Atmospheric Observatory from 1941 to 2013 by using artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, R. D.; García, O. E.; Cuevas, E.; Cachorro, V. E.; Barreto, A.; Guirado-Fuentes, C.; Kouremeti, N.; Bustos, J. J.; Romero-Campos, P. M.; de Frutos, A. M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the reconstruction of a 73-year time series of the aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 500 nm at the subtropical high-mountain Izaña Atmospheric Observatory (IZO) located in Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain). For this purpose, we have combined AOD estimates from artificial neural networks (ANNs) from 1941 to 2001 and AOD measurements directly obtained with a Precision Filter Radiometer (PFR) between 2003 and 2013. The analysis is limited to summer months (July-August-September), when the largest aerosol load is observed at IZO (Saharan mineral dust particles). The ANN AOD time series has been comprehensively validated against coincident AOD measurements performed with a solar spectrometer Mark-I (1984-2009) and AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) CIMEL photometers (2004-2009) at IZO, obtaining a rather good agreement on a daily basis: Pearson coefficient, R, of 0.97 between AERONET and ANN AOD, and 0.93 between Mark-I and ANN AOD estimates. In addition, we have analysed the long-term consistency between ANN AOD time series and long-term meteorological records identifying Saharan mineral dust events at IZO (synoptical observations and local wind records). Both analyses provide consistent results, with correlations > 85 %. Therefore, we can conclude that the reconstructed AOD time series captures well the AOD variations and dust-laden Saharan air mass outbreaks on short-term and long-term timescales and, thus, it is suitable to be used in climate analysis.

  1. Aerosol optical depth retrievals at the Izaña Atmospheric Observatory from 1941 to 2013 by using artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, R. D.; García, O. E.; Cuevas, E.; Cachorro, V. E.; Barreto, A.; Guirado-Fuentes, C.; Kouremeti, N.; Bustos, J. J.; Romero-Campos, P. M.; de Frutos, A. M.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents the reconstruction of the 73 year time series of the aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 500 nm at the subtropical high-mountain Izaña Atmospheric Observatory (IZO) located in Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain). For this purpose, we have combined AOD estimates from artificial neural networks (ANNs) from 1941 to 2001 and AOD measurements directly obtained with a Precision Filter Radiometer (PFR) between 2003 and 2013. The analysis is limited to summer months (July-August-September), when the largest aerosol load is observed at IZO (Saharan mineral dust particles). The ANN AOD time series has been comprehensively validated against coincident AOD measurements performed with a solar spectrometer Mark-I (1984-2009) and AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) CIMEL photometers (2004-2009) at IZO, obtaining a rather good agreement on a daily basis: Pearson coefficient, R, of 0.97 between AERONET and ANN AOD, and 0.93 between Mark-I and ANN AOD estimates. In addition, we have analyzed the long-term consistency between ANN AOD time series and long-term meteorological records identifying Saharan mineral dust events at IZO (synoptical observations and local wind records). Both analyses provide consistent results, with correlations larger than 85 %. Therefore, we can conclude the reconstructed AOD time series captures well the AOD variations and dust-laden Saharan air mass outbreaks at short-term and long-term time scales and, thus, it is suitable to be used in climate analysis.

  2. Comparison of aerosol volume size distributions retrieved from ground-based remote sensing measurements with those from an optical particle counter on the ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, B.; Choi, Y.; Ghim, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Both Cimel CE-318 sunphotometer and POM-02 skyradiometer were operated for around 15 months starting from March 2012 as a part of the DRAGON (Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks) campaign. These two instruments were collocated at the Hankuk_UFS (Hankuk University of Foreign Studies) site of AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork,) and the YGN (Yongin) site of SKYNET (SKYradiometer NETwork). We have also measured the particle concentration on the ground using an optical particle counter (Grimm Model 1.108) since the beginning of this year. The measurement site (37.02 °N, 127.16 °E, 167 m above sea level) is located about 35 km southeast of downtown Seoul. We compare the volume size distributions from sunphotometer, skyradiometer, and optical particle counter for the former part of this year. In the retrieval process, AERONET assumes 22 bins for 0.05-15 μm while SKYNET assumes 20 bins for 0.01-20 μm. The optical particle counter measures the particle number concentrations between 0.25 and 32 μm in 31 bins. Since the measurement intervals are different between instruments, we compare the distributions when the measurement time coincides within 5 minutes as well as mean distributions from the instruments. We examine the differences in mode radii and volume concentrations of fine and coarse mode aerosols between instruments.

  3. An effective inversion algorithm for retrieving bimodal aerosol particle size distribution from spectral extinction data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhenzong; Qi, Hong; Yao, Yuchen; Ruan, Liming

    2014-12-01

    The Ant Colony Optimization algorithm based on the probability density function (PDF-ACO) is applied to estimate the bimodal aerosol particle size distribution (PSD). The direct problem is solved by the modified Anomalous Diffraction Approximation (ADA, as an approximation for optically large and soft spheres, i.e., χ≫1 and |m-1|≪1) and the Beer-Lambert law. First, a popular bimodal aerosol PSD and three other bimodal PSDs are retrieved in the dependent model by the multi-wavelength extinction technique. All the results reveal that the PDF-ACO algorithm can be used as an effective technique to investigate the bimodal PSD. Then, the Johnson's SB (J-SB) function and the modified beta (M-β) function are employed as the general distribution function to retrieve the bimodal PSDs under the independent model. Finally, the J-SB and M-β functions are applied to recover actual measurement aerosol PSDs over Beijing and Shanghai obtained from the aerosol robotic network (AERONET). The numerical simulation and experimental results demonstrate that these two general functions, especially the J-SB function, can be used as a versatile distribution function to retrieve the bimodal aerosol PSD when no priori information about the PSD is available.

  4. A Mesoscale Analysis of Column-Integrated Aerosol Properties in Northern India During the TIGERZ 2008 Pre-Monsoon Period and a Comparison to MODIS Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Tripathi, S. N.; Eck, T. F.; Newcomb, W. W.; Slutsker, I.; Dickerson, R. R.; Thompson, A. M.; Wang, S.-H.; Singh, R. P.; Sinyuk, A.

    2010-01-01

    The Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) of the northern Indian subcontinent produces anthropogenic pollution from urban, industrial and rural combustion sources nearly continuously and is affected by convection-induced winds driving desert and alluvial dust into the atmosphere during the premonsoon period. Within the IGP, the NASA Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) project initiated the TIGERZ measurement campaign in May 2008 with an intensive operational period from May 1 to June 23, 2008. Mesoscale spatial variability of aerosol optical depth (AOD, tau) measurements at 500mn was assessed at sites around Kanpur, India, with averages ranging from 0.31 to 0.89 for spatial variability study (SVS) deployments. Sites located downwind from the city of Kanpur indicated slightly higher average aerosol optical depth (delta Tau(sub 500)=0.03-0.09). In addition, SVS AOD area-averages were compared to the long-tenn Kanpur AERONET site data: Four SVS area-averages were within +/- 1 cr of the climatological mean of the Kanpur site, while one SVS was within 2sigma below climatology. For a SVS case using AERONET inversions, the 440-870mn Angstrom exponent of approximately 0.38, the 440-870mn absorption Angstrom exponent (AAE) of 1.15-1.53, and the sphericity parameter near zero suggested the occurrence of large, strongly absorbing, non-spherical aerosols over Kanpur (e.g., mixed black carbon and dust) as well as stronger absorption downwind of Kanpur. Furthermore, the 3km and lOkm Terra and Aqua MODIS C005 aerosol retrieval algorithms at tau(sub 550) were compared to the TIGERZ data set. Although MODIS retrievals at higher quality levels were comparable to the MODIS retrieval uncertainty, the total number of MODIS matchups (N) were reduced with subsequent quality levels (N=25, QA>=0; N=9,QA>=l; N=6, QA>=2; N=1, QA=3) over Kanpur during the premonsoon primarily due to the semi-bright surface, complex aerosol mixture and cloud-contaminated pixels. The TIGERZ 2008 data set provided a unique

  5. Robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2012-01-01

    Earth's upper atmosphere is an extreme environment: dry, cold, and irradiated. It is unknown whether our aerobiosphere is limited to the transport of life, or there exist organisms that grow and reproduce while airborne (aerophiles); the microenvironments of suspended particles may harbor life at otherwise uninhabited altitudes[2]. The existence of aerophiles would significantly expand the range of planets considered candidates for life by, for example, including the cooler clouds of a hot Venus-like planet. The X project is an effort to engineer a robotic exploration and biosampling payload for a comprehensive survey of Earth's aerobiology. While many one-shot samples have been retrieved from above 15 km, their results are primarily qualitative; variations in method confound comparisons, leaving such major gaps in our knowledge of aerobiology as quantification of populations at different strata and relative species counts[1]. These challenges and X's preliminary solutions are explicated below. X's primary balloon payload is undergoing a series of calibrations before beginning flights in Spring 2012. A suborbital launch is currently planned for Summer 2012. A series of ground samples taken in Winter 2011 is being used to establish baseline counts and identify likely background contaminants.

  6. Comparison of aerosol properties retrieved using GARRLiC, LIRIC, and Raman algorithms applied to multi-wavelength lidar and sun/sky-photometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovchaliuk, Valentyn; Goloub, Philippe; Podvin, Thierry; Veselovskii, Igor; Tanre, Didier; Chaikovsky, Anatoli; Dubovik, Oleg; Mortier, Augustin; Lopatin, Anton; Korenskiy, Mikhail; Victori, Stephane

    2016-07-01

    Aerosol particles are important and highly variable components of the terrestrial atmosphere, and they affect both air quality and climate. In order to evaluate their multiple impacts, the most important requirement is to precisely measure their characteristics. Remote sensing technologies such as lidar (light detection and ranging) and sun/sky photometers are powerful tools for determining aerosol optical and microphysical properties. In our work, we applied several methods to joint or separate lidar and sun/sky-photometer data to retrieve aerosol properties. The Raman technique and inversion with regularization use only lidar data. The LIRIC (LIdar-Radiometer Inversion Code) and recently developed GARRLiC (Generalized Aerosol Retrieval from Radiometer and Lidar Combined data) inversion methods use joint lidar and sun/sky-photometer data. This paper presents a comparison and discussion of aerosol optical properties (extinction coefficient profiles and lidar ratios) and microphysical properties (volume concentrations, complex refractive index values, and effective radius values) retrieved using the aforementioned methods. The comparison showed inconsistencies in the retrieved lidar ratios. However, other aerosol properties were found to be generally in close agreement with the AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) products. In future studies, more cases should be analysed in order to clearly define the peculiarities in our results.

  7. Optical Properties of Atmospheric Aerosol in Maritime Environments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Alexander; Holben, Brent N.; Kaufman, Yoram J.; Dubovik, Oleg; Eck, Thomas F.; Slutsker, Ilya; Pietras, Christophe; Halthore, Rangasayi N.

    2002-02-01

    Systematic characterization of aerosol over the oceans is needed to understand the aerosol effect on climate and on transport of pollutants between continents. Reported are the results of a comprehensive optical and physical characterization of ambient aerosol in five key island locations of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) of sun and sky radiometers, spanning over 2-5 yr. The results are compared with aerosol optical depths and size distributions reported in the literature over the last 30 yr. Aerosol found over the tropical Pacific Ocean (at three sites between 20°S and 20°N) still resembles mostly clean background conditions dominated by maritime aerosol. The optical thickness is remarkably stable with mean value of a(500 nm) = 0.07, mode value at am = 0.06, and standard deviation of 0.02-0.05. The average Ångström exponent range, from 0.3 to 0.7, characterizes the wavelength dependence of the optical thickness. Over the tropical to subtropical Atlantic (two stations at 7°S and 32°N) the optical thickness is significantly higher: a(500 nm) = 0.14 and am = 0.10 due to the frequent presence of dust, smoke, and urban-industrial aerosol. For both oceans the atmospheric column aerosol is characterized by a bimodal lognormal size distribution with a fine mode at effective radius Reff = 0.11 ± 0.01 m and coarse mode at Reff = 2.1 ± 0.3 m. A review of the published 150 historical ship measurements from the last three decades shows that am was around 0.07 to 0.12 in general agreement with the present finding. The information should be useful as a test bed for aerosol global models and aerosol representation in global climate models. With global human population expansion and industrialization, these measurements can serve in the twenty-first century as a basis to assess decadal changes in the aerosol concentration, properties, and radiative forcing of climate.

  8. Can AERONET data be used to accurately model the monochromatic beam and circumsolar irradiances under cloud-free conditions in desert environment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eissa, Y.; Blanc, P.; Wald, L.; Ghedira, H.

    2015-07-01

    Routine measurements of the beam irradiance at normal incidence (DNI) include the irradiance originating from within the extent of the solar disc only (DNIS) whose angular extent is 0.266° ± 1.7 %, and that from a larger circumsolar region, called the circumsolar normal irradiance (CSNI). This study investigates if the spectral aerosol optical properties of the AERONET stations are sufficient for an accurate modelling of the monochromatic DNIS and CSNI under cloud-free conditions in a desert environment. The data from an AERONET station in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, and a collocated Sun and Aureole Measurement (SAM) instrument which offers reference measurements of the monochromatic profile of solar radiance, were exploited. Using the AERONET data both the radiative transfer models libRadtran and SMARTS offer an accurate estimate of the monochromatic DNIS, with a relative root mean square error (RMSE) of 5 %, a relative bias of +1 % and acoefficient of determination greater than 0.97. After testing two configurations in SMARTS and three in libRadtran for modelling the monochromatic CSNI, libRadtran exhibits the most accurate results when the AERONET aerosol phase function is presented as a Two Term Henyey-Greenstein phase function. In this case libRadtran exhibited a relative RMSE and a bias of respectively 22 and -19 % and a coefficient of determination of 0.89. The results are promising and pave the way towards reporting the contribution of the broadband circumsolar irradiance to standard DNI measurements.

  9. Satellite observations of aerosol and CO over Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massie, Steven T.; Gille, John C.; Edwards, David P.; Nandi, Sreela

    The development of remote sensing satellite technology potentially will lead to the technical means to monitor air pollution emitted from large cities on a global basis. This paper presents observations by the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) and measurements of pollution in the troposphere (MOPITT) experiments of aerosol optical depths and CO mixing ratios, respectively, in the vicinity of Mexico City to illustrate current satellite capabilities. MOPITT CO mixing ratios over Mexico City, averaged between January-March 2002-2005, are 19% above regional values and the CO plume extends over 10° 2 in the free troposphere at 500 hPa. Time series of Red Automatica de Monitoreo Ambiental (RAMA) PM10, and (Aerosol Robotic Network) AERONET and MODIS aerosol optical depths, and RAMA and MOPITT CO time series are inter-compared to illustrate the different perspectives of ground based and satellite instrumentation. Finally, we demonstrate, by examining MODIS and MOPITT data in April 2003, that satellite data can be used to identify episodes in which pollution form fires influences the time series of ground based and satellite observations of urban pollution.

  10. Development towards a global operational aerosol consensus: basic climatological characteristics of the International Cooperative for Aerosol Prediction Multi-Model Ensemble (ICAP-MME)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sessions, W. R.; Reid, J. S.; Benedetti, A.; Colarco, P. R.; da Silva, A.; Lu, S.; Sekiyama, T.; Tanaka, T. Y.; Baldasano, J. M.; Basart, S.; Brooks, M. E.; Eck, T. F.; Iredell, M.; Hansen, J. A.; Jorba, O. C.; Juang, H.-M. H.; Lynch, P.; Morcrette, J.-J.; Moorthi, S.; Mulcahy, J.; Pradhan, Y.; Razinger, M.; Sampson, C. B.; Wang, J.; Westphal, D. L.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present the first steps in developing a global multi-model aerosol forecasting ensemble intended for eventual operational and basic research use. Drawing from members of the International Cooperative for Aerosol Prediction (ICAP) latest generation of quasi-operational aerosol models, 5-day aerosol optical thickness (AOT) forecasts are analyzed for December 2011 through November 2012 from four institutions: European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA), NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), and Naval Research Lab/Fleet Numerical Meteorology and Oceanography Center (NRL/FNMOC). For dust, we also include the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-National Geospatial Advisory Committee (NOAA NGAC) product in our analysis. The Barcelona Supercomputing Centre and UK Met Office dust products have also recently become members of ICAP, but have insufficient data to be included in this analysis period. A simple consensus ensemble of member and mean AOT fields for modal species (e.g., fine and coarse mode, and a separate dust ensemble) is used to create the ICAP Multi-Model Ensemble (ICAP-MME). The ICAP-MME is run daily at 00:00 UTC for 6-hourly forecasts out to 120 h. Basing metrics on comparisons to 21 regionally representative Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites, all models generally captured the basic aerosol features of the globe. However, there is an overall AOT low bias among models, particularly for high AOT events. Biomass burning regions have the most diversity in seasonal average AOT. The Southern Ocean, though low in AOT, nevertheless also has high diversity. With regard to root mean square error (RMSE), as expected the ICAP-MME placed first over all models worldwide, and was typically first or second in ranking against all models at individual sites. These results are encouraging; furthermore, as more global operational aerosol models come online, we expect their inclusion in a robust

  11. An optimal-estimation-based aerosol retrieval algorithm using OMI near-UV observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, U.; Kim, J.; Ahn, C.; Torres, O.; Liu, X.; Bhartia, P. K.; Spurr, R. J. D.; Haffner, D.; Chance, K.; Holben, B. N.

    2016-01-01

    An optimal-estimation(OE)-based aerosol retrieval algorithm using the OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) near-ultraviolet observation was developed in this study. The OE-based algorithm has the merit of providing useful estimates of errors simultaneously with the inversion products. Furthermore, instead of using the traditional look-up tables for inversion, it performs online radiative transfer calculations with the VLIDORT (linearized pseudo-spherical vector discrete ordinate radiative transfer code) to eliminate interpolation errors and improve stability. The measurements and inversion products of the Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Network campaign in northeast Asia (DRAGON NE-Asia 2012) were used to validate the retrieved aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and single scattering albedo (SSA). The retrieved AOT and SSA at 388 nm have a correlation with the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) products that is comparable to or better than the correlation with the operational product during the campaign. The OE-based estimated error represented the variance of actual biases of AOT at 388 nm between the retrieval and AERONET measurements better than the operational error estimates. The forward model parameter errors were analyzed separately for both AOT and SSA retrievals. The surface reflectance at 388 nm, the imaginary part of the refractive index at 354 nm, and the number fine-mode fraction (FMF) were found to be the most important parameters affecting the retrieval accuracy of AOT, while FMF was the most important parameter for the SSA retrieval. The additional information provided with the retrievals, including the estimated error and degrees of freedom, is expected to be valuable for relevant studies. Detailed advantages of using the OE method were described and discussed in this paper.

  12. An Optimal-Estimation-Based Aerosol Retrieval Algorithm Using OMI Near-UV Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeong, U; Kim, J.; Ahn, C.; Torres, O.; Liu, X.; Bhartia, P. K.; Spurr, R. J. D.; Haffner, D.; Chance, K.; Holben, B. N.

    2016-01-01

    An optimal-estimation(OE)-based aerosol retrieval algorithm using the OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) near-ultraviolet observation was developed in this study. The OE-based algorithm has the merit of providing useful estimates of errors simultaneously with the inversion products. Furthermore, instead of using the traditional lookup tables for inversion, it performs online radiative transfer calculations with the VLIDORT (linearized pseudo-spherical vector discrete ordinate radiative transfer code) to eliminate interpolation errors and improve stability. The measurements and inversion products of the Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Network campaign in northeast Asia (DRAGON NE-Asia 2012) were used to validate the retrieved aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and single scattering albedo (SSA). The retrieved AOT and SSA at 388 nm have a correlation with the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) products that is comparable to or better than the correlation with the operational product during the campaign. The OEbased estimated error represented the variance of actual biases of AOT at 388 nm between the retrieval and AERONET measurements better than the operational error estimates. The forward model parameter errors were analyzed separately for both AOT and SSA retrievals. The surface reflectance at 388 nm, the imaginary part of the refractive index at 354 nm, and the number fine-mode fraction (FMF) were found to be the most important parameters affecting the retrieval accuracy of AOT, while FMF was the most important parameter for the SSA retrieval. The additional information provided with the retrievals, including the estimated error and degrees of freedom, is expected to be valuable for relevant studies. Detailed advantages of using the OE method were described and discussed in this paper.

  13. A multi-angle aerosol optical depth retrieval algorithm for geostationary satellite data over the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Lyapustin, A.; Wang, Y.; Kondragunta, S.; Laszlo, I.; Ciren, P.; Hoff, R. M.

    2011-04-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieval from geostationary satellites has high temporal resolution compared to the polar orbiting satellites and thus enables us to monitor aerosol motion. However, current Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) have only one visible channel for retrieving aerosol and hence the retrieval accuracy is lower than those from the multichannel polar-orbiting satellite instruments such as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). The operational GOES AOD retrieval algorithm (GOES Aerosol/Smoke Product, GASP) uses 28-day composite images from the visible channel to derive surface reflectance, which can produce large uncertainties. In this work, we develop a new AOD retrieval algorithm for the GOES imager by applying a modified multi-angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) algorithm. The algorithm assumes the surface Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) at channel 1 of GOES is proportional to seasonal average BRDF in the 2.1 μm channel from MODIS. The ratios between them are derived through time series analysis of the GOES visible channel images. The results of the AOD and surface reflectance retrievals are evaluated through comparison against those from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET), GASP, and MODIS. The AOD retrievals from the new algorithm demonstrate good agreement with AERONET retrievals at several sites across the US. They are comparable to the GASP retrievals in the eastern-central sites and are more accurate than GASP retrievals in the western sites. In the western US where surface reflectance is high, the new algorithm also produces larger AOD retrieval coverage than both GASP and MODIS.

  14. Inter-comparison of model-simulated and satellite-retrieved componential aerosol optical depths in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shenshen; Yu, Chao; Chen, Liangfu; Tao, Jinhua; Letu, Husi; Ge, Wei; Si, Yidan; Liu, Yang

    2016-09-01

    China's large aerosol emissions have major impacts on global climate change as well as regional air pollution and its associated disease burdens. A detailed understanding of the spatiotemporal patterns of aerosol components is necessary for the calculation of aerosol radiative forcing and the development of effective emission control policy. Model-simulated and satellite-retrieved aerosol components can support climate change research, PM2.5 source appointment and epidemiological studies. This study evaluated the total and componential aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the GEOS-Chem model (GC) and the Global Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport model (GOCART), and the Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) from 2006 to 2009 in China. Linear regression analysis between the GC and AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) in China yielded similar correlation coefficients (0.6 daily, 0.71 monthly) but lower slopes (0.41 daily, 0.58 monthly) compared with those in the U.S. This difference was attributed to GC's underestimation of water-soluble AOD (WAOD) west of the Heihe-Tengchong Line, the dust AOD (DAOD) in the fall and winter, and the soot AOD (SAOD) throughout the year and throughout the country. GOCART exhibits the strongest dust estimation capability among all datasets. However, the GOCART soot distribution in the Northeast and Southeast has significant errors, and its WAOD in the polluted North China Plain (NCP) and the South is underestimated. MISR significantly overestimates the water-soluble aerosol levels in the West, and does not capture the high dust loadings in all seasons and regions, and the SAOD in the NCP. These discrepancies can mainly be attributed to the uncertainties in the emission inventories of both models, the poor performance of GC under China's high aerosol loading conditions, the omission of certain aerosol tracers in GOCART, and the tendency of MISR to misidentify dust and non-dust mixtures.

  15. Determination of Aerosol Optical Depth with a Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer using in-place calibrations at a coastal site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denn, F. M.; Fabbri, B. E.; Schuster, G. L.

    2012-12-01

    Direct and indirect aerosol effects are identified among the largest sources of uncertainty in model projections of climate change (IPCC AR-4). Even though aerosol optical depths (AODs) are currently derived on a global scale from satellite measurements as well as within data assimilation models, ground-based sun photometer measurements of AOD are extremely important for validating these indirect retrievals. Calibration of surface sun photometers requires knowledge of the instrument-specific solar signal at each measurement channel (V0), determined by doing Langley extrapolations. V0s are often difficult to determine at ground sites, and are very difficult to obtain at the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy (CERES) Ocean Validation Experiment (COVE) site. Some reasons for this difficulty are varying humidity, aerosol loading, and generally unstable atmospheric conditions. For these reasons, many researchers prefer to determine instrument V0s at pristine mountain sites, such as Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO) Hawaii, where these problems are greatly reduced. However, taking an instrument to a mountain top location can introduce a new set of problems, such as shipping damage and potential environmental influences on the instrument (temperature). For instruments with an exposed Spectralon diffuser such as the Multifilter Rotating Shadowband radiometer (MFRSR), diffuser bleaching by ultraviolet radiation and possible distortion of the diffuser by changes in atmospheric pressure can occur. For these reasons, our goal is to determine AODs for our MFRSR using V0s determined in-place at the COVE site. The reference AOD data is from a co-located CIMEL sun photometer, which is part of NASA's Aerosol Robotic NETwork (AERONET). We show that in-place V0s can be determined with nearly the same precision as at a mountain site, and that the resultant AODs obtained using these in-place V0s agree better with AERONET than the AODs determined using the mountain derived V0s. The

  16. Atmospheric Correction at AERONET Locations: A New Science and Validation Data Set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yujie; Lyapustin, Alexei; Privette, Jeffery L.; Morisette, Jeffery T.; Holben, Brent

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes an AERONET-based Surface Reflectance Validation Network (ASRVN) and its dataset of spectral surface bidirectional reflectance and albedo based on MODIS TERRA and AQUA data. The ASRVN is an operational data collection and processing system. It receives 50x50 square kilometer subsets of MODIS L1B data from MODAPS and AERONET aerosol and water vapor information. Then it performs an accurate atmospheric correction for about 100 AERONET sites based on accurate radiative transfer theory with high quality control of the input data. The ASRVN processing software consists of L1B data gridding algorithm, a new cloud mask algorithm based on a time series analysis, and an atmospheric correction algorithm. The atmospheric correction is achieved by fitting the MODIS top of atmosphere measurements, accumulated for 16-day interval, with theoretical reflectance parameterized in terms of coefficients of the LSRT BRF model. The ASRVN takes several steps to ensure high quality of results: 1) cloud mask algorithm filters opaque clouds; 2) an aerosol filter has been developed to filter residual semi-transparent and sub-pixel clouds, as well as cases with high inhomogeneity of aerosols in the processing area; 3) imposing requirement of consistency of the new solution with previously retrieved BRF and albedo; 4) rapid adjustment of the 16-day retrieval to the surface changes using the last day of measurements; and 5) development of seasonal back-up spectral BRF database to increase data coverage. The ASRVN provides a gapless or near-gapless coverage for the processing area. The gaps, caused by clouds, are filled most naturally with the latest solution for a given pixels. The ASRVN products include three parameters of LSRT model (k(sup L), k(sup G), k(sup V)), surface albedo, NBRF (a normalized BRF computed for a standard viewing geometry, VZA=0 deg., SZA=45 deg.), and IBRF (instantaneous, or one angle, BRF value derived from the last day of MODIS measurement for

  17. Aerosol optical depth assimilation for a size-resolved sectional model: impacts of observationally constrained, multi-wavelength and fine mode retrievals on regional scale analyses and forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saide, P. E.; Carmichael, G. R.; Liu, Z.; Schwartz, C. S.; Lin, H. C.; da Silva, A. M.; Hyer, E.

    2013-10-01

    An aerosol optical depth (AOD) three-dimensional variational data assimilation technique is developed for the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) system for which WRF-Chem forecasts are performed with a detailed sectional model, the Model for Simulating Aerosol Interactions and Chemistry (MOSAIC). Within GSI, forward AOD and adjoint sensitivities are performed using Mie computations from the WRF-Chem optical properties module, providing consistency with the forecast. GSI tools such as recursive filters and weak constraints are used to provide correlation within aerosol size bins and upper and lower bounds for the optimization. The system is used to perform assimilation experiments with fine vertical structure and no data thinning or re-gridding on a 12 km horizontal grid over the region of California, USA, where improvements on analyses and forecasts is demonstrated. A first set of simulations was performed, comparing the assimilation impacts of using the operational MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) dark target retrievals to those using observationally constrained ones, i.e., calibrated with AERONET (Aerosol RObotic NETwork) data. It was found that using the observationally constrained retrievals produced the best results when evaluated against ground based monitors, with the error in PM2.5 predictions reduced at over 90% of the stations and AOD errors reduced at 100% of the monitors, along with larger overall error reductions when grouping all sites. A second set of experiments reveals that the use of fine mode fraction AOD and ocean multi-wavelength retrievals can improve the representation of the aerosol size distribution, while assimilating only 550 nm AOD retrievals produces no or at times degraded impact. While assimilation of multi-wavelength AOD shows positive impacts on all analyses performed, future work is needed to generate observationally constrained multi-wavelength retrievals, which when assimilated will generate size

  18. Radiometric calibration of ocean color satellite sensors using AERONET-OC data.

    PubMed

    Hlaing, Soe; Gilerson, Alexander; Foster, Robert; Wang, Menghua; Arnone, Robert; Ahmed, Sam

    2014-09-22

    Radiometric vicarious calibration of ocean color (OC) satellite sensors is carried out through the full sunlight path radiative transfer (RT) simulations of the coupled ocean-atmosphere system based on the aerosol and water-leaving radiance data from AERONET-OC sites for the visible and near-infrared (NIR) bands. Quantitative evaluation of the potential of such approach for achieving the radiometric accuracies of OC satellite sensors is made by means of direct comparisons between simulated and satellite measured top of atmosphere (TOA) radiances. Very high correlations (R ≥ 0.96 for all visible channels) are achieved for the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) sensor when this approach is applied with the data from the LISCO and WaveCIS AERONET-OC sites. Vicarious calibration gain factors derived with this approach are highly consistent, with comparisons between the two sites exhibiting around 0.5% discrepancy in the blue and green parts of the spectrum, while their average temporal variability is also within 0.28% - 1.23% permitting the approach to be used, at this stage, for verification of sensor calibration performance.

  19. Sensitivity of spectral reflectance to aerosol optical properties in UV and visible wavelength range: Preparatory study for aerosol retrieval from Geostationary Environmental Monitoring Spectrometer (GEMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KIM, M.; Kim, J.; Lee, J.

    2011-12-01

    Asia, with its rapid increase in industrialization and population, has been receiving great attention as one of important source regions of pollutants including aerosols and trace gases. Since the spatio-temporal distribution of the pollutants varies rapidly, demands to monitor air quality in a geostationary satellite have increased recently. In these perspectives, the Ministry of Environment of Korea initiated a geostationary satellite mission to launch the Geostationary Environmental Monitoring Spectrometer (GEMS) onboard the GEO-KOMPSAT in 2017-2018 timeframe. From the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) measurements, it has been found that the low surface reflectance and strong interaction between aerosol absorption and molecular scattering in UV wavelength range can be advantageous in retrieving aerosol optical properties, such as aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and optical type (or single scattering albedo), over the source regions as well as ocean areas. In addition, GEMS is expected to have finer spatial resolution compared to OMI (13 x 24 km2 at nadir), thereby less affected by sub-pixel clouds. In this study, we present sensitivity of spectral reflectance to aerosol optical properties in ultraviolet (UV) and visible wavelength range for a purpose to retrieve aerosol optical properties from GEMS. The so called UV-VIS algorithm plans to use spectral reflectance in 350-650 nm. The algorithm retrieves AOT and aerosol type using an inversion method, which adopts pre-calculated lookup table (LUT) for a set of assumed aerosol models. For the aerosol models optimized in Asia areas, the inversion data of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) located in the target areas are selectively used to archive aerosol optical properties. As a result, major aerosol types representing dust, polluted dust, and absorbing/non-absorbing anthropogenic aerosols are constructed and used for the LUT calculations. We analyze the effect of cloud contamination on the retrieved AOT by

  20. Effect of MODIS Terra radiometric calibration improvements on Collection 6 Deep Blue aerosol products: Validation and Terra/Aqua consistency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.; Bettenhausen, C.; Jeong, M.-J.; Meister, G.

    2015-12-01

    The Deep Blue (DB) algorithm's primary data product is midvisible aerosol optical depth (AOD). DB applied to Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measurements provides a data record since early 2000 for MODIS Terra and mid-2002 for MODIS Aqua. In the previous data version (Collection 5, C5), DB production from Terra was halted in 2007 due to sensor degradation; the new Collection 6 (C6) has both improved science algorithms and sensor radiometric calibration. This includes additional calibration corrections developed by the Ocean Biology Processing Group to address MODIS Terra's gain, polarization sensitivity, and detector response versus scan angle, meaning DB can now be applied to the whole Terra record. Through validation with Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data, it is shown that the C6 DB Terra AOD quality is stable throughout the mission to date. Compared to the C5 calibration, in recent years the RMS error compared to AERONET is smaller by ˜0.04 over bright (e.g., desert) and ˜0.01-0.02 over darker (e.g., vegetated) land surfaces, and the fraction of points in agreement with AERONET within expected retrieval uncertainty higher by ˜10% and ˜5%, respectively. Comparisons to the Aqua C6 time series reveal a high level of correspondence between the two MODIS DB data records, with a small positive (Terra-Aqua) average AOD offset <0.01. The analysis demonstrates both the efficacy of the new radiometric calibration efforts and that the C6 MODIS Terra DB AOD data remain stable (to better than 0.01 AOD) throughout the mission to date, suitable for quantitative scientific analyses.

  1. Effect of MODIS Terra Radiometric Calibration Improvements on Collection 6 Deep Blue Aerosol Products: Validation and Terra/Aqua Consistency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.; Bettenhausen, C.; Jeong, M.-J.; Meister, G.

    2015-01-01

    The Deep Blue (DB) algorithm's primary data product is midvisible aerosol optical depth (AOD). DB applied to Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measurements provides a data record since early 2000 for MODIS Terra and mid-2002 for MODIS Aqua. In the previous data version (Collection 5, C5), DB production from Terra was halted in 2007 due to sensor degradation; the new Collection 6 (C6) has both improved science algorithms and sensor radiometric calibration. This includes additional calibration corrections developed by the Ocean Biology Processing Group to address MODIS Terra's gain, polarization sensitivity, and detector response versus scan angle, meaning DB can now be applied to the whole Terra record. Through validation with Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data, it is shown that the C6 DB Terra AOD quality is stable throughout the mission to date. Compared to the C5 calibration, in recent years the RMS error compared to AERONET is smaller by approximately 0.04 over bright (e.g., desert) and approximately 0.01-0.02 over darker (e.g., vegetated) land surfaces, and the fraction of points in agreement with AERONET within expected retrieval uncertainty higher by approximately 10% and approximately 5%, respectively. Comparisons to the Aqua C6 time series reveal a high level of correspondence between the two MODIS DB data records, with a small positive (Terra-Aqua) average AOD offset <0.01. The analysis demonstrates both the efficacy of the new radiometric calibration efforts and that the C6 MODIS Terra DB AOD data remain stable (to better than 0.01 AOD) throughout the mission to date, suitable for quantitative scientific analyses.

  2. A Multi-Parameter Aerosol Classification Method and its Application to Retrievals from Spaceborne Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, P. B.; Kacenelenbogen, M. S.; Livingston, J. M.; Hasekamp, O. P.; Burton, S. P.; Schuster, G. L.; Johnson, M. S.; Knobelspiesse, K. D.; Redemann, J.; Ramachandran, S.; Holben, B. N.

    2014-12-01

    Classifying observed aerosols into types (e.g., urban-industrial, biomass burning, mineral dust, maritime) helps to understand aerosol sources, transformations, effects, and feedback mechanisms; to improve accuracy of satellite retrievals; and to quantify aerosol radiative impacts on climate. The number of aerosol parameters retrieved from spaceborne sensors has been growing, from the initial aerosol optical depth (AOD) at one or a few wavelengths to a list that now includes AOD, complex refractive index, single scattering albedo (SSA), and depolarization of backscatter, each at several wavelengths, plus several particle size and shape parameters. Making optimal use of these varied data products requires objective, multi-dimensional analysis methods. We describe such a method, which makes explicit use of uncertainties in input parameters. It treats an N-parameter retrieved data point and its N-dimensional uncertainty as an extended data point, E. It then uses a modified Mahalanobis distance, DEC, to assign an observation to the class (cluster) C that has minimum DEC from the point. We use parameters retrieved from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) to define seven prespecified clusters (pure dust, polluted dust, urban-industrial/developed economy, urban-industrial/developing economy, dark biomass smoke, light biomass smoke, pure marine), and we demonstrate application of the method to a 5-year record of retrievals from the spaceborne POLDER-3 (Polarization and Directionality of the Earth's Reflectances) polarimeter over the island of Crete, Greece. Results show changes of aerosol type at this location in the eastern Mediterranean Sea, which is influenced by a wide variety of aerosol sources.

  3. A multiparameter aerosol classification method and its application to retrievals from spaceborne polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Philip B.; Kacenelenbogen, Meloë; Livingston, John M.; Hasekamp, Otto P.; Burton, Sharon P.; Schuster, Gregory L.; Johnson, Matthew S.; Knobelspiesse, Kirk D.; Redemann, Jens; Ramachandran, S.; Holben, Brent

    2014-08-01

    Classifying observed aerosols into types (e.g., urban-industrial, biomass burning, mineral dust, maritime) helps to understand aerosol sources, transformations, effects, and feedback mechanisms; to improve accuracy of satellite retrievals; and to quantify aerosol radiative impacts on climate. The number of aerosol parameters retrieved from spaceborne sensors has been growing, from the initial aerosol optical depth (AOD) at one or a few wavelengths to a list that now includes AOD, complex refractive index, single scattering albedo (SSA), and depolarization of backscatter, each at several wavelengths, plus several particle size and shape parameters. Making optimal use of these varied data products requires objective, multidimensional analysis methods. We describe such a method, which makes explicit use of uncertainties in input parameters. It treats an N-parameter retrieved data point and its N-dimensional uncertainty as an extended data point, E. It then uses a modified Mahalanobis distance, DEC, to assign an observation to the class (cluster) C that has minimum DEC from the point. We use parameters retrieved from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) to define seven prespecified clusters (pure dust, polluted dust, urban-industrial/developed economy, urban-industrial/developing economy, dark biomass smoke, light biomass smoke, and pure marine), and we demonstrate application of the method to a 5 year record of retrievals from the spaceborne Polarization and Directionality of the Earth's Reflectances 3 (POLDER 3) polarimeter over the island of Crete, Greece. Results show changes of aerosol type at this location in the eastern Mediterranean Sea, which is influenced by a wide variety of aerosol sources.

  4. [Aerosol optical properties during different air-pollution episodes over Beijing].

    PubMed

    Shi, Chan-Zhen; Yu, Xing-Na; Zhou, Bin; Xiang, Lei; Nie, Hao-Hao

    2013-11-01

    Based on the 2005-2011 data from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET), this study conducted analysis on aerosol optical properties over Beijing during different air-pollution episodes (biomass burning, CNY firework, dust storm). The aerosol optical depth (AOD) showed notable increases in the air-pollution episodes while the AOD (at 440 nm) during dust storm was 4. 91, 4. 07 and 2.65 times higher as background, biomass burning and firework aerosols. AOD along with Angstrom exponent (alpha) can be used to determine the aerosol types. The dust aerosol had the highest AOD and the lowest alpha. The alpha value of firework (1.09) was smaller than biomass burning (1.21) and background (1.27), indicating that coarse particles were dominant in the former type. Higher AOD of burnings (than background) can be attributed to the optical extinction capability of black carbon aerosol. The single scattering albedo (SSA) was insensitive to wavelength. The SSA value of dust (0.934) was higher than background (0.878), biomass burning (0.921) and firework (0.905). Additionally, the extremely large SSA of burnings here maybe was caused by the aging smoke, hygroscopic growth and so on. The peak radius of aerosol volume size distributions were 0.1-0.2 microm and 2.24 -3.85 microm in clear and polluted conditions. The value of volume concentration ratio between coarse and fine particles was in the order of clear background (1.04), biomass burning (1.10), CNY firework (1.91) and dust storm (4.96) episode. PMID:24455916

  5. [Aerosol optical properties during different air-pollution episodes over Beijing].

    PubMed

    Shi, Chan-Zhen; Yu, Xing-Na; Zhou, Bin; Xiang, Lei; Nie, Hao-Hao

    2013-11-01

    Based on the 2005-2011 data from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET), this study conducted analysis on aerosol optical properties over Beijing during different air-pollution episodes (biomass burning, CNY firework, dust storm). The aerosol optical depth (AOD) showed notable increases in the air-pollution episodes while the AOD (at 440 nm) during dust storm was 4. 91, 4. 07 and 2.65 times higher as background, biomass burning and firework aerosols. AOD along with Angstrom exponent (alpha) can be used to determine the aerosol types. The dust aerosol had the highest AOD and the lowest alpha. The alpha value of firework (1.09) was smaller than biomass burning (1.21) and background (1.27), indicating that coarse particles were dominant in the former type. Higher AOD of burnings (than background) can be attributed to the optical extinction capability of black carbon aerosol. The single scattering albedo (SSA) was insensitive to wavelength. The SSA value of dust (0.934) was higher than background (0.878), biomass burning (0.921) and firework (0.905). Additionally, the extremely large SSA of burnings here maybe was caused by the aging smoke, hygroscopic growth and so on. The peak radius of aerosol volume size distributions were 0.1-0.2 microm and 2.24 -3.85 microm in clear and polluted conditions. The value of volume concentration ratio between coarse and fine particles was in the order of clear background (1.04), biomass burning (1.10), CNY firework (1.91) and dust storm (4.96) episode.

  6. Long- and/or short-range transportation of local Asian aerosols in DRAGON-Osaka Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, M.; Sano, I.; Mukai, S.; Holben, B. N.

    2013-12-01

    This work intends to demonstrate the spatial and temporal variation of atmospheric particles in East Asia, especially around AERONET (Aerosol Robotics Network) -Osaka site during Dragon Asia period in the spring of 2012, named Dragon-Osaka. It is known that the air pollution in East Asia becomes to be severe due to both the increasing emissions of the anthropogenic aerosols associated with economic growth and the complicated behavior of natural aerosols. Thus the precise observations of atmospheric particles in East Asia are desired. Osaka is the second big city in Japan and a typical Asian urban area. The population of the region is around 20 millions including neighbor prefectures. Therefore, air quality in the region is slightly bad compared to remote area due to industries and auto mobiles. In recent years, Asian dusts and anthropogenic small particles transported from China and cover those cities throughout year. AERONET Osaka site was established in 2002 on the campus of Kinki University. Nowadays, LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging), an SPM sampler (SPM-613D, Kimoto Electric, Japan) and others are available on the roof of a building. The site data are useful for algorithm development of aerosol retrieval over busy city. On the other hand, human activities in this region also emit the huge amount of pollutions, thus it is needed to investigate the local distribution of aerosols in this region. In order to investigate change of aerosol properties, PM-individual analysis is made with scanning electron microscope (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (EDX). SEM/EDX is an effective instrument to observe the surface microstructure and analyze the chemical composition of such materials as metals, powders, biological specimens, etc. We used sampling data from the SPM sampler at AERONET Osaka site. During a period of DRAGON-Asia, high concentrations of air pollutant were observed on the morning of March 11 in Fukue Island in the East China Sea. On the

  7. Recovering Long-term Aerosol Optical Depth Series (1976-2012) from an Astronomical Potassium-based Resonance Scattering Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreto, A.; Cuevas, E.; Pallé, P.; Romero, P. M.; Almansa, F.; Wehrli, C.

    2014-04-01

    A 37 year long-term series of monochromatic Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) has been recovered from solar irradiance measurements performed with the solar spectrometer Mark-I, deployed at Izaña mountain since 1976. The instrument operation is based on the method of resonant scattering, which presents a long-term stability and high precision in comparison to other instruments based on interference filters. However, it has been specifically designed as a reference instrument for helioseismology, and its ability to determine AOD from transmitted and scattered monochromatic radiation at 769.9 nm inside a potassium vapor cell in the presence of a permanent magnetic field is evaluated in this paper. Particularly, the use of an exposed mirrors arrangement to collect sunlight as well as the Sun-laboratory velocity dependence of the scattered component introduces some inconveniences when we perform the instrument's calibration. We have solved this problem using a quasi-continuous Langley calibration technique and a refinement procedure to correct for calibration errors as well as for the fictitious diurnal cycle on AOD data. Our results showed that calibration errors associated to the quasi-continuous Langley technique are not dependent on aerosol load, provided aerosol concentration remains constant throughout the day, assuring the validity of this technique for those periods with relatively high aerosol content required to calibrate the scattered component. The comparative analysis between the recovered AOD dataset from Mark-I and collocated quasi-simultaneous data from Cimel AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and Precision Filter Radiometer (PFR) instruments showed an absolute mean bias ≤ 0.01 in the 11 year and 12 year comparison, respectively. High correlation coefficients between AERONET/Mark-I and PFR/Mark-I pairs confirmed a very good linear relationship between instruments, proving that recovered AOD data series from Mark-I can be used together PFR and AERONET AOD

  8. Recovering long-term aerosol optical depth series (1976-2012) from an astronomical potassium-based resonance scattering spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreto, A.; Cuevas, E.; Pallé, P.; Romero, P. M.; Guirado, C.; Wehrli, C. J.; Almansa, F.

    2014-12-01

    A 37-year long-term series of monochromatic aerosol optical depth (AOD) has been recovered from solar irradiance measurements performed with the solar spectrometer Mark-I, deployed at Izaña mountain since 1976. The instrument operation is based on the method of resonant scattering, which affords wavelength absolute reference and stability (long-term stability and high precision) in comparison to other instruments based purely on interference filters. However, it has been specifically designed as a reference instrument for helioseismology, and its ability to determine AOD from transmitted and scattered monochromatic radiation at 769.9 nm inside a potassium vapour cell in the presence of a permanent magnetic field is evaluated in this paper. Particularly, the use of an exposed mirror arrangement to collect sunlight as well as the Sun-laboratory velocity dependence of the scattered component introduces some important inconveniences to overcome when we perform the instrument's calibration. We have solved this problem using a quasi-continuous Langley calibration technique and a refinement procedure to correct for calibration errors as well as for the fictitious diurnal cycle on AOD data. Our results showed similar calibration errors retrieved by means of this quasi-continuous Langley technique applied in different aerosol load events (from 0.04 to 0.3), provided aerosol concentration remains constant throughout the calibration interval. It assures the validity of this technique when it is applied in those periods with relatively high aerosol content. The comparative analysis between the recovered AOD data set from the Mark-I and collocated quasi-simultaneous data from the Cimel-AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and Precision Filter Radiometer (PFR) instruments showed an absolute mean bias ≤ 0.01 in the 10- and 12-year comparison, respectively. High correlation coefficients between AERONET and Mark-I and PFR/Mark-I pairs confirmed a very good linear relationship

  9. Aerosol climatology over Mexico City basin: Characterization of their optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carabali-Sandoval, Giovanni; Valdéz-Barrón, Mauro; Bonifaz-Alfonso, Roberto; Riveros-Rosas, David; Estévez, Héctor

    2015-04-01

    Climatology of aerosol optical depth (AOD), single scattering albedo (SSA) and size parameters were analyzed using a 15-year (1999-2014) data set from AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) observations over Mexico City basin. Since urban air pollution is one of the biggest problems that face this megacity, many studies addressing these issues have been published. However few studies have examined the climatology of aerosol taking into account their optical properties over long-time period. Pollution problems in Mexico City have been generated by the daily activities of some 21 million people coupled with the vast amount of industry located within the city's metropolitan area. Another contributing factor is the unique geographical setting of the basin encompassing Mexico City. The basin covers approximately 5000 km2 of the Mexican Plateau at an average elevation of 2250 m above sea level (ASL) and is surrounded on three sides by mountains averaging over 3000 m ASL. In this work we present preliminary results of aerosol climatology in Mexico City.

  10. Improving Calculation Accuracies of Accumulation-Mode Fractions Based on Spectral of Aerosol Optical Depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Zhang; Zhengqiang, Li; Yan, Wang

    2014-03-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols are released into the atmosphere, which cause scattering and absorption of incoming solar radiation, thus exerting a direct radiative forcing on the climate system. Anthropogenic Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) calculations are important in the research of climate changes. Accumulation-Mode Fractions (AMFs) as an anthropogenic aerosol parameter, which are the fractions of AODs between the particulates with diameters smaller than 1μm and total particulates, could be calculated by AOD spectral deconvolution algorithm, and then the anthropogenic AODs are obtained using AMFs. In this study, we present a parameterization method coupled with an AOD spectral deconvolution algorithm to calculate AMFs in Beijing over 2011. All of data are derived from AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) website. The parameterization method is used to improve the accuracies of AMFs compared with constant truncation radius method. We find a good correlation using parameterization method with the square relation coefficient of 0.96, and mean deviation of AMFs is 0.028. The parameterization method could also effectively solve AMF underestimate in winter. It is suggested that the variations of Angstrom indexes in coarse mode have significant impacts on AMF inversions.

  11. Monitoring spatio-temporal aerosol patterns over Pakistan based on MODIS, TOMS and MISR satellite data and a HYSPLIT model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Khan; Qureshi, Salman; Blaschke, Thomas

    2011-09-01

    Three different satellite-borne sensors, namely the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), and the Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR), were used to investigate the spatial and temporal variations of aerosols over several cities in Pakistan. A Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model was used for trajectory analysis in order to reconstruct the origins of air masses and understand the spatio-temporal variability of aerosol concentrations. Recent MODIS aerosol data (2002-2008) and earlier TOMS data (1979-2001) revealed increasing concentrations of aerosols over Pakistan and adjacent areas. Validation of MODIS and MISR derived aerosol optical depths (AODs) with Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data for 2007 demonstrated that the MISR data was more accurate when close to the ocean, while the MODIS was more accurate over vegetated areas. The relationship between MODIS and MISR AOD data from 2002 to 2008 was analyzed, revealing a strong correlation between the two datasets. An assessment of seasonal variability in AOD for industrial, urban, semi-urban, rural, and semi-arid areas revealed maximum AOD values during the summer over all the areas investigated. Back trajectory analyses indicated that while winter air masses reaching Pakistan had travelled long distances, summer air masses had travelled only short distances. The higher aerosol concentrations during the summer are interpreted to be a result of the air masses spending more time over land during the summer than they do during the winter. While monsoonal rainfall tends to reduce aerosol concentrations by washing aerosols out of the atmosphere, this effect is mainly restricted to the eastern and south-eastern parts of Pakistan.

  12. The climatology of dust aerosol over the arabian peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalaby, A.; Rappenglueck, B.; Eltahir, E. A. B.

    2015-01-01

    Dust storms are considered to be a natural hazard over the Arabian Peninsula, since they occur all year round with maximum intensity and frequency in Spring and Summer. The Regional Climate Model version 4 (RegCM4) has been used to study the climatology of atmospheric dust over the Arabian Peninsula from 1999 to 2012. This relatively long simulation period samples the meteorological conditions that determine the climatology of mineral dust aerosols over the Arabian Peninsula. The modeled Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) has been compared against ground-based observations of three Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) stations that are distributed over the Arabian Peninsula and daily space based observations from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), the Moderate resolution Imaging SpectroRadimeter (MODIS) and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). The large scale atmospheric circulation and the land surface response that lead to dust uplifting have been analyzed. While the modeled AOD shows that the dust season extends from March to August with two pronounced maxima, one over the northern Arabian Peninsula in March with AOD equal to 0.4 and one over the southern Arabian Peninsula in July with AOD equal to 0.7, the observations show that the dust season extends from April to August with two pronounced maxima, one over the northern Arabian Peninsula in April with AOD equal to 0.5 and one over the southern Arabian Peninsula in July with AOD equal to 0.5. In spring a high pressure dominates the Arabian Peninsula and is responsible for advecting dust from southern and western part of the Arabian Peninsula to northern and eastern part of the Peninsula. Also, fast developed cyclones in northern Arabian Peninsula are responsible for producing strong dust storms over Iraq and Kuwait. However, in summer the main driver of the surface dust emission is the strong northerly wind ("Shamal") that transport dust from the northern Arabian Peninsula toward south parallel to the

  13. Can AERONET data be used to accurately model the monochromatic beam and circumsolar irradiances under cloud-free conditions in desert environment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eissa, Y.; Blanc, P.; Wald, L.; Ghedira, H.

    2015-12-01

    Routine measurements of the beam irradiance at normal incidence include the irradiance originating from within the extent of the solar disc only (DNIS), whose angular extent is 0.266° ± 1.7 %, and from a larger circumsolar region, called the circumsolar normal irradiance (CSNI). This study investigates whether the spectral aerosol optical properties of the AERONET stations are sufficient for an accurate modelling of the monochromatic DNIS and CSNI under cloud-free conditions in a desert environment. The data from an AERONET station in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, and the collocated Sun and Aureole Measurement instrument which offers reference measurements of the monochromatic profile of solar radiance were exploited. Using the AERONET data both the radiative transfer models libRadtran and SMARTS offer an accurate estimate of the monochromatic DNIS, with a relative root mean square error (RMSE) of 6 % and a coefficient of determination greater than 0.96. The observed relative bias obtained with libRadtran is +2 %, while that obtained with SMARTS is -1 %. After testing two configurations in SMARTS and three in libRadtran for modelling the monochromatic CSNI, libRadtran exhibits the most accurate results when the AERONET aerosol phase function is presented as a two-term Henyey-Greenstein phase function. In this case libRadtran exhibited a relative RMSE and a bias of respectively 27 and -24 % and a coefficient of determination of 0.882. Therefore, AERONET data may very well be used to model the monochromatic DNIS and the monochromatic CSNI. The results are promising and pave the way towards reporting the contribution of the broadband circumsolar irradiance to standard measurements of the beam irradiance.

  14. Dust Plume Position and Transport in the NASA GEOS-4 Model Compared With MODIS, TOMS, AERONET, and Ground-Based Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowottnick, E.; Colarco, P. R.; da Silva, A.

    2006-12-01

    Annually, about 240 Tg of Saharan dust is transported across the Atlantic Ocean. Dust deposited to the surface provides nutrients that support the aquatic ecosystems of the Atlantic Ocean as well as the terrestrial ecosystems of South America, the Caribbean, and North America. Additionally, the long-range transport of dust is a potential source of pollutant particulate matter. Dust has an influence on the Earth radiation budget through scattering and absorption of radiation and modification of cloud properties. These radiative feedbacks potentially influence the cyclogenesis occurring off the west African coast. In order to investigate the impacts of dust on the Earth system we employ a newly developed dust model implemented in the NASA GEOS-4 general circulation model and data assimilation system. Here we present a 27 year simulation (1979-2005) of dust transport. We find that our model consistently transports dust further south in the Caribbean then is seen in space-based imagery from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS). This misplacement of the dust plume is also found in our comparisons to in situ surface measurements of dust mass concentration. Our model accurately simulates surface dust mass concentrations in Barbados (South Caribbean), but inaccurately simulates concentrations in Bermuda (Atlantic) and Miami (North Caribbean), particularly in summer months. We suspect that our model is not accurately simulating the lifting processes for dust over Africa, so that the dust is not positioned properly in the vertical to be correctly transported westward within the Saharan Air Layer (SAL) and the African Easterly Jet (AEJ). Here we consider constraints provided by MODIS and TOMS, ground-based sun photometer observations from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET), and in situ surface measurements of dust mass concentration to evaluate the location of the dust plume in our model simulations. Further

  15. Diversity of Aerosol Optical Thickness in analysis and forecasting modes of the models from the International Cooperative for Aerosol Prediction Multi-Model Ensemble (ICAP-MME)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, P.

    2014-12-01

    With the emergence of global aerosol models intended for operational forecasting use at global numerical weather prediction (NWP) centers, the International Cooperative for Aerosol Prediction (ICAP) was founded in 2010. One of the objectives of ICAP is to develop a global multi-model aerosol forecasting ensemble (ICAP-MME) for operational and basic research use. To increase the accuracy of aerosol forecasts, several of the NWP centers have incorporated assimilation of satellite and/or ground-based observations of aerosol optical thickness (AOT), the most widely available and evaluated aerosol parameter. The ICAP models are independent in their underlying meteorology, as well as aerosol sources, sinks, microphysics and chemistry. The diversity of aerosol representations in the aerosol forecast models results in differences in AOT. In addition, for models that include AOT assimilations, the diversity in assimilation methodology, the observed AOT data to be assimilated, and the pre-assimilation treatments of input data also leads to differences in the AOT analyses. Drawing from members of the ICAP latest generation of quasi-operational aerosol models, five day AOT forecasts and AOT analyses are analyzed from four multi-species models which have AOT assimilations: ECMWF, JMA, NASA GSFC/GMAO, and NRL/FNMOC. For forecast mode only, we also include the dust products from NOAA NGAC, BSC, and UK Met office in our analysis leading to a total of 7 dust models. AOT at 550nm from all models are validated at regionally representative Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites and a data assimilation grade multi-satellite aerosol analysis. These analyses are also compared with the recently developed AOT reanalysis at NRL. Here we will present the basic verification characteristics of the ICAP-MME, and identify regions of diversity between model analyses and forecasts. Notably, as in many other ensemble environments, the multi model ensemble consensus mean outperforms all of the

  16. The effect of smoke, dust, and pollution aerosol on shallow cloud development over the Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Koren, Ilan; Remer, Lorraine A.; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Rudich, Yinon

    2005-08-01

    evaluation and writing the paper.Freely available online through the PNAS open access option.Abbreviations: MODIS, Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer; AOT, aerosol optical thickness; LWP, liquid water path; AERONET, Aerosol Robotic Network.

  17. Temporal and spatial long-term characterizations of aerosol optical depth and its radiative effects over Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cachorro, Victoria E.; Toledano, Carlos; Joao Costa, Maria; Anton, Manuel; Mateos, D.; Alados-Arboledas, L.; Sorribas, M.; Baldasano, Jose M.

    A better understanding of the aerosol radiative properties is a crucial challenge for climate change studies. This study aims to provide a complete characterization of aerosol radiative effects in different spectral ranges within the shortwave (SW) solar spectrum. Six long-term datasets of aerosol properties of AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) over the Iberian Peninsula are analyzed. The aerosol load over the Iberian Peninsula shows a decrease trend between 2004 and 2012 (-0.04 per unit of aerosol optical depth per decade). Continental aerosols are identified as the main type over the peninsula, although desert dust events are phenomena registered at the six sites with a clear South-North gradient, which modulates the aerosol climatology over the analyzed area. Aerosol data are used as input in the libRadtran model to simulate ultraviolet (UV), visible (VIS), near-infrared (NIR), and SW radiation. Then, the aerosol radiative effect (ARE) and aerosol forcing efficiency (AFE) can be evaluated. ARE values at the six stations differ because of the different aerosol types over each station. Considering the whole Iberian Peninsula, ARE is in the ranges: -1.1 < ARE _{UV} < -0.7 W m (-2) , -5.7 < ARE _{VIS} < -3.8 W m (-2) , -2.8 < ARE _{NIR} < -1.7 W m (-2) , and -9.5 < ARE _{SW} < -6.1 W m (-2) . The four variables show positive statistically significant trends between 2004 and 2012 (e.g., ARE _{SW} increased +3.6 W m (-2) per decade). I.e., a reduction of ARE on solar radiation at the surface is observed in this period. The intra-annual ARE cycle exhibits larger values during the spring and summer months when the likelihood of high aerosol loading over the Iberian Peninsula increases. Finally, AFE exhibits a clear dependence on single scattering albedo and a weaker one on Ångström exponent. AFE is larger (in absolute value) for small and absorbing particles. The contributions of the UV, VIS, and NIR ranges to the SW efficiency vary with the aerosol types. Conditions

  18. An online aerosol retrieval algorithm using OMI near-UV observations based on the optimal estimation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, U.; Kim, J.; Ahn, C.; Torres, O.; Liu, X.; Bhartia, P. K.; Spurr, R. J. D.; Haffner, D.; Chance, K.; Holben, B. N.

    2015-06-01

    An online version of the OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) near-ultraviolet (UV) aerosol retrieval algorithm was developed to retrieve aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and single scattering albedo (SSA) based on the optimal estimation (OE) method. Instead of using the traditional look-up tables for radiative transfer calculations, it performs online radiative transfer calculations with the Vector Linearized Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer (VLIDORT) model to eliminate interpolation errors and improve stability. The OE-based algorithm has the merit of providing useful estimates of uncertainties simultaneously with the inversion products. The measurements and inversion products of the Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Network campaign in Northeast Asia (DRAGON NE-Asia 2012) were used to validate the retrieved AOT and SSA. The retrieved AOT and SSA at 388 nm have a correlation with the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) products that is comparable to or better than the correlation with the operational product during the campaign. The estimated retrieval noise and smoothing error perform well in representing the envelope curve of actual biases of AOT at 388 nm between the retrieved AOT and AERONET measurements. The forward model parameter errors were analyzed separately for both AOT and SSA retrievals. The surface albedo at 388 nm, the imaginary part of the refractive index at 354 nm, and the number fine mode fraction (FMF) were found to be the most important parameters affecting the retrieval accuracy of AOT, while FMF was the most important parameter for the SSA retrieval. The additional information provided with the retrievals, including the estimated error and degrees of freedom, is expected to be valuable for future studies.

  19. Aerosol ultraviolet absorption experiment (2002 to 2004), part 1: ultraviolet multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer calibration and intercomparison with CIMEL sunphotometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krotkov, Nickolay A.; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Herman, Jay R.; Slusser, James R.; Labow, Gordon J.; Scott, Gwendolyn R.; Janson, George T.; Eck, Tom; Holben, Brent N.

    2005-04-01

    Radiative transfer calculations of UV irradiance from total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) satellite data are frequently overestimated compared to ground-based measurements because of the presence of undetected absorbing aerosols in the planetary boundary layer. To reduce these uncertainties, an aerosol UV absorption closure experiment has been conducted at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA/GSFC) site in Greenbelt, Maryland, using 17 months of data from a shadowband radiometer [UV-multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (UV-MFRSR), U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) UV-B Monitoring and Research Network] colocated with a group of three sun-sky CIMEL radiometers [rotating reference instruments of the NASA Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET)]. We describe an improved UV-MFRSR on-site calibration method augmented by AERONET-CIMEL measurements of aerosol extinction optical thickness (τa) interpolated or extrapolated to the UV-MFRSR wavelengths and measurement intervals. The estimated τa is used as input to a UV-MFRSR spectral-band model, along with independent column ozone and surface pressure measurements, to estimate zero air mass voltages V0 in three longer wavelength UV-MFRSR channels (325, 332, 368 nm). Daily mean , estimates and standard deviations are obtained for cloud-free conditions and compared with the on-site UV-MFRSR Langley plot calibration method. By repeating the calibrations on clear days, relatively good stability (+/-2% in ) is found in summer, with larger relative changes in fall-winter seasons.

  20. Merging aerosol optical depth data from multiple satellite missions to view agricultural biomass burning in Central and East China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Y.; Xu, H.; Mei, L.; Guang, J.; Guo, J.; Li, Y.; Hou, T.; Li, C.; Yang, L.; He, X.

    2012-04-01

    Agricultural biomass burning (ABB) in Central and East China occurs every year from May to October and peaks in June. The biomass burning event in June 2007 was very strong. During the period from 26 May to 16 June 2007, ABB occurred mainly in Anhui, Henan, Jiangsu and Shandong provinces. A comprehensive set of aerosol optical depth (AOD) data, produced by a merger of AOD product data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MIRS), is used to study the spatial and temporal distribution of agricultural biomass aerosols in Central and East China combining with ground observations from both AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and China Aerosol Remote Sensing NETwork (CARSNET) measurements. We compared merged AOD data with single-sensor single-algorithm AOD data (MODIS Dark Target AOD data, MODIS Deep Blue AOD data, SRAP-MODIS AOD data and MISR AOD data). In this comparison, we found merged AOD products can improve the quality of AOD products from single-sensor single-algorithm data sets by expanding the spatial coverage of the study area and keeping the statistical confidence in AOD parameters. There existed high correlation (0.8479) between the merged AOD data and AERONET measurements. Our merged AOD data make use of synergetic information conveyed in all of the available satellite data. The merged AOD data were used for the analysis of the biomass burning event from 26 May to 16 June 2007 together with meteorological data. The merged AOD products and the ground observations from China suggest that biomass burning in Central and East China has had great impact on AOD over China. Influenced by this ABB, the highest AOD value in Beijing on 12 June 2007 reached 5.71.

  1. Highlights from 4STAR Sky-Scanning Retrievals of Aerosol Intensive Optical Properties from Multiple Field Campaigns with Detailed Comparisons of SSA Reported During SEAC4RS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunagan, Stephen E.

    2016-01-01

    The 4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research) instrument combines airborne sun tracking capabilities of the Ames Airborne Tracking Sun Photometer (AATS-14) with AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network)-like sky-scanning capability and adds state-of-the-art fiber-coupled grating spectrometry to yield hyperspectral measurements of direct solar irradiance and angularly resolved sky radiance. The combination of sun-tracking and sky-scanning capability enables retrievals of wavelength-dependent aerosol optical depth (AOD), mode-resolved aerosol size distribution (SD), asphericity, and complex refractive index, and thus also the scattering phase function, asymmetry parameter, single-scattering albedo (SSA), and absorption aerosol optical thickness (AAOT). From 2012 to 2014 4STAR participated in four major field campaigns: the U.S. Dept. of Energy's TCAP (Two-Column Aerosol Project) I & II campaigns, and NASA's SEAC4RS (Studies of Emissions, Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys) and ARISE (Arctic Radiation - IceBridge Sea & Ice Experiment) campaigns. Establishing a strong performance record, 4STAR operated successfully on all flights conducted during each of these campaigns. Sky radiance spectra from scans in either constant azimuth (principal plane) or constant zenith angle (almucantar) were interspersed with direct beam measurements during level legs. During SEAC4RS and ARISE, 4STAR airborne measurements were augmented with flight-level albedo from the collocated Shortwave Spectral Flux Radiometer (SSFR) providing improved specification of below-aircraft radiative conditions for the retrieval. Calibrated radiances and retrieved products will be presented with particular emphasis on detailed comparisons of ambient SSA retrievals and measurements during SEAC4RS from 4STAR, AERONET, HSRL2 (High Spectral Resolution Lidar), and from in situ measurements.

  2. Characteristics of atmospheric aerosol optical depth variation in China during 1993-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaofeng; Qiu, Jinhuan; Xia, Xiangao; Sun, Ling; Min, Min

    2015-10-01

    The long-term variations of atmospheric aerosol optical depth (AOD) over 14 first-class solar radiation stations in China during 1993-2012 are studied. The AOD at 750 nm wavelength is retrieved with the hourly accumulated direct solar radiation by using a broadband extinction method. The retrievals are validated in comparison with AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) and MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) AOD products. For the comparison with AERONET, the correlation coefficient (R), mean bias error (MBE) and root mean square error (RMSE) of the monthly mean AODs are respectively 0.848, 0.029 and 0.101. Based on the statistical analysis, the monthly, seasonal and annual AOD variation characteristics are categorized as follow: (1) There are three major types of the seasonal AOD variations, which shows the largest seasonal averaged AOD appearing in spring, summer and winter. The smallest seasonal averaged AOD appears mostly in autumn. (2) Beijing and Guangzhou show a significant decreasing trend of the yearly AOD, while an increasing tendency appears in Zhengzhou, Shanghai, Kunming, Kashi and Wuhan. Although no significant variation trends are found, some fluctuations appear in the 20-year period in other cities. (3) The 20-year mean AOD ranges from 0.135 (Lhasa) to 0.678 (Zhengzhou). The aerosol hygroscopic growth contributes a lot to AOD in major cities in the eastern part of China, while not in most cities in the western part. A simple correction method is applied for enhancing the relationship of AOD and PM2.5 concentration.

  3. Simultaneous Retrieval of Aerosol Optical Depth and Surface Reflectance over Land within Short Temporal Interval Using MSG Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Xue, Y.; Li, Y. J.; Yang, L. K.; Hou, T. T.

    2012-04-01

    resolution of 10 km. Preliminary validation results by comparing our retrieved AOD with Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data show that the correlation coefficient R is about 0.81, the root-mean-square error (RMSE) is less than 0.1, and the uncertainty is found to be Δτ = ± 0.05 ± 0.20τ. Time serial comparison of MSG and AERONET AODs on Granada site also shows a good fitting. To conclude, this algorithm shows its potential to retrieve real-time AODs over land from geostationary satellites.

  4. Techniques of Validation of Aerosol and Water Vapor Retrievals From MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichoku, Charles; Chu, Allen; Mattoo, Shana; Kaufman, Yoram; Remer, Lorraine; Tanre, Didier; Slutsker, Ilya; Holben, Brent N.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Aerosols are extremely important for global climate studies and modeling in the quest to characterize the global radiation budget and forcing. The physical characteristics, composition, abundance, and spatial distribution and dynamics of aerosols are still very poorly known. Aerosol column optical thickness and other parameters as well as column precipitable water vapor amount are some of the main atmospheric parameters retrieved from the MODIS instrument on board the Terra satellite. To ensure the reliability of these parameters, we have embarked on a very massive validation effort. This involves cross correlation between the retrievals from the satellite data and those obtained from sunphotometer measurements at a large number of ground stations spread throughout the globe. Notable among these ground stations is a large network of over 100 stations coordinated under the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) project. Whereas MODIS retrieves the aerosol parameters throughout the globe once or twice a day during the daytime, the ground measurements cover only discrete locations of the earth, though the retrievals are done several times a day. We have devised a method to. match the MODIS and ground retrievals through spatial statistics for the MODIS data and temporal statistics for the ground data. This has produced good comparisons and has enabled the validation of MODIS aerosol and water vapor retrievals at over 100 discrete locations in various parts of the earth both over the land and over the ocean. Currently, the validation statistical data is produced routinely by the MODIS aerosol group and is even available not only for validation but also for use by the science community for short and long term studies at various parts of the earth. One important advantage is that the system can be expanded to incorporate more locations where ground measurements and other studies may be conducted at any time during the lifetime of MODIS.

  5. Deriving brown carbon from multiwavelength absorption measurements: Method and application to AERONET and Aethalometer observations

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, X.; Heald, C. L.; Sedlacek, A.; de Sa, S. S.; Martin, S. T.; Alexander, M. L.; Watson, T. B.; Aiken, A. C.; Springston, S. R.; Artaxo, P.

    2016-10-13

    The radiative impact of organic aerosols (OA) is a large source of uncertainty in estimating the global direct radiative effect (DRE) of aerosols. This radiative impact includes not only light scattering but also light absorption from a subclass of OA referred to as brown carbon (BrC). However the absorption properties of BrC are poorly understood leading to large uncertainties in modelling studies. To obtain observational constraints from measurements, a simple Absorption Ångström Exponent (AAE) method is often used to separate the contribution of BrC absorption from that of black carbon (BC). However, this attribution method is based on assumptions regardingmore » the spectral dependence of BC that are often violated in the ambient atmosphere. Here we develop a new method that decreases the uncertainties associated with estimating BrC absorption. By applying this method to multi-wavelength absorption aerosol optical depth (AAOD) measurements at AERONET sites worldwide and surface aerosol absorption measurements at multiple ambient sites, we estimate that BrC globally contributes 6-40% of the absorption at 440nm. We find that the mass absorption coefficient of OA (OA-MAC) is positively correlated with BC/OA mass ratio. Based on the variability of BC properties and BC/OA emission ratio, we estimate a range of 0.05-1.2 m2/g for OA-MAC at 440nm. Using the combination of AERONET and OMI UV absorption observations we estimate that the AAE388/440nm for BrC is generally ~4 world-wide, with a smaller value in Europe (< 2). Our analyses of two surface sites (Cape Cod, to the southeast of Boston, and the GoAmazon2014/5 T3 site, to the west of Manaus, Brazil) reveal no significant relationship between BrC absorptivity and photochemical aging in typical urban influenced conditions. However, the absorption of BrC measured during the biomass burning season near Manaus is found to decrease with photochemical aging with a lifetime of ~1 day. This lifetime is comparable to

  6. Estimating absorbing black carbon and organic carbon optical properties from AERONET and MISR data over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, B.; Ramanathan, V.; Huang, J.; Zhang, G. J.; Xu, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The radiative forcing due to carbonaceous aerosols is one of the largest source of uncertainties in global and regional climate change. Black carbon and organic carbon from biomass and fossil fuel are two major types of carbonaceous aerosols. In this study we use available ground based and satellite observations to infer the optical properties of black and organic carbon. NASA's AERONET and MISR data over East Asia provide the observational basis. We use the spectral variations in the observed aerosol extinction optical depth and absorption optical depth to categorize the optical properties including their mixing state with other aerosols such as dust and other inorganic aerosols. We create 8 different categories of aerosol mixtures: Dust, Biomass Burning, Fossil Fuel, Aged Fossil Fuel, Mixed Dust with Biomass Burning, Mixed Dust with Aged Fossil Fuel, Mixed Biomass Burning with Fossil Fuel, and Mixed Dust, Biomass Burning, with Fossil Fuel, over the following 6 regions of East Asia: Nepal, Gobi, North Industrial China, South Industrial China, Southeast Asia, and Korea/Japan. Our results are compared with independent surface observations over China using Aethalometers and Single Particle Soot Photometers.

  7. Deriving brown carbon from multiwavelength absorption measurements: method and application to AERONET and Aethalometer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuan; Heald, Colette L.; Sedlacek, Arthur J.; de Sá, Suzane S.; Martin, Scot T.; Lizabeth Alexander, M.; Watson, Thomas B.; Aiken, Allison C.; Springston, Stephen R.; Artaxo, Paulo

    2016-10-01

    The radiative impact of organic aerosols (OA) is a large source of uncertainty in estimating the global direct radiative effect (DRE) of aerosols. This radiative impact includes not only light scattering but also light absorption from a subclass of OA referred to as brown carbon (BrC). However, the absorption properties of BrC are poorly understood, leading to large uncertainties in modeling studies. To obtain observational constraints from measurements, a simple absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) method is often used to separate the contribution of BrC absorption from that of black carbon (BC). However, this attribution method is based on assumptions regarding the spectral dependence of BC that are often violated in the ambient atmosphere. Here we develop a new AAE method which improves upon previous approaches by using the information from the wavelength-dependent measurements themselves and by allowing for an atmospherically relevant range of BC properties, rather than fixing these at a single assumed value. We note that constraints on BC optical properties and mixing state would help further improve this method. We apply this method to multiwavelength absorption aerosol optical depth (AAOD) measurements at AERONET sites worldwide and surface aerosol absorption measurements at multiple ambient sites. We estimate that BrC globally contributes up to 40 % of the seasonally averaged absorption at 440 nm. We find that the mass absorption coefficient of OA (OA-MAC) is positively correlated with the BC / OA mass ratio. Based on the variability in BC properties and BC / OA emission ratio, we estimate a range of 0.05-1.5 m2 g-1 for OA-MAC at 440 nm. Using the combination of AERONET and OMI UV absorption observations we estimate that the AAE388/440 nm for BrC is generally ˜ 4 worldwide, with a smaller value in Europe (< 2). Our analyses of observations at two surface sites (Cape Cod, to the southeast of Boston, and the GoAmazon2014/5 T3 site, to the west of

  8. Application of spectral analysis techniques to the intercomparison of aerosol data - Part 4: Combined maximum covariance analysis to bridge the gap between multi-sensor satellite retrievals and ground-based measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Carlson, B. E.; Lacis, A. A.

    2014-04-01

    The development of remote sensing techniques has greatly advanced our knowledge of atmospheric aerosols. Various satellite sensors and the associated retrieval algorithms all add to the information of global aerosol variability, while well-designed surface networks provide time series of highly accurate measurements at specific locations. In studying the variability of aerosol properties, aerosol climate effects, and constraining aerosol fields in climate models, it is essential to make the best use of all of the available information. In the previous three parts of this series, we demonstrated the usefulness of several spectral decomposition techniques in the analysis and comparison of temporal and spatial variability of aerosol optical depth using satellite and ground-based measurements. Specifically, Principal Component Analysis (PCA) successfully captures and isolates seasonal and interannual variability from different aerosol source regions, Maximum Covariance Analysis (MCA) provides a means to verify the variability in one satellite dataset against Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data, and Combined Principal Component Analysis (CPCA) realized parallel comparison among multi-satellite, multi-sensor datasets. As the final part of the study, this paper introduces a novel technique that integrates both multi-sensor datasets and ground observations, and thus effectively bridges the gap between these two types of measurements. The Combined Maximum Covariance Analysis (CMCA) decomposes the cross covariance matrix between the combined multi-sensor satellite data field and AERONET station data. We show that this new method not only confirms the seasonal and interannual variability of aerosol optical depth, aerosol source regions and events represented by different satellite datasets, but also identifies the strengths and weaknesses of each dataset in capturing the variability associated with sources, events or aerosol types. Furthermore, by examining the spread of

  9. In-situ, sunphotometer and Raman lidar observations of aerosol transport events in the western Mediterranean during the June 2013 ChArMEx campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totems, Julien; Sicard, Michael; Bertolin, Santi; Boytard, Mai-Lan; Chazette, Patrick; Comeron, Adolfo; Dulac, Francois; Hassanzadeh, Sahar; Lange, Diego; Marnas, Fabien; Munoz, Constantino; Shang, Xiaoxia

    2014-05-01

    We present a preliminary analysis of aerosol observations performed in June 2013 in the western Mediterranean at two stations set up in Barcelona and Menorca (Spain) in the framework of the ChArMEx (Chemistry Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment) project. The Barcelona station was equipped with the following fixed instruments belonging to the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC): an AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) sun-photometer, an MPL (Micro Pulse Lidar) lidar and the UPC multi-wavelength lidar. The MPL lidar works at 532 nm and has a depolarization channel, while the UPC lidar works at 355, 532 and 1064 nm, and also includes two N2- (at 387 and 607 nm) and one H2O-Raman (at 407 nm) channels. The MPL system works continuously 24 hour/day. The UPC system was operated on alert in coordination with the research aircrafts plans involved in the campaign. In Cap d'en Font, Menorca, the mobile laboratory of the Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement hosted an automated (AERONET) and a manual (Microtops) 5-lambda sunphotometer, a 3-lambda nephelometer, a 7-lambda aethalometer, as well as the LSCE Water vapor Aerosol LIdar (WALI). This mini Raman lidar, first developed and validated for the HyMEX (Hydrological cycle in the Mediterranean eXperiment) campaign in 2012, works at 355 nm for eye safety and is designed with a short overlap distance (<300m) to probe the lower troposphere. It includes depolarization, N2- and H2O-Raman channels. H2O observations have been calibrated on-site by different methods and show good agreement with balloon measurements. Observations at Cap d'en Font were quasi-continuous from June 10th to July 3rd, 2013. The lidar data at both stations helped direct the research aircrafts and balloon launches to interesting plumes of particles in real time for in-situ measurements. Among some light pollution background from the European continent, a typical Saharan dust event and an unusual American dust/biomass burning event are

  10. Inventory of African desert dust events in the north-central Iberian Peninsula in 2003-2014 based on sun-photometer-AERONET and particulate-mass-EMEP data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cachorro, Victoria E.; Burgos, Maria A.; Mateos, David; Toledano, Carlos; Bennouna, Yasmine; Torres, Benjamín; de Frutos, Ángel M.; Herguedas, Álvaro

    2016-07-01

    A reliable identification of desert dust (DD) episodes over north-central Spain is carried out based on the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) columnar aerosol sun photometer (aerosol optical depth, AOD, and Ångström exponent, α) and European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) surface particulate-mass concentration (PMx, x = 10, 2.5, and 2.5-10 µm) as the main core data. The impact of DD on background aerosol conditions is detectable by means of aerosol load thresholds and complementary information provided by HYSPLIT (Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory Model) air mass back trajectories, MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) images, forecast aerosol models, and synoptic maps, which have been carefully reviewed by a human observer for each day included in the DD inventory. This identification method allows the detection of low and moderate DD intrusions and also of mixtures of mineral dust with other aerosol types by means of the analysis of α. During the period studied (2003-2014), a total of 152 DD episodes composed of 418 days are identified. Overall, this means ˜ 13 episodes and ˜ 35 days per year with DD intrusion, representing 9.5 % days year-1. During the identified DD intrusions, 19 daily exceedances over 50 µg m-3 are reported at the surface. The occurrence of DD event days during the year peaks in March and June, with a marked minimum in April and lowest occurrence in winter. A large interannual variability is observed showing a statistically significant temporal decreasing trend of ˜ 3 days year-1. The DD impact on the aerosol climatology is addressed by evaluating the DD contribution in magnitude and percent (in brackets) for AOD, PM10, PM2.5, and PM2.5 - 10, obtaining mean values of 0.015 (11.5 %), 1.3 µg m-3 (11.8 %), 0.55 µg m-3 (8.5 %) and 0.79 µg m-3 (16.1 %), respectively. Annual cycles of the DD contribution for AOD and PM10 present two maxima - one in summer (0.03 and 2.4 µg m-3 for AOD in

  11. Spatial and Temporal Characteristics of Aerosols from Collection 6 Aqua and Terra MODIS e-Deep Blue Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettenhausen, C.; Hsu, N. Y. C.; Sayer, A. M.; Lee, J.; Carletta, N.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosols continue to attract a significant amount of attention from researchers worldwide due to their extensive effects on Earth's climate, ecology, public health, and even energy production. In order to truly understand these effects, a long, stable, and well-calibrated data record is required. Since 2000 and 2002, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments aboard the Terra and Aqua satellites together with the e-Deep Blue aerosol retrieval algorithm have been providing such a data record. After a multi-year development effort, the production of both Aqua and Terra MODIS Collection 6 (C6) atmosphere products successfully completed earlier this year and the data was released to the public shortly thereafter. The C6 Deep Blue products (now enhanced Deep Blue or e-Deep Blue) have been significantly improved over the previous Collection 5.1 version. In this poster we provide an overview of the latest C6 e-Deep Blue products and the improvements implemented since the previous collection including coverage over dark surfaces and updates to the Terra calibration. Validation results utilizing Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data are also summarized. We then use the C6 e-Deep Blue products from both Aqua and Terra to explore the spatial characteristics in addition to the seasonal and inter-annual variability of aerosols on both regional and global scales. We also use this as an opportunity to compare these results and investigate any differences found between the two instruments.

  12. Column-integrated aerosol optical properties and direct radiative forcing over the urban-industrial megacity Nanjing in the Yangtze River Delta, China.

    PubMed

    Kang, Na; Kumar, K Raghavendra; Yu, Xingna; Yin, Yan

    2016-09-01

    Aerosol optical properties were measured and analyzed through the ground-based remote sensing Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) over an urban-industrial site, Nanjing (32.21° N, 118.72° E, and 62 m above sea level), in the Yangtze River Delta, China, during September 2007-August 2008. The annual averaged values of aerosol optical depth (AOD500) and the Ångström exponent (AE440-870) were measured to be 0.94 ± 0.52 and 1.10 ± 0.21, respectively. The seasonal averaged values of AOD500 (AE440-870) were noticed to be high in summer (autumn) and low in autumn (spring). The characterization of aerosol types showed the dominance of mixed type followed by the biomass burning and urban-industrial type of aerosol at Nanjing. Subsequently, the curvature (a 2) obtained from the second-order polynomial fit and the second derivative of AE (α') were also analyzed to understand the dominant aerosol type. The single scattering albedo at 440 nm (SSA440) varied from 0.88 to 0.93 with relatively lower (higher) values during the summer (spring), suggesting an increase in black carbon and mineral dust (desert dust) aerosols of absorbing (scattering) nature. The averaged monthly and seasonal evolutions of shortwave (0.3-4.0 μm) direct aerosol radiative forcing (DARF) values were computed from the Santa Barbara DISORT Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART) model both at the top of atmosphere (TOA) and bottom of atmosphere (SUR) during the study period. Further, the aerosol forcing efficiency (AFE) and the corresponding atmospheric heating rates (AHR) were also estimated from the forcing within the atmosphere (ATM). The derived DARF values, therefore, produced a warming effect within the atmosphere due to strong absorption of solar radiation.

  13. Column-integrated aerosol optical properties and direct radiative forcing over the urban-industrial megacity Nanjing in the Yangtze River Delta, China.

    PubMed

    Kang, Na; Kumar, K Raghavendra; Yu, Xingna; Yin, Yan

    2016-09-01

    Aerosol optical properties were measured and analyzed through the ground-based remote sensing Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) over an urban-industrial site, Nanjing (32.21° N, 118.72° E, and 62 m above sea level), in the Yangtze River Delta, China, during September 2007-August 2008. The annual averaged values of aerosol optical depth (AOD500) and the Ångström exponent (AE440-870) were measured to be 0.94 ± 0.52 and 1.10 ± 0.21, respectively. The seasonal averaged values of AOD500 (AE440-870) were noticed to be high in summer (autumn) and low in autumn (spring). The characterization of aerosol types showed the dominance of mixed type followed by the biomass burning and urban-industrial type of aerosol at Nanjing. Subsequently, the curvature (a 2) obtained from the second-order polynomial fit and the second derivative of AE (α') were also analyzed to understand the dominant aerosol type. The single scattering albedo at 440 nm (SSA440) varied from 0.88 to 0.93 with relatively lower (higher) values during the summer (spring), suggesting an increase in black carbon and mineral dust (desert dust) aerosols of absorbing (scattering) nature. The averaged monthly and seasonal evolutions of shortwave (0.3-4.0 μm) direct aerosol radiative forcing (DARF) values were computed from the Santa Barbara DISORT Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART) model both at the top of atmosphere (TOA) and bottom of atmosphere (SUR) during the study period. Further, the aerosol forcing efficiency (AFE) and the corresponding atmospheric heating rates (AHR) were also estimated from the forcing within the atmosphere (ATM). The derived DARF values, therefore, produced a warming effect within the atmosphere due to strong absorption of solar radiation. PMID:27234827

  14. Synergistic analyses of optical and microphysical properties of agricultural crop residue burning aerosols over the Indo-Gangetic Basin (IGB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Amit Kumar; Shibata, Takashi

    2012-09-01

    Agriculture crop residue burning is one of the important sources of trace gas emissions and aerosol loading over the Indo-Gangetic Basin (IGB). The present study deals with the spatial variability including the vertical structure of optical and microphysical properties of aerosols, during the crop residue burning season (October and November) of 2009 over the IGB. Increased number of fire counts observed by MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) that is associated with high aerosol optical depth (MODIS-AOD > 0.7) and enhanced tropospheric columnar NO2 concentrations observed by OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument), suggests agriculture crop residue burning as a main source of aerosol loading over the IGB during October and November. PARASOL (Polarization and Anisotropy of Reflectances for Atmospheric Science coupled with Observations from a Lidar) observations show an increase in fine mode AOD (at 865 nm) from October (0.1-0.2) to November (0.2-0.3) over the IGB, which is well corroborated with MODIS observations. CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) data shows the elevated aerosol plume (4.0-4.5 km) over the north-west IGB (associated with burning activities) that could have been caused by positive buoyancy through pyro-convection. However, large concentrations of aerosol were found below 1.0 km altitude. The averaged vertical structure of crop residue burning aerosols shows an exponential decrease with altitude (mean scale height ˜1.44 ± 0.20 km). Aerosol optical and microphysical properties coupled with backward air trajectories analyses at Kanpur indicated regional transport of biomass burning aerosols in a downwind direction from north-west IGB to south-east IGB. Aerosol classification, using AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork)-derived absorption properties coupled with size parameter (2006-2010) showed clear seasonal dependency of aerosol types which revealed the presence of biomass burning aerosols only during the crop

  15. Retrieval of aerosol optical depth over land using MSG/SEVIRI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, Lu; Xue, Yong; Guang, Jie; Di, Aojie

    2016-04-01

    In the present study we proposed an algorithm to estimate hourly Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) using multi-temporal data from SEVIRI aboard Meteosat Second Generation (MSG). The algorithm coupled a Radiative Transfer Model with Ross-Li-sparse bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF) to calculate the AOD and bidirectional reflectance simultaneously using the visible and near-infrared (NIR) channel of SEVIRI data. We assume the surface albedo doesn't vary over a short time (e.g. 1 day), and a κ-ratio approach was used which assumes the ratio of surface reflectance in the visible and NIR channel for two observations is the same. In the inversion, the MODIS product (MCD43) was used as the prior information of the surface reflectance and the single scattering albedo (SSA) and asymmetry factor (g) were derived from six pre-defined aerosol types. The retrieved AOD and AngstrÖm exponent α were compared with Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measurements, which shows good consistency.

  16. The importance of temporal collocation for the evaluation of aerosol models with observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schutgens, N. A. J.; Partridge, D. G.; Stier, P.

    2016-01-01

    It is often implicitly assumed that over suitably long periods the mean of observations and models should be comparable, even if they have different temporal sampling. We assess the errors incurred due to ignoring temporal sampling and show that they are of similar magnitude as (but smaller than) actual model errors (20-60 %).Using temporal sampling from remote-sensing data sets, the satellite imager MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) and the ground-based sun photometer network AERONET (AErosol Robotic NETwork), and three different global aerosol models, we compare annual and monthly averages of full model data to sampled model data. Our results show that sampling errors as large as 100 % in AOT (aerosol optical thickness), 0.4 in AE (Ångström Exponent) and 0.05 in SSA (single scattering albedo) are possible. Even in daily averages, sampling errors can be significant. Moreover these sampling errors are often correlated over long distances giving rise to artificial contrasts between pristine and polluted events and regions. Additionally, we provide evidence that suggests that models will underestimate these errors. To prevent sampling errors, model data should be temporally collocated to the observations before any analysis is made.We also discuss how this work has consequences for in situ measurements (e.g. aircraft campaigns or surface measurements) in model evaluation.Although this study is framed in the context of model evaluation, it has a clear and direct relevance to climatologies derived from observational data sets.

  17. Effects of Data Quality on the Characterization of Aerosol Properties from Multiple Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrenko, Maksym; Ichoku, Charles; Leptoukh, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    Cross-comparison of aerosol properties between ground-based and spaceborne measurements is an important validation technique that helps to investigate the uncertainties of aerosol products acquired using spaceborne sensors. However, it has been shown that even minor differences in the cross-characterization procedure may significantly impact the results of such validation. Of particular consideration is the quality assurance I quality control (QA/QC) information - an auxiliary data indicating a "confidence" level (e.g., Bad, Fair, Good, Excellent, etc.) conferred by the retrieval algorithms on the produced data. Depending on the treatment of available QA/QC information, a cross-characterization procedure has the potential of filtering out invalid data points, such as uncertain or erroneous retrievals, which tend to reduce the credibility of such comparisons. However, under certain circumstances, even high QA/QC values may not fully guarantee the quality of the data. For example, retrievals in proximity of a cloud might be particularly perplexing for an aerosol retrieval algorithm, resulting in an invalid data that, nonetheless, could be assigned a high QA/QC confidence. In this presentation, we will study the effects of several QA/QC parameters on cross-characterization of aerosol properties between the data acquired by multiple spaceborne sensors. We will utilize the Multi-sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System (MAPSS) that provides a consistent platform for multi-sensor comparison, including collocation with measurements acquired by the ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET), The multi-sensor spaceborne data analyzed include those acquired by the Terra-MODIS, Aqua-MODIS, Terra-MISR, Aura-OMI, Parasol-POLDER, and CalipsoCALIOP satellite instruments.

  18. Remote sensing of aerosols over snow using infrared AATSR observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istomina, L. G.; von Hoyningen-Huene, W.; Kokhanovsky, A. A.; Schultz, E.; Burrows, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    Infrared (IR) retrievals of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) are challenging because of the low reflectance of aerosol layer at longer wavelengths. In this paper we present a closer analysis of this problem, performed with radiative transfer (RT) simulations for coarse and accumulation mode of four main aerosol components. It shows the strong angular dependence of aerosol IR reflectance at low solar elevations resulting from significant asymmetry of aerosol phase function at these wavelengths. This results in detectable values of aerosol IR reflectance at certain non-nadir observation angles providing the advantage of multiangle remote sensing instruments for a retrieval of AOT at longer wavelengths. Such retrievals can be of importance e.g. in case of a very strong effect of the surface on the top of atmosphere (TOA) reflectance in the visible range of spectrum. In current work, a new method to retrieve AOT over snow has been developed using the measurements of Advanced Along Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR) on board the ENVISAT satellite. The algorithm uses AATSR channel at 3.7 μm and utilizes its dual-viewing observation technique implying the forward view with an observation zenith angle around 55 degrees and the nadir view. It includes cloud/snow discrimination, extraction of the atmospheric reflectance out of measured brightness temperature (BT) at 3.7 μm, interpolation of look-up tables (LUTs) for a given aerosol reflectance. The algorithm uses LUTs, separately simulated with RT forward calculations. The resulting AOT at 500 nm is estimated from the value at 3.7 μm using a fixed Angström parameter. The presented method has been validated against ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data for 4 high Arctic stations and shows good agreement. A case study has been performed at W-Greenland on 5 July 2008. The day before was characterized by a noticeable dust event. The retrieved AOT maps of the region show a clear increase of AOT in the

  19. Remote sensing of aerosols over snow using infrared AATSR observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istomina, L. G.; von Hoyningen-Huene, W.; Kokhanovsky, A. A.; Schultz, E.; Burrows, J. P.

    2011-06-01

    Infrared (IR) retrievals of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) are challenging because of the low reflectance of aerosol layer at longer wavelengths. In this paper we present a closer analysis of this problem, performed with radiative transfer (RT) simulations for coarse and accumulation mode of four main aerosol components. It shows the strong angular dependence of aerosol IR reflectance at low solar elevations resulting from the significant asymmetry of aerosol phase function at these wavelengths. This results in detectable values of aerosol IR reflectance at certain non-nadir observation angles providing the advantage of multiangle remote sensing instruments for a retrieval of AOT at longer wavelengths. Such retrievals can be of importance e.g. in case of a very strong effect of the surface on the top of atmosphere (TOA) reflectance in the visible spectral range. In the current work, a new method to retrieve AOT of the coarse and accumulation mode particles over snow has been developed using the measurements of Advanced Along Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR) on board the ENVISAT satellite. The algorithm uses AATSR channel at 3.7 μm and utilizes its dual-viewing observation technique, implying the forward view with an observation zenith angle of around 55 degrees and the nadir view. It includes cloud/snow discrimination, extraction of the atmospheric reflectance out of measured brightness temperature (BT) at 3.7 μm, and interpolation of look-up tables (LUTs) for a given aerosol reflectance. The algorithm uses LUTs, separately simulated with RT forward calculations. The resulting AOT at 500 nm is estimated from the value at 3.7 μm using a fixed Angström parameter. The presented method has been validated against ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data for 4 high Arctic stations and shows good agreement. A case study has been performed at W-Greenland on 5 July 2008. The day before was characterized by a noticeable dust event. The retrieved AOT maps of

  20. Modeling South America regional smoke plume: aerosol optical depth variability and shortwave surface forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosário, N. E.; Longo, K. M.; Freitas, S. R.; Yamasoe, M. A.; Fonseca, R. M.

    2012-07-01

    Intra-seasonal variability of smoke aerosol optical depth (AOD) and downwelling solar irradiance at the surface during the 2002 biomass burning season in South America was modeled using the Coupled Chemistry-Aerosol-Tracer Transport model to the Brazilian developments on the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (CCATT-BRAMS). Measurements of AOD from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and solar irradiance at the surface from the Solar Radiation Network (SolRad-NET) were used to evaluate model results. In general, the major features associated with AOD evolution over the southern part of the Amazon Basin and cerrado ecosystem are captured by the model. The main discrepancies were found for high aerosol loading events. In the northeastern portion of the Amazon Basin the model systematically underestimated AOD. This is likely due to the cloudy nature of the region, preventing accurate detection of the fire spots used in the emission model. Moreover, measured AOD were very often close to background conditions and emissions other than smoke were not considered in the simulation. Therefore, under the background scenario, one would expect the model to underestimate AOD. The issue of high aerosol loading events in the southern part of the Amazon and cerrado is also discussed in the context of emission shortcomings. The Cuiabá cerrado site was the only one where the highest quality AERONET data were unavailable. Thus, lower quality data were used. Root-mean-square-error (RMSE) between the model and observations decreased from 0.48 to 0.17 when extreme AOD events (AOD550 nm ≥ 1.0) and Cuiabá were excluded from analysis. Downward surface solar irradiance comparisons also followed similar trends when extremes AOD were excluded. This highlights the need to improve the modelling of the regional smoke plume in order to enhance the accuracy of the radiative energy budget. Aerosol optical model based on the mean intensive properties of smoke from the southern part of the

  1. New developments in the representation of Saharan dust sources in the aerosol-climate model ECHAM6-HAM2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinold, Bernd; Tegen, Ina; Schepanski, Kerstin; Banks, Jamie R.

    2016-02-01

    In the aerosol-climate model ECHAM6-HAM2, dust source activation (DSA) observations from Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellite are proposed to replace the original source area parameterization over the Sahara Desert. The new setup is tested in nudged simulations for the period 2007 to 2008. The evaluation is based on comparisons to dust emission events inferred from MSG dust index imagery, Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun photometer observations, and satellite retrievals of aerosol optical thickness (AOT).The model results agree well with AERONET measurements especially in terms of seasonal variability, and a good spatial correlation was found between model results and MSG-SEVIRI (Spinning-Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager) dust AOT as well as Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) AOT. ECHAM6-HAM2 computes a more realistic geographical distribution and up to 20 % higher annual Saharan dust emissions, using the MSG-based source map. The representation of dust AOT is partly improved in the southern Sahara and Sahel. In addition, the spatial variability is increased towards a better agreement with observations depending on the season. Thus, using the MSG DSA map can help to circumvent the issue of uncertain soil input parameters.An important issue remains the need to improve the model representation of moist convection and stable nighttime conditions. Compared to sub-daily DSA information from MSG-SEVIRI and results from a regional model, ECHAM6-HAM2 notably underestimates the important fraction of morning dust events by the breakdown of the nocturnal low-level jet, while a major contribution is from afternoon-to-evening emissions.

  2. Global and Regional Evaluation of Over-Land Spectral Aerosol Optical Depth Retrievals from SeaWiFS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.; Bettenhausen, C.; Jeong, M. J.; Holben, B. N.; Zhang, J.

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluates a new spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD) dataset derived from Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (Sea WiFS) measurements over land. First, the data are validated against Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) direct-sun AOD measurements, and found to compare well on a global basis. If only data with the highest quality flag are used, the correlation is 0.86 and 72% of matchups fall within an expected absolute uncertainty of 0.05 + 20% (for the wavelength of 550 nm). The quality is similar at other wavelengths and stable over the 13-year (1997-2010) mission length. Performance tends to be better over vegetated, low-lying terrain with typical AOD of 0.3 or less, such as found over much of North America and Eurasia. Performance tends to be poorer for low-AOD conditions near backscattering geometries, where Sea WiFS overestimates AOD, or optically-thick cases of absorbing aerosol, where SeaWiFS tends to underestimate AOD. Second, the SeaWiFS data are compared with midvisible AOD derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) and Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR). All instruments show similar spatial and seasonal distributions of AOD, although there are regional and seasonal offsets between them. At locations where AERONET data are available, these offsets are largely consistent with the known validation characteristics of each dataset. With the results of this study in mind, the SeaWiFS over-land AOD record should be suitable for quantitative scientific use.

  3. A Model for the Transport of Sea-Spray Aerosols in the Coastal Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazzola, J.; Tedeschi, G.; Demoisson, A.

    2015-05-01

    We study the dynamics of sea-spray particles in the coastal region of La Reunion Island on the basis of numerical simulations using the transport aerosol model MACMod (Marine Aerosol Concentration Model) and a survey of the aerosol size distributions measured at four locations at two different heights in the north-west part of the island. This allows evaluation of the performance of our model in case of pure marine air masses with implementation of accurate boundary conditions. First of all, an estimate of the aerosol concentration at 10-m height at the upwind boundary of the calculation domain is obtained using a revisited version of the MEDEX (Mediterranean Extinction) model. Estimates of the vertical profile of aerosol concentrations are then provided using aerosol data obtained at two different heights at the upwind boundary of the calculation domain. A parametrization of the vertical profiles of aerosol concentrations for maritime environment is proposed. The results are then compared to the vertical profiles of 0.532 m aerosol particle extinction coefficient obtained from lidar data provided by the Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and also to the data provided by the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). This allows validation of the complete vertical profiles in the mixed layer and shows the validity of satellite data for determination of the vertical profiles. Two kinds of simulation were made: one without a particle advection flux at the upwind boundary of the numerical domain, whereas the second simulation was made with a particle advection flux. In the first case, the influence of the distance to the shoreline on the local sea-spray dynamics is investigated. In the second set of simulation, the particles issued from the local production in the surf zone near the shoreline are mixed with aerosols advected from the remote ocean. A good agreement between the model calculations using our boundary conditions and the data was found. The

  4. Application of the LIRIC algorithm for the characterization of aerosols during the Airborne Romanian Measurements of Aerosols and Trace gases (AROMAT) campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanie, Horatiu; Nicolae, Doina; Nemuc, Anca; Belegante, Livio; Toanca, Florica; Ajtai, Nicolae; Ozunu, Alexandru

    2015-04-01

    The ESA/ESTEC AROMAT campaign (Airborne Romanian Measurements of Aerosols and Trace gases) was held between 1st and 14th of September 2014 with the purpose to test and inter-compare newly developed airborne and ground-based instruments dedicated to air quality studies in the context of validation programs of the forthcoming European Space Agency satellites (Sentinel 5P, ADM-Aeolus and EarthCARE). Ground-based remote sensing and airborne in situ measurements were made in southern Romania in order to assess the level and the variability of NO2 and particulate matter, focusing on two areas of interest: SW (Turceni), where many coal based power plants are operating, and SE (Bucharest), affected by intense traffic and partially by industrial pollution. In this paper we present the results obtained after the application of the Lidar - Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC) algorithm on combined lidar and sunphotometer data collected at Magurele, 6 km South Bucharest. Full lidar data sets in terms of backscatter signals at 355, 532 and 1064 nm, as well as depolarization at 532 nm were used and combined with Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data, in order to retrieve the profiles of aerosol volume concentrations, separated as fine, spherical and spheroidal coarse modes. Preliminary results showed that aerosols generated by traffic and industrial activities were present in the Planetary Boundary Layer, while biomass burning aerosols transported from the Balkan Peninsula were detected in the upper layers. Acknowledgements: ***This work has been supported by Programme for Research- Space Technology and Advanced Research - STAR, project number 55/2013 - CARESSE. ***The financial support by the European Community's FP7 - PEOPLE 2011 under ITaRS Grant Agreement n° 289923 is gratefully acknowledged.

  5. Regional distribution of PM2.5 over a megacity Osaka in Japan derived from satellite, AERONET and/or LIDAR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, I.; Mukai, S.; Nakata, M.; Holben, B.; Sugimoto, N.

    2012-04-01

    Monitoring of particulate matter near the surface is very important for the Earth environment, especially for human health and atmospheric environment. In Japan, concentration of suspended particulate matter (SPM), which is similar to PM10 but sharply cutting at 10 µm for the particle diameter, has been monitored since 1975 and is still now widely available for a daily monitoring. New PM2.5 rule was defined in 1997 in the United States, however the standard rule for PM2.5 monitoring has net yet made in Japan until 2009. As a result, the number of PM2.5 instruments is very limited in Japan. In practice the PM2.5 samplers are only used for scientific objects. Therefore estimation of PM2.5 over the wide area as possible as in Japan is an urgent issue. Anthropogenic small particles dominate the air especially over the urban areas because of local emissions by diesel vehicles and industries. The distribution of these particles is complicated due to the increasing emissions of sulfuric, nitric, carbonaceous and other aerosols in association with economic growth in East Asia. The goal of this work is to estimate PM2.5 distribution over the second big city Osaka in Japan based on satellite measurements. A brief processing line of PM2.5 estimation is as follows: 1. Acquirement of surface reflectance based on satellite data to retrieve aerosol characteristics. 2. Retrieval of columnar aerosol optical thickness (AOT) over Osaka from the fine resolved satellite image. 3. Vertical profile of aerosol concentration with NIES-LIDAR measurements. 4. Surface level aerosol optical depth (AOD) derived from columnar AOT and LIDAR dataset. 5. Estimation of PM2.5 based on the relationship between AOT, surface AOD, LIDAR and in-situ PM2.5 dataset simultaneously accumulated at AERONET/Osaka site since 2008. Note that, collocated data set of in situ PM2.5, AERONET AOT, and NIES-LIDAR data are available at Kinki University's AERONET site as mentioned in the above item 5. It is of interest

  6. The Effect of Recent Aerosol Trends on Solar Radiation in the Central and Southeastern United States: Implications for Regional Hydrology.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusworth, D.; Mickley, L. J.; Leibensperger, E. M.; Iacono, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Observations show large increases in summertime (JJA) surface solar radiation (SWdn) over the central and southeastern United States during the last 20 years, as much as a +40 Wm-2 at midday. At the same time, in response to environmental regulations in the early 1990s, emissions of U.S. aerosol precursors have decreased by as much as 60%. Detecting a possible connection between these two trends has been difficult due to the secondary effects of aerosols on cloud concentration and lifetime, and previous efforts have failed to find a direct link. Here we investigate the clear-sky direct effect of decreasing U.S. aerosols on climate, using a radiative transfer model (RRTMG) driven by 1997-2014 measurements of aerosol optical depth at Surface Radiation Budget Network (SURFRAD) sites in the central and southeastern United States. We impose aerosol asymmetry parameters and single scattering albedos from nearby Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites. Preliminary results indicate that declining aerosols drive a summer noontime change in clear-sky SWdn of +25 Wm-2 since 1997 at Goodwin Creek, MS, accounting for 56% of the observed increase in SWdn at that site. Similarly, we find that aerosols increase clear-sky SWdn by +6.5 Wm-2 in Bondville, IL, which accounts for 21% of the observed SWdn trend there. These results suggest that the climate in these regions of the U.S. may be sensitive to recent reductions in aerosol concentrations, especially during summer months. We also analyze in situ soil measurements from the Illinois Climate Network from 1990-present, and find that a significant decrease in soil moisture (-0.6 m3 m-3 a-1) accompanies the increase in SWdn, implying a link between aerosol trends and regional hydrology. Aerosol reductions are expected to continue in the United States and may further influence regional climate including hydrological factors. Our work has implications for polluted regions outside the U.S., where future reductions in the aerosol burden

  7. Ensembles of satellite aerosol retrievals based on three AATSR algorithms within aerosol_cci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosmale, Miriam; Popp, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Ensemble techniques are widely used in the modelling community, combining different modelling results in order to reduce uncertainties. This approach could be also adapted to satellite measurements. Aerosol_cci is an ESA funded project, where most of the European aerosol retrieval groups work together. The different algorithms are homogenized as far as it makes sense, but remain essentially different. Datasets are compared with ground based measurements and between each other. Three AATSR algorithms (Swansea university aerosol retrieval, ADV aerosol retrieval by FMI and Oxford aerosol retrieval ORAC) provide within this project 17 year global aerosol records. Each of these algorithms provides also uncertainty information on pixel level. Within the presented work, an ensembles of the three AATSR algorithms is performed. The advantage over each single algorithm is the higher spatial coverage due to more measurement pixels per gridbox. A validation to ground based AERONET measurements shows still a good correlation of the ensemble, compared to the single algorithms. Annual mean maps show the global aerosol distribution, based on a combination of the three aerosol algorithms. In addition, pixel level uncertainties of each algorithm are used for weighting the contributions, in order to reduce the uncertainty of the ensemble. Results of different versions of the ensembles for aerosol optical depth will be presented and discussed. The results are validated against ground based AERONET measurements. A higher spatial coverage on daily basis allows better results in annual mean maps. The benefit of using pixel level uncertainties is analysed.

  8. Aerosol Properties Changes of Northeast Asia due to a Severe Dust Storm in April 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Li; Wang, Shupeng; Yu, Tao; Gu, Xingfa; Zhang, Xingying; Wang, Weihe; Ren, Suling

    2016-04-01

    This study focuses on analyzing the aerosol properties changes due to the dust storm named as "China's Great Wall of Dust" oriented from Taklimakan desert in April, 2014. Dust identification IDDI (Infrared Difference Dust Index) images from FY-2E and true color composite images from FY-3C MERSI (Medium Resolution Spectral Imager) show the breakout and transport of the dust storm.From 4-day forward air mass trajectories, the dusty air masses were mostly transported within the lower boundary layer(<3km) over the Northwest China on April 23rd and April 24th, however they were progressively increasing in altitude to above 5km above the surface when they reached the central part of north China region (32°N-42°N; 105°E-123°E). 3-hourly data records at surface stations suggest that anticyclonic circulation occupying southern Xinjiang basin and cyclonic circulation maintaining in Mongolia formed the typical Synoptic condition which leaded to the strong dust storm. Aerosol Index (AI) results of TOU (Total Ozone Unit) aboard FY-3B are first developed and used in studying the affected areas due to the dust storm. The retrieved aerosol indexes show sensitivity to the dust particles. The dust affected areas agree with the synoptic meteorological condition analysis, which prove the synoptic meteorological condition is the main reason for the break out and transport of the dust storm. Anomalies of the average MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) AOD (Aerosol Optical Depth) distributions over Northeast Asia during the dust storm to the average of that in April between 2010-2014 show high aerosol loading due to the dust storm. Compared with the 5-year average AOD in April, aerosol loading during this dust storm was much higher, with AOD values at 550nm up to 2.9 observed over the northwest China.The dust storm also brought different change in the aerosol microphysical properties between Beijing and Dalanzadgad. Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) retrievals

  9. Deriving atmospheric visibility from satellite retrieved aerosol optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riffler, M.; Schneider, Ch.; Popp, Ch.; Wunderle, S.

    2009-04-01

    Atmospheric visibility is a measure that reflects different physical and chemical properties of the atmosphere. In general, poor visibility conditions come along with risks for transportation (e.g. road traffic, aviation) and can negatively impact human health since visibility impairment often implies the presence of atmospheric pollution. Ambient pollutants, particulate matter, and few gaseous species decrease the perceptibility of distant objects. Common estimations of this parameter are usually based on human observations or devices that measure the transmittance of light from an artificial light source over a short distance. Such measurements are mainly performed at airports and some meteorological stations. A major disadvantage of these observations is the gap between the measurements, leaving large areas without any information. As aerosols are one of the most important factors influencing atmospheric visibility in the visible range, the knowledge of their spatial distribution can be used to infer visibility with the so called Koschmieder equation, which relates visibility and atmospheric extinction. In this study, we evaluate the applicability of satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) products from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to infer atmospheric visibility on large spatial scale. First results applying AOD values scaled with the planetary boundary layer height are promising. For the comparison we use a full automated and objective procedure for the estimation of atmospheric visibility with the help of a digital panorama camera serving as ground truth. To further investigate the relation between the vertical measure of AOD and the horizontal visibility data from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) site Laegeren (Switzerland), where the digital camera is mounted, are included as well. Finally, the derived visibility maps are compared with synoptical observations in central

  10. Nighttime Aerosol Optical Thickness Retrievals Via the VIIRS Day/Night Band and the Effects of Lunar Contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHardy, T. M.; Zhang, J.; Reid, J. S.; Miller, S. D.; Hyer, E. J.; Kuehn, R.

    2015-12-01

    Using Visible/Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Day/Night Band (DNB) data, a method for retrieving aerosol optical thickness (AOT) values at night via the examination of the dispersion of radiance values above an artificial light source ,dubbed the "variance method", is presented. Based on the improvement of a previous algorithm, this updated method derives a semi-quantitative indicator of nighttime AOT using artificial light sources. Nighttime DNB AOT retrievals from the variance method are compared with an AOT value from late afternoon and early morning ground observations from four AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) sites as well as column integrated from one High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) site at Huntsville, AL during the NASA Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) campaign, providing full diel coverage. An emphasis is placed on sensitivity studies performed to examine the effects of lunar illumination on VIIRS DNB AOT retrievals made via the variance method. Although the small sample size of this study limits the conclusiveness thus far, investigation reveals that lunar contamination may have a smaller impact on VIIRS DNB AOT retrievals made using this method than previously thought. Preliminary results suggest that artificial light sources can be used for estimating regional and global nighttime aerosol distributions in the future.

  11. Long-term trend of aerosol optical depth derived from MODIS Aqua using linear regression and ensemble empirical mode decomposition over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KIM, J.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol has played an important role in air quality for short term and climate change for long term. Especially, it is important to understand how aerosol optical depth (AOD) has changed to date for the prognosis of future atmospheric state and radiation budget which are related to human life. In this study, the trend of AOD at 550 nm from MODIS Aqua (MYD08) was estimated for 10 years from 2004 to 2014 using linear regression method and ensemble empirical mode decomposition method (EEMD). Search region was selected to East Asia [18.5°N-51.5°N, 85.5°E-150.5°E] which is considered to be of great interest in emission source. The result of linear regression shows remarkably increasing trend in North and East China including Sanjiang, Hailun, Beijing, Beijing forest and Jinozhou Bay, than rather downward trend in other neighboring regions. Actually, however, AOD has seasonality itself and its trend is also affected by external source consistently, so non-linear trend analysis was conducted to analyze the changing tendency of AOD trends. Consequently, secular trends of AOD defined by EEMD showed almost similar values over the entire region, but their shapes over time are quite different with those of linear regression. Here, AOD linear trend in Beijing has monotonically increased [0.03% yr-1] since 2004, but its non-linear trend shows that initial increasing trend has alleviated and even turned into downward trend from about 2010. Lastly, the validation of MODIS AOD with AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) was conducted additionally which showed fairly good agreement with those of AERONET (R=0.901, RMSE=0.226, MAE=0.031, MBE=-0.001).

  12. Evaluation of ocean color data processing schemes for VIIRS sensor using in-situ data of coastal AERONET-OC sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, S.; Gilerson, A.; Hlaing, S.; Weidemann, A.; Arnone, R.; Wang, M.

    2013-10-01

    In the processing of Ocean Color (OC) data from sensor data recorded by Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) aboard JPSS-Suomi satellite, NASA Ocean Biology Processing Group (OBPG) is deriving a continuous temporal calibration based on the on-board calibration measurements for the visible bands, and then reprocessing the full mission to produce a continuously calibrated sensor data record (SDR) product. In addition, a vicarious calibration during SDR to OC Level-2 processing is applied. In the latest processing the vicarious calibration is derived from the Marine Optical Buoy (MOBY) data, whereas in the initial processing it was derived from a sea surface reflectance model and a climatology of chlorophyll-a concentration. Furthermore, NASA has recently reprocessed the OC data for the entire VIIRS mission with lunar-based temporal calibration and updated vicarious gains. On the other hand, in fulfilling the mission of the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the Interface Data Processing Segment (IDPS) developed by Raytheon Intelligence and Information Systems, for the processing of the environmental data products from sensor data records, has gained beta status for evaluation. As these processing schemes continue to evolve, monitoring the validity and assessments of the related VIIRS ocean color products are necessary, especially for coastal waters, to evaluate the consistency of these processing and calibration schemes. The ocean color component of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET-OC) has been designed to support long-term satellite ocean color investigations through cross-site measurements collected by autonomous multispectral radiometer systems deployed above water. As part of this network, the Long Island Sound Coastal Observatory (LISCO) near New York City and WaveCIS in the Gulf of Mexico expand those observational capabilities with continuous monitoring as well as (for the LISCO site) additional assessment of the

  13. Global Aerosol Optical Models and Lookup Tables for the New MODIS Aerosol Retrieval over Land

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Robert C.; Remer, Loraine A.; Dubovik, Oleg

    2007-01-01

    Since 2000, MODIS has been deriving aerosol properties over land from MODIS observed spectral reflectance, by matching the observed reflectance with that simulated for selected aerosol optical models, aerosol loadings, wavelengths and geometrical conditions (that are contained in a lookup table or 'LUT'). Validation exercises have showed that MODIS tends to under-predict aerosol optical depth (tau) in cases of large tau (tau greater than 1.0), signaling errors in the assumed aerosol optical properties. Using the climatology of almucantur retrievals from the hundreds of global AERONET sunphotometer sites, we found that three spherical-derived models (describing fine-sized dominated aerosol), and one spheroid-derived model (describing coarse-sized dominated aerosol, presumably dust) generally described the range of observed global aerosol properties. The fine dominated models were separated mainly by their single scattering albedo (omega(sub 0)), ranging from non-absorbing aerosol (omega(sub 0) approx. 0.95) in developed urban/industrial regions, to neutrally absorbing aerosol (omega(sub 0) approx.90) in forest fire burning and developing industrial regions, to absorbing aerosol (omega(sub 0) approx. 0.85) in regions of savanna/grassland burning. We determined the dominant model type in each region and season, to create a 1 deg. x 1 deg. grid of assumed aerosol type. We used vector radiative transfer code to create a new LUT, simulating the four aerosol models, in four MODIS channels. Independent AERONET observations of spectral tau agree with the new models, indicating that the new models are suitable for use by the MODIS aerosol retrieval.

  14. Comparison of the aerosol optical properties and size distribution retrieved by sun photometer with in situ measurements at midlatitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvigné, Aurélien; Sellegri, Karine; Hervo, Maxime; Montoux, Nadège; Freville, Patrick; Goloub, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    Aerosols influence the Earth radiative budget through scattering and absorption of solar radiation. Several methods are used to investigate aerosol properties and thus quantify their direct and indirect impacts on climate. At the Puy de Dôme station, continuous high-altitude near-surface in situ measurements and low-altitude ground-based remote sensing atmospheric column measurements give the opportunity to compare the aerosol extinction measured with both methods over a 1-year period. To our knowledge, it is the first time that such a comparison is realised with continuous measurements of a high-altitude site during a long-term period. This comparison addresses to which extent near-surface in situ measurements are representative of the whole atmospheric column, the aerosol mixing layer (ML) or the free troposphere (FT). In particular, the impact of multi-aerosol layers events detected using lidar backscatter profiles is analysed. A good correlation between in situ aerosol extinction coefficient and aerosol optical depth (AOD) measured by the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun photometer is observed with a correlation coefficient around 0.80, indicating that the in situ measurements station is representative of the overall atmospheric column. After filtering for multilayer cases and correcting for each layer optical contribution (ML and FT), the atmospheric structure seems to be the main factor influencing the comparison between the two measurement techniques. When the site lies in the ML, the in situ extinction represents 45 % of the sun photometer ML extinction while when the site lies within the FT, the in situ extinction is more than 2 times higher than the FT sun photometer extinction. Moreover, the assumption of a decreasing linear vertical aerosol profile in the whole atmosphere has been tested, significantly improving the instrumental agreement. Remote sensing retrievals of the aerosol particle size distributions (PSDs) from the sun photometer

  15. Cloud and aerosol classification for 2.5 years of MAX-DOAS observations in Wuxi (China) and comparison to independent data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Penning de Vries, M.; Xie, P. H.; Beirle, S.; Dörner, S.; Remmers, J.; Li, A.; Wagner, T.

    2015-12-01

    Multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) observations of trace gases can be strongly influenced by clouds and aerosols. Thus it is important to identify clouds and characterize their properties. In a recent study Wagner et al. (2014) developed a cloud classification scheme based on the MAX-DOAS measurements themselves with which different "sky conditions" (e.g., clear sky, continuous clouds, broken clouds) can be distinguished. Here we apply this scheme to long-term MAX-DOAS measurements from 2011 to 2013 in Wuxi, China (31.57° N, 120.31° E). The original algorithm has been adapted to the characteristics of the Wuxi instrument, and extended towards smaller solar zenith angles (SZA). Moreover, a method for the determination and correction of instrumental degradation is developed to avoid artificial trends of the cloud classification results. We compared the results of the MAX-DOAS cloud classification scheme to several independent measurements: aerosol optical depth from a nearby Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) station and from two Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments, visibility derived from a visibility meter and various cloud parameters from different satellite instruments (MODIS, the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME-2)). Here it should be noted that no quantitative comparison between the MAX-DOAS results and the independent data sets is possible, because (a) not exactly the same quantities are measured, and (b) the spatial and temporal sampling is quite different. Thus our comparison is performed in a semi-quantitative way: the MAX-DOAS cloud classification results are studied as a function of the external quantities. The most important findings from these comparisons are as follows: (1) most cases characterized as clear sky with low or high aerosol load were associated with the respective aerosol optical depth (AOD) ranges obtained by AERONET and MODIS

  16. On the influence of the diurnal variations of aerosol content to estimate direct aerosol radiative forcing using MODIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hui; Guo, Jianping; Ceamanos, Xavier; Roujean, Jean-Louis; Min, Min; Carrer, Dominique

    2016-09-01

    Long-term measurements of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) located in Beijing reveal a strong diurnal cycle of aerosol load staged by seasonal patterns. Such pronounced variability is matter of importance in respect to the estimation of daily averaged direct aerosol radiative forcing (DARF). Polar-orbiting satellites could only offer a daily revisit, which turns in fact to be even much less in case of frequent cloudiness. Indeed, this places a severe limit to properly capture the diurnal variations of AOD and thus estimate daily DARF. Bearing this in mind, the objective of the present study is however to evaluate the impact of AOD diurnal variations for conducting quantitative assessment of DARF using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) AOD data over Beijing. We provide assessments of DARF with two different assumptions about diurnal AOD variability: taking the observed hourly-averaged AOD cycle into account and assuming constant MODIS (including Terra and Aqua) AOD value throughout the daytime. Due to the AOD diurnal variability, the absolute differences in annual daily mean DARFs, if the constant MODIS/Terra (MODIS/Aqua) AOD value is used instead of accounting for the observed hourly-averaged daily variability, is 1.2 (1.3) Wm-2 at the top of the atmosphere, 27.5 (30.6) Wm-2 at the surface, and 26.4 (29.3) Wm-2 in the atmosphere, respectively. During the summertime, the impact of the diurnal AOD variability on seasonal daily mean DARF estimates using MODIS Terra (Aqua) data can reach up to 2.2 (3.9) Wm-2 at the top of the atmosphere, 43.7 (72.7) Wm-2 at the surface, and 41.4 (68.8) Wm-2 in the atmosphere, respectively. Overall, the diurnal variation in AOD tends to cause large bias in the estimated DARF on both seasonal and annual scales. In summertime, the higher the surface albedo, the stronger impact on DARF at the top of the atmosphere caused by dust and biomass burning (continental) aerosol. This

  17. Validation and Uncertainty Estimates for MODIS Collection 6 "Deep Blue" Aerosol Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.; Bettenhausen, C.; Jeong, M.-J.

    2013-01-01

    The "Deep Blue" aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieval algorithm was introduced in Collection 5 of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) product suite, and complemented the existing "Dark Target" land and ocean algorithms by retrieving AOD over bright arid land surfaces, such as deserts. The forthcoming Collection 6 of MODIS products will include a "second generation" Deep Blue algorithm, expanding coverage to all cloud-free and snow-free land surfaces. The Deep Blue dataset will also provide an estimate of the absolute uncertainty on AOD at 550 nm for each retrieval. This study describes the validation of Deep Blue Collection 6 AOD at 550 nm (Tau(sub M)) from MODIS Aqua against Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data from 60 sites to quantify these uncertainties. The highest quality (denoted quality assurance flag value 3) data are shown to have an absolute uncertainty of approximately (0.086+0.56Tau(sub M))/AMF, where AMF is the geometric air mass factor. For a typical AMF of 2.8, this is approximately 0.03+0.20Tau(sub M), comparable in quality to other satellite AOD datasets. Regional variability of retrieval performance and comparisons against Collection 5 results are also discussed.

  18. Retrieval of dust storm aerosols using an integrated Neural Network model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Fei; Wong, Man Sing; Lee, Kwon Ho; Campbell, James R.; Shea, Yu-kai

    2015-12-01

    Dust storms are known to have adverse effects on public health. Atmospheric dust loading is also one of the major uncertainties in global climatic modeling as it is known to have a significant impact on the radiation budget and atmospheric stability. This study develops an integrated model for dust storm detection and retrieval based on the combination of geostationary satellite images and forward trajectory model. The proposed model consists of three components: (i) a Neural Network (NN) model for near real-time detection of dust storms; (ii) a NN model for dust Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) retrieval; and (iii) the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model to analyze the transports of dust storms. These three components are combined using an event-driven active geo-processing workflow technique. The NN models were trained for the dust detection and validated using sunphotometer measurements from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET). The HYSPLIT model was applied in the regions with high probabilities of dust locations, and simulated the transport pathways of dust storms. This newly automated hybrid method can be used to give advance near real-time warning of dust storms, for both environmental authorities and public. The proposed methodology can be applied on early warning of adverse air quality conditions, and prediction of low visibility associated with dust storm events for port and airport authorities.

  19. Retrieval of Aerosol information from UV measurement by using optimal estimation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KIM, M.; Kim, J.; Jeong, U.; Kim, W. V.; Kim, S. K.; Lee, S. D.; Moon, K. J.

    2014-12-01

    An algorithm to retrieve aerosol optical depth (AOD), single scattering albedo (SSA), and aerosol loading height is developed for GEMS (Geostationary Environment Monitoring Spectrometer) measurement. The GEMS is planned to be launched in geostationary orbit in 2018, and employs hyper-spectral imaging with 0.6 nm resolution to observe solar backscatter radiation in the UV and Visible range. In the UV range, the low surface contribution to the backscattered radiation and strong interaction between aerosol absorption and molecular scattering can be advantageous in retrieving aerosol information such as AOD and SSA [Torres et al., 2007; Torres et al., 2013; Ahn et al., 2014]. However, the large contribution of atmospheric scattering results in the increase of the sensitivity of the backward radiance to aerosol loading height. Thus, the assumption of aerosol loading height becomes important issue to obtain accurate result. Accordingly, this study focused on the simultaneous retrieval of aerosol loading height with AOD and SSA by utilizing the optimal estimation method. For the RTM simulation, the aerosol optical properties were analyzed from AERONET inversion data (level 2.0) at 46 AERONET sites over ASIA. Also, 2-channel inversion method is applied to estimate a priori value of the aerosol information to solve the Lavenberg Marquardt equation. The GEMS aerosol algorithm is tested with OMI level-1B dataset, a provisional data for GEMS measurement, and the result is compared with OMI standard aerosol product and AERONET values. The retrieved AOD and SSA show reasonable distribution compared with OMI products, and are well correlated with the value measured from AERONET. However, retrieval uncertainty in aerosol loading height is relatively larger than other results.

  20. Effects of aerosols on microphysics and on urban warm season precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosannah, Nathan

    Precipitation anomalies in and around major urban centers have been attributed to dynamic processes such as warm air updrafts induced by urban heat island events, and to microphysical processes affected by the release of natural and anthropogenic aerosols that affect atmospheric water balance. Both factors must be analyzed in order to fully understand the role that urban environments may have on precipitation. The research presented here is directed towards improving understanding of how aerosol particle size distribution (PSD) and land cover land use (LCLU) affect cloud processes and precipitation over a complex urban environment such as New York City (NYC). While aerosols are intrinsically necessary for rainfall formation, and urban environments also influence precipitation via convection enhancement, the partial contributions of each are not yet known. The Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) was used to simulate several NYC summer precipitation scenarios. PSD data from NASA's Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) complemented with National Land Cover Database (NLCD) 2006 land surface data for NYC and northern New Jersey (NJ) were processed and assimilated directly into RAMS to determine the effect of varying PSD and LCLU on simulated precipitation amounts. An ensemble of 17 numerical simulations were configured and run. The first two runs were month long runs for July 2007, the first with constant PSD values, and the second with PSD updates. The third and fourth runs mirrored the first two simulations for a "No-City" case. A fifth month long simulation was run with average Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) and Giant CCN values. Next, twelve 24 hour simulations driven with high volumes of fine mode particles and with high volumes of coarse mode particles each under "City" and "No City" conditions were compared for 1-day localized and mesoscale events. Results suggest that RAMS precipitation results are sensitive to both PSD variation and land use variations.

  1. Multi-site characterization of tropical aerosols: Implications for regional radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumit, Kumar; Devara, P. C. S.; Manoj, M. G.

    2012-03-01

    A land campaign, as a part of the Indian Space Research Organization-Geosphere Biosphere Program (ISRO-GBP), has been organized using a suit of instruments like AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) Sun/Sky sunphotometer, Microtops-II (MICROprocessor-controlled Total Ozone Portable Spectrometer), short-wave pyranometer from December 1, 2006 to April 30, 2007, over five locations (Ahmedabad, Pune, Sinhgad, Trivandrum and Gadanki) representing different environments. The dominance of different aerosol types such as biomass burning, urban/industrial pollution, marine origin and desert-dust particles is expected at these five sites. In all locations, significant day-to-day variability in AOD and Ångström exponent is observed. The Ångström exponent exhibits its lowest values over semi-arid region (Ahmedabad) 0.4-0.7, while it is around 1.8 at rural site (Gadanki). The retrieved volume size distributions for Pune, Ahmedabad and Trivandrum are found to be bimodal with varying concentration of each mode. Interesting feature of this observation is, very low coarse-mode volume concentration observed at Trivandrum even though observations were made about 300 m from the coast. The synergy of results from these complementary measurements is reflected in the computed regional aerosol radiative forcing and heating rates. We have used a radiative transfer model (SBDART) to examine the variations of aerosol direct radiative effect (ADRE) and heating rates to give an overall estimation of the effect on climate. The ADRE, over different measurement sites, at short wavelength is found to be negative at the surface in the range of - 18 to - 59 W m - 2 , and TOA forcing values varied from + 0.9 to - 8 W m - 2 .

  2. A consistent aerosol optical depth (AOD) dataset over mainland China by integration of several AOD products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Guang, J.; Xue, Y.; de Leeuw, Gerrit; Che, Y. H.; Guo, Jianping; He, X. W.; Wang, T. K.

    2015-08-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), the Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) and the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) provide validated aerosol optical depth (AOD) products over both land and ocean. However, the values of the AOD provided by each of these satellites may show spatial and temporal differences due to the instrument characteristics and aerosol retrieval algorithms used for each instrument. In this article we present a method to produce an AOD data set over Asia for the year 2007 based on fusion of the data provided by different instruments and/or algorithms. First, the bias of each satellite-derived AOD product was calculated by comparison with ground-based AOD data derived from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and the China Aerosol Remote Sensing NETwork (CARSNET) for different values of the surface albedo and the AOD. Then, these multiple AOD products were combined using the maximum likelihood estimate (MLE) method using weights derived from the root mean square error (RMSE) associated with the accuracies of the original AOD products. The original and merged AOD dataset has been validated by comparison with AOD data from the CARSNET. Results show that the mean bias error (MBE) and mean absolute error (MAE) of the merged AOD dataset are not larger than that of any of the original AOD products. In addition, for the merged AOD dataset the fraction of pixels with no data is significantly smaller than that of any of the original products, thus increasing the spatial coverage. The fraction of retrievable area is about 50% for the merged AOD dataset and between 5% and 20% for the MISR, SeaWiFS, MODIS-DT and MODIS-DB algorithms.

  3. Sun photometer aerosol retrievals during SALTRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledano, Carlos; Torres, Benjamin; Althausen, Dietrich; Groß, Silke; Freudenthaler, Volker; Weinzierl, Bernadett; Gasteiger, Josef; Ansmann, Albert; Wiegner, Matthias; González, Ramiro; Cachorro, Victoria

    2015-04-01

    The Saharan Aerosol Long-range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud-Interaction Experiment (SALTRACE), aims at investigating the long-range transport of Saharan dust across the Atlantic Ocean. A large set of ground-based and airborne aerosol and meteorological instrumentation was used for this purpose during a 5-week campaign that took place during June-July 2013. Several Sun photometers were deployed at Barbados Island during this campaign. Two Cimels included in AERONET and the Sun and Sky Automatic Radiometer (SSARA) were co-located with the ground-based lidars BERTHA and POLIS. A set of optical and microphysical aerosol properties derived from Sun and Sky spectral observations (principal plane and almucantar configurations) in the range 340-1640nm are analyzed, including aerosol optical depth (AOD), volume size distribution, complex refractive index, sphericity and single scattering albedo. The Sun photometers include polarization capabilities, therefore apart from the inversion of sky radiances as it is routinely done in AERONET, polarized radiances are also inverted. Several dust events are clearly identified in the measurement period, with moderated AOD (500nm) in the range 0.3 to 0.6. The clean marine background was also observed during short periods. The retrieved aerosol properties are compared with the lidar and in-situ observations carried out within SALTRACE, as well as with data collected during the SAMUM campaigns in Morocco and Cape Verde, in order to investigate possible changes in the dust plume during the transport.

  4. Operational Retrieval of aerosol optical depth over Indian subcontinent and Indian Ocean using INSAT-3D/Imager product validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, M. K.; Rastogi, G.; Chauhan, P.

    2014-11-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD) over Indian subcontinent and Indian Ocean region is derived operationally for the first time from the geostationary earth orbit (GEO) satellite INSAT-3D Imager data at 0.65 μm wavelength. Single visible channel algorithm based on clear sky composites gives larger retrieval error in AOD than other multiple channel algorithms due to errors in estimating surface reflectance and atmospheric property. However, since MIR channel signal is insensitive to the presence of most aerosols, therefore in present study, AOD retrieval algorithm employs both visible (centred at 0.65 μm) and mid-infrared (MIR) band (centred at 3.9 μm) measurements, and allows us to monitor transport of aerosols at higher temporal resolution. Comparisons made between INSAT-3D derived AOD (τI) and MODIS derived AOD (τM) co-located in space (at 1° resolution) and time during January, February and March (JFM) 2014 encompasses 1165, 1052 and 900 pixels, respectively. Good agreement found between τI and τM during JFM 2014 with linear correlation coefficients (R) of 0.87, 0.81 and 0.76, respectively. The extensive validation made during JFM 2014 encompasses 215 co-located AOD in space and time derived by INSAT 3D (τI) and 10 sun-photometers (τA) that includes 9 AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) and 1 handheld sun-photometer site. INSAT-3D derived AOD i.e. τI, is found within the retrieval errors of τI = ±0.07 ±0.15τA with linear correlation coefficient (R) of 0.90 and root mean square error equal (RMSE) to 0.06. Present work shows that INSAT-3D aerosol products can be used quantitatively in many applications with caution for possible residual clouds, snow/ice, and water contamination.

  5. Experiences with the AEROnet/PSCN ATM Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurak, Richard S.; Lisotta, Anthony J.; McCabe, James D.; Nothaft, Alfred E.; Russell, Kelly R.; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses the experience gained by the AEROnet/PSCN networking team in deploying a prototype Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) based network as part of the wide-area network for the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Program at NASA Ames Research Center. The objectives of this prototype were to test concepts in using ATM over wide-area Internet Protocol (IP) networks and measure end-to-end system performance. This testbed showed that end-to-end ATM over a DS3 reaches approximately 80% of the throughput achieved from a FDDI to DS3 network. The 20% reduction in through-put can be attributed to the overhead associated with running ATM. As a result, we conclude that if the loss in capacity due to ATM overhead is balanced by the reduction in cost of ATM services, as compared to dedicated circuits, then ATM can be a viable alternative.

  6. Aerosol optical properties derived from the DRAGON-NE Asia campaign, and implications for a single-channel algorithm to retrieve aerosol optical depth in spring from Meteorological Imager (MI) on-board the Communication, Ocean, and Meteorological Satellite (COMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, M.; Kim, J.; Jeong, U.; Kim, W.; Hong, H.; Holben, B.; Eck, T. F.; Lim, J. H.; Song, C. K.; Lee, S.; Chung, C.-Y.

    2016-02-01

    An aerosol model optimized for northeast Asia is updated with the inversion data from the Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON)-northeast (NE) Asia campaign which was conducted during spring from March to May 2012. This updated aerosol model was then applied to a single visible channel algorithm to retrieve aerosol optical depth (AOD) from a Meteorological Imager (MI) on-board the geostationary meteorological satellite, Communication, Ocean, and Meteorological Satellite (COMS). This model plays an important role in retrieving accurate AOD from a single visible channel measurement. For the single-channel retrieval, sensitivity tests showed that perturbations by 4 % (0.926 ± 0.04) in the assumed single scattering albedo (SSA) can result in the retrieval error in AOD by over 20 %. Since the measured reflectance at the top of the atmosphere depends on both AOD and SSA, the overestimation of assumed SSA in the aerosol model leads to an underestimation of AOD. Based on the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) inversion data sets obtained over East Asia before 2011, seasonally analyzed aerosol optical properties (AOPs) were categorized by SSAs at 675 nm of 0.92 ± 0.035 for spring (March, April, and May). After the DRAGON-NE Asia campaign in 2012, the SSA during spring showed a slight increase to 0.93 ± 0.035. In terms of the volume size distribution, the mode radius of coarse particles was increased from 2.08 ± 0.40 to 2.14 ± 0.40. While the original aerosol model consists of volume size distribution and refractive indices obtained before 2011, the new model is constructed by using a total data set after the DRAGON-NE Asia campaign. The large volume of data in high spatial resolution from this intensive campaign can be used to improve the representative aerosol model for East Asia. Accordingly, the new AOD data sets retrieved from a single-channel algorithm, which uses a precalculated look-up table (LUT) with the new aerosol model, show an

  7. Southeast Asian Summer Burning: A Micro Pulse Lidar Network Study of Aerosol Particle Physical Properties near Fires in Borneo and Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lolli, S.; Welton, E. J.; Holben, B. N.; Campbell, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    In August and September 2012, as part of the continuing Seven South East Asian Studies (7-SEAS) project, three autonomous elastic-scattering 355 nm lidars were deployed by the NASA Micro Pulse Lidar Network (MPLNET) to Sumatra and Borneo, measuring the vertical profile of aerosol particle scattering during peak burning season. In coordination with the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET), a regional characterization of aerosol particle physical properties and distribution was performed. In addition to a permanent regional network site at Singapore, the three temporary sites established for this research include Jambi (Sumatra, Indonesia), Kuching (northwest Borneo, Malaysia) and Palangkaraya (south-central Borneo, Indonesia). In this paper, we discuss the mission and instruments, and introduce data products available to the community through the MPLNET online website. We further describe initial results of the study, including a contrast of mean vertical scattering profiles versus those observed near active fire sources at Jambi and Palangkaraya, and resolve longer-range particle evolution at receptor sites, like Kuching, that are most commonly 1-2 days downwind of larger fire complexes.

  8. Spatial variation of aerosol optical properties in North China Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xuehua

    2013-04-01

    The column-integrated optical properties of aerosol in Beijing and Xianghe situated at North China Plain were investigated based on Sun/sky radiometer measurements made at Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites. Only version 2 and level 2 quality-assured data were presented and analyzed in this paper. Time intervals differ for the two sites, with Beijing having 9 years of data (Mar.-May, 2001; Apr., 2002-Dec., 2011),while Xianghe having 6 years of data (Mar.-Apr., 2001;Sep., 2004-Dec.,2011). Monthly mean 500 nm AOT values reach a maximum in June (0.95) and exceed 0.55 from March through September, and the minimum values occur during the late fall and winter months of November through February at Beijing. The monthly mean AOT values at Xianghe are very close to those measured at Beijing. The absolute differences of AOT between the two sites are less than 0.1 except in June and July. The reason of large difference in June and July is the frequently cloud contamination in summer result in the monthly means over the two sites computed from a large number of measurements of different date. The monthly averaged AOT with the same date in June and July are re-computed and the absolute difference of AOT between Beijing and Xianghe redu