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Sample records for aeronet-based surface reflectance

  1. Baffle system employing reflective surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linlor, W. I.

    1983-12-01

    Reflective baffles are proposed to reject off-axis light entering a telescope. Toroidal surfaces and adjacent cones are positioned so that off-axis rays make multiple reflections between these two surfaces. Meridional rays are reflected approximately parallel to the entering direction. Skew rays are reflected obliquely, but leave the telescope aperture. The range of incident angles for which these reflections are obtained is approximately 45 deg. A system is described that is designed specifically for the Space Shuttle Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). Because of its reflective properties, the proposed baffle system rejects about 90 deg of the heat load from the SIRTF sunshade that would be absorbed in systems of conventional black baffles.

  2. Reflection of cylindrical surface waves.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Reuven

    2009-10-12

    The reflection of the radially polarized surface wave on a metal wire at an abrupt end is derived. This theory allows for straightforward calculation of the reflection coefficient, including the phase and the amplitude, which will prove useful to the many applications in nanoplasmonics and terahertz spectroscopy. The theory shows excellent quantitative agreement with past comprehensive numerical simulations for small wires and for predicting the minima in reflection for larger wires. Using this theory, the wavelength dependent reflection is calculated for gold rods of diameter 10 nm, 26 nm and 85 nm, from which the Fabry-Perot resonance wavelengths are found. The Fabry-Perot resonances show good agreement with experimentally measured surface plasmon resonances in nanorods. This demonstrates the predictive ability of the theory for applications involving widely-used nanorods, optical antennas and plasmonic resonators. PMID:20372593

  3. Reflectance measurements from particulate surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltoniemi, J.; Gritsevich, M.; Hakala, T.; Penttilä, A.; Eskelinen, J.; Dagsson-Waldhauserova, P.; Arnalds, O.; Guirado, D.; Muinonen, K.

    2014-07-01

    Asteroids consists of, e.g., metals and rocky materials, and comets consist of, e.g., icy and rocky materials and dust. Their surfaces can be covered by small particles. To certain extent, these surfaces can resemble some natural or artificial surfaces on the Earth, such as snow layers, sand, gravels, or silt. By measuring the reflectance from such surfaces, one can gain better understanding on how to interpret astronomical observations of asteroids and comets. Even if not completely analogous, these samples and measurements provide a strict test bed for the scattering models applied to interpret observations of small Solar System bodies. FIGIFIGO (Finnish Geodetic Institute's Field Gonio-spectro-polari- radiometer) can measure the bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF) of surface targets of a diameter of around 10 cm, in a selected angular range and resolution, in the spectral range of 400-2400 nm, at about 10-nm resolution, including linear polarisation (Stokes I, Q, and U, or reflection coefficient matrix elements R_{11}, R_{12}, and R_{13}). Using FIGIFIGO, over 500 samples have been measured over the past years, including over 100 snow samples and almost 100 samples resembling sand, silt, soil, dust, or gravel. For planetary studies, especially interesting are dark volcanic ash and silt samples from Eyjafjallajökull and Grímsvönt eruptions. These have been measured loose and compressed, smooth and rough, purely and deposited on snow. Further single-scattering measurements using the Granada setup and measurements using the Univ. Helsinki integrating sphere complement the picture. Generally, we have observed that the reflectance from volcanic materials behaves mostly as expected and modelled. BRF shows typical bowl shape with strong phase-angle dependence. Spectral features are smooth, with slight angular dependence. Polarisation depends strongly on the phase angle, weaker on other angles defining the scattering geometry, and smoothly on the wavelength. There

  4. Environmental responses of solar reflective surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, F. L.

    1983-01-01

    An assessment is undertaken of the environmental responses of solar reflective surfaces, with emphasis on dish-type concentrator surfaces exposed to the conditions of Southern California. A generalized mathematical model for specific solar reflective surfaces can be formulated on the basis of either experimental or assumed site degradation/corrosion data. In addition, the fabrication parameters of a parabolic reflecting surface and its substrate can be used to model combined reflective characteristics for the postulated environmental conditions.

  5. Inverse Common-Reflection-Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perroud, H.; Tygel, M.; Freitas, L.

    2010-12-01

    The Common-Reflection-Surface (CRS) stack method is a powerful tool to produce high-quality stacked images of multicoverage seismic data. As a result of the CRS stack, not only a stacked section, but also a number of attributes defined at each point of that section, are produced. In this way, one can think of the CRS stack method as a transformation from data space to attribute space. Being a purely kinematic method, the CRS stack lacks amplitude information that can be useful for many purposes. Here we propose to fill this gap by means of a combined use of a zero-offset section (that could be a short-offset or amplitude-corrected stacked section) and common midpoint gather. We present an algorithm for an inverse CRS transformation, namely one that (approximately) transforms the CRS attributes back to data space. First synthetic tests provide satisfying results for the two simple cases of single dipping-plane and single circular reflectors with a homogeneous overburden, and provide estimates of the range of applicability, in both midpoint and offset directions. We further present an application for interpolating missing traces in a near-surface, high-resolution seismic experiment, conducted in the alluvial plain of the river Gave de Pau, near Assat, southern France, showing its ability to build coherent signals, where recording was not available. A somewhat unexpected good feature of the algorithm, is that it seems capable to reconstruct signals even in muted parts of the section.

  6. Condenser optic with sacrificial reflective surface

    DOEpatents

    Tichenor, Daniel A.; Kubiak, Glenn D.; Lee, Sung Hun

    2007-07-03

    Employing collector optics that has a sacrificial reflective surface can significantly prolong the useful life of the collector optics and the overall performance of the condenser in which the collector optics are incorporated. The collector optics is normally subject to erosion by debris from laser plasma source of radiation. The presence of an upper sacrificial reflective surface over the underlying reflective surface effectively increases the life of the optics while relaxing the constraints on the radiation source. Spatial and temporally varying reflectivity that results from the use of the sacrificial reflective surface can be accommodated by proper condenser design.

  7. Condenser optic with sacrificial reflective surface

    DOEpatents

    Tichenor, Daniel A.; Kubiak, Glenn D.; Lee, Sang Hun

    2006-07-25

    Employing collector optics that have a sacrificial reflective surface can significantly prolong the useful life of the collector optics and the overall performance of the condenser in which the collector optics are incorporated. The collector optics are normally subject to erosion by debris from laser plasma source of radiation. The presence of an upper sacrificial reflective surface over the underlying reflective surface effectively increases the life of the optics while relaxing the constraints on the radiation source. Spatial and temporally varying reflectivity that results from the use of the sacrificial reflective surface can be accommodated by proper condenser design.

  8. Low-Reflectance Surfaces For Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Fatemi, Navid; Jenkins, Phillip P.

    1994-01-01

    Improved method for increasing solar cell efficiency has potential application for space-based and terrestrial solar power systems and optoelectronic devices. Etched low-angle grooves help recover reflected light. Light reflected from v-grooved surface trapped in cover glass and adhesive by total internal reflection. Reflected light redirected onto surface, and greater fraction of incident light absorbed, producing more electrical energy in InP solar photovoltaic cell.

  9. Surface roughness effects on bidirectional reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, T. F.; Hering, R. G.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental study of surface roughness effects on bidirectional reflectance of metallic surfaces is presented. A facility capable of irradiating a sample from normal to grazing incidence and recording plane of incidence bidirectional reflectance measurements was developed. Samples consisting of glass, aluminum alloy, and stainless steel materials were selected for examination. Samples were roughened using standard grinding techniques and coated with a radiatively opaque layer of pure aluminum. Mechanical surface roughness parameters, rms heights and rms slopes, evaluated from digitized surface profile measurements are less than 1.0 micrometers and 0.28, respectively. Rough surface specular, bidirectional, and directional reflectance measurements for selected values of polar angle of incidence and wavelength of incident energy within the spectral range of 1 to 14 micrometers are reported. The Beckmann bidirectional reflectance model is compared with reflectance measurements to establish its usefulness in describing the magnitude and spatial distribution of energy reflected from rough surfaces.

  10. Geometric optics of arrays of reflective surfaces.

    PubMed

    Chapman, H N; Rode, A V

    1994-05-01

    We present an analysis of the geometric optics of spherically curved arrays of reflective surfaces. In particular we consider optical devices in which reflective surfaces are arranged on a spherical interface and every ray reflects once from a reflector. The orientation of the reflective surfaces is not necessarily related in any way to the orientation of the interface. The analysis can be applied to any radiation that may specularly reflect from the reflectors. This may be reflection from stacks of mirrors or diffraction from the atomic planes. The principles are applied to x-ray optical systems such as capillary arrays and curved crystals. The calculations are used to find optimum configurations of reflective arrays for applications such as x-ray condensers and telescopes, to find the tolerances to which reflective arrays must be constructed, and to find the conditions in which primary aberrations are eliminated. PMID:20885592

  11. A climatology of visible surface reflectance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoogman, Peter; Liu, Xiong; Chance, Kelly; Sun, Qingsong; Schaaf, Crystal; Mahr, Tobias; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    We present a high spectral resolution climatology of visible surface reflectance as a function of wavelength for use in satellite measurements of ozone and other atmospheric species. The Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO) instrument is planned to measure backscattered solar radiation in the 290-740 nm range, including the ultraviolet and visible Chappuis ozone bands. Observation in the weak Chappuis band takes advantage of the relative transparency of the atmosphere in the visible to achieve sensitivity to near-surface ozone. However, due to the weakness of the ozone absorption features this measurement is more sensitive to errors in visible surface reflectance, which is highly variable. We utilize reflectance measurements of individual plant, man-made, and other surface types to calculate the primary modes of variability of visible surface reflectance at a high spectral resolution, comparable to that of TEMPO (0.6 nm). Using the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Bidirection Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF)/albedo product and our derived primary modes we construct a high spatial resolution climatology of wavelength-dependent surface reflectance over all viewing scenes and geometries. The Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) Lambertian Equivalent Reflectance (LER) product provides complementary information over water and snow scenes. Preliminary results using this approach in multispectral ultraviolet+visible ozone retrievals from the GOME-2 instrument show significant improvement to the fitting residuals over vegetated scenes.

  12. The reflectance characteristics of snow covered surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batten, E. S.

    1979-01-01

    Data analysis techniques were developed to most efficiently use available satellite measurements to determine and understand components of the surface energy budget for ice and snow-covered areas. The emphasis is placed on identifying the important components of the heat budget related to snow surfaces, specifically the albedo and the energy consumed in the melting process. Ice and snow charts are prepared by NOAA from satellite observations which map areas into three relative reflectivity zones. Field measurements are analyzed of the reflectivity of an open snow field to assist in the interpretation of the NOAA reflectivity zones.

  13. Tunable reflection minima of nanostructured antireflective surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boden, S. A.; Bagnall, D. M.

    2008-09-01

    Broadband antireflection schemes for silicon surfaces based on the moth-eye principle and comprising arrays of subwavelength-scale pillars are applicable to solar cells, photodetectors, and stealth technologies and can exhibit very low reflectances. We show that rigorous coupled wave analysis can be used to accurately model the intricate reflectance behavior of these surfaces and so can be used to explore the effects of variations in pillar height, period, and shape. Low reflectance regions are identified, the extent of which are determined by the shape of the pillars. The wavelengths over which these low reflectance regions operate can be shifted by altering the period of the array. Thus the subtle features of the reflectance spectrum of a moth-eye array can be tailored for optimum performance for the input spectrum of a specific application.

  14. Measuring Light Reflectance of BGO Crystal Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Janecek, Martin; Moses, William

    2008-07-28

    A scintillating crystal's surface reflectance has to be well understood in order to accurately predict and optimize the crystal?s light collection through Monte Carlo simulations. In this paper, we measure the inner surface reflectance properties for BGO. The measurements include BGO crystals with a mechanically polished surface, rough-cut surface, and chemically etched surface, and with various reflectors attached, both air- coupled and with coupling compound. The measurements are performed with a laser aimed at the center of a hemispherical shaped BGO crystal. The hemispherical shape eliminates any non-perpendicular angles for light entering and exiting the crystal. The reflected light is collected with an array of photodiodes. The laser can be set at an arbitrary angle, and the photodiode array is rotated to fully cover 2? of solid angle. The current produced in the photodiodes is readout with a digital multimeter connected through a multiplexer. The two rows of photodiodes achieve 5-degree by 4-degree resolution, and the current measurement has a dynamic range of 10^5:1. The acquired data was not described by the commonly assumed linear combination of specular and diffuse (Lambertian) distributions, except for a very few surfaces. Surface roughness proved to be the most important parameter when choosing crystal setup. The reflector choice was of less importance and of almost no consequence for rough-cut surfaces. Pure specular reflection distribution for all incidence angles was measured for polished surfaces with VM2000 film, while the most Lambertian distribution for any surface finish was measured for titanium dioxide paint. The distributions acquired in this paper will be used to create more accurate Monte Carlo models for light reflection distribution within BGO crystals.

  15. Method for producing highly reflective metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, J.B.; Steger, P.J.; Wright, R.R.

    1982-03-04

    The invention is a novel method for producing mirror surfaces which are extremely smooth and which have high optical reflectivity. The method includes depositing, by electrolysis, an amorphous layer of nickel on an article and then diamond-machining the resulting nickel surface to increase its smoothness and reflectivity. The machined nickel surface then is passivated with respect to the formation of bonds with electrodeposited nickel. Nickel then is electrodeposited on the passivated surface to form a layer of electroplated nickel whose inside surface is a replica of the passivated surface. The mandrel then may be-re-passivated and provided with a layer of electrodeposited nickel, which is then recovered from the mandrel providing a second replica. The mandrel can be so re-used to provide many such replicas. As compared with producing each mirror-finished article by plating and diamond-machining, the new method is faster and less expensive.

  16. Surface reflectance degradation by microbial communities

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Meng -Dawn; Allman, Steve L.; Graham, David E.; Cheng, Karen R.; Pfiffner, Susan Marie; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A.; Desjarlais, Andre Omer

    2015-11-05

    Building envelope, such as a roof, is the interface between a building structure and the environment. Understanding of the physics of microbial interactions with the building envelope is limited. In addition to the natural weathering, microorganisms and airborne particulate matter that attach to a cool roof tend to reduce the roof reflectance over time, compromising the energy efficiency advantages of the reflective coating designs. We applied microbial ecology analysis to identify the natural communities present on the exposed coatings and investigated the reduction kinetics of the surface reflectance upon the introduction of a defined mixture of both photoautotrophic and heterotrophic microorganisms representing the natural communities. The result are (1) reflectance degradation by microbial communities follows a first-order kinetic relationship and (2) more than 50% of degradation from the initial reflectance value can be caused by microbial species alone in much less time than 3 years required by the current standard ENERGY STAR® test methods.

  17. Surface reflectance degradation by microbial communities

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cheng, Meng -Dawn; Allman, Steve L.; Graham, David E.; Cheng, Karen R.; Pfiffner, Susan Marie; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A.; Desjarlais, Andre Omer

    2015-11-05

    Building envelope, such as a roof, is the interface between a building structure and the environment. Understanding of the physics of microbial interactions with the building envelope is limited. In addition to the natural weathering, microorganisms and airborne particulate matter that attach to a cool roof tend to reduce the roof reflectance over time, compromising the energy efficiency advantages of the reflective coating designs. We applied microbial ecology analysis to identify the natural communities present on the exposed coatings and investigated the reduction kinetics of the surface reflectance upon the introduction of a defined mixture of both photoautotrophic and heterotrophicmore » microorganisms representing the natural communities. The result are (1) reflectance degradation by microbial communities follows a first-order kinetic relationship and (2) more than 50% of degradation from the initial reflectance value can be caused by microbial species alone in much less time than 3 years required by the current standard ENERGY STAR® test methods.« less

  18. The Reflecting Surface of the MAGIC Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastieri, D.; Bigongiari, C.; Galante, N.; Lorenz, E.; Mariotti, M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moralejo, A.; Pepato, A.; Peruzzo, L.; Saggion, A.; Scalzotto, V.; Tonello, N.; MAGIC Collaboration

    2003-07-01

    ˇ The MAGIC Collab oration is starting to operate the Cerenkov telescope with the largest reflecting surface, in order to lower the energy threshold well ˇ below 100 GeV. The MAGIC (Ma jor Atmospheric Gamma Imaging Cerenkov) telescope has a 17 m diameter parab olic surface F/1, consisting of 956 spherical aluminium mirrors (50 × 50 cm2 each). In this contribution, we describe the technology adopted to produce metallic mirrors and the methods used to measure the optical quality in terms of: reflectivity, radius of curvature, spot dimension and geometry.

  19. Uniform reflective films deposited on large surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Specially designed baffle which intercepts varying amounts of the vapor stream from an evaporant source, vacuum deposits films of uniform thickness on large substrates, using a single small area evaporation source. A mirror coated by this method will have a reflectance as high as 82 percent at 1216 angstroms with a variation of only plus/minus 2 percent over the surface.

  20. Reflectance spectroscopy and asteroid surface mineralogy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffey, Michael J.; Bell, Jeffrey F.; Cruikshank, Dale P.

    1989-01-01

    Information available from reflectance spectroscopy on the surface mineralogy of asteroids is discussed. Current spectral interpretive procedures used in the investigations of asteroid mineralogy are described. Present understanding of the nature and history of asteroids is discussed together with some still unresolved issues such as the source of ordinary chondrites.

  1. Method for producing highly reflective metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Jones B.; Steger, Philip J.; Wright, Ralph R.

    1983-01-01

    The invention is a novel method for producing mirror surfaces which are extremely smooth and which have high optical reflectivity. The method includes electrolessly depositing an amorphous layer of nickel on an article and then diamond-machining the resulting nickel surface to increase its smoothness and reflectivity. The machined nickel surface then is passivated with respect to the formation of bonds with electrodeposited nickel. Nickel then is electrodeposited on the passivated surface to form a layer of electroplated nickel whose inside surface is a replica of the passivated surface. The electroplated nickel layer then is separated from the passivated surface. The mandrel then may be re-passivated and provided with a layer of electrodeposited nickel, which is then recovered from the mandrel providing a second replica. The mandrel can be so re-used to provide many such replicas. As compared with producing each mirror-finished article by plating and diamond-machining, the new method is faster and less expensive.

  2. Mercury: surface composition from the reflection spectrum.

    PubMed

    McCord, T B; Adams, J B

    1972-11-17

    The reflection spectrum for the integral disk of the planet Mercury was measured and was found to have a constant positive slope from 0.32 to 1.05 micrometers, except for absorption features in the infrared. The reflectivity curve matches closely the curve for the lunar upland and mare regions. Thus, the surface of Mercury is probably covered with a lunar-like soil rich in dark glasses of high iron and titanium content. Pyroxene is probably the dominant mafic mineral. PMID:17798540

  3. X-ray reflectivity and surface roughness

    SciTech Connect

    Ocko, B.M.

    1988-01-01

    Since the advent of high brightness synchrotron radiation sources there has been a phenomenal growth in the use of x-rays as a probe of surface structure. The technique of x-ray reflectivity is particularly relevant to electrochemists since it is capable of probing the structure normal to an electrode surface in situ. In this paper the theoretical framework for x-ray reflectivity is reviewed and the results from previous non-electrochemistry measurements are summarized. These measurements are from the liquid/air interface (CCl/sub 4/), the metal crystal vacuum interface (Au(100)), and from the liquid/solid interface(liquid crystal/silicon). 34 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Characteristic variations in reflectance of surface soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoner, E. R.; Baumgardner, M. F. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Surface soil samples from a wide range of naturally occurring soils were obtained for the purpose of studying the characteristic variations in soil reflectance as these variations relate to other soil properties and soil classification. A total 485 soil samples from the U.S. and Brazil representing 30 suborders of the 10 orders of 'Soil Taxonomy' was examined. The spectral bidirectional reflectance factor was measured on uniformly moist soils over the 0.52 to 2.32 micron wavelength range with a spectroradiometer adapted for indoor use. Five distinct soil spectral reflectance curve forms were identified according to curve shape, the presence or absence of absorption bands, and the predominance of soil organic matter and iron oxide composition. These curve forms were further characterized according to generically homogeneous soil properties in a manner similar to the subdivisions at the suborder level of 'Soil Taxonomy'. Results indicate that spectroradiometric measurements of soil spectral bidirectional reflectance factor can be used to characterize soil reflectance in terms that are meaningful to soil classification, genesis, and survey.

  5. Reduction of Glass Surface Reflectance by Ion Beam Surface Modification

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Spitzer

    2011-03-11

    This is the final report for DOE contract DE-EE0000590. The purpose of this work was to determine the feasibility of the reduction of the reflection from the front of solar photovoltaic modules. Reflection accounts for a power loss of approximately 4%. A solar module having an area of one square meter with an energy conversion efficiency of 18% generates approximately 180 watts. If reflection loss can be eliminated, the power output can be increased to 187 watts. Since conventional thin-film anti-reflection coatings do not have sufficient environmental stability, we investigated the feasibility of ion beam modification of the glass surface to obtain reduction of reflectance. Our findings are generally applicable to all solar modules that use glass encapsulation, as well as commercial float glass used in windows and other applications. Ion implantation of argon, fluorine, and xenon into commercial low-iron soda lime float glass, standard float glass, and borosilicate glass was studied by implantation, annealing, and measurement of reflectance. The three ions all affected reflectance. The most significant change was obtained by argon implantation into both low-iron and standard soda-lime glass. In this way samples were formed with reflectance lower than can be obtained with a single-layer coatings of magnesium fluoride. Integrated reflectance was reduced from 4% to 1% in low-iron soda lime glass typical of the glass used in solar modules. The reduction of reflectance of borosilicate glass was not as large; however borosilicate glass is not typically used in flat plate solar modules. Unlike conventional semiconductor ion implantation doping, glass reflectance reduction was found to be tolerant to large variations in implant dose, meaning that the process does not require high dopant uniformity. Additionally, glass implantation does not require mass analysis. Simple, high current ion implantation equipment can be developed for this process; however, before the process

  6. Airway surface liquid depth imaged by surface laser reflectance microscopy.

    PubMed

    Thiagarajah, Jay R; Song, Yuanlin; Derichs, Nico; Verkman, A S

    2010-09-01

    The thin layer of liquid at the surface of airway epithelium, the airway surface liquid (ASL), is important in normal airway physiology and in the pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis. At present, the best method to measure ASL depth involves scanning confocal microscopy after staining with an aqueous-phase fluorescent dye. We describe here a simple, noninvasive imaging method to measure ASL depth by reflectance imaging of an epithelial mucosa in which the surface is illuminated at a 45-degree angle by an elongated 13-microm wide rectangular beam produced by a 670-nm micro-focus laser. The principle of the method is that air-liquid, liquid-liquid, and liquid-cell interfaces produce distinct specular or diffuse reflections that can be imaged to give a micron-resolution replica of the mucosal surface. The method was validated using fluid layers of specified thicknesses and applied to measure ASL depth in cell cultures and ex vivo fragments of pig trachea. In addition, the method was adapted to measure transepithelial fluid transport from the dynamics of fluid layer depth. Compared with confocal imaging, ASL depth measurement by surface laser reflectance microscopy does not require dye staining or costly instrumentation, and can potentially be adapted for in vivo measurements using fiberoptics. PMID:20713545

  7. Polarized and specular reflectance variation with leaf surface features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Lois; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Vanderbilt, V. C.

    1993-01-01

    The linearly polarized reflectance from a leaf depends on the characteristics of the leaf surface. In the present study the leaf reflectance of a number of plant species with varying surface characteristics was measured at the Brewster angle with a polarization photometer having 5 visible and near-infrared wavelength bands. We found that all leaf surfaces polarized incident light. Differences among species could be explained by variation in surface features. The results support our hypothesis that the polarized light is reflected by the leaf surface, not by its interior. Two mechanisms appeared responsible for the linearly polarized reflectance: (1) specular reflectance and (2) surface particle scattering. In most cases, large values of linearly polarized reflectance could be attributed to specular reflectance from the leaf surface. Attribution required knowledge of the optical dimensions of features on the leaf surface.

  8. Optical properties of micromachined polysilicon reflective surfaces with etching holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Jun; Byrne, Colin; Liu, Chang; Brady, David J.

    1998-08-01

    MUMPS (Multi-User MEMS Process) is receiving increasingly wide use in micro optics. We have investigated the optical properties of the polysilicon reflective surface in a typical MUMPS chip within the visible light spectrum. The effect of etching holes on the reflected laser beam is studied. The reflectivity and diffraction patterns at five different wavelengths have been measured. The optical properties of the polysilicon reflective surface are greatly affected by the surface roughness, the etching holes, as well as the material. The etching holes contribute to diffraction and reduction of reflectivity. This study provides a basis for optimal design of micromachined free-space optical systems.

  9. Reflective overcoats for radiation control surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan M.

    1991-01-01

    Theoretical models are developed to predict the surface properties of a coating layer composed of particles of a known size distribution, applied to an opaque substrate, such as a metal or reaction cured glass (RCG). The surface temperature attained at radiative equilibrium by an overcoated surface subject to a given heat flux is calculated. The incident radiation was assumed to exhibit the spectral distribution characteristic of a black body at different temperatures or equivalently, having different peak wavelengths, with the energy level scaled to give a range of desired surface radiative heat fluxes. This approach allows a straightforward comparison of the thernal response of a surface to incident radiation having the energy predominantly in a characteristic wavelength band and a well-defined spectral distribution. The ratio of the radiative heat flux to the total heat flux was varied, and the different geometric and material parameters of such overcoat layers were explored. The model was applied to representative surface heating rates to the Aeroasssisted Flight Experiment (AFE) and to Aeroassisted Space Transfer Vehicles (ASTVs). The predicted radiative energy flux to the surface of the AFE vehicle gives a single-point comparison of the surface temperatures attained with and without a selective-reflector overcoat on the vehicle surface. The specific objective of this work is to identify the most desirable radiative properties of an overcoat/substrate system for this environment.

  10. Reflections concerning triply-periodic minimal surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Schoen, Alan H.

    2012-01-01

    In recent decades, there has been an explosion in the number and variety of embedded triply-periodic minimal surfaces (TPMS) identified by mathematicians and materials scientists. Only the rare examples of low genus, however, are commonly invoked as shape templates in scientific applications. Exact analytic solutions are now known for many of the low genus examples. The more complex surfaces are readily defined with numerical tools such as Surface Evolver software or the Landau–Ginzburg model. Even though table-top versions of several TPMS have been placed within easy reach by rapid prototyping methods, the inherent complexity of many of these surfaces makes it challenging to grasp their structure. The problem of distinguishing TPMS, which is now acute because of the proliferation of examples, has been addressed by Lord & Mackay (Lord & Mackay 2003 Curr. Sci. 85, 346–362). PMID:24098851

  11. MODIS Directional Surface Reflectance Product: Method, Error Estimates and Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermote, Eric; Kotchenova, Svetlana

    The surface bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF) is the ratio between reflected radiance measured in specific observation geometry (zenith and azimuth) within an infinitely small solid angle and irradiance incident on the surface from a direct source of illumination (zenith and azimuth). The BRF is determined from satellite observations through an atmospheric correction (AC) process. When properly retrieved, the surface BRF is fully decoupled from an atmospheric signal, and thus represents the value as measured by an ideal sensor held at the same view geometry and located just above the Earth's surface assuming an absence of atmosphere.

  12. Light reflecting apparatus including a multi-aberration light reflecting surface

    DOEpatents

    Sawicki, Richard H.; Sweatt, William

    1987-01-01

    A light reflecting apparatus including a multi-aberration bendable light reflecting surface is disclosed herein. This apparatus includes a structural assembly comprised of a rectangular plate which is resiliently bendable, to a limited extent, and which has a front side defining the multi-aberration light reflecting surface and an opposite back side, and a plurality of straight leg members rigidly connected with the back side of the plate and extending rearwardly therefrom. The apparatus also includes a number of different adjustment mechanisms, each of which is connected with specific ones of the leg members. These mechanisms are adjustably movable in different ways for applying corresponding forces to the leg members in order to bend the rectangular plate and light reflecting surface into different predetermined curvatures and which specifically include quadratic and cubic curvatures corresponding to different optical aberrations.

  13. A light reflecting apparatus including a multi-aberration light reflecting surface

    DOEpatents

    Sawicki, R.H.; Sweatt, W.

    1985-11-21

    A light reflecting apparatus including a multi-aberration bendable light reflecting surface is disclosed herein. This apparatus includes a structural assembly comprised of a rectangular plate which is resiliently bendable, to a limited extent, and which has a front side defining the multi-aberration light reflecting surface and an opposite back side, and a plurality of straight leg members rigidly connected with the back side of the plate and extending rearwardly therefrom. The apparatus also includes a number of different adjustment mechanisms, each of which is connected with specific ones of the leg members. These mechanisms are adjustably movable in different ways for applying corresponding forces to the leg members in order to bend the rectangular plate and light reflecting surface into different predetermined curvatures and which specifically include quadratic and cubic curvatures corresponding to different optical aberrations.

  14. Comparison of the bidirectional reflectance distribution function of various surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Rene; Seasholtz, Richard G.; Oberle, Lawrence G.; Kadambi, Jaikrishnan R.

    1988-01-01

    Described is the development and use of a system to measure the Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) of various surfaces. The BRDF measurements are used in the analysis and design of optical measurement systems, such as laser anemometers. An argon ion laser (514 nm) is the light source. Preliminary results are presented for eight samples: two glossy black paints, two flat black paints, black glass, sand blasted aluminum, unworked aluminum, and a white paint. A BaSO4 white reflectance standard was used as the reference sample throughout the tests. The reflectance characteristics of these surfaces are compared.

  15. Land Surface Albedo from MERIS Reflectances Using MODIS Directional Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaaf, Crystal L. B.; Gao, Feng; Strahler, Alan H.

    2004-01-01

    MERIS Level 2 surface reflectance products are now available to the scientific community. This paper demonstrates the production of MERIS-derived surface albedo and Nadir Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) adjusted reflectances by coupling the MERIS data with MODIS BRDF products. Initial efforts rely on the specification of surface anisotropy as provided by the global MODIS BRDF product for a first guess of the shape of the BRDF and then make use all of the coincidently available, partially atmospherically corrected, cloud cleared, MERIS observations to generate MERIS-derived BRDF and surface albedo quantities for each location. Comparisons between MODIS (aerosol-corrected) and MERIS (not-yet aerosol-corrected) surface values from April and May 2003 are also presented for case studies in Spain and California as well as preliminary comparisons with field data from the Devil's Rock Surfrad/BSRN site.

  16. Asymmetric light reflectance from metal nanoparticle arrays on dielectric surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Huang, K.; Pan, W.; Zhu, J. F.; Li, J. C.; Gao, N.; Liu, C.; Ji, L.; Yu, E. T.; Kang, J.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Asymmetric light reflectance associated with localized surface plasmons excited in metal nanoparticles on a quartz substrate is observed and analyzed. This phenomenon is explained by the superposition of two waves, the wave reflected by the air/quartz interface and that reflected by the metal nanoparticles, and the resulting interference effects. Far field behavior investigation suggests that zero reflection can be achieved by optimizing the density of metal nanoparticles. Near field behavior investigation suggests that the coupling efficiency of localized surface plasmon can be additionally enhanced by separating the metal NPs from substrates using a thin film with refractive index smaller than the substrate. The latter behavior is confirmed via surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy studies using metal nanoparticles on Si/SiO2 substrates. PMID:26679353

  17. FOOD SURFACE TEXTURE MEASUREMENT USING REFLECTIVE CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was used in the reflection mode to characterize the surface texture (roughness) of sliced food surfaces. Sandpapers of grit size between 150 and 600 were used as the height reference to standardize the CLSM hardware settings. Sandpaper particle sizes were v...

  18. Global, long-term surface reflectance records from Landsat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Global, long-term monitoring of changes in Earth’s land surface requires quantitative comparisons of satellite images acquired under widely varying atmospheric conditions. Although physically based estimates of surface reflectance (SR) ultimately provide the most accurate representation of Earth’s s...

  19. Surface enrichment in polymer blends: A neutron reflection test

    SciTech Connect

    Composto, R.J.; Stein, R.S.; Kramer, E.J.; Jones, R.A.L.; Mansour, A.; Karim, A.; Felcher, G.P.

    1988-07-01

    In polymer melts of protonated and deuterated polystyrene (PS and d-PS) surface segregation of the d-PS occurs at temperatures and compositions in the one phase region close to the coexistence curve for phase separation. A neutron reflection test on a polymer blend containing 10% volume fraction of d-PS has shown that a thermal treatment caused a surface enrichment of d-PS up to 28%. The experiment demonstrates that neutron reflection measurements can generate detailed information on surface enrichment phenomena in polymer blends.

  20. Terrain-Moisture Classification Using GPS Surface-Reflected Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Michael S.; Acton, Scott T.; Katzberg, Stephen J.

    2006-01-01

    In this study we present a novel method of land surface classification using surface-reflected GPS signals in combination with digital imagery. Two GPS-derived classification features are merged with visible image data to create terrain-moisture (TM) classes, defined here as visibly identifiable terrain or landcover classes containing a surface/soil moisture component. As compared to using surface imagery alone, classification accuracy is significantly improved for a number of visible classes when adding the GPS-based signal features. Since the strength of the reflected GPS signal is proportional to the amount of moisture in the surface, use of these GPS features provides information about the surface that is not obtainable using visible wavelengths alone. Application areas include hydrology, precision agriculture, and wetlands mapping.

  1. Directional Reflective Surface Formed via Gradient-Impeding Acoustic Meta-Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kyungjun; Kim, Jedo; Hur, Shin; Kwak, Jun-Hyuk; Lee, Seong-Hyun; Kim, Taesung

    2016-01-01

    Artificially designed acoustic meta-surfaces have the ability to manipulate sound energy to an extraordinary extent. Here, we report on a new type of directional reflective surface consisting of an array of sub-wavelength Helmholtz resonators with varying internal coiled path lengths, which induce a reflection phase gradient along a planar acoustic meta-surface. The acoustically reshaped reflective surface created by the gradient-impeding meta-surface yields a distinct focal line similar to a parabolic cylinder antenna, and is used for directive sound beamforming. Focused beam steering can be also obtained by repositioning the source (or receiver) off axis, i.e., displaced from the focal line. Besides flat reflective surfaces, complex surfaces such as convex or conformal shapes may be used for sound beamforming, thus facilitating easy application in sound reinforcement systems. Therefore, directional reflective surfaces have promising applications in fields such as acoustic imaging, sonic weaponry, and underwater communication. PMID:27562634

  2. Directional Reflective Surface Formed via Gradient-Impeding Acoustic Meta-Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Song, Kyungjun; Kim, Jedo; Hur, Shin; Kwak, Jun-Hyuk; Lee, Seong-Hyun; Kim, Taesung

    2016-01-01

    Artificially designed acoustic meta-surfaces have the ability to manipulate sound energy to an extraordinary extent. Here, we report on a new type of directional reflective surface consisting of an array of sub-wavelength Helmholtz resonators with varying internal coiled path lengths, which induce a reflection phase gradient along a planar acoustic meta-surface. The acoustically reshaped reflective surface created by the gradient-impeding meta-surface yields a distinct focal line similar to a parabolic cylinder antenna, and is used for directive sound beamforming. Focused beam steering can be also obtained by repositioning the source (or receiver) off axis, i.e., displaced from the focal line. Besides flat reflective surfaces, complex surfaces such as convex or conformal shapes may be used for sound beamforming, thus facilitating easy application in sound reinforcement systems. Therefore, directional reflective surfaces have promising applications in fields such as acoustic imaging, sonic weaponry, and underwater communication. PMID:27562634

  3. Reflection properties of hydrogen ions at helium irradiated tungsten surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doi, K.; Tawada, Y.; Lee, H. T.; Kato, S.; Tanaka, N.; Sasao, M.; Kisaki, M.; Nishiura, M.; Matsumoto, Y.; Kenmotsu, T.; Wada, M.; Ueda, Y.; Yamaoka, H.

    2016-02-01

    Nanostructured W surfaces prepared by He bombardment exhibit characteristic angular distributions of hydrogen ion reflection upon injection of 1 keV H+ beam. A magnetic momentum analyzer that can move in the vacuum chamber has measured the angular dependence of the intensity and the energy of reflected ions. Broader angular distributions were observed for He-irradiated tungsten samples compared with that of the intrinsic polycrystalline W. Both intensity and energy of reflected ions decreased in the following order: the polycrystalline W, the He-bubble containing W, and the fuzz W. Classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulations based on Atomic Collision in Amorphous Target code suggests that lower atom density near the surface can make the reflection coefficients lower due to increasing number of collisions.

  4. Surface reflectance and material studies for the PROSPECT Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowes, Alyssa; Prospect Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The PROSPECT Experiment aims to probe the existence of sterile neutrino oscillations by measuring the energy spectrum of antineutrinos emanating from nuclear reactors in a matrix of optically separated target scintillator cells at a variety of reactor-detector baselines. By measuring the absolute spectrum we also learn about reactors and what isotopes they produce. In order to properly model and optimise PROSPECT's energy resolution and background rejection capabilities, the reflective properties of the cell surfaces must be well understood. To address this, a study of various reflective surfaces under consideration to be used in the detector was conducted at non-normal incident angles through liquid using a custom-built laser-based reflectance measurement system. This presentation will describe the apparatus, reflectance measurements, and implications for the PROSPECT optical cell performance. Future plans to incorporate measurements into existing optical simulations will also be discussed. Funding provided by Illinois Institute of Technology College of Science.

  5. Effect of wildfires on surface reflectance from a savanna ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poudyal, R.; Gatebe, C. K.; Ichoku, C. M.; Varnai, T.

    2015-12-01

    During an airborne field campaign in South Africa in 2005, NASA's Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) flew aboard South Africa Weather Service, Aerocommander 690A and measured surface bidirectional reflectance-distribution function (BRDF) over savanna comprised mostly of grasses and a few scattered trees. Savannas cover half the surface of Africa, large areas of Australia, South America, and India. . The region that was studied is located in Kruger National Park in northeastern South Africa, which was heavily affected by the wildfires. The CAR measured surface reflectance along its flight path covering both burned and unburned areas. . In this study, we compared surface reflectance between burnt and un-burnt areas at various wavelengths (340nm, 380nm, 472nm, 682nm, 870nm, 1036nm, 1219nm, 1273nm, and 2205nm) at satellite sub-pixel scales. We found a relative burnt surface reflectance decrease of between 8 and 65% due to fires. These results not only serve to highlight the importance of biomass burning and effects on the energy budgets, but also the need to determine the effects of albedo changes due to fires on soil moisture budget, evapotranspiration, infiltration, and runoff, all of which govern the land-surface component of the water cycle.

  6. Echo thresholds for reflections from acoustically diffusive architectural surfaces.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Philip W; Walther, Andreas; Faller, Christof; Braasch, Jonas

    2013-10-01

    When sound reflects from an irregular architectural surface, it spreads spatially and temporally. Extensive research has been devoted to prediction and measurement of diffusion, but less has focused on its perceptual effects. This paper examines the effect of temporal diffusion on echo threshold. There are several notable differences between the waveform of a reflection identical to the direct sound and one from an architectural surface. The onset and offset are damped and the energy is spread in time; hence, the reflection response has a lower peak amplitude, and is decorrelated from the direct sound. The perceptual consequences of these differences are previously undocumented. Echo threshold tests are conducted with speech and music signals, using direct sound and a simulated reflection that is either identical to the direct sound or has various degrees of diffusion. Results indicate that for a speech signal, diffuse reflections are less easily detectable as a separate auditory event than specular reflections of the same total energy. For a music signal, no differences are observed between the echo thresholds for reflections with and without temporal diffusion. Additionally, echo thresholds are found to be shorter for speech than for music, and shorter for spatialized than for diotic presentation of signals. PMID:24116414

  7. UV 380 nm Reflectivity of the Earth's Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, J. R.; Celarier, E.; Larko, D.

    2000-01-01

    The 380 nm radiance measurements of TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) have been converted into a global data set of daily (1979 to 1992) Lambert equivalent reflectivities R of the Earth's surface and boundary layer (clouds, aerosols, surface haze, and snow/ice). Since UV surface reflectivity is between 2 and 8% for both land and water during all seasons of the year (except for ice and snow cover), reflectivities larger than the surface value indicates the presence of clouds, haze, or aerosols in the satellite field of view. Statistical analysis of 14 years of daily data show that most snow/ice-free regions of the Earth have their largest fraction of days each year when the reflectivity is low (R less than 10%). The 380 nm reflectivity data shows that the true surface reflectivity is 2 to 3% lower than the most frequently occurring reflectivity value for each TOMS scene. The most likely cause of this could be a combination of frequently occurring boundary-layer water or aerosol haze. For most regions, the observation of extremely clear conditions needed to estimate the surface reflectivity from space is a comparatively rare occurrence. Certain areas (e.g., Australia, southern Africa, portions of northern Africa) are cloud-free more than 80% of the year, which exposes these regions to larger amounts of UV radiation than at comparable latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere. Regions over rain-forests, jungle areas, Europe and Russia, the bands surrounding the Arctic and Antarctic regions, and many ocean areas have significant cloud cover (R greater than 15%) more than half of each year. In the low to middle latitudes, the areas with the heaviest cloud cover (highest reflectivity for most of the year) are the forest areas of northern South America, southern Central America, the jungle areas of equatorial Africa, and high mountain regions such as the Himalayas or the Andes. The TOMS reflectivity data show the presence of large nearly clear ocean areas and the effects

  8. In situ laser reflectance measurement of diffuse surfaces.

    PubMed

    Chan, W S; Khan, S U

    1978-08-01

    Report is made on an in situ method of laser reflectance measurement of diffuse surfaces by using a GaAs laser and off-the-shelf optical components not involving radiation integration over a hemisphere as with most conventional reflectometers. The design features and limitations are described. Several diffuse surfaces were evaluated by this method, and the reflectance results obtained were in good agreement with those determined by the method of integrating sphere that used MgCO(3) surface as a standard. The main advantages of this method are: the elimination of the need of a surface standard; the avoidance of having the surfaces in close contact with the measuring equipment; the accuracy better than 10%; and the relatively straightforward alignment. PMID:20203783

  9. Retrieval of surface BRDF for reflectance-based calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thome, K.; Czapla-Myers, J.; McCorkel, J.

    2007-09-01

    The University of Arizona has recently deployed a set of automated, downlooking radiometers to retrieve surface reflectance of the Railroad Valley test site in Nevada. Results from these radiometers have been combined with atmospheric data from the same site to provide a reflectance-based, vicarious calibration of multiple sensors. The accuracy of the calibrations is similar to those obtained from on-site personnel. Past work has emphasized near-nadir views by the satellite sensors under study to match more closely the view geometry of the automated radiometers to minimize the effect of bi-directional effects in the surface reflectance. Extension to off-nadir views requires an accurate understanding of the surface BRDF. Surface bi-directional reflectance effects have always played a key role in the accuracy of the vicarious calibration of imaging sensors. Such effects are especially important for the large, off-nadir views of sensors such as AVHRR and MODIS. The current work presents a method for retrieving the BRDF using the nadir-viewing data from the automated radiometers throughout the day. The concept of reciprocity is used to derive the reflectance as a function of view angle based on the measurements as a function of solar zenith angle. Comparisons of the results from this approach are compared to MODIS-derived BRDF data as well as ground-based measurements.

  10. Laboratory laser reflectance measurement and applications to asteroid surface analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, A.; Daly, M. G.; Cloutis, E. A.; Tait, K. T.; Izawa, M. R. M.; Barnouin, O. S.; Hyde, B. C.; Nicklin, I.

    2014-07-01

    Introduction Laboratory reflectance measurement of asteroid analogs is an important tool for interpreting the reflectance of asteroids. One dominant factor affecting how measured reflectance changes as a function of phase angle (180° minus the scattering angle) is surface roughness [1], which is related to grain size. A major goal of this study is to be able to use the angular distributions (phase functions) of scattered light from various regions on an asteroid surface to determine the relative grain size between those regions. Grain size affects the spectral albedo and continuum slopes of surface materials, has implications in terms of understanding geologic processes on asteroids and is also valuable for the planning and operations of upcoming missions to asteroids, such as the New Frontiers OSIRIS-REx sample return mission to the asteroid (101955) Bennu [2]. Information on surface roughness is particularly powerful when combined with other datasets, such as thermal inertia maps (e.g., a smooth, low-backscatter surface of low thermal inertia likely contains fine grains). Approach To better constrain the composition and surface texture of Bennu, we are conducting experiments to investigate the laser return signature of terrestrial and meteorite analogs to Bennu. The objective is to understand the nature of laser returns given possible compositional, grain size and slope distributions on the surface of Bennu to allow surface characterization, particularly surface grain size, which would significantly aid efforts to identify suitable sites for sampling by the OSIRIS-REx mission. Setup A 1064-nm laser is used to determine the reflectance of Bennu analogs and their constituents (1064 nm is the wavelength of many laser altimeters including the one planned to fly on OSIRIS-REx). Samples of interest include serpentinites (greenalite, etc.), magnetite, and shungite. To perform the experiments, a goniometer has been built. This instrument allows reflectance measurements

  11. Advantages of wet work for near-surface seismic reflection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, R.D.; Markiewicz, R.D.; Rademacker, T.R.; Hopkins, R.; Rawcliffe, R.J.; Paquin, J.

    2007-01-01

    Benefits of shallow water settings (0.1 to 0.5 m) are pronounced on shallow, high-resolution seismic reflection images and, for examples discussed here, range from an order of magnitude increased signal-to-noise ratio to resolution potential elevated by more than 8 times. Overall data quality of high-resolution seismic reflection data at three sites notorious for poor near-surface reflection returns was improved by coupling the source and/or receivers to a well sorted and fully saturated surface. Half-period trace-to-trace static offsets evident in reflections from receivers planted into a creek bank were eliminated by moving the geophones to the base of a shallow creek at the toe of the bank. Reflections from a dipping bedrock were recorded with a dominant frequency approaching 1 KHz from hydrophones in 0.5 m of water at the toe of a dam using a hammer impact source. A tamper impacted by a dead blow hammer in a shallow (10-20 cm) deep creek produced reflections with a dominant frequency over 400 Hz at depths as shallow as 6 ms. ?? 2007 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  12. Quality assessment of Landsat surface reflectance products using MODIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Min; Huang, Chengquan; Channan, Saurabh; Vermote, Eric F.; Masek, Jeffrey G.; Townshend, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Surface reflectance adjusted for atmospheric effects is a primary input for land cover change detection and for developing many higher level surface geophysical parameters. With the development of automated atmospheric correction algorithms, it is now feasible to produce large quantities of surface reflectance products using Landsat images. Validation of these products requires in situ measurements, which either do not exist or are difficult to obtain for most Landsat images. The surface reflectance products derived using data acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), however, have been validated more comprehensively. Because the MODIS on the Terra platform and the Landsat 7 are only half an hour apart following the same orbit, and each of the 6 Landsat spectral bands overlaps with a MODIS band, good agreements between MODIS and Landsat surface reflectance values can be considered indicators of the reliability of the Landsat products, while disagreements may suggest potential quality problems that need to be further investigated. Here we develop a system called Landsat-MODIS Consistency Checking System (LMCCS). This system automatically matches Landsat data with MODIS observations acquired on the same date over the same locations and uses them to calculate a set of agreement metrics. To maximize its portability, Java and open-source libraries were used in developing this system, and object-oriented programming (OOP) principles were followed to make it more flexible for future expansion. As a highly automated system designed to run as a stand-alone package or as a component of other Landsat data processing systems, this system can be used to assess the quality of essentially every Landsat surface reflectance image where spatially and temporally matching MODIS data are available. The effectiveness of this system was demonstrated using it to assess preliminary surface reflectance products derived using the Global Land Survey (GLS) Landsat

  13. Quality Assessment of Landsat Surface Reflectance Products Using MODIS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Min; Huang, Chengquan; Channan, Saurabh; Vermote, Eric; Masek, Jeffrey G.; Townshend, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Surface reflectance adjusted for atmospheric effects is a primary input for land cover change detection and for developing many higher level surface geophysical parameters. With the development of automated atmospheric correction algorithms, it is now feasible to produce large quantities of surface reflectance products using Landsat images. Validation of these products requires in situ measurements, which either do not exist or are difficult to obtain for most Landsat images. The surface reflectance products derived using data acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), however, have been validated more comprehensively. Because the MODIS on the Terra platform and the Landsat 7 are only half an hour apart following the same orbit, and each of the 6 Landsat spectral bands overlaps with a MODIS band, good agreements between MODIS and Landsat surface reflectance values can be considered indicators of the reliability of the Landsat products, while disagreements may suggest potential quality problems that need to be further investigated. Here we develop a system called Landsat-MODIS Consistency Checking System (LMCCS). This system automatically matches Landsat data with MODIS observations acquired on the same date over the same locations and uses them to calculate a set of agreement metrics. To maximize its portability, Java and open-source libraries were used in developing this system, and object-oriented programming (OOP) principles were followed to make it more flexible for future expansion. As a highly automated system designed to run as a stand-alone package or as a component of other Landsat data processing systems, this system can be used to assess the quality of essentially every Landsat surface reflectance image where spatially and temporally matching MODIS data are available. The effectiveness of this system was demonstrated using it to assess preliminary surface reflectance products derived using the Global Land Survey (GLS) Landsat

  14. Criteria for evaluation of reflective surface for parabolic dish concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, F.

    1980-01-01

    Commercial, second surface glass mirror are emphasized, but aluminum and metallized polymeric films are also included. Criteria for sealing solar mirrors in order to prevent environmental degradation and criteria for bonding sagged or bent mirrors to substrate materials are described. An overview of the technical areas involved in evaluating small mirror samples, sections, and entire large gores is presented. A basis for mirror criteria was established that eventually may become part of inspection and evaluation techniques for three dimensional parabolic reflective surfaces.

  15. Reconstructing surface wave profiles from reflected acoustic pulses.

    PubMed

    Walstead, Sean P; Deane, Grant B

    2013-05-01

    Surface wave shapes are determined by analyzing underwater reflected acoustic signals. The acoustic signals (of nominal frequency 200 kHz) are forward scattered from the underside of surface waves that are generated in a wave tank and scaled to model smooth ocean swell. An inverse processing algorithm is designed and implemented to reconstruct the surface displacement profiles of the waves over one complete period. The inverse processing uses the surface scattered pulses collected at the receiver, an initial wave profile (two are considered), and a broadband forward scattering model based on Kirchhoff's diffraction formula to iteratively adjust the surface until it is considered optimized or reconstructed. Two physical length scales over which information can be known about the surface are confirmed. An outer length scale, the Fresnel zone surrounding each specular reflection point, is the only region where optimized surfaces resulting from each initial profile converge within a resolution set by the inner length scale, a quarter-wavelength of the acoustic pulse. The statistical confidence of each optimized surface is also highest within a Fresnel zone. Future design considerations are suggested such as an array of receivers that increases the region of surface reconstruction by a factor of 2 to 3. PMID:23654368

  16. Polarized reflectance and transmittance distribution functions of the ocean surface.

    PubMed

    Hieronymi, Martin

    2016-07-11

    Two aspects of ocean modelling are treated: representation of ocean waves considering all size-classes of waves and tracing of light-interactions at the wavy sea surface. Nonlinear wave profiles are realized accounting for a wide range of climatologically relevant sea states and wind speeds. Polarized ray tracing is used to investigate air-incident and whitecap-free reflectance and transmittance distributions with high angular resolution subject to sea-characterizing parameters, such as significant wave height, peak wave period, wind speed, and surface roughness. Wave-shadowing effects of incident and multiple reflected rays are fully considered. Their influence mostly starts with incidence angles greater than 60°, i.e., when the sun is near the horizon, and is especially pronounced for steep sea states. The net effect of multiple reflections is a redistribution of reflectance and transmittance fractions in their respective hemispheres and a slight increase of the net transmission of light into the sea. Revised reflectance and transmittance distribution functions, RDF and TDF, are provided depending on surface roughness in terms of the mean-square slope; reference is made to other sea state parameters. In comparison with the slope statistics approach, uncertainties related to sun near the horizon are reduced and on average this study yields somewhat higher reflectance values with some variability related to the sea state. By means of provided data, irradiance and radiance reflectances can be computed using desired sky radiance distributions, e.g., clear sky, overcast or partly cloudy sky, as well as wind or sea state information including wave propagation direction. PMID:27410893

  17. Surface Reflectances and Human Color Constancy: Comment on Dannemiller (1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troost, Jimmy M.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    It is argued that a reflectance channel that requires priority information is shown to be less plausible for the human visual system than J. L. Dannemiller (1989) argued. In the response, Dannemiller replies that lightness is not an illuminant invariant surface descriptor when daylight illuminant substitutions are considered. (SLD)

  18. DETERMINING REFLECTANCE SPECTRA OF SURFACES AND CLOUDS ON EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Nicolas B.; Strait, Talia E.

    2013-03-01

    Planned missions will spatially resolve temperate terrestrial planets from their host star. Although reflected light from such a planet encodes information about its surface, it has not been shown how to establish surface characteristics of a planet without assuming known surfaces to begin with. We present a reanalysis of disk-integrated, time-resolved, multiband photometry of Earth obtained by the Deep Impact spacecraft as part of the EPOXI Mission of Opportunity. We extract reflectance spectra of clouds, ocean, and land without a priori knowledge of the numbers or colors of these surfaces. We show that the inverse problem of extracting surface spectra from such data is a novel and extreme instance of spectral unmixing, a well-studied problem in remote sensing. Principal component analysis is used to determine an appropriate number of model surfaces with which to interpret the data. Shrink-wrapping a simplex to the color excursions of the planet yields a conservative estimate of the planet's endmember spectra. The resulting surface maps are unphysical, however, requiring negative or larger-than-unity surface coverage at certain locations. Our ''rotational unmixing'' supersedes the endmember analysis by simultaneously solving for the surface spectra and their geographical distributions on the planet, under the assumption of diffuse reflection and known viewing geometry. We use a Markov Chain Monte Carlo to determine best-fit parameters and their uncertainties. The resulting albedo spectra are similar to clouds, ocean, and land seen through a Rayleigh-scattering atmosphere. This study suggests that future direct-imaging efforts could identify and map unknown surfaces and clouds on exoplanets.

  19. Polarized infrared emissivity of one-dimensional Gaussian sea surfaces with surface reflections.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongkun; Pinel, Nicolas; Bourlier, Christophe

    2011-08-10

    Surface reflection is an important phenomenon that must be taken into account when studying sea surface infrared emissivity, especially at large observation angles. This paper models analytically the polarized infrared emissivity of one-dimensional sea surfaces with shadowing effect and one surface reflection, by assuming a Gaussian surface slope distribution. A Monte Carlo ray-tracing method is employed as a reference. It is shown that the present model agrees well with the reference method. The emissivity calculated by the present model is then compared with measurements. The comparisons show that agreements are greatly improved by taking one surface reflection into account. The Monte Carlo ray-tracing results of sea surface infrared emissivity with two and three reflections are also determined. Their contributions are shown to be negligible. PMID:21833139

  20. Surface Inspection Of Automotive Bodies By Reflective Computer Vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Y. Y.; Jin, G. C.; Tang, S. H.

    1988-12-01

    A simple but practical optical technique for automated surface inspection of car bodies is presented. The method which is based on light reflection is applicable to inspecting specularly reflective surfaces such as painted car bodies. A structured light signal consists of linear grating is imaged by a video camera via the surface to be inspected. With this arrangement, the surface being inspected acts as a mirror. Presence of surface flaws causes the grating to be locally perturbed. The grating-image is digitized and analyzed by a computer. Several algorithms are developed which automatically identifies the surface flaws by analyzing the perturbation in the grating-image. The technique allows surface flaws to be quantified in terms of slope deviation or depth variation. The sensitivity of the technique is very high permitting minute flaws to be detected. In the paper the theory of the technique will be presented together with experimental validation. The technique possesses numerous practical features such as requiring no special surface preparation, allowing evaluation in place, requiring minimum environmental safeguards, allowing rapid testing and evaluation, providing reliable and quantitative results, and it can be automated. Therefore the technique has clearly exhibited a great potential for being developed into a production-line inspection tool.

  1. Mercury's Surface Magnetic Field Determined from Proton-Reflection Magnetometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winslow, Reka M.; Johnson, Catherine L.; Anderson, Brian J.; Gershman, Daniel J.; Raines, Jim M.; Lillis, Robert J.; Korth, Haje; Slavin, James A.; Solomon, Sean C.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2014-01-01

    Solar wind protons observed by the MESSENGER spacecraft in orbit about Mercury exhibit signatures of precipitation loss to Mercury's surface. We apply proton-reflection magnetometry to sense Mercury's surface magnetic field intensity in the planet's northern and southern hemispheres. The results are consistent with a dipole field offset to the north and show that the technique may be used to resolve regional-scale fields at the surface. The proton loss cones indicate persistent ion precipitation to the surface in the northern magnetospheric cusp region and in the southern hemisphere at low nightside latitudes. The latter observation implies that most of the surface in Mercury's southern hemisphere is continuously bombarded by plasma, in contrast with the premise that the global magnetic field largely protects the planetary surface from the solar wind.

  2. Copper-assisted, anti-reflection etching of silicon surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Toor, Fatima; Branz, Howard

    2014-08-26

    A method (300) for etching a silicon surface (116) to reduce reflectivity. The method (300) includes electroless deposition of copper nanoparticles about 20 nanometers in size on the silicon surface (116), with a particle-to-particle spacing of 3 to 8 nanometers. The method (300) includes positioning (310) the substrate (112) with a silicon surface (116) into a vessel (122). The vessel (122) is filled (340) with a volume of an etching solution (124) so as to cover the silicon surface (116). The etching solution (124) includes an oxidant-etchant solution (146), e.g., an aqueous solution of hydrofluoric acid and hydrogen peroxide. The silicon surface (116) is etched (350) by agitating the etching solution (124) with, for example, ultrasonic agitation, and the etching may include heating (360) the etching solution (124) and directing light (365) onto the silicon surface (116). During the etching, copper nanoparticles enhance or drive the etching process.

  3. Repulsive Casimir-Polder potential by a negative reflecting surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Qi-Zhang

    2015-07-01

    We present a scheme to generate an all-range long repulsive Casimir-Polder potential between a perfect negative reflecting surface and a ground-state atom. The repulsive potential is stable and does not decay with time. The Casimir-Polder potential is proportional to z-2 at short atom-surface distances and to z-4 at long atom-surface distances. Because of these advantages, this potential can help in building quantum reflectors, quantum levitating devices, and waveguides for matter waves.

  4. Moth's eye anti-reflection gratings on germanium freeform surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Meng; Shultz, Jason A.; Owen, Joseph D.; Davies, Matthew A.; Suleski, Thomas J.

    2014-09-01

    Germanium is commonly used for optical components in the infrared, but the high refractive index of germanium causes significant losses due to Fresnel reflections. Anti-reflection (AR) surfaces based on subwavelength "moth's eye" gratings provide one means to significantly increase optical transmission. As found in nature, these gratings are conformal to the curved surfaces of lenslets in the eye of the moth. Engineered optical systems inspired by biological examples offer possibilities for increased performance and system miniaturization, but also introduce significant challenges to both design and fabrication. In this paper, we consider the design and fabrication of conformal moth's eye AR structures on germanium freeform optical surfaces, including lens arrays and Alvarez lenses. Fabrication approaches and limitations based on both lithography and multi-axis diamond machining are considered. Rigorous simulations of grating performance and approaches for simulation of conformal, multi-scale optical systems are discussed.

  5. Far-infrared emissivity measurements of reflective surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, J.; Lange, A. E.; Bock, J. J.

    1996-01-01

    An instrument developed to measure the emissivity of reflective surfaces by comparing the thermal emission of a test sample to that of a reference surface is reported. The instrument can accurately measure the emissivity of mirrors made from lightweight thermally insulating materials such as glass and metallized carbon fiber reinforced plastics. Far infrared measurements at a wavelength of 165 micrometers are reported. The instrument has an absolute accuracy of Delta epsilon = 9 x 10(exp -4) and can reproducibly measure an emissivity of as small as 2 x 10(exp -4) between flat reflective surfaces. The instrument was used to measure mirror samples for balloon-borne and spaceborne experiments. An emissivity of (6.05 +/- 1.24) x 10(exp -3) was measured for gold evaporated on glass, and (6.75 +/- 1.17) x 10(exp -3) for aluminum evaporated on glass.

  6. Asteroid surface materials - Mineralogical characterizations from reflectance spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffey, M. J.; Mccord, T. B.

    1978-01-01

    The use of general and specific diagnostic spectral features and parameters to interpret most of the published high-quality reflectance spectra of asteroids is discussed. Such diagnostics are shown to provide the most complete and sophisticated mineralogically and petrologically based interpretation of the asteroid surface materials. Previous investigations of asteroid surface materials are exhaustively reviewed, emphasizing the general approaches employed, sources of information, previous characterizations of asteroid surface materials, and asteroid spectral groups. The interpretive methodology is then applied to spectral reflectance data for many individual members of the various spectral groups. A range of mineral assemblages similar to certain meteorite classes is identified, and evidence is presented for a selective high-temperature event that melted certain asteroid parent bodies and permitted their differentiation as some function of distance from the sun or the protosun and of the size of the protoasteroid. Possible candidates are proposed for the source bodies of different meteorite groups.

  7. Atmospheric and Science Complexity Effects on Surface Bidirectional Reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, D. J. (Principal Investigator); Martonchik, J. V.; Sythe, W. D.; Hessom, C.

    1985-01-01

    Among the tools used in passive remote sensing of Earth resources in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions are measurements of spectral signature and bidirectional reflectance functions (BDRFs). Determination of surface properties using these observables is complicated by a number of factors, including: (1) mixing of surface components, such as soil and vegetation, (2) multiple reflections of radiation due to complex geometry, such as in crop canopies, and (3) atmospheric effects. In order to bridge the diversity in these different approaches, there is a need for a fundamental physical understanding of the influence of the various effects and a quantiative measure of their relative importance. In particular, we consider scene complexity effects using the example of reflection by vegetative surfaces. The interaction of sunlight with a crop canopy and interpretation of the spectral and angular dependence of the emergent radiation is basically a multidimensional radiative transfer problem. The complex canopy geometry, underlying soil cover, and presence of diffuse as well as collimated illumination will modify the reflectance characteristics of the canopy relative to those of the individual elements.

  8. Removing Atmospheric Effects From AVIRIS Data for Surface Reflectance Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Bo-Cai; Goetz, Alexander F. H.; Zamudio, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of high resolution imaging spectrometer data requires a thorough compensation for atmospheric absorption and scattering. A method for retrieving surface reflectances from spectral data collected by the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) is being developed. In this method, the integrated water vapor amount on a pixel by pixel basis is derived from the 0.94- and 1.14-micrometer water vapor features. The water vapor, carbon dioxide (CO2), oxygen (O2) and methane (CH4) transmission spectrum in the 0.4-2.5 micrometer region is calculated. The derived water vapor value and the solar and observational geometry are used in the spectral calculation. The AVIRIS spectrum is ratioed against the transmission spectrum to obtain the surface reflectance spectrum. Major mineral absorption features near 2.2 micrometer in retrieved reflectance spectra can be identified. Different vegetation absorption characteristics are observed. At present, the method is most useful for deriving surface reflectances from AVIRIS data measured on clear days with high visibilities. Atmospheric scattering effects will be included in our spectral calculations in the near future.

  9. BOREAS RSS-1 PARABOLA SSA Surface Reflectance and Transmittance Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); Deering, Donald D.; Eck, Thomas F.; Banerjee, Babu

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS RSS-1 team collected surface reflectance and transmittance data from three forested sites in the SSA. This data set contains averaged reflectance factors and transmitted radiances measured by the PARABOLA instrument at selected sites in the BOREAS SSA at different view angles and at three wavelength bands throughout the day. PARABOLA measurements were made during each of the three BOREAS IFCs during the growing season of 1994 at three SSA tower flux sites as well as during the FFC-T. Additional measurements were made in early and mid-1996 during the FFC-W and during IFC-2. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  10. Impact of Foliage Surface Properties on Vegetation Reflection and Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, B.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Yan, L.; Zhao, Y.; Jiao, J.

    2013-12-01

    Optical properties of phytoelements and their distribution in the canopy space (i.e., canopy structure) are among key factors that determine light environment in vegetation canopies, which in turn drives various physiological and physical processes required for the functioning of plants. Canopy radiative response is the source of information about ecosystem properties from remote sensing. Understanding of how radiation interacts with foliage and traverses in the 3D vegetation canopy is essential to both modeling and remote sensing communities. Radiation scattered by a leaf includes information from two dissimilar sources - the leaf surface and leaf interior. The first component of scattered radiation emanates from light reflected at the air-cuticle interface. This portion of reflected radiation does not interact with biochemical constituents inside the leaf and depends on the properties of the leaf surface. The leaf cuticle acts as a "barrier" for photons to enter the mesophyll and be absorbed; thus, tending to increase the leaf scattering. The second component mainly results from radiation interactions within the leaf-interior. The canopy radiation regime is sensitive to canopy structure, leaf surface properties and leaf biochemical constituents. Impact of leaf surface properties on canopy reflection and absorption is poorly understood. Radiation scattered at the surface of leaves is partly polarized. Fresnel reflection is the principal cause of light polarization. Polarization measurements provide a means to assess the impact of leaf surface properties on canopy radiation regime. We measured Bidirectional Reflectance Factor (BRF) in the principal plane and its polarized portion of needles and shoots of two coniferous species in the 400 to 1000 nm spectral interval. The needle and shoot BRF spectra were decomposed into polarized (PBRF) and diffuse (DBRF) components: BRF=PBRF+DBRF. Our analyses indicate: 1) PBRF in forward directions can account for up to 70% of

  11. Surface Reflectance in the Visible for Improved Satellite Measurements of Near-surface Ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoogman, P.; Liu, X.; Chance, K.; Sun, Q.; Schaaf, C.; Mahr, T.; Wagner, T.

    2014-12-01

    We present high spectral resolution calculations of visible surface reflectance as a function of wavelength for use in satellite measurements of ozone using the Chappuis band (400-650 nm) and evaluate the impacts of using this reflectance data in two methods on GOME-2 (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2) ultraviolet + visible ozone profile retrievals. The TEMPO (Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution) instrument is planned to measure backscattered solar radiation in the 290-740 nm range, including the ultraviolet and visible Chappuis ozone bands for increased sensitivity to near-surface ozone. Observation in the weak Chappuis band takes advantage of the relative transparency of the atmosphere in the visible to achieve sensitivity to near-surface ozone. However, due to the weakness of the ozone absorption features this measurement is more sensitive to errors in visible surface reflectance, which is highly variable. We utilize reflectance measurements of individual plant, man-made, and other surface types to calculate the primary modes of variability of visible surface reflectance at a spectral resolution comparable to than that of TEMPO (0.6 nm). Using MODIS (Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) BRDF (Bidirection Reflectance Distribution Function)/albedo product and our derived primary modes we construct a high spatial resolution climatology of wavelength-dependent surface reflectance over all viewing scenes and geometries. In the ozone profile retrieval from visible measurements, we can model the surface reflectance by either fitting a combination of primary modes or using the derived high spatial resolution spectral reflectance. We evaluate the improvement using this new reflectance data in multispectral ultraviolet + visible ozone retrievals from the GOME-2 instrument and compare the retrieval performance of using these two approaches.

  12. Global Land Cover Classification Using Modis Surface Reflectance Prosucts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukue, Kiyonari; Shimoda, Haruhisa

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study is to develop high accuracy land cover classification algorithm for Global scale by using multi-temporal MODIS land reflectance products. In this study, time-domain co-occurrence matrix was introduced as a classification feature which provides time-series signature of land covers. Further, the non-parametric minimum distance classifier was introduced for timedomain co-occurrence matrix, which performs multi-dimensional pattern matching for time-domain co-occurrence matrices of a classification target pixel and each classification classes. The global land cover classification experiments have been conducted by applying the proposed classification method using 46 multi-temporal(in one year) SR(Surface Reflectance) and NBAR(Nadir BRDF-Adjusted Reflectance) products, respectively. IGBP 17 land cover categories were used in our classification experiments. As the results, SR and NBAR products showed similar classification accuracy of 99%.

  13. Implementation of solar-reflective surfaces: Materials and utility programs

    SciTech Connect

    Bretz, S.; Akbari, H.; Rosenfeld, A.; Taha, H.

    1992-06-01

    This report focuses on implementation issues for using solar-reflective surfaces to cool urban heat islands, with specific examples for Sacramento, California. Advantages of solar-reflective surfaces for reducing energy use are: (1) they are cost-effective if albedo is increased during routine maintenance; (2) the energy savings coincide with peak demand for power; (3) there are positive effects on environmental quality; and (4) the white materials have a long service life. Important considerations when choosing materials for mitigating heat islands are identified as albedo, emissivity, durability, cost, pollution and appearance. There is a potential for increasing urban albedo in Sacramento by an additional 18%. Of residential roofs, we estimate that asphalt shingle and modified bitumen cover the largest area, and that built-up roofing and modified bitumen cover the largest area of commercial buildings. For all of these roof types, albedo may be increased at the time of re-roofing without any additional cost. When a roof is repaired, a solar-reflective roof coating may be applied to significantly increase albedo and extend the life of the root Although a coating may be cost-effective if applied to a new roof following installation or to an older roof following repair, it is not cost-effective if the coating is applied only to save energy. Solar-reflective pavement may be cost-effective if the albedo change is included in the routine resurfacing schedule. Cost-effective options for producing light-colored pavement may include: (1) asphalt concrete, if white aggregate is locally available; (2) concrete overlays; and (3) newly developed white binders and aggregate. Another option may be hot-rolled asphalt, with white chippings. Utilities could promote solar-reflective surfaces through advertisement, educational programs and cost-sharing of road resurfacing.

  14. System for measuring the spatial reflectance distribution of material surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berni, L. A.; Ribeiro, M. S.; Paes, T. F.; Beloto, A. F.

    2015-04-01

    An automatic device for measuring the reflectance distribution from material surfaces was assembled in the laboratory. The mechanical setup employs two aluminum rotating arms driven by stepper motors: one for the light source and the second for the collecting optics. The two arms can rotate in the zenith direction from -90 to +90 degrees and the light collecting arm in the azimuth angle over 360 degrees, both with adjustable angular resolution. Measurements from black anodized aluminum, PTFE, graphite, porous silicon and a lambertian reference surface were performed to validate the system.

  15. Color constancy - A method for recovering surface spectral reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloney, L. T.; Wandell, B. A.

    1986-01-01

    An algorithm has been developed for estimating the surface reflectance functions of objects in a scene with incomplete knowledge of the spectral power distribution of the ambient light. An image processing system employing this algorithm can assign colors that are constant despite changes in the lighting of the scene; this capability is essential to correct color rendering in photography, TV, and in the construction of artificial visual systems for robotics. Attention is given to the way in which constraints on lights and surfaces in the environment make color-constancy possible for a visual system, and the algorithm's implications for human color vision are discussed.

  16. Ghost imaging for a reflected object with a rough surface

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Chunfang; Zhang Dawei; Chen Bin; Bai Yanfeng

    2010-12-15

    Ghost imaging for the reflected object with rough surface is investigated. The surface height variance {sigma}{sub h}{sup 2} and the correlation length l{sub c} have been introduced to characterize the rough surface. Based on a simple scattering model, we derive the analytical expressions which are used to describe the effects of {sigma}{sub h}{sup 2} and l{sub c} on ghost imaging. The results show that both {sigma}{sub h}{sup 2} and l{sub c} have no influence on the image resolution, while the convergence of the correlation decreases as {sigma}{sub h}{sup 2} increases. Additionally, the bucket detector used in the test arm can dramatically improve the visibility of ghost images. The results are backed up by numerical simulations, in which a Monte Carlo approach to generate a rough surface has been used.

  17. Cleanliness evaluation of rough surfaces with diffuse IR reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, L. H.

    1995-01-01

    Contamination on bonding surfaces has been determined to be a primary cause for degraded bond strength in certain solid rocket motor bondlines. Hydrocarbon and silicone based organic contaminants that are airborne or directly introduced to a surface are a significant source of contamination. Diffuse infrared (IR) reflectance has historically been used as an effective technique for detection of organic contaminants, however, common laboratory methods involving the use of a Fourier transform IR spectrometer (FTIR) are impractical for inspecting the large bonding surface areas found on solid rocket motors. Optical methods involving the use of acousto-optic tunable filters and fixed bandpass optical filters are recommended for increased data acquisition speed. Testing and signal analysis methods are presented which provide for simultaneous measurement of contamination concentration and roughness level on rough metal surfaces contaminated with hydrocarbons.

  18. Microroughness, statistical surface models, and bidirectional reflection distribution function (BRDF): functions of smooth surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnisch, Bernd; Weigel, Thomas

    1994-09-01

    The calculation of the BRDF (Bi-Directional-Reflection-Distribution-Function) from profile measurements was performed theoretically and verified by measurements on a BK7 sample. The assumptions on the surface topography and approximations done are highlighted.

  19. Apparatus for and method of correcting for astigmatism in a light beam reflected off of a light reflecting surface

    DOEpatents

    Sawicki, R.H.; Sweatt, W.

    1985-11-21

    A technique for adjustably correcting for astigmatism in a light beam is disclosed herein. This technique defines a flat, rectangular light reflecting surface having opposite reinforced side edges and which is resiliently bendable, to a limited extent, into different concave and/or convex cylindrical curvatures about a particular axis and provides for adjustably bending the light reflecting surface into one of different curvatures depending upon the astigmatism to be corrected and for fixedly maintaining the curvature selected. In the embodiment disclosed, the light reflecting surface is adjustably bendable into the selected cylindrical curvature by application of a particular bending moment to the reinforced side edges of the light reflecting surface.

  20. Simulation of radar reflectivity and surface measurements of rainfall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandrasekar, V.; Bringi, V. N.

    1987-01-01

    Raindrop size distributions (RSDs) are often estimated using surface raindrop sampling devices (e.g., disdrometers) or optical array (2D-PMS) probes. A number of authors have used these measured distributions to compute certain higher-order RSD moments that correspond to radar reflectivity, attenuation, optical extinction, etc. Scatter plots of these RSD moments versus disdrometer-measured rainrates are then used to deduce physical relationships between radar reflectivity, attenuation, etc., which are measured by independent instruments (e.g., radar), and rainrate. In this paper RSDs of the gamma form as well as radar reflectivity (via time series simulation) are simulated to study the correlation structure of radar estimates versus rainrate as opposed to RSD moment estimates versus rainrate. The parameters N0, D0 and m of a gamma distribution are varied over the range normally found in rainfall, as well as varying the device sampling volume. The simulations are used to explain some possible features related to discrepancies which can arise when radar rainfall measurements are compared with surface or aircraft-based sampling devices.

  1. Asteroid surface materials: Mineralogical characterizations from reflectance spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffey, M. J.; Mccord, T. B.

    1977-01-01

    Mineral assemblages analogous to most meteorite types, with the exception of ordinary chondritic assemblages, have been found as surface materials of Main Belt asteroids. C1- and C2-like assemblages (unleached, oxidized meteoritic clay minerals plus opaques such as carbon) dominate the population throughout the Belt, especially in the outer Belt. A smaller population of asteroids exhibit surface materials similar to C3 (CO, CV) meteoritic assemblages (olivine plus opaque, probably carbon) and are also distributed throughout the Belt. The majority of remaining studied asteroids (20) of 65 asteroids exhibit spectral reflectance curves dominated by the presence of metallic nickel-iron in their surface materials. The C2-like materials which dominate the main asteroid belt population appear to be relatively rare on earth-approaching asteroids.

  2. Reflection spectra and magnetochemistry of iron oxides and natural surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasilewski, P.

    1978-01-01

    The magnetic properties and spectral characteristics of iron oxides are distinctive. Diagnostic features in reflectance spectra (0.5 to 2.4 micron) for alpha Fe2O3, gamma Fe2O3, and FeOOH include location of Fe3(+) absorption features, intensity ratios at various wavelengths, and the curve shape between 1.2 micron and 2.4 micron. The reflection spectrum of natural rock surfaces are seldom those of the bulk rock because of weathering effects. Coatings are found to be dominated by iron oxides and clay. A simple macroscopic model of rock spectra (based on concepts of stains and coatings) is considered adequate for interpretation of LANDSAT data. The magnetic properties of materials associated with specific spectral types and systematic changes in both spectra and magnetic properties are considered.

  3. Modulated surface nanostructures for enhanced light trapping and reduced surface reflection of crystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayagaki, Takeshi; Hoshi, Yusuke; Hirai, Yuji; Matsuo, Yasutaka; Usami, Noritaka

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrated the fabrication of modulated surface nanostructures as a new surface texture design for thin wafer solar cells. Using a combination of conventional alkali etching and colloidal lithography, we fabricated surface textures with micrometer and nanometre scales on a Si substrate. These modulated surface nanostructures exhibit reduced surface reflection in a broad spectral range, compared with conventional micrometer textures. We investigated optical absorption using a rigorous coupled wave analysis simulation, which revealed a significant reduction in surface reflection over a broad spectral range and efficient light trapping (comparable to that of conventional micrometer-scale textures) for the modulated nanostructures. We found that the modulated surface nanostructures have a high potential of improving the performance of thin wafer crystalline Si solar cells.

  4. Dispersionless Manipulation of Reflected Acoustic Wavefront by Subwavelength Corrugated Surface

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yi-Fan; Zou, Xin-Ye; Li, Rui-Qi; Jiang, Xue; Tu, Juan; Liang, Bin; Cheng, Jian-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Free controls of optic/acoustic waves for bending, focusing or steering the energy of wavefronts are highly desirable in many practical scenarios. However, the dispersive nature of the existing metamaterials/metasurfaces for wavefront manipulation necessarily results in limited bandwidth. Here, we propose the concept of dispersionless wavefront manipulation and report a theoretical, numerical and experimental work on the design of a reflective surface capable of controlling the acoustic wavefront arbitrarily without bandwidth limitation. Analytical analysis predicts the possibility to completely eliminate the frequency dependence with a specific gradient surface which can be implemented by designing a subwavelength corrugated surface. Experimental and numerical results, well consistent with the theoretical predictions, have validated the proposed scheme by demonstrating a distinct phenomenon of extraordinary acoustic reflection within an ultra-broad band. For acquiring a deeper insight into the underlying physics, a simple physical model is developed which helps to interpret this extraordinary phenomenon and predict the upper cutoff frequency precisely. Generations of planar focusing and non-diffractive beam have also been exemplified. With the dispersionless wave-steering capability and deep discrete resolution, our designed structure may open new avenue to fully steer classical waves and offer design possibilities for broadband optical/acoustical devices. PMID:26077772

  5. Dispersionless Manipulation of Reflected Acoustic Wavefront by Subwavelength Corrugated Surface.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yi-Fan; Zou, Xin-Ye; Li, Rui-Qi; Jiang, Xue; Tu, Juan; Liang, Bin; Cheng, Jian-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Free controls of optic/acoustic waves for bending, focusing or steering the energy of wavefronts are highly desirable in many practical scenarios. However, the dispersive nature of the existing metamaterials/metasurfaces for wavefront manipulation necessarily results in limited bandwidth. Here, we propose the concept of dispersionless wavefront manipulation and report a theoretical, numerical and experimental work on the design of a reflective surface capable of controlling the acoustic wavefront arbitrarily without bandwidth limitation. Analytical analysis predicts the possibility to completely eliminate the frequency dependence with a specific gradient surface which can be implemented by designing a subwavelength corrugated surface. Experimental and numerical results, well consistent with the theoretical predictions, have validated the proposed scheme by demonstrating a distinct phenomenon of extraordinary acoustic reflection within an ultra-broad band. For acquiring a deeper insight into the underlying physics, a simple physical model is developed which helps to interpret this extraordinary phenomenon and predict the upper cutoff frequency precisely. Generations of planar focusing and non-diffractive beam have also been exemplified. With the dispersionless wave-steering capability and deep discrete resolution, our designed structure may open new avenue to fully steer classical waves and offer design possibilities for broadband optical/acoustical devices. PMID:26077772

  6. Near Surface Seismic Reflection Imaging: Great Potential Under Critical Eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, R. D.; Peterie, S.; Judy, B. E.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic-reflection imaging has long been a mainstay in the oil and gas exploration community with mind boggling advancements in just the last decade, but its application to engineering, environmental, and groundwater problems has not seen the same level of utilization. A great deal of the problem lies in the many assumptions that are valid for deep exploration that are violated in the very complex near surface. Large channel systems with acquisition geometries conducive for both deep and shallow targets are many times assumed to be capable of extending the imaging depth window. In reality, constraints of the source and sensor/recording systems must be considered, where large powerful sources are needed to image exploration depths while low-energy, high-frequency sources are required for the shallow and thin targets in the near surface. Attempts to make one size fit all will result in artifacts that result in bogus images and characterizations in the shallow subsurface.Narrow optimum offsets, highly attenuative materials, extreme velocity variability, wavefield interference, and low signal-to-noise ratios provide an ideal breeding ground for the generation of artifacts on near-surface seismic-reflection data. With the cost of shallow reflection data being so high relative to other geophysical methods and invasive sampling, sometimes a single failure can hinder the growth in the use of the method. The method is extremely powerful and has the potential to provide vast quantities of information critical to understand the distributed hydrogeological and biogeochemical processes that elude borehole investigations. It is imperative that data be acquired in its rawest possible form and be processed with an eye to each operation. Cost savings sometimes result in one-size-fits-all acquisition and automated processing flows. Attention to detail and following signal from origination to characterization is essential.

  7. Mars surface composition from reflectance spectroscopy - A summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, R. B.; Clark, R. N.; Mccord, T. B.; Adams, J. B.; Huguenin, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    Visible and near-infrared reflectance spectra and multispectral maps of the Martian surface are discussed, and implications of the data for the composition of the Martian surface are considered. Spacecraft and earth-based telescopic observations have confirmed the generally bimodal albedo distribution of the planet, dividing the surface into bright and dark regions. Mars spectra are characterized by the presence of strong Fe(+3) absorption, which is attributed to various ferric oxide minerals. Interpretations of the spectra from the dark regions indicate a basaltic or ultramafic source rock. Evidence for water ice or a highly desiccated metal hydrate has been obtained, along with evidence for CO2-ice only in the south polar cap. Mariner 9 observations of Martian dust suggest the presence of rather acidic rock or mineral particles, or a montmorillonite-type clay. Prospects for the future study of Martian surface composition include continuing earth-based spectrophotometric studies, and high-spectral-resolution mapping of a significant portion of the surface by the Galileo spacecraft and the next Mars mission.

  8. Airborne Interferometry using GNSS Reflections for Surface Level Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semmling, Maximilian; Beyerle, Georg; Schön, Steffen; Stosius, Ralf; Gerber, Thomas; Beckheinrich, Jamila; Markgraf, Markus; Ge, Maorong; Wickert, Jens

    2013-04-01

    The interferometric use of GNSS reflections for ocean altimetry can fill the gap in coverage of ocean observations. Today radar altimeters are used for large scale ocean observations to monitor e.g. global sea level change or circulation processes like El Niño. Spacial and temporal resolution of a single radar altimeter, however, is insufficient to observe mesoscale ocean phenomena like large oceanic eddies that are important indicators of climate change. The high coverage expected for a spaceborne altimeter based on GNSS reflections stimulated investigations on according interferometric methods. Several airborne experiments have been conducted using code observations. Carrier observations have a better precision but are severely affected by noise and have mostly been used in ground-based experiments. A new interferometric approach is presented using carrier observations for airborne application. Implementing a spectral retrieval noise reduction is achieved. A flight experiment was conducted with a Zeppelin airship on 2010/10/12 over Lake Constance at the border between Austria, Germany and Switzerland. The lake surface with an area of 536km2 is suitable for altimetric study as its decimeter range Geoid undulations are well-known. Three GNSS receiver were installed on the airship. A Javad Delta receiver recording direct signals for navigation. The DLR G-REX receiver recording reflected signals for scatterometry and the GORS (GNSS Occultation Reflectometry Scatterometry) receiver recording direct and reflected signals for interferometry. The airship's trajectory is determined from navigation data with a precision better than 10cm using regional augmentation. This presentation focuses on the interferometric analysis of GORS observations. Ray tracing calculations are used to model the difference of direct and reflected signals' path. Spectral retrieval is applied to determine Doppler residuals of modelled path difference and interferometric observations. Lake level

  9. Impedance estimation from surface-based GPR reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmelzbach, C.; Tronicke, J.; Dietrich, P.

    2012-04-01

    High-resolution physical-parameter images of the shallow subsurface are important for various environmental applications. For example, the knowledge of the detailed hydrological-parameter distribution is key for groundwater and contaminant flow simulation. Surface-based ground-penetrating radar (GPR) is one of the most important geophysical techniques for high-resolution mapping of the subsurface structure in electrical-resistive environments. However, extracting information from surface-based GPR data on the physical parameters governing the wave propagation is challenging. Common tools such as common-mid point (CMP) velocity analyses can only provide images of limited resolution. We present a novel reflection-amplitude inversion workflow for surface-based GPR capable of resolving the subsurface dielectric permittivity distribution in markedly improved resolution. Our scheme is an adaptation of a seismic-reflection impedance inversion scheme to surface-based GPR. Key steps are relative amplitude-preserving data pre-conditioning including GPR deconvolution resulting in traces with the source-wavelet distortions and propagation effects largely removed. The subsequent inversion for the underlying dielectric permittivity structure is constraint with in situ dielectric permittivity data obtained by direct-push logging. Applications on realistic synthetic and field data demonstrate that our novel inversion scheme is capable of providing reliable physical-parameter images in a sub-wavelength resolution. For example, we mapped the shallow (3-7 m depth) dielectric permittivity structure of a sedimentary aquifer with decimeter resolution using 100 MHz GPR data. The resultant electrical-property models can, for example, by transformed to high-resolution water content or porosity maps, which are key for hydrological studies.

  10. Development of land surface reflectance models based on multiscale simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodenough, Adam A.; Brown, Scott D.

    2015-05-01

    Modeling and simulation of Earth imaging sensors with large spatial coverage necessitates an understanding of how photons interact with individual land surface processes at an aggregate level. For example, the leaf angle distribution of a deciduous forest canopy has a significant impact on the path of a single photon as it is scattered among the leaves and, consequently, a significant impact on the observed bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of the canopy as a whole. In particular, simulation of imagery of heterogeneous scenes for many multispectral/hyperspectral applications requires detailed modeling of regions of the spectrum where many orders of scattering are required due to both high reflectance and transmittance. Radiative transfer modeling based on ray tracing, hybrid Monte Carlo techniques and detailed geometric and optical models of land cover means that it is possible to build effective, aggregate optical models with parameters such as species, spatial distribution, and underlying terrain variation. This paper examines the capability of the Digital Image and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) model to generate BRDF data representing land surfaces at large scale from modeling at a much smaller scale. We describe robust methods for generating optical property models effectively in DIRSIG and present new tools for facilitating the process. The methods and results for forest canopies are described relative to the RAdiation transfer Model Intercomparison (RAMI) benchmark scenes, which also forms the basis for an evaluation of the approach. Additional applications and examples are presented, representing different types of land cover.

  11. Exploring for natural gas using reflectance spectra of surface soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Da-Qi; Ni, Guo-Qiang; Jiang, Li-Li; Shen, Yuan-Ting; Li, Ting; Ge, Shu-Le; Shu, Xian-Biao

    Reflectance spectra in the visible and near-infrared wavelengths provide a rapid and inexpensive means for determining the mineralogy of samples and obtaining information on chemical composition. Hydrocarbon microseepage theory establishes a cause-and-effect relation between oil and gas reservoirs and some special surface anomalies, which mainly include surface hydrocarbon microseepage and related alterations. Therefore, we can explore for oil, gas by determining reflectance spectra of surface anomalies. This idea has been applied to the R&D project of exploring for natural gas in Qinghai province of China using NASA EO-1 satellite with the Hyperion sensor (June 2005 to June 2006). In this project, in order to improve the accuracy of exploration targets of natural gas mapped in the field studied, an integrated practical system of exploration of oil and gas was built by the analysis of not only hyperspectral remote sensing data but also data provided from field work. In this paper, our efforts were focused on the analysis of the 799 reflectance spectra provided from the field work. In order to properly define the typical form of hydrocarbon microseepage with spectroscopy and fulfill the data analysis, it was necessary to build a spectral model. In this spectral model the most important features of hydrocarbon microseepage in the surface of our study area, i.e., diagnostic spectral macroscopic features and diagnostic spectral absorption features, were proposed and extracted, respectively. The distribution of coexisting anomalies, which results from both alteration minerals and hydrocarbons, is estimated by the diagnostic macroscopic features mainly using Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM) classifier. On the other hand, the diagnostic absorption features of two main absorption bands presented abundant local information, based on deep analysis of which, we are able to map the anomalies of alteration minerals and hydrocarbons, respectively. Additionally, a general framework of

  12. Dependence of the spectral surface irradiance on aerosol properties and surface reflectivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otterman, J.; Kaufman, Y.; Podolak, M.; Ungar, S.

    1980-01-01

    A reduction in global surface irradiance occurs with increasing aerosol loadings when the aerosols are absorbing. For scattering aerosols, a reduction is pronounced for isotropic scattering (characteristic of small particles) but reduction is not as significant for scattering with a high anisotropy of a large forward peak (characteristic of large particles). This distinction between isotropic and anisotropic scattering becomes small or null over highly reflecting terrain; and for reflectivities higher than 0.5 and solar elevation angles close to the zenith, the global irradiance can be slightly higher for isotropic scattering than in the case of an anisotropy of a forward peak. Under such conditions, which can be encountered in reflective infrared bands over dense vegetation or over sandy deserts (close to noon, in low latitudes) the surface irradiance becomes nearly independent of the aerosol optical thickness.

  13. Apparatus for and method of correcting for astigmatism in a light beam reflected off of a light reflecting surface

    DOEpatents

    Sawicki, Richard H.; Sweatt, William

    1987-01-01

    A technique for adjustably correcting for astigmatism in a light beam is disclosed herein. This technique utilizes first means which defines a flat, rectangular light reflecting surface having opposite reinforced side edges and which is resiliently bendable, to a limited extent, into different concave and/or convex cylindrical curvatures about a particular axis and second means acting on the first means for adjustably bending the light reflecting surface into a particular selected one of the different curvatures depending upon the astigmatism to be corrected for and for fixedly maintaining the curvature selected. In the embodiment disclosed, the light reflecting surface is adjustably bendable into the selected cylindrical curvature by application of a particular bending moment to the reinforced side edges of the light reflecting surface.

  14. Surface roughness effects on the solar reflectance of cool asphalt shingles

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari, Hashem; Berdahl, Paul; Akbari, Hashem; Jacobs, Jeffry; Klink, Frank

    2008-02-17

    We analyze the solar reflectance of asphalt roofing shingles that are covered with pigmented mineral roofing granules. The reflecting surface is rough, with a total area approximately twice the nominal area. We introduce a simple analytical model that relates the 'micro-reflectance' of a small surface region to the 'macro-reflectance' of the shingle. This model uses a mean field approximation to account for multiple scattering effects. The model is then used to compute the reflectance of shingles with a mixture of different colored granules, when the reflectances of the corresponding mono-color shingles are known. Simple linear averaging works well, with small corrections to linear averaging derived for highly reflective materials. Reflective base granules and reflective surface coatings aid achievement of high solar reflectance. Other factors that influence the solar reflectance are the size distribution of the granules, coverage of the asphalt substrate, and orientation of the granules as affected by rollers during fabrication.

  15. Dependence of Mercurian Atmospheric Column Abundance Estimations on Surface-Reflectance Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domingue, Deborah L.; Sprague, Ann L.; Hunten, Donald M.

    1997-01-01

    Column abundance estimates of sodium, and analogously, potassium, in Mercury's exosphere are strongly correlated to the surface reflection model used to calibrate the spectral data and the surface reflection model incorporated into the atmospheric radiative transfer solution. Depending on the surface reflection model parameters used, there can be differences in calibration factors of up to +/- 30% and differences in estimated column abundance of up to +/- 35%. Although the surface reflectance may not be used in the calibration of spacecraft measurements, the interaction between the reflected surface light and the atmospheric brightness remains important.

  16. Bi-directional reflectance studies of prepared compact particulate surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao

    Controlled laboratory BRDF and transmission measurements on layers of polymer and glass spheres have been carried out to investigate the connection between single particle optics and the optics of a packed surface. The measurements show that despite being closely packed, significant features of single scattering, such as the rainbow peaks, are preserved even in aggregated sphere layers. The measurements have been compared to 5 radiative transfer model predictions: the Hapke's model and its improved version, the Lumme-Bowell model, Mishchenko et al.'s BRF algorithm and DISORT. It has been found that strict numerical RTE models predict the measurements well in some regions, but have errors in both forward and backward scattering directions. The discrepancies have been attributed to the non-ideal factors such as internal inhomogeneity and surface roughness and may be corrected using Lumme-Bowell's roughness correction factor for oblique incident light. The inadequacy of the semi-empirical models can be partly attributed to the exclusion of a diffraction contribution in the models. In-situ BRDF measurements on submerged sediments with grain sizes ranging from 300 mum to over 1000 mum have been carried out. For normally illuminated small grain size samples the BRDF was nearly Lambertian, but samples with larger grain sizes are less Lambertian, with the BRDF decreasing with increasing view angles. Under oblique incident angles the samples become increasingly non-Lambertian; the dominant feature in the BRDF is enhanced backscattering. An empirical model is presented for each sediment type which represents the data within the standard deviation of the sample variation. This model is well behaved at angles out to 90°, and thus can be incorporated into the radiative transfer models to improve the light field predictions in shallow water. The BRDF of both dry and wet ooid sand layers with different particle size distributions and layer thicknesses on a reflecting mirror have

  17. Analysis of ground reflection of jet noise obtained with various microphone arrays over an asphalt surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    Ground reflection effects on the propagation of jet noise over an asphalt surface are discussed for data obtained using a 33.02-cm diameter nozzle with microphones at several heights and distances from the nozzle axis. Ground reflection effects are analyzed using the concept of a reflected signal transfer function which represents the influence of both the reflecting surface and the atmosphere on the propagation of the reflected signal in a mathematical model. The mathematical model used as a basis for the computer program was successful in significantly reducing the ground reflection effects. The range of values of the single complex number used to define the reflected signal transfer function was larger than expected when determined only by the asphalt surface. This may indicate that the atmosphere is affecting the propagation of the reflected signal more than the asphalt surface. The selective placement of the reinforcements and cancellations in the design of an experiment to minimize ground reflection effects is also discussed.

  18. Controlled reflectance surfaces with film-coupled colloidal nanoantennas

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Antoine; Ciraci, Cristian; Mock, Jack J.; Hill, Ryan T.; Wang, Qiang; Wiley, Benjamin J.; Chilkoti, Ashutosh; Smith, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Efficient and tunable absorption is essential for a variety of applications, such as the design of controlled emissivity surfaces for thermophotovoltaic devices1; tailoring of the infrared spectrum for controlled thermal dissipation2; and detector elements for imaging3. Metamaterials based on metallic elements are particularly efficient as absorbing media, because both the electrical and the magnetic properties of a metamaterial can be tuned by structured design4. To date, metamaterial absorbers in the infrared or visible range have been fabricated using lithographically patterned metallic structures2,5–9, making them inherently difficult to produce over large areas and hence reducing their applicability. We demonstrate here an extraordinarily simple method to create a metamaterial absorber by randomly adsorbing chemically synthesized silver nanocubes onto a nanoscale thick polymer spacer layer on a gold film –making no effort to control the spatial arrangement of the cubes on the film– and show that the film-coupled nanocubes provide a reflectance spectrum that can be tailored by varying the geometry. Each nanocube is the optical analog of the well-known grounded patch antenna, with a nearly identical local field structure that is modified by the plasmonic response of the metal dielectric function, and with an anomalously large absorption efficiency that can be partly attributed to an interferometric effect10. The absorptivity of large surface areas can be controlled using this method, at scales out of reach of lithographic approaches like e-beam lithography otherwise required to manipulate matter at the nanometer scale. PMID:23222613

  19. Low energy electron elastic reflection from solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starý, Vladimír.; Zemek, Josef

    2004-09-01

    Using our Monte-Carlo (MC) code, we calculated the ratio of the coefficients of elastic reflection of electrons from Si, SiO 2 and Au to those of Cu and Al in the electron energy range 0.2-1.0 and 1.5 keV (Au-Cu), respectively. The electron scattering was simulated by a single scattering model. For the MC calculations, we compared the elastic differential cross-sections calculated using a static field approximation with relativistic partial wave analysis on either the Thomas-Fermi-Dirac potential of free atoms (TFD model) or the Hartree-Fock-Wigner-Seitz (muffin-tin) potential of atoms in the solid state (HFWS model). The MC data were compared with the experimental values. For both models, reasonably good agreement for Si-Cu and SiO 2-Cu systems was found. In the Au-Cu system, better agreement was achieved using the TFD model. The addition of C in a surface interaction layer of 2-5 nm improves the agreement between simulated and experimental values for the Si-Al and Si-SiO 2 systems.

  20. Landsat surface reflectance quality assurance extraction (version 1.7)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, J.W.; Starbuck, M.J.; Jenkerson, C.B.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Land Remote Sensing Program is developing an operational capability to produce Climate Data Records (CDRs) and Essential Climate Variables (ECVs) from the Landsat Archive to support a wide variety of science and resource management activities from regional to global scale. The USGS Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center is charged with prototyping systems and software to generate these high-level data products. Various USGS Geographic Science Centers are charged with particular ECV algorithm development and (or) selection as well as the evaluation and application demonstration of various USGS CDRs and ECVs. Because it is a foundation for many other ECVs, the first CDR in development is the Landsat Surface Reflectance Product (LSRP). The LSRP incorporates data quality information in a bit-packed structure that is not readily accessible without postprocessing services performed by the user. This document describes two general methods of LSRP quality-data extraction for use in image processing systems. Helpful hints for the installation and use of software originally developed for manipulation of Hierarchical Data Format (HDF) produced through the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Observing System are first provided for users who wish to extract quality data into separate HDF files. Next, steps follow to incorporate these extracted data into an image processing system. Finally, an alternative example is illustrated in which the data are extracted within a particular image processing system.

  1. The Effect of Non-Lambertian Surface Reflectance on Aerosol Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Ricchiazzi, P.; O'Hirok, W.; Gautier, C.

    2005-03-18

    Surface reflectance is an important factor in determining the strength of aerosol radiative forcing. Previous studies of radiative forcing assumed that the reflected surface radiance is isotropic and does not depend on incident illumination angle. This Lambertian reflection model is not a very good descriptor of reflectance from real land and ocean surfaces. In this study we present computational results for the seasonal average of short and long wave aerosol radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface. The effect of the Lambertian assumption is found through comparison with calculations using a more detailed bi-direction reflectance distribution function (BRDF).

  2. Interactions of light with rough dielectric surfaces - Spectral reflectance and polarimetric properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yon, S. A.; Pieters, C. M.

    1988-01-01

    The nature of the interactions of visible and NIR radiation with the surfaces of rock and mineral samples was investigated by measuring the reflectance and the polarization properties of scattered and reflected light for slab samples of obsidian and fine-grained basalt, prepared to controlled surface roughness. It is shown that the degree to which radiation can penetrate a surface and then scatter back out, an essential criterion for mineralogic determinations based on reflectance spectra, depends not only upon the composition of the material, but also on its physical condition such as sample grain size and surface roughness. Comparison of the experimentally measured reflectance and polarization from smooth and rough slab materials with the predicted models indicates that single Fresnel reflections are responsible for the largest part of the reflected intensity resulting from interactions with the surfaces of dielectric materials; multiple Fresnel reflections are much less important for such surfaces.

  3. RTM-based Teleseismic Reflection Tomography with Free Surface Multiples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdick, S. A.; De Hoop, M. V.; van der Hilst, R. D.

    2013-12-01

    Receiver function analysis of teleseismic converted and free surface reflected phases has long been a cornerstone of lithospheric studies. Discontinuities in elastic properties are revealed by deconvolving the incident wavefield from scattered phases and projecting the time differences to depth to form an image. The accuracy of the image is determined to a large extent by the accuracy of the method and background velocity model used, but popular approaches for projecting receiver functions to depth commonly rely on simplifying assumptions of a 1D velocity and planar discontinuities. In tectonically complex regions like subduction zones and rift systems, strong heterogeneity can create an ambiguous tradeoff between the background velocity and the depth of the discontinuities. Furthermore, such structures are apt to create caustics at high frequencies, rendering ray-based methods inadequate. In order to better constrain the background velocity and correctly place the discontinuities at depth, we employ a novel reverse-time migration (RTM) based reflection tomography method. We adapt our reflection tomography from exploration seismology for use with teleseismic phases. Active source methods for exploration have focused on the annihilation of extended images - image gathers formed with different subsurface angle or offset information - as a means of judging the accuracy of the model. Applying these approaches to teleseismic data is untenable because 1) the sparse and uneven distribution of earthquake sources leads to the incomplete construction of extended image, 2) the imperfect separation and source deconvolution of the scattered wavefield render previous error measurements unreliable, and 3) the planar geometry of incoming arrivals makes measures of subsurface offset insensitive to perturbations in the model. To overcome these obstacles, we have developed a flexible approach based on pairwise single-source image correlations. We determine the success of the RTM and

  4. Searching under Surfaces: Reflection as an Antidote for Forgery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sunstein, Bonnie S.

    1998-01-01

    Describes connections between art forgers and assessment practices of student writing in schools. Ponders how students might be encouraged to work more like masters than forgers. Argues that teaching strategies for reflection brings authenticity and encourages reflection in students about their work. Discusses techniques students can use to…

  5. Spectral Reflectance Estimates of Surface Soil Physical and Chemical Properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Optical diffuse reflectance sensing in visible and near-infrared wavelength ranges is one approach to rapidly quantify soil properties for site-specific management. The objectives of this study were (1) to determine the accuracy of the reflectance approach for estimating physical and chemical proper...

  6. Earth-atmosphere system and surface reflectivities in arid regions from LANDSAT multispectral scanner measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otterman, J.; Fraser, R. S.

    1976-01-01

    Programs for computing atmospheric transmission and scattering solar radiation were used to compute the ratios of the Earth-atmosphere system (space) directional reflectivities in the vertical direction to the surface reflectivity, for the four bands of the LANDSAT multispectral scanner (MSS). These ratios are presented as graphs for two water vapor levels, as a function of the surface reflectivity, for various sun elevation angles. Space directional reflectivities in the vertical direction are reported for selected arid regions in Asia, Africa and Central America from the spectral radiance levels measured by the LANDSAT MSS. From these space reflectivities, surface vertical reflectivities were computed applying the pertinent graphs. These surface reflectivities were used to estimate the surface albedo for the entire solar spectrum. The estimated albedos are in the range 0.34-0.52, higher than the values reported by most previous researchers from space measurements, but are consistent with laboratory measurements.

  7. Anti-reflective device having an anti-reflective surface formed of silicon spikes with nano-tips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bae, Youngsam (Inventor); Manohara, Harish (Inventor); Mobasser, Sohrab (Inventor); Lee, Choonsup (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Described is a device having an anti-reflection surface. The device comprises a silicon substrate with a plurality of silicon spikes formed on the substrate. A first metallic layer is formed on the silicon spikes to form the anti-reflection surface. The device further includes an aperture that extends through the substrate. A second metallic layer is formed on the substrate. The second metallic layer includes a hole that is aligned with the aperture. A spacer is attached with the silicon substrate to provide a gap between an attached sensor apparatus. Therefore, operating as a Micro-sun sensor, light entering the hole passes through the aperture to be sensed by the sensor apparatus. Additionally, light reflected by the sensor apparatus toward the first side of the silicon substrate is absorbed by the first metallic layer and silicon spikes and is thereby prevented from being reflected back toward the sensor apparatus.

  8. Anti- reflective device having an anti-reflection surface formed of silicon spikes with nano-tips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bae, Youngsman (Inventor); Mooasser, Sohrab (Inventor); Manohara, Harish (Inventor); Lee, Choonsup (Inventor); Bae, Kungsam (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Described is a device having an anti-reflection surface. The device comprises a silicon substrate with a plurality of silicon spikes formed on the substrate. A first metallic layer is formed on the silicon spikes to form the anti-reflection surface. The device further includes an aperture that extends through the substrate. A second metallic layer is formed on the substrate. The second metallic layer includes a hole that is aligned with the aperture. A spacer is attached with the silicon substrate to provide a gap between an attached sensor apparatus. Therefore, operating as a Micro-sun sensor, light entering the hole passes through the aperture to be sensed by the sensor apparatus. Additionally, light reflected by the sensor apparatus toward the first side of the silicon substrate is absorbed by the first metallic layer and silicon spikes and is thereby prevented from being reflected back toward the sensor apparatus.

  9. Symmetry and structure of reflection matrices of celestial bodies with particulate surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovenier, J. W.; Muñoz, O.

    2016-05-01

    The polarization of electromagnetic radiation reflected by a particulate surface is determined by a four by four reflection matrix. Symmetry relations are quite common for such reflection matrices. The reciprocity and mirror symmetry relations are combined to derive a third symmetry relation. These three relations are used to simplify reflection matrices for a variety of special directions of incident and reflected radiation. We show that some elements of the reflection matrix can vanish or equal other elements that have the same or opposite sign. Several applications of the results for studies of particulate surfaces and atmospheres above them are pointed out.

  10. Quantitative abundance estimates from bidirectional reflectance measurements. [for planetary surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mustard, John F.; Pieters, Carle M.

    1987-01-01

    A simplified approach for estimating mineral abundances in mineral mixtures from bidirectional reflectance measurements is presented. Fundamental to this approach is a priori information concerning reflectance spectra of the individual minerals and an estimate of the particle sizes of the components. Simplified equations for bidirectional reflectance are used to linearize the systematics of spectral mixing. The method was used to determine the relative proportions of olivine, magnetite, enstatite, and anorthite in a mixture; the mass fractions of mixture components were calculated on the basis of known particle diameters. The results indicate that for materials without strongly adsorbing components, the accuracy of abundance determinations is better than 5 percent.

  11. High resolution seismic imaging of Rainier Mesa using surface reflection and surface to tunnel tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Majer, E.L.; Johnson, L.R.; Karageorgi, E.K.; Peterson, J.E.

    1994-06-01

    In the interpretation of seismic data to infer properties of an explosion source, it is necessary to account for wave propagation effects. In order to understand and remove these propagation effects, it is necessary to have a model. An open question concerning this matter is the detail and accuracy which must be present in the velocity model in order to produce reliable estimates in the estimated source properties. While it would appear that the reliability of the results would be directly related to the accuracy of the velocity and density models used in the interpretation, it may be that certain deficiencies in these models can be compensated by the and amount of seismic data which is used in the inversion. The NPE provided an opportunity to test questions of this sort. In August 1993, two high resolution seismic experiments were performed in N-Tunnel and on the surface of Rainier Mesa above it. The first involved a surface-to-tunnel imaging experiment with sources on the surface and receivers in tunnel U12n.23 about 88 meters west of the NPE. It was possible to estimate the apparent average velocity between the tunnel and the surface. In a separate experiment, a high resolution reflection experiment was performed in order to image the lithology in Rainier Mesa. Good quality, broad band, reflections were obtained from depths extending into the Paleozoic basement. A high velocity layer near the surface is underlain by a thick section of low velocity material, providing a nonuniform but low average velocity between the depth of the NPE and the surface.

  12. Measurements of the reflection factor of flat ground surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ventres, C. S.; Myles, M. M.; Ver, I. L.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements are made of the reflection factors of asphalt, concrete, and sod at oblique angles of incidence. Initial measurements were carried out in an anechoic chamber to eliminate the effects of wind and temperature gradients. These were followed by measurements made outdoors over a wider frequency range. Data are presented for the magnitudes of the reflection factors of asphalt, concrete, and sod at angles of incidence of 38 deg and 45 deg.

  13. Special report, diffuse reflectivity of the lunar surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fastie, W. G.

    1972-01-01

    The far ultraviolet diffuse reflectivity of samples of lunar dust material is determined. Equipment for measuring the diffuse reflectivity of materials (e.g. paint samples) is already in existence and requires only minor modification for the proposed experiment which will include the measurement of the polarizing properties of the lunar samples. Measurements can be made as a function of both illumination angle and angle of observation.

  14. Analysis for Mar Vel Black and acetylene soot low reflectivity surfaces for star tracker sunshade applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yung, E.

    1974-01-01

    Mar Vel Black is a revolutionary new extremely low reflectivity anodized coating developed by Martin Marietta of Denver. It is of great interest in optics in general, and in star trackers specifically because it can reduce extraneous light reflections. A sample of Mar Vel Black was evaluated. Mar Vel Black looks much like a super black surface with many small peaks and very steep sides so that any light incident upon the surface will tend to reflect many times before exiting that surface. Even a high reflectivity surface would thus appear to have a very low reflectivity under such conditions. Conversely, acetylene soot does not have the magnified surface appearance of a super black surface. Its performance is, however, predictable from the surface structure, considering the known configuration of virtually pure carbon.

  15. Reflection Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy for Surface Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhong Lin

    2005-08-01

    This book is a comprehensive review of the theories, techniques and applications of reflection electron microscopy (REM), reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy (REELS). The book is divided into three parts: diffraction, imaging and spectroscopy. The text is written to combine basic techniques with special applications, theories with experiments, and the basic physics with materials science, so that a full picture of RHEED and REM emerges. An entirely self-contained study, the book contains much invaluable reference material, including FORTRAN source codes for calculating crystal structures data and electron energy-loss spectra in different scattering geometries. This and many other features makes the book an important and timely addition to the materials science literature for researchers and graduate students in physics and materials science.

  16. Reflection Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy for Surface Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhong Lin

    1996-05-01

    This book is a comprehensive review of the theories, techniques and applications of reflection electron microscopy (REM), reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy (REELS). The book is divided into three parts: diffraction, imaging and spectroscopy. The text is written to combine basic techniques with special applications, theories with experiments, and the basic physics with materials science, so that a full picture of RHEED and REM emerges. An entirely self-contained study, the book contains much invaluable reference material, including FORTRAN source codes for calculating crystal structures data and electron energy-loss spectra in different scattering geometries. This and many other features makes the book an important and timely addition to the materials science literature for researchers and graduate students in physics and materials science.

  17. The theoretical reflectance of X-rays from optical surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neergaard, J. R.; Reynolds, J. M.; Fields, S. A.

    1976-01-01

    The theoretical reflectance of X-rays from various materials and evaporated films is presented. A computer program was written that computes the reflected intensity as a function of the angle of the incident radiation. The quantities necessary to generate the efficiency and their effect on the data are demonstrated. Five materials were chosen for evaluation: (1) fused silica, (2) chromium, (3) beryllium, (4) gold, and (5) a thin layer contaminant. Fused silica is a versatile and common material; chromium has high reflection efficiency at X-ray wavelengths and is in the middle of the atomic number range; beryllium contains a single atomic shell and has a low range atomic number; gold contains multiple atomic shells and has a high atomic number; the contaminant is treated as a thin film in the calculations and results are given as a function of thickness for selected wavelengths. The theoretical results are compared to experimental data at lambda = 8.34 A.

  18. Reflection of hydrogen atoms from the surface of superfluid helium

    SciTech Connect

    Tiesinga, E.; Stoof, H.T.C.; Verhaar, B.J. )

    1990-05-01

    We propose a new method for studying the reflection of a hydrogen atom from a superfluid-helium film. Starting from the narrow width of the reflected angular distribution recently found experimentally, we tentatively extrapolate to the extreme limit of low ripplon wave numbers in which the adiabatic or degenerate-internal-states approximation becomes valid. We obtain simple closed expressions for single- and multiple-ripplon processes, which do not require the integration of a Schroedinger equation for their evaluation and do not depend on the specific form of the potential.

  19. Sea Ice Remote Sensing Using Surface Reflected GPS Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komjathy, Attila; Maslanik, James; Zavorotny, Valery U.; Axelrad, Penina; Katzberg, Stephen J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a new research effort to extend the application of Global Positioning System (GPS) signal reflections, received by airborne instruments, to cryospheric remote sensing. Our experimental results indicate that reflected GPS signals have potential to provide information on the presence and condition of sea and freshwater ice as well as the freeze/thaw state of frozen ground. In this paper we show results from aircraft experiments over the ice pack near Barrow, Alaska indicating correlation between forward-scattered GPS returns and RADARSAT backscattered measurements.

  20. Light Reflection from Water Surfaces Perturbed by Falling Rain Droplets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molesini, Giuseppe; Vannoni, Maurizio

    2009-01-01

    An account of peculiar light patterns produced by reflection in a pool under falling rain droplets was recently reported by Molesini and Vannoni (2008 Eur. J. Phys. 29 403-11). The mathematical approach, however, only covered the case of a symmetrical location of a light source and the observer's eyes with respect to the vertical of the falling…

  1. Characterization of surface reflectance variation effects on remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, W. A.

    1984-03-01

    The use of Monte Carlo radiative transfer codes to simulate the effects on remote sensing in visible and infrared wavelengths of variables which affect classification is examined. These variables include detector viewing angle, atmospheric aerosol size distribution, aerosol vertical and horizontal distribution (e.g., finite clouds), the form of the bidirectional ground reflectance function, and horizontal variability of reflectance type and reflectivity (albedo). These simulations are used to characterize the sensitivity of observables (intensity and polarization) to variations in the underlying physical parameters both to improve algorithms for the removal of atmospheric effects and to identify techniques which can improve classification accuracy. It was necessary to revise and validate the simulation codes (CTRANS, ARTRAN, and the Mie scattering code) to improve efficiency and accommodate a new operational environment, and to build the basic software tools for acquisition and off-line manipulation of simulation results. Initial calculations compare cases in which increasing amounts of aerosol are shifted into the stratosphere, maintaining a constant optical depth. In the case of moderate aerosol optical depth, the effect on the spread function is to scale it linearly as would be expected from a single scattering model. Varying the viewing angle appears to provide the same qualitative effect as modifying the vertical optical depth (for Lambertian ground reflectance).

  2. Acoustical imaging of spheres above a reflecting surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, David; Berryman, James

    2003-04-01

    An analytical study using the MUSIC method of subspace imaging is presented for the case of spheres above a reflecting boundary. The field scattered from the spheres and the reflecting boundary is calculated analytically, neglecting interactions between spheres. The singular value decomposition of the response matrix is calculated and the singular vectors divided into signal and noise subspaces. Images showing the estimated sphere locations are obtained by backpropagating the noise vectors using either the free space Green's function or the Green's function that incorporates reflections from the boundary. We show that the latter Green's function improves imaging performance after applying a normalization that compensates for the interference between direct and reflected fields. We also show that the best images are attained in some cases when the number of singular vectors in the signal subspace exceeds the number of spheres. This is consistent with previous analysis showing multiple eigenvalues of the time reversal operator for spherical scatterers [Chambers and Gautesen, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 109 (2001)]. [Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  3. Surface adsorption of zwitterionic surfactants: n-alkyl phosphocholines characterised by surface tensiometry and neutron reflection.

    PubMed

    Yaseen, M; Wang, Y; Su, T J; Lu, J R

    2005-08-15

    The surface adsorption of n-dodecyl phosphocholine (C12PC) has been characterised by a combined measurement of surface tension and neutron reflectivity. The critical micellar concentration (CMC) was found to be 0.91 mM at 25 degrees C in pure water. At the CMC, the limiting area per molecule (A(cmc)) was found to be 52+/-3 A2 and the surface tension (gamma(cmc)) to be ca. 40.0+/-0.5 mN/m. The parallel study of chain isomer n-hexadecyl phosphocholine (C16PC) showed a decrease of the CMC to 0.012 mM and a drop of gamma(cmc) to 38.1+/-0.5 mN/m. However, A(cmc) for C16PC was found to be 54+/-3 A2, showing that increase in alkyl chain length by four methylene groups has little effect on A(cmc). The almost constant A(cmc) suggested that the limiting area per molecule was determined by the bulky PC head group. It was further found that the surface tension and related key physical parameters did not vary much with temperature, salt addition, solution pH or any combination of these, thus showing that surface adsorption and solution aggregation from PC surfactants is largely similar to the zwitterionic betaine surfactants and is distinctly different from ionic and non-ionic surfactants. The thickness of the adsorbed monolayers measured from both dC12hPC and dC16hPC was found to be 20-22 A at the CMC from neutron reflectivity. Neither A(cmc) nor layer thickness varied with alkyl chain length, indicating that as the alkyl chain length became longer it was further tilted away from the surface normal direction and the layer packing density increased. It was also observed that the thickness of the layer varied little with surfactant concentration, indicating that the average conformational orientation of the alkyl chain remained unchanged against varying surface coverage. PMID:15927600

  4. Reflection of a slow cesium atomic beam from a naturally magnetized Nd-Fe-B surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lison, F.; Haubrich, D.; Schuh, P.; Meschede, D.

    We have demonstrated the partly directed reflection of a slow cesium atomic beam by using the natural magnetic stray field above a Nd-Fe-B surface. From these experiments we determine the reflectivity and a minimum value for the magnetic stray field directly at the surface.

  5. A Monte Carlo reflectance model for soil surfaces with three-dimensional structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, K. D.; Smith, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    A Monte Carlo soil reflectance model has been developed to study the effect of macroscopic surface irregularities larger than the wavelength of incident flux. The model treats incoherent multiple scattering from Lambertian facets distributed on a periodic surface. Resulting bidirectional reflectance distribution functions are non-Lambertian and compare well with experimental trends reported in the literature. Examples showing the coupling of the Monte Carlo soil model to an adding bidirectional canopy of reflectance model are also given.

  6. Spectral reflectance of surface soils - A statistical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouse, K. R.; Henninger, D. L.; Thompson, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    The relationship of the physical and chemical properties of soils to their spectral reflectance as measured at six wavebands of Thematic Mapper (TM) aboard NASA's Landsat-4 satellite was examined. The results of performing regressions of over 20 soil properties on the six TM bands indicated that organic matter, water, clay, cation exchange capacity, and calcium were the properties most readily predicted from TM data. The middle infrared bands, bands 5 and 7, were the best bands for predicting soil properties, and the near infrared band, band 4, was nearly as good. Clustering 234 soil samples on the TM bands and characterizing the clusters on the basis of soil properties revealed several clear relationships between properties and reflectance. Discriminant analysis found organic matter, fine sand, base saturation, sand, extractable acidity, and water to be significant in discriminating among clusters.

  7. Towards GPS Surface Reflection Remote Sensing of Sea Ice Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komjathy, A.; Maslanik, J. A.; Zavorotny, V. U.; Axelrad, P.; Katzberg, S. J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the research to extend the application of Global Positioning System (GPS) signal reflections, received by airborne instruments, to cryospheric remote sensing. The characteristics of the GPS signals and equipment afford the possibility of new measurements not possible with existing radar and passive microwave systems. In particular, the GPS receiving systems are small and light-weight, and as such are particularly well suited to be deployed on small aircraft or satellite platforms with minimal impact. Our preliminary models and experimental results indicate that reflected GPS signals have potential to provide information on the presence and condition of sea and fresh-water ice as well as the freeze/thaw state of frozen ground. In this paper we show results from aircraft experiments over the ice pack near Barrow, Alaska suggesting correlation between forward scattered GPS returns and RADARSAT backscattered signals.

  8. Time-Evolution Statistics of GPS Surface Reflectivity Following Precipitation in Desert and Cultivated Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, M. S.; Katzberg, S. J.

    2005-05-01

    Use of the L-band Global Positioning System (GPS) forward-reflected signal for remote sensing of surface moisture shows promise as a new and complimentary method to more developed backscattering and emission techniques. The ratio of reflected-to-direct GPS signals provides a measurement of surface reflectivity. At present, due to the relatively high incident angles, embedded range code, and forward reflection of the signal, the reflected GPS signal statistical characteristics as a function of soil type, vegetation, precipitation amount, and drying time are not well known. The objective of this analysis is to examine the effect of precipitation amount and surface characteristics on the distribution of GPS surface reflectivity as a function of time following rain events over both a desert environment in New Mexico and cultivated areas near Ames, Iowa (Soil Moisture Experiments 2002). Reflectivity data from New Mexico and Iowa were collected using an airborne GPS Remote Sensor (GPSRS)/reflectometer. Iowa data sets include measurements over both sparsely and heavily vegetated areas. Reflectivity measurements from Iowa are examined with respect to precipitation amount, vegetation coverage (i.e. leaf-area-index), and measured surface soil moisture. A fuller understanding of variations in GPS reflectivity distribution and parametric form due to precipitation and drying time, over various soil/terrain types, is necessary for the development of GPS-based soil moisture retrieval algorithms that are specific to the surface type and environmental conditions.

  9. Reflective fiber optic probe for surface finish survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawrzyniuk, Leszek

    1995-06-01

    The Report relates to verification of the design of refractive fiber optic probes designed for checking surface finish condition and provides a description of tests on the models of such probes. Presented in the paper are the results of performance tests of a bifurcated probe to the concept of application of a non-random bundle of light guides for identification of surfaces representing different CLA values (0.32, 0.63, 1.25, 2.50 micrometers).

  10. Intensity of nightside MARSIS AIS surface reflections and implications for low-altitude ionospheric densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Němec, F.; Morgan, D. D.; Diéval, C.; Gurnett, D. A.

    2015-04-01

    Spacecraft radar sounding signals at frequencies higher than the ionospheric peak plasma frequency are not reflected by the ionosphere. Instead, they make it to the ground where they are reflected by the planetary surface. We analyze the intensity of the surface reflections measured by the Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionosphere Sounding (MARSIS) ionospheric radar sounder on board the Mars Express spacecraft. Apart from the surface reflectivity and the spacecraft altitude, the detected intensity of surface reflections is controlled primarily by the signal attenuation during the ionospheric propagation. We focus on the nightside region, where the ionospheric densities in the main layer are too low to cause a significant attenuation and allow sampling of the surface reflections at frequencies down to 3 MHz. The attenuation occurs mainly at altitudes below 100 km, where the electron-neutral collision frequency is a maximum. The intensity of surface reflections can thus serve as a proxy for electron densities at low altitudes not accessible by the direct ionospheric radar sounding. We analyze the intensity of surface reflections as a function of relevant controlling parameters. The intensity of surface reflections is lower at higher solar zenith angles on the nightside and during the periods of larger solar activity. Moreover, it exhibits a seasonal variation that is related to the dust storm occurrence. The intensity of surface reflections is lower in areas of closed magnetic field lines, suggesting that nightside electron densities behave rather differently at low altitudes than at higher altitudes. This is confirmed by comparison with simultaneous observations of the main ionospheric layer.

  11. Arrival-time fluctuations of coherent reflections from surface gravity water waves.

    PubMed

    Badiey, Mohsen; Eickmeier, Justin; Song, Aijun

    2014-05-01

    Arrival time fluctuations of coherent reflections from surface gravity waves are examined. A two-dimensional ray model with an evolving rough sea surface is used to explain the mechanism and formation of the deterministic striation patterns due to the surface reflection. Arrival time predictions from the ray model match qualitatively well with the measurements from bidirectional acoustic transmissions in a water depth of 100 m. PMID:24815293

  12. Spectral reflectance of surface soils: Relationships with some soil properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiesewetter, C. H.

    1983-01-01

    Using a published atlas of reflectance curves and physicochemical properties of soils, a statistical analysis was carried out. Reflectance bands which correspond to five of the wavebands used by NASA's Thematic Mapper were examined for relationships to specific soil properties. The properties considered in this study include: Sand Content, Silt Content, Clay Content, Organic Matter Content, Cation Exchange Capacity, Iron Oxide Content and Moisture Content. Regression of these seven properties on the mean values of five TM bands produced results that indicate that the predictability of the properties can be increased by stratifying the data. The data was stratified by parent material, taxonomic order, temperature zone, moisture zone and climate (combined temperature and moisture). The best results were obtained when the sample was examined by climatic classes. The middle Infra-red bands, 5 and 7, as well as the visible bands, 2 and 3, are significant in the model. The near Infra-red band, band 4, is almost as useful and should be included in any studies. General linear modeling procedures examined relationships of the seven properties with certain wavebands in the stratified samples.

  13. The influence of acoustic reflections from diffusive architectural surfaces on spatial auditory perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Philip W.

    This thesis addresses the effect of reflections from diffusive architectural surfaces on the perception of echoes and on auditory spatial resolution. Diffusive architectural surfaces play an important role in performance venue design for architectural expression and proper sound distribution. Extensive research has been devoted to the prediction and measurement of the spatial dispersion. However, previous psychoacoustic research on perception of reflections and the precedence effect has focused on specular reflections. This study compares the echo threshold of specular reflections, against those for reflections from realistic architectural surfaces, and against synthesized reflections that isolate individual qualities of reflections from diffusive surfaces, namely temporal dispersion and spectral coloration. In particular, the activation of the precedence effect, as indicated by the echo threshold is measured. Perceptual tests are conducted with direct sound, and simulated or measured reflections with varying temporal dispersion. The threshold for reflections from diffusive architectural surfaces is found to be comparable to that of a specular re ection of similar energy rather than similar amplitude. This is surprising because the amplitude of the dispersed re ection is highly attenuated, and onset cues are reduced. This effect indicates that the auditory system is integrating re ection response energy dispersed over many milliseconds into a single stream. Studies on the effect of a single diffuse reflection are then extended to a full architectural enclosure with various surface properties. This research utilizes auralizations from measured and simulated performance venues to investigate spatial discrimination of multiple acoustic sources in rooms. It is found that discriminating the lateral arrangement of two sources is possible at narrower separation angles when reflections come from at rather than diffusive surfaces. Additionally, subjective impressions are

  14. Estimating aerodynamic resistance of rough surfaces from angular reflectance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current wind erosion and dust emission models neglect the heterogeneous nature of surface roughness and its geometric anisotropic effect on aerodynamic resistance, and over-estimate the erodible area by assuming it is not covered by roughness elements. We address these shortfalls with a new model wh...

  15. Analysis of ground reflection of jet noise obtained with various microphone arrays over an asphalt surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    Ground reflection effects on the propagation of jet noise over an asphalt surface are discussed for data obtained using a 33.02 cm (13-in.) diameter nozzle with microphones at several heights and distances from the nozzle axis. Analysis of ground reflection effects is accomplished using the concept of a reflected signal transfer function which represents the influence of both the reflecting surface and the atmosphere on the propagation of the reflected signal in a mathematical model. The mathematical model used as a basis for the computer program was successful in significantly reducing the ground reflection effects. The range of values of the single complex number used to define the reflected signal transfer function was larger than expected when determined only by the asphalt surface. This may indicate that the atmosphere is affecting the propagation of the reflected signal more than the asphalt surface. Also discussed is the selective placement of the reinforcements and cancellations in the design of an experiment to minimize ground reflection effects.

  16. Surface Reflectance of Mars Observed by CRISM-MRO: 1. Multi-angle Approach for Retrieval of Surface Reflectance from CRISM Observations (mars-reco)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ceamanos, Xavier; Doute, S.; Fernando, J.; Pinet, P.; Lyapustin, A.

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses the correction for aerosol effects in near-simultaneous multiangle observations acquired by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) aboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. In the targeted mode, CRISM senses the surface of Mars using 11 viewing angles, which allow it to provide unique information on the scattering properties of surface materials. In order to retrieve these data, however, appropriate strategies must be used to compensate the signal sensed by CRISM for aerosol contribution. This correction is particularly challenging as the photometric curve of these suspended particles is often correlated with the also anisotropic photometric curve of materials at the surface. This article puts forward an innovative radiative transfer based method named Multi-angle Approach for Retrieval of Surface Reflectance from CRISM Observations (MARS-ReCO). The proposed method retrieves photometric curves of surface materials in reflectance units after removing aerosol contribution. MARS-ReCO represents a substantial improvement regarding previous techniques as it takes into consideration the anisotropy of the surface, thus providing more realistic surface products. Furthermore, MARS-ReCO is fast and provides error bars on the retrieved surface reflectance. The validity and accuracy of MARS-ReCO is explored in a sensitivity analysis based on realistic synthetic data. According to experiments, MARS-ReCO provides accurate results (up to 10 reflectance error) under favorable acquisition conditions. In the companion article, photometric properties of Martian materials are retrieved using MARS-ReCO and validated using in situ measurements acquired during the Mars Exploration Rovers mission.

  17. Surface reflectance of Mars observed by CRISM/MRO: 1. Multi-angle Approach for Retrieval of Surface Reflectance from CRISM observations (MARS-ReCO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceamanos, X.; Douté, S.; Fernando, J.; Schmidt, F.; Pinet, P.; Lyapustin, A.

    2013-03-01

    This article addresses the correction for aerosol effects in near-simultaneous multi-angle observations acquired by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) aboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. In the targeted mode, CRISM senses the surface of Mars using 11 viewing angles, which allow it to provide unique information on the scattering properties of surface materials. In order to retrieve these data, however, appropriate strategies must be used to compensate the signal sensed by CRISM for aerosol contribution. This correction is particularly challenging as the photometric curve of these suspended particles is often correlated with the also anisotropic photometric curve of materials at the surface. This article puts forward an innovative radiative transfer-based method named Multi-angle Approach for Retrieval of Surface Reflectance from CRISM Observations (MARS-ReCO). The proposed method retrieves photometric curves of surface materials in reflectance units after removing aerosol contribution. MARS-ReCO represents a substantial improvement regarding previous techniques as it takes into consideration the anisotropy of the surface, thus providing more realistic surface products. Furthermore, MARS-ReCO is fast and provides error bars on the retrieved surface reflectance. The validity and accuracy of MARS-ReCO is explored in a sensitivity analysis based on realistic synthetic data. According to experiments, MARS-ReCO provides accurate results (up to 10% reflectance error) under favorable acquisition conditions. In the companion article, photometric properties of Martian materials are retrieved using MARS-ReCO and validated using in situ measurements acquired during the Mars Exploration Rovers mission.

  18. Surface-enhanced, multi-dimensional attenuated total reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraack, Jan Philip; Lotti, Davide; Hamm, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Ultrafast two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy (2D IR) spectroscopy is performed in attenuated total reflectance (ATR) geometry with the Kretschmann configuration in order to measure femtosecond to picosecond dynamics of self-assembled monolayers on gold-coated solid-liquid interfaces. In the monolayers low-absorbing (<200 M-1 cm-1) nitrile functional groups are used as local vibrational probes to monitor vibrational relaxation and spectral diffusion in dependence of different environments of the nitrile group. By comparing spectral diffusion dynamics of the vibrational probe in bulk solution and in the monolayer we find that the dynamics are slowed down by more than a factor of 20 upon immobilization of the sample. Moreover, spectral diffusion dynamics are affected by the local environment within the monolayers as evidenced by 2D ATR IR experiments on mixed monolayers with different aliphatic and aromatic co-adsorbates. The results are interpreted in terms of absent excitation energy-transfer as well as solvation dynamics around the nitrile vibrational probe. Our results demonstrate that 2D ATR IR spectroscopy offers the possibility to obtain ultrafast dynamics from sub-monolayer coverages of even low-absorbing vibrational probes such as nitrile functional groups.

  19. SO2 frost - UV-visible reflectivity and Io surface coverage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, D. B.; Fanale, F. P.; Nelson, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    The reflectance spectrum in the range 0.24-0.85 microns of SO2 frost is measured in light of the discovery of SO2 gas in the atmosphere of Io and the possible discovery of the frost on its surface. Frost deposits up to 1.5 mm thick were grown in vacuum at 130 K and bi-directional reflectance spectra were obtained. Typical SO2 frost is found to exhibit very low reflectivity (2-5%) at 0.30 microns, rising steeply at 0.32 microns to attain a maximum reflectivity (75-80%) at 4.0 microns and uniformly high reflectivity throughout the visible and near infrared. Comparison with the full disk spectrum of Io reveals that no more than 20% of the surface can be covered with optically thick SO2 frost. Combinations of surface materials including SO2 frost which can produce the observed spectrum are indicated.

  20. Oxidation-resistant reflective surfaces for solar dynamic power generation in near earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulino, Daniel A.; Egger, Robert A.; Banholzer, William F.

    1987-01-01

    Reflective surfaces for Space Station power generation systems are required to withstand the atomic oxygen-dominated environment of near earth orbit. Thin films of platinum and rhodium, which are corrosion resistant reflective metals, have been deposited by ion beam sputter deposition onto various substrate materials. Solar reflectances were then measured as a function of time of exposure to a RF-generated air plasma.

  1. A Universal Dynamic Threshold Cloud Detection Algorithm (UDTCDA) supported by a prior surface reflectance database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lin; Wei, Jing; Wang, Jian; Mi, Xueting; Guo, Yamin; Lv, Yang; Yang, Yikun; Gan, Ping; Zhou, Xueying; Jia, Chen; Tian, Xinpeng

    2016-06-01

    Conventional cloud detection methods are easily affected by mixed pixels, complex surface structures, and atmospheric factors, resulting in poor cloud detection results. To minimize these problems, a new Universal Dynamic Threshold Cloud Detection Algorithm (UDTCDA) supported by a priori surface reflectance database is proposed in this paper. A monthly surface reflectance database is constructed using long-time-sequenced MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer surface reflectance product (MOD09A1) to provide the surface reflectance of the underlying surfaces. The relationships between the apparent reflectance changes and the surface reflectance are simulated under different observation and atmospheric conditions with the 6S (Second Simulation of the Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum) model, and the dynamic threshold cloud detection models are developed. Two typical remote sensing data with important application significance and different sensor parameters, MODIS and Landsat 8, are selected for cloud detection experiments. The results were validated against the visual interpretation of clouds and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation cloud measurements. The results showed that the UDTCDA can obtain a high precision in cloud detection, correctly identifying cloudy pixels and clear-sky pixels at rates greater than 80% with error rate and missing rate of less than 20%. The UDTCDA cloud product overall shows less estimation uncertainty than the current MODIS cloud mask products. Moreover, the UDTCDA can effectively reduce the effects of atmospheric factors and mixed pixels and can be applied to different satellite sensors to realize long-term, large-scale cloud detection operations.

  2. Cost/performance of solar reflective surfaces for parabolic dish concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, F.

    1980-01-01

    Materials for highly reflective surfaces for use in parabolic dish solar concentrators are discussed. Some important factors concerning performance of the mirrors are summarized, and typical costs are treated briefly. Capital investment cost/performance ratios for various materials are computed specifically for the double curvature parabolic concentrators using a mathematical model. The results are given in terms of initial investment cost for reflective surfaces per thermal kilowatt delivered to the receiver cavity for various operating temperatures from 400 to 1400 C. Although second surface glass mirrors are emphasized, first surface, chemically brightened and anodized aluminum surfaces as well as second surface, metallized polymeric films are treated. Conventional glass mirrors have the lowest cost/performance ratios, followed closely by aluminum reflectors. Ranges in the data due to uncertainties in cost and mirror reflectance factors are given.

  3. Super hydrophobic surface of polytetrafluoroethylene fabricated by picosecond laser and phenomenon of total internal reflection underwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yijian; Cao, Wenshen; Zhao, Yan; Wu, Yan; Ji, Lingfei

    2015-03-01

    A groove-shaped array with average 25 μm interval, 25 μm wall thickness, 75 μm depth and a columnar array with average 30 μm side length, 25 μm interval, 43 μm depth are processed by 1064 nm picosecond laser on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) surface at room temperature. The water contact angle of modified PTFE surface can reach 167°, which show super hydrophobic surface of PTFE is prepared. It is observed super hydrophobic surface reflects metal luster underwater through the glassware when super hydrophobic PTFE entirely immerses in pure water. The experiment conducts super hydrophobic surface will enhance intensity of reflection of visible light underwater, which is due to total internal reflection of super hydrophobic surface und erwater.

  4. Utilization of GPS Surface Reflected Signals to Provide Aircraft Altitude Verification for SVS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gance, George G.; Young, Steven D.

    2005-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) consists of a constellation of Earth orbiting satellites that transmit continuous electromagnetic signals to users on or near the Earth surface. At any moment of time, at least four GPS satellites, and sometimes nine or more, are visible from any point. The electromagnetic signal transmitted from the satellites is reflected to at least some degree from virtually every place on the Earth. When this signal is received by a specially constructed receiver, its characteristics can be used to determine information about the reflected surface. One piece of information collected is the time delay encountered by the reflected signal versus the direct signal. This time delay can be used to determine the altitude (or height) above the local terrain when the terrain in the reflection area is level. However, given the potential of simultaneously using multiple reflections, it should be possible to also determine the elevation above even terrains where the reflecting area is not level. Currently an effort is underway to develop the technology to characterize the reflected signal that is received by the GPS Surface Reflection Experiment (GSRE) instrument. Recent aircraft sorties have been flown to collect data that can be used to refine the technology. This paper provides an update on the status of the instrument development to enable determination of terrain proximity using the GPS Reflected signal. Results found in the data collected to date are also discussed.

  5. WAVELENGTH IDENTIFICATION FOR REFLECTANCE ESTIMATION OF SURFACE AND SUBSURFACE SOIL PROPERTIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Optical diffuse reflectance sensing is a potential approach for rapid and reliable on-site estimation of soil properties. In this study, reflectance sensing in visible (VIS) and near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths was combined with partial least squares (PLS) regression to estimate surface and subsurfac...

  6. Reflected Signal Analysis and Surface Albedo in the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanov, Anton B.; Muhleman, Duane O.

    2001-01-01

    This work presents results from the analysis of the reflectivity data from the MOLA investigation. We will discuss calculation of the surface albedo using the MGS TES 9 micron opacity. We will also overview reflectivity data collected to date. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  7. Surface roughness and gloss study of prints: application of specular reflection at near infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silfsten, P.; Dutta, R.; Pääkkönen, P.; Tåg, C.-M.; Gane, P. A. C.; Peiponen, K.-E.

    2012-12-01

    Absolute reflectance data were measured with a spectrophotometer in the visible and near infrared (NIR) spectral range. The specular reflectance data in the NIR were used for the assessment of the surface roughness of magenta, yellow, cyan and black prints on paper. In addition, surface roughness data obtained from the prints with a mechanical diamond stylus, an optical profiling system and the spectrophotometer are compared with each other. The surface roughness obtained with the aid of the spectrophotometer data suggests a smoother surface than when measured with the diamond stylus and the optical profiling system. The gloss of the prints can be obtained from the absolute specular reflectance spectra in the spectral region of visible light. It is shown that specular reflection data at a fixed wavelength in the NIR are useful also in the interpretation of gloss in the visible spectral range, but using an unconventional grazing angle of incidence.

  8. A reflection ansatz for surfaces with electrically small radii of curvature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominek, Allen K.; Peters, Leon, Jr.; Burnside, Walter D.

    1987-01-01

    Uniform reflection coefficients are developed for two- and three-dimensional, edge-like, perfectly conducting surfaces in the deep lit region. The uniformity is with respect to the electrical size of the radii of curvature at the surface's specular point. This uniformity allows one to physically interpret the reflected field from a smooth surface as one of the radii of curvature approaches zero as a diffracted field. The coefficients are heuristically generated from the exact scattered field for a two dimensional parabolic cylinder with plane wave illumination. The significant variables in this solution are the radii of curvature at the specular point and the distance between the specular point and the incident shadow boundaries in the principal planes. The field prediction accuracy of these reflection cofficients are critically examined through comparisons with reflected fields extracted from scattered fields of canonical surfaces.

  9. The phenomenon of simplified scattering from rough surfaces to reflection in fractional space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safdari, Hadiseh; Vahabi, Mahsa; Jafari, Gholamreza

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, the scattering of incident plane waves from rough surfaces has been modeled in a fractional space. It is shown how wave scattering from a rough surface could correspond to a simple reflection problem in a fractional space. In an integer dimensional space, fluctuations of the surface result in wave scattering, while in the fractional space, these fluctuations are compensated by the geometry of space. In the fractional space, reflection is equivalent to scattering from the integer dimensional space. Comparing scattered wave functions from different self-affine rough surfaces in the framework of the Kirchhoff theory with the results from the fractional space, we see good agreement between them.

  10. Constraints on the origins of lunar magnetism from electron reflection measurements of surface magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes a new method of detecting lunar surface magnetic fields, summarizes electron reflection measurements and correlations of surface field anomalies to moon geologic features, and discusses the constraints on the origin of lunar magnetism. Apollo 15 and 16 measurements of lunar surface magnetic fields by the electron reflection method show patches of strong surface fields distributed over the lunar surface, and a positive statistical correlation is found in lunar mare regions between the surface field strength and the geologic age of the surface. However, there is a lack of correlation of surface field with impact craters indicating that the mare does not have a strong large-scale uniform magnetization as may be expected from an ancient lunar dynamo. Fields were found in lunar highlands which imply that the rille has a strong magnetization associated with it as intrusive, magnetized rock or as a gap in a uniformly magnetic layer of rock.

  11. Effects of particle size on bidirectional reflectance factor measurements from particulate surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhongqiu; Lv, Yunfeng; Tong, Zhijun

    2016-03-21

    The bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF) is commonly used to study the structure of a particulate surface based on photometric measurements. In this paper, we describe the bidirectional reflectance factor distribution of natural particulate surfaces with particles sizes varying from 0.15 mm to 0.9 mm. Two types of natural particulate surfaces (one with low reflectance and the other with moderate reflectance) were measured at visible and near-infrared wavelengths using the Northeast Normal University Laboratory Goniospectrometer System (NENULGS). Both the BRFs and anisotropic reflectance factors (ARFs) at selected wavelengths were compared with previously published results to verify the accuracy of our measurements, and we also quantitatively analyzed the effects of particle size on the BRF. It was found that the maximum reflectance difference, which was more distinct for the low-reflectance samples, between particulate surfaces with particle sizes of 0.15 mm and 0.9 mm occurred in the forward scattering direction for all samples, and the value of this maximum difference reached 59% for the low-reflectance samples. Then, we conducted a test of a photometric model to determine which parameters could be confidently linked to the surfaces' reflectance behavior. The inverted parameters were compared with the known physical parameters of our samples, such as the particle size. We found that the single-scattering albedo could be empirically used to determine the particle sizes of our samples when measurements of particulate surfaces with different particle sizes were performed under the same incidence conditions and with wide viewing angles. The potential applications of our results appear very promising for empirically resolving the spatial distribution of particle size within a given particulate sample as well as for deepening our understanding of the scattering properties of particulate media. PMID:27136881

  12. Reflection of diffuse light from dielectric one-dimensional rough surfaces.

    PubMed

    González-Alcalde, Alma K; Méndez, Eugenio R; Terán, Emiliano; Cuppo, Fabio L S; Olivares, J A; García-Valenzuela, Augusto

    2016-03-01

    We study the reflection of diffuse light from 1D randomly rough dielectric interfaces. Results for the reflectance under diffuse illumination are obtained by rigorous numerical simulations and then contrasted with those obtained for flat surfaces. We also explore the possibility of using perturbation theories and conclude that they are limited for this type of study. Numerical techniques based on Kirchhoff approximation and reduced Rayleigh equations yield better results. We find that, depending on the refractive index contrast and nature of the irregularities, the roughness can increase or decrease the diffuse reflectance of the surface. PMID:26974906

  13. Deghosting towed streamer data in τ/p domain based on rough sea surface reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xing-Yan; Pan, Dong-Ming; Shi, Wen-Ying; Fang, Zhong-Yu; Dan, Zhi-Wei; Zhang, Li-Xia

    2015-12-01

    Currently, the deghosting of towed streamer seismic data assumes a flat sea level and a sea-surface reflection coefficient of -1; this decreases the precision of deghosting. A new method that considers the rough sea surface is proposed to suppress ghost reflections. The proposed deghosting method obtains the rough sea surface reflection coefficient using Gaussian statistics, and calculates the optimized deghosting operator in the τ/ p domain. The proposed method is closer to the actual sea conditions, offers an improved deghosting operator, removes the ghost reflections from marine towed seismic data, widens the bandwidth and restores the low-frequency information, and finally improves the signal-tonoise ratio and resolution of the seismic data.

  14. Reflection of illumination laser from gas metal arc weld pool surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaoji; Zhang, Yu Ming

    2009-11-01

    The weld pool is the core of the welding process where complex welding phenomena originate. Skilled welders acquire their process feedback primarily from the weld pool. Observation and measurement of the three-dimensional weld pool surface thus play a fundamental role in understanding and future control of complex welding processes. To this end, a laser line is projected onto the weld pool surface in pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and an imaging plane is used to intercept its reflection from the weld pool surface. Resultant images of the reflected laser are analyzed and it is found that the weld pool surface in GMAW does specularly reflect the projected laser as in gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). Hence, the weld pool surface in GMAW is also specular and it is in principle possible that it may be observed and measured by projecting a laser pattern and then intercepting and imaging the reflection from it. Due to high frequencies of surface fluctuations, GMAW requires a relatively short time to image the reflected laser.

  15. Tunable natural nano-arrays: controlling surface properties and light reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Jolanta A.; Myhra, Sverre; Watson, Gregory S.

    2006-01-01

    The general principles of optical design based on the theories of reflection, refraction and diffraction have been rigorously developed and optimized over the last three centuries. Of increasing importance has been the ability to predict and devise new optical technologies designed for specific functions. A key design feature of many of today's optical materials is the control of reflection and light transmittance through the medium. A sudden transition or impedance mismatch from one optical medium to another can result in unwanted reflections from the surface plane. Modification of a surface by creation of a gradual change in refractive index over a significant portion of a wavelength range will result in a reduction in reflection. An alternative surface modification to the multi layered stack coating (gradient index coating) is to produce a surface with structures having a period and height shorter than the light wavelength. These structures act like a pseudo-gradient index coating and can be described by the effective medium theory. Bernhard and Miller some forty years ago were the first to observe such structures found on the surface of insects. These were found in the form of hexagonally close packed nanometre sized protrusions on the corneal surface of certain moths. In this study we report on similar structures which we have found on certain species of cicada wings demonstrating that the reflective/transmission properties of these natural nano-structures can be tuned by controlled removal of the structure height using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM).

  16. Electron reflection and secondary emission characteristics of sputter-textured pyrolytic graphite surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, E. G.; Curren, A. N.; Sovey, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    Low secondary and reflected primary electron emission from the collector electrode surfaces is important for optimum collector efficiency and hence for high overall efficiency of microwave amplifier tubes used in communication satellites and in military systems. Ion sputter texturing of the surface effectively suppresses electron emission from pyrolytic graphite, which is a promising collector electrode material. Secondary and reflected primary electron emission characteristics of sputter textured pyrolytic graphite surfaces with microstructures of various sizes and densities are presented. The microstructure with the lowest electron emission levels, less than those of soot, consists of a dense array of tall, thin spires.

  17. Simulation of a polarized laser beam reflected at the sea surface: modeling and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenger, Frédéric

    2015-05-01

    A 3-D simulation of the polarization-dependent reflection of a Gaussian shaped laser beam on the dynamic sea surface is presented. The simulation considers polarized or unpolarized laser sources and calculates the polarization states upon reflection at the sea surface. It is suitable for the radiance calculation of the scene in different spectral wavebands (e.g. near-infrared, SWIR, etc.) not including the camera degradations. The simulation also considers a bistatic configuration of laser source and receiver as well as different atmospheric conditions. In the SWIR, the detected total power of reflected laser light is compared with data collected in a field trial. Our computer simulation combines the 3-D simulation of a maritime scene (open sea/clear sky) with the simulation of polarized or unpolarized laser light reflected at the sea surface. The basic sea surface geometry is modeled by a composition of smooth wind driven gravity waves. To predict the input of a camera equipped with a linear polarizer, the polarized sea surface radiance must be calculated for the specific waveband. The s- and p-polarization states are calculated for the emitted sea surface radiance and the specularly reflected sky radiance to determine the total polarized sea surface radiance of each component. The states of polarization and the radiance of laser light specularly reflected at the wind-roughened sea surface are calculated by considering the s- and p- components of the electric field of laser light with respect to the specular plane of incidence. This is done by using the formalism of their coherence matrices according to E. Wolf [1]. Additionally, an analytical statistical sea surface BRDF (bidirectional reflectance distribution function) is considered for the reflection of laser light radiances. Validation of the simulation results is required to ensure model credibility and applicability to maritime laser applications. For validation purposes, field measurement data (images and

  18. Effects of aerosols and surface shadowing on bidirectional reflectance measurements of deserts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowker, David E.; Davis, Richard E.

    1987-01-01

    Desert surfaces are probably one of the most stable of the Earth's natural targets for remote sensing. The bidirectional reflectance properties of the Saudi Arabian desert was investigated during the Summer Monsoon Experiment (Summer Monex). A comparison of high-altitude with near-surface measurements of the White Sands desert showed significant differences. These discrepancies have been attributed to forward scattering of the dust-laden atmosphere prevalent during Summer Monex. This paper is concerned in general with modeling the effects of atmospheric aerosols and surface shadowing on the remote sensing of bidirectional reflectance factors of desert targets, and in particular with comparing the results of these models with flight results. Although it is possible to approximate the latter, it is felt that a surface reflectance model with a smaller specular component would have permitted using a more realistic set of atmospheric conditions in the simulations.

  19. Light scattering by a rough surface of human skin. 2. Diffuse reflectance

    SciTech Connect

    Barun, V V; Ivanov, A P

    2013-10-31

    Based on the previously calculated luminance factors, we have investigated the integral characteristics of light reflection from a rough surface of the skin with large-scale inhomogeneities under various conditions of the skin illumination. Shadowing of incident and scattered beams by relief elements is taken into account. Diffuse reflectances by the Gaussian and the quasi-periodic surfaces are compared and, in general, both these roughness models are shown to give similar results. We have studied the effect of the angular structure of radiation multiply scattered deep in the tissue and the refraction of rays as they propagate from the dermis to the surface of the stratum corneum on the reflection characteristics of the skin surface. The importance of these factors is demonstrated. The algorithms constructed can be included in the schemes of calculation of the light fields inside and outside the medium in solving various direct and inverse problems of optics of biological tissues. (biophotonics)

  20. Light scattering by a rough surface of human skin. 2. Diffuse reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barun, V. V.; Ivanov, A. P.

    2013-10-01

    Based on the previously calculated luminance factors, we have investigated the integral characteristics of light reflection from a rough surface of the skin with large-scale inhomogeneities under various conditions of the skin illumination. Shadowing of incident and scattered beams by relief elements is taken into account. Diffuse reflectances by the Gaussian and the quasi-periodic surfaces are compared and, in general, both these roughness models are shown to give similar results. We have studied the effect of the angular structure of radiation multiply scattered deep in the tissue and the refraction of rays as they propagate from the dermis to the surface of the stratum corneum on the reflection characteristics of the skin surface. The importance of these factors is demonstrated. The algorithms constructed can be included in the schemes of calculation of the light fields inside and outside the medium in solving various direct and inverse problems of optics of biological tissues.

  1. High-resolution seismic reflection survey near SPR surface collapse feature at Weeks Island, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.D.; Xia, J.; Harding, R.S. Jr.; Steeples, D.W.

    1994-12-31

    Shallow high resolution 2-D and 3-D seismic reflection techniques are assisting in the subsurface delineation of a surface collapse feature (sinkhole) at Weeks Island, Louisiana. Seismic reflection surveys were conducted in March 1994. Data from walkaway noise tests were used to assist selection of field recording parameters. The top of the salt dome is about 180 ft below ground surface at the sinkhole. The water table is an estimated 90 ft below the ground surface. A single coherent reflection was consistently recorded across the entire area of the survey, although stacking velocity and spectral content of the event varied. On the basis of observed travel times and stacking velocities, the coherent reflection event appears to originate above the top of the salt, possibly at or near the water table. Identification of this reflector will be made form borehole investigations currently planned for the sinkhole site. A depression or time sag in this reflection event is clearly evident in both the 2-D and 3-D seismic data in the immediate vicinity of the sinkhole. The time sag appears to be related to the subsurface structure of the reflector and not to near surface topography or velocity effects. Elsewhere in the survey area, observed changes in reflection travel times and wavelet character appear to be related to subsurface geologic structure. These seismic observations may assist in predicting where future sinkholes will develop after they have been tied to borehole data collected at the site.

  2. Measuring and Modeling the Effect of Surface Moisture on the Spectral Reflectance of Coastal Beach Sand

    PubMed Central

    Nolet, Corjan; Poortinga, Ate; Roosjen, Peter; Bartholomeus, Harm; Ruessink, Gerben

    2014-01-01

    Surface moisture is an important supply limiting factor for aeolian sand transport, which is the primary driver of coastal dune development. As such, it is critical to account for the control of surface moisture on available sand for dune building. Optical remote sensing has the potential to measure surface moisture at a high spatio-temporal resolution. It is based on the principle that wet sand appears darker than dry sand: it is less reflective. The goals of this study are (1) to measure and model reflectance under controlled laboratory conditions as function of wavelength () and surface moisture () over the optical domain of 350–2500 nm, and (2) to explore the implications of our laboratory findings for accurately mapping the distribution of surface moisture under natural conditions. A laboratory spectroscopy experiment was conducted to measure spectral reflectance (1 nm interval) under different surface moisture conditions using beach sand. A non-linear increase of reflectance upon drying was observed over the full range of wavelengths. Two models were developed and tested. The first model is grounded in optics and describes the proportional contribution of scattering and absorption of light by pore water in an unsaturated sand matrix. The second model is grounded in soil physics and links the hydraulic behaviour of pore water in an unsaturated sand matrix to its optical properties. The optical model performed well for volumetric moisture content 24% ( 0.97), but underestimated reflectance for between 24–30% ( 0.92), most notable around the 1940 nm water absorption peak. The soil-physical model performed very well ( 0.99) but is limited to 4% 24%. Results from a field experiment show that a short-wave infrared terrestrial laser scanner ( = 1550 nm) can accurately relate surface moisture to reflectance (standard error 2.6%), demonstrating its potential to derive spatially extensive surface moisture maps of a natural coastal beach. PMID:25383709

  3. Measurement of the configuration of a concave surface by the interference of reflected light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumazawa, T.; Sakamoto, T.; Shida, S.

    1985-01-01

    A method whereby a concave surface is irradiated with coherent light and the resulting interference fringes yield information on the concave surface is described. This method can be applied to a surface which satisfies the following conditions: (1) the concave face has a mirror surface; (2) the profile of the face is expressed by a mathematical function with a point of inflection. In this interferometry, multilight waves reflected from the concave surface interfere and make fringes wherever the reflected light propagates. Interference fringe orders. Photographs of the fringe patterns for a uniformly loaded thin silicon plate clamped at the edge are shown experimentally. The experimental and the theoretical values of the maximum optical path difference show good agreement. This simple method can be applied to obtain accurate information on concave surfaces.

  4. Suppressing light reflection from polycrystalline silicon thin films through surface texturing and silver nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Akhter, Perveen; Huang, Mengbing Kadakia, Nirag; Spratt, William; Malladi, Girish; Bakhru, Hassarum

    2014-09-21

    This work demonstrates a novel method combining ion implantation and silver nanostructures for suppressing light reflection from polycrystalline silicon thin films. Samples were implanted with 20-keV hydrogen ions to a dose of 10¹⁷/cm², and some of them received an additional argon ion implant to a dose of 5×10¹⁵ /cm² at an energy between 30 and 300 keV. Compared to the case with a single H implant, the processing involved both H and Ar implants and post-implantation annealing has created a much higher degree of surface texturing, leading to a more dramatic reduction of light reflection from polycrystalline Si films over a broadband range between 300 and 1200 nm, e.g., optical reflection from the air/Si interface in the AM1.5 sunlight condition decreasing from ~30% with an untextured surface to below 5% for a highly textured surface after post-implantation annealing at 1000°C. Formation of Ag nanostructures on these ion beam processed surfaces further reduces light reflection, and surface texturing is expected to have the benefit of diminishing light absorption losses within large-size (>100 nm) Ag nanoparticles, yielding an increased light trapping efficiency within Si as opposed to the case with Ag nanostructures on a smooth surface. A discussion of the effects of surface textures and Ag nanoparticles on light trapping within Si thin films is also presented with the aid of computer simulations.

  5. Voltage-induced broad-spectrum reflectivity change with surface-plasmon waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yu; Russell, Stephen D.; Shimabukuro, Randy L.

    2005-01-01

    Voltage-induced broad-spectrum reflectivity change with surface-plasmon waves is reported. When white light is incident at a metal/electro-optical material interface, surface-plasmon waves can be excited under phase match conditions. This surface-plasmon resonance depends on the dielectric constants of both the metal and the electro-optical material. Photons in the surface-plasmon resonance wavelength range are absorbed by the interface. Since metals have large imaginary parts of their dielectric constants, the surface-plasmon resonances are broad and may cover all visible wavelengths. Applying voltage to the electro-optical material to change its dielectric constant can result in a change in the reflectivity at the interface. Experimental results showed a reflectivity change from almost 0% to about 40% under an applied voltage using a liquid-crystal and nickel film structure, and the results had good agreement with theoretical calculations. The theoretical calculations also predicted a 90% reflectivity recovery by exciting surface-plasmon waves at a Rh-Al/electro-optical material interface. These results demonstrate that a high efficiency white light modulator can be built using surface-plasmon excitations.

  6. Comparison of Deep Blue and Land Surface Reflectance in the San Joaquin Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmuth, S.; Agrawal, P.; Fisher, D.; Nguyen, A.; Roberts, K.; Strawa, A. W.; Johnson, L. F.; Skiles, J. W.

    2009-12-01

    lation standards for the past several years. While previous studies show strong correlations between the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) derived Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) and surface PM measurements on the East Coast of the United States, weak correlations have been found on the West Coast. Specific causes for this discrepancy have not been identified. The Deep Blue algorithm was created in order to correct AOT calculations over arid, non-vegetated regions. Although slight improvements were seen, numbers over California remained problematic. This study aims to understand the poor correlation on the West Coast, specifically in the SJV, by targeting surface reflectance as a factor for the inaccuracy. This was done by comparing land surface reflectances derived from MODIS Aqua to ground reflectance measurements for the region, in order to examine their correlation. Presumably, an undesirable effect on AOT calculations would occur if these surface reflectance values are imprecise. Results show that there is little correlation between the data sets. MODIS Land Surface Reflectance matched closest to the mixed ground measurements. In all products, the red band (0.620 - 0.670 μm) values vary more than the blue band (0.459 - 0.479 μm) values. Most data fall in a horizontal linear trend line, not the expected 1:1 line.

  7. Highly reflective and adhesive surface of aluminized polyvinyl chloride film by vacuum evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Denian; Tai, Qile; Feng, Qiang; Li, Qi; Xu, Xizhe; Li, Hairong; Huang, Jing; Dong, Lijie; Xie, Haian; Xiong, Chuanxi

    2014-08-01

    Aluminized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) film with high reflectivity and strong adhesion was facilely fabricated by vacuum evaporation. The technical study revealed that both alkali-pretreatment of the PVC matrix and thermal annealing after aluminization could greatly promote the peeling adhesion force of this metal/polymer composite by producing interfacial active chemical groups and removing the inner stress, respectively. Reflectivity test and AFM study indicated that the reflecting capacitance of the aluminum coating was closely related to the surface roughness, which can be easily controlled by modulating deposition of aluminum. Moreover, the formation of aluminum layer follows an island model process, and a continuous and smooth coating with highest reflectivity and lowest surface resistance was achieved at deposition time of 60 s. We anticipate that the cost-effective metallized PVC film by this strategy may find extensive applications in light harvesting, solar energy, and flexible mirrors, among others.

  8. Forming high efficiency silicon solar cells using density-graded anti-reflection surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Yuan, Hao-Chih; Branz, Howard M.; Page, Matthew R.

    2014-09-09

    A method (50) is provided for processing a graded-density AR silicon surface (14) to provide effective surface passivation. The method (50) includes positioning a substrate or wafer (12) with a silicon surface (14) in a reaction or processing chamber (42). The silicon surface (14) has been processed (52) to be an AR surface with a density gradient or region of black silicon. The method (50) continues with heating (54) the chamber (42) to a high temperature for both doping and surface passivation. The method (50) includes forming (58), with a dopant-containing precursor in contact with the silicon surface (14) of the substrate (12), an emitter junction (16) proximate to the silicon surface (14) by doping the substrate (12). The method (50) further includes, while the chamber is maintained at the high or raised temperature, forming (62) a passivation layer (19) on the graded-density silicon anti-reflection surface (14).

  9. Forming high-efficiency silicon solar cells using density-graded anti-reflection surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Yuan, Hao-Chih; Branz, Howard M.; Page, Matthew R.

    2015-07-07

    A method (50) is provided for processing a graded-density AR silicon surface (14) to provide effective surface passivation. The method (50) includes positioning a substrate or wafer (12) with a silicon surface (14) in a reaction or processing chamber (42). The silicon surface (14) has been processed (52) to be an AR surface with a density gradient or region of black silicon. The method (50) continues with heating (54) the chamber (42) to a high temperature for both doping and surface passivation. The method (50) includes forming (58), with a dopant-containing precursor in contact with the silicon surface (14) of the substrate (12), an emitter junction (16) proximate to the silicon surface (14) by doping the substrate (12). The method (50) further includes, while the chamber is maintained at the high or raised temperature, forming (62) a passivation layer (19) on the graded-density silicon anti-reflection surface (14).

  10. Study of the adsorbed layer on a solid electrode surface by specular reflection measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusu, Fumiyo; Takamura, Kiyoko

    1985-07-01

    Specular reflection measurements were carried out to study the adsorbed layers of certain heterocyclic compounds such as adenine, barbital, 2'-deoxyadenosine, phenobarbital, pyridine and thymine. When pyridine was present in 0.1M NaClO 4, a marked decrease in the reflectivity of a gold electrode was observed. In the potential range near the point of zero charge on the reflectivity-potential curve, the decrease was due to the adsorption of pyridine. Assuming the reflectivity change to be proportional to the surface coverage, the potential and concentration dependence of pyridine adsorption was determined and analysed on the basis of a Langmuir-type adsorption isotherm. The refractive indices and extinction coefficients for the adsorbed layers of the compounds investigated were evaluated using the observed reflectivity change, according to relations proposed by McIntyre and Aspnes.

  11. Simple equation to approximate the bidirectional reflectance from vegetative canopies and bare soil surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walthall, C. L.; Norman, J. M.; Blad, B. L.; Welles, J. M.; Campbell, G.

    1985-01-01

    A simple equation has been developed for describing the bidirectional reflectance of some vegetative canopies and bare soil surfaces. The equation describes directional reflectance as a function of zenith and azimuth view angles and solar azimuth angle. The equation works for simulated and field measured red and IR reflectance under clear sky conditions. Hemispherical reflectance can be calculated as a function of the simple equation coefficients by integrating the equation over the hemisphere of view angles. A single equation for estimating soil bidirectional reflectance was obtained using the relationships between solar zenith angles and the simple equation coefficients for medium and rough soil distributions. The equation has many useful applications such as providing a lower level boundary condition in complex plant canopy models and providing an additional tool for studying bidirectional effects on pointable sensors.

  12. Comparison Between Sea Surface Wind Speed Estimates From Reflected GPS Signals and Buoy Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, James L.; Katzberg, Steven J.; Zavorotny, Valery U.

    2000-01-01

    Reflected signals from the Global Positioning System (GPS) have been collected from an aircraft at approximately 3.7 km altitude on 5 different days. Estimation of surface wind speed by matching the shape of the reflected signal correlation function against analytical models was demonstrated. Wind speed obtained from this method agreed with that recorded from buoys to with a bias of less than 0.1 m/s, and with a standard derivation of 1.3 meters per second.

  13. Transmission and reflection of waves from a magnetized ferrite surface by a coordinate-free method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H. C.

    An approach to the problem of wave reflection from the surface of a magnetized ferrite is proposed which, being based on the direct manipulation of vectors, dyadics, and their invariants, eliminates the use of coordinate systems. The new results, all in coordinate-free form, include the permeability tensor of a magnetized ferrite, the dispersion equation and the directions of field vectors, the laws of reflection and refraction, the Booker quartic equation, and the transmission and reflection coefficient matrices. The method can be easily applied to other anisotropic media such as plasmas and crystals.

  14. Design, fabrication, and measured performance of anti-reflecting surface textures in infrared transmitting materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Douglas S.; MacLeod, Bruce D.

    2005-05-01

    Rugged infrared transmitting materials have a high refractive index, which leads to large reflection losses. Multi-layer thin-film coatings designed for anti-reflection (AR), exhibit good performance, but have limited bandwidths, narrow acceptance angles, polarization effects, high costs, and short lifetimes in harsh environments. Many aerospace and military applications requiring high optical transmission, durability, survivability, and radiation resistance, are inadequately addressed by thin-film coating technology. Surface relief microstructures have been shown to be an effective alternative to thin-film AR coatings in many infrared and visible-band applications. These microstructures, etched directly into the window surface and commonly referred to as "Motheye" textures, impart an optical function that minimizes surface reflections without compromising the inherent durability of the window material. Reflection losses are reduced to a minimum for broad-band light incident over a wide angular range. For narrow-band applications such as laser communications, a simpler type of AR surface structure called a sub-wavelength, or "SWS" surface, is used. In general, both the Motheye and SWS surface textures will exhibit the same characteristics as the bulk material with respect to durability, thermal issues, and radiation resistance. The problems associated with thin-film coating adhesion and stress, are thus eliminated by design. Optical performance data for AR structures fabricated in fused silica, sapphire, Clear ZnS, ZnSe, cadmium zinc telluride (CZT), silicon, and germanium, will be presented.

  15. Wind-Driven Angular Dependence of Sea-Surface Reflectance Measured with an Airborne Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tratt, David M.; Menzies, Robert T.; Cutten, Dean R.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of wind-stress on the optical properties of the ocean surface have been studied for several decades. In particular, the classic study by Cox and Munk (1954) linking sea-surface wind field to wave slope statistics provides a phenomenology by which the sea-surface wind velocity can be estimated from direct measurement of the wave-modulated surface reflectance. A limited number of studies along these lines have been conducted using airborne or spaceborne lidar systems. In these instances, truthing was provided by in situ ship reports or satellite microwave remote sensing instruments (e.g., ERS scatterometer, SSM/I). During the second deployment of the MACAWS Doppler wind lidar in the summer of 1996 measurements of sea-surface reflectance as a function of azimuth- and nadir-viewing angles were acquired off the California coast. MACAWS data products include directly measured winds, as well as calibrated backscatter/reflectance profiles, thus enabling comparison of the winds inferred from sea-surface reflectance measurements with those deriving from the Doppler-processed direct line-of-sight (LOS) estimates. Additional validation data was extracted from the ERS and SSM/I satellite microwave sensor archives maintained by the JPL Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO- DAAC).

  16. Developmental prosopagnosia and super-recognition: no special role for surface reflectance processing

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Richard; Chatterjee, Garga; Nakayama, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Face recognition by normal subjects depends in roughly equal proportions on shape and surface reflectance cues, while object recognition depends predominantly on shape cues. It is possible that developmental prosopagnosics are deficient not in their ability to recognize faces per se, but rather in their ability to use reflectance cues. Similarly, super-recognizers’ exceptional ability with face recognition may be a result of superior surface reflectance perception and memory. We tested this possibility by administering tests of face perception and face recognition in which only shape or reflectance cues are available to developmental prosopagnosics, super-recognizers, and control subjects. Face recognition ability and the relative use of shape and pigmentation were unrelated in all the tests. Subjects who were better at using shape or reflectance cues were also better at using the other type of cue. These results do not support the proposal that variation in surface reflectance perception ability is the underlying cause of variation in face recognition ability. Instead, these findings support the idea that face recognition ability is related to neural circuits using representations that integrate shape and pigmentation information. PMID:22192636

  17. Evaluation of land surface reflectance and emissivity spectra retrieved from MASTER data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugisaki, Takashi; Tonooka, Hideyuki

    2008-10-01

    The MODIS/ASTER (MASTER) airborne simulator which has fifty bands in the visible to the thermal-infrared spectral regions was developed mainly to support the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection radiometer (ASTER) and the Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument teams in the areas of algorithm development, calibration and validation, but its wide spectral capability is also useful for other studies such as geology, environmental monitoring, and land management. Currently, only MASTER product distributed to users is a level-1B at-sensor radiance product, so that if a user needs surface reflectance and/or emissivity/temperature, the user should apply atmospheric correction to a level-1B product. Thus in the present study, we derived surface reflectance and emissivity spectra from MASTER data acquired over Railroad Valley Playa, NV/USA, by atmospheric correction with various atmospheric sources like Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) products, and then compared with in-situ measured spectra for both reflective and emissive regions. Calibration errors in the reflective region which caused discrepancy from the in-situ spectra were reduced by adjusting the MASTER radiance to ASTER and MODIS radiances at the top of the atmosphere. We also compared the spectral similarity in the reflective region versus that in the emissive region, for MASTER spectra, and the spectra of ASTER spectral library and in-situ spectra, as an example of discrimination analysis using both reflective and emissive bands.

  18. Correlated imaging for a reflective target with a smooth or rough surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Wenlin

    2016-08-01

    Correlated imaging for a reflective target with a smooth or rough surface is investigated. Our analytical results, which are backed up by numerical simulations, demonstrate that for a reflective target with a smooth surface, the quality of ghost imaging is related with the transverse sizes of both the source and the detector in the object path, and the target’s information can also be obtained by the technique of Fourier-transform ghost diffraction. However, for a reflective target with a rough surface, the target’s whole image can be reconstructed by ghost imaging even using a single point-like detector but Fourier-transform ghost diffraction is invalid. The application of correlated imaging in remote sensing is also discussed based on the above results.

  19. Airborne Doppler radar velocity measurements of precipitation seen in ocean surface reflection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atlas, D.; Matejka, T. J.

    1985-01-01

    The use of airborne or spaceborne radars to observe precipitation simultaneously directly and in reflection could provide significant new opportunities for measuring the properties of the precipitation, wind field, and ocean surface. Atlas and Meneghini (1983) have proposed that the difference between direct and reflected precipitation echo intensities observed with a nadir-directed beam is a measure of two-way attenuation and thus of path average rain rate, taking into account an employment of direct and reflected echoes from very near the ocean surface to normalize for ocean surface scatter. In the present paper, some key meteorological and oceanographic research applications are illustrated, giving particular attention to airborne Doppler radar velocity measurements of the precipitation.

  20. Surface temperature correction for active infrared reflectance measurements of natural materials.

    PubMed

    Snyder, W C; Wan, Z

    1996-05-01

    Land surface temperature algorithms for the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer satellite instrument will require the spectral bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of natural surfaces in the thermal infrared. We designed the spectral infrared bidirectional reflectance and emissivity instrument to provide such measurements by the use of a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. A problem we encountered is the unavoidable surface heating caused by the source irradiance. For our system, the effects of the heating can cause a 30% error in the measured BRDF The error caused by heating is corrected by temporally curve fitting the radiance signal. This curve-fitting technique isolates the radiance caused by reflected irradiance. With this correction, other factors dominate the BRDF error. It is now ~5% and can be improved further. The method is illustrated with measurements of soil BRDF. PMID:21085353

  1. Coherence of the vortex Bessel beam reflected from the rough surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, Igor P.

    2015-11-01

    Researches of coherent properties of the vortex Bessel optical beams propagating in a uniform medium after reflection from a rough surface are developed. It is shown, that at low levels of a random roughness of a reflecting surface, the degree of coherence of a vortex Bessel optical beam essentially depends on value of a topological charge of an optical beam. In the central part of a two-dimensional field of degree of coherence the ring dislocation is formed, the number of rings in which is equal to value of a topological charge of a vortex optical beam. At high levels of a random roughness of a reflecting surface, mutual coherence function of a vortex Bessel optical beam coincides with the similar characteristic of an incoherent source.

  2. Empirical Models for the Shielding and Reflection of Jet Mixing Noise by a Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Clifford A.

    2016-01-01

    Empirical models for the shielding and reflection of jet mixing noise by a nearby surface are described and the resulting models evaluated. The flow variables are used to non-dimensionalize the surface position variables, reducing the variable space and producing models that are linear function of non-dimensional surface position and logarithmic in Strouhal frequency. A separate set of coefficients are determined at each observer angle in the dataset and linear interpolation is used to for the intermediate observer angles. The shielding and reflection models are then combined with existing empirical models for the jet mixing and jet-surface interaction noise sources to produce predicted spectra for a jet operating near a surface. These predictions are then evaluated against experimental data.

  3. JPL field measurements at the Finney County, Kansas, test site, October 1976: Meteorological variables, surface reflectivity, surface and subsurface temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahle, A. B.; Schieldge, J.; Paley, H. N.

    1977-01-01

    Data collected at the Finney County, Kansas test site as part of the Joint Soil Moisture Experiment (JSME) are presented here, prior to analysis, to provide all JSME investigators with an immediate source of primary information. The ground-truth measurements were taken to verify and complement soil moisture data taken by microwave and infrared sensors during aircraft overflights. Measurements were made of meteorological variables (air speed, temperature, relative humidity, and rainfall), surface reflectivity, and temperatures at and below the surface.

  4. A bidirectional reflectance model of the Earth's surface for the correction of remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roujean, Jean-Louis; Leroy, Marc; Deschamps, Pierre-Yves

    1992-12-01

    A surface bidirectional reflectance model has been developed for the correction of surface bidirectional effects in time series of satellite observations, where both sun and viewing angles are varying. The model follows a semiempirical approach and is designed to be applicable to heterogeneous surfaces. It contains only three adjustable parameters describing the surface and can potentially be included in an algorithm of processing and correction of a time series of remote sensing data. The model considers that the observed surface bidirectional reflectance is the sum of two main processes operating at a local scale: (1) a diffuse reflection component taking into account the geometrical structure of opaque reflectors on the surface, and shadowing effects, and (2) a volume scattering contribution by a collection of dispersed facets which simulates the volume scattering properties of canopies and bare soils. Detailed comparisons between the model and in situ observations show satisfactory agreement for most investigated surface types in the visible and near-infrared spectral bands. The model appears therefore as a good candidate to reduce substantially the undesirable fluctuations related to surface bidirectional effects in remotely sensed multitemporal data sets.

  5. Surface scattering properties estimated from modeling airborne multiple emission angle reflectance data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinness, Edward A.; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Irons, J. R.; Harding, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    Here, researchers apply the Hapke function to airborne bidirectional reflectance data collected over three terrestrial surfaces. The objectives of the study were to test the range of natural surfaces that the Hapke model fits and to evaluate model parameters in terms of known surface properties. The data used are multispectral and multiple emission angle data collected during the Geologic Remote Sensing Field Experiment (GRSFE) over a mud-cracked playa, an artificially roughened playa, and a basalt cobble strewn playa at Lunar Lake Playa in Nevada. Airborne remote sensing data and associated field measurements were acquired at the same time. The airborne data were acquired by the Advanced Solid State Array Spectroradiometer (ASAS) instrument, a 29-spectral band imaging system. ASAS reflectance data for a cobble-strewn surface and an artificially rough playa surface on Lunar Lake Playa can be explained with the Hanke model. The cobble and rough playa sites are distinguishable by a single scattering albedo, which is controlled by material composition; by the roughness parameter, which appears to be controlled by the surface texture and particle size; and the symmetry factor of the single particle phase function, which is controlled by particle size and shape. A smooth playa surface consisting of compacted, fine-grained particles has reflectance variations that are also distinct from either the cobble site or rough playa site. The smooth playa appears to behave more like a Lambertian surface that cannot be modeled with the Hapke function.

  6. A New Fast Algorithm to Completely Account for Non-Lambertian Surface Reflection of The Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qin, Wen-Han; Herman, Jay R.; Ahmad, Ziauddin; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Surface bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) influences not only radiance just about the surface, but that emerging from the top of the atmosphere (TOA). In this study we propose a new, fast and accurate, algorithm CASBIR (correction for anisotropic surface bidirectional reflection) to account for such influences on radiance measured above TOA. This new algorithm is based on a 4-stream theory that separates the radiation field into direct and diffuse components in both upwelling and downwelling directions. This is important because the direct component accounts for a substantial portion of incident radiation under a clear sky, and the BRDF effect is strongest in the reflection of the direct radiation reaching the surface. The model is validated by comparison with a full-scale, vector radiation transfer model for the atmosphere-surface system. The result demonstrates that CASBIR performs very well (with overall relative difference of less than one percent) for all solar and viewing zenith and azimuth angles considered in wavelengths from ultraviolet to near-infrared over three typical, but very different surface types. Application of this algorithm includes both accounting for non-Lambertian surface scattering on the emergent radiation above TOA and a potential approach for surface BRDF retrieval from satellite measured radiance.

  7. Solid sulfur in vacuum: Sublimation effects on surface microtexture, color and spectral reflectance, and applications to planetary surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, D. B.

    1987-01-01

    A form of sulfur that is white at room temperature and very fluffy in texture has been found in laboratory experiments on the effects of vacuum sublimation (evaporation) on solid sulfur. This work is an outgrowth of proton sputtering experiments on sulfur directed toward understanding Jovian magnetospheric effects on the surface of Io. Fluffy white sulfur is formed on the surface of solid yellow, tan, or brown sulfur melt freezes in vacuum by differential (fractional) evaporation of two or more sulfur molecular species present in the original sulfur; S(8) ring sulfur is thought to be the dominant sublimination phase lost to the vacuum sink, and polymeric chain sulfur S(u) the dominant residual phase that remains in place, forming the residual fluffy surface layer. The reflectance spectrum of the original sulfur surface is greaty modified by formation of the fluffy layer: the blue absorption band-edge and shoulder move 0.05 to 0.06 microns toward shorter wavelengths resulting in a permanent increase in reflectivity near 0.42 to 0.46 microns; the UV reflectivity below 0.40 microns is reduced. This form of sulfur should exist in large quantity on the surface of Io, especially in hotspot regions if there is solid free sulfur there that has solidified from a melt. Its color and spectra will indicate relative crystallization age on a scale of days to months and/or surface temperature distribution history.

  8. A surface reflectance scheme for retrieving aerosol optical depth over urban surfaces in MODIS Dark Target retrieval algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Pawan; Levy, Robert C.; Mattoo, Shana; Remer, Lorraine A.; Munchak, Leigh A.

    2016-07-01

    The MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments, aboard the two Earth Observing System (EOS) satellites Terra and Aqua, provide aerosol information with nearly daily global coverage at moderate spatial resolution (10 and 3 km). Almost 15 years of aerosol data records are now available from MODIS that can be used for various climate and air-quality applications. However, the application of MODIS aerosol products for air-quality concerns is limited by a reduction in retrieval accuracy over urban surfaces. This is largely because the urban surface reflectance behaves differently than that assumed for natural surfaces. In this study, we address the inaccuracies produced by the MODIS Dark Target (MDT) algorithm aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals over urban areas and suggest improvements by modifying the surface reflectance scheme in the algorithm. By integrating MODIS Land Surface Reflectance and Land Cover Type information into the aerosol surface parameterization scheme for urban areas, much of the issues associated with the standard algorithm have been mitigated for our test region, the continental United States (CONUS). The new surface scheme takes into account the change in underlying surface type and is only applied for MODIS pixels with urban percentage (UP) larger than 20 %. Over the urban areas where the new scheme has been applied (UP > 20 %), the number of AOD retrievals falling within expected error (EE %) has increased by 20 %, and the strong positive bias against ground-based sun photometry has been eliminated. However, we note that the new retrieval introduces a small negative bias for AOD values less than 0.1 due to the ultra-sensitivity of the AOD retrieval to the surface parameterization under low atmospheric aerosol loadings. Global application of the new urban surface parameterization appears promising, but further research and analysis are required before global implementation.

  9. Early Evaluation of the VIIRS Calibration, Cloud Mask and Surface Reflectance Earth Data Records

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vermote, Eric; Justice, Chris; Csiszar, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Surface reflectance is one of the key products fromVIIRS and as withMODIS, is used in developing several higherorder land products. The VIIRS Surface Reflectance (SR) Intermediate Product (IP) is based on the heritageMODIS Collection 5 product (Vermote, El Saleous, & Justice, 2002). The quality and character of surface reflectance depend on the accuracy of the VIIRS Cloud Mask (VCM), the aerosol algorithms and the adequate calibration of the sensor. The focus of this paper is the early evaluation of the VIIRS SR product in the context of the maturity of the operational processing system, the Interface Data Processing System (IDPS). After a brief introduction, the paper presents the calibration performance and the role of the surface reflectance in calibration monitoring. The analysis of the performance of the cloud mask with a focus on vegetation monitoring (no snow conditions) shows typical problems over bright surfaces and high elevation sites. Also discussed is the performance of the aerosol input used in the atmospheric correction and in particular the artifacts generated by the use of the Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System. Early quantitative results of the performance of the SR product over the AERONET sites showthatwith the fewadjustments recommended, the accuracy iswithin the threshold specifications. The analysis of the adequacy of the SR product (Land PEATE adjusted version) in applications of societal benefits is then presented. We conclude with a set of recommendations to ensure consistency and continuity of the JPSS mission with the MODIS Land Climate Data Record.

  10. Evaluation of Experimental Data from the Gains Balloon GPS Surface Reflection Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganoe, George G.; Johnson, Thomas A.; Somero, John Ryan

    2002-01-01

    The GPS Surface Reflection Instrument was integrated as an experiment on the GAINS (Global Airocean IN-situ System) 48-hour balloon mission flown in June 2002. The data collected by similar instruments in the past has been used to measure sea state from which ocean surface winds can be accurately estimated. The GPS signal has also been shown to be reflected from wetland areas and even from subsurface moisture. The current version of the instrument has been redesigned to be more compact, use less power, and withstand a greater variation in environmental conditions than previous versions. This instrument has also incorporated a new data collection mode to track 5 direct satellites (providing a continuous navigation solution) and multiplex the remaining 7 channels to track the reflected signal of the satellite tracked in channel 0. The new software mode has been shown to increase the signal to noise ratio of the collected data and enhance the science return of the instrument. During the GAINS balloon flight over the Northwest US, the instrument measured surface reflections as they were detected over the balloon's ground track. Since ground surface elevations in this area vary widely from the WGS-84 ellipsoid altitude, the instrument software has been modified to incorporate a surface altitude correction based on USGS 30-minute Digital Elevation Models. Information presented will include facts about instrument design goals, data collection methodologies and algorithms, and will focus on results of the science data analyses for the mission.

  11. Evaluation of Experimental Data from the GAINS Balloon GPS Surface Reflection Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gance, George G.; Johnson, Thomas A.

    2004-01-01

    The GPS Surface Reflection Instrument was integrated as an experiment on the GAINS (Global Airocean IN-situ System) 48-hour balloon mission flown in September 2001. The data collected by similar instruments in the past has been used to measure sea state from which ocean surface winds can be accurately estimated. The GPS signal has also been shown to be reflected from wetland areas and even from subsurface moisture. The current version of the instrument has been redesigned to be more compact, use less power, and withstand a greater variation in environmental conditions than previous versions. This instrument has also incorporated a new data collection mode to track 5 direct satellites (providing a continuous navigation solution) and multiplex the remaining 7 channels to track the reflected signal of the satellite tracked in channel 0. The new software mode has been shown to increase the signal to noise ratio of the collected data and enhance the science return of the instrument. During the 48-hour flight over the Northwest US, the instrument will measure surface reflections that can be detected over the balloon's ground track. Since ground surface elevations in this area vary widely from the WGS-84 ellipsoid altitude, the instrument software has been modified to incorporate a surface altitude correction based on USGS 30-minute Digital Elevation Models. Information presented will include facts about instrument design goals, data collection methodologies and algorithms, and results of the science data analyses for the 48-hour mission.

  12. An assessment of the bidirectional reflectance models basing on laboratory experiment of natural particulate surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhongqiu; Lv, Yunfeng; Lu, Shan

    2015-09-01

    The bidirectional reflectance model is commonly used to study surface structure and composition of atmosphereless celestial bodies basing on photometric measurements. We conducted a test of two bidirectional reflectance models, which are theoretically similar but with different form, to assess their ability for calculating the bidirectional reflectance of particulate surfaces and if the parameters could be confidently linked to the surface's property. Two types of natural particulate surfaces with controlled particle sizes vary from 300 μm to 900 μm have been measured in the visible and near-infrared wavelength with the NENULGS (Northeast Normal University Laboratory Goniospectrometer System), we only used these measurement results at 560 nm and 670 nm which are regarded to the evaluation standard of models. In this range of particle size, the bidirectional reflectance models were well match to the experimental data as the results shown in previous publications. Although some parameters of the models can be used to simulate the reflectance of particulate surface, they contain no reliable information on the physical property of our samples. Furthermore, the influence of the number of viewing angles on the precision of modeling results has been tested in this paper. It is clear that an increase of the number of viewing angles and the range of azimuth angles could allow us to improve precision on the estimation of parameters. Comparing with the best fitted model reflectance, we also found that if we used the parameters, which derived from measurements in the principal plane for individual incident zenith angle, to model the bidirectional reflectance may overestimate the computed results in the backward scattering direction and underestimate the computed results in the forward scattering direction. The difference between modeled results and measurements can reach up to 20% in the backward direction when using the parameters inverted in the principal plane. However

  13. A new look at decoupling of atmospheric radiative transfer and anisotropic surface reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radkevich, Alexander

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents a new approach for separating atmospheric radiative transport from the lower boundary condition in the case of one-dimensional problem. The approach allows for an exact analytical expression of the solution for an arbitrary surface reflectance. The solution has the form of linear combination of the standard problem solutions with illumination from both top and bottom of the atmosphere. The problem with illumination from below can be solved with existing radiative transfer codes by reversing the order of the atmospheric layers. The solutions for illumination from below are weighted with a surface resolving kernel that is specific for every lower boundary condition. The surface resolving kernel is defined by an integral equation of the Fredholm type. The solution for the Lambertian surface is also obtained in the framework of this approach. Different methods of solution for the surface resolving kernel are considered. The successive iterations of the integral equation for the surface resolving kernel are equivalent to the decomposition of the surface reflected radiance by the orders of reflection. Recipes for the cases when standard problems are solved with the methods of discrete ordinates and spherical harmonics are also considered.

  14. Reflectance characteristics of uniform earth and cloud surfaces derived from Nimbus-7 ERB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, V. R.; Stowe, L. L.

    1984-06-01

    The effect of solar zenith angle (SZA) on the reflectance characteristics of terrestrial surfaces is investigated in data obtained with the Nimbus-7 earth-radiation-budget (ERB) instrument on 61 days during 1978-1979. Ground-based measurements and data from the Nimbus-7 temperature-humidity IR radiometer are used for comparison, and the results are presented in graphs and maps. It is found that increasing SZA leads to increased specularity in water, land, snow, and clouds; increased albedo in all surfaces except snow; and a change from limb darkening to limb brightening in land and cloud surfaces. Water surfaces exhibit limb brightening at all SZAs.

  15. Atomic Scale Flatness of Chemically Cleaned Silicon Surfaces Studied by Infrared Attenuated-Total-Reflection Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawara, Kenichi; Yasaka, Tatsuhiro; Miyazaki, Seiichi; Hirose, Masataka

    1992-07-01

    Hydrogen-terminated Si(111) and Si(100) surfaces obtained by aqueous HF or pH-modified (pH{=}5.3) buffered-HF (BHF) treatments have been characterized by a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) attenuated-total-reflection (ATR) technique. The BHF treatment provides better surface flatness than the HF treatment. Pure water rinse is effective for improving the Si(111) surface flatness, while this is not the case for Si(100) because the pure water acts as an alkaline etchant and promotes the formation of (111) microfacets or microdefects on the (100) surface.

  16. The geometrical-optics law of reflection for electromagnetic waves in magnetically confined plasmas: Specular reflection of rays at the last closed flux surface

    SciTech Connect

    Bizarro, Joao P. S.

    2010-10-15

    Within the geometrical-optics approximation, it is shown that the reflection of rays describing the propagation of electromagnetic waves in fusion-grade, magnetically confined plasmas and impinging on the last closed flux surface, or plasma surface, is necessarily specular or mirror-like. More precisely, the component of the wave vector tangential to that surface does not change, whereas the component normal to it reverses its sign while keeping its magnitude. The well-known law of reflection, stating that the angle of incidence equals that of reflection, is thus generalized to anisotropic media.

  17. Smectic order induced at homeotropically aligned nematic surfaces: a neutron reflection study.

    PubMed

    Lau, Y G J; Richardson, Robert M; Cubitt, R

    2006-06-21

    Neutron reflection was used to measure the buildup of layers at a solid surface as the smectic phase is approached from higher temperatures in a nematic liquid crystal. The liquid crystal was 4-octyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (8CB), and the solid was silicon with one of five different surface treatments that induce homeotropic alignment: (i) silicon oxide; (ii) a cetyltrimethylammonium bromide coating; (iii) an octadecyltrichlorosilane monolayer; (iv) an n-n-dimethyl-n-octadecyl-3- aminopropyltrimethyloxysilyl chloride monolayer; and (v) a lecithin coating. The development of surface smectic layers in the nematic phase of 8CB was followed by measuring specular reflectivity and monitoring the pseudo-Bragg peak from the layers. The scattering data were processed to remove the scattering from short-ranged smecticlike fluctuations in the bulk nematic phase from the specular reflection. The pseudo-Bragg peak at scattering vector Q approximately 0.2 A(-1) therefore corresponded to the formation of long-range smectic layers at the surface. The amplitude of the smectic density wave decayed with increasing distance from the surface, and the characteristic thickness of this smectic region diverged as the transition temperature was approached. It was found that the characteristic thickness for some of the surface treatments was greater than the correlation length in the bulk nematic. The different surfaces gave different values of the smectic order parameter at the surface. This suggests that the interaction with the surface is significantly different from a "hard wall" which would give the same values of the smectic order parameter and penetration depths similar to the bulk correlation length. Comparison of the different surfaces also suggested that the strength and range of the surface smectic ordering may be varied independently. PMID:16821956

  18. Angular distributions of surface produced H{sup −} ions for reflection and desorption processes

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, M. Kasuya, T.; Kenmotsu, T.; Sasao, M.

    2014-02-15

    A numerical simulation code, Atomic Collision in Amorphous Target, has been run to clarify the effects due to the incident angle of hydrogen flux onto surface collision cascade in the subsurface region of a Cs covered Mo plasma grid. The code has taken into account the threshold energy for negative hydrogen (H{sup −}) ions to leave the surface. This modification has caused the shift of energy distribution functions of H{sup −} from that of hydrogen atoms leaving the surface. The results have shown that large incident angle of hydrogen particle tilt the angular distribution of reflection component, while it caused a small effect onto the angular distribution of desorption component. The reflection coefficient has increased, while the desorption yield has decreased for increased angle of incidence measured from the surface normal.

  19. Surface characteristics of Venus derived from Pioneer Venus altimetry, roughness, and reflectivity measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Head, J. W., III; Peterfreund, A. R.; Garvin, J. B.; Zisk, S. H.

    1985-01-01

    Pioneer Venus data sets for global topography, surface roughness, and reflectivity are analyzed, and the geological significance of some of the distinctive surface types is locally calibrated by examining high-resolution images from the Venera lander spacecraft and the Arecibo Observatory. Regional rock and bedrock surfaces are found to cover the majority of the planet. The relatively smooth rock and bedrock surfaces probably represent lava flows. Porous and unconsolidated fine materials cover less than about 27 percent of the surface. The distribution of soil surfaces indicate that they are the result of local weathering and small amounts of lateral transport. Several hypotheses for the origin of the high-dielectric materials which cover a small portion of the surface are discussed.

  20. [Study on exploring for oil and gas using reflectance spectra of surface soils].

    PubMed

    Xu, Da-qi; Ni, Guo-qiang; Shen, Yuan-ting; He, Jin-ping; Jiang, Li-li

    2007-03-01

    Reflectance spectra in the visible and near-infrared wavelength region provide a rapid and inexpensive means for determining the mineralogy of samples and obtaining information on chemical composition. Hydrocarbon microseepage theory sets up a cause-and-effect relation between oil and gas reservoirs and some special surface alterations. Therefore the authors can explore for oil and gas by determining the reflectance spectra of surface alterations. This determination can be fulfilled by means of field work and hyperspectral remote sensing. In the present paper, firstly a macroscopical feature of reflectance spectra of typical observation points in gas fields is presented. Then a method is proposed in order to provide surface distribution information (e.g., classification) of alterations based on the reflectance spectra determined from the field, and obtain anomaly zones of the special alterations. This method has been applied to the analysis of the reflectance spectra determined in the field of Qinghai X X area, and the classification results tally with the existent gas fields in this area. A robustness analysis of the method shows that good results can be obtained when different combinations of parameters, such as samples, study band regions and thresholds, have been chosen in the process of classification. The valid classification samples and algorithms can be provided for the oil and gas exploration in progress in this area using NASA experimental hyperion hyperspectral satellite. PMID:17554913

  1. Remote sensing of solar radiation absorbed and reflected by vegetated land surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myneni, Ranga B.; Asrar, Ghassem; Tanre, Didier; Choudhury, Bhaskar J.

    1992-01-01

    1D and 3D radiative-transfer models have been used to investigate the problem of remotely sensed determination of vegetated land surface-absorbed and reflected solar radiation. Calculations were conducted for various illumination conditions to determine surface albedo, soil- and canopy-absorbed photosynthetically active and nonactive radiation, and normalized difference vegetation index. Simple predictive models are developed on the basis of the relationships among these parameters.

  2. Reconstructing surface wave profiles from reflected acoustic pulses using multiple receivers.

    PubMed

    Walstead, Sean P; Deane, Grant B

    2014-08-01

    Surface wave shapes are determined by analyzing underwater reflected acoustic signals collected at multiple receivers. The transmitted signals are of nominal frequency 300 kHz and are reflected off surface gravity waves that are paddle-generated in a wave tank. An inverse processing algorithm reconstructs 50 surface wave shapes over a length span of 2.10 m. The inverse scheme uses a broadband forward scattering model based on Kirchhoff's diffraction formula to determine wave shapes. The surface reconstruction algorithm is self-starting in that source and receiver geometry and initial estimates of wave shape are determined from the same acoustic signals used in the inverse processing. A high speed camera provides ground-truth measurements of the surface wave field for comparison with the acoustically derived surface waves. Within Fresnel zone regions the statistical confidence of the inversely optimized surface profile exceeds that of the camera profile. Reconstructed surfaces are accurate to a resolution of about a quarter-wavelength of the acoustic pulse only within Fresnel zones associated with each source and receiver pair. Multiple isolated Fresnel zones from multiple receivers extend the spatial extent of accurate surface reconstruction while overlapping Fresnel zones increase confidence in the optimized profiles there. PMID:25096095

  3. Oxidation-resistant reflective surfaces for solar dynamic power generation in near Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulino, D. A.; Mgf2, Sio2, Al2o3, and si3n4, we

    1986-01-01

    Reflective surfaces for space station power generation systems are required to withstand the atomic oxygen-dominated environment of near Earth orbit. Thin films of platinum and rhodium, which are corrosion resistant reflective metals, have been deposited by ion beam sputter deposition onto various substrate materials. Solar reflectances were then measured as a function of time of exposure to a RF-generated air plasma. Similarly, various protective coating materials, including MgF2, SiO2, Al2O3, and Si3N4, were deposited onto silver-coated substrates and then exposed to the plasma. Analysis of the films both before and after exposure by both ESCA and Auger spectroscopy was also performed. The results indicate that Pt and Rh do not suffer any loss in reflectance over the duration of the tests. Also, each of the coating materials survived the plasma environment. The ESCA and Auger analyses are discussed as well.

  4. Software simulator for design and optimization of the kaleidoscopes for the surface reflectance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havran, Vlastimil; Bittner, Jiří; Čáp, Jiří; Hošek, Jan; Macúchová, Karolina; Němcová, Šárka

    2015-01-01

    Realistic reproduction of appearance of real-world materials by means of computer graphics requires accurate measurement and reconstruction of surface reflectance properties. We propose an interactive software simulation tool for modeling properties of a kaleidoscopic optical system for surface reflectance measurement. We use ray tracing to obtain fine grain simulation results corresponding to the resolution of a simulated image sensor and computing the reflections inside this system based on planar mirrors. We allow for a simulation of different geometric configurations of a kaleidoscope such as the number of mirrors, the length, and the taper angle. For accelerating the computation and delivering interactivity we use parallel processing of large groups of rays. Apart from the interactive mode our tool also features batch optimization suitable for automatic search for optimized kaleidoscope designs. We discuss the possibilities of the simulation and present some preliminary results obtained by using it in practice.

  5. A transmit/reflect switchable frequency selective surface based on all dielectric metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Fei; Wang, Jun; Wang, Jiafu; Ma, Hua; Du, Hongliang; Zhuo, Xu; Qu, Shaobo

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel transmit/reflect switchable frequency selective surface (FSS) in millimeter wave band based on the effective medium theory under quasi-static limit, which is designed with square-hole elements cut from continuum dielectric plates. The building elements of the surface are composed of all dielectric metamaterial rather than metal material. With proper structural design and parameters tuning, the resonance frequencies can be tuned appropriately. The frequency response of the surface can be switched from that of a reflecting structure to a transmitting one by rotating the surface 90°, which means under different incident polarizations. The reflective response can be realized due to the effect of electric and magnetic resonances. Theoretical analysis shows that the reflective response arises from impedance mismatching by electric and magnetic resonances. And the transmitting response is the left-handed passband, arises from the coupling of the electric and magnetic resonances. In addition, effective electromagnetic parameters and the dynamic induced field distributions are analyzed to explain the mechanism of the responses. The method can also be used to design switchable all-dielectric FSS with continuum structures in other frequencies.

  6. Hyperspectral surface reflectance data detect low moisture status of pecan orchards during flood irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For large fields, remote sensing might permit plant low moisture status to be detected early, and this may improve drought detection and monitoring. The objective of this study was to determine whether canopy and soil surface reflectance data derived from a handheld spectroradiometer can detect mois...

  7. Correlation between x-ray reflectivity measurements and surface roughness of AXAF coated witness samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Anna M.; Bruni, Ricardo J.; Romaine, Suzanne E.; Schwartz, Daniel A.; van Speybroeck, Leon P.; Yip, P. W.; Drehman, A. J.; Shapiro, Alan P.

    1996-07-01

    One of the specifications used to polish the AXAF witness samples was that the rms surface roughness be reflectivity of the surfaces. In particular, the reflectivity data from the AXAF flight optic witness samples indicate sample to sample differences of a few percent which do not correlate with the optical profilometry results for these samples. Further investigations were carried out to measure rms surface roughness using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The differences shown by AFM surface roughness measurements correlates to differences found in reflectivity for these same samples. One-dimensional power spectral density data is presented from both AFM and WYKO measurements along with the reflectivity results at 8 keV for the AXAF witness samples. The results indicate that to obtain accurate prediction of x-ray performance it is necessary to look at the scanning probe metrology data provided by the AFM, in addition to the optical profilometry data.

  8. An Undergraduate Experiment to Measure the Reflectances of a Dielectric Surface

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Driver, H. S. T.

    1978-01-01

    Describes an experiment for the measurement of the reflectances of dielectric surface. The experiment is analyzed in terms of the Stokes parameters and the Mueller calculus, and Malus law is derived. The experiment also provides an introduction to the properties of real linear polarizers. (Author/GA)

  9. A Cylindrical Microlens With An Internally Reflective Surface And A Method Of Fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Beach, Raymond J.; Freitas, Barry L.

    2005-09-27

    A fast (high numerical aperture) cylindrical microlens, which includes an internally reflective surface, that functions to deviate the direction of the light that enters the lens from its original propagation direction is employed in optically conditioning laser diodes, laser diode arrays and laser diode bars.

  10. Cylindrical microlens with an internally reflecting surface and a method of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Beach, Raymond J.; Freitas, Barry L.

    2004-03-23

    A fast (high numerical aperture) cylindrical microlens, which includes an internally reflective surface, that functions to deviate the direction of the light that enters the lens from its original propagation direction is employed in optically conditioning laser diodes, laser diode arrays and laser diode bars.

  11. Observations of Reflectivity of the Martian Surface in the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanov, Anton B.; Muhleman, Duane O.

    2000-01-01

    We are presenting results of calculation of the surface albedo of Mars at 1 micron wavelength from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) reflectivity measurements. The Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (MGS TES) 9 micron opacity is employed to remove opacity from the MOLA measurements.

  12. Wavelength Identification and Diffuse Reflectance Estimation for Surface and Profile Soil Properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Optical diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) has been used to estimate soil physical and chemical properties, but much of the previous work has been limited to surface soils or to samples obtained from a restricted geographic area. Our objectives in this research were (1) to assess the accuracy of...

  13. Cryogenic Infrared Reflectance Spectra of Organic Ices and Their Relevance to the Surface Composition of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curchin, John; Clark, R. N.; Hoefen, T. M.

    2006-09-01

    In order to properly interpret reflectance spectra of Titan's surface, laboratory spectra of candidate materials for comparative analysis is needed. Although the common cosmochemical species (H2O, CO2, CO, NH3, and CH4) are well represented in the spectroscopic literature, comparatively little reflectance work has been done on organics at cryotemperatures at visible to near infrared wavelengths. Measurement of reflectance is required for characterizing weak features not seen in transmittance. Such features may be important in remote sensing of planetary surfaces. The USGS Spectroscopy Laboratory uses Nicolet FT-IR and ASD field spectrometers in combination with cryogenic chambers to acquire reflectance spectra of organic ices at approximately 80-90 ºK in a wavelength range of 0.35 to 15.5 microns. This region encompasses the fundamental absorptions and many overtones and combinations of major organic molecules including those with hydrogen-carbon, carbon-carbon (single, double and triple bonds), carbon-oxygen, oxygen-hydrogen, carbon-nitrogen, and nitrogen-hydrogen bonds. Because most organic compounds belong to families with similar structure and composition, individual species identification within a narrow wavelength range may be ambiguous. Only by measuring spectral reflectance of the pure laboratory ices from the visible through the near and mid-infrared can absorption bands unique to each be observed, cataloged and compared to planetary reflectance data. We present here spectra of organic ices belonging to eight families, the alkanes, cycloalkanes, alkenes, alkynes, aromatics, nitriles, amines, and cyanides. Many of these compounds are predicted to coat the surface of Titan and indeed, a number of atmospheric windows, particularly at 5 microns, have allowed their identification with VIMS (Clark et al., DPS 2006, this volume). The spectral properties of these materials have applications to other solar system surfaces and remote sensing of terrestrial

  14. Absolute height measurement of specular surfaces with modified active fringe reflection photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hongyu; Jiang, Xiangqian; Gao, Feng; Zhang, Zonghua

    2014-07-01

    Deflectometric methods have been studied for more than a decade for slope measurement of specular freeform surfaces through utilization of the deformation of a sample pattern after reflection from a tested sample surface. Usually, these approaches require two-directional fringe patterns to be projected on a LCD screen or ground glass and require slope integration, which leads to some complexity for the whole measuring process. This paper proposes a new mathematical measurement model for measuring topography information of freeform specular surfaces, which integrates a virtual reference specular surface into the method of active fringe reflection photogrammetry and presents a straight-forward relation between height of the tested surface and phase signals. This method only requires one direction of horizontal or vertical sinusoidal fringe patterns to be projected from a LCD screen, resulting in a significant reduction in capture time over established methods. Assuming the whole system has been precalibrated during the measurement process, the fringe patterns are captured separately via the virtual reference and detected freeform surfaces by a CCD camera. The reference phase can be solved according to the spatial geometric relation between the LCD screen and the CCD camera. The captured phases can be unwrapped with a heterodyne technique and optimum frequency selection method. Based on this calculated unwrapped-phase and that proposed mathematical model, absolute height of the inspected surface can be computed. Simulated and experimental results show that this methodology can conveniently calculate topography information for freeform and structured specular surfaces without integration and reconstruction processes.

  15. Tracking daily land surface albedo and reflectance anisotropy with moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuai, Yanmin

    A new algorithm provides daily values of land surface albedo and angular reflectance at a 500-m spatial resolution using data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments currently in orbit on NASA's Terra and Aqua satellite platforms. To overcome the day-to-day variance in observed surface reflectance induced by differences in view and solar illumination angles, the algorithm uses the RossThickLiSparse-Reciprocal bidirectional reflectance model, which is fitted to all MODIS observations of a 500-m resolution cell acquired during a 16-day moving window. Individual observations are weighted by their quality, observation coverage, and proximity to the production date of interest. Product quality is measured by (1) the root mean square error (RMSE) of observations against the best model fit; and (2) the ability of the angular sampling pattern of the observations at hand to determine reflectance model parameters accurately. A regional analysis of model fits to data from selected MODIS data tiles establishes the bounds of these quality measures for application in the daily algorithm. The algorithm, which is now available to users of direct broadcast satellite data from MODIS, allows daily monitoring of rapid surface radiation and land surface change phenomena such as crop development and forest foliage cycles. In two demonstrations, the daily algorithm captured rapid change in plant phenology. The growth phases of a winter wheat crop, as monitored at the Yucheng agricultural research station in Yucheng, China, matched MODIS daily multispectral reflectance data very well, especially during the flowering and heading stages. The daily algorithm also captured the daily change in autumn leaf color in New England, documenting the ability of the algorithm to work well over large regions with varying degrees of cloud cover and atmospheric conditions. Daily surface albedos measured using ground-based instruments on towers at the agricultural and

  16. Effect of surface topography on reflection electron energy loss plasmon spectra of group III metals

    SciTech Connect

    Strawbridge, B.; Singh, R. K.; Beach, C.; Mahajan, S.; Newman, N.

    2006-09-15

    In situ reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy (REELS) and reflection high energy electron diffraction employing a 20 keV electron beam at a 2 deg. grazing angle were used to characterize the surface properties of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown Al, Ga, and In metals on silicon and sapphire substrates. In our study we found that the surface topography strongly influences the REELS plasmon spectra. Smooth Al films with <1 nm rms roughness exhibited surface plasmon peaks. Both surface and bulk plasmons are seen from an Al film with a rms roughness of 3.5 nm. Aluminum surfaces with >5 nm rms roughness yielded only bulk plasmon peaks. To understand the EELS spectrum for the Ga and In films, the rms roughness alone is not the relevant figure of merit as the electron beam interaction with the surface is influenced most by the shape of the tops of the surface grains and the grain size. Indium films on Si with a rms roughness of 52 nm were found to excite predominantly surface plasmons as the grazing angle electron beam scattered mostly off the flat top surface of each grain and was not strongly influenced by the crevices between the grains. The rounded tops of the Ga topography with 31 nm rms roughness facilitated transmission through the grains and therefore excited a combination of bulk and surface plasmons. This experimental method is very surface sensitive, as a probe depth of 0.8 nm was inferred from the diminishing intensity of the substrate peak with increasing coverage of a flat metal surface. The techniques and methods discussed here can be readily applied to other thin film systems such as MBE-grown III-V semiconductors, sputtered oxides, and other vacuum deposited materials.

  17. A facile method for preparing highly conductive and reflective surface-silvered polyimide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yuan; Cao, Bing; Wang, Wen-Cai; Zhang, Liqun; Wu, Dezhen; Jin, Riguang

    2009-07-01

    A novel method was developed for the preparation of reflective and electrically conductive surface-silvered polyimide (PI) films. The polyimide films were functionalized with poly(dopamine), simply by dipping the PI films into aqueous dopamine solution and mildly stirring at room temperature. Electroless plating of silver was readily carried out on the poly(dopamine) deposited PI (PI-DOPA) surface. The surface compositions of the modified PI films were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XPS results show that the PI-DOPA surfaces were successfully deposited with ploy(dopamine) and were ready for electroless deposition of silver. The poly(dopamine) layer was used not only as the chemi-sorption sites for silver particles during the electroless plating of silver, but also as an adhesion promotion layer for the electrolessly deposited silver. The as-prepared silvered PI films show high conductivity and reflectivity, with a surface resistance of 1.5 Ω and a reflectivity of 95%, respectively.

  18. Lunar surface remanent magnetic fields detected by the electron reflection method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.; Anderson, K. A.; Bush, R.; Mcguire, R. E.; Mccoy, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    We present maps of the lunar surface remanent magnetic fields detected by the electron reflection method. These maps provide substantial coverage of the latitude band from 30 N southward to 30 S with a resolution of about 40 km and a sensitivity of about 0.2 gamma at the lunar surface. Regions of remanent magnetization are observed ranging in size from the resolution limit of 1.25 deg to above approximately 60 deg. The largest contiguous region fills the Big Backside Basin where it is intersected by the spacecraft orbital tracks. Preliminary analyses of the maps show that the source regions of lunar limb compressions correspond to regions of strong surface magnetism, and that there does not appear to be sharply discontinuous magnetization at the edges of maria. We also analyze the electron reflection observations to obtain information on the direction and distribution of magnetization in the Van de Graaff anomaly region.

  19. Reflective optical probing of laser-driven plasmas at the rear surface of solid targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzkes, J.; Zeil, K.; Kraft, S. D.; Rehwald, M.; Cowan, T. E.; Schramm, U.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a reflective optical pump-probe technique for laser-driven plasmas at solid density target surfaces is presented. The technique is termed high depth-of-field time-resolved microscopy and it exploits the angular redistribution of the probe beam intensity after the probe’s reflection from an expanded and hence non-planar iso-density surface in the plasma. The main application of the robust technique, which uses simple imaging of the probe beam, is the spatio-temporal resolution of the plasma formation and expansion at the target rear surface. Analytic and numerical modeling of the experimental setup are applied for the analysis of the experimental results. The relevance and potential of the optical plasma probing method is highlighted by the application to targets of different geometries, helping to understand the target shape-related differences in the ion acceleration performance.

  20. Reflection of an internal gravity wave beam off a horizontal free-slip surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qi; Diamessis, Peter J.

    2013-03-01

    The reflection of a planar finite-amplitude internal gravity wave beam off a free-slip flat horizontal surface is investigated numerically in a uniformly stratified Boussinesq fluid. Nonlinear effects such as mean currents and harmonics are observed in the wave reflection zone. Mean currents form a stationary, vertically oscillatory, layered structure under the free-slip reflecting surface. The vertical wavelength of the mean-flow layers equals half of the vertical wavelength of the reflecting wave. An empirical predictive model for the steady-state mean flow strength, based on the degree of wave nonlinearity and hydrostaticity, is proposed and subsequently compared to the weakly nonlinear theory by Tabaei et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 526, 217-243 (2005), 10.1017/S0022112004002769]. Very strong agreement between simulation results and theory is observed for all waves considered, suggesting although weakly nonlinear in its formulation, the Tabaei et al. theory is valid for the full range of finite amplitudes for which a wave remains stable. Both propagating and evanescent superharmonics are observed, and for waves with steepnesses of O(5%), parametric subharmonic instabilities can occur in the later stages of the reflection process. When a subsurface mixed layer is incorporated into the simulations, the mean currents at the middle of the underlying pycnocline are similar in structure and magnitude to their uniformly-stratified counterparts.

  1. Aerosol Optical Retrieval and Surface Reflectance from Airborne Remote Sensing Data over Land

    PubMed Central

    Bassani, Cristiana; Cavalli, Rosa Maria; Pignatti, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of atmospheric optical properties and surface reflectance can be performed by applying radiative transfer theory in the Atmosphere-Earth coupled system, for the atmospheric correction of hyperspectral remote sensing data. This paper describes a new physically-based algorithm to retrieve the aerosol optical thickness at 550nm (τ550) and the surface reflectance (ρ) from airborne acquired data in the atmospheric window of the Visible and Near-Infrared (VNIR) range. The algorithm is realized in two modules. Module A retrieves τ550 with a minimization algorithm, then Module B retrieves the surface reflectance ρ for each pixel of the image. The method was tested on five remote sensing images acquired by an airborne sensor under different geometric conditions to evaluate the reliability of the method. The results, τ550 and ρ, retrieved from each image were validated with field data contemporaneously acquired by a sun-sky radiometer and a spectroradiometer, respectively. Good correlation index, r, and low root mean square deviations, RMSD, were obtained for the τ550 retrieved by Module A (r2 = 0.75, RMSD = 0.08) and the ρ retrieved by Module B (r2 ≤ 0.9, RMSD ≤ 0.003). Overall, the results are encouraging, indicating that the method is reliable for optical atmospheric studies and the atmospheric correction of airborne hyperspectral images. The method does not require additional at-ground measurements about at-ground reflectance of the reference pixel and aerosol optical thickness. PMID:22163558

  2. Geometric and variational methods in optical design of reflecting surfaces with prescribed irradiance properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliker, Vladimir

    2005-08-01

    Numerous optical and electromagnetic applications require numerical design of reflecting surfaces in 3D with capabilities to redirect the input energy flow and reshape the energy radiation intensity of a source into a prescribed output irradiance distribution over a specified target surface. In the geometrical optics approximation, a systematic application of the ray tracing equations and energy conservation law reduces the problem, in many cases, to finding numerical solutions to nonlinear, second order partial differential equations. If the severe limitation of rotational symmetry is not assumed then the resulting equations are very far from being standard and require significant efforts for their theoretical investigation and reliable numerical solution. In recent years a quite general approach combining geometric techniques with methods from calculus of variations has been developed and applied to a rigorous and unified investigation of several classes of such equations. Moreover, this approach allows implementations in provably convergent numerical algorithms. In this paper I outline this approach in the problem of designing a reflecting surface capable of redirecting the energy flow from a point source so that the reflected rays have directions specified in advance as a subset on the far-sphere and the output irradiance density is also pre-specified in advance as a function of the reflected direction. A numerical example illustrating the solution is also presented.

  3. Aerosol optical retrieval and surface reflectance from airborne remote sensing data over land.

    PubMed

    Bassani, Cristiana; Cavalli, Rosa Maria; Pignatti, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of atmospheric optical properties and surface reflectance can be performed by applying radiative transfer theory in the Atmosphere-Earth coupled system, for the atmospheric correction of hyperspectral remote sensing data. This paper describes a new physically-based algorithm to retrieve the aerosol optical thickness at 550 nm (τ(550)) and the surface reflectance (ρ) from airborne acquired data in the atmospheric window of the Visible and Near-Infrared (VNIR) range. The algorithm is realized in two modules. Module A retrieves τ(550) with a minimization algorithm, then Module B retrieves the surface reflectance ρ for each pixel of the image. The method was tested on five remote sensing images acquired by an airborne sensor under different geometric conditions to evaluate the reliability of the method. The results, τ(550) and ρ, retrieved from each image were validated with field data contemporaneously acquired by a sun-sky radiometer and a spectroradiometer, respectively. Good correlation index, r, and low root mean square deviations, RMSD, were obtained for the τ(550) retrieved by Module A (r(2) = 0.75, RMSD = 0.08) and the ρ retrieved by Module B (r(2) ≤ 0.9, RMSD ≤ 0.003). Overall, the results are encouraging, indicating that the method is reliable for optical atmospheric studies and the atmospheric correction of airborne hyperspectral images. The method does not require additional at-ground measurements about at-ground reflectance of the reference pixel and aerosol optical thickness. PMID:22163558

  4. [Quantitative analysis of surface composition of polypropylene blends using attenuated total reflectance FTIR spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Chen, Han-jia; Zhu, Ya-fei; Zhang, Yi; Xu, Jia-rui

    2008-08-01

    The surface composition and structure of solid organic polymers influence many of their properties and applications. Oligomers such as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) poly(butyl methacrylate) (PBMA) and their graft copolymers of polybutadiene and polypropylene were used as the macromolecular surface modifiers of polypropylene. The compositions on surface and in bulk of the polypropylene (PP) blends were determined quantitatively using attenuated total reflectance FTIR spectroscopic (ATR-FTIR) technique with a variable-angle multiple-reflection ATR accessory and FTIR measurements, respectively. By validating by Lambert-Beer law, 1103 and 1733 cm(-1) can be used to represent modifiers characteristic absorbance band to determine quantitatively the surface composition of modifiers including poly(ethylene glycol) and carbonyl segment in PP blends, respectively. The determination error can be effectively eliminated by calibrating wavelength and using absorption peak area ratio as the calibrating basis for the quantitative analysis. To minimize the effect of contact between the polymer film and the internal reflection element on the results of absolute absorbance, the technique of "band ratioing" was developed, and it was testified that the error of the peak area ratios of interest can be reduced to 5% or below, which was suitable for ATR-FTIR used as a determining quantitative tool for surface composition. The working curves were then established and used to calculate the composition of the responding functional groups in the film surface of the PP blends. The depth distribution of modifiers on the surface of blend films also can be determined by changing the incident angle of interest on the basis of the equation of the depth of penetration of the excursion wave in ATR spectra. The results indicated that ATR-FTIR can be used to determine quantitatively the surface composition and distribution of modifiers with reproducible and reliable

  5. Direct observation of surface plasmons in YBCO by attenuated total reflection of light in the infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walmsley, D. G.; Smyth, C. C.; Sellai, A.; McCafferty, P. G.; Dawson, P.; Morrow, T.; Graham, W. G.

    1994-02-01

    Surface plasmons have been observed directly in YBCO films in an Otto-geometry attenuated total reflection measurement at a wavelength of 3.392 μm. The laser deposited films are c-axis oriented on an MgO substrate. This observation confirms theoretical deductions from complex dielectric function data. Measured data have been fitted to a theoretical model and are compared with the optical constants determined by Bozovic [1]. The investigations have been extended to films with other orientations to investigate whether material anisotropy is reflected in the results and non-metallic behaviour is found.

  6. [A Method to Reconstruct Surface Reflectance Spectrum from Multispectral Image Based on Canopy Radiation Transfer Model].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong-guang; Ma, Ling-ling; Li, Chuan-rong; Zhu, Xiao-hua; Tang, Ling-li

    2015-07-01

    Due to the lack of enough spectral bands for multi-spectral sensor, it is difficult to reconstruct surface retlectance spectrum from finite spectral information acquired by multi-spectral instrument. Here, taking into full account of the heterogeneity of pixel from remote sensing image, a method is proposed to simulate hyperspectral data from multispectral data based on canopy radiation transfer model. This method first assumes the mixed pixels contain two types of land cover, i.e., vegetation and soil. The sensitive parameters of Soil-Leaf-Canopy (SLC) model and a soil ratio factor were retrieved from multi-spectral data based on Look-Up Table (LUT) technology. Then, by combined with a soil ratio factor, all the parameters were input into the SLC model to simulate the surface reflectance spectrum from 400 to 2 400 nm. Taking Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) image as reference image, the surface reflectance spectrum was simulated. The simulated reflectance spectrum revealed different feature information of different surface types. To test the performance of this method, the simulated reflectance spectrum was convolved with the Landsat ETM + spectral response curves and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) spectral response curves to obtain the simulated Landsat ETM+ and MODIS image. Finally, the simulated Landsat ETM+ and MODIS images were compared with the observed Landsat ETM+ and MODIS images. The results generally showed high correction coefficients (Landsat: 0.90-0.99, MODIS: 0.74-0.85) between most simulated bands and observed bands and indicated that the simulated reflectance spectrum was well simulated and reliable. PMID:26717721

  7. Molecular contamination effects on the thermal emittance of highly reflective surfaces at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chien W.

    2002-09-01

    For contamination effects on thermal control surfaces, changes in solar absorptance are the effect noted. Emittance of the surface is not normally affected. The SIRTF (Space InfraRed Telescope Facility) and NGST (Next Generation Space Telescope) spacecraft will fly large low emissivity surfaces (e.g. aluminized Kapton shields and gold mirrors). During the orbital missions, these surfaces will not be exposed to the sun and will be at temperatures less than 150 K. Concern is that a thick molecular film, even water, will cause a change in emittance and results in affecting the thermal performance primarily controlled by emittance alone. Although an emphasis will be placed upon examining the effects on thermal performance for low emissivity surfaces, the effects on optical performance will also be examined because changes of the optical characteristics such as reflectance and scattering are of greater concern for the NGST mission.

  8. Time dependent changes in extreme ultraviolet reflectivity of Ru mirrors from electron-induced surface chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanjilal, A.; Catalfano, M.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.; Rice, B.

    2012-03-01

    Time dependent changes in 13.5 nm extreme ultraviolet (EUV) reflectivity of Ru mirrors due to variations in surface composition were investigated. The surface properties of Ru films were analyzed in situ by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and further verified by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Moreover, the impact on EUV reflectivity (EUVR) with time was examined in situ via continuous and/or discrete EUV exposures. The rapid decrease in EUVR was observed in the presence of photoelectrons (PEs) from Ru mirror of the EUV setup, whereas no significant variation was recorded by screening out additional PEs. Detailed XPS and AES analyses suggest that carbon deposition via dissociation of residual hydrocarbons plays a dominant role in the presence of additional PEs, and thus reduces the reflectivity rapidly. Using EUV photoelectron spectroscopy, systematic reduction of the secondary electron yield from the Ru mirror surface was observed in consecutive scans, and therefore supports the formation of carbonaceous Ru surface in the presence of additional PEs.

  9. Radar-Reflective Minerals Tested Under Venus Near-Surface Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, E.; Chevrier, V.; Johnson, N.; Lacy, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    Radar mapping of the surface of Venus shows areas of high reflectivity (low emissivity) in the Venusian highlands at altitudes between 2.5-4.75 kilometers. The origin of the radar anomalies found in the highlands remains unclear. Previous theoretical studies suggest increased surface roughness or materials with higher dielectric constants as well as surface-atmospheric interactions. This work intends to experimentally constrain the source of the radar anomalies on Venus. Primarily, the suggested explanations for these radar-bright regions involve a reaction between volatiles in the atmosphere and rocks/minerals on the surface. Thus, possible materials that could potentially cause the high reflectivities on the surface of Venus are investigated and their behavior tested under simulated Venusian atmospheric and surface conditions, with special emphasis on the combined effect of pressure and temperature, and chemical composition. Stability experiments were conducted in the Venus simulation chamber at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center. Several minerals thought to exist on Venus were tested including bismuthinite (Bi2S3), tellurobismuthite (Bi2Te3), tellurium (Te), coloradoite (HgTe), and pyrite (FeS2). One gram of each sample was heated in the chamber to average Venusian surface conditions, and separately to highland conditions (460°C and 90 bar, 380°C and 55 bar, respectively) under a simulated Venusian atmosphere of 96.5% CO2, 3.5% N2 and 150 ppm SO2. After each run, the samples were weighed and then analyzed using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Ongoing experiments show several minerals are of potential interest due to their stability at highland conditions where the anomalies are observed. These minerals would exhibit a higher dielectric value than the surrounding basalts, creating a higher radar reflectivity in those regions and potentially being the source of the Venusian radar anomalies.

  10. An effective medium study of surface plasmon polaritons in nanostructured gratings using attenuated total reflection

    SciTech Connect

    Tyboroski, M. H.; Anderson, N. R.; Camley, R. E.

    2014-01-07

    Recent work studied surface plasmon resonances in structured materials by the method of attenuated total reflection using a prism on top of a metallic grating. That calculation considered Transverse Magnetic polarized radiation, involved an expansion in 121 Fourier modes, and found a number of interesting features. Many of these features were attributed to localized plasmons or other factors, which arise from a discrete structure. We use a simple effective medium theory to address the same problem, and find many of the same reflection features observed in the more complex calculation, indicating that localization is not an important factor. We also evaluate the possibility of using some of the new features in the reflection spectrum for bio-sensing and find that the sensitivity of the system to small changes in relative permittivity is increased compared to some standard methods.

  11. Self-consistent approach to x-ray reflection from rough surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Feranchuk, I. D.; Feranchuk, S. I.; Ulyanenkov, A. P.

    2007-02-15

    A self-consistent analytical approach for specular x-ray reflection from interfaces with transition layers [I. D. Feranchuk et al., Phys. Rev. B 67, 235417 (2003)] based on the distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA) is used for the description of coherent and incoherent x-ray scattering from rough surfaces and interfaces. This approach takes into account the transformation of the modeling transition layer profile at the interface, which is caused by roughness correlations. The reflection coefficients for each DWBA order are directly calculated without phenomenological assumptions on their exponential decay at large scattering angles. Various regions of scattering angles are discussed, which show qualitatively different dependence of the reflection coefficient on the scattering angle. The experimental data are analyzed using the method developed.

  12. Measuring and modeling near-surface reflected and emitted radiation fluxes at the FIFE site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blad, Blaine L.; Walter-Shea, Elizabeth A.; Starks, Patrick J.; Vining, Roel C.; Hays, Cynthia J.; Mesarch, Mark A.

    1990-01-01

    Information is presented pertaining to the measurement and estimation of reflected and emitted components of the radiation balance. Information is included about reflectance and transmittance of solar radiation from and through the leaves of some grass and forb prairie species, bidirectional reflectance from a prairie canopy is discussed and measured and estimated fluxes are described of incoming and outgoing longwave and shortwave radiation. Results of the study showed only very small differences in reflectances and transmittances for the adaxial and abaxial surfaces of grass species in the visible and infrared wavebands, but some differences in the infrared wavebands were noted for the forbs. Reflectance from the prairie canopy changed as a function of solar and view zenith angles in the solar principal plane with definite asymmetry about nadir. The surface temperature of prairie canopies was found to vary by as much as 5 C depending on view zenith and azimuth position and on the solar azimuth. Aerodynamic temperature calculated from measured sensible heat fluxes ranged from 0 to 3 C higher than nadir-viewed temperatures. Models were developed to estimate incoming and reflected shortwave radiation from data collected with a Barnes Modular Multiband Radiometer. Several algorithms for estimating incoming longwave radiation were evaluated and compared to actual measures of that parameter. Net radiation was calculated using the estimated components of the shortwave radiation streams, determined from the algorithms developed, and from the longwave radiation streams provided by the Brunt, modified Deacon, and the Stefan-Boltzmann models. Estimates of net radiation were compared to measured values and found to be within the measurement error of the net radiometers used in the study.

  13. Light reflection from a rough liquid surface including wind wave effects in a scattering atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, Santo V.; Liew, S. C.

    2007-07-01

    Visible and near-IR images of the ocean surface, taken from remote satellites, often contain important information of near-surface or sub-surface processes, which occur on, or over the ocean. Remote measurements of near surface winds, sea surface temperature and salinity, ocean color and underwater bathymetry, all, one way or another, depend on how well we understand sea surface roughness. However, in order to extract useful information from our remote measurements, we need to construct accurate models of the transfer of solar radiation inside the atmosphere as well as, its reflection from the sea surface. To approach this problem, we numerically solve the radiative transfer equation (RTE) by implementing a model for the atmosphere ocean system. A one-dimensional atmospheric radiation model is solved via the widely known doubling and adding method and the ocean body is treated as a boundary condition to the problem. The ocean surface is modeled as a rough liquid surface which includes wind interaction and wave states, such as wave age. The model can have possible applications to the retrieval of wind and wave states, such as wave age, near a Sun glint region.

  14. Study of the reflectivity of neutron supermirrors influenced by surface oil layers.

    PubMed

    Veres, Tamás; Cser, László

    2010-06-01

    Neutron guides made of supermirror-coated glass are important components of most neutron scattering instruments, thus their quality and possible deterioration due to various deleterious effects (e.g., surface contamination or defects) deserve careful examination. The modification of the reflectivity of supermirrors and the transmission of neutron guides due to surface contamination with hydrocarbon oil has been investigated using neutron reflectometry together with model calculations. A significant loss in the neutron reflectivity was observed for supermirrors covered with thin hydrocarbon oil films, which were confirmed in model calculations. Simulations carried out for several typical arrangements show drastic decreases in the transmitted neutron flux of neutron guides. These simulations show that determining the distortion of the beam profile (using a slit or a pin hole) enables the detection of oil contamination even in an operating neutron guide. PMID:20590233

  15. Energy loss of MeV protons specularly reflected from metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Juaristi, J.I.

    1996-05-01

    A parameter-free model is presented to study the energy loss of fast protons specularly reflected from metal surfaces. The contributions to the energy loss from excitation of valence-band electrons and ionization of localized target-atom electronic states are calculated separately. The former is calculated from the induced surface wake potential using linear response theory and the specular-reflection model, while the latter is calculated in the first Born approximation. The results obtained are in good agreement with available experimental data. However, the experimental qualitative trend of the energy loss as a function of the angle of incidence is obtained when the valence-band electron model is replaced by localized target atom electron states, though with a worse quantitative agreement. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  16. A Metasurface Anti-reflection Coating for Enhancing Surface Plasmon-Polariton of Metallic Hole Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattarai, Khagendra; Jeon, Jiyeon; Kim, Jun; Ku, Zahyun; Lee, Sang Jun; Zhou, Jiangfeng; Usf, Usa Collaboration; Kriss, Korea Collaboration; Afrl, Usa Collaboration

    We demonstrate a metasurface made of metallic disk resonator array as an anti-reflection (AR) coating to enhance (reduce) the transmission (reflection) through metal hole array (MHA). Our result show that the simulated (measured) transmission at the first order surface plasmon-polariton (SPP) resonance is increased up to 82 %(88%) compared to uncoated MHA. The electric field of the surface wave is also enhanced by 33%. Using an effective medium theory, we show that the metasurface operates at off-resonance wavelengths and can be understood as a thin film that exhibits high effective permittivity (~30) with very low loss (loss tangent ~0.005). Thus we reveal the mechanism of the metasurface AR coating as the traditional thin film AR coating. With tunable effective permittivity, our structure provides great flexibility to achieve AR coating for general substance at any wavelength.

  17. Recent Surface Reflectance Measurement Campaigns with Emphasis on Best Practices, SI Traceability and Uncertainty Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helder, Dennis; Thome, Kurtis John; Aaron, Dave; Leigh, Larry; Czapla-Myers, Jeff; Leisso, Nathan; Biggar, Stuart; Anderson, Nik

    2012-01-01

    A significant problem facing the optical satellite calibration community is limited knowledge of the uncertainties associated with fundamental measurements, such as surface reflectance, used to derive satellite radiometric calibration estimates. In addition, it is difficult to compare the capabilities of calibration teams around the globe, which leads to differences in the estimated calibration of optical satellite sensors. This paper reports on two recent field campaigns that were designed to isolate common uncertainties within and across calibration groups, particularly with respect to ground-based surface reflectance measurements. Initial results from these efforts suggest the uncertainties can be as low as 1.5% to 2.5%. In addition, methods for improving the cross-comparison of calibration teams are suggested that can potentially reduce the differences in the calibration estimates of optical satellite sensors.

  18. Improved system calibration for specular surface measurement by using reflections from a plane mirror.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tian; Chen, Kun; Wei, Haoyun; Li, Yan

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we introduce a flexible and simple system calibration method for specular surface metrology based on the combination of reflection rays determined by the varied points on a screen and reflection images of a plane mirror without fiducials placed at three different locations. This calibration procedure involves three steps. The camera is first calibrated based on plane patterns. Then the reflection ray directions are measured via correspondence matching. The last calibration step is the pose estimation by the orthogonal iteration algorithm and reflections in a plane mirror. Basically, the concept of replacing the coordinates of the camera center with the reflection ray can alleviate the trouble of imaging aberration. Then global optimization can be operated with the orthogonal projection defined by the reflection ray, providing precise initial values for the process of bundle adjustment, compared to the classical calibration approach directly using the local optimization algorithm. Simulations and experiments both demonstrate the validity, efficiency, and robustness of the proposed improved method. In the simulations, the proposed method achieves the absolute errors of the camera parameters within 3 pixels and the relative errors of the screen pose are below 0.5% when the noise level is 0.6 pixel. Furthermore, the calibration method shows strong anti-noise ability, relying on the application of the reflection rays and the global optimization before the final bundle adjustment. In addition, the reconstruction accuracy in our experiment improves by 60.11% by the proposed method compared with the calibration procedure, which only utilizes the bundle adjustment optimization. In general, this novel calibration method can make the measurement achieve high accuracy and robustness at a low cost and with a simple setup, providing an efficient, economical, and flexible approach for a phase measuring deflectometry system in practical situations. PMID:27607278

  19. IR reflection spectra of the silicate surface layer of yellowed rice plant leaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kenzo

    1986-09-01

    We have investigated the IR reflectional properties of the three-hold cytrogical surface layer (kutchikura layer on silicate layer n(SiO2) on silicate cellulose layer C6H10SixOy) and that of chlorophyll, a(C55H72MgN4O5) etc., present in bladder's cells by using our experimental method. From analysis of three set of anisotropical reflection spectra assigned as due to CO, SiO and NC surface oscillators contained in the cytrogical cells and measured at 2500 2200 cm-1, 1200 700 cm-1 and at 700 200 cm-1 regions, we have confirmed some important results. One is their quantized directional distributions that of the numbers of fine step spectrum and that of the reflection integrals of these spectra. Here, that of the NC oscillators were found to distribute in pentagonal directions relating to the molecular structure of chlorophyll. Second, we confirmed the pecularity of eight fine step-series measured in these sensitive spectra comparing with that of bamboo's seven series. Third, from analysis of the stepnized variation of the “reflection integrals”, we estimated the origin of this effect as which is presumably due to statistical, transfer of the 2p4 valence electrons etc. in the oxygen atoms from C=O, Si=O double bonding side upto the shallower quantized states, E(N,J) which were formed softly around the MediaObjects/10762_2005_BF01012055_f1.tif and MediaObjects/10762_2005_BF01012055_f2.tif surface oscillators. And these surface oscillators were confirmed as to make photo-chemical reaction process by receiving energy higher than ˜24 m eV especially under the illumination of sunshine etc.

  20. Combined analysis of surface reflection imaging and vertical seismic profiling at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Daley, T.M.; Majer, E.L.; Karageorgi, E.

    1994-08-01

    This report presents results from surface and borehole seismic profiling performed by the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) on Yucca Mountain. This work was performed as part of the site characterization effort for the potential high-level nuclear waste repository. Their objective was to provide seismic imaging from the near surface (200 to 300 ft. depth) to the repository horizon and below, if possible. Among the issues addressed by this seismic imaging work are location and depth of fracturing and faulting, geologic identification of reflecting horizons, and spatial continuity of reflecting horizons. The authors believe their results are generally positive, with tome specific successes. This was the first attempt at this scale using modem seismic imaging techniques to determine geologic features on Yucca Mountain. The principle purpose of this report is to present the interpretation of the seismic reflection section in a geologic context. Three surface reflection profiles were acquired and processed as part of this study. Because of environmental concerns, all three lines were on preexisting roads. Line 1 crossed the mapped surface trace of the Ghost Dance fault and it was intended to study the dip and depth extent of the fault system. Line 2 was acquired along Drill Hole wash and was intended to help the ESF north ramp design activities. Line 3 was acquired along Yucca Crest and was designed to image geologic horizons which were thought to be less faulted along the ridge. Unfortunately, line 3 proved to have poor data quality, in part because of winds, poor field conditions and limited time. Their processing and interpretation efforts were focused on lines 1 and 2 and their associated VSP studies.

  1. Transitioning MODIS to VIIRS observations for Land: Surface Reflectance results, Status and Long-term Prospective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermote, E.

    2015-12-01

    Surface reflectance is one of the key products from VIIRS and as with MODIS, is used in developing several higher-order land products. The VIIRS Surface Reflectance (SR) IP is based on the heritage MODIS Collection 5 product (Vermote et al. 2002). The quality and character of surface reflectance depends on the accuracy of the VIIRS Cloud Mask (VCM) and aerosol algorithms and of course on the adequate calibration of the sensor. Early evaluation of the VIIRS SR product in the context of the maturity of the operational processing system known as the Interface Data Processing System (IDPS), has been a major focus of work to-date, but is now evolving into the development of a VIIRS suite of Climate Data Records produced by the NASA Land Science Investigator Processing System (SIPS). We will present the calibration performance and the role of the surface reflectance in calibration monitoring, the performance of the cloud mask with a focus on vegetation monitoring (no snow conditions), the performance of the aerosol input used in the atmospheric correction with quantitative results of the performance of the SR product over AERONET sites. Based on those elements and further assessment, we will address the readiness of the SR product for the production of higher-order land products such as Vegetation Indices, Albedo and LAI/FPAR, the its application to agricultural monitoring and in particular the integration of VIIRS data into the global agricultural monitoring (GLAM) system developed at UMd. Finally from the lessons learned, we will articulate a set of critical recommendations to ensure consistency and continuity of the JPSS mission with the MODIS data record.

  2. Surface contour of a biaxially strained, doubly curved antenna reflective mesh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saylor, A. V.

    1982-01-01

    The elastic membrane equations which describe the deflection of a biaxially tensioned reflective mesh from an idealized surface were developed and solved. The conditions of equilibrium of the forces acting on a membrane element furnish equations which may be used to solve a variety of problems. Configurations considered include continuous, as well as incremental mesh attachment to structural members to form shapes which are approximately parabolic or spherical.

  3. Reflection of polarized light by rough surfaces: Monte Carlo modeling compared to measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guirado, Daniel; Marcos Sanz, Juan; María Saiz, José; Muñoz, Olga; Stam, Daphne M.

    2013-04-01

    A Monte Carlo model of light scattering in a dense medium was developed in order to simulate the reflection of polarized light by rough surfaces [1]. This model calculates all four Stokes parameters of light scattered in all directions by a surface made of any material. Although multiple scattering is allowed, there is a limitation in the packing density of the medium, as independent scattering is assumed. The model can be applied to the study of light scattering by fluffy icy/dusty surfaces, e.g., various types of planetary or lunar regolith-type surfaces, icy moons or comets. The main goal of this work is to test the model by comparing scattering matrix elements calculated with the Monte Carlo model to experimentally measured scattering matrix elements as functions of the phase angle. We use a Sahara sand surface for this. The experimental scattering matrix is measured at the new apparatus developed at the University of Cantabria (Spain) [2]. Sample surfaces are prepared by putting together dust grains with a water-diluted glue coating. A surface's top layer was made with pure sand, to preserve the air-sand refractive index ratio. Calibration measurements have already been carried out successfully by using Spectralon as a Lambertian surface. After calibration, measurements of a surface made of Sahara sand were performed. In such measurements, deviations from Lambertian behavior were found, as well as a very prominent forward peak in the (1,1)-element of the matrix for grazing illumination angles. The values of I and -Q/I calculated by the model for the vertical scattering plane and non-polarized incident light were compared to the measured F11 and -F21/F11 elements for several incident directions. A good agreement between measurements and calculations was achieved. The forward-scattering peak of the (1,1)-element can be interpreted as a result of single scattering of horizontally incident light by the small features of the non-flat surface. In this case, light

  4. A fiber-coupled displacement measuring interferometer for determination of the posture of a reflective surface.

    PubMed

    Mao, Shuai; Hu, Peng-Cheng; Ding, Xue-Mei; Tan, Jiu-Bin

    2016-08-01

    A fiber-coupled displacement measuring interferometer capable of determining of the posture of a reflective surface of a measuring mirror is proposed. The newly constructed instrument combines fiber-coupled displacement and angular measurement technologies. The proposed interferometer has advantages of both the fiber-coupled and the spatially beam-separated interferometer. A portable dual-position sensitive detector (PSD)-based unit within this proposed interferometer measures the parallelism of the two source beams to guide the fiber-coupling adjustment. The portable dual PSD-based unit measures not only the pitch and yaw of the retro-reflector but also measures the posture of the reflective surface. The experimental results of displacement calibration show that the deviations between the proposed interferometer and a reference one, Agilent 5530, at two different common beam directions are both less than ±35 nm, thus verifying the effectiveness of the beam parallelism measurement. The experimental results of angular calibration show that deviations of pitch and yaw with the auto-collimator (as a reference) are less than ±2 arc sec, thus proving the proposed interferometer's effectiveness for determination of the posture of a reflective surface. PMID:27587101

  5. Lagrangian flows within reflecting internal waves at a horizontal free-slip surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qi; Diamessis, Peter J.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper sequel to Zhou and Diamessis ["Reflection of an internal gravity wave beam off a horizontal free-slip surface," Phys. Fluids 25, 036601 (2013)], we consider Lagrangian flows within nonlinear internal waves (IWs) reflecting off a horizontal free-slip rigid lid, the latter being a model of the ocean surface. The problem is approached both analytically using small-amplitude approximations and numerically by tracking Lagrangian fluid particles in direct numerical simulation (DNS) datasets of the Eulerian flow. Inviscid small-amplitude analyses for both plane IWs and IW beams (IWBs) show that Eulerian mean flow due to wave-wave interaction and wave-induced Stokes drift cancels each other out completely at the second order in wave steepness A, i.e., O(A2), implying zero Lagrangian mean flow up to that order. However, high-accuracy particle tracking in finite-Reynolds-number fully nonlinear DNS datasets from the work of Zhou and Diamessis suggests that the Euler-Stokes cancelation on O(A2) is not complete. This partial cancelation significantly weakens the mean Lagrangian flows but does not entirely eliminate them. As a result, reflecting nonlinear IWBs produce mean Lagrangian drifts on O(A2) and thus particle dispersion on O(A4). The above findings can be relevant to predicting IW-driven mass transport in the oceanic surface and subsurface region which bears important observational and environmental implications, under circumstances where the effect of Earth rotation can be ignored.

  6. Oleate adsorption at an apatite surface studied by ex-situ FTIR internal reflection spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Y.; Drelich, J.; Miller, J.D.

    1998-06-15

    Oleate adsorption at an apatite surface was investigated by ex-situ Fourier transform infrared internal reflection spectroscopy (FTIR/IRS). Adsorption isotherms have been determined using an apatite internal reflection element (IRE) and it has been found that pH has a significant influence on oleate adsorption by apatite. At pH 8.0 and 20 C, oleate adsorption density increases monotonically as equilibrium oleate concentration increases from 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} to 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} M. These results are in contrast to the results at pH 9.5 and 20 C in which case the adsorption density is limited to that corresponding to approximately monolayer coverage. Oleate adsorption by apatite was compared to oleate adsorption by fluorite and calcite and the different adsorption behavior at these three mineral surfaces is attributed to the differences in the densities of surface calcium sites and to the differences in the solubilities of these minerals. Contact angles have been measured at the apatite IRE surface and it has been demonstrated that both the amount and the nature of the adsorbed species influence the hydrophobic state of the surface.

  7. Computer-aided high-accuracy testing of reflective surface with reverse Hartmann test.

    PubMed

    Wang, Daodang; Zhang, Sen; Wu, Rengmao; Huang, Chih Yu; Cheng, Hsiang-Nan; Liang, Rongguang

    2016-08-22

    The deflectometry provides a feasible way for surface testing with a high dynamic range, and the calibration is a key issue in the testing. A computer-aided testing method based on reverse Hartmann test, a fringe-illumination deflectometry, is proposed for high-accuracy testing of reflective surfaces. The virtual "null" testing of surface error is achieved based on ray tracing of the modeled test system. Due to the off-axis configuration in the test system, it places ultra-high requirement on the calibration of system geometry. The system modeling error can introduce significant residual systematic error in the testing results, especially in the cases of convex surface and small working distance. A calibration method based on the computer-aided reverse optimization with iterative ray tracing is proposed for the high-accuracy testing of reflective surface. Both the computer simulation and experiments have been carried out to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed measurement method, and good measurement accuracy has been achieved. The proposed method can achieve the measurement accuracy comparable to the interferometric method, even with the large system geometry calibration error, providing a feasible way to address the uncertainty on the calibration of system geometry. PMID:27557245

  8. Surface Compositional Units on Mercury from Spectral Reflectance at Ultraviolet to Near-infrared Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izenberg, N. R.; Holsclaw, G. M.; Domingue, D. L.; McClintock, W. E.; Klima, R. L.; Blewett, D. T.; Helbert, J.; Head, J. W.; Sprague, A. L.; Vilas, F.; Solomon, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft has been acquiring reflectance spectra of Mercury's surface for over 16 months. The Visible and Infrared Spectrograph (VIRS) component of MASCS has accumulated a global data set of more than 2 million spectra over the wavelength range 300-1450 nm. We have derived a set of VIRS spectral units (VSUs) from the following spectral parameters: visible brightness (R575: reflectance at 575 nm); visible/near-infrared reflectance ratio (VISr: reflectance at 415 nm to that at 750 nm); and ultraviolet reflectance ratio (UVr: reflectance at 310 nm to that at 390 nm). Five broad, slightly overlapping VSUs may be distinguished from these parameters. "Average VSU" areas have spectral parameters close to mean global values. "Dark blue VSU" areas have spectra with low R575 and high UVr. "Red VSU" areas have spectra with low UVr and higher VISr and R575 than average. "Intermediate VSU" areas have spectra with higher VISr than VSU red, generally higher R575, and a wide range of UVr. "Bright VSU" areas have high R575 and VISr and intermediate UVr. Several units defined by morphological or multispectral criteria correspond to specific VSUs, including low-reflectance material (dark blue VSU), pyroclastic deposits (red VSU), and hollows (intermediate VSU), but these VSUs generally include other types of areas as well. VSU definitions are complementary to those obtained by unsupervised clustering analysis. The global distribution of VIRS spectral units provides new information on Mercury's geological evolution. Much of Mercury's northern volcanic plains show spectral properties ranging from those of average VSU to those of red VSU, as does a large region in the southern hemisphere centered near 50°S, 245°E. Dark blue VSU material is widely distributed, with concentrations south of the northern plains, around the Rembrandt and

  9. The reflection and transmission properties of a triple band dichroic surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, S. W.; Munk, B. A.

    1990-01-01

    The development of a triple-band dichroic surface design is detailed that is reflective in the Ka-band from 22.5 to 27.3 GHz and the Ku-band from 13.7 to 15.1 GHz, yet transparent in the S-band from 2.0 to 2.3 GHz, for all planes of incidence, and for all angles of incidence out to eta = 45 deg. The design is comprised of two gangbuster whole-surfaces separated by a distance, d, that is comparable to a fraction of a wavelength in S-band, and enhanced by the addition of a dielectric matching plate. The gangbuster array is comprised of tightly packed straight skewed dipole elements referred to as half-surfaces. Two of these half-surfaces are oriented orthogonal to each other and placed an array separation distance, s, apart to form the gangbuster whole-surface which allows any arbitrary plane of incidence. Results are given for the triple-band design with and without dielectric and conduction losses. The cross polarization properties of the dichroic surface was further investigated. It is shown that the reflection cross polarized component is dominated by the geometry of the front whole surface of the design (particularly the array separation s) and is never more than -22.5 dB in the frequency band 0 to 30 GHz. The transmission cross polarization component is dependent on both whole-surfaces and is never more than -30 dB in the same frequency band.

  10. ChemCam passive reflectance spectroscopy of surface materials at the Curiosity landing site, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Bell, J. F.; Bender, S.; Blaney, D.; Cloutis, E.; DeFlores, L.; Ehlmann, B.; Gasnault, O.; Gondet, B.; Kinch, K.; Lemmon, M.; Le Mouélic, S.; Maurice, S.; Rice, M.; Wiens, R. C.

    2015-03-01

    The spectrometers on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) ChemCam instrument were used in passive mode to record visible/near-infrared (400-840 nm) radiance from the martian surface. Using the onboard ChemCam calibration targets' housing as a reflectance standard, we developed methods to collect, calibrate, and reduce radiance observations to relative reflectance. Such measurements accurately reproduce the known reflectance spectra of other calibration targets on the rover, and represent the highest spatial resolution (0.65 mrad) and spectral sampling (<1 nm) visible/near-infrared reflectance spectra from a landed platform on Mars. Relative reflectance spectra of surface rocks and soils match those from orbital observations and multispectral data from the MSL Mastcam camera. Preliminary analyses of the band depths, spectral slopes, and reflectance ratios of the more than 2000 spectra taken during the first year of MSL operations demonstrate at least six spectral classes of materials distinguished by variations in ferrous and ferric components. Initial comparisons of ChemCam spectra to laboratory spectra of minerals and Mars analog materials demonstrate similarities with palagonitic soils and indications of orthopyroxene in some dark rocks. Magnesium-rich "raised ridges" tend to exhibit distinct near-infrared slopes. The ferric absorption downturn typically found for martian materials at <600 nm is greatly subdued in brushed rocks and drill tailings, consistent with their more ferrous nature. Calcium-sulfate veins exhibit the highest relative reflectances observed, but are still relatively red owing to the effects of residual dust. Such dust is overall less prominent on rocks sampled within the "blast zone" immediately surrounding the landing site. These samples were likely affected by the landing thrusters, which partially removed the ubiquitous dust coatings. Increased dust coatings on the calibration targets during the first year of the mission were documented by

  11. X-ray reflectivity studies of liquid metal and alloy surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, M.J.; Pershan, P.S.; Magnussen, O.M.; Ocko, B.M.; Deutsch, M.; Berman, L.E.

    1997-06-01

    Surface-induced atomic layering at the liquid/vapor interface in liquid metals has been observed using x-ray reflectivity on sputtered clean surfaces under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. A well-defined quasi-Bragg peak is obtained for surfaces of elemental Ga and a Ga-In alloy at large wave vectors q{sub z}{approximately}2.3{endash}2.5 {Angstrom}{sup {minus}1}. These results are an unambiguous indication of atomic layering with an interlayer spacing d{approximately}2{pi}/q{sub z}=2.5{endash}2.7 {Angstrom}. For liquid Ga, the amplitude of the electron-density oscillations, which is significantly underestimated by existing theory and molecular simulation, decays with a characteristic length of 6 {Angstrom}, which is twice that of Hg. Results on the alloy show a clear enrichment of indium at the topmost surface layer, consistent with the Gibbs adsorption rule. The enrichment consists of a single monolayer, with subsequent layers at the bulk eutectic composition. In order to suppress mechanically excited surface waves, the measurements were performed on thin liquid metal films ({lt}0.5 mm deep), which leads to a macroscopically curved surface due to the large surface tensions in liquid metals. The experimental challenges posed by measurements on curved surfaces and the techniques that were developed are discussed in detail. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. Reflectance spectroscopy of palagonite and iron-rich montmorillonite clay mixtures: Implications for the surface composition of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orenberg, J. B.; Handy, J.

    1991-01-01

    Because of the power of remote sensing reflectance spectroscopy in determining mineralogy, it was used as the major method of identifying possible mineral analogs of the Martian surface. A summary of proposed Martian surface compositions from reflectance spectroscopy before 1979 was presented. Since that time, iron-rich montmorillonite clay, nanocrystalline or nanophase hematite, and palagonite were suggested as Mars soil analog materials.

  13. Radar reflectivity of the surface of Mars at 20 MHz from SHARAD: Cartography and quantitative analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kofman, W. W.; Grima, C.; Herique, A.; Seu, R.

    2011-12-01

    In the search for buried water ice on Mars, radar sounding instruments have unique abilities. Their capacity to resolve glacial structures down to kilometers depth has already provided a huge amount of information related to Martian glaciers. Sounding radars are also relevant tools to determine the composition of the surface, since the radar-waves reflectivity is sensitive to the dielectric properties of the sounding materials. It also has the originality to be representative of the first decameter of the surface (depending on the bandwidth), whereas other observations methods do not exceed few millimeters. The Shallow Radar (SHARAD) is a subsurface sounding instrument aboard the NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) spacecraft [3]. SHARAD is working at a 20 MHz central frequency with a 10 MHz bandwidth. The along-track foot print range is between 0.3 and 1 km, while the typical footprint radius (Fresnel zone) is ~3 km. The radar surface echoes from SHARAD observations are extracted to drawn up a reflectivity map covering almost half of the Martian surface and compared to roughness maps. A 2-steps method, based on a stochastic description of the reflectivity, is proposed in order to (i) separate the coherent/incoherent components of the signal by the mean of PDF (Probability Density Functions) fitting of amplitude distributions, (ii) and to express them with respect to roughness/permittivity values by adapting common backscattering models to the nadir case. We show that scattering is the most important process dominating the reflectivity over the Martian terrains. However some nearly-flat regions clearly exhibit the signature of the surface permittivity. We show that the RMS roughness can be derived at centimeter to decimeter scale without prior calibration of the signal for slightly rough surfaces, which raises SHARAD capabilities in determining surface roughness for landing site selection. Sets of derived dielectric constants are obtained and analyzed

  14. Reflectance for an approximately one-dimensional rough surface that has rms roughness greater than a wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendeleev, Vladimir Y.; Skovorod'ko, Sergey N.

    2004-02-01

    A relation between the intensity reflectances of approximately one-dimensional and one-dimensional rough surfaces within the diffraction solid angle in the specular direction for normal incidence is derived for an rms roughness greater than a wavelength. The relation shows that the reflectance of an approximately one-dimensional rough surface is proportional to the reflectance of a one-dimension rough surface. The validity of the derived relation is studied for an approximately one-dimensional rough steel surface with an rms roughness of 1.3 μm and a correlation length of 15.2 μm. The wavelength was 0.6328 μm and the angle of incidence was 4°. The reflectance of the rough steel surface was measured and estimated from the derived relation. Satisfactory agreement was found between the estimated and measured reflectance values.

  15. Observations of reflectivity of the Martian surface in the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. B.; Muhleman, D. O.

    1999-09-01

    The Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) is an instrument on board the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft. The laser operates at the 1.064 micron wavelength. MOLA measures range to the planet's surface, reflectivity and returned pulse width. Reflectivity (R) is a ratio of the returned energy to the emitted energy. It can be interpreted as a product of albedo (A) of the Martian surface and two-way atmospheric transmission ( R = A * e({) -2 tau }), where tau is total atmospheric opacity. Attenuation of the MOLA signal in the atmosphere is only due to extinction of photons from the laser beam. There are practically no photons scattered into the laser beam. This allows us a very straightforward calculation of albedo, given the opacity of the atmosphere. At the same time the MGS Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) was performing measurements of opacity at 9 micron wavelength (Smith et al., 1999). We propose to use these opacities to calculate albedo of the Martian surface from MOLA observations. Appropriate scaling should be applied to TES 9 micron opacity to scale it to the 1.064 micron wavelength, where MOLA operates. This scaling depends on the assumed particle size distribution of dust, suspended in the atmosphere. We will investigate the effect of this assumption on our final albedo results. MOLA has performed measurements of reflectivity during Science Phasing (L_s = 300 - 7) and Mapping (L_s = 103-170) orbits. We will concentrate our albedo calculations on reflectivities obtained by MOLA during the mapping orbit in the darker regions of Mars (Chryse Planitia, North Polar Dune fields). The resulting albedo dataset can then used to estimate the opacity during the Science Phasing Orbit period. References. Smith M.D. et al., Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) observations of dust opacity during aerobraking and science phasing, submitted to JGR-Planets, 1999

  16. Measurements of long-range interactions between protein-functionalized surfaces by total internal reflection microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaohui; Gong, Xiangjun; Ngai, To

    2015-03-17

    Understanding the interaction between protein-functionalized surfaces is an important subject in a variety of protein-related processes, ranging from coatings for biomedical implants to targeted drug carriers and biosensors. In this work, utilizing a total internal reflection microscope (TIRM), we have directly measured the interactions between micron-sized particles decorated with three types of common proteins concanavalin A (ConA), bovine serum albumin (BSA), lysozyme (LYZ), and glass surface coated with soy proteins (SP). Our results show that the protein adsorption greatly affects the charge property of the surfaces, and the interactions between those protein-functionalized surfaces depend on solution pH values. At pH 7.5-10.0, all these three protein-functionalized particles are highly negatively charged, and they move freely above the negatively charged SP-functionalized surface. The net interaction between protein-functionalized surfaces captured by TIRM was found as a long-range, nonspecific double-layer repulsion. When pH was decreased to 5.0, both protein-functionalized surfaces became neutral and double-layer repulsion was greatly reduced, resulting in adhesion of all three protein-functionalized particles to the SP-functionalized surface due to the hydrophobic attraction. The situation is very different at pH = 4.0: BSA-decorated particles, which are highly charged, can move freely above the SP-functionalized surfaces, while ConA- and LYZ-decorated particles can only move restrictively in a limited range. Our results quantify these nonspecific kT-scale interactions between protein-functionalized surfaces, which will enable the design of surfaces for use in biomedical applications and study of biomolecular interactions. PMID:25719226

  17. Immunoglobulin surface-binding kinetics studied by total internal reflection with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, N L; Axelrod, D

    1983-01-01

    An experimental application of total internal reflection with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (TIR/FCS) is presented. TIR/FCS is a new technique for measuring the binding and unbinding rates and surface diffusion coefficient of fluorescent-labeled solute molecules in equilibrium at a surface. A laser beam totally internally reflects at the solid-liquid interface, selectively exciting surface-adsorbed molecules. Fluorescence collected by a microscope from a small, well-defined surface area approximately 5 micron2 spontaneously fluctuates as solute molecules randomly bind to, unbind from, and/or diffuse along the surface in chemical equilibrium. The fluorescence is detected by a photomultiplier and autocorrelated on-line by a minicomputer. The shape of the autocorrelation function depends on the bulk and surface diffusion coefficients, the binding rate constants, and the shape of the illuminated and observed region. The normalized amplitude of the autocorrelation function depends on the average number of molecules bound within the observed area. TIR/FCS requires no spectroscopic or thermodynamic change between dissociated and complexed states and no extrinsic perturbation from equilibrium. Using TIR/FCS, we determine that rhodamine-labeled immunoglobulin and insulin each nonspecifically adsorb to serum albumin-coated fused silica with both reversible and irreversible components. The characteristic time of the most rapidly reversible component measured is approximately 5 ms and is limited by the rate of bulk diffusion. Rhodamine-labeled bivalent antibodies to dinitrophenyl (DNP) bind to DNP-coated fused silica virtually irreversibly. Univalent Fab fragments of these same antibodies appear to specifically bind to DNP-coated fused silica, accompanied by a large amount of nonspecific binding. TIR/FCS is shown to be a feasible technique for measuring absorption/desorption kinetic rates at equilibrium. In suitable systems where nonspecific binding is low, TIR

  18. Effects of surface reflectance on local second order shape estimation in dynamic scenes.

    PubMed

    Dövencioğlu, Dicle N; Wijntjes, Maarten W A; Ben-Shahar, Ohad; Doerschner, Katja

    2015-10-01

    In dynamic scenes, relative motion between the object, the observer, and/or the environment projects as dynamic visual information onto the retina (optic flow) that facilitates 3D shape perception. When the object is diffusely reflective, e.g. a matte painted surface, this optic flow is directly linked to object shape, a property found at the foundations of most traditional shape-from-motion (SfM) schemes. When the object is specular, the corresponding specular flow is related to shape curvature, a regime change that challenges the visual system to determine concurrently both the shape and the distortions of the (sometimes unknown) environment reflected from its surface. While human observers are able to judge the global 3D shape of most specular objects, shape-from-specular-flow (SFSF) is not veridical. In fact, recent studies have also shown systematic biases in the perceived motion of such objects. Here we focus on the perception of local shape from specular flow and compare it to that of matte-textured rotating objects. Observers judged local surface shape by adjusting a rotation and scale invariant shape index probe. Compared to shape judgments of static objects we find that object motion decreases intra-observer variability in local shape estimation. Moreover, object motion introduces systematic changes in perceived shape between matte-textured and specular conditions. Taken together, this study provides a new insight toward the contribution of motion and surface material to local shape perception. PMID:25645965

  19. A perturbative analysis of surface acoustic wave propagation and reflection in interdigital transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoma, Carsten Hilmar

    1997-12-01

    The coupling of stress and strain fields to electric fields present in anisotropic piezoelectric crystals makes them ideal for use as electromechanical transducers in a wide variety of applications. In recent years such crystals have been utilized to produce surface acoustic wave devices for signal processing applications, in which an applied metallic grating both transmits and receives, through the piezoelectric effect, electromechanical surface waves. The design of such interdigital transducers requires an accurate knowledge of wave propagation and reflection. The presence of the metal grating in addition to its ideal transduction function, by means of electrical and mechanical loading, also introduces a velocity shift as well as reflection into substrate surface waves. We seek to obtain a consistent formulation of the wave behavior due to the electrical and mechanical loading of the substrate crystal by the metallic grating. A perturbative solution up to second order in h//lambda is developed, where h is the maximum grating height and λ the acoustic wavelength. For the operating frequencies and physical parameters of modern surface acoustic wave devices such an analysis will provide an adequate description of device behavior in many cases, thereby circumventing the need for more computationally laborious methods. Numerical calculations are presented and compared with available experimental data.

  20. Bidirectional measurements of surface reflectance for view angle corrections of oblique imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, R. D.; Teillet, P. M.; Slater, P. N.; Fedosejevs, G.; Jasinski, Michael F.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus for acquiring bidirectional reflectance-factor data was constructed and used over four surface types. Data sets were obtained over a headed wheat canopy, bare soil having several different roughness conditions, playa (dry lake bed), and gypsum sand. Results are presented in terms of relative bidirectional reflectance factors (BRFs) as a function of view angle at a number of solar zenith angles, nadir BRFs as a function of solar zenith angles, and, for wheat, vegetation indices as related to view and solar zenith angles. The wheat canopy exhibited the largest BRF changes with view angle. BRFs for the red and the NIR bands measured over wheat did not have the same relationship with view angle. NIR/Red ratios calculated from nadir BRFs changed by nearly a factor of 2 when the solar zenith angle changed from 20 to 50 degs. BRF versus view angle relationships were similar for soils having smooth and intermediate rough surfaces but were considerably different for the roughest surface. Nadir BRF versus solar-zenith angle relationships were distinctly different for the three soil roughness levels. Of the various surfaces, BRFs for gypsum sand changed the least with view angle (10 percent at 30 degs).

  1. Plane-wave Sf S reconstruction of water surface characteristics from Lambertian reflectance data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jian; O'Sullivan, Finbarr; Jike, Linhao

    2012-06-01

    The classical shape from shading (SfS) problem of computer vision is concerned with the reconstruction of a 3D object surface from its photographic image. Essential non-uniqueness and intrinsic nonlinearity make the problem challenging. This work considers the case where the object is a water surface so that the statistical approximation by superposition of plane waves is natural. An efficient greedy algorithm involving recursive refinement of wave fronts, subject to a wave-front frequency constraint is developed. The approach is evaluated using simulated reflectance data based on a set of wind-generated wave-field images obtained from detailed wave-tank measurements. The traditional setup for the SfS problem (orthographic cameras, light sources at infinity and the Lambertian surfaces) is used. Generalization to include a specular (Phong) reflectance component is also discussed. Results indicate that key statistical characteristics of the wave field related to its stage of development (evolution) are properly recovered by the approach. Thus there may be future potential for novel photographic-based remote sensing of physical drivers (e.g. wind velocity) of local water surface patterns.

  2. Interaction of ester functional groups with aluminum oxide surfaces studied using infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    van den Brand, J; Blajiev, O; Beentjes, P C J; Terryn, H; de Wit, J H W

    2004-07-20

    The bonding of two types of ester group-containing molecules with a set of different oxide layers on aluminum has been investigated using infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy. The different oxide layers were made by giving typical surface treatments to the aluminum substrate. The purpose of the investigation was to find out what type of ester-oxide bond is formed and whether this is influenced by changes in the composition and chemistry of the oxide. The extent by which these bonded ester molecules resisted disbondment in water or substitution by molecules capable of chemisorption was also investigated. The ester groups were found to show hydrogen bonding with hydroxyls on the oxide surfaces through their carbonyl oxygens. For all oxides, the ester groups showed the same nu(C = O) carbonyl stretching vibration after adsorption, indicating very similar bonding occurs. However, the oxides showed differences in the amount of molecules bonded to the oxide surface, and a clear relation was observed with the hydroxyl concentration present on the oxide surface, which was determined from XPS measurements. The two compounds showed differences in the free to bonded nu(C = O) infrared peak shift, indicating differences in bonding strength with the oxide surface between the two types of molecules. The bonding of the ester groups with the oxide surfaces was found to be not stable in the presence of water and also not in the presence of a compound capable of chemisorption with the aluminum oxide surface. PMID:15248718

  3. Surface structure of liquid Bi and Sn: An x-ray reflectivity study

    SciTech Connect

    Pershan, P.S.; Stoltz, S.E.; Shpyrko, Oleg G.; Deutsch, Moshe; Balagurusamy, V.S.K.; Meron, Mati; Lin, Binhua; Streitel, Reinhard

    2009-03-23

    X-ray reflectivity measurements of the liquid Bi surface are presented and analyzed together with previous liquid Sn results. Published measurements on liquid Ga, In, and K all exhibit a single strong maximum at a wave-vector transfer of the order of the reciprocal of an atomic-diameter, due to surface-induced layering. In contrast, both Sn and Bi exhibit - in addition - a weak broad peak at much smaller wave-vector transfers. This feature is an unambiguous signature of an enhanced electron density in the near-surface region. Possible ways of modeling this enhancement are presented. Once the different surface-roughening effects of thermal capillary waves are accounted for, the surface structure factors of Sn and Bi are remarkably similar. The principal difference between the two is that the depth of the layering below the surface is more than {approx}40% larger for Bi than for Sn. This is considerably larger than the ratio of their covalent radii which is only {approx}10%. No theoretical explanation can be offered at this time for the surface structure difference between Sn and Bi and other elemental liquid metals studied to date: Ga, In, and K.

  4. Automatic and improved radiometric correction of Landsat imagery using reference values from MODIS surface reflectance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pons, X.; Pesquer, L.; Cristóbal, J.; González-Guerrero, O.

    2014-12-01

    Radiometric correction is a prerequisite for generating high-quality scientific data, making it possible to discriminate between product artefacts and real changes in Earth processes as well as accurately produce land cover maps and detect changes. This work contributes to the automatic generation of surface reflectance products for Landsat satellite series. Surface reflectances are generated by a new approach developed from a previous simplified radiometric (atmospheric + topographic) correction model. The proposed model keeps the core of the old model (incidence angles and cast-shadows through a digital elevation model [DEM], Earth-Sun distance, etc.) and adds new characteristics to enhance and automatize ground reflectance retrieval. The new model includes the following new features: (1) A fitting model based on reference values from pseudoinvariant areas that have been automatically extracted from existing reflectance products (Terra MODIS MOD09GA) that were selected also automatically by applying quality criteria that include a geostatistical pattern model. This guarantees the consistency of the internal and external series, making it unnecessary to provide extra atmospheric data for the acquisition date and time, dark objects or dense vegetation. (2) A spatial model for atmospheric optical depth that uses detailed DEM and MODTRAN simulations. (3) It is designed so that large time-series of images can be processed automatically to produce consistent Landsat surface reflectance time-series. (4) The approach can handle most images, acquired now or in the past, regardless of the processing system, with the exception of those with extremely high cloud coverage. The new methodology has been successfully applied to a series of near 300 images of the same area including MSS, TM and ETM+ imagery as well as to different formats and processing systems (LPGS and NLAPS from the USGS; CEOS from ESA) for different degrees of cloud coverage (up to 60%) and SLC

  5. Far-infrared BRDFs and reflectance spectra of candidate SOFIA telescope, cavity, and focal-plane instrument surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Allan W.; Smith, Sheldon M.; Koerber, Christopher T.

    2000-06-01

    The far-infrared reflectance and scattering properties of telescope surfaces, surrounding cavity walls, and surfaces within focal-plane instruments can be significant contributors to background noise. Radiation from sources well off-axis, such as the earth, moon or aircraft engines may be multiply scattered by the cavity walls and/or surface facets of a complex telescope structure. The Non-Specular Reflectometer at NASA Ames Research Center was reactivated and upgraded, and used to measure reflectance and Bi- directional Reflectance Distribution Functions for samples of planned telescope system structural materials and associated surface treatments.

  6. Multi-angle RT Approach for Retrieval of Surface Reflectance from CRISM Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douté, S.; Ceamanos, X.; Fernando, J.; Schmidt, F.; Lyapustin, A.; Pinet, P. C.

    2012-12-01

    We address the atmospheric correction of near-simultaneous multi-angle observations acquired by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) [1] aboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. In the targeted mode CRISM senses the surface of Mars using eleven viewing angles that allow it to provide unique information on the scattering properties of the surface materials. In order to retrieve this information we put forward an innovative radiative transfer-based method named Multi-angle Approach for Retrieval of Surface Reflectance from CRISM Observations [2] (MARS-ReCO). It retrieves photometric curves of surface materials in reflectance units after compensating the signal sensed by CRISM for the aerosol and gaseous contributions. MARS-ReCO represents a substantial improvement regarding previous planetary remote sensing techniques as it takes into consideration the anisotropy of the surface, thus providing more realistic surface products. MARS-ReCO inherits the basis of state-of-the-art atmospheric correction methods in Earth observation such as the MAIAC algorithm [3] while adding some features. Contrary to MAIAC, which works with multi-temporal series of images, MARS-ReCO is devised to process near-simultaneous multi-angle CRISM observations. Furthermore, MARS-ReCO adopts a new inversion scheme that takes care of propagating several sources of errors to the end products. In addition an aerosol optical thickness (AOT) retrieval algorithm is put forward which exploits the full view zenith angle range spanned by a single CRISM targeted observation. This technique is based on a formulation of the TOA signal expressing the correlation at 2 μm between the intensity of the CO2 gas absorption and the amount of aerosols. In conclusion, the present work thus proposes a complete chain for atmospheric correction of CRISM targeted observations composed by (i) the transformation of targeted observations into appropriate products for multi-angular data processing

  7. Effects of Spectralon absorption on reflectance spectra of typical planetary surface analog materials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Yang, Yazhou; Jin, Weidong; Liu, Chujian; Hsu, Weibiao

    2014-09-01

    Acquiring accurate visible and near-infrared (VisNIR) reflectance values of atmosphereless celestial bodies is very important in inferring the physical and geological properties of their surficial materials. When a calibration target with inherent non-trivial absorption features is used, the calibrated reflectance would essentially always contain spurious spectral features and the spectroscopic data may easily be misinterpreted if the artifact is not properly taken care of. We demonstrate with laboratory reflectance measurements that the VisNIR spectra of three typical planetary surface analog materials, lunar simulant JSC-1A, olivine and pyroxene grains, have an artificial peak at 2.1 µm when Spectralon-type plaque made of polytetrafluoroethylene is used as the calibration target in the NIR region. The degree of severity of this artifact is dependent on the strength of the 2.0 µm absorption feature of the mineral. Empirical methods are proposed to remove this artifact to bring the spectra close to that calibrated by a gold mirror which does not have any conspicuous absorption features in the NIR region. The correction methods may be applied to reflectance data acquired by the VisNIR imaging spectrometer onboard the Yutu Rover of the Chinese Chang'E 3 lunar mission which employed an onboard Spectralon-type calibration target. PMID:25321507

  8. Ground-roll attenuation using modified common-offset-common-reflection-surface stacking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastegar, Seyyed Ali Fa'al; Javaherian, Abdolrahim; Farajkhah, Naser Keshavarz; Monfared, Mehrdad Soleimani; Zarei, Abbas

    2016-06-01

    We modified the common-offset-common-reflection-surface (COCRS) method to attenuate ground roll, the coherent noise typically generated by a low-velocity, low-frequency, and high-amplitude Rayleigh wave. The COCRS operator is based on hyperbolas, thus it fits events with hyperbolic traveltimes such as reflection events in prestack data. Conversely, ground roll is linear in the common-midpoint (CMP) and common-shot gathers and can be distinguished and attenuated by the COCRS operator. Thus, we search for the dip and curvature of the reflections in the common-shot gathers prior to the common-offset section. Because it is desirable to minimize the damage to the reflection amplitudes, we only stack the multicoverage data in the ground-roll areas. Searching the CS gathers before the CO section is another modification of the conventional COCRS stacking. We tested the proposed method using synthetic and real data sets from western Iran. The results of the ground-roll attenuation with the proposed method were compared with results of the f-k filtering and conventional COCRS stacking after f-k filtering. The results show that the proposed method attenuates the aliased and nonaliased ground roll better than the f-k filtering and conventional CRS stacking. However, the computation time was higher than other common methods such as f-k filtering.

  9. The Normalization of Surface Anisotropy Effects Present in SEVIRI Reflectances by Using the MODIS BRDF Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proud, Simon Richard; Zhang, Qingling; Schaaf, Crystal; Fensholt, Rasmus; Rasmussen, Mads Olander; Shisanya, Chris; Mutero, Wycliffe; Mbow, Cheikh; Anyamba, Assaf; Pak, Ed; Sandholt, Inge

    2014-01-01

    A modified version of the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) algorithm is presented for use in the angular normalization of surface reflectance data gathered by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) aboard the geostationary Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellites. We present early and provisional daily nadir BRDFadjusted reflectance (NBAR) data in the visible and near-infrared MSG channels. These utilize the high temporal resolution of MSG to produce BRDF retrievals with a greatly reduced acquisition period than the comparable MODIS products while, at the same time, removing many of the angular perturbations present within the original MSG data. The NBAR data are validated against reflectance data from the MODIS instrument and in situ data gathered at a field location in Africa throughout 2008. It is found that the MSG retrievals are stable and are of high-quality across much of the SEVIRI disk while maintaining a higher temporal resolution than the MODIS BRDF products. However, a number of circumstances are discovered whereby the BRDF model is unable to function correctly with the SEVIRI observations-primarily because of an insufficient spread of angular data due to the fixed sensor location or localized cloud contamination.

  10. Bidirectional reflectance spectroscopy. III - Correction for macroscopic roughness. [of planetary surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hapke, B.

    1984-01-01

    A mathematically rigorous formalism is derived by which an arbitrary photometric function for the bidirectional reflectance of a smooth surface may be corrected to include effects of general macroscopic roughness. The correction involves only one arbitrary parameter, the mean slope angle, and is applicable to surfaces of any albedo. Using physically reasonable assumptions and mathematical approximations, the correction expressions are evaluated analytically to second order in the mean slope angle. The correction is applied to the bidirectional-reflectance function of Hapke (1981). Expressions for both the differential and integral brightnesses are obtained. Photometric profiles on hypothetical smooth and rough planets of low and high albedo are shown to illustrate the effects of macroscopic roughness. The theory is applied to observations of Mercury and predicts the integral phase function, the apparent polar darkening, and the lack of limb brightness surge on the planet. The roughness-corrected bidirectional-reflectance function is sufficiently simple that it can be conveniently evaluated on a programmable hand-held calculator.

  11. Effects of scanning orientation on outlier formation in 3D laser scanning of reflective surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yutao; Feng, Hsi-Yung

    2016-06-01

    Inspecting objects with reflective surfaces using 3D laser scanning is a demanded but challenging part inspection task due to undesirable specular reflections, which produce extensive outliers in the scanned point cloud. These outliers need to be removed in order to alleviate subsequent data processing issues. Many existing automatic outlier removal methods do not detect outliers according to the outlier formation properties. As a result, these methods only offer limited capabilities in removing extensive and complex outliers from scanning objects with reflective surfaces. This paper reports an empirical study which experimentally investigates the outlier formation characteristics in relation to the scanning orientation of the laser probe. The objective is to characterize the scanning orientation effects on outlier formation in order to facilitate the development of an effective outlier detection and removal method. Such an experimental investigation was hardly done before. It has been found in this work that scanning orientation can directly affect outlier extensity and occurrence in 3D laser scanning. A general guidance on proper scan path planning can then be provided with an aim to reduce the occurrence of outliers. Further, the observed dependency of outlier formation on scanning orientation can be exploited to facilitate effective and automatic outlier detection and removal.

  12. The reflection of low energy phonons at the free surface of liquid4He. II. Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baddar, H.; Edwards, D. O.

    1996-09-01

    Using a heater and bolometer as source and detector, the reflection of a pulsed beam of phonons at the free surface of liquid4He at ˜ 0.05 K has been measured for angles of incidence between 30 ° and 80 °. The energy distribution of the incident beam was obtained from the theory of phonon decay in the accompanying paper (I). The average incident phonon energy was ˜ 0.3 K, corresponding to an effective beam temperature of about 0.1 K. Both heater and bolometer were made from graphite resistor board with a layer of poly aniline fibers to increase the absorptivity for rotons. The angular distribution of the phonons from the heater is quite broad, approximately (cosn π+cosm θ)/2 with n ≈ 0.65 and m ≈ 3.4. However, the receiver response has a broad component with n ≈ 2.2 and an extraordinarily narrow one with m ≈ 106. In agreement with the theory in I, the reflection appears to be specular within the accuracy of the experiment. The reflection coefficient is unity within the experimental error; the weighted mean value is 1.001±0.025. During the experiment, the free surface became contaminated with ˜ 0.034 of a monolayer of3He, but no effect from the3He impurity was observed.

  13. A surface vitrinite reflectance anomaly related to Bell Creek oil field, Montana, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, C.E.; Dalziel, M.C.; Pawlewicz, M.J.

    1983-01-01

    Vitrinite reflectance measurements from surface samples of mudrock and coal show anomalously high values over the Bell Creek oil field. The average vitrinite reflectance (Rm) increases to a maximum of 0.9 percent over the field against background values of about 0.3 percent. The Rm anomaly coincides with a geochemical anomaly indicated by diagenetic magnetite in surface rocks and a geobiologic anomaly indicated by ethane-consuming bacteria. These samples were taken from the Upper Cretaceous Hell Creek and Paleocene Fort Union Formations which form an essentially conformable sequence. The depositional environment is similar in both formations, and we expect little variation in the source and composition of the organic matter. The surface R m should be approximately constant because of a uniform thermal history across the field. Temperature studies over local oil fields with similar geology suggest the expected thermal anomaly would be less than 10?C (50?F), which is too small to account for the significantly higher rank over the field. Coal clinkers are rare in the vicinity of Bell Creek and an Rm anomaly caused by burning of the thin, discontinuous coal seams is unlikely. The limited topographic relief, less than 305 m (1,000 ft), over the shallow-dipping homoclinal structure and the poor correlation between Rm and sample locality elevation (r = -0.2) indicate that the Rm anomaly is not due to burial, deformation and subsequent erosion. We conjecture that activity by petroleum-metabolizing bacteria is a possible explanation of the Rm anomaly. Microseepage from oil reservoirs supports large colonies of these organisms, some of which can produce enzymes that can cleave hydrocarbon side-chains on the kerogen molecule. The loss of these side chains causes condensation of the ring structures (Stach and others, 1982) and consequently increases its reflectance. These data indicate that vitrinite reflectance may be a useful tool to explore for stratigraphic traps in the

  14. Mars - Near-infrared spectral reflectance of surface regions and compositional implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCord, T. B.; Clark, R. N.; Singer, R. B.

    1982-04-01

    Both morphological and compositional information are needed to define and characterize surface geologic units on Mars. A description is presented of new, near-infrared spectra (0.65 to 2.50 micrometers) for 11 regions on the Martian surface observed in 1978. The high photometric quality of these data combined with increased near-infrared spectral coverage provide new information about the spectral behavior and, therefore, the composition and physical nature of Martian surface materials. The spectral reflectances were obtained with the aid of a 2.2-m telescope located on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. A cooled (to 77 K) circular variable filter spectrometer with an InSb detector was used to measure alternatively Mars and the standard star Beta Geminorum. Attention is given to general spectral characteristics, the dark region composition, spectral evidence for water, and the 2.3 micrometer absorption.

  15. Radiative Transfer Simulations of the Two-Dimensional Ocean Glint Reflectance and Determination of the Sea Surface Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Zhenyi; Li, Wei; Gatebe, Charles; Poudyal, Rajesh; Stamnes, Knut

    2016-01-01

    An optimized discrete-ordinate radiative transfer model (DISORT3) with a pseudo-two-dimensional bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) is used to simulate and validate ocean glint reflectances at an infrared wavelength (1036 nm) by matching model results with a complete set of BRDF measurements obtained from the NASA cloud absorption radiometer (CAR) deployed on an aircraft. The surface roughness is then obtained through a retrieval algorithm and is used to extend the simulation into the visible spectral range where diffuse reflectance becomes important. In general, the simulated reflectances and surface roughness information are in good agreement with the measurements, and the diffuse reflectance in the visible, ignored in current glint algorithms, is shown to be important. The successful implementation of this new treatment of ocean glint reflectance and surface roughness in DISORT3 will help improve glint correction algorithms in current and future ocean color remote sensing applications.

  16. Radiative transfer simulations of the two-dimensional ocean glint reflectance and determination of the sea surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhenyi; Li, Wei; Gatebe, Charles; Poudyal, Rajesh; Stamnes, Knut

    2016-02-20

    An optimized discrete-ordinate radiative transfer model (DISORT3) with a pseudo-two-dimensional bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) is used to simulate and validate ocean glint reflectances at an infrared wavelength (1036 nm) by matching model results with a complete set of BRDF measurements obtained from the NASA cloud absorption radiometer (CAR) deployed on an aircraft. The surface roughness is then obtained through a retrieval algorithm and is used to extend the simulation into the visible spectral range where diffuse reflectance becomes important. In general, the simulated reflectances and surface roughness information are in good agreement with the measurements, and the diffuse reflectance in the visible, ignored in current glint algorithms, is shown to be important. The successful implementation of this new treatment of ocean glint reflectance and surface roughness in DISORT3 will help improve glint correction algorithms in current and future ocean color remote sensing applications. PMID:26906570

  17. Angular and Seasonal Variation of Spectral Surface Reflectance Ratios: Implications for the Remote Sensing of Aerosol over Land

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, L. A.; Wald, A. E.; Kaufman, Y. J.

    1999-01-01

    We obtain valuable information on the angular and seasonal variability of surface reflectance using a hand-held spectrometer from a light aircraft. The data is used to test a procedure that allows us to estimate visible surface reflectance from the longer wavelength 2.1 micrometer channel (mid-IR). Estimating or avoiding surface reflectance in the visible is a vital first step in most algorithms that retrieve aerosol optical thickness over land targets. The data indicate that specular reflection found when viewing targets from the forward direction can severely corrupt the relationships between the visible and 2.1 micrometer reflectance that were derived from nadir data. There is a month by month variation in the ratios between the visible and the mid-IR, weakly correlated to the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). If specular reflection is not avoided, the errors resulting from estimating surface reflectance from the mid-IR exceed the acceptable limit of DELTA-rho approximately 0.01 in roughly 40% of the cases, using the current algorithm. This is reduced to 25% of the cases if specular reflection is avoided. An alternative method that uses path radiance rather than explicitly estimating visible surface reflectance results in similar errors. The two methods have different strengths and weaknesses that require further study.

  18. Unpolarized emissivity with shadow and multiple reflections from random rough surfaces with the geometric optics approximation: application to Gaussian sea surfaces in the infrared band.

    PubMed

    Bourlier, Christophe

    2006-08-20

    The emissivity from a stationary random rough surface is derived by taking into account the multiple reflections and the shadowing effect. The model is applied to the ocean surface. The geometric optics approximation is assumed to be valid, which means that the rough surface is modeled as a collection of facets reflecting locally the light in the specular direction. In particular, the emissivity with zero, single, and double reflections are analytically calculated, and each contribution is studied numerically by considering a 1D sea surface observed in the near infrared band. The model is also compared with results computed from a Monte Carlo ray-tracing method. PMID:16892130

  19. Transient Heat Transfer in a Semitransparent Radiating Layer with Boundary Convection and Surface Reflections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Surface convection and refractive index are examined during transient radiative heating or cooling of a grey semitransparent layer with internal absorption, emission and conduction. Each side of the layer is exposed to hot or cold radiative surroundings, while each boundary is heated or cooled by convection. Emission within the layer and internal reflections depend on the layer refractive index. The reflected energy and heat conduction distribute energy across the layer and partially equalize the transient temperature distributions. Solutions are given to demonstrate the effect of radiative heating for layers with various optical thicknesses, the behavior of the layer heated by radiation on one side and convectively cooled on the other, and a layer heated by convection while being cooled by radiation. The numerical method is an implicit finite difference procedure with non-uniform space and time increments. The basic method developed in earlier work is expanded to include external convection and incident radiation.

  20. Raman study on surface layers and thin films by using total reflection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölzer, W.; Schröter, O.; Richter, A.

    1990-03-01

    An access to Raman spectroscopic investigations of phenomena of boundary layers is given through the excitation by means of the evanescent wave in total reflection (Total Reflection Raman Spectroscopy - TRRS). The TRRS scattering unit contains a semicylinder as TR-element and the sample placed on the planar face of it. This equipment permits the variation of the incident angle in the full range from 0° to 90°. The general theory of the TRRS is specialized for our experimental setup. The TRRS-method allows two possibilities of application: i) the investigation of surface layers by excitation above the critical angle and ii) the investigation of thin films by excitation at the critical angle. Any examples were discussed for demonstrating these applications.

  1. An assessment of ASTER surface reflectance products generated by GEO Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Hirokazu; Kamei, Akihide; Moriyama, Masao; Tsuchida, Satoshi

    2010-08-01

    The GEO Grid is an e-infrastructure, which is capable in archiving large amount of satellite data and conducting higher level processing using the advanced grid technologies.1 The Advanced Space-borne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) Level 0 data are stored in a cluster system on GEO Grid, and ASTER ortho-rectified radiance and Digital Elevation Model (DEM) products are able to be generated on this system globally since 2000. This research shows validation of new ASTER surface reflectance products generated by the GEO Grid system, which can apply the radiometric and atmospheric correction to ASTER ortho-rectified radiance data of Visible and Near Infrared (VNIR) and Shortwave Infrared (SWIR).

  2. Dynamics of surface thermal expansion and diffusivity using two-color reflection transient gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, D.M.; Harris, C.B.

    1993-02-01

    We report ultrafast measurements of the dynamic thermal expansion of a surface and the temperature dependent surface thermal diffusivity using a two-color reflection transient grating technique. Studies were performed on p-type, n-type, and undoped GaAs(100) samples at several temperatures. Using a 75 fs ultraviolet probe with visible excitation beams, the electronic effects that dominate single color experiments become negligible; thus surface expansion due to heating and the subsequent contraction caused by cooling provide the dominant influence on the diffracted probe. The diffracted signal was composed of two components, thermal expansion of the surface and heat flow away from the surface, allowing the determination of the rate of expansion as well as the surface thermal diffusivity. At room temperature a signal rise due to thermal expansion was observed, corresponding to a maximum average displacement of {approx} 1 {angstrom} at 32 ps. Large fringe spacings were used, thus the dominant contributions to the signal were expansion and diffusion perpendicular to the surface. Values for the surface thermal diffusivity of GaAs were measured and found to be in reasonable agreement with bulk values above 50{degrees}K. Below 50{degrees}K, the diffusivity at the surface was more than an order of magnitude slower than in the bulk due to increased phonon boundary scattering. Comparison of the results with a straightforward thermal model yields good agreement over a range of temperatures (12--300{degrees}K). The applicability and advantages of the transient grating technique for studying photothermal and photoacoustic phenomena are discussed.

  3. A Monte Carlo model for the reflection of polarized light on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guirado, D.; Stam, D. M.; Smit, M.

    2012-04-01

    An accurate modeling of the reflection of polarized light on rough surfaces is crucial for the interpretation of polarimetric observations of planets and moons, as well as of remote sensing measurements on Earth. We have developed an accurate Monte Carlo code to predict polarization signatures of sunlight reflected from the surface of a planetary body. Using this code for predictions of polarization signatures of the Jovian Moon Ganymede, we find that characteristic features near scattering angles around 90 deg. can mark small differences in refractive index, such as may result from ice-stress. As the phenomenon of reflection of light by a surface occurs locally, we assumed a plane-parallel geometry for our problem. We first considered a surface as a layer of compressed dust grains. A Monte Carlo (MC hereafter) technique was then applied in order to account for multiple scattering and absorption of the individual photons entering the medium. In the MC approach, packets of photons with an initial weight W = 1 are launched. Each packet is split into two parts. One goes to the bottom of the surface or to infinity and is subsequently lost from the packet. The other part undergoes scattering into the surface. The optical thickness to the point of scattering is calculated according to a probability density function depending on the distribution of particles. The weight of the scattered part is reduced according to the single scattering albedo of the scatterer. We follow the path of a photon until W < Wmin, and then another one is launched. This MC scattering model has a limitation on the packing of the particles because it is based on the hypothesis that each scatterer is in the far field zone of the others. As a consequence, it is valid only for fluffy media. In order to make a more realistic model, we included a specular (Fresnel) or Lambertian reflection for light reaching the bottom of the layer of compressed dust. So the whole model consists of a plane

  4. Analyzed polarized reflectance model of typical surface types over China based on the PARASOL measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Kun-Sheng; Cheng, Tian-Hai; Gu, Xing-Fa; Guo, Hong; Chen, Hao; Wang, Ying; Wei, Xi; Bao, Fang-Wen; Kong, Fan-Ping

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the parameters of four types of polarization reflectance models (the Breon physical model, the Nadal-Breon semi-empirical model, the Maignan et al. single parameter model, and the Litvinov et al. model) were analyzed based on the PARASOL observation of three typical features in China three sites (forest, grassland, and desert). Subsequently, combined with the model analysis, the polarization reflectance characteristics of each typical feature were studied. The results reveal that 1) the imitative effect of the Litvinov et al. model about forest was the best, as the linear slope was greater than 0.9 and R2 was better than 0.8; 2) the linear slope and R2 of the Nadal-Breon model about all surfaces were higher than 0.8; 3) although fitting slope of the Maignan et al. model was bad under the forest (0.15surface type and provide a priori knowledge for the quantitative inversion of surface atmospheric parameters.

  5. Quantifying Libya-4 Surface Reflectance Heterogeneity With WorldView-1, 2 and EO-1 Hyperion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neigh, Christopher S. R.; McCorkel, Joel; Middleton, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    The land surface imaging (LSI) virtual constellation approach promotes the concept of increasing Earth observations from multiple but disparate satellites. We evaluated this through spectral and spatial domains, by comparing surface reflectance from 30-m Hyperion and 2-m resolution WorldView-2 (WV-2) data in the Libya-4 pseudoinvariant calibration site. We convolved and resampled Hyperion to WV-2 bands using both cubic convolution and nearest neighbor (NN) interpolation. Additionally, WV-2 and WV-1 same-date imagery were processed as a cross-track stereo pair to generate a digital terrain model to evaluate the effects from large (>70 m) linear dunes. Agreement was moderate to low on dune peaks between WV-2 and Hyperion (R2 <; 0.4) but higher in areas of lower elevation and slope (R2 > 0.6). Our results provide a satellite sensor intercomparison protocol for an LSI virtual constellation at high spatial resolution, which should start with geolocation of pixels, followed by NN interpolation to avoid tall dunes that enhance surface reflectance differences across this internationally utilized site.

  6. Monte Carlo simulation of light reflection from cosmetic powder particles near the human skin surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Takashi; Kumagawa, Tatsuya; Motoda, Masafumi; Igarashi, Takanori; Nakao, Keisuke

    2013-06-01

    The reflection and scattering properties of light incident on human skin covered with powder particles have been investigated. A three-layer skin structure with a pigmented area is modeled, and the propagation of light in the skin's layers and in a layer of particles near the skin's surface is simulated using the Monte Carlo method. Assuming that only single scattering of light occurs in the powder layer, the simulation results show that the reflection spectra of light from the skin change with the size of powder particles. The color difference between normal and discolored skin is found to decrease considerably when powder particles with a diameter of approximately 0.25 μm are present near the skin's surface. The effects of the medium surrounding the particles, and the influence of the distribution of particle size (polydispersity), are also examined. It is shown that a surrounding medium with a refractive index close to that of the skin substantially suppresses the extreme spectral changes caused by the powder particles covering the skin surface.

  7. Method and apparatus for detecting the presence and thickness of carbon and oxide layers on EUV reflective surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Malinowski, Michael E.

    2005-01-25

    The characteristics of radiation that is reflected from carbon deposits and oxidation formations on highly reflective surfaces such as Mo/Si mirrors can be quantified and employed to detect and measure the presence of such impurities on optics. Specifically, it has been shown that carbon deposits on a Mo/Si multilayer mirror decreases the intensity of reflected HeNe laser (632.8 nm) light. In contrast, oxide layers formed on the mirror should cause an increase in HeNe power reflection. Both static measurements and real-time monitoring of carbon and oxide surface impurities on optical elements in lithography tools should be achievable.

  8. Imaging objects behind a partially reflective surface with a modified time-of-flight sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geerardyn, D.; Kuijk, M.

    2014-05-01

    Time-of-Flight (ToF) methods are used in different applications for depth measurements. There are mainly 2 types of ToF measurements, Pulsed Time-of-Flight and Continuous-Wave Time-of-Flight. Pulsed Time-of-Flight (PToF) techniques are mostly used in combination with a scanning mirror, which makes them not well suited for imaging purposes. Continuous-wave Time-of-Flight (CWToF) techniques are mostly used wide-field, hence they are much faster and more suited for imaging purposes but cannot be used behind partially-reflective surfaces. In commercial applications, both ToF methods require specific hardware, which cannot be exchanged. In this paper, we discuss the transformation of a CWToF sensor to a PToF camera, which is able to make images and measure the distances of objects behind a partially-reflective surface, like the air-water interface in swimming pools when looking from above. We first created our own depth camera which is suitable for both CWToF and PToF. We describe the necessary hardware components for a normal ToF camera and compare it with the adapted components which make it a range-gating depth imager. Afterwards, we modeled the distances and images of one or more objects positioned behind a partially-reflective surface and combine it with measurement data of the optical pulse. A scene was virtualized and the rays from a raytracing software tool were exported to Matlab™. Subsequently, pulse deformations were calculated for every pixel, which resulted in the calculation of the depth information.

  9. Lagrangian flows within reflecting internal waves at a horizontal free-slip surface

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Qi; Diamessis, Peter J.

    2015-12-15

    In this paper sequel to Zhou and Diamessis [“Reflection of an internal gravity wave beam off a horizontal free-slip surface,” Phys. Fluids 25, 036601 (2013)], we consider Lagrangian flows within nonlinear internal waves (IWs) reflecting off a horizontal free-slip rigid lid, the latter being a model of the ocean surface. The problem is approached both analytically using small-amplitude approximations and numerically by tracking Lagrangian fluid particles in direct numerical simulation (DNS) datasets of the Eulerian flow. Inviscid small-amplitude analyses for both plane IWs and IW beams (IWBs) show that Eulerian mean flow due to wave-wave interaction and wave-induced Stokes drift cancels each other out completely at the second order in wave steepness A, i.e., O(A{sup 2}), implying zero Lagrangian mean flow up to that order. However, high-accuracy particle tracking in finite-Reynolds-number fully nonlinear DNS datasets from the work of Zhou and Diamessis suggests that the Euler-Stokes cancelation on O(A{sup 2}) is not complete. This partial cancelation significantly weakens the mean Lagrangian flows but does not entirely eliminate them. As a result, reflecting nonlinear IWBs produce mean Lagrangian drifts on O(A{sup 2}) and thus particle dispersion on O(A{sup 4}). The above findings can be relevant to predicting IW-driven mass transport in the oceanic surface and subsurface region which bears important observational and environmental implications, under circumstances where the effect of Earth rotation can be ignored.

  10. Radiative Forcing of Dust in Mountain Snow from MODIS surface reflectance data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painter, T. H.

    2009-05-01

    Here I present an algorithm that retrieves the radiative forcing by desert dust in mountain snow cover from surface reflectance data from NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Dust emitted from natural and disturbed lands frequently deposits to mountain snow cover through dry and wet deposition, particularly in spring when synoptic scale storms entrain material from recently dried surfaces. Dust decreases snow spectral albedo, primarily in the visible wavelengths where the imaginary parts of the complex refractive indices of dust and ice have the greatest contrast. This surface radiative forcing accelerates melt and contributes to the snow-albedo feedback. In the Rocky Mountains of Colorado, this has been shown to shorten the duration of snow cover by approximately a month. The algorithm presented here, MODIS Dust Radiative Forcing in Snow (MOD-DRFS), determines the per pixel radiative forcing by dust in snow from a coupled radiative transfer model that infers the reflectance difference between clean snow spectra and dust- laden snow spectra according to a grain size matching in the near infrared and shortwave infrared wavelengths that are not affected by dust absorption. The spectral residuals are splined to a high spectral resolution and convolved with the at surface spectral irradiance modulated by local topography, and subsequently integrated to the instantaneous surface radiative forcing. I demonstrate the model with retrievals in the Zagros Mountains, Iran and the San Juan Mountains, Colorado, USA. Preliminary validation of the model with in situ detailed pyranometer measurements in the San Juan Mountains indicates that the model has uncertainties of < 7 W/m2.

  11. Computer simulation of irregular surface reflection of an underwater shock wave

    SciTech Connect

    Kamegai, Minqo

    1986-09-01

    Computational studies are given for the behavior of a fluid set in motion by a shallow underwater nuclear explosion. Of particular interest is the interaction of the incident shock wave with the reflected rarefaction wave. Under certain conditions, the rarefaction wave can overtake the shock front beneath the water surface in a manner that is analogous to Mach stem formation in shock reflection from a rigid wall. This phenomenon, referred to as irregular surface rarefaction, has important implications in naval tactics, because it can limit the effective range of shallow underwater explosions. The boundary of the region where irregular rarefaction has occurred is determined by a rarefaction fan generated at the point of surface interaction. This fan resembles the Prandtl-Meyer fan for a supersonic flow through a rapidly expanding jet nozzle. A Lagrangian code and the ALE code were applied to simulate explosions of 10/sup 15/ joules at depths of burst of 3 m, 21 m, and 6.5 m, and to compute the underwater shock wave until the peak pressure decays to less than 0.1 GPa. The results show that the portion of the wave unperturbed by rarefaction closely follows Snay's theoretical description of a shock wave generated by a point explosion in infinite homogeneous water. The onset of the irregular surface rarefaction and the envelope which separates the irregular rarefaction region from the regular rarefaction one are calculated. The theoretical model that developed predicts quite well the onset point at the surface for all three cases plus the region boundary for weak shocks. However, the theory does not match the region boundary with the computed results at large distances for strong shocks. 14 refs., 26 figs.

  12. Reflected solar radiation from horizontal, vertical and inclined surfaces: ultraviolet and visible spectral and broadband behaviour due to solar zenith angle, orientation and surface type.

    PubMed

    Turner, J; Parisi, A V; Turnbull, D J

    2008-07-24

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation affects human life and UV exposure is a significant everyday factor that individuals must be aware of to ensure minimal damaging biological effects to themselves. UV exposure is affected by many complex factors. Albedo is one factor, involving reflection from flat surfaces. Albedo is defined as the ratio of reflected (upwelling) irradiance to incident (downwelling) irradiance and is generally accepted only for horizontal surfaces. Incident irradiance on a non horizontal surface from a variety of incident angles may cause the reflectivity to change. Assumptions about the reflectivity of a vertical surface are frequently made for a variety of purposes but are rarely quantified. As urban structures are dominated by vertical surfaces, using albedo to estimate influence on UV exposure is limiting when incident (downwelling) irradiance is not normal to the surface. Changes to the incident angle are affected by the solar zenith angle, surface position and orientation and surface type. A new characteristic describing reflection from a surface has been used in this research. The ratio of reflected irradiance (from any surface position of vertical, horizontal or inclined) to global (or downwelling) irradiance (RRG) has been calculated for a variety of metal building surfaces in winter time in the southern hemisphere for both the UV and visible radiation spectrum, with special attention to RRG in the UV spectrum. The results show that the RRG due to a vertical surface can exceed the RRG due to a horizontal surface, at smaller solar zenith angles as well as large solar zenith angles. The RRG shows variability in reflective capacities of surface according to the above mentioned factors and present a more realistic influence on UV exposure than albedo for future investigations. Errors in measuring the RRG at large solar zenith angles are explored, which equally highlights the errors in albedo measurement at large solar zenith angles. PMID:18490174

  13. Polarization and Color Filtering Applied to Enhance Photogrammetric Measurements of Reflective Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, Jeffrey M.; Jones, Thomas W.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2005-01-01

    Techniques for enhancing photogrammetric measurement of reflective surfaces by reducing noise were developed utilizing principles of light polarization. Signal selectivity with polarized light was also compared to signal selectivity using chromatic filters. Combining principles of linear cross polarization and color selectivity enhanced signal-to-noise ratios by as much as 800 fold. More typical improvements with combining polarization and color selectivity were about 100 fold. We review polarization-based techniques and present experimental results comparing the performance of traditional retroreflective targeting materials, cornercube targets returning depolarized light, and color selectivity.

  14. Modification of carbon-fiber-composite surface emissivity/reflectance by high-index interference films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pike, John N.; Matthews, Linn H.

    1997-10-01

    High strength/weight carbon fiber-reinforced composites (CFRCs) are finding applications where control of surface infrared emission or reflection is desirable. A quarter wave sputtered Ge film has been shown to reduce the normal emittance of a bismaleimide CFRC in the 8 - 14 micrometers band by 39%, with angle dependence theoretically constant out to 80% off-axis. A three-layer HLH stack is predicted to reduce emittance of less than 0.1. For thermal IR polymer curing, a single-layer coating optimizing emissivity in the polymer's absorption band while suppressing emission at longer wavelengths may yield electric power savings in the 10 - 20% range.

  15. Highly directive Fabry-Perot leaky-wave nanoantennas based on optical partially reflective surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lorente-Crespo, M.; Mateo-Segura, C.

    2015-05-04

    Nanoantennas enhance the conversion between highly localized electromagnetic fields and far-field radiation. Here, we investigate the response of a nano-patch partially reflective surface backed with a silver mirror to an optical source embedded at the centre of the structure. Using full wave simulations, we demonstrate a two orders of magnitude increased directivity compared to the isotropic radiator, 50% power confinement to a 13.8° width beam and a ±16 nm bandwidth. Our antenna does not rely on plasmonic phenomena thus reducing non-radiative losses and conserving source coherence.

  16. Mesoscale climatic simulation of surface air temperature cooling by highly reflective greenhouses in SE Spain.

    PubMed

    Campra, Pablo; Millstein, Dev

    2013-01-01

    A long-term local cooling trend in surface air temperature has been monitored at the largest concentration of reflective greenhouses in the world, at the Province of Almeria, SE Spain, associated with a dramatic increase in surface albedo in the area. The availability of reliable long-term climatic field data at this site offers a unique opportunity to test the skill of mesoscale meteorological models describing and predicting the impacts of land use change on local climate. Using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) mesoscale model, we have run a sensitivity experiment to simulate the impact of the observed surface albedo change on monthly and annual surface air temperatures. The model output showed a mean annual cooling of 0.25 °C associated with a 0.09 albedo increase, and a reduction of 22.8 W m(-2) of net incoming solar radiation at surface. Mean reduction of summer daily maximum temperatures was 0.49 °C, with the largest single-day decrease equal to 1.3 °C. WRF output was evaluated and compared with observations. A mean annual warm bias (MBE) of 0.42 °C was estimated. High correlation coefficients (R(2) > 0.9) were found between modeled and observed values. This study has particular interest in the assessment of the potential for urban temperature cooling by cool roofs deployment projects, as well as in the evaluation of mesoscale climatic models performance. PMID:24074145

  17. New figuring model based on surface slope profile for grazing-incidence reflective optics.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lin; Huang, Lei; Bouet, Nathalie; Kaznatcheev, Konstantine; Vescovi, Matthew; Dai, Yifan; Li, Shengyi; Idir, Mourad

    2016-09-01

    Surface slope profile is widely used in the metrology of grazing-incidence reflective optics instead of surface height profile. Nevertheless, the theoretical and experimental model currently used in deterministic optical figuring processes is based on surface height, not on surface slope. This means that the raw slope profile data from metrology need to be converted to height profile to perform the current height-based figuring processes. The inevitable measurement noise in the raw slope data will introduce significant cumulative error in the resultant height profiles. As a consequence, this conversion will degrade the determinism of the figuring processes, and will have an impact on the ultimate surface figuring results. To overcome this problem, an innovative figuring model is proposed, which directly uses the raw slope profile data instead of the usual height data as input for the deterministic process. In this paper, first the influence of the measurement noise on the resultant height profile is analyzed, and then a new model is presented; finally a demonstration experiment is carried out using a one-dimensional ion beam figuring process to demonstrate the validity of our approach. PMID:27577760

  18. A study of protein reactions with surface-bound molecular targets using oblique-incidence reflectivity difference microscope

    PubMed Central

    Landry, J. P.; Sun, Y. S.; Zhu, X. D.

    2009-01-01

    We applied oblique-incidence reflectivity difference (OI-RD) microscopes (a form of polarization-modulated nulling ellipsometry) to detection of biomolecular microarrays without external labeling in a study of protein reactions with surface-immobilized targets. We show that the optical reflectivity difference signals can be quantitatively related to changes in surface mass density of molecular layers as a result of the reactions. Our experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of using oblique-incidence reflectivity difference microscopes for high-throughput proteomics research such as screening unlabeled protein probes against libraries of surface-immobilized small-molecules. PMID:18566623

  19. Calibration to surface reflectance of terrestrial imaging spectrometry data: Comparison of methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Roger N.; Swayze, Gregg A.; Heidebrecht, Kathy; Green, Robert O.; Goetz, F. H.

    1995-01-01

    Many algorithms for spectral analysis of imaging spectroscopy data of the Earth's surface require that the data be calibrated to surface reflectance. Calibration requires removing instrumental response, solar irradiance, atmospheric transmittance, and atmospheric scattering from the radiance detected at the sensor. Depending on the amount of support data, this can be a formidable task. This paper examines four methods of calibration: (1) a radiative transfer model from the University of Colorado (ATREM: Gao and Goetz, 1990; Gao et al., 1992), (2) a MODTRAN-based method developed at the Jet Propulsion Lab by Green et al., (1191), (3) a ground calibration using known sites as standards, and (4) a combined approach using radiative transfer methods and ground calibration. Data from the Airborne Visual and Infra-Red Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) instrument were evaluated from data sets obtained over multiple years and multiple sites.

  20. Reflectance-difference spectra of Si(001) surfaces with semi-empirical self-enegy corrections^

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.; Li, L.; Chang, Y.-C.

    1997-03-01

    We present ab initio pseudopotential calculations of the reflectance-difference (RD) spectra of Si(001) surfaces. For calculating optical responses it is important to have the correct excited states, which are not easily obtained from the ab initio calculation. Our calculation is based on the density functional theory and planar-orbital basis, which is periodic in the plane and localized in the perpendicular direction. We have included the many-body self-energy corrections semi-empirically by using ad hoc model potentials in order to reproduce the experimentally observed band gaps at Γ, X, and L points in the Brillouin zone and the surface bands (with respect to bulk bands). Comparison between theory and experiment for Si (001) 2×1 and 2×2 reconstructions and with overlayers (e.g., H, As, and Sb) will be presented. Work supported by ONR N00014-89-J-1157.

  1. Light scattering by a rough surface of human skin. 1. The luminance factor of reflected light

    SciTech Connect

    Barun, V V; Ivanov, A P

    2013-08-31

    Based on the analytical solution of Maxwell's equations, we have studied the angular structure of the luminance factor of light reflected by the rough skin surface with large-scale relief elements, illuminated by a directed radiation beam incident at an arbitrary angle inside or outside the medium. The parameters of the surface inhomogeneities are typical of human skin. The calculated angular dependences are interpreted from the point of view of the angular distribution function of micro areas. The results obtained can be used for solving direct and inverse problems in biomedical optics, in particular for determining the depth of light penetration into a biological tissue, for studying the light action spectra on tissue chromophores under the in vivo conditions, for developing diagnostic methods of structural and biophysical parameters of a medium, and for optimising the mechanisms of interaction of light with biological tissues under their noninvasive irradiation through skin. (biomedical optics)

  2. Interaction of mineral surfaces with simple organic molecules by diffuse reflectance IR spectroscopy (DRIFT)

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Joan E.; Kelley, Michael J.

    2008-06-01

    Diffuse reflectance Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) was used to characterize multi-layers of lysine, glutamic acid and salicylic acid on -alumina and kaolinite surfaces. The results agreed well with those previously obtained by ATR-IR in aqueous media where available, indicating that DRIFT may be regarded as effectively an in-situ spectroscopy for these materials. In the case of salicylic acid adsorption onto γ-alumina, DRIFTS was used to identify monolayer coverage and to detect molecules down to coverage of 3% of a monolayer. The spectroscopic results as to coverage were confirmed by analysis of the solutions used for treatment. The spectra obtained allowed identification of changes in the bonding environment with increasing surface coverage. DRIFTS, offers several advantages in terms of materials, experimental technique and data treatment, motivating further investigations.

  3. Effects of light polarization and waves slope statistics on the reflectance factor of the sea surface.

    PubMed

    D'Alimonte, Davide; Kajiyama, Tamito

    2016-04-18

    Above-water radiometry depends on estimates of the reflectance factor ρ of the sea surface to compute the in situ water-leaving radiance. The Monte Carlo code for ocean color simulations MOX is used in this study to analyze the effect of different environmental components on ρ values. A first aspect is examining the reflectance factor without and by accounting for the sky-radiance polarization. The influence of the sea-surface statistics at discrete grid points is then considered by presenting a new scheme to define the variance of the waves slope. Results at different sun elevations and sensor orientations indicate that the light polarization effect on ρ simulations reduces from ∼17 to ∼10% when the wind speed increases from 0 to 14m s-1. An opposite tendency characterizes the modeling of the sea-surface slope variance, with ρ differences up to ∼12% at a wind speed of 10m s-1. The joint effect of polarization and the the sea-surface statistics displays a less systematic dependence on the wind speed, with differences in the range ∼13 to ∼18%. The ρ changes due to the light polarization and the variance of the waves slope become more relevant at sky-viewing geometries respectively lower and higher than 40° with respect to the zenith. An overall compensation of positive and negative offsets due to light polarization is finally documented when considering different sun elevations. These results address additional investigations which, by combining the modeling and experimental components of marine optics, better evaluate specific measurement protocols for collecting above-water radiometric data in the field. PMID:27137234

  4. Fabrication of hard-coated optical absorbers with microstructured surfaces using etched ion tracks: Toward broadband ultra-low reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amemiya, Kuniaki; Koshikawa, Hiroshi; Yamaki, Tetsuya; Maekawa, Yasunari; Shitomi, Hiroshi; Numata, Takayuki; Kinoshita, Kenichi; Tanabe, Minoru; Fukuda, Daiji

    2015-08-01

    Broadband low reflectance materials have various applications in the field of optical energy management; however, materials with ultra-low reflectance (below 0.1%) have been considered as mechanically delicate. We have developed a novel hard-surface optical absorber with microstructured, diamond-like carbon coated ion tracks on CR-39 plastic substrate. The spectral reflectance of the first prototype was below 2% for wavelengths ranging from 400 nm to 1400 nm; moreover, the optical absorber had mechanically hard surface and exhibited temporal durability. Choosing the appropriate design of the surface structure and coating layer is likely to reduce the reflectance to the order of 0.1%. This technique yields easy-to-handle broadband ultra-low reflectance absorbers.

  5. Electron reflection and secondary emission characteristics of sputter-textured pyrolytic graphite surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, E. G.; Curren, A. N.; Sovey, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements are presented of secondary electron emission and reflected primary electron characteristics of sputter-textured pyrolitic graphite surfaces with microstructures of various sizes and densities, made with an Auger cylindrical mirror analyzer in a high-vacuum chamber at pressures below 1.33 x 10 to the -7th N/sq m (10 to the -9th torr). A dense, tall, thin, spire-like microstructure, obtained at ion energies of 1000 eV and ion current densities of 5 mA/sq cm, is the most effective. The secondary electron emission from such a surface is lower than that of soot, whose secondary emission is among the lowest of any material. At a primary electron energy of 1000 eV, the secondary electron emission yield of smooth CU is about 350% greater than the lowest value obtained for sputter-textured pyrolitic graphite. The reflected primary electron index of smooth Cu is a factor of 80 greater. If the secondary electron emission yield is reduced to 0.3, which is possible with sputter-textured pyrolitic graphite, the traveling wave tube collector efficiency could be improved by as much as 4% over that for smooth copper.

  6. Simultaneous determination of hemolysis and hematocrit in extracorporeal circulation by plasma surface reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sakota, Daisuke; Kani, Yuki; Kosaka, Ryo; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    To achieve quantitative non-invasive optical diagnosis of blood abnormalities during extracorporeal circulation therapies, plasma surface reflectance spectroscopy was developed by implementing oblique-incidence optical fiber reflectometry on the surface of circulating blood. The reflected light in the wavelength range from 450 to 600 nm changed with respect to the plasma free hemoglobin level and could be used to quantify the free hemoglobin at an accuracy of 5.7 ± 3.5 mg/dL. In contrast, the spectrum did not changed by varying the hematocrit. In the wavelength range from 600 to 800 nm, the obtained spectrum was affected by both the hematocrit change and hemolysis. The linear correlation between the hematocrit value and the spectrum was confirmed at R(2) = 0.99. The feasibility of determining of the hematocrit of arbitrary hemolyzed blood was confirmed. The developed system permits the extraction of the optical characteristics of both plasma and red blood cells without centrifugation. The study establishes non-invasive optical diagnostics capable of analyzing the optical properties of both plasma and red blood cells. PMID:24111296

  7. Effects of 450-kg surface explosions on HF radio reflection from the E layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, T. Joseph; Carlos, Robert C.

    1997-01-01

    We describe ionospheric disturbances caused by the passage of acoustic shock waves at the E layer generated by the surface detonation of ordinance with effective yields of 450 kg of high explosive during an exercise conducted by the U.S. Air Force at a bombing range near the Nevada Test Site. We deployed a network of HF bistatic ionospheric sounders consisting of two transmitter and two receiver stations at the Nevada Test Site on April 4, 1991. The frequencies of the transmissions were chosen so that the HF radio waves were totally reflected in the E layer of the ionosphere at an altitude of approximately 100 km. The transmissions were highly stable continuous wave (CW) tones at two frequencies separated by 100 kHz so that two altitudes separated by approximately 0.5 km could be probed. The network sampled four geographic locations in the ionosphere in a line covering a horizontal range of 60 km. At two time periods during the day (1930 and 2400 UT), we detected a series of disturbances in the sounder data that continued for 10 min and consisted of Doppler-shifted peaks that chirped rapidly from positive to negative Doppler. We describe the effects produced by the surface explosions and interpret the disturbance in terms of diffraction induced by electron density changes accompanying the passage of the acoustic waves from the explosions through the reflection altitudes of the HF transmissions.

  8. Mueller Matrix of Specular Reflection Using an Aluminum Grating Surface with Oxide Nanofilm.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jun; Ran, Dongfang; Liu, Linhua; Hsu, Pei-Feng

    2016-06-01

    The accurate nondestructive and real-time determination of the critical dimensions of oxide nanofilms on periodic nanostructures has potential applications in nanofabrication techniques. Mueller ellipsometry is fast, accurate, nondestructive, and can be used in the ambient air. This study used the elements of a Mueller matrix of specular reflection, which is based on a Mueller ellipsometry method, to evaluate the thickness of an oxide nanofilm on an aluminum grating surface. By using non-traditional rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA), we decomposed the Mueller matrix to obtain the relationship between the evaluated polarization properties of reflected light and the dimensions of oxide nanofilms on aluminum grating surfaces. We also quantitatively analyzed the Mueller matrix elements' variation due to the thicknesses of top, sidewall, and bottom oxides. We consider these oxide films are naturally formed and of nonuniform thickness on grating structures. The results show that the elements of Mueller matrix shift with the increasing of the uniform thickness of oxide at a fixed wavelength. Moreover, as oxide nanofilms on grating structures are nonuniform, the impact of the thickness of side wall oxide on the Mueller matrix elements is more obvious than that of top and bottom oxides at the relative larger incidence wavelength range. The finding of this work may facilitate the nondestructive and real-time measurement of the thickness of oxide nanofilms on metal gratings where the metal is easily oxidized. PMID:27129364

  9. Molecular Dynamics Calculation of Carbon/Hydrocarbon Reflection Coefficients on a Graphite Surface Employing Distributed Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alman, D. A.; Ruzic, D. N.; Brooks, J. N.

    2001-10-01

    Reflection coefficients of carbon and hydrocarbon molecules have been calculated with a molecular dynamics code. The code uses the Brenner hydrocarbon potential, an empirical many-body potential that can model the chemical bonding in small hydrocarbon molecules and graphite surfaces. A variety of incident energies and angles have been studied. Typical results for carbon show reflection coefficients 0.4 at thermal energy, decreasing to a minimum of 0.15 at 10-20 eV, and then increasing again. Distributed computing is used to distribute the work among 10-20 desktop PCs in the laboratory. The system consists of a client application run on all of the PCs and a single server machine that distributes work and compiles the results sent back from the clients. The client-server software is written in Java and requires no commercial software packages. Thus, the MD code benefits from multiprocessor-like speed-up at no additional cost by using the idle CPU cycles that would otherwise be wasted. These calculations represent an important improvement to the WBC code, which has been used to model surface erosion, core plasma contamination, and tritium codeposition in many fusion design studies and experiments.

  10. Study of Surface and Interface Roughness of GaN-Based Films Using Spectral Reflectance Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzarti, Z.; Khelifi, M.; Halidou, I.; El Jani, B.

    2015-10-01

    GaN films were grown using SiN treatment of sapphire substrate by metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy in a home-made vertical reactor at atmospheric pressure. The growth was interrupted at different stages to investigate the impact of interface and surface roughness on the optical properties of the GaN layers. A transition from a three-dimensional (3D) to two-dimensional (2D) growth mode was revealed by real-time in situ laser reflectometry ( λ = 632.8 nm) as well as by atomic force microscopy images. A theoretical model is proposed to determine the refractive index evolution during GaN layer growth based on the Bruggeman effective medium approximation. Ex situ multiwavelength reflectivity signals were fit to the thin-film interference equations to derive the evolution of the effective refractive indexes for the surface and interface GaN layer, thereby determining the refractive index of the GaN layer during growth. Ex situ spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements of the GaN layer refractive indexes at different growth stages were compared with calculated results. Moreover, an empirical law was developed to fit the refractive index evolution during GaN layer growth and used for in situ reflectivity signal simulation in order to deduce the growth rate. Finally, good agreement was observed between the experimental and theoretical findings.

  11. The effect of the near earth micrometeoroid environment on a highly reflective mirror surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, Michael J.; Mark, Herman; Kerslake, William R.

    1988-01-01

    A resurgence of interest in placing large solar concentrator solar dynamic systems in space for power generation has brought up again a concern for maintaining the integrity of the optical properties of highly specular reflecting surfaces in the near earth space environment. One of the environmental hazards needing evaluation is the micrometeoroid environment. It has been shown that highly reflective polished metals and thin film coatings degrade when exposed to simulated micrometeoroids in the lab. At NASA-Lewis, a shock tube was used to simulate the phenomenon of micrometeoroid impact by accelerating micron sized particles to hypervelocities. Any changes in the optical properties of surfaces exposed to this impact were then evaluated. The degradation of optical properties of polished metals and thin metallic films after exposure to simulated micrometeoroids was determined as a function of impacting kinetic energy area of the particles. A calibrated sensor was developed to not only detect the micrometeoroid environment, but also to evaluate the degradation of the optical properties of thin aluminum films in space. Results of the simulation are presented and discussed.

  12. Improved Near-surface Velocity Models from Waveform Tomography Applied to Vibroseis MCS Reflection Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithyman, B.; Clowes, R. M.

    2009-12-01

    Multichannel vibroseis reflection surveys are prevalent in the land exploration seismic industry because of benefits in speed and cost, along with reduced environmental impact when compared to explosive sources. Since the downgoing energy must travel through the shallow subsurface, an improved model of near-surface velocity can in theory substantially improve the resolution of deeper reflections. We describe techniques aimed at allowing the use of vibroseis data for long-offset refraction processing of first-arrival traveltimes and waveforms. Refraction processing of surface vibroseis data is typically limited to near-offset refraction statics. Velocity models of the shallow subsurface can be built to facilitate CDP stacking and migration, but these models are typically coarse and of limited use for interpretation. Waveform tomography combines inversion of first-arrival traveltime data with full waveform inversion of densely-sampled refracted arrivals. Since inversion of the waveform amplitude and phase is not limited by the ray-theory approximation, identification of low-velocity zones and small scattering targets is possible. Incorporating a wide range of offsets is critical for a more complete characterization of the near-surface. Because of the use of a non-linear frequency-domain approach to the solution of this inverse problem, low data frequencies are important in comparison with conventional reflection processing. Through the use of waveform tomography, we plan to build useful, detailed near-surface velocity models for both the reflection work flow and direct interpretation. Several difficulties exist in first-arrival analysis and waveform inversion of vibroseis data. The mixed-phase vibroseis source signature exhibits variations in phase with offset that are difficult to quantify without detailed a priori knowledge of the near-surface. This causes difficulties with picking and initial model building, which is critical for non-linear waveform inversion. A

  13. Inferring hemispherical reflectance of the earth's surface for global energy budgets from remotely sensed nadir or directional radiance values

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, D. S.; Sellers, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    The relationship between directional reflectances spanning the entire reflecting hemisphere and hemispherical reflectance (albedo) and the effect of solar zenith angle and cover type on these relationships were investigated, using the results obtained from NOAA's 7/8 AVHRR ground-level reflectance measurements. Bands 1 (0.58-0.6B microns) and 2 (0.73-1. 1 microns) were used for reflectance measurements of 11 natural vegetation surfaces ranging from bare soils to dense vegetation canopies. The results show that errors in inferring hemispherical reflectance from nadir reflectance can be between 11 and 45 percent for all cover types and solar angles, depending on the viewing angles. A technique is described in which a choice of two specific view angles reduces this error to less than 6 percent for both bands and for all sun angles and cover types.

  14. Genesis Sample Surface Contamination Study using Total-reflection X-Ray Fluorescence (TXRF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, S.; Luening, K.; Pianetta, P.; Ishii, H. A.; Burnett, D. S.

    2005-12-01

    We have used synchrotron-based Total-reflection X-Ray Fluorescence (TXRF) to measure the surface and near-surface contamination of Genesis flight spare material as well as one piece of sapphire which flew on the mission. Flight spare samples included uncoated, Al-coated and Au-coated sapphire wafers and diamond-like carbon (DLC) on silicon. These studies were performed to determine the suitability of TXRF for the study of Genesis materials. The technique is optimally suited and highly surface sensitive for elements between Na and Br with sensitivities ranging from 1e9 to 1e12 atoms/cm2. By changing the x-ray angle of incidence one can vary the sampling depth from ~ 100 Å to several thousand Å. We found that the level of contamination of the flight-spare material varied widely. For the case of the returned piece of sapphire there were concentrations of Ge on the surface approaching monolayer coverage.

  15. Theoretical study of swift molecular ions specularly reflected from solid surfaces under glancing angle of incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yuan-Hong; Wang, You-Nian; Mišković, Z. L.

    2005-04-01

    We develop a theoretical model to study grazing scattering of fast diatomic molecular ions from a solid surface, based on the dielectric response formalism within the specular reflection model, where the plasmon pole approximation for dielectric function is employed to describe the single-particle and the collective excitations of the electron gas at the surface. Evolution of the bound-electron densities at the constituent ions of a molecule in the course of scattering is described by an approach similar to recent implementation of the Brandt-Kitagawa model for single-ion surface grazing scattering. We solve numerically the equations of motion for the constituent ions and obtain the ion scattering trajectories in the presence of Coulomb explosion modified by the surface wake potential, for the initial molecular-axis orientations in either random directions or along the beam. Vicinage effect on the total energy loss is discussed on the basis of analyzing the position-dependent stopping powers of individual ions and the interferences in the electron excitations of the substrate.

  16. Reference-free total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis of semiconductor surfaces with synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Beckhoff, Burkhard; Fliegauf, Rolf; Kolbe, Michael; Müller, Matthias; Weser, Jan; Ulm, Gerhard

    2007-10-15

    Total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) analysis is a well-established method to monitor lowest level contamination on semiconductor surfaces. Even light elements on a wafer surface can be excited effectively when using high-flux synchrotron radiation in the soft X-ray range. To meet current industrial requirements in nondestructive semiconductor analysis, the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) operates dedicated instrumentation for analyzing light element contamination on wafer pieces as well as on 200- and 300-mm silicon wafer surfaces. This instrumentation is also suited for grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence analysis and conventional energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis of buried and surface nanolayered structures, respectively. The most prominent features are a high-vacuum load-lock combined with an equipment front end module and a UHV irradiation chamber with an electrostatic chuck mounted on an eight-axis manipulator. Here, the entire surface of a 200- or a 300-mm wafer can be scanned by monochromatized radiation provided by the plane grating monochromator beamline for undulator radiation in the PTB laboratory at the electron storage ring BESSY II. This beamline provides high spectral purity and high photon flux in the range of 0.078-1.86 keV. In addition, absolutely calibrated photodiodes and Si(Li) detectors are used to monitor the exciting radiant power respectively the fluorescence radiation. Furthermore, the footprint of the excitation radiation at the wafer surface is well-known due to beam profile recordings by a CCD during special operation conditions at BESSY II that allow for drastically reduced electron beam currents. Thus, all the requirements of completely reference-free quantitation of TXRF analysis are fulfilled and are to be presented in the present work. The perspectives to arrange for reference-free quantitation using X-ray tube-based, table-top TXRF analysis are also addressed. PMID:17880182

  17. A prototype for automation of land-cover products from Landsat Surface Reflectance Data Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rover, J.; Goldhaber, M. B.; Steinwand, D.; Nelson, K.; Coan, M.; Wylie, B. K.; Dahal, D.; Wika, S.; Quenzer, R.

    2014-12-01

    Landsat data records of surface reflectance provide a three-decade history of land surface processes. Due to the vast number of these archived records, development of innovative approaches for automated data mining and information retrieval were necessary. Recently, we created a prototype utilizing open source software libraries for automatically generating annual Anderson Level 1 land cover maps and information products from data acquired by the Landsat Mission for the years 1984 to 2013. The automated prototype was applied to two target areas in northwestern and east-central North Dakota, USA. The approach required the National Land Cover Database (NLCD) and two user-input target acquisition year-days. The Landsat archive was mined for scenes acquired within a 100-day window surrounding these target dates, and then cloud-free pixels where chosen closest to the specified target acquisition dates. The selected pixels were then composited before completing an unsupervised classification using the NLCD. Pixels unchanged in pairs of the NLCD were used for training decision tree models in an iterative process refined with model confidence measures. The decision tree models were applied to the Landsat composites to generate a yearly land cover map and related information products. Results for the target areas captured changes associated with the recent expansion of oil shale production and agriculture driven by economics and policy, such as the increase in biofuel production and reduction in Conservation Reserve Program. Changes in agriculture, grasslands, and surface water reflect the local hydrological conditions that occurred during the 29-year span. Future enhancements considered for this prototype include a web-based client, ancillary spatial datasets, trends and clustering algorithms, and the forecasting of future land cover.

  18. Plasma surface reflectance spectroscopy for non-invasive and continuous monitoring of extracellular component of blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakota, Daisuke; Takatani, Setsuo

    2012-04-01

    To achieve the quantitative optical non-invasive diagnosis of blood during extracorporeal circulation therapies, the instrumental technique to extract extracellular spectra from whole blood was developed. In the circuit, the continuous blood flow was generated by a centrifugal blood pump. The oxygen saturation was maintained 100% by an oxygenator. The developed glass optical flow cell was attached to the outlet tubing of the oxygenator. The halogen lamp including the light from 400 to 900 nm wavelength was used for the light source. The light was guided into an optical fiber. The light emitted by the fiber was collimated and emitted to the flow cell flat surface at the incident angle of 45 degrees. The light just reflected on the boundary between inner surface of the flow cell and plasma at 45 degrees was detected by the detection fiber. The detected light was analyzed by a spectral photometer. The obtained spectrum from 400 to 600nm wavelength was not changed with respect to the hematocrit. In contrast, the signal in the spectral range was changed when the plasma free hemoglobin increased. By using two spectral range, 505+/-5 nm and 542.5+/-2.5 nm, the differential spectrum was correlated with the free hemoglobin at R2=0.99. On the other hand, as for the hematocrit, the differential spectrum was not correlated at R2=0.01. Finally, the plasma free hemoglobin was quantified with the accuracy of 22+/-19mg/dL. The result shows that the developed plasma surface reflectance spectroscopy (PSRS) can extract the plasma spectrum from flowing whole blood.

  19. Interactions of satellite-speed helium atoms with satellite surfaces. 2: Energy distributions of reflected helium atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, S. M.; Knuth, E. L.

    1976-01-01

    Energy transfer in collisions of satellite-speed (7,000 m/sec) helium atoms with a cleaned 6061-T6 satellite-type aluminum surface was investigated using the molecular-beam technique. The amount of energy transferred was determined from the measured energy of the molecular-beam and the measured spatial and energy distributions of the reflected atoms. Spatial distributions of helium atoms scattered from a 6061-T6 aluminum surface were measured. The scattering pattern exhibits a prominent backscattering, probably due to the gross surface roughness and/or the relative lattice softness of the aluminum surface. Energy distributions of reflected helium atoms from the same surface were measured for six different incidence angles. For each incidence angle, distributions were measured at approximately sixty scattering positions. At a given scattering position, the energy spectra of the reflected helium atoms and the background gas were obtained using the retarding-field energy analyzer.

  20. Reflectance spectra of 'featureless' materials and the surface mineralogies of M- and E-class asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloutis, E. A.; Gaffey, M. J.; Smith, D. G. W.; Lambert, R. St. J.

    1990-01-01

    In a search for diagnostic spectral parameters which can be used to distinguish different materials on the surface of asteroids and to provide information on the detection limits for mafic silicates, the 0.3- to 2.6-micron reflectance spectra of meteoritic enstatite (nearly pure MgSiO3), iron meteorite metal, magnetite, and amorphous carbon as well as various mixtures of these materials with mafic silicates were examined. Results are presented on the dependence of the spectral detectability of mafic silicates associated with metal, carbon, and magnetite on the particle sizes of the phases, their chemistries, crystal structures, and abundances. It is shown that the observational data for a representative M-class asteroid, (16) Psyche, are largely consistent with a fine-grained metal-rich surface assemblage, whereas data for the E-class asteroid (44) Nysa indicate that its surface is composed of fine-grained material similar to enstatite achondrites, with a small amount of material comparable to the chondritic inclusions found in the Cumberland Falls aubrite.

  1. Neutron reflectivity study of substrate surface chemistry effects on supported phospholipid bilayer formation on (1120) sapphire.

    SciTech Connect

    Oleson, Timothy A.; Sahai, Nita; Wesolowski, David J; Dura, Joseph A; Majkrzak, Charles F; Giuffre, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Oxide-supported phospholipid bilayers (SPBs) used as biomimetric membranes are significant for a broad range of applications including improvement of biomedical devices and biosensors, and in understanding biomineralization processes and the possible role of mineral surfaces in the evolution of pre-biotic membranes. Continuous-coverage and/or stacjed SPBs retain properties (e.,g. fluidity) more similar to native biological membranes, which is desirable for most applications. Using neutron reflectivity, we examined face coverage and potential stacking of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers on the (1120) face of sapphire (a-Al2O3). Nearly full bilayers were formed at low to neutral pH, when the sapphire surface is positively charged, and at low ionic strength (l=15 mM NaCl). Coverage decreased at higher pH, close to the isoelectric point of sapphire, and also at high I>210mM, or with addition of 2mM Ca2+. The latter two effects are additive, suggesting that Ca2+ mitigates the effect of higher I. These trends agree with previous results for phospholipid adsorption on a-Al2O3 particles determined by adsorption isotherms and on single-crystal (1010) sapphire by atomic force microscopy, suggesting consistency of oxide surface chemistry-dependent effects across experimental techniques.

  2. Remote sensing of solar radiation absorbed and reflected by vegetated land surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Tanre, D.; Myneni, R.B.; Choudhury, B.J. ); Asrar, G. )

    1992-03-01

    This paper discusses the problem of remotely sensing the amount of solar radiation absorbed and reflected by vegetated land surfaces which was investigated with the aid of one- and three-dimensional radiative transfer models. Desert-like vegetation was modeled as clumps of leaves randomly distributed on a bright dry soil with a ground cover of generally less than 100%. Surface albedo (ALB), fraction of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by the canopy (FAPAR), fractions of solar radiation absorbed by the canopy (FASOLAR) and soil (FASOIL), and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) were calculated for various illumination conditions. A base case was defined with problem parameters considered typical for desert vegetation in order to understand the dynamics of NDVI and ALB with respect to ground cover, leaf area index, soil brightness, and illumination conditions. The magnitude of errors involved in the estimation of surface albedo from broad-band monodirectional measurements was assessed through model simulations of SPOT, AVHRR, and GOES sensors. The nature of the relationships between NDVI vs. FASOLAR, FAPAR, FASOIL, and ALB, and their sensitivity to all problem parameter was investigated in order to develop simple predictive models.

  3. Bio-inspired, subwavelength surface structures to control reflectivity, transmission, and scattering in the infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lora Gonzalez, Federico

    Controlling the reflection of visible and infrared (IR) light at interfaces is extremely important to increase the power efficiency and performance of optics, electro-optical and (thermo)photovoltaic systems. The eye of the moth has evolved subwavelength protuberances that increase light transmission into the eye tissue and prevent reflection. The subwavelength protuberances effectively grade the refractive index from that of air (n=1) to that of the tissue (n=1.4), making the interface gradual, suppressing reflection. In theory, the moth-eye (ME) structures can be implemented with any material platform to achieve an antireflectance effect by scaling the pitch and size of protuberances for the wavelength range of interest. In this work, a bio-inspired, scalable and substrate-independent surface modification protocol was developed to realize broadband antireflective structures based on the moth-eye principle. Quasi-ordered ME arrays were fabricated in IR relevant materials using a colloidal lithography method to achieve highly efficient, omni-directional transmission of mid and far infrared (IR) radiation. The effect of structure height and aspect ratio on transmittance and scattering is explored, with discussion on experimental techniques and effective medium theory (EMT). The highest aspect ratio structures (AR = 9.4) achieved peak single-side transmittance of 98%, with >85% transmission for lambda = 7--30 microns. A detailed photon balance constructed by transmission, forward scattering, specular reflection and diffuse reflection measurements to quantify optical losses due to near-field effects will be discussed. In addition, angle-dependent transmission measurements showed that moth-eye structures provide superior antireflective properties compared to unstructured interfaces over a wide angular range (0--60° incidence). Finally, subwavelength ME structures are incorporated on a Si substrate to enhance the absorption of near infrared (NIR) light in PtSi films to

  4. Detecting moisture status of pecan orchards and the potential of remotely-sensed surface reflectance data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, Yahia Abdelrahman

    Demand for New Mexico's limited water resources coupled with periodic drought has increased the need to schedule irrigation of pecan orchards based on tree water status. The overall goal of this research was to develop advanced tree water status sensing techniques to optimize irrigation scheduling of pecan orchards. To achieve this goal, I conducted three studies in the La Mancha and Leyendecker orchards, both mature pecan orchards located in the Mesilla Valley, New Mexico. In the first study, I screened leaf-level physiological changes that occurred during cyclic irrigation to determine parameters that best represented changes in plant moisture status. Then, I linked plant physiological changes to remotely-sensed surface reflectance data derived from Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+). In the second study, I assessed the impact of water deficits that developed during the flood irrigation dry-down cycles on photosynthesis (A) and gas exchange and established preliminary water deficit thresholds of midday stem water potential (Psi smd) critical to A and gas exchange of pecans. In a third study, I investigated whether hyperspectral data obtained from a handheld spectroradiometer and multispectral remotely-sensed data derived from Landsat 7 ETM+ and Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) could detect moisture status in pecans during cyclic flood irrigations. I conducted the first study simultaneously in both orchards. Leaf-level physiological responses and remotely-sensed surface reflectance data were collected from trees that were either well watered or in water deficit. Midday stem water potential was the best leaf-level physiological response to detect moisture status in pecans. Multiple linear regression between Psismd and vegetation indices revealed a significant relationship (R 2 = 0.54) in both orchards. Accordingly, I concluded that remotely-sensed multispectral data form Landsat TMETM+ holds promise for detecting the moisture

  5. Grain size of the surface regolith of asteroid 4 Vesta estimated from its reflectance spectrum in comparison with HED meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiroi, Takahiro; Pieters, Carle M.; Takeda, Hiroshi

    1994-01-01

    The grain-size distribution of the regolith of asteroid 4 Vesta has been estimated by comparing its reflectance spectra (0.3-2.6 microns) with those of HED meteorites. The finest grain-size separate (less than 25 micrometers) of a particular howardite has a reflectance spectrum most similar to Vesta's. In order to better simulate Vesta's surface mineralogy, reflectance spectra of those finest HED meteorite powders were linearly combined, and Vesta's spectrum was scaled for the best fit between them. Both the albedo and the shape of reflectance spectrum of Vesta were well reproduced by regional mixtures of the finest (less than 25 micrometers) powders of HED meteorites. The result suggests the heterogeneity of Vesta's surface and provides an estimate of the visible reflectance of Vesta that is close to its Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) albedo. Thus, this suggests that fine grains can be generated and retained by relatively small bodies (Vesta is approximately 500 km in diameter).

  6. Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy of single bowtie nano-antennas using a differential reflectivity method

    PubMed Central

    Kaniber, M.; Schraml, K.; Regler, A.; Bartl, J.; Glashagen, G.; Flassig, F.; Wierzbowski, J.; Finley, J. J.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the structural and optical properties of individual bowtie nanoantennas both on glass and semiconducting GaAs substrates. The antennas on glass (GaAs) are shown to be of excellent quality and high uniformity reflected by narrow size distributions with standard deviations for the triangle and gap size of = 4.5 nm = 2.6 nm and = 5.4 nm = 3.8 nm, respectively. The corresponding optical properties of individual nanoantennas studied by differential reflection spectroscopy show a strong reduction of the localised surface plasmon polariton resonance linewidth from 0.21 eV to 0.07 eV upon reducing the antenna size from 150 nm to 100 nm. This is attributed to the absence of inhomogeneous broadening as compared to optical measurements on nanoantenna ensembles. The inter-particle coupling of an individual bowtie nanoantenna, which gives rise to strongly localised and enhanced electromagnetic hotspots, is demonstrated using polarization-resolved spectroscopy, yielding a large degree of linear polarization of ρmax ~ 80%. The combination of highly reproducible nanofabrication and fast, non-destructive and non-contaminating optical spectroscopy paves the route towards future semiconductor-based nano-plasmonic circuits, consisting of multiple photonic and plasmonic entities. PMID:27005986

  7. Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy of single bowtie nano-antennas using a differential reflectivity method.

    PubMed

    Kaniber, M; Schraml, K; Regler, A; Bartl, J; Glashagen, G; Flassig, F; Wierzbowski, J; Finley, J J

    2016-01-01

    We report on the structural and optical properties of individual bowtie nanoantennas both on glass and semiconducting GaAs substrates. The antennas on glass (GaAs) are shown to be of excellent quality and high uniformity reflected by narrow size distributions with standard deviations for the triangle and gap size of = 4.5 nm = 2.6 nm and = 5.4 nm = 3.8 nm, respectively. The corresponding optical properties of individual nanoantennas studied by differential reflection spectroscopy show a strong reduction of the localised surface plasmon polariton resonance linewidth from 0.21 eV to 0.07 eV upon reducing the antenna size from 150 nm to 100 nm. This is attributed to the absence of inhomogeneous broadening as compared to optical measurements on nanoantenna ensembles. The inter-particle coupling of an individual bowtie nanoantenna, which gives rise to strongly localised and enhanced electromagnetic hotspots, is demonstrated using polarization-resolved spectroscopy, yielding a large degree of linear polarization of ρmax ~ 80%. The combination of highly reproducible nanofabrication and fast, non-destructive and non-contaminating optical spectroscopy paves the route towards future semiconductor-based nano-plasmonic circuits, consisting of multiple photonic and plasmonic entities. PMID:27005986

  8. Polarization radiation in the planetary atmosphere delimited by a heterogeneous diffusely reflecting surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strelkov, S. A.; Sushkevich, T. A.

    1983-01-01

    Spatial frequency characteristics (SFC) and the scattering functions were studied in the two cases of a uniform horizontal layer with absolutely black bottom, and an isolated layer. The mathematical model for these examples describes the horizontal heterogeneities in a light field with regard to radiation polarization in a three dimensional planar atmosphere, delimited by a heterogeneous surface with diffuse reflection. The perturbation method was used to obtain vector transfer equations which correspond to the linear and nonlinear systems of polarization radiation transfer. The boundary value tasks for the vector transfer equation that is a parametric set and one dimensional are satisfied by the SFC of the nonlinear system, and are expressed through the SFC of linear approximation. As a consequence of the developed theory, formulas were obtained for analytical calculation of albedo in solving the task of dissemination of polarization radiation in the planetary atmosphere with uniform Lambert bottom.

  9. Comparisons of bidirectional reflectance distribution function measurements on prepared particulate surfaces and radiative-transfer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Voss, Kenneth J.

    2005-02-01

    To understand the connection between single-particle optics and the optics of a closely packed surface, controlled laboratory measurements of bidirectional reflectance distribution functions on layers of polymer and glass spheres are carried out. The measurements are compared with predictions from five radiative-transfer models; the Hapke's models, the Lumme-Bowell model, the BRF algorithm of Mishchenko et al., and the discrete ordinate radiative transfer. It is found that models of strict numerical radiative-transfer equations (RTEs) predict measurements well in some regions but have errors in both forward-and backward-scattering directions. The improved Hapke's model, although it has an anisotropic multiple-scattering term, still produces considerable errors compared with the strict RTE. The difference can be attributed to the exclusion of a diffraction contribution in the Hapke model.

  10. Modification of nanostructured fused silica for use as superhydrophobic, IR-transmissive, anti-reflective surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Darryl A.; Frantz, Jesse A.; Bayya, Shyam S.; Busse, Lynda E.; Kim, Woohong; Aggarwal, Ishwar; Poutous, Menelaos; Sanghera, Jasbinder S.

    2016-04-01

    In order to mimic and enhance the properties of moth eye-like materials, nanopatterned fused silica was chemically modified to produce self-cleaning substrates that have anti-reflective and infrared transmissive properties. The characteristics of these substrates were evaluated before and after chemical modification. Furthermore, their properties were compared to fused silica that was devoid of surface features. The chemical modification imparted superhydrophobic character to the substrates, as demonstrated by the average water contact angles which exceeded 170°. Finally, optical analysis of the substrates revealed that the infrared transmission capabilities of the fused silica substrates (nanopatterned to have moth eye on one side) were superior to those of the regular fused silica substrates within the visible and near-infrared region of the light spectrum, with transmission values of 95% versus 92%, respectively. The superior transmission properties of the fused silica moth eye were virtually unchanged following chemical modification.

  11. Development of sheet molding compound solar collectors with molded-in silvered glass reflective surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Champion, R. L.; Allred, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    An approach to the fabrication of a line-focusng parabolic trough reflector structure which offers the potential of high performance while utilizing mass production type technology with potential for low cost is discussed. The concept is one of a molded structure of fiber reinforced plastic with an integrally molded silvered glass reflective surface. Sheet molding compound (SMC), a mixture of glass fibers and inorganic fillers in polyester resin, has been selected for evaluation as representative of reinforced plastic molding materials. The purpose of the work was to establish the feasibility of molding glass mirrors into SMC structural trough panels. If the effort proved successful, the next stage of development would be demonstration of the structure in a trough collector which incorporates individual SMC reflector panels. The trough has a 2 x 6 m aperture with six individual SMC panels mounted on a torque tube as the main support structure. Results are described. (WHK)

  12. Analytical model for the excitation of leaky surface plasmon polaritons in the attenuated total reflection configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Hongwei; Xie, Yunya; Liu, Haitao; Zhong, Ying

    2016-05-01

    We propose a fully-analytical model for the excitation of leaky surface plasmon polariton (SPP) in the attenuated total reflection (ATR) configuration under illumination by a finite-width beam of electromagnetic wave. The model is built up on the basis of the general unconjugated-form reciprocity theorem and is able to predict the excitation amplitude and phase of the leaky SPP at a quantitative level. The validity of the model is carefully supported through a comparison with the numerical results obtained with the mode orthogonality. With the model a physical understanding of the resonant excitation of the leaky SPP is achieved and the optimal parameters such as the incidence angle and the beam width to ensure an efficient SPP excitation are demonstrated for design tasks.

  13. Effects of surface reflectance on skylight polarization measurements at the Mauna Loa Observatory.

    PubMed

    Dahlberg, Andrew R; Pust, Nathan J; Shaw, Joseph A

    2011-08-15

    An all-sky imaging polarimeter was deployed in summer 2008 to the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii to study clear-sky atmospheric skylight polarization. The imager operates in five wavebands in the visible and near infrared spectrum and has a fisheye lens for all-sky viewing. This paper describes the deployment and presents comparisons of the degree of skylight polarization observed to similar data observed by Coulson with a principal-plane scanning polarimeter in the late 1970s. In general, the results compared favorably to those of Coulson. In addition, we present quantitative results correlating a variation of the maximum degree of polarization over a range of 70-85% to fluctuation in underlying surface reflectance and upwelling radiance data from the GOES satellite. PMID:21934965

  14. BOREAS Level-2 MAS Surface Reflectance and Temperature Images in BSQ Format

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey (Editor); Lobitz, Brad; Spanner, Michael; Strub, Richard; Lobitz, Brad

    2000-01-01

    The BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Staff Science Aircraft Data Acquisition Program focused on providing the research teams with the remotely sensed aircraft data products they needed to compare and spatially extend point results. The MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS) images, along with other remotely sensed data, were collected to provide spatially extensive information over the primary study areas. This information includes biophysical parameter maps such as surface reflectance and temperature. Collection of the MAS images occurred over the study areas during the 1994 field campaigns. The level-2 MAS data cover the dates of 21-Jul-1994, 24-Jul-1994, 04-Aug-1994, and 08-Aug-1994. The data are not geographically/geometrically corrected; however, files of relative X and Y coordinates for each image pixel were derived by using the C130 navigation data in a MAS scan model. The data are provided in binary image format files.

  15. Raman scattering and attenuated-total-reflection studies of surface-plasmon polaritons

    SciTech Connect

    Kurosawa, K.; Pierce, R.M.; Ushioda, S.; Hemminger, J.C.

    1986-01-15

    We have made in situ measurements of attenuated total reflection (ATR) and Raman scattering from a layered structure consisting of a glass prism, a thin silver film, an MgF2 spacer, and a liquid mixture whose refractive index is matched to that of MgF2. When the incident angle of the laser beam coincides with the ATR angle, the surface-plasmon polariton (SPP) of the silver film is excited resonantly and the Raman scattering intensity of the liquid shows a maximum. The same effect is observed at the frequency of the Stokes scattered light. By measuring the decrease of the Raman scattering intensity of the liquid with increase of the thickness of the MgF2 spacer layer, we have determined the decay length (l/sub d/) of the SPP field into the liquid. The measured value of l/sub d/ = 1539 A agrees with the calculated value, 1534 A.

  16. High-orbit satellite reflection surface geometry information estimation using photometric measurement method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shixue

    2015-10-01

    The method to get high-orbit satellite basic information such as geometry and material characteristic, is an important goal in the field of space posture apperception. In this paper, we calculate the satellite magnitude by comparing the output value of camera's CCD between the known fixed star and the satellite. We select certain reference stars to calculate the luminance value of a certain object on the acquired image using a background-removing method. We make time-domain analysis of the measurement data, and get the statistic result. With the knowledge of the theory brightness of the target, we estimate the geometric characteristics of the target. We have got a serious of the images of a certain satellite on large telescope. The experimental results demonstrate that, the accuracy of the measured magnitude is better than 0.12Mv, and the estimation error of the target reflection surface size is less than 15%.

  17. Impact of differences in the solar irradiance spectrum on surface reflectance retrieval with different radiative transfer codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staenz, K.; Williams, D. J.; Fedosejevs, G.; Teillet, P. M.

    1995-01-01

    Surface reflectance retrieval from imaging spectrometer data as acquired with the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) has become important for quantitative analysis. In order to calculate surface reflectance from remotely measured radiance, radiative transfer codes such as 5S and MODTRAN2 play an increasing role for removal of scattering and absorption effects of the atmosphere. Accurate knowledge of the exo-atmospheric solar irradiance (E(sub 0)) spectrum at the spectral resolution of the sensor is important for this purpose. The present study investigates the impact of differences in the solar irradiance function, as implemented in a modified version of 5S (M5S), 6S, and MODTRAN2, and as proposed by Green and Gao, on the surface reflectance retrieved from AVIRIS data. Reflectance measured in situ is used as a basis of comparison.

  18. Plasma generation for controlled microwave-reflecting surfaces in plasma antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Bliokh, Yury P.; Felsteiner, Joshua; Slutsker, Yakov Z.

    2014-04-28

    The idea of replacing metal antenna elements with equivalent plasma objects has long been of interest because of the possibility of switching the antenna on and off. In general, two kinds of designs have so far been reported: (a) Separate plasma “wires” which are thin glass tubes filled with gas, where plasma appears due to discharge inside. (b) Reflecting surfaces, consisting of tightly held plasma wires or specially designed large discharge devices with magnetic confinement. The main disadvantages of these antennas are either large weight and size or too irregular surfaces for proper reflection. To design a microwave plasma antenna in the most common radar wavelength range of 1–3 cm with a typical gain of 30 dB, a smooth plasma mirror having a 10–30 cm diameter and a proper curvature is required. The plasma density must be 10{sup 12}–10{sup 14} cm{sup −3} in order to exceed the critical density for the frequency of the electromagnetic wave. To achieve this we have used a ferromagnetic inductively coupled plasma (FICP) source, where a thin magnetic core of a large diameter is fully immersed in the plasma. In the present paper, we show a way to adapt the FICP source for creating a flat switchable microwave plasma mirror with an effective diameter of 30 cm. This mirror was tested as a microwave reflector and there was found no significant difference when compared with a copper plate having the same diameter.

  19. Fracture Detection in Alluvial Fan Deposits Using Near-Surface Seismic Reflection Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, R. A.; Miller, B.

    2012-12-01

    In this study we document the observation of probable extensive shallow vertical fracture systems in unprocessed 2-D source gathers from near-surface seismic reflection surveys conducted over unconsolidated materials in alluvial fans environments. Mapping of fracture and fault systems within the sedimentary sections at hydrocarbon exploration scales has become common practice. This is due to the advent of post-stack attribute analysis of 3-D seismic images worldwide. However, examples of fracture detection and imaging in the near-surface are currently lacking in the literature. In addition, examples of fracture detection and mapping in the pre-stack domain are also lacking. In this study, unprocessed seismic source gathers from very high-resolution reflection surveys over alluvial fan deposits in tectonically active areas appear to display distinct patterns of amplitude drop off, geometrically similar to patterns expected for vertical fracture systems. The patterns can also be extracted by attribute analysis using techniques such as envelope and coherency analyses. Simple standard processing steps such as trace editing, muting, and bandpass filtering enhance interpretability. The patterns appear to be consistent and spatially fixed in the subsurface from source location to source location. These are observed in areas of obvious recent local large-scale fault movement. Examples are given from two areas, eastern Queen Valley in California and eastern Fish Lake Valley in Nevada. The stratigraphic and sedimentation patterns are quite complicated in both areas, and sediment characteristics vary considerably between sites. The surface sediments in the Queen Valley case are, in general, much coarser with many more boulder-sized clasts in the shallow subsurface. The seismic source consisted of a 30-06 rifle fired downhole at a depth of 0.5m. While the boulders interfered with seismic source operations, the record quality was excellent. The alluvial materials, especially

  20. Seasonal lake surface water temperature trends reflected by heterocyst glycolipid-based molecular thermometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauersachs, T.; Rochelmeier, J.; Schwark, L.

    2015-06-01

    preserved in the sediment record of Lake Schreventeich reflect summer surface water temperatures. As N2-fixing heterocystous cyanobacteria are widespread in present-day freshwater and brackish environments, we conclude that the distribution of HGs in sediments may allow for the reconstruction of surface water temperatures of modern and potentially ancient lacustrine settings.

  1. An optical metamaterial with simultaneously suppressed optical diffraction and surface reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivijärvi, V.; Nyman, M.; Shevchenko, A.; Kaivola, M.

    2016-03-01

    Diffraction-free propagation of light has been demonstrated in free space for Bessel-like beams and for arbitrary beams in specially designed photonic crystals and metamaterials. The phenomenon is called self-collimation in photonic crystals and canalization in metamaterials, as the approaches to obtaining the effect are different. In both cases, however, diffraction-free propagation of light is achieved by making the dispersion surface of the material at a given frequency flat. In photonic crystals this is done by tuning the unit-cell dimensions close to the band-gap regime, and in metamaterials by tuning a hyperbolic-type metamaterial towards its transition to an ordinary elliptical metamaterial. In this work, we propose an alternative way to suppress optical diffraction in a metamaterial by adjusting the anisotropy of the finite-sized three-dimensional metamolecules and the material’s spatial dispersion. The approach allows matching the wave impedance of the material to that of the surrounding medium in a wide range of incidence angles and thereby also suppressing optical reflection from the material’s surface.

  2. Evaluation of laser light specularly reflected by the hohlraum surface on OMEGA indirect implosion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, Nobuhiko; Turner, R. E.; Landen, O. L.; Wallace, R. J.; Koch, R. A.

    2003-10-01

    Due to the cylindrical shape of hohlraums typically used in indirect implosion experiments, the laser beams specularly reflected by the inner hohlraum surface are focused onto the capsule surface. This effect, which is known as the glint light effect, is important during the early stages of laser irradiation ( ˜200 ps), and might seed undesirable hydrodynamic instabilities which could grow during the implosion. We performed ray-trace calculations to evaluate this effect, and found that with a typical laser configuration the peak intensity of glint light can be up to 4 × 10^14 W/cm^2. We also performed experiments to measure of glint light effect at Omega using a time resolved x-ray re-emission technique, and evaluated the effect of rough hohlraum walls on the glint light intensity and spatial distribution. The results of the calculations and experiments will be presented. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  3. An analytical and numerical study of the nonlinear reflection at a stress-free surface

    SciTech Connect

    Romer, Anne Kim, Jin-Yeon; Jacobs, Laurence J.

    2015-03-31

    Implementation of the ultrasonic second harmonic generation has typically been restricted to simple setups such as through-transmission or Rayleigh surface waves. Recent research has evaluated the second harmonic waves generation in P- and SV- waves reflected from a stress-free surface to enable the single-sided interrogation of a specimen. This research considers the second harmonic generation in an aluminum specimen, which is analytically evaluated using an approach based on a perturbation method. Here, the model is chosen to mimic an experimental setup where the longitudinal wave is generated at oblique angle using a wedge transducer. Due to the mode conversion at the interface of the wedge and the specimen, it is necessary to evaluate longitudinal and shear waves, determining all second harmonic waves generated in the bulk and at the stress-free boundary. The theoretically developed model is then implemented in a commercial finite element code, COMSOL, using increasing fundamental wave amplitudes for different values of third order elastic constants. The results of this computational model verify the analytical approach and the proposed measurement setup, taking into account assumptions and approximations of the solution procedure. Furthermore, the computational model is used to draw important conclusions relevant to the experimental setup, including the need to avoid interaction with diffracted waves.

  4. A Monte Carlo study of reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy spectrum of a carbon contaminated surface

    SciTech Connect

    Da, B.; Li, Z. Y.; Chang, H. C.; Ding, Z. J.; Mao, S. F.

    2014-09-28

    It has been experimentally found that the carbon surface contamination influences strongly the spectrum signals in reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy (REELS) especially at low primary electron energy. However, there is still little theoretical work dealing with the carbon contamination effect in REELS. Such a work is required to predict REELS spectrum for layered structural sample, providing an understanding of the experimental phenomena observed. In this study, we present a numerical calculation result on the spatially varying differential inelastic mean free path for a sample made of a carbon contamination layer of varied thickness on a SrTiO{sub 3} substrate. A Monte Carlo simulation model for electron interaction with a layered structural sample is built by combining this inelastic scattering cross-section with the Mott's cross-section for electron elastic scattering. The simulation results have clearly shown that the contribution of the electron energy loss from carbon surface contamination increases with decreasing primary energy due to increased individual scattering processes along trajectory parts carbon contamination layer. Comparison of the simulated spectra for different thicknesses of the carbon contamination layer and for different primary electron energies with experimental spectra clearly identifies that the carbon contamination in the measured sample was in the form of discontinuous islands other than the uniform film.

  5. The laboratory investigation of surface envelope solitons: reflection from a vertical wall and collisions of solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slunyaev, Alexey; Klein, Marco; Clauss, Günther F.

    2016-04-01

    Envelope soliton solutions are key elements governing the nonlinear wave dynamics within a simplified theory for unidirectional weakly modulated weakly nonlinear wave groups on the water surface. Within integrable models the solitons preserve their structure in collisions with other waves; they do not disperse and can carry energy infinitively long. Steep and short soliton-like wave groups have been shown to exist in laboratory tests [1] and, even earlier, in numerical simulations [2, 3]. Thus, long-living wave groups may play important role in the dynamics of intense sea waves and wave-structure interactions. The solitary wave groups may change the wave statistics and can be taken into account when developing approaches for the deterministic forecasting of dangerous waves, including so-called rogue waves. An experimental campaign has been conducted in the wave basin of the Technical University of Berlin on simulations of intense solitary wave groups. The first successful experimental observation of intense envelope solitons took place in this facility [1]. The new experiments aimed at following main goals: 1) to reproduce intense envelope solitons with different carrier wave lengths; 2) to estimate the rate of envelope soliton dissipation; 3) to consider the reflection of envelope solitons on a vertical wall; 4) to consider head-on collisions of envelope solitons, and 5) to consider overtaking interactions of envelope solitons. Up to 9 wave gauges were used in each experimental run, which enabled registration of the surface movement at different distances from the wavemaker, at different locations across the wave flume and near the wall. Besides surface displacements, the group envelope shapes were directly recorded, with use of phase shifts applied to the modulated waves generated by the wavemaker. [1] A. Slunyaev, G.F. Clauss, M. Klein, M. Onorato, Simulations and experiments of short intense envelope solitons of surface water waves. Phys. Fluids 25, 067105

  6. Field spectroscopy sampling strategies for improved measurement of Earth surface reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mac Arthur, A.; Alonso, L.; Malthus, T. J.; Moreno, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    Over the last two decades extensive networks of research sites have been established to measure the flux of carbon compounds and water vapour between the Earth's surface and the atmosphere using eddy covariance (EC) techniques. However, contributing Earth surface components cannot be determined and (as the ';footprints' are spatially constrained) these measurements cannot be extrapolated to regional cover using this technique. At many of these EC sites researchers have been integrating spectral measurements with EC and ancillary data to better understand light use efficiency and carbon dioxide flux. These spectroscopic measurements could also be used to assess contributing components and provide support for imaging spectroscopy, from airborne or satellite platforms, which can provide unconstrained spatial cover. Furthermore, there is an increasing interest in ';smart' database and information retrieval systems such as that proposed by EcoSIS and OPTIMISE to store, analyse, QA and merge spectral and biophysical measurements and provide information to end users. However, as Earth surfaces are spectrally heterogeneous and imaging and field spectrometers sample different spatial extents appropriate field sampling strategies require to be adopted. To sample Earth surfaces spectroscopists adopt either single; random; regular grid; transect; or 'swiping' point sampling strategies, although little comparative work has been carried out to determine the most appropriate approach; the work by Goetz (2012) is a limited exception. Mac Arthur et al (2012) demonstrated that, for two full wavelength (400 nm to 2,500 nm) field spectroradiometers, the measurement area sampled is defined by each spectroradiometer/fore optic system's directional response function (DRF) rather than the field-of-view (FOV) specified by instrument manufacturers. Mac Arthur et al (2012) also demonstrated that each reflecting element within the sampled area was not weighted equally in the integrated

  7. Chromatic X-ray magnifying method and apparatus by Bragg reflective planes on the surface of Abbe sphere

    DOEpatents

    Thoe, Robert S.

    1991-01-01

    Method and apparatus for producing sharp, chromatic, magnified images of X-ray emitting objects, are provided. The apparatus, which constitutes an X-ray microscope or telescope, comprises a connected collection of Bragg reflecting planes, comprised of either a bent crystal or a synthetic multilayer structure, disposed on and adjacent to a locus determined by a spherical surface. The individual Bragg planes are spatially oriented to Bragg reflect radiation from the object location toward the image location. This is accomplished by making the Bragg planes spatially coincident with the surfaces of either a nested series of prolate ellipsoids of revolution, or a nested series of spheres. The spacing between the Bragg reflecting planes can be tailored to control the wavelengths and the amount of the X-radiation that is Bragg reflected to form the X-ray image.

  8. Objective and Subjective Evaluation of Reflecting and Diffusing Surfaces in Auditoria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Trevor John

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. The performance of reflectors and diffusers used in auditoria have been evaluated both objectively and subjectively. Two accurate systems have been developed to measure the scattering from surfaces via the cross correlation function. These have been used to measure the scattering from plane panels, curved panels and quadratic residue diffusers (QRDs). The scattering measurements have been used to test theoretical prediction methods based on the Helmholtz-Kirchhoff integral equation. Accurate prediction methods were found for all surfaces tested. The limitations of the more approximate methods have been defined. The assumptions behind Schroeder's design of the QRD have been tested and the local reacting admittance assumption found to be valid over a wide frequency range. It was found that the QRD only produces uniform scattering at low frequencies. For an on-axis source the scattering from a curved panel was as good as from a QRD. For an oblique source the QRD produced much more uniform scattering than the curved panel. The subjective measurements evaluated the smallest perceivable change in the early sound field, the part most influenced by reflectors and diffusers. A natural sounding simulation of a concert hall field within an anechoic chamber was used. Standard objective parameters were reasonable values when compared to values found in real halls and subjective preference measurements. A difference limen was measured for early lateral energy fraction (.048 +/-.005); inter aural cross correlation (.075 +/-.008); clarity index (.67 +/-.13 dB); and centre time (8.6 +/- 1.6 ms). It was found that: (i) when changes are made to diffusers and reflectors, changes in spatial impression will usually be larger than those in clarity; and (ii) acousticians can gain most by paying attention to lateral sound in auditoria. It was also found that: (i) diffuse reflections in the early sound field

  9. a Simple and Effective Retrieval of Land Surface Temperature Using a New Reflectance Based Emissivity Estimation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nithiyanandam, Y.; Nichol, J. E.

    2016-06-01

    Emissivity is a significant factor in determining land surface temperature (LST) retrieved from the thermal infrared (TIR) satellite images. A new simplified method (reflectance method) for emissivity correction was developed in this study while estimating emissivity values at a spatial resolution of 30 m from the radiance values of the SWIR image. This in turn enables mapping surface temperatures at a much finer spatial resolution (30 m). Temperatures so estimated are validated against surface temperatures measured in the ground by thermocouple data loggers recorded during satellite overpass time. In this study, surface emissivity values are derived directly from the AST_ L1B images. The reflectance method estimates temperature at higher spatial resolution of 30 m when compared to the 90 m spatial resolution of TES and reference channel methods. Temperature determined for the daytime image of 30th November 2007 using different emissivity techniques was compared with the temperatures measured on the field using thermocouple data loggers. It is observed that the estimates from the reflectance method are much closer to the field measurements than the TES and reference channel methods. The temperature difference values range from 0.2 to 2.3 °C, 0.15 to 5.6 °C, and 2.6 to 8.6 °C for the reflectance method, normalization method and reference channel method, respectively. The new reflectance emissivity techniques i.e. reflectance method exhibits the least deviation from the field measured temperature values. While considering the accuracy of data logger (1 °C) the reflectance method enables one to map surface temperature precisely than other two methods.

  10. Chemical modification of oxidized and silicon oxide covered aluminium surfaces studied by FTIR/multiple specular reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sondag, A. H.; Raas, M. C.; Touwslager, F. J.; Ponjee, J. J.

    1989-12-01

    Multiple Specular Reflectance (MSR) infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy has been applied to study surface modification by organosilane (sub)monomolecular layers. The spectrum of octadecyldimethylmethoxysilane immobilized on an oxidized aluminium substrate is compared to the absorption spectra of the monomer and the disiloxane condensation product. Formation of hydroxyl groups on a Si02 covered aluminium substrate by a UV-ozon treatment is shown. Simultaneously, organic contaminants are removed from the surface by the UV-ozon treatment. The chemisorption of 3-methacryloxypropyldimethylethoxysilane on UV-ozon treated Si02 has been examined at different surface coverages. An increase of the number of organosilane species at the surface is accompanied by a decrease of surface hydroxyl groups.

  11. Uncertainty analysis of the SPOT 4 VEGETATION and MODIS surface reflectance products, and its impact on vegetation indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czapla-Myers, J.

    2012-12-01

    Vegetation indices (VIs) are used to monitor the spatial and temporal variations of global vegetation. They provide essential measurements for climate, phenology, and land cover change detection. VIs are typically determined from surface reflectance data that are collected using spaceborne platforms. In order to understand the uncertainty of long-term data records, it is important to understand the uncertainty of the inputs that are used to determine the VIs. The Remote Sensing Group (RSG) at the University of Arizona uses the reflectance-based approach to perform the absolute radiometric calibration of airborne and satellite sensors in the solar-reflective regime. During a typical field campaign, measurements of the atmosphere and surface are made during a sensor overpass. The surface reflectance is measured using a portable spectroradiometer that operates from 400-2500 nm. This work uses in situ data that were obtained at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, and Railroad Valley, Nevada. The surface reflectance data are compared to those reported by SPOT 4 VEGETATION and both MODIS sensors to acquire an understanding of the uncertainty in the VI data product.

  12. Aerosol radiative forcing over land: effect of surface and cloud reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satheesh, S. K.

    2002-12-01

    It is now clearly understood that atmospheric aerosols have a significant impact on climate due to their important role in modifying the incoming solar and outgoing infrared radiation. The question of whether aerosol cools (negative forcing) or warms (positive forcing) the planet depends on the relative dominance of absorbing aerosols. Recent investigations over the tropical Indian Ocean have shown that, irrespective of the comparatively small percentage contribution in optical depth ( ~ 11%), soot has an important role in the overall radiative forcing. However, when the amount of absorbing aerosols such as soot are significant, aerosol optical depth and chemical composition are not the only determinants of aerosol climate effects, but the altitude of the aerosol layer and the altitude and type of clouds are also important. In this paper, the aerosol forcing in the presence of clouds and the effect of different surface types (ocean, soil, vegetation, and different combinations of soil and vegetation) are examined based on model simulations, demonstrating that aerosol forcing changes sign from negative (cooling) to positive (warming) when reflection from below (either due to land or clouds) is high.

  13. In Situ X-ray Reflectivity Studies of Protein Adsorption onto Functionalized Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Andrew

    2007-03-01

    The adsorption of protein films onto solid surfaces, both artificial and naturally occurring, have been widely studied using a variety of techniques due to their importance in medicine, biomedical applications, and the general understanding of protein structure and function. What have yet to be performed are in situ, time-resolved, high-resolution structural studies of these systems. We have begun a project that uses the technique of in situ x-ray reflectivity to obtain highly resolved structural information with time resolution on the order of minutes. This talk will present our first findings of serum albumin and immunoglobulin G films on hydrophobic self-assembled monolayers. The protein films are readily observable, showing extensive denaturing after adsorption with a slow decay of density into the aqueous solution. Additionally, a thin low-density region that occurs between the hydrophobic film and the solution persists after protein deposition. Comparisons to films that are removed from solution, the influence of solution concentration, the effects of x-ray damage, and the time scales for protein film formation and evolution will also be discussed.

  14. Sua Pan Surface Bidirectional Reflectance: An Experiment to Validate the Surface Products of the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) During SAFARI 2000.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdou, W. A.; Pilorz, S. H.; Helmlinger, M. C.; Bruegge, C.; Diner, D. J.; Conel, J. E.; Martonchik, J. V.; Gatebe, C. K.; King, M. K.; Hobbs, P. V.

    2004-05-01

    The Southern Africa Regional Science Initiative dry season campaign was carried out during August and September 2000 at the peak of biomass burning. The intensive measurements in this campaign provided the opportunity to validate the surface products of the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), onboard NASA's EOS Terra platform. MISR validation team participated with a suite of ground-based instruments, including the PARABOLA and sun radiometers, to measure the surface bidirectional reflectance and atmospheric aerosol. A participating airborne sensor was the Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) flown onboard the convair-580 research aircraft. The CAR observations provide measurements of the surface bidirectional reflectance (BRF). This paper presents a validation study of MISR surface products by comparing MISR retrieval of the surface BRF, at Sua Pan, Botswana, with those evaluated on the ground and from the air, using the PARABOLA and CAR observations, respectively.

  15. Inter-Comparison of ASTER and MODIS Surface Reflectance and Vegetation Index Products for Synergistic Applications to Natural Resource Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Tomoaki; Yoshioka, Hiroki; Fujiwara, Kayo; Yamamoto, Hirokazu

    2008-01-01

    Synergistic applications of multi-resolution satellite data have been of a great interest among user communities for the development of an improved and more effective operational monitoring system of natural resources, including vegetation and soil. In this study, we conducted an inter-comparison of two remote sensing products, namely, visible/near-infrared surface reflectances and spectral vegetation indices (VIs), from the high resolution Advanced Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) (15 m) and lower resolution Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) (250 m – 500 m) sensors onboard the Terra platform. Our analysis was aimed at understanding the degree of radiometric compatibility between the two sensors' products due to sensor spectral bandpasses and product generation algorithms. Multiple pairs of ASTER and MODIS standard surface reflectance products were obtained at randomly-selected, globally-distributed locations, from which two types of VIs were computed: the normalized difference vegetation index and the enhanced vegetation indices with and without a blue band. Our results showed that these surface reflectance products and the derived VIs compared well between the two sensors at a global scale, but subject to systematic differences, of which magnitudes varied among scene pairs. An independent assessment of the accuracy of ASTER and MODIS standard products, in which “in-house” surface reflectances were obtained using in situ Aeronet atmospheric data for comparison, suggested that the performance of the ASTER atmospheric correction algorithm may be variable, reducing overall quality of its standard reflectance product. Atmospheric aerosols, which were not corrected for in the ASTER algorithm, were found not to impact the quality of the derived reflectances. Further investigation is needed to identify the sources of inconsistent atmospheric correction results associated with the ASTER algorithm, including additional quality

  16. Reflective and Electrically Conductive Surface Silvered Polyimide Films and Coatings Prepared via Unusual Single-Stage Self-Metallization Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Southward, Robin E.; Stoakley, Diane M.

    2001-01-01

    Highly reflective and/or surface conductive flexible polyimide films can be prepared by the incorporation of positive valent silver compounds into solutions of poly(amic acid)s formed from a variety of dianhydrides and diamines. Thermal curing of selected silver(I)-containing poly(amic acid)s leads to cycloimidization of the polyimide precursor with concomitant silver(I) reduction and surface aggregation of the metal yielding a reflective and/or conductive silver surface similar to that of the native metal. However, not all silver(I) precursors are effective surface metallization agents and not all poly(amic acid)s metallize with equal facility. Ligand/anion and polyimide structural effects on film metallization efficacy and on physical properties on metallized films are reviewed.

  17. Surface Material Analysis of the S-type Asteroids: Removing the Space Weathering Effect from Reflectance Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ueda, Y.; Miyamoto, M.; Mikouchi, T.; Hiroi, T.

    2003-01-01

    Recent years, many researchers have been observing a lot of asteroid reflectance spectra in the UV, visible to NIR at wavelength region. Reflectance spectroscopy of asteroid at this range should bring us a lot of information about its surface materials. Pyroxene and olivine have characteristic absorption bands in this wavelength range. Low-Ca pyroxene has two absorption bands around 0.9 microns and 1.9 microns. The more Ca and Fe content, the longer both absorption band centers. On the other hand, reflectance spectrum of olivine has three complicated absorption bands around 1 m, and no absorption feature around 2 microns. In general, reflectance spectra of many asteroids that are considered to be silicate rich (i.e., S- and A type asteroids) show redder slope and more subdued absorption bands than those of terrestrial minerals and meteorites. These features are now believed to be caused by the space weathering effect, which is probably caused by micrometeorite bombardment and/or solar wind. This process causes nanophase reduced iron (npFe(sup 0)) particles near the surface of mineral grains, which leads the optical change. Therefore, the space weathering effect should be removed from asteroid reflectance spectra to compare with those of meteorite and terrestrial minerals. In this report, we will apply the expanded modified Gaussian model (MGM) to the reflectance spectra of S-type asteroids 7 Iris and 532 Herculina and compare them with those of meteorites.

  18. An attenuated total reflectance IR study of silicic acid adsorbed onto a ferric oxyhydroxide surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swedlund, Peter J.; Miskelly, Gordon M.; McQuillan, A. James

    2009-07-01

    Silicic acid (H 4SiO 4) can have significant effects on the properties of iron oxide surfaces in both natural and engineered aquatic systems. Understanding the reactions of H 4SiO 4 on these surfaces is therefore necessary to describe the aquatic chemistry of iron oxides and the elements that associate with them. This investigation uses attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR) to study silicic acid in aqueous solution and the products formed when silicic acid adsorbs onto the surface of a ferrihydrite film in 0.01 M NaCl at pH 4. A spectrum of 1.66 mM H 4SiO 4 at pH 4 (0.01 M NaCl) has an asymmetric Si-O stretch at 939 cm -1 and a weak Si-O-H deformation at 1090 cm -1. ATR-IR spectra were measured over time (for up to 7 days) for a ferrihydrite film (≈1 mg) approaching equilibrium with H 4SiO 4 at concentrations between 0.044 and 0.91 mM. Adsorbed H 4SiO 4 had a broad spectral feature between 750 and 1200 cm -1 but the shape of the spectra changed as the amount of H 4SiO 4 adsorbed on the ferrihydrite increased. When the solid phase Si/Fe mole ratio was less than ≈0.01 the ATR-IR spectra had a maximum intensity at 943 cm -1 and the spectral shape suggests that a monomeric silicate species was formed via a bidentate linkage. As the solid phase Si/Fe mole ratio increased to higher values a discrete oligomeric silicate species was formed which had maximum intensity in the ATR-IR spectra at 1001 cm -1. The spectrum of this species suggests that it is larger than a dimer and it was tentatively identified as a cyclic tetramer. A small amount of a polymeric silica phase with a broad spectral feature centered at ≈1110 cm -1 was also observed at high surface coverage. The surface composition was estimated from the relative contribution of each species to the area of the ATR-IR spectra using multivariate curve resolution with alternating least squares. For a ferrihydrite film approaching equilibrium with 0.044, 0.14, 0.40 and 0.91 mM H 4SiO 4 the

  19. Land Surface Reflectance Retrieval from Hyperspectral Data Collected by an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle over the Baotou Test Site

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Si-Bo; Li, Zhao-Liang; Tang, Bo-Hui; Wu, Hua; Ma, Lingling; Zhao, Enyu; Li, Chuanrong

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the in-flight performance of a new hyperspectral sensor onboard an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV-HYPER), a comprehensive field campaign was conducted over the Baotou test site in China on 3 September 2011. Several portable reference reflectance targets were deployed across the test site. The radiometric performance of the UAV-HYPER sensor was assessed in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the calibration accuracy. The SNR of the different bands of the UAV-HYPER sensor was estimated to be between approximately 5 and 120 over the homogeneous targets, and the linear response of the apparent reflectance ranged from approximately 0.05 to 0.45. The uniform and non-uniform Lambertian land surface reflectance was retrieved and validated using in situ measurements, with root mean square error (RMSE) of approximately 0.01–0.07 and relative RMSE of approximately 5%–12%. There were small discrepancies between the retrieved uniform and non-uniform Lambertian land surface reflectance over the homogeneous targets and under low aerosol optical depth (AOD) conditions (AOD = 0.18). However, these discrepancies must be taken into account when adjacent pixels had large land surface reflectance contrast and under high AOD conditions (e.g. AOD = 1.0). PMID:23785513

  20. Land surface reflectance retrieval from hyperspectral data collected by an unmanned aerial vehicle over the Baotou test site.

    PubMed

    Duan, Si-Bo; Li, Zhao-Liang; Tang, Bo-Hui; Wu, Hua; Ma, Lingling; Zhao, Enyu; Li, Chuanrong

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the in-flight performance of a new hyperspectral sensor onboard an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV-HYPER), a comprehensive field campaign was conducted over the Baotou test site in China on 3 September 2011. Several portable reference reflectance targets were deployed across the test site. The radiometric performance of the UAV-HYPER sensor was assessed in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the calibration accuracy. The SNR of the different bands of the UAV-HYPER sensor was estimated to be between approximately 5 and 120 over the homogeneous targets, and the linear response of the apparent reflectance ranged from approximately 0.05 to 0.45. The uniform and non-uniform Lambertian land surface reflectance was retrieved and validated using in situ measurements, with root mean square error (RMSE) of approximately 0.01-0.07 and relative RMSE of approximately 5%-12%. There were small discrepancies between the retrieved uniform and non-uniform Lambertian land surface reflectance over the homogeneous targets and under low aerosol optical depth (AOD) conditions (AOD = 0.18). However, these discrepancies must be taken into account when adjacent pixels had large land surface reflectance contrast and under high AOD conditions (e.g. AOD = 1.0). PMID:23785513

  1. Comparison of diffuse sky irradiance calculation methods and effect on surface reflectance retrieval from an automated radiometric calibration test site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leisso, Nathan; Czapla-Myers, Jeffrey

    2011-10-01

    The Remote Sensing Group (RSG) at the University of Arizona is currently refining an automated system for the absolute radiometric calibration of earth-observing sensors. The Radiometric Calibration Test Site (RadCaTS) relies on semi-permanent instrumentation at the Railroad Valley (RRV) test site to collect data from which surface reflectance and an atmospheric characterization is determined. Multispectral surface reflectance is determined from calibrated ground viewing radiometers and assimilated to determine the hyperspectral reflectance used in radiative transfer calculations. The reflectance retrieval algorithm relies on an accurate determination of the diffuse sky irradiance for the time of interest. Currently, diffuse sky irradiance is modeled using the atmospheric characterization as input into MODTRAN5. This work investigates the accuracy of the diffuse sky modeling by comparing modeled results to measurements made at the test site. Diffuse sky irradiance from several alternative methods are also presented. Surface reflectance is computed and compared to in-situ measurements taken with a portable spectoradiometer.

  2. Observation of surface reduction of NiO to Ni by surface-sensitive total reflection X-ray spectroscopy using Kramers–Kronig relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Hitoshi; Nakayama, Takeshi; Niwa, Yasuhiro; Nitani, Hiroaki; Kondoh, Hiroshi; Nomura, Masaharu

    2016-06-01

    We have developed a promising surface-sensitive X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurement method. This method is based on total reflection detection and Kramers–Kronig relations, and has been named the KK-XAFS method. Total reflection spectra are transformed via Kramers–Kronig relations to obtain XAFS spectra. KK-XAFS experiments give us surface-sensitive structural parameters, while usual EXAFS analyses yield bulk structural parameters. The total reflection spectra themselves are useful for observing and discussing time evolutions of chemical reactions at surfaces by quick scanning measurements. Chemical species are analyzed to estimate their fractions during reactions. The whole method would be named total reflection X-ray spectroscopy (TREXS). A reduction of the NiO layer at the surface of Ni (30 nm)/Si was observed in a laboratory-built TREXS in situ cell. The method would be applicable to observe chemical reactions starting at surfaces and to study their kinetics and mechanisms.

  3. Measurement of the surface form error of large aperture plane optical surfaces with a polarization phase-shifting liquid reference reflection Fizeau interferometer.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sanjib; Kumar, Y Pavan; Singh, Rishipal; Singh, Sarvendra

    2016-01-10

    A polarization phase-shifting liquid reference reflection Fizeau interferometer has been proposed. A polarization cyclic path optical configuration along with a concave telescope mirror is used to produce a pair of expanded, collimated p and s polarized beams with a small angular separation between them. The collimated beams are deflected along a vertical direction toward a Fizeau interferometer cavity formed between a liquid surface that acts as a reference surface and a plane test surface. Either the p or s polarized beam is allowed to strike the liquid surface normally and the orientation of the test surface is adjusted to reflect the other beam, having orthogonal linear polarization, in the direction of the normally reflected reference beam from the liquid surface. A combination of a quarter-wave plate and linear polarizer is used to apply polarization phase shift between the test and reference beams, and quantitative surface form error is measured by applying phase-shifting interferometry. A method for elimination of the residual system aberration is discussed. Results obtained for an optically polished BK-7 disk of clear aperture diameter ≈160  mm are presented. PMID:26835767

  4. Model for the ultrasound reflection from micro-beads and cells distributed in layers on a uniform surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couture, O.; Cherin, E.; Foster, F. S.

    2007-07-01

    A model predicting the reflection of ultrasound from multiple layers of small scattering spheres is developed. Predictions of the reflection coefficient, which takes into account the interferences between the different sphere layers, are compared to measurements performed in the 10-80 MHz and 15-35 MHz frequency range with layers of glass beads and spherical acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells, respectively. For both types of scatterers, the reflection coefficient increases as a function of their density on the surface for less than three superimposed layers, at which point it saturates at 0.38 for glass beads and 0.02 for AML cells. Above three layers, oscillations of the reflection coefficient due to constructive or destructive interference between layers are observed experimentally and are accurately predicted by the model. The use of such a model could lead to a better understanding of the structures observed in layered tissue images.

  5. Spectral data of specular reflectance, narrow-angle transmittance and angle-resolved surface scattering of materials for solar concentrators

    PubMed Central

    Good, Philipp; Cooper, Thomas; Querci, Marco; Wiik, Nicolay; Ambrosetti, Gianluca; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    The spectral specular reflectance of conventional and novel reflective materials for solar concentrators is measured with an acceptance angle of 17.5 mrad over the wavelength range 300−2500 nm at incidence angles 15–60° using a spectroscopic goniometry system. The same experimental setup is used to determine the spectral narrow-angle transmittance of semi-transparent materials for solar collector covers at incidence angles 0–60°. In addition, the angle-resolved surface scattering of reflective materials is recorded by an area-scan CCD detector over the spectral range 350–1050 nm. A comprehensive summary, discussion, and interpretation of the results are included in the associated research article “Spectral reflectance, transmittance, and angular scattering of materials for solar concentrators” in Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells. PMID:26862556

  6. Fluorine-containing composition for forming anti-reflection film on resist surface and pattern formation method

    DOEpatents

    Nishi, Mineo; Makishima, Hideo

    1996-01-01

    A composition for forming anti-reflection film on resist surface which comprises an aqueous solution of a water soluble fluorine compound, and a pattern formation method which comprises the steps of coating a photoresist composition on a substrate; coating the above-mentioned composition for forming anti-reflection film; exposing the coated film to form a specific pattern; and developing the photoresist, are provided. Since the composition for forming anti-reflection film can be coated on the photoresist in the form of an aqueous solution, not only the anti-reflection film can be formed easily, but also, the film can be removed easily by rinsing with water or alkali development. Therefore, by the pattern formation method according to the present invention, it is possible to form a pattern easily with a high dimensional accuracy.

  7. Regions of validity of geometric optics and Kirchhoff approximations for reflection from Gaussian random rough dielectric surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khemiri, Mehdi; Sassi, Imed

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, the effects of characteristics of incident light and the geometrical parameters to the reflectivity of dielectric Gaussian random rough surfaces are presented. The behaviors of the reflectivity vs. several parameters are quantified using approximate methods: the geometric optics approximation (GOA) and the Kirchhoff approximation (KA) and an exact method called integral method (IM). Finally, we determine the limits of validity of approximate methods by comparisons with IM results. The regions of validity of approximate methods depending of many geometrical and physical parameters: roughness, Brewster and shadowing effects, multiple reflections, surface materials, and nature of polarization. The broader domain of validity (DV) is for KA, at normal TE-polarized incident light, for the higher dielectric permittivity. However, the narrowed DV is for GOA, at normal TM-polarized incident light for lower dielectric permittivity.

  8. A tutorial solution to scattering of radiation in a thin atmosphere bounded below by a diffusely reflecting, absorbing surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buglia, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    A simple tutorial method, based on a photon tracking procedure, is described to determine the spherical albedo for a thin atmosphere overlying a reflecting surface. This procedure is used to provide a physical structure with which to interpret the more detailed but highly mathematical analyses presented. The final equations are shown to be in good numerical agreement with more exact solutions for thin atmospheres.

  9. High-resolution shear-wave reflection profiling to image offset in unconsolidated near-surface sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Bevin L.

    S-wave reflection profiling has many theoretical advantages, when compared to P-wave profiling, such as high-resolution potential, greater sensitivities to lithologic changes and insensitivity to the water table and pore fluids, and could be particularly useful in near-surface settings. However, S-wave surveys can be plagued by processing pitfalls unique to near-surface studies such as interference of Love waves with reflections, and the stacking of Love waves as coherent noise, leading to possible misinterpretations of the subsurface. Two lines of S-wave data are processed and used to locate previously unknown faults in Quaternary sediments in a region where earthquake activity poses a threat to surface structures. This study provides clear examples of processing pitfalls such as Love waves with hyperbolic appearances on shot gathers, and a CMP section with coherent noise that is easily misinterpreted as reflections. This study demonstrates pros and cons of using SH reflection data in the near surface.

  10. Evaluation of the Aerosol Type Effect on the Surface Reflectance Retrieval Using Chris/proba Images Over Land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirelli, C.; Manzo, C.; Curci, G.; Bassani, C.

    2015-04-01

    Surface reflectance has a central role in the analysis of land surface for a broad variety of agricultural, geological and urban studies. An accurate atmospheric correction, obtained by an appropriate selection of aerosol type and loading, is the first requirement for a reliable surface reflectance estimation. The aerosol type is defined by its micro-physical properties, while the aerosol loading is described by optical thickness at 550 nm. The aim of this work is to evaluate the radiative impact of the aerosol model on the surface reflectance obtained from CHRIS (Compact High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer) hyperspectral data over land by using the specifically developed algorithm CHRIS@CRI (CHRIS Atmospherically Corrected Reflectance Imagery) based on the 6SV radiative transfer model. Five different aerosol models have been used: one provided by the AERONET inversion products (used as reference), three standard aerosol models in 6SV, and one obtained from the output of the GEOS-Chem global chemistry-transport model (CTM). As test case the urban site of Bruxelles and the suburban area of Rome Tor Vergata have been considered. The results obtained encourages the use of CTM in operational retrieval and provides an evaluation of the role of the aerosol model in the atmospheric correction process, considering the different microphysical properties impact.

  11. In vivo macroscopic HPD fluorescence reflectance imaging on small animals bearing surface ARO/NPA tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autiero, Maddalena; Celentano, Luigi; Laccetti, Paolo; Marotta, Marcello; Mettivier, Giovanni; Montesi, Maria C.; Riccio, Patrizia; Russo, Paolo; Roberti, Giuseppe

    2005-08-01

    Recently multimodal imaging systems have been devised because the combination of different imaging modalities results in the complementarity and integration of the techniques and in a consequent improvement of the diagnostic capabilities of the multimodal system with respect to each separate imaging modality. We developed a simple and reliable HematoPorphyrin (HP) mediated Fluorescence Reflectance Imaging (FRI) system that allows for in vivo real time imaging of surface tumors with a large field of view. The tumor cells are anaplastic human thyroid carcinoma-derived ARO cells, or human papillary thyroid carcinoma-derived NPA cells. Our measurements show that the optical contrast of the tumor region image is increased by a simple digital subtraction of the background fluorescence and that HP fluorescence emissivity of ARO tumors is about 2 times greater than that of NPA tumors, and about 4 times greater than that of healthy tissues. This is also confirmed by spectroscopic measurements on histological sections of tumor and healthy tissues. It was shown also the capability of this system to distinguish the tumor type on the basis of the different intensity of the fluorescence emission, probably related to the malignancy degree. The features of this system are complementary with those ones of a pixel radionuclide detection system, which allows for relatively time expensive, narrow field of view measurements, and applicability to tumors also deeply imbedded in tissues. The fluorescence detection could be used as a large scale and quick analysis tool and could be followed by narrow field, higher resolution radionuclide measurements on previously determined highly fluorescent regions.

  12. Adaption of the MODIS aerosol retrieval algorithm using airborne spectral surface reflectance measurements over urban areas: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäkel, E.; Mey, B.; Levy, R.; Gu, X.; Yu, T.; Li, Z.; Althausen, D.; Heese, B.; Wendisch, M.

    2015-12-01

    MODIS (MOderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) retrievals of aerosol optical depth (AOD) are biased over urban areas, primarily because the reflectance characteristics of urban surfaces are different than that assumed by the retrieval algorithm. Specifically, the operational "dark-target" retrieval is tuned towards vegetated (dark) surfaces and assumes a spectral relationship to estimate the surface reflectance in blue and red wavelengths. From airborne measurements of surface reflectance over the city of Zhongshan, China, were collected that could replace the assumptions within the MODIS retrieval algorithm. The subsequent impact was tested upon two versions of the operational algorithm, Collections 5 and 6 (C5 and C6). AOD retrieval results of the operational and modified algorithms were compared for a specific case study over Zhongshan to show minor differences between them all. However, the Zhongshan-based spectral surface relationship was applied to a much larger urban sample, specifically to the MODIS data taken over Beijing between 2010 and 2014. These results were compared directly to ground-based AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) measurements of AOD. A significant reduction of the differences between the AOD retrieved by the modified algorithms and AERONET was found, whereby the mean difference decreased from 0.27±0.14 for the operational C5 and 0.19±0.12 for the operational C6 to 0.10±0.15 and -0.02±0.17 by using the modified C5 and C6 retrievals. Since the modified algorithms assume a higher contribution by the surface to the total measured reflectance from MODIS, consequently the overestimation of AOD by the operational methods is reduced. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the MODIS AOD retrieval with respect to different surface types was investigated. Radiative transfer simulations were performed to model reflectances at top of atmosphere for predefined aerosol properties. The reflectance data were used as input for the retrieval methods. It

  13. Wavelength Selection for Reflectance Estimation of Surface and Subsurface Soil Properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Optical diffuse reflectance sensing is a potential approach for rapid and reliable on-site estimation of soil properties. In this study, reflectance sensing in visible (VIS) and near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths was combined with partial least squares (PLS) regression and stepwise multiple linear regr...

  14. Surface structure of the liquid Au[subscript 72]Ge[subscript 28] eutectic phase: X-ray reflectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Pershan, P.S.; Stoltz, S.E.; Mechler, S.; Shpyrko, O.G.; Grigoriev, A.Y.; Balagurusamy, V.S. K.; Lin, B.H.; Meron, M.

    2009-12-01

    The surface structure of the liquid phase of the Au{sub 72}Ge{sub 28} eutectic alloy has been measured using resonant and nonresonant x-ray reflectivity and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction. In spite of the significant differences in the surface tension of liquid Ge and Au the Gibbs adsorption enhancement of Ge concentration at the surface is minimal. This is in striking contrast to all the other binary alloys with large differences in the respective surface tensions measured up to date. In addition there is no evidence of the anomalous strong surface layering or in-plane crystalline order that has been reported for the otherwise quite similar liquid Au{sub 82}Si{sub 18} eutectic. Instead, the surface of eutectic Au{sub 72}Ge{sub 28} is liquidlike and the layering can be explained by the distorted crystal model with only slight modifications to the first layer.

  15. Learning to See Beneath the Surface: A Qualitative Analysis of Family Medicine Residents' Reflections About Communication.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Ashley P; Vicini, Andrea; Allen, Lucas; Shaughnessy, Allen F

    2015-01-01

    Patients share straightforward statements with physicians such as describing their fears about their diagnosis. Physicians need to also understanding implicit, indirect, subtle communication cues that give broader context to patients' illness experiences. This project examines physicians' written reflections that offer insight into their interpretation of both the stated and the tacit aspects of their observations about communication, their resulting responses, and their intended actions. Tufts University Family Medicine residents (N = 33) of the Tufts Family Medicine Cambridge Health Alliance completed three reflective exercises each week over the course of 1 year (756 reflective entries). An interdisciplinary research team identified communication-related concepts within the reflections. Identified themes include (a) physicians recognizing and discovering mutual interplay of their communication with and patient disclosure, (b) physicians paying attention to subtleties of patient behavior as indicative of a fuller picture of patients' lives and their coping with illness, and (c) physician images of growth and awareness about communication indicative of their potential for growth and improvement. The project extends the literature in communication and medical education by examining explicit and tacit points of reflection about communication. The project (a) allows for unpacking the multifaceted aspects of reflection and (b) bridges reflective theory and medical education with communication foundations. PMID:26147857

  16. Production of nanostructures on bulk metal samples by laser ablation for fabrication of low-reflective surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, Béla; Smausz, Tomi; Csizmadia, Tamás; Vass, Csaba; Tápai, Csaba; Kiss, Bálint; Ehrhardt, Martin; Lorenz, Pierre; Zimmer, Klaus

    2013-11-01

    Nanostructure formation on bulk noble metals (copper, gold and silver) by a femtosecond laser was studied aiming at the production of low-reflectivity surfaces. The target surface was irradiated with the beam of a 775 nm wavelength and 150 fs pulse duration Ti:sapphire laser. The fluence was in the 16-2000 mJ/cm2 range, while the average pulse number was varied between 10 and 1000 depending on the scanning speed of the sample stage. The reflectivity of the treated surfaces was measured with a visible-near-infrared microspectrometer in the 450-800 nm range, while the morphology was studied with a scanning electron microscope. A strong correlation was found between the decreasing reflectivity and the nanostructure formation on the irradiated surface; however, the morphology of silver significantly differed from those of copper and gold. For the two latter metals a dense coral-like structure was found probably as a result of cluster condensation in the ablation plume followed by diffusion-limited aggregation. In the case of silver the surface was covered by nanodroplets, which formation was probably influenced by the ‘spitting’ caused by ambient oxygen absorption in the molten silver followed by its fast release during the resolidification.

  17. ASTM standards for measuring solar reflectance and infrared emittance of construction materials and comparing their steady-state surface temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari, H.; Levinson, R.; Berdahl, P.

    1996-08-01

    Numerous experiments on individual buildings in California and Florida show that painting roofs white reduces air conditioning load up to 50%, depending on the thermal resistance or amount of insulation under the roof. The savings, of course, are strong functions of the thermal integrity of a building and climate. In earlier work, the authors have estimated the national energy savings potential from reflective roofs and paved surfaces. Achieving this potential, however, is conditional on receiving the necessary Federal, states, and electric utilities support to develop materials with high solar reflectance and design effective implementation programs. An important step in initiating an effective program in this area is to work with the american Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) and the industry to create test procedures, rating, and labeling for building and paving materials. A subcommittee of ASTM E06, E06.42, on Cool Construction Materials, was formed as the vehicle to develop standard practices for measuring, rating, and labeling cool construction materials. The subcommittee has also undertaken the development of a standard practice for calculating a solar reflectance index (SRI) of horizontal and low-sloped surfaces. SRI is a measure of the relative steady-state temperature of a surface with respect to a standard white surface (SRI = 100) and a standard black surface (SRI = 0) under standard solar and ambient conditions. This paper discusses the technical issues relating to development of these two ASTM standards.

  18. Variable-temperature diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic studies of amine desorption from a siliceous surface

    SciTech Connect

    Leyden, D.E.; Proctor, K.G.

    1994-12-31

    Variable-temperature diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy was used in conjunction with pyridine desorption studies to assess the acidity of a siliceous surface. An amorphous, porous silica substrate was investigated. The results contribute to an understanding of the acidic strength and the distribution of acidic sites on this material. A hydrogen-bonding interaction was observed between pyridine and the surface. Isothermal rate constants and an activation energy for the desorption process are reported and can be used as direct measures of surface site acidity. 23 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Reflection and transmission at the boundary surface of modified couple stress thermoelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R.; Kumar, K.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper the reflection and transmission at a plane interface in modified couple stress generalized thermoelastic solid half spaces in the context of Loard-Shulman (LS) and Green-Lindsay (GL) theories in welded contact are investigated. Amplitude ratios of various reflected and transmitted waves are obtained due to incidence of a set of coupled longitudinal waves and coupled transverse waves. It is found that the amplitude ratios of various reflected and transmitted waves are functions of the angle of incidence, frequency and are affected by the couple stress properties of the media. Some special cases are deduced from the present formulation.

  20. Surface reflectance measurements in the ultraviolet from an airborne platform. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doda, D. D.; Green, A. E. S.

    1981-01-01

    The spectral and broadband reflectance of naturally occurring desert sand, black lava, gypsum sand, and snow cover is measured from a twin engine Cessna 402-series aircraft. The measurement system is computer controlled and electrically isolated from the aircraft. It consists of upward and downward looking hemispheric diffusers, filters, a rotating 90 degree mirror, a focusing lens, and a double monochromator/PMT or a UV enhanced photodiode. Measurements are made at several altitudes enabling the empirical determination of the backscatter and attenuation effects on the reflectance. These reflectance results along with those reported earlier for a pine forest, green farmland, the open ocean, and brown farmland are represented analytically.

  1. A Study of Surface Directional Reflectance Properties To Enhance Aerosol Retrieval Capability Over Land Using MISR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martonchik, J.; Bull, M.; Dang, V. T.

    2007-12-01

    The nearly-simultaneous multiangle, multispectral,radiometrically calibrated imagery of the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) has a nominal spatial resolution of 1.1 km and covers the globe in about 9 days. Once the imagery is co-located and co-registered, an aerosol retrieval is performed, over both land and ocean, using an aerosol model look-up database. The technique for aerosol retrieval over ocean is conventional, namely assuming that measurements in the red and near-IR spectral bands are measurements of radiance scattered only within the atmosphere. Over land, however, the radiance measurements generally are a combination of atmosphereric and surface scattering events, the proportions which vary with wavelength and usually are not known a priori. This makes the retrieval of aersosls over land a much more intractable process. In fact any retrieval of aerosol properties over land from space with a passive instrument requires some constraints to be placed on the surface reflectance properties so that atmospheric radiance can be effectively separated from surface reflected radiance in the measurements. To facilitate the MISR standard aerosol retrieval process over land, it is assumed that the surface directional reflectance at any given location has the same (or very similar) angular form or shape in the different spectral bands. There is some theoretical basis for this assumption, especially when the surface spectral albedos have similar values, but an empirical verification in the context of multiangle remote sensing data is necessary if further progress in aerosol retrieval quality over land is to be made. This poster presents some results of a study to test the surface directional reflectance spectral similarity assumption. It focuses on MISR data taken over a number of AERONET sunphotometer sites with different surface conditions, ranging from urban areas to forested regions, at a spatial scale of 1.1 km. In contrast to MISR data alone, the

  2. Estimation of surface energy balance from radiant surface temperature and NOAA AVHRR sensor reflectances over agricultural and native vegetation. [AVHRR (advanced very high resolution radiometer)

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Xinmei; Lyons, T.J. ); Smith, R.C.G. ); Hacker, J.M.; Schwerdtfeger, P. )

    1993-08-01

    A model is developed to evaluate surface heat flux densities using the radiant surface temperature and red and near-infrared reflectances from the NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer sensor. Net radiation is calculated from an empirical formulation and albedo estimated from satellite observations. Infrared surface temperature is corrected to aerodynamic surface temperature in estimating the sensible heat flux and the latent flux is evaluated as the residual of the surface energy balance. When applied to relatively homogeneous agricultural and native vegetation, the model yields realistic estimates of sensible and latent heat flux density in the surface layer for cases where either the sensible or latent flux dominates. 29 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Bidirectional Reflectance of Flat, Optically Thick Particulate Layers: An Efficient Radiative Transfer Solution and Applications to Snow and Soil Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Dlugach, Janna M.; Yanovitsku, Edgard G.; Zakharova, Nadia T.

    1999-01-01

    We describe a simple and highly efficient and accurate radiative transfer technique for computing bidirectional reflectance of a macroscopically flat scattering layer composed of nonabsorbing or weakly absorbing, arbitrarily shaped, randomly oriented and randomly distributed particles. The layer is assumed to be homogeneous and optically semi-infinite, and the bidirectional reflection function (BRF) is found by a simple iterative solution of the Ambartsumian's nonlinear integral equation. As an exact Solution of the radiative transfer equation, the reflection function thus obtained fully obeys the fundamental physical laws of energy conservation and reciprocity. Since this technique bypasses the computation of the internal radiation field, it is by far the fastest numerical approach available and can be used as an ideal input for Monte Carlo procedures calculating BRFs of scattering layers with macroscopically rough surfaces. Although the effects of packing density and coherent backscattering are currently neglected, they can also be incorporated. The FORTRAN implementation of the technique is available on the World Wide Web at http://ww,,v.giss.nasa.gov/-crmim/brf.html and can be applied to a wide range of remote sensing, engineering, and biophysical problems. We also examine the potential effect of ice crystal shape on the bidirectional reflectance of flat snow surfaces and the applicability of the Henyey-Greenstein phase function and the 6-Eddington approximation in calculations for soil surfaces.

  4. Method for reconstruction of complex surface shapes from a reflection-based non-null interferometric measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micali, Jason D.; Greivenkamp, John E.

    2016-03-01

    Complex surface forms are becoming increasingly prevalent in optical designs, requiring advances in manufacturing and surface metrology to maintain the state of the art. Non-null interferometry extends the range of standard interferometers to test complex shapes without the need for complicated and expensive compensating elements. However, non-null measurements will accumulate significant retrace errors, or interferometer-induced errors, which can be difficult to isolate from surface figure errors. Methods discussed in the literature to correct for retrace errors in a reflection-based interferometer are computationally intensive and limited in spatial resolution. A method is presented for reconstructing complex surface shapes in a reflection-based non-null interferometer configuration, which is computationally efficient, easy to implement, and can produce high spatial resolution surface reconstructions. The method is verified against simulated surfaces that contain more than 200 μm of surface departure from a null configuration. Examples are provided to demonstrate the effects of measurement noise and interferometer model uncertainties, as well as an experimental validation of the method.

  5. Reflectance spectroscopy of palagonite and iron-rich montmorillonite clay mixtures - Implications for the surface composition of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orenberg, James; Handy, Jonathan

    1992-01-01

    The diffuse reflectance spectra of Hawaiian palagonite mixtures with an Fe-rich montmorillonite have prompted their present use as spectral analogs of the Martian surface. Like the Mars spectrum and unlike clays, the 2.2-micron reflectance spectrum absorption band is not present in the palagonite sample; neither is the 2.2-micron Al-OH clay lattice band seen in palagonite-montmorillonite mixtures, where the latter component remains below 15 wt pct. Fe-rich montmorillonite clay may therefore be present in Mars, in combination with palagonite, while remaining undetected in remotely sensed spectra.

  6. Surface bidirectional reflectance properties of two southwestern Arizona deserts for wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.2 micrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlock, Charles H.; Purgold, G. Carlton; Lecroy, Stuart R.

    1987-01-01

    Surface bidirectional reflectance characteristics are presented for the Sonora Desert and the Mohawk Valley at solar zenith angles of 13, 31, and 57 degs at wavelengths between 0.4 and 1.6 microns. Nadir reflectance values are presented for wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.2 microns for solar zenith angles of 13, 17.5, 27, 31, 45, 57, and 62 degs. Data were taken from a helicopter during May l985 in support of an Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE), a Stratospheric Aerosol Gas Experiment (SAGE II), and an Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) satellite validation experiment.

  7. Effect of the aerosol type uncertainty on the surface reflectance retrieval using CHRIS/PROBA hyperspectral images over land.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirelli, C.; Manzo, C.; Curci, G.; Bassani, C.

    2014-12-01

    The surface reflectance is crucial for the quantitative analysis of land surface properties in geological, agricultural and urban studies. The first requirement for a reliable surface reflectance estimation is an accurate atmospheric correction obtained by an appropriate selection of aerosol loading and type. The aerosol optical thickness at 550nm is widely used to describe the aerosol loading. Recent works have highlighted the relevant role of the aerosol types on the atmospheric correction process defined by their micro-physical properties. The aim of this work is to evaluate the radiative impact of the aerosol type on the surface reflectance obtained from CHRIS (Compact High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer) hyperspectral data over land. CHRIS on PROBA satellite is an high resolution multi-angular imaging spectrometer, operating in the visible near-infrared spectral domain (400 to 1000 nm). As test case the urban site of Brussels has been selected. The physically-based algorithm CHRIS@CRI (CHRIS Atmospherically Corrected Reflectance Imagery) has been developed specifically for CHRIS data by using the vector version of 6S (6SV) radiative transfer model. The atmospheric data needed for the atmospheric correction were obtained from CIMEL CE-318 of the Brussels AERONET station. CHRIS images were selected if simultaneous AERONET data were available. Other specific requirements for imagery acquisition were high aerosol loading and high solar irradiation. The aerosol radiative impact has been investigated comparing the reflectance obtained by applying the CHRIS@CRI algorithm with different aerosol types: the three aerosol standard of 6SV and two characterized by specific microphysical properties provided by the AERONET station and calculated with FlexAOD code (a post-processing tool of the chemical transport model GEOS-Chem), respectively. The results show a clear dependence of the atmospheric correction results on the aerosol absorption properties.

  8. A relation between landsat digital numbers, surface reflectance, and the cosine of the solar zenith angle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kowalik, William S.; Marsh, Stuart E.; Lyon, Ronald J. P.

    1982-01-01

    A method for estimating the reflectance of ground sites from satellite radiance data is proposed and tested. The method uses the known ground reflectance from several sites and satellite data gathered over a wide range of solar zenith angles. The method was tested on each of 10 different Landsat images using 10 small sites in the Walker Lake, Nevada area. Plots of raw Landsat digital numbers (DNs) versus the cosine of the solar zenith angle (cos Z) for the the test areas are linear, and the average correlation coefficients of the data for Landsat bands 4, 5, 6, and 7 are 0.94, 0.93, 0.94, and 0.94, respectively. Ground reflectance values for the 10 sites are proportional to the slope of the DN versus cos Z relation at each site. The slope of the DN versus cos Z relation for seven additional sites in Nevada and California were used to estimate the ground reflectances of those sites. The estimates for nearby sites are in error by an average of 1.2% and more distant sites are in error by 5.1%. The method can successfully estimate the reflectance of sites outside the original scene, but extrapolation of the reflectance estimation equations to other areas may violate assumptions of atmospheric homogeneity.

  9. Surface-atmosphere interactions with coupled within-canopy aerodynamic resistance and canopy reflection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmermans, J.; van der Tol, C.; Verhoef, W.; Su, Z.

    2009-04-01

    Models that describe the exchange of CO2 and H2O between the surface and atmosphere use bulk-parametrization of the within-canopy aerodynamic resistance and leaf area density (eq. LAI). This bulk parametrization is based on the Monin-Obukhov Similarity (MOS) theory. The MOS theory however breaks down for sparse canopies and it cannot couple profiles in the leaf density to profiles in the within-canopy aerodynamic resistance. The objective of this research is to create a simple model that is able to couple the within-canopy aerodynamic resistance and canopy reflection for different levels in the canopy. This model should be able to represent the canopy using as fewer parameters as possible, in order to facilitate inversion of remote sensing imagery. A virtual canopy was simulated using an L-systems approach, Lindenmayer 1968. The L-system approach was chosen because it describes the canopy with fractals. It therefore needs very little inputs to simulate a virtual canopy. A vertical profile of leaf density was calculated for 60 levels from this virtual canopy. The within-canopy aerodynamic resistance was modeled from the vertical leaf density profile using foliage drag coefficient, Massman 1997. A modified version of the SCOPE (Soil Canopy Observations and Photosynthesis) model was used to calculate the H2O and CO2 fluxes using the vertical profiles of leaf density and within-canopy aerodynamic resistance. The simulated fluxes are compared with field measurements over a vineyard and a forested area. The field measurements in both areas are acquired using the same setup: a basic flux tower in addition with an eddy-covariance setup. We present in this article the methodology and the results, as a proof of concept. references Massman, W.J., An Analytical One-Dimensional Model of Momentum Transfer by vegetation of arbitrary structure, Boundary-Layer Meteorology, 1997, 83, 407-421 Lindenmayer, A., Mathematical Models for Cellular Interactions in Development, Journal of

  10. Modification of the surface state of rough substrates by two different varnishes and influence on the reflected light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, Mady; René de la Rie, E.; Delaney, John K.; Charron, Eric; Morales, Kathryn M.

    2006-10-01

    Modification of the visual appearance when a rough surface is covered by a varnish is mostly attributed to the levelling of the substrate surface, which depends on the molecular weight of the varnish. The topography of varnished surfaces, however, has never been measured directly. Surfaces of varnishes applied over glass substrates of varying roughness were studied, therefore, using mechanical profilometry. Two different varnishes made with a low and a high molecular weight resin were studied. Both varnishes lower the r.m.s. roughness of the substrates and filter the high spatial frequencies. These results are amplified for the varnish containing the low molecular weight resin. The light reflected by the varnished samples is modelled from these topographical data. Its angular distribution, calculated from the probability density of slopes is presented, taking into account separately the air/varnish and the varnish/substrate interfaces. These analyses are presented in a back-scattering configuration. They show that varnishing significantly reduces the angular width of the reflected light and that this effect is magnified for the low molecular weight resin. Modelling furthermore shows that the influence of the roughness of the varnish/substrate interface is negligible in the total reflected light.

  11. Low energy Ar{sup +} bombardment of GaN surfaces: A statistical study of ion reflection and sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Despiau-Pujo, Emilie; Chabert, Pascal

    2010-09-15

    Statistical molecular dynamics simulations are performed to analyze the sputtering of w-GaN (wurtzite) and z-GaN (zinc blende) surfaces under 100 eV Ar{sup +} ion bombardment. Ion reflection and physical sputtering mechanisms are investigated as a function of the ion impact angle and the crystalline nature of samples. The probability of ion reflection is lower for the w-GaN phase and increases with the angle of incidence {theta}{sub i}. As {theta}{sub i} becomes more glancing, the reflected ions become more energetic and their angular distribution tends to narrow. The sputtering yields of w-GaN and z-GaN surfaces are maximum for {theta}{sub i}=45 deg. For near-normal incidence, the probability of sputtering is smaller for the w-GaN phase, suggesting that the atomic arrangement in the pristine state modifies the characteristics of the momentum transfer occurring between the ion and the surface atoms during the collision cascade. Atomic nitrogen sputters preferentially and represents 87% to 100% of sputtered species due to its lower mass. These statistical results differ from the predictions of continuous ion bombardment simulations since the surfaces are not allowed to evolve self-consistently during the gathering of impact statistics.

  12. Native SrTiO3 (001) surface layer from resonant Ti L2,3 reflectance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Valvidares, Manuel; Huijben, Mark; Yu, Pu; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Kortright, Jeffrey

    2010-11-03

    We quantitatively model resonant Ti L2,3 reflectivity Rs,p(q, hn) from several SrTiO3 (001) single crystals having different initial surface preparations and stored in ambient conditions before and between measurements. All samples exhibit unexpected 300 K Rs(hn) - Rp(hn) anisotropy corresponding to weak linear dichroism and tetragonal distortion of the TiO6 octahedra indicating a surface layer with properties different from cubic SrTiO3. Oscillations in Rs(q) confirm a ubiquitous surface layer 2-3 nm thick that evolves over a range of time scales. Resonant optical constant spectra derived from Rs,p(hn) assuming a uniform sample are refined using a single surface layer to fit measured Rs(q). Differences in surface layer and bulk optical properties indicate that the surface is significantly depleted in Sr and enriched in Ti and O. While consistent with the tendency of SrTiO3 surfaces toward non-stoichiometry, this layer does not conform simply to existing models for the near surface region and apparently forms via room temperature surface reactions with the ambient. This new quantitative spectral modeling approach is generally applicable and has potential to study near-surface properties of a variety of systems with unique chemical and electronic sensitivities.

  13. A new theory and its application to remove the effect of surface-reflected light in above-surface radiance data from clear and turbid waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dev, Pravin Jeba; Shanmugam, Palanisamy

    2014-07-01

    Water-leaving radiances (Lw) measured from the deck of a ship or boat in oceanic and lake waters are widely and operationally used for satellite sensor vicarious calibration and validation and development of remote-sensing algorithms to understand interdisciplinary coastal ocean properties and processes. However, accurate determination of Lw remains to be a challenging issue because of the limitations of the existing methods to accurately remove the undesired signal (surface-reflected light of the sky and sun) from above-surface measurements of the total upwelling radiance leaving the water surface. In this study, a new theory is developed and applied to the above-surface radiometric data measured from clear, turbid and eutrophic waters. The new method effectively removes surface-reflected contributions from the total upwelling radiance signal under different sky (clear sky to overcast sky) and sun glint conditions. The Lw spectra obtained from the above-surface radiance data using the new method are found to match well with those extrapolated from the upwelling radiances (Lu) measured with another set of underwater radiometers (used just below the sea surface). The new method proves to be a viable alternative, especially in circumstances when the above-surface measurements of radiances are severally contaminated by the surface-reflected light fields. Since spectral radiance measurements are also sensitive to the observation angles, and to the magnitude of the radiometer's solid angle field of view, above-surface radiances are also measured for different viewing angles in highly eutrophic waters. Such measurements show large deviations in Lw spectra except at lower viewing angles (30°). When applied to these data, the new method eliminates the undesired signal encountered at higher viewing angles and delivers accurate water-leaving radiance data. These results suggest that the new method is capable of removing the surface-reflected light fields from both time

  14. Analysis of the reflectance spectra of oil emulsion spilled on the sea surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicot, Guillaume; Lennon, Marc; Miegebielle, Veronique; Dubucq, Dominique

    2014-10-01

    Airborne remote sensing appears useful for monitoring oil spill accident or detecting illegal oil discharges. In that context, hyperspectral imagery in the SWIR range shows a high potential to describe oil spills. Indeed reflectance spectra of an oil emulsion layer show a wide variety of shapes according to its thickness or emulsion rate. Although based on laboratory measurements, it seems that these two parameters are insufficient to completely describe them. It appears that the way emulsion is performed leads to different reflectance spectra. Hence this paper will present a model which tends to simulate reflectance spectra of an oil emulsion layer over the sea water. To derive an analytical expression, some approximations and assumptions will be done. The result of this model shows high similarities with laboratory measurements and seems able to simulate most of the shapes of reflectance spectra. It also shows that a key parameter to define the shape of the reflectance spectra is the statistical distribution of water bubbles size in the emulsion. The description of this distribution function, if measurable, should be integrated into the methodology of elaboration of spectral libraries in the future.

  15. Effects of surface contamination on the infrared emissivity and visible-light scattering of highly reflective surfaces at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viehmann, W.; Eubanks, A. G.

    1972-01-01

    A technique is described for the simultaneous in situ measurement of film thickness, refractive index, total normal emissivity, visible-light scattering, and reflectance of contaminant films on a highly reflective liquid-nitrogen cooled, stainless steel substrate. Emissivities and scattering data are obtained for films of water, carbon dioxide, silicone oil, and a number of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons as a function of film thickness between zero and 20 microns. Of the contaminants investigated, water has by far the greatest effect on emissivity, followed by silicone oil, aliphatic hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons, and carbon dioxide. The emissivity increases more rapidly with film thickness between zero and 2.5 microns than at thicknesses greater than 2.5 microns. Scattering of visible light changes very little below 2 microns thickness but increases rapidly with thickness beyond 2 to 3 microns. The effect of contaminant films on passive radiation coolers is discussed.

  16. Applications of high power lasers. [using reflection holograms for machining and surface treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angus, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    The use of computer generated, reflection holograms in conjunction with high power lasers for precision machining of metals and ceramics was investigated. The Reflection holograms which were developed and made to work at both optical wavelength (He-Ne, 6328 A) and infrared (CO2, 10.6) meet the primary practical requirement of ruggedness and are relatively economical and simple to fabricate. The technology is sufficiently advanced now so that reflection holography could indeed be used as a practical manufacturing device in certain applications requiring low power densities. However, the present holograms are energy inefficient and much of the laser power is lost in the zero order spot and higher diffraction orders. Improvements of laser machining over conventional methods are discussed and addition applications are listed. Possible uses in the electronics industry include drilling holes in printed circuit boards making soldered connections, and resistor trimming.

  17. Determining the influential depth for surface reflectance of sediment by BRDF measurements.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Voss, K; Reid, R

    2003-10-20

    We measure the Bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of ooid sand layers with three particle size distributions (0.5-1mm, 0.25-0.5mm and 0.125-0.25mm) and layer thicknesses on a reflecting mirror to determine the influential depth in the optical region at wavelengths of 658 nm (red), 570 nm (green) and 457 nm (blue). The hemispherical reflectance (albedo) was used as an indicator of BRDF changes between different layers. Measurements are carried out on both dry and water wetted grains. The results indicate that for both dry and wet and all size distributions, the influential depth is at most 2mm. PMID:19471379

  18. Comparison of P- and S-wave velocity profiles obtained from surface seismic refraction/reflection and downhole data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, R.A.; Stephenson, W.J.; Odum, J.K.

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution seismic-reflection/refraction data were acquired on the ground surface at six locations to compare with near-surface seismic-velocity downhole measurements. Measurement sites were in Seattle, WA, the San Francisco Bay Area, CA, and the San Fernando Valley, CA. We quantitatively compared the data in terms of the average shear-wave velocity to 30-m depth (Vs30), and by the ratio of the relative site amplification produced by the velocity profiles of each data type over a specified set of quarter-wavelength frequencies. In terms of Vs30, similar values were determined from the two methods. There is <15% difference at four of the six sites. The Vs30 values at the other two sites differ by 21% and 48%. The relative site amplification factors differ generally by less than 10% for both P- and S-wave velocities. We also found that S-wave reflections and first-arrival phase delays are essential for identifying velocity inversions. The results suggest that seismic reflection/refraction data are a fast, non-invasive, and less expensive alternative to downhole data for determining Vs30. In addition, we emphasize that some P- and S-wave reflection travel times can directly indicate the frequencies of potentially damaging earthquake site resonances. A strong correlation between the simple S-wave first-arrival travel time/apparent velocity on the ground surface at 100 m offset from the seismic source and the Vs30 value for that site is an additional unique feature of the reflection/refraction data that could greatly simplify Vs30 determinations. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. In situ anodization of aluminum surfaces studied by x-ray reflectivity and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bertram, F. Evertsson, J.; Messing, M. E.; Mikkelsen, A.; Lundgren, E.; Zhang, F.; Pan, J.; Carlà, F.; Nilsson, J.-O.

    2014-07-21

    We present results from the anodization of an aluminum single crystal [Al(111)] and an aluminum alloy [Al 6060] studied by in situ x-ray reflectivity, in situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and ex situ scanning electron microscopy. For both samples, a linear increase of oxide film thickness with increasing anodization voltage was found. However, the slope is much higher in the single crystal case, and the break-up of the oxide film grown on the alloy occurs at a lower anodization potential than on the single crystal. The reasons for these observations are discussed as are the measured differences observed for x-ray reflectivity and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

  20. In situ anodization of aluminum surfaces studied by x-ray reflectivity and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertram, F.; Zhang, F.; Evertsson, J.; Carlà, F.; Pan, J.; Messing, M. E.; Mikkelsen, A.; Nilsson, J.-O.; Lundgren, E.

    2014-07-01

    We present results from the anodization of an aluminum single crystal [Al(111)] and an aluminum alloy [Al 6060] studied by in situ x-ray reflectivity, in situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and ex situ scanning electron microscopy. For both samples, a linear increase of oxide film thickness with increasing anodization voltage was found. However, the slope is much higher in the single crystal case, and the break-up of the oxide film grown on the alloy occurs at a lower anodization potential than on the single crystal. The reasons for these observations are discussed as are the measured differences observed for x-ray reflectivity and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

  1. Coherent reflection from surface gravity water waves during reciprocal acoustic transmissions.

    PubMed

    Badiey, Mohsen; Song, Aijun; Smith, Kevin B

    2012-10-01

    During a recent experiment in Kauai, Hawaii, reciprocal transmissions were conducted between two acoustic transceivers mounted on the seafloor at a depth of 100 m. The passage of moving surface wave crests was shown to generate focused and intense coherent acoustic returns, which had increasing or decreasing delay depending on the direction of propagation relative to the direction of surface wave crests. It is shown that a rough surface two-dimensional parabolic equation model with an evolving sea surface can produce qualitative agreement with data for the dynamic surface returns. PMID:23039567

  2. Surface recombination velocity and lifetime in InP measured by transient microwave reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bothra, S.; Tyagi, S. D.; Ghandhi, S. K.; Borrego, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Minority carrier lifetime and surface recombination velocity are determined in organometallic vapor-phase epitaxy (OMVPE)-grown InP by a contactless microwave technique. For lightly doped n-type InP, a surface recombination velocity of 5000 cm/s is measured. However, in solar cells with a heavily doped n-type emitter a surface recombination velocity of 1 x 10 to the 6th cm/s is observed. Possible reasons for this due to surface pinning are discussed. The effects of various chemical treatments and SiO on the surface recombination velocity are measured.

  3. Effect of pump wave reflections on the excitation of a dual-wavelength vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, M. Yu.; Morozov, Yu. A. Popov, V. V.

    2009-03-15

    The effect of pump wave reflections on the carrier generation rate and uniformity of carrier population in quantum wells (QWs) of a dual-wavelength vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser has been numerically analyzed. The laser's active region has been described within a mathematical model allowing any number of QWs and arbitrary distribution of carrier generation rate. It is shown that the optimal arrangement of blocking layers in the active region of a dual-wavelength vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser allows one to obtain a very uniform QW population. It is established that pump wave reflections significantly affect the local carrier generation rate and, therefore, the distribution of excited carriers in the laser structure.

  4. Nonlinear reflection of a spherically divergent N-wave from a plane surface: Optical interferometry measurements in air

    SciTech Connect

    Karzova, M.; Yuldashev, P.; Khokhlova, V.; Ollivier, S.; Blanc-Benon, Ph.

    2015-10-28

    Mach stem is a well-known structure typically observed in the process of strong (acoustic Mach numbers greater than 0.4) step-shock waves reflection from a rigid boundary. However, this phenomenon has been much less studied for weak shocks in nonlinear acoustic fields where Mach numbers are in the range from 0.001 to 0.01 and pressure waveforms have more complicated waveforms than step shocks. The goal of this work was to demonstrate experimentally how nonlinear reflection occurs in air for very weak spherically divergent acoustic spark-generated pulses resembling an N-wave. Measurements of reflection patterns were performed using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. A thin laser beam with sub-millimeter cross-section was used to obtain the time resolution of 0.4 µs, which is 6 times higher than the time resolution of the condenser microphones. Pressure waveforms were reconstructed using the inverse Abel transform applied to the phase of the signal measured by the interferometer. The Mach stem formation was observed experimentally as a result of collision of the incident and reflected shock pulses. It was shown that irregular reflection of the pulse occurred in a dynamic way and the length of the Mach stem increased linearly while the pulse propagated along the surface. Since the front shock of the spark-generated pulse was steeper than the rear shock, irregular type of reflection was observed only for the front shock of the pulse while the rear shock reflection occurred in a regular regime.

  5. ABCD matrix for reflection and refraction of Gaussian beams at the surface of a parabola of revolution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongzhan; Liu, Liren; Xu, Rongwei; Luan, Zhu

    2005-08-10

    We report the formulation of an ABCD matrix for reflection and refraction of Gaussian light beams at the surface of a parabola of revolution that separate media of different refractive indices based on optical phase matching. The equations for the spot sizes and wave-front radii of the beams are also obtained by using theABCD matrix. With these matrices, we can more conveniently design and evaluate some special optical systems, including these kinds of elements. PMID:16114516

  6. Io's surface composition based on reflectance spectra of sulfur/salt mixtures and proton-irradiation experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, D. B.; Fanale, F. P.

    1977-01-01

    Available full-disk reflectance spectra of Io in the range 0.3 to 2.5 microns have been used to determine a surface compositional model for Io that is consistent with Io's other known chemical and physical properties. Results indicate that the surface of Io contains abundant dehydrated salts of high Na, Mg, and Fe(3+) content such as bloedite and ferrous iron sulfate. Experiments were performed studying the irradiation damage effects from low-energy proton bombardment, since Io is immersed in Jupiter's magnetosphere.

  7. Critical and Creative Reflective Inquiry: Surfacing Narratives to Enable Learning and Inform Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardiff, Shaun

    2012-01-01

    Narratives are being increasingly used in nursing and action research. In this participatory action research study, nurse leaders of an acute care of the older person unit collectively, critically and creatively reflected on lived experiences in order to explore the concept of person-centred leadership within their own practice. This paper…

  8. A DIURNAL REFLECTANCE MODEL USING GRASS: SURFACE-SUBSTRATE INTERACTION AND INVERSE SOLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The accuracy of using remote sensing data from earth orbiting radiometers can be improved by using a model that helps to separate the green-fraction in a canopy reflectance () from thatch and soil background, accounts for their diurnal changes, and inverts to a solution of a biop...

  9. [Characteristic wavelengths analysis for remote sensing reflectance on water surface in Taihu Lake].

    PubMed

    Shen, Qian; Zhang, Bing; Li, Jun-sheng; Wu, Yuan-feng; Wu, Di; Song, Yang; Zhang, Fang-fang; Wang, Gan-lin

    2011-07-01

    The research on characteristic wavelengths analysis of reflectance spectrum is a very important and basic task for remote sensing of inland-water color. The present paper analyzed remote sensing reflectances of 312 samples measured in Taihu Lake between 2006 and 2009, and these reflectances were separated into three classes by chlorophyll-a concentrations. The reflectance spectra smoothed by Savitzky-Golay algorithm were calculated by first- and second-order derivatives. Then, zero values were located in the derivatives and counted at all wavelengths. Thus the frequency distribution of zeros at each wavelength was got. At which wavelength a local maximum of the frequencies appears a characteristic wavelength will most likely be there. These characteristic wavelengths are corresponding to maximum, minimum, from-concave-to-convex inflection point and from-convex-to-concave inflection point of a spectrum curve. At last the paper provided the characteristic wavelengths for Taihu Lake water at the spectral coverage from 350 to 900 nm, which are 359, 440, 464, 472, 552, 566, 583, 628, 636, 645, 660, 676, 689, 706, 728, 791, 806, and 825 nm. In addition, these wavelengths we found were explained by absorption of phytoplankton pigments and components of water in Taihu Lake. Being able to distinguish overlaps between peaks and vales at the same wavelength in different measurements, the method to analyze characteristic wavelengths is universally applicable to various spectrum curves. The characteristic wavelengths chosen by the paper are helpful to improving some algorithms of retrieval of water quality parameters. PMID:21942046

  10. A diurnal reflectance model using grass: Surface-substrate interaction and inverse solution - October 16, 2011

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report an analysis of canopy reflectance (ρ) experiment, using hand-held radiometer to measure distribution of biomass in a grass field. The analysis: 1) separates the green-fraction from thatch and soil background, 2) accounts for the changing diurnal ρ with the sun elevation...

  11. Holographic contouring and its limitations in nearly specularly reflecting surface measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lédl, Vít.; Psota, Pavel; Vojtíšek, Petr; Doleček, Roman; Mokrý, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    The applicability of the digital holography to grinded surfaces shape measurements is experimentally examined with regard to the surface micro-roughness of brittle materials (optical glass). Multi-wavelength phase shifted digital holographic interferometry (holographic contouring) is used and its performance is analyzed. Holographic contouring is a great candidate for the precise shape measurement technique, which can be applied to the iterative manufacture process of optical elements. Optical surface artifacts with different radii of the spherical (convex and concave) shapes were prepared with different micro-roughness. Their optical surfaces were then holographically recorded using a designed setup. Two different measures were selected to estimate the quality of the holographic recording: first, the intensity profile of the reconstructed surface deviation as a consequence of the micro-roughness decrease, where the shape of the intensity profile develops as the surface is altering from strongly diffusive to almost specular; second, the correlation of the phase fields (surfaces shapes), which were holographically recorded using two light beams of different wavelengths. In this situation, the correlation function decreases with an increase in the noise amount in data. The presented preliminary results indicate that the multi- wavelength holographic contouring can be used for surface measurements of high-quality polished and nearly specular surfaces. On the other hand, the application of holographic contouring to polished surface measurement still represents a challenging task and remains unresolved even with the multidirection illumination.

  12. Reflectance Infrared Spectroscopy on Operating Surface Acoustic Wave Chemical Sensors During Exposure to Gas-Phase Analytes

    SciTech Connect

    Hierlemann, A.; Hill, M.; Ricco, A.J.; Staton, A.W.; Thomas, R.C.

    1999-01-11

    We have developed instrumentation to enable the combination of surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor measurements with direct, in-situ molecular spectroscopic measurements to understand the response of the SAW sensors with respect to the interfacial chemistry of surface-confined sensing films interacting with gas-phase analytes. Specifically, the instrumentation and software was developed to perform in-situ Fourier-transform infrared external-reflectance spectroscopy (FTIR-ERS) on operating SAW devices during dosing of their chemically modified surfaces with analytes. By probing the surface with IR spectroscopy during gas exposure, it is possible to understand in unprecedented detail the interaction processes between the sorptive SAW coatings and the gaseous analyte molecules. In this report, we provide details of this measurement system, and also demonstrate the utility of these combined measurements by characterizing the SAW and FTIR-ERS responses of organic thin-film sensor coatings interacting with gas-phase analytes.

  13. X-ray off-specular reflectivity studies of electrochemical pitting of Cu surfaces in sodium bicarbonate solution.

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Y. P.; Sinha, S. K.; Melendres, C. A.; Lee, D. D.; Chemical Engineering; Exxon Research and Engineering Co.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.

    1996-01-01

    We have studied the electrochemically-induced pitting process on a Cu electrode in NaHCO{sub 3} solution using in-situ X-ray off-specular reflectivity measurements. The morphology and growth dynamics of the localized corrosion sites or pits were studied as the applied potential was varied from the cathodic region where the Cu surface is relatively free of oxide films to the anodic region where surface roughening occurs by general corrosion with concomitant formation of an oxide film. Quantitative analysis of the experimental results indicates that early pitting proceeds in favor of nucleation of pit clusters over individual pit growth. It was found that the lateral distribution of the pits is not random but exhibits a short-range order as evidenced by the appearance of a side peak in the transverse off-specular reflectivity. The position, height, and width of the peak was modeled to yield the average size, nearest-neighbor distance (within any one of the clusters), and over-all density of the pits averaged over the entire illuminated surface. In addition, measurements of the longitudinal off-specular reflectivity indicate a bimodal depth distribution for the pits, suggesting a 'film breaking' type of pitting mechanism.

  14. Multi-angle Approach for Coherent Retrieval of Surface Reflectance and Atmosphere Optical Depth from CRISM Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doute, S.; Ceamanos, X.

    2015-10-01

    This paper addresses the correction for aerosol effects in near-simultaneous multi-angle observations acquired by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) aboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. In the targeted mode, CRISM senses planet Mars from the top of the atmosphere (TOA) using 11 viewing angles in 437 visible and infrared wavelengths, which allow it to provide unique information on the scattering properties of surface materials and atmospheric aerosols. In order to retrieve these data, however, appropriate strategies must be used to model the signal sensed by CRISM and compensate for aerosol contribution. In [2] we put forward an innovative inversion scheme of the model named Multi-angle Approach for Retrieval of Surface Reflectance from CRISM Observations (MARS-ReCO). Nevertheless this first version of MARS-ReCO requires a priori information about the scattering properties and the abundance of the atmospheric aerosols prior to the inversion. The proposed method retrieves conjointly the atmosphere optical depth (AOD) and the bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF) of surface materials as a function of wavelength. MARS-ReCO represents a substantial improvement regarding previous techniques as it takes into consideration in a coherent way the anisotropy of both the surface and the atmosphere scattering. Thus it provides more realistic surface and atmospheric products. Furthermore, MARSReCO is fast and provides error bars on the retrieved parameters.

  15. Analysis of captan on nitrile glove surfaces using a portable attenuated total reflection fourier transform infrared spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Phalen, R N; Que Hee, Shane S

    2005-06-01

    This study developed a method to produce uniform captan surface films on a disposable nitrile glove for quantitation with a portable attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectrometer. A permeation test was performed using aqueous captan formulation. Uniform captan surface films were produced using solvent casting with 2-propanol and a 25 mm filter holder connected to a vacuum manifold to control solvent evaporation. The coefficient of variation of the reflectance at 1735 +/- 5 cm(-1) was minimized by selection of the optimum solvent volume, airflow rate, and evaporation time. At room temperature, the lower to upper quantifiable limits were 0.31-20.7 microg/cm2 (r = 0.9967; p < or = 0.05) for the outer glove surface and 0.55-17.5 microg/cm2 (r = 0.9409; p < or = 0.05) for the inner surface. Relative humidity and temperature did not affect the uncoated gloves at the wavelength of captan analysis. Glove screening using ATR-FTIR was necessary as a control for between-glove variation. Captan permeation, after 8 hours exposure to an aqueous concentration of 217 mg/mL of Captan 50-WP, was detected at 0.8 +/- 0.3 microg/cm2 on the inner glove surface. ATR-FTIR can detect captan permeation and can determine the protectiveness of this glove in the field. PMID:16053538

  16. Effects of local field and inherent strain in reflectance anisotropy spectra of AIIIBV semiconductors with naturally oxidized surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkovits, V. L.; Kosobukin, V. A.; Gordeeva, A. B.

    2015-12-01

    Reflectance anisotropy (RA) spectra of naturally oxidized (001) surfaces of GaAs and InAs crystals are measured for photon energies from 1.5 up to 5.5 eV. The differential high-accuracy RA spectra reveal features substantially different from those caused by either a reconstruction of clean surface or a built-in near-surface electric field. Models of atomic structure with anisotropic transition layers of excess arsenic atoms specific for GaAs(001)/oxide and InAs(001)/oxide interfaces are proposed. In conformity with these models, a general theory of reflectance anisotropy is developed for semiconductor/oxide interfaces within the Green's function technique. The theory takes into account the combined effect of local field due to interface dipoles and of intrinsic near-surface strain of the crystal. Measured RA spectra are analyzed in the model of valence-bond dipoles occupying a rectangular lattice in a multilayer medium. Comparing the measured and calculated spectra, we conclude that RA spectra of oxidized GaAs(001) and InAs(001) surfaces are simultaneously influenced by interface and near-surface anisotropies. The former is responsible for the broad-band spectral features which are associated with polarizability of the valence bonds attached to As atoms at the crystal/oxide interface. The near-surface anisotropy is due to inherent uniaxial straining the near-surface region of crystal. The effect of strain on RA spectra is experimentally and theoretically substantiated for GaAs crystal wafers undergone a uniaxial applied stress. Basically, this work results in the following. It establishes the physical nature of different levels of RA spectra observed in a majority of papers, but never analyzed. It demonstrates how the studied features of RA spectra could be applied for optical characterization of strained interfaces and atomic layers.

  17. Why Surface Syntactic Structure Reflects Logical Structure as Much as It Does, But Only That Much.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCawley, James D.

    1999-01-01

    Examines parallelisms between surface structure and logical structure and why those parallelisms do not extend farther than they do. If syntactic deep structures are identified with logical structures, an appropriate cyclic principle guarantees that cyclic rules will apply so that large-scale parallelisms exist between surface syntactic structures…

  18. Reflection of an acoustic line source by an impedance surface with uniform flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brambley, E. J.; Gabard, G.

    2014-10-01

    An exact analytic solution is derived for the 2D acoustic pressure field generated by a time-harmonic line mass source located above an impedance surface with uniform grazing flow. Closed-form asymptotic solutions in the far field are also provided. The analysis is valid for both locally-reacting and nonlocally-reacting impedances, as is demonstrated by analyzing a nonlocally reacting effective impedance representing the presence of a thin boundary layer over the surface. The analytic solution may be written in a form suggesting a generalization of the method of images to account for the impedance surface. The line source is found to excite surface waves on the impedance surface, some of which may be leaky waves which contradict the assumption of decay away from the surface predicted in previous analyses of surface waves with flow. The surface waves may be treated either (correctly) as unstable waves or (artificially) as stable waves, enabling comparison with previous numerical or mathematical studies which make either of these assumptions. The computer code for evaluating the analytic solution and far-field asymptotics is provided in the supplementary material. It is hoped this work will provide a useful benchmark solution for validating 2D numerical acoustic codes.

  19. Measuring and modeling near surface reflected and emitted radiation fluxes at the FIFE site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blad, Blaine L.; Norman, John M.; Walter-Shea, Elizabeth; Starks, Patrick; Vining, Roel; Hays, Cynthia

    1988-01-01

    Research was conducted during the four Intensive Field Campaigns (IFC) of the FIFE project in 1987. The research was done on a tall grass prairie with specific measurement sites on and near the Konza Prairie in Kansas. Measurements were made to help meet the following objectives: determination of the variability in reflected and emitted radiation fluxes in selected spectral wavebands as a function of topography and vegetative community; development of techniques to account for slope and sun angle effects on the radiation fluxes; estimation of shortwave albedo and net radiation fluxes using the reflected and emitted spectral measurements described; estimation of leaf and canopy spectral properties from calculated normalized differences coupled with off-nadir measurements using inversion techniques; estimation of plant water status at several locations with indices utilizing plant temperature and other environmental parameters; and determination of relationships between estimated plant water status and measured soil water content. Results are discussed.

  20. Bidirectional Reflectance of a Macroscopically Flat, High-Albedo Particulate Surface: An Efficient Radiative Transfer Solution and Applications to Regoliths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Zakharova, Nadia T.

    1999-01-01

    Many remote sensing applications rely on accurate knowledge of the bidirectional reflection function (BRF) of surfaces composed of discrete, randomly positioned scattering particles. Theoretical computations of BRFs for plane-parallel particulate layers are usually reduced to solving the radiative transfer equation (RTE) using one of existing exact or approximate techniques. Since semi-empirical approximate approaches are notorious for their low accuracy, violation of the energy conservation law, and ability to produce unphysical results, the use of numerically exact solutions of RTE has gained justified popularity. For example, the computation of BRFs for macroscopically flat particulate surfaces in many geophysical publications is based on the adding-doubling (AD) and discrete ordinate (DO) methods. A further saving of computer resources can be achieved by using a more efficient technique to solve the plane-parallel RTE than the AD and DO methods. Since many natural particulate surfaces can be well represented by the model of an optically semi-infinite, homogeneous scattering layer, one can find the BRF directly by solving the Ambartsumian's nonlinear integral equation using a simple iterative technique. In this way, the computation of the internal radiation field is avoided and the computer code becomes highly efficient and very accurate and compact. Furthermore, the BRF thus obtained fully obeys the fundamental physical laws of energy conservation and reciprocity. In this paper, we discuss numerical aspects and the computer implementation of this technique, examine the applicability of the Henyey-Greenstein phase function and the sigma-Eddington approximation in BRF and flux calculations, and describe sample applications demonstrating the potential effect of particle shape on the bidirectional reflectance of flat regolith surfaces. Although the effects of packing density and coherent backscattering are currently neglected, they can also be incorporated. The

  1. Empirical Models for the Shielding and Reflection of Jet Mixing Noise by a Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Cliff

    2015-01-01

    Empirical models for the shielding and refection of jet mixing noise by a nearby surface are described and the resulting models evaluated. The flow variables are used to non-dimensionalize the surface position variables, reducing the variable space and producing models that are linear function of non-dimensional surface position and logarithmic in Strouhal frequency. A separate set of coefficients are determined at each observer angle in the dataset and linear interpolation is used to for the intermediate observer angles. The shielding and rejection models are then combined with existing empirical models for the jet mixing and jet-surface interaction noise sources to produce predicted spectra for a jet operating near a surface. These predictions are then evaluated against experimental data.

  2. An algorithm for simultaneous inversion of aerosol properties and surface reflectance from airborne GeoTASO hyperspectral data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, W.; Wang, J.; Xu, X.; Ding, S.; Han, D.; Leitch, J. W.; Delker, T.; Chen, G.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents an inversion method to retrieve aerosol properties from the hyperspectral data collected by airborne GeoTASO (Geostationary Trance gas and Aerosol Sensor Optimization). Mounted on the NASA HU-25C aircraft, GeoTASO measures radiation in 1000 spectral bands from 415 nm to 696 nm, and is a prototype for the TEMPO (Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution) instrument. It flew over Houston during September 2013 and gathered several days' of airborne hyperspectral remote sensing data for our research. Our inversion method, which is based on the optimization theory and different from the traditional lookup table (LUT) retrieval technique, can simultaneously retrieve parameters of atmospheric aerosols such as the aerosol optical depth and other aerosol parameters, as well as the surface reflectance albedo. To provide constraints of hyperspectral surface reflectance in the inversion, we first conduct principal component analysis (PCA) using 46 reflectance spectra of various plants and vegetation to identify the most influential components. With the first six principal components and the corresponding calculated weight vector, the spectra could be reconstructed with an accuracy of 1%. UNL-VRTM (UNified Linearized Radiative Transfer Model) is employed for forward model calculation, and its outputs include not only the Stokes 4-vector elements, but also their sensitivities (Jacobians) with respect to the aerosol properties parameters and the principal components of surface spectral reflectance. The inversion is carried out with optimization algorithm L-BFGS-B (Large scale BFGS Bound constrained), and is conducted iteratively until the modeled spectral radiance fits with GeoTASO measurements. Finally, the retrieval results of aerosol optical depth and other aerosol parameters are compared against those retrieved by AEROENT and/or in situ measurements during the aircraft campaign.

  3. Variability of Electron Densities in the Low-Altitude Martian Nightside Ionosphere Derived from the Intensity of Marsis AIS Surface Reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, F.; Morgan, D. D.; Gurnett, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Sounding signals at frequencies higher than the ionospheric peak plasma frequency are not reflected by the ionosphere. Instead they make it to the ground where they are reflected by the planetary surface. We analyze the intensity of the surface reflections measured by the MARSIS ionospheric radar sounder on board the Mars Express spacecraft. Apart from the surface reflectivity, the intensity of the surface reflection is controlled primarily by the signal attenuation during ionospheric propagation. We focus on the nightside region, where the ionospheric densities in the main layer are too low to cause a significant attenuation and allow sampling of the surface reflection at frequencies down to 3 MHz. The attenuation is then expected to occur mainly at lower altitudes (<100 km), where electron-neutral collision frequency is a maximum. The intensity of surface reflections can thus serve as a proxy for the electron density at low altitudes not accessible by the direct MARSIS ionospheric radar sounding. We derive the intensity of surface reflections from all available MARSIS nightside ionograms, and we analyze its variability as a function of relevant controlling factors such as SZA, solar activity, magnetic field magnitude and inclination, and simultaneously observed electron density in the main ionospheric layer. The results obtained are discussed in terms of possible processes affecting the electron densities at low altitudes.

  4. Spectral reflectance characteristics of different snow and snow-covered land surface objects and mixed spectrum fitting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, J.-H.; Zhou, Z.-M.; Wang, P.-J.; Yao, F.-M.; Yang, L.

    2011-01-01

    The field spectroradiometer was used to measure spectra of different snow and snow-covered land surface objects in Beijing area. The result showed that for a pure snow spectrum, the snow reflectance peaks appeared from visible to 800 nm band locations; there was an obvious absorption valley of snow spectrum near 1030 nm wavelength. Compared with fresh snow, the reflection peaks of the old snow and melting snow showed different degrees of decline in the ranges of 300~1300, 1700~1800 and 2200~2300 nm, the lowest was from the compacted snow and frozen ice. For the vegetation and snow mixed spectral characteristics, it was indicated that the spectral reflectance increased for the snow-covered land types(including pine leaf with snow and pine leaf on snow background), due to the influence of snow background in the range of 350~1300 nm. However, the spectrum reflectance of mixed pixel remained a vegetation spectral characteristic. In the end, based on the spectrum analysis of snow, vegetation, and mixed snow/vegetation pixels, the mixed spectral fitting equations were established, and the results showed that there was good correlation between spectral curves by simulation fitting and observed ones(correlation coefficient R2=0.9509).

  5. Semi-automatic laboratory goniospectrometer system for performing multi-angular reflectance and polarization measurements for natural surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sun, Z Q; Wu, Z F; Zhao, Y S

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the design and operation of the Northeast Normal University Laboratory Goniospectrometer System for performing multi-angular reflected and polarized measurements under controlled illumination conditions is described. A semi-automatic arm, which is carried on a rotated circular ring, enables the acquisition of a large number of measurements of surface Bidirectional Reflectance Factor (BRF) over the full hemisphere. In addition, a set of polarizing optics enables the linear polarization over the spectrum from 350 nm to 2300 nm. Because of the stable measurement condition in the laboratory, the BRF and linear polarization has an average uncertainty of 1% and less than 5% depending on the sample property, respectively. The polarimetric accuracy of the instrument is below 0.01 in the form of the absolute value of degree of linear polarization, which is established by measuring a Spectralon plane. This paper also presents the reflectance and polarization of snow, soil, sand, and ice measured during 2010-2013 in order to illustrate its stability and accuracy. These measurement results are useful to understand the scattering property of natural surfaces on Earth. PMID:24517791

  6. Semi-automatic laboratory goniospectrometer system for performing multi-angular reflectance and polarization measurements for natural surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Z. Q.; Wu, Z. F.; Zhao, Y. S.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the design and operation of the Northeast Normal University Laboratory Goniospectrometer System for performing multi-angular reflected and polarized measurements under controlled illumination conditions is described. A semi-automatic arm, which is carried on a rotated circular ring, enables the acquisition of a large number of measurements of surface Bidirectional Reflectance Factor (BRF) over the full hemisphere. In addition, a set of polarizing optics enables the linear polarization over the spectrum from 350 nm to 2300 nm. Because of the stable measurement condition in the laboratory, the BRF and linear polarization has an average uncertainty of 1% and less than 5% depending on the sample property, respectively. The polarimetric accuracy of the instrument is below 0.01 in the form of the absolute value of degree of linear polarization, which is established by measuring a Spectralon plane. This paper also presents the reflectance and polarization of snow, soil, sand, and ice measured during 2010-2013 in order to illustrate its stability and accuracy. These measurement results are useful to understand the scattering property of natural surfaces on Earth.

  7. Reflectance and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of sculptured silver films deposited at various vapor incident angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shigeng; Keating, Martin; Chen, Yu; Placido, Frank

    2012-08-01

    By using e-beam evaporation at various oblique angles, silver nanorod arrays were produced on silicon and fused silica substrates. Reflectance of P and S polarizations was measured at an incident angle of 30°, with the data analyzed by using the appropriate optical dispersive model. The surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was investigated using trans-1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethene (BPE) as a probe molecule at an excitation wavelength of 633 nm. The Ag-coated surface become rougher as the vapor incident angle is increased. Only the sample deposited at 85° shows clear oblique column structure. Reflectance fitting confirmed the positive rexlation between roughness and deposition angle and showed an increase of porosity in the film with increasing deposition angle. The reflectance measurements also indicate that the sample deposited at 85° has a very high anisotropic effect due to the inclined column structure. In the RS scans, only the 85° samples on Si and silica substrates gave strong SERS with a similar enhancement factor, with a higher background level and noise signal from the silica substrate.

  8. Reflection and transmission of obliquely incident graphene plasmons by discontinuities in surface conductivity: observation of the Brewster-like effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farajollahi, Saeed; Rejaei, Behzad; Khavasi, Amin

    2016-07-01

    Scattering of graphene surface plasmons that are obliquely incident on a line discontinuity in graphene surface conductivity is investigated. The analysis is based on a solution of the quasi-static integral equation for surface charge density. It is shown that the reflection coefficient of the graphene plasmons reaches a minimum at a specific angle of incidence that depends on the ratio of conductivities of the two regions surrounding the discontinuity. This effect, which is similar to the well-known Brewster effect, is pronounced for abrupt discontinuities, but becomes weaker as the width of the transition region increases. The results obtained can be used for the design and analysis of devices based on graphene layers with non-uniform conductivity patterns. As an example, an approximate method is presented for obtaining the dispersion relation of waveguide modes in a graphene ribbon.

  9. Use of AVHRR-derived spectral reflectances to estimate surface albedo across the Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, J.; Gao, W.

    1997-03-01

    Substantial variations in surface albedo across a large area cause difficulty in estimating regional net solar radiation and atmospheric absorption of shortwave radiation when only ground point measurements of surface albedo are used to represent the whole area. Information on spatial variations and site-wide averages of surface albedo, which vary with the underlying surface type and conditions and the solar zenith angle, is important for studies of clouds and atmospheric radiation over a large surface area. In this study, a bidirectional reflectance model was used to inversely retrieve surface properties such as leaf area index and then the bidirectional reflectance distribution was calculated by using the same radiation model. The albedo was calculated by converting the narrowband reflectance to broadband reflectance and then integrating over the upper hemisphere.

  10. Infrared, spectral, directional-hemispherical reflectance of fused silica, Teflon polytetrafluoroethylene polymer, chrome oxide ceramic particle surface, Pyromark 2500 paint, Krylon 1602 paint, and Duraflect coating.

    PubMed

    Persky, Merle J; Szczesniak, Martin

    2008-04-01

    Infrared, spectral, directional-hemispherical reflectivity measurements of polished fused silica, Teflon polytetrafluoroethylene polymer, chrome oxide ceramic particle surface, Pyromark 2500 paint, Krylon 1602 paint, and Duraflect coating are provided. The reflectance was measured with an estimated accuracy of 0.01 to 0.02 units and a precision of 0.005 units. All the surfaces were measured at ambient temperatures. Additionally, the chrome oxide ceramic particle surface was measured at 486 K and the Pyromark 2500 at four temperatures to 877 K. Polarization measurements are also provided for fused silica, Duraflect, chrome oxide ceramic particle surface, and Pyromark 2500 paint. Separate diffuse and specular reflectance components for the Duraflect and chrome oxide ceramic surfaces are included. Fresnel-based predictions for fused silica parallel and perpendicular polarized reflections are compared to measurements. It is notable that the Pyromark 2500 and chrome oxide ceramic particle surfaces exhibit a significant lack of manufacturing repeatability. PMID:18382562

  11. The importance of environmental conditions in reflectance spectroscopy of laboratory analogs for Mars surface materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, J.; Murchie, S.; Pratt, S.; Mustard, J.; Pieters, C.

    Reflectance spectra are presented here for a variety of particulate, ferric-containing analogs to Martian soil (Fe(3+)-doped smectites and palagonites) to facilitate interpretation of remotely acquired spectra. The analog spectra were measured under differing environmental conditions to evaluate the influence of exposure history on water content and absorption features due to H2O in these samples. Each of these materials contains structural OH bonded to metal cations, adsorbed H2O, and bound H2O (either in a glass, structural site, or bound to a cation). Previous experiments involving a variety of Mars analogs have shown that the 3 micron H2O band in spectra of palagonites is more resistant to drying than the 3 micron H2O band in spectra of montmorillonites. Other experiments have shown that spectra of ferrihydrite and montmorillonites doped with ferric sulfate also contain sufficient bound H2O to retain a strong 3 micron band under dry conditions. Once the effects of the environment on bound water in clays, oxides, and salts are better understood, the hydration bands measured via reflectance spectroscopy can be used to gain information about the chemical composition and moisture content of real soil systems. Such information would be especially useful in interpreting observations of Mars where subtle spatial variations in the strengths of metal-OH and H2O absorptions have been observed in telescopic and ISM spectra. We measured bidirectional reflectance spectra of several Mars soil analogs under controlled environmental conditions to assess the effects of moisture content on the metal-OH and H2O absorptions. The samples analyzed include chemically altered montmorillonites, ferrihydrite. and palagonites from Hawaii and Iceland. Procedures for preparation of the cation-exchanged montmorillonites, ferric-salt doped montmorillonites, and ferric oxyhydroxides are described in detail elsewhere.

  12. The importance of environmental conditions in reflectance spectroscopy of laboratory analogs for Mars surface materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, J.; Murchie, S.; Pratt, S.; Mustard, J.; Pieters, C.

    1993-01-01

    Reflectance spectra are presented here for a variety of particulate, ferric-containing analogs to Martian soil (Fe(3+)-doped smectites and palagonites) to facilitate interpretation of remotely acquired spectra. The analog spectra were measured under differing environmental conditions to evaluate the influence of exposure history on water content and absorption features due to H2O in these samples. Each of these materials contains structural OH bonded to metal cations, adsorbed H2O, and bound H2O (either in a glass, structural site, or bound to a cation). Previous experiments involving a variety of Mars analogs have shown that the 3 micron H2O band in spectra of palagonites is more resistant to drying than the 3 micron H2O band in spectra of montmorillonites. Other experiments have shown that spectra of ferrihydrite and montmorillonites doped with ferric sulfate also contain sufficient bound H2O to retain a strong 3 micron band under dry conditions. Once the effects of the environment on bound water in clays, oxides, and salts are better understood, the hydration bands measured via reflectance spectroscopy can be used to gain information about the chemical composition and moisture content of real soil systems. Such information would be especially useful in interpreting observations of Mars where subtle spatial variations in the strengths of metal-OH and H2O absorptions have been observed in telescopic and ISM spectra. We measured bidirectional reflectance spectra of several Mars soil analogs under controlled environmental conditions to assess the effects of moisture content on the metal-OH and H2O absorptions. The samples analyzed include chemically altered montmorillonites, ferrihydrite. and palagonites from Hawaii and Iceland. Procedures for preparation of the cation-exchanged montmorillonites, ferric-salt doped montmorillonites, and ferric oxyhydroxides are described in detail elsewhere.

  13. Reverse-time migration-based reflection tomography using teleseismic free surface multiples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdick, S.; de Hoop, M. V.; Wang, S.; van der Hilst, R. D.

    2014-02-01

    Converted and multiply reflected phases from teleseismic events are routinely used to create structural images of the crust-mantle boundary (Moho) and the elasticity contrasts within the crust and upper mantle. The accuracy of these images is to a large extent determined by the background velocity model used to propagate these phases to depth. In order to improve estimates of 3-D velocity variations and, hence, improve imaging, we develop a method of reverse-time migration-based reflection tomography for use with wavefields from teleseismic earthquakes recorded at broad-band seismograph arrays. Reflection tomography makes use of data redundancy-that is, the ability to generate numerous structural images of the subsurface with different parts of the wavefield. In exploration seismology (where it is known as migration velocity analysis) reflection tomography typically involves the generation of an extended image (e.g. offset- or angle-gathers), and the fitness of the background model is evaluated through the application of image-domain annihilators. In regional-scale passive source seismology, however, annihilation-based methods are inadequate because the sparse and irregular distribution of teleseismic sources is not likely to produce illumination over a sufficient range of angles. To overcome this problem we turn towards a source-indexed moveout scheme. Instead of extended image annihilation, we determine the success of the tomographic velocity model by cross correlating images produced with multiply scattered waves from different teleseismic sources. The optimal velocity model is the one that minimizes correlation power between windowed images away from zero depth shift. We base our inversion scheme on the seismic adjoint method and a conjugate gradient solver. For each image pair, the update direction is determined by correlations between downgoing wavefields with upgoing adjoint wavefields for both images. The sensitivity kernels used in this method is similar

  14. Quantitative and comparative examination of the spectral features characteristics of the surface reflectance information retrieved from the atmospherically corrected images of Hyperion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayadibi, Önder; Aydal, Doğan

    2013-01-01

    The retrieval of surface reflectance information from the same single pixel of the Hyperion image atmospherically corrected by using image-based [internal average relative reflectance (IARR), log residuals, and flat field] and radiative transfer model (RTM)-based [the fast line-of-sight atmospheric analysis of spectral hypercubes (FLAASH) and the Atmospheric and Topographic Correction 2 (ATCOR-2)] approaches and the spectral feature characteristics of this information were quantitatively and comparatively examined based on measured ground spectral reflectance data. The spectral features quantitative analysis results of the reflectance data showed that spectral reflectances that are suitable and best fitting to the ground spectral reflectances which were obtained from the pixels of FLAASH, ATCOR-2, and flat field-corrected images, respectively. The retrieval of surface reflectance from the FLAASH-corrected image pixels, in general, produced high scores in spectral parameter analyses. Of the image-based approaches, only in flat field-derived reflectance data, results were obtained which are high and nearest to those of RTM and ground spectral reflectance data. Generally, low scores obtained in the spectral parameter analyses of the surface reflectance values retrieved from single pixels of IARR and log residuals-corrected images showed the results that fit worst to the measured ground spectral reflectance.

  15. An analysis of the moon's surface using reflected illumination from the earth during a waning crescent lunar phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, Ernest C., Jr.; Linton-Petza, Maggie

    1989-01-01

    There have been many articles written concerning the lunar after-glow, the spectacular reflection from the moon's surface, and the possible observation of luminescence on the dark side of the moon. The researcher, using a 600 mm cassegrain telescope lense and Kodak 400 ASA T-Max film, photographed the crescent moon whose dark side was clearly visible by the reflected light from earth. The film was digitized to a Perkin-Elmer 1010M microdensitometer for enhancement and enlargement. The resulting pictures indicate a completely different land pattern formation than observed during a full moon. An attempt is made to analyze the observed structures and to compare them to the pictures observed during the normal full moon. There are boundaries on the digitized dark section of the moon that can be identified with structures seen during the normal full moon. But, these variations do change considerably under enhancement.

  16. Reflectance Spectroscopy of Palagonite and Iron-Rich Montmorillonite Clay Mixtures: Implications for the Surface Composition of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orenberg, James; Handy, Jonathan

    1992-01-01

    Mixtures of a Hawaiian palagonite and an iron-rich, montmorillonite clay (15.8 +/- 0.4 wt% Fe as Fe2O3) were evaluated as Mars surface spectral analogs from their diffuse reflectance spectra. The presence of the 2.2 microns absorption band in the reflectance spectrum of clays and its absence in the Mars spectrum have been interpreted as indicating that highly crystalline aluminous hydroxylated clays cannot be a major mineral component of the soil on Mars. The palagonite sample used in this study does not show this absorption feature in its spectrum. In mixtures of palagonite and iron-rich montmorillonite, the 2.2 microns Al-OH clay lattice band is not seen below 15 wt% montmorillonite. This suggests the possibility that iron-rich montmorillonite clay may be present in the soil of Mars at up to 15 wt% in combination with palagonite, and remain undetected in remotely sensed spectra of Mars.

  17. Impact of ions and micrometeorites on mineral surfaces: Reflectance changes and production of atmospheric species in airless solar system bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baragiola, R. A.; Duke, C. A.; Loeffler, M.; McFadden, L. A.; Sheffield, J.

    2003-04-01

    We are conducting a research program to study the effect of ion and micrometeorite bombardment of mineral surfaces in airless bodies like asteroids, the Moon, and Mercury. We simulate the solar wind with accelerated protons and helium ions at 1 keV/amu, and micrometeorite impact with energetic laser pulses of similar transient energy deposition. We have quantified for the first time the contribution of sputtering to the sodium atmosphere around the Moon and Mercury. In addition to these results, we will present a progress report on the simulation of solar wind and micrometeorite bombardment on the visible to near-infrared reflectance of olivine. The experiments are motivated by the need to understand reflectance data, in particular that obtained recently by the NEAR mission and in the future for analysis of spectra of Vesta and Ceres to be returned by the Dawn mission.

  18. Extreme ultraviolet reflection efficiencies of diamond-turned aluminum, polished nickel, and evaporated gold surfaces. [for telescope mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malina, R. F.; Cash, W.

    1978-01-01

    Measured reflection efficiencies are presented for flat samples of diamond-turned aluminum, nickel, and evaporated gold surfaces fabricated by techniques suited for EUV telescopes. The aluminum samples were 6.2-cm-diameter disks of 6061-T6, the electroless nickel samples were formed by plating beryllium disks with 7.5-microns of Kanigen. Gold samples were produced by coating the aluminum and nickel samples with 5 strips of evaporated gold. Reflection efficiencies are given for grazing angles in the 5-75 degree range. The results indicate that for wavelengths over about 100 A, the gold-coated nickel samples yield highest efficiencies. For shorter wavelengths, the nickel samples yield better efficiencies. 500 A is found to be the optimal gold thickness.

  19. Analysis of beam interference reflected from atomic force microscope tip and periodic silicon surface under various humidity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Hans P.; Weerasinghe, Asanka T.; Lyuksyutov, Sergei F.

    2012-10-01

    Dynamical sensing based on combination of classical optical effects and atomic force microscopy (AFM) presents challenge for analysis of the forces at the nanoscale and beyond. An interference effect between light reflected from an AFM cantilever and highly reflective silicon surface of the calibration grating was studied for relative humidity (RH) varied between 9 and 60%. Force-distance analysis indicates on separation of capillary, van der Waals, adhesion, and electrostatic forces. The measurements performed in contact AFM mode suggest that the period of interference pattern observed in displacement curves is a function of humidity and varies between 293 nm at RH = 9% and 335 nm at RH > 50% with standard deviation less than 8 nm. Clear change of the interference period suggests that other than hardwarerelated factors may be involved in the formation of the interference in force-distance curves.

  20. Reflectance-based low-cost disposable optical fiber surface plasmon resonance probe with enhanced biochemical sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhara, Papiya; Singh, Vinod Kumar; Olivero, Massimo; Perrone, Guido

    2016-04-01

    A reflectance-based surface plasmon resonance (SPR) fiber sensor with enhanced sensitivity for biochemical sensing is reported after comparing its result with the transmittance-based SPR optical fiber sensors. The fabricated SPR sensor contains a gold-coated multimode fiber with the implementation of a standard source-sensor-spectrometer interrogation system. As the refractive index of the liquid under test is increased, a redshift of the SPR is observed. The coupling of the source to the fiber sensor is optimized by investigating the effect of an intentional misalignment in transmission-based setup. When a fiber tip coated with the silver mirror and the bifurcated fiber bundle is used, an alignment-free disposable sensor probe is achieved. A comprehensive characterization of the proposed reflectance-based SPR probe is discussed. The maximum sensitivity of 3212.19 nm/refractive index unit (RIU) is obtained.

  1. Control of back surface reflectance from aluminum alloyed contacts on silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cudzinovic, M.; Sopori, B.

    1996-05-01

    A process for forming highly reflective aluminum back contacts with low contact resistance to silicon solar cells is described. By controlling the process conditions, it is possible to vary the silicon/aluminum interface from a specular to a diffuse reflector while maintaining a high interface reflectance. The specular interface is found to be a uniform silicon/aluminum alloy layer a few angstroms thick that has epitaxially regrown on the silicon. The diffuse interface consists of randomly distributed (111) pyramids produced by crystallographic out-diffusion of the bulk silicon. The light trapping ability of the diffuse contact is found to be close to the theoretical limit. Both types of contacts are found to have specific contact resistivities of 10{sup {minus}5} {Omega}-cm{sup 2}. The process for forming the contacts involves illuminating the devices with tungsten halogen lamps. The process is rapid (under 100 s) and low temperature (peak temperature < 580{degrees}C), making it favorable for commercial solar cell fabrication.

  2. High resolution laser remote imaging innovative tools for preservation of painted surfaces: information from reflectance and fluorescence data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantoni, R.; Ferri de Collibus, M.; Francucci, M.; Fornetti, G.; Guarneri, M.; Caneve, L.; Colao, F.; Fiorani, L.; Palucci, A.; Spizzichino, V.

    2013-11-01

    Two innovative laser scanning prototypes have been developed at ENEA for diagnostics of large surfaces relevant to monumental cultural heritage. The first, based on amplitude modulation technique in the visible, is a trichromatic (Red /Green /Blue) imaging topologic radar (RGB-ITR) specialized to collect high resolution 3D models. After proper color calibration, it allows for hyper-realistic rendering of colored features on painted surfaces and for precise localization of irregularities. The second is a line scanning system, working either in reflectance or laser induced fluorescence mode, capable of fast 2D monochromatic images acquisition on up to 90 different spectral channels in the visible/UV range, which was developed to investigate the presence of different substances onto the painted surface. Data collected during former field campaigns on frescos by means each scanning system will be reported and discussed extracting information of interest to conservators by means of specific data processing methodologies and respective software tools. Recent results relevant to paints of the Assumption on slate and canvas by Scipione Pulzone named "il Gaetano" collected in two churches in Rome (San Silvestro al Quirinale, Bandini chapel; Santa Caterina dei Funari, Solano della Vetera Chapel) from the late XVI century are presented in order to demonstrate the increased diagnostic capabilities coming from data integration. From combination of reflectance data from both instruments, the first true remote differential colorimetry has been implemented, giving a chance to test the color quality in the future from the archived images.

  3. Challenges of infrared reflective spectroscopy of solid-phase explosives and chemicals on surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Mark C.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2012-09-01

    Reliable active and passive hyperspectral imaging and detection of explosives and solid-phase chemical residue on surfaces remains a challenge and an active area of research and development. Both methods rely on reference libraries for material identification, but in many cases the reference spectra do not sufficiently resemble those instrumental signals scattered from real-world objects. We describe a physics-based model using the dispersive complex dielectric constant to explain what is often thought of as anomalous behavior of scattered or non-specular signatures encountered in active and passive sensing of explosives or chemicals on surfaces and show modeling and experimental results for RDX.

  4. Red-Edge Spectral Reflectance as an Indicator of Surface Moisture Content in an Alaskan Peatland Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPartland, M.; Kane, E. S.; Turetsky, M. R.; Douglass, T.; Falkowski, M. J.; Montgomery, R.; Edwards, J.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic and boreal peatlands serve as major reservoirs of terrestrial organic carbon (C) because Net Primary Productivity (NPP) outstrips C loss from decomposition over long periods of time. Peatland productivity varies as a function of water table position and surface moisture content, making C storage in these systems particularly vulnerable to the climate warming and drying predicted for high latitudes. Detailed spatial knowledge of how aboveground vegetation communities respond to changes in hydrology would allow for ecosystem response to environmental change to be measured at the landscape scale. This study leverages remotely sensed data along with field measurements taken at the Alaska Peatland Experiment (APEX) at the Bonanza Creek Long Term Ecological Research site to examine relationships between plant solar reflectance and surface moisture. APEX is a decade-long experiment investigating the effects of hydrologic change on peatland ecosystems using water table manipulation treatments (raised, lowered, and control). Water table levels were manipulated throughout the 2015 growing season, resulting in a maximum separation of 35 cm between raised and lowered treatment plots. Water table position, soil moisture content, depth to seasonal ice, soil temperature, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), CO2 and CH4 fluxes were measured as predictors of C loss through decomposition and NPP. Vegetation was surveyed for percent cover of plant functional types. Remote sensing data was collected during peak growing season, when the separation between treatment plots was at maximum difference. Imagery was acquired via a SenseFly eBee airborne platform equipped with a Canon S110 red-edge camera capable of detecting spectral reflectance from plant tissue at 715 nm band center to within centimeters of spatial resolution. Here, we investigate empirical relationships between spectral reflectance, water table position, and surface moisture in relation to peat carbon balance.

  5. Asteroid surface processes: Experimental studies of the solar wind on reflectance and optical properties of asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfadden, Lucy-Ann

    1991-01-01

    The effect of the solar wind on the optical properties of meteorites was studied to determine whether the solar wind can alter the properties of ordinary chondrite parent bodies resulting in the spectral properties of S-type asteroids. The existing database of optical properties of asteroids was analyzed to determine the effect of solar wind in altering asteroid surface properties.

  6. Quantitative surface topography determination by Nomarski reflection microscopy. 2: Microscope modification, calibration, and planar sample experiments.

    PubMed

    Hartman, J S; Gordon, R L; Lessor, D L

    1980-09-01

    The application of reflective Nomarski differential interference contrast microscopy for the determination of quantitative sample topography data is presented. The discussion includes a review of key theoretical results presented previously plus the experimental implementation of the concepts using a commercial Nomarski microscope. The experimental work included the modification and characterization of a commercial microscope to allow its use for obtaining quantitative sample topography data. System usage for the measurement of slopes on flat planar samples is also discussed. The discussion has been designed to provide the theoretical basis, a physical insight, and a cookbook procedure for implementation to allow these results to be of value to both those interested in the microscope theory and its practical usage in the metallography laboratory. PMID:20234540

  7. Absolute determination of inelastic mean-free paths and surface excitation parameters by absolute reflection electron energy loss spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatomi, T.; Goto, K.

    2005-11-01

    An analytical approach was proposed for simultaneously determining an inelastic mean-free path (IMFP) and a surface excitation parameter (SEP) with absolute units by the analysis of an absolute experimental reflection electron energy loss spectrum. The IMFPs and SEPs in Ni were deduced for electrons of 300 to 3000 eV. The obtained IMFPs were in good agreement with those calculated using the TPP-2M equation. The Chen-type empirical formula was proposed for determining the SEP. The results confirmed the applicability of the present approach for determining the IMFP and SEP for medium-energy electrons.

  8. A note on Feynmanʼs calculation of reflection amplitudes for radiation striking a glass surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reali, Giancarlo

    2014-07-01

    In this paper we present a detailed calculation of reflection amplitudes for s- and p-polarized radiation striking a glass surface, closely following the derivation found in the Feynman Lectures on Physics, vol I. The basic idea underlying Feynman's exposition is the extinction theorem, which is used here in a very unique, Feynmanesque way. The calculation is carried out both for the case of radiation coming from the air and from the glass. We also show that the same reasonings are useful to discuss the internal Brewster's law.

  9. Seasonal lake surface water temperature trends reflected by heterocyst glycolipid based molecular thermometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauersachs, T.; Rochelmeier, J.; Schwark, L.

    2015-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that the relative distribution of heterocyst glycolipids (HGs) in cultures of N2-fixing heterocystous cyanobacteria is largely controlled by growth temperature, suggesting a potential use of these components in paleoenvironmental studies. Here, we investigated the effect of environmental parameters (e.g. surface water temperatures, oxygen concentrations and pH) on the distribution of HGs in a natural system using water column filtrates collected from Lake Schreventeich (Kiel, Germany) from late July to the end of October 2013. HPLC-ESI/MS analysis revealed a dominance of 1-(O-hexose)-3,25-hexacosanediols (HG26 diols) and 1-(O-hexose)-3-keto-25-hexacosanol (HG26 keto-ol) in the solvent extracted water column filtrates, which were accompanied by minor abundances of 1-(O-hexose)-3,27-octacosanediol (HG28 diol) and 1-(O-hexose)-3-keto-27-octacosanol (HG28 keto-ol) as well as 1-(O-hexose)-3,25,27-octacosanetriol (HG28 triol) and 1-(O-hexose)-3-keto-25,27-octacosanediol (HG28 keto-diol). Fractional abundances of alcoholic and ketonic HGs generally showed strong linear correlations with surface water temperatures and no or only weak linear correlations with both oxygen concentrations and pH. Changes in the distribution of the most abundant diol and keto-ol (e.g., HG26 diol and HG26 keto-ol) were quantitatively expressed as the HDI26 (heterocyst diol index of 26carbon atoms) with values of this index ranging from 0.89 in mid-August to 0.66 in mid-October. An average HDI26 value of 0.79, which translates into a calculated surface water temperature of 15.8 ± 0.3 °C, was obtained from surface sediments collected from Lake Schreventeich. This temperature - and temperatures obtained from other HG indices (e.g., HDI28 and HTI28) - is similar to the one measured during maximum cyanobacterial productivity in early to mid-September and suggests that HGs preserved in Lake Schreventeich sediments record summer surface water temperatures. As N2-fixing

  10. Mineralogical analyses of surface sediments in the Antarctic Dry Valleys: coordinated analyses of Raman spectra, reflectance spectra and elemental abundances.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Janice L; Englert, Peter A J; Patel, Shital; Tirsch, Daniela; Roy, Alex J; Koeberl, Christian; Böttger, Ute; Hanke, Franziska; Jaumann, Ralf

    2014-12-13

    Surface sediments at Lakes Fryxell, Vanda and Brownworth in the Antarctic Dry Valleys (ADV) were investigated as analogues for the cold, dry environment on Mars. Sediments were sampled from regions surrounding the lakes and from the ice cover on top of the lakes. The ADV sediments were studied using Raman spectra of individual grains and reflectance spectra of bulk particulate samples and compared with previous analyses of subsurface and lakebottom sediments. Elemental abundances were coordinated with the spectral data in order to assess trends in sediment alteration. The surface sediments in this study were compared with lakebottom sediments (Bishop JL et al. 2003 Int. J. Astrobiol. 2, 273-287 (doi:10.1017/S1473550403001654)) and samples from soil pits (Englert P et al. 2013 In European Planetary Science Congress, abstract no. 96; Englert P et al. 2014 In 45th Lunar and Planetary Science Conf., abstract no. 1707). Feldspar, quartz and pyroxene are common minerals found in all the sediments. Minor abundances of carbonate, chlorite, actinolite and allophane are also found in the surface sediments, and are similar to minerals found in greater abundance in the lakebottom sediments. Surface sediment formation is dominated by physical processes; a few centimetres below the surface chemical alteration sets in, whereas lakebottom sediments experience biomineralization. Characterizing the mineralogical variations in these samples provides insights into the alteration processes occurring in the ADV and supports understanding alteration in the cold and dry environment on Mars. PMID:25368345

  11. In-out asymmetry of surface excitations in reflection-electron-energy-loss spectra of polycrystalline Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvat-Pujol, Francesc; Werner, Wolfgang S. M.; Novák, Mihaly; Jiricek, Petr; Zemek, Josef

    2014-05-01

    We present experimental evidence for differences in surface energy losses between (a) electrons entering a solid from vacuum and (b) electrons leaving the solid into vacuum. Although these so-called in-out asymmetries have been long assumed to exist on theoretical grounds, the present work constitutes a clear experimental observation of the phenomenon. The effect has been exposed by comparing reflection-electron-energy-loss spectra of polycrystalline Al for pairs of conjugate scattering geometries where the directions of the source and the detector were interchanged. Differences of up to 30% in the peak height of surface energy-loss features are observed. The experimentally observed in-out asymmetry has been examined within the semiclassical dielectric formalism using state-of-the-art models for surface scattering of charged projectiles. The theoretical analysis suggests that in-out asymmetry effects are most accentuated for surface-crossing directions close to the surface normal and for high kinetic energies, in good agreement with the observed behavior. The effect is assumed to be present not only for electrons, but in principle for any charged particle.

  12. Inspection of the diamond-turned surfaces used for mounting an array of eight x-ray reflection gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Montesanti, R.C.

    1993-11-01

    This paper describes the use of a T-base diamond-turning machine as a measuring machine for inspecting the positional accuracy of the diamond-tuned surfaces of four attachment rails--parts that resemble precision step gauges. The attachment rails provide the precision mounting surfaces for a prototype array of eight X-ray reflection gratings for the European Space Agency`s (ESA) X-ray Multi-Mirror project (XMM). Each rail is 4.5 in. long with a cross-section of less than 0.1 in{sup 2}, and has eight protruding bosses spaced approximately 0.5 in. apart (Figure 1). A diamond-turned feature on each boss provides a mounting surface for one of the four corners of a grating. These surfaces are 0.018 in. high by 0.1 in. wide, and have a 12 in. cylindrical radius with an axis parallel to the boss protrusion (Figure 2). Together, the four rails provide eight sets of four coplanar points for mounting the gratings (Figure 3). Note that the gratings are not parallel to each other; they sweep through a 12 mrad angle from the first to eighth grating. To accommodate this fanned array, the normal directions (denoted by arrows in Figure 1) of the mounting surfaces on the bosses, at the rail centerline, also sweep through a 12 mrad angle from the first to eighth boss.

  13. Neutron reflectivity study of substrate surface chemistry effects on supported phospholipid bilayer formation on (11 ̅20) sapphire.

    PubMed

    Oleson, Timothy A; Sahai, Nita; Wesolowski, David J; Dura, Joseph A; Majkrzak, Charles F; Giuffre, Anthony J

    2012-03-15

    Oxide-supported phospholipid bilayers (SPBs) used as biomimetic membranes are significant for a broad range of applications including improvement of biomedical devices and biosensors, and in understanding biomineralization processes and the possible role of mineral surfaces in the evolution of pre-biotic membranes. Continuous-coverage and/or stacked SPBs retain properties (e.g., fluidity) more similar to native biological membranes, which is desirable for most applications. Using neutron reflectivity, we examined the role of oxide surface charge (by varying pH and ionic strength) and of divalent Ca(2+) in controlling surface coverage and potential stacking of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers on the (11 ̅20) face of sapphire (α-Al(2)O(3)). Nearly full bilayers were formed at low to neutral pH, when the sapphire surface is positively charged, and at low ionic strength (I=15 mM NaCl). Coverage decreased at higher pH, close to the isoelectric point of sapphire, and also at high I≥210 mM, or with addition of 2mM Ca(2+). The latter two effects are not additive, suggesting that Ca(2+) mitigates the effect of higher I. These trends agree with previous results for phospholipid adsorption on α-Al(2)O(3) particles determined by adsorption isotherms and on single-crystal (10 ̅10) sapphire by atomic force microscopy, suggesting consistency of oxide surface chemistry-dependent effects across experimental techniques. PMID:22244865

  14. Joint effects of illumination geometry and object shape in the perception of surface reflectance

    PubMed Central

    Olkkonen, Maria; Brainard, David H

    2011-01-01

    Surface properties provide useful information for identifying objects and interacting with them. Effective utilization of this information, however, requires that the perception of object surface properties be relatively constant across changes in illumination and changes in object shape. Such constancy has been studied separately for changes in these factors. Here we ask whether the separate study of the illumination and shape effects is sufficient, by testing whether joint effects of illumination and shape changes can be predicted from the individual effects in a straightforward manner. We found large interactions between illumination and object shape in their effects on perceived glossiness. In addition, analysis of luminance histogram statistics could not account for the interactions. PMID:23145259

  15. Reflected GPS Power for the Detection of Surface Roughness Patterns in Coastal Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oertel, George, F.; Allen, Thomas R.

    2000-01-01

    Coastal bays formed by the barrier islands of Delaware, Maryland and Virginia are parts of a coastal region known as a "Coastal Compartment". The coastal compartment between the Chesapeake and Delaware Bays is actually the mosaic of landscapes on the headland of the interfluve that separates these large drainage basins. The coastal compartments form a variety of different-shaped waterways landward of the coastline. Shape differences along the boundaries produce differences in exposure to wind and waves. Different shoreface topographies seaward of the coastline also influence surface roughness by changing wave-refraction patterns. Surface-water roughness (caused by waves) is controlled by a number of parameters, including fetch, shielding, exposure corridors, water-mass boundary conditions, wetland vegetation and water depth in coastal bays. In the coastal ocean, surface roughness patterns are controlled by shoreface shoaling and inlet refraction patterns in the coastal ocean. Knowledge of wave phenomena in the nearshore and backbarrier areas is needed to understand how wave climate influences important ecosystems in estuaries and bays.

  16. A near-Infrared reflectance data cube of the Martian surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riu, Lucie; Poulet, François; Carter, John; Bibring, Jean-Pierre; Gondet, Brigitte; Langevin, Yves

    2016-04-01

    OMEGA ("Observatoire pour la Minéralogie, l'Eau, les Glaces et l'Activité") the hyperspectral VIS-NIR imager on board Mars Express, has acquired a global coverage of Mars, with major outcomes in terms of surface and atmospheric properties. The image-cubes acquired within the last 10 years have enabled in particular the building of global maps of key minerals using independent OMEGA observations for each pixel. Following those previous global studies, a new approach consists in deriving a 3-D global image cube of Mars by merging atmospheric- and aerosol-corrected NIR data cubes. The aerosol correction is performed using a radiative transfer model developed by Vincendon et al. (2007). The final product is a global cube containing 0.97μm to 2.5μm spectra at a resolution of 32pix per degree with a surface coverage of ~90% from 60S to 60N. It allows the extraction of spectrum from any location of Mars, and global maps can directly constructed. We will present global maps of new spectral criteria giving global mineral distributions. The application of surface radiative transfer model to each spectrum will enable the retrieve of quantitative mineral abundance distributions. A comparison with global maps of mineral abundances by TES (Thermal Emission Spectrometer) is foreseen.

  17. Automatic segmentation and classification of the reflected laser dots during analytic measurement of mirror surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, ZhenZhou

    2016-08-01

    In the past research, we have proposed a one-shot-projection method for analytic measurement of the shapes of the mirror surfaces, which utilizes the information of two captured laser dots patterns to reconstruct the mirror surfaces. Yet, the automatic image processing algorithms to extract the laser dots patterns have not been addressed. In this paper, a series of automatic image processing algorithms are proposed to segment and classify the projected laser dots robustly and efficiently during measuring the shapes of mirror surfaces and each algorithm is indispensible for the finally achieved accuracy. Firstly, the captured image is modeled and filtered by the designed frequency domain filter. Then, it is segmented by a robust threshold selection method. A novel iterative erosion method is proposed to separate connected dots. Novel methods to remove noise blob and retrieve missing dots are also proposed. An effective registration method is used to help to select the used SNF laser and the dot generation pattern by analyzing if the dot pattern obeys the principle of central projection well. Experimental results verified the effectiveness of all the proposed algorithms.

  18. Si (111) surface cleaning using atomic hydrogen and SiH2 studied using reflection high-energy electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayama, Hiroyuki; Tatsumi, Toru

    1989-07-01

    The Si(111) wafer covered by a thin protective oxide layer was cleaned in disilane gas source Si molecular-beam epitaxy chamber. The effect of the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) cracked/uncracked disilane or hydrogen irradiation on the initial surface cleaning was studied by observing the reflection high-energy electron diffraction pattern change. The ECR-cracked disilane irradiation was the most effective for lowering the cleaning temperature and the surface cleaning was achieved at 680 °C. The uncracked disilane and the ECR-cracked hydrogen irradiation were also effective for lowering the cleaning temperature. The uncracked hydrogen irradiation has no effect for lowering the cleaning temperature. The SiH2 and H were main species of the ECR-cracked disilane and these played important roles in the cleaning process.

  19. Modeling of Microwave Reflection from the Surface of Water Basins with Spills of Water-Cut Oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krotikov, V. D.; Pelushenko, S. A.; Rakut', I. V.; Savelyev, V. Yu.

    2015-06-01

    We consider specific features of reflection of microwaves from the surface of a water basin for the two-layer model of oil spills, which are determined by a water-cut-oil film. Within the spill model, the dielectric properties of water were allowed for in accordance with the Debye theory, and the dielectric properties of the water-cut oil, in accordance with the theory developed for binary systems. The data about variations in the values of reflection coefficients depending on the frequency, viewing angle, thickness of the oil film, and moisture content in the film are obtained. The dependences of reflection coefficients on the film thickness are determined for various values of volume content of the water fraction in oil. Complex values of the dielectric permittivity of oil-water emulsions with preset volume moisture content are found. Describing the obtained dependences of the complex dielectric permittivity of the emulsion on the volume moisture content requires application of asymmetrical formulas for the mixture of polar and nonpolar fluids.

  20. Visible and near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy of pyroxene-bearing rocks: New constraints for understanding planetary surface compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompilio, Loredana; Sgavetti, Maria; Pedrazzi, Giuseppe

    Laboratory visible and near-infrared reflectance spectra of solid rock slabs, mineral separates and systematic mixtures were simultaneously investigated. We apply an empirical approach to evaluate spectra, in order to achieve qualitative and quantitative information. We use cumulates (mostly norites, leuconorites, melanorites and anorthosites) belonging to the Bjerkreim-Sokndal Layered Intrusion, a sequence of genetically related rocks with simple textures. Laboratory spectra are measured on slightly polished rock slabs in the 350- to 2500-nm interval and directional-hemispherical reflectance geometry. Composition is determined using traditional techniques other than reflectance spectroscopy. We find that: (1) band minima measured on rock spectra are strongly influenced by the concurrent effects due to modal abundance of the spectroscopically active mineral and mineral chemistry; (2) band depths can be used for semiquantitative analyses, limited to the set of rocks investigated; (3) the spectral parameters derived from powdered pyroxene are in agreement with previously published calibrations; (4) the mineral mixture systematics can be reasonably considered as linear, when pyroxene is mixed with neutral components; and (5) the empirical evaluation of solid rock surface spectra needs further insights to give a great improvement to planetary researches. In addition, genetic sequences of rocks should be investigated in detail to help the geological interpretation of planetary evolution. Therefore more laboratory and analytical studies are required in order to understand the influence of composition and petrographic textures on the spectral analysis.

  1. Comparative Characterization Study of a LaBr3(Ce) Scintillation Crystal in Two Surface Wrapping Scenarios: Absorptive and Reflective

    PubMed Central

    Aldawood, Saad; Castelhano, Ines; Gernhäuser, Roman; Van Der Kolff, Hugh; Lang, Christian; Liprandi, Silvia; Lutter, Rudolf; Maier, Ludwig; Marinšek, Tim; Schaart, Dennis R.; Parodi, Katia; Thirolf, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    The properties of a 50 mm × 50 mm × 30 mm monolithic LaBr3:Ce scintillator crystal coupled to a position-sensitive multi-anode photomultiplier (PMT, Hamamatsu H9500), representing the absorbing detector of a Compton camera under study for online ion (proton) beam range verification in hadron therapy, was evaluated in combination with either absorptive or reflective crystal surface coating. This study covered an assessment of the energy and position-dependent energy resolution, exhibiting a factor of 2.5–3.5 improvement for the reflectively wrapped crystal at 662 keV. The spatial dependency was investigated using a collimated 137Cs source, showing a steep degradation of the energy resolution at the edges and corners of the absorptively wrapped crystal. Furthermore, the time resolution was determined to be 273 ps (FWHM) and 536 ps (FWHM) with reflective and absorptive coating, respectively, using a 60Co source. In contrast, the light spread function (LSF) of the light amplitude distribution on the PMT segments improved for the absorptively wrapped detector. Both wrapping modalities showed almost no differences in the energy-dependent photopeak detection efficiency. PMID:26697405

  2. Development of Surfaces Optically Suitable for Flat Solar Panels. [using a reflectometer which separately evaluates spectral and diffuse reflectivities of surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A reflectometer which can separately evaluate the spectral and diffuse reflectivities of surfaces is described. A phase locked detection system for the reflectometer is also described. A selective coating on aluminum potentially useful for flat plate solar collector applications is presented. The coating is composed of strongly bound copper oxide (divalent) and is formed by an etching process performed on an aluminum alloy with high copper content. Fabrication costs are expected to be small due to the one stop fabrication process. A number of conclusions gathered from the literature as to the required optical properties of flat plate solar collectors are discussed.

  3. Optical reflection from planetary surfaces as an operator-eigenvalue problem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wildey, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    The understanding of quantum mechanical phenomena has come to rely heavily on theory framed in terms of operators and their eigenvalue equations. This paper investigates the utility of that technique as related to the reciprocity principle in diffuse reflection. The reciprocity operator is shown to be unitary and Hermitian; hence, its eigenvectors form a complete orthonormal basis. The relevant eigenvalue is found to be infinitely degenerate. A superposition of the eigenfunctions found from solution by separation of variables is inadequate to form a general solution that can be fitted to a one-dimensional boundary condition, because the difficulty of resolving the reciprocity operator into a superposition of independent one-dimensional operators has yet to be overcome. A particular lunar application in the form of a failed prediction of limb-darkening of the full Moon from brightness versus phase illustrates this problem. A general solution is derived which fully exploits the determinative powers of the reciprocity operator as an unresolved two-dimensional operator. However, a solution based on a sum of one-dimensional operators, if possible, would be much more powerful. A close association is found between the reciprocity operator and the particle-exchange operator of quantum mechanics, which may indicate the direction for further successful exploitation of the approach based on the operational calculus. ?? 1986 D. Reidel Publishing Company.

  4. Understanding the Internal Structure of Layered Organic Compounds deposited on mineral surface using Neutron Reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambaye, Haile; Jagadamma, Sindhu; Petridis, Loukas; Mayes, Melanie; Lauter, Valeria

    2013-03-01

    Organic carbon (OC) stabilization in soils plays a significant role in the global C cycle, therefore the understanding of the structure and function of the OC-soil mineral interface is of high importance. To study the internal structure, films with different combination of simple OC compounds, natural organic matter (NOM), Bi-layers of SA (Stearic Acid) on Glucose and NOM/Hydrophilic-NOM/Hydrophobic-NOM were deposited onto sapphire using spin coating. The phobic and phylic fractions of the NOM are operationally separated by exchange resins. We obtained detailed structural depth profile of the films using the depth-sensitive technique of the neutron reflectometry. The neutron reflectivity data were collected at the MAGICS Reflectometer at Spallation Neutron Source at the ORNL. Self-assembled ordering of SA in a repeating bi-layer structure was observed when it was deposited on NOM, phylic-NOM and Glucose. However, when SA was added to phobic-NOM no ordering of SA was detected. The formation of distinct, immiscible layers is due to insolubility of SA with NOM/Hydrophilic-NOM and Glucose. Our results reveal that the OC-mineral interface form complex layering and that the sequence of the layering depends on the compounds. The work was supported by ORNL (LDRD), BES and DOE.

  5. Parameters inversing of polarized bidirectional reflectance distribution function model for target rough surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qing; Zhan, Yong-hong; Yang, Di; Zeng, Chang-e.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we try to find a model that can apply to predict the polarization characteristics of the targets on the ground correctly. In the first place, we give an introduction to several kinds of existing models which are divided into three categories: Empirical models are precise but occupy too much source of computer; Physical-based models can predict the phenomenon of reflection exactly but hardly get the final results; Semi-empirical models have both advantages mentioned above and avoid their disadvantages effectively. Then we make an analysis of the Priest-Germer (PG) pBRDF model, one of semi-empirical models, which is suitable for our study. The methods of parameters inversing and testing are proposed based on this model and the test system from which we can get enough data to verify the accuracy of the model is designed independently. At last, we make a simulation of the whole process of the parameters inversing based on PG pBRDF model. From the analysis of the simulation curves, we briefly know the direction we go in the following work to make an amendment.

  6. Surface topography to reflectivity mapping in two-dimensional photonic crystals designed in germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husanu, M. A.; Ganea, C. P.; Anghel, I.; Florica, C.; Rasoga, O.; Popescu, D. G.

    2015-11-01

    Light confinement in a two dimensional photonic crystal (2D PhC) with hexagonal symmetry is studied using infra-red reflectance spectromicroscopy and numerical calculations. The structure has been realized by laser ablation, using a pulsed laser (λ = 775 nm), perforating an In-doped Ge wafer and creating a lattice of holes with well-defined symmetry. Correlating the spectral signature of the photonic gaps recorded experimentally with the results obtained in the finite difference time domain and finite difference frequency domain calculations, we established the relationship between the geometric parameters of the structure (lattice constants, shape of the hole) and its efficiency in trapping and guiding the radiation in a well-defined frequency range. Besides the gap in the low energy range of transversal electric modes, a second one is identified in the telecommunication range, originating in the localization of the leaky modes within the radiation continuum. The emerging picture is of a device with promising characteristics as an alternative to Si-based technology in photonic device fabrication with special emphasize in energy storage and conversion.

  7. Development of sheet molding compound solar collectors with molded-in silvered glass reflective surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Champion, R. L.; Allred, R. E.

    1980-12-01

    The reflecting concentrator of a parabolic trough solar collector system comprises approximately 40% of initial system cost. The parabolic concentrator structure is also the most influential component in determining overall system efficiency. Parabolic test moldings have been fabricated from a general purpose sheet molding compound with flat chemically strengthened glass, flat annealed glass, and thermally formed glass. The test panel configuration was a 1.22 m x 0.61 m, 45/sup 0/ rim angle (0.762 m focal length) parabola. Attempts to mold with annealed sheet glass (1 mm thick) and thermally formed glass (1.25 mm thick) were unsuccessful; only the chemically strengthened glass (1.25 mm thick) was strong enough to survive molding pressures. Because of the mismatch in thermal expansion between glass and sheet molding compound, the as-molded panels contained a sizeable residual stress. The results are given of dimensional changes taking place in the panels under accelerated thermal cycling and outdoor aging conditions; these results are compared to an analytical model of the laminate. In addition, the sheet molding compound has been examined for thermomechanical properties and flow behavior in the rib sections. Results indicated that lowering the thermal expansion coefficient of the sheet molding compound through material modifications would produce a more stable structure.

  8. Reduction of reflection losses of PV-modules by structured surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Scheydecker, A.; Goetzberger, A.; Wittwer, V. )

    1994-08-01

    Structuring the transparent cover of solar cell modules reduces reflection losses, particularly at large angles of incidence. Relevant aspects are good transmission efficiency independent of wavelength and a low sensitivity to pollution. The macroscopic, linearly grooved structure proposed in this article shows good performance only in combination with a textured cell because large angles are likely to occur inside the structured cover. A classification is made with the concept of annual averaged transmission efficiency for the climatic zone of Freiburg. Calculations and measurements for different combinations of smooth and structured covers and solar cells are presented. From the calculated 97.8% entering the structured glass cover, a measured 93.2% can be coupled into a pyramidal textured monocrystalline solar cell. This is an absolute improvement of 17% compared to a smooth, uncoated solar cell with a smooth glass cover. Outdoor measurements showed that a textured solar cell with a structured cover has between 5 and 10% higher values of short-circuit current than a textured cell with a smooth cover.

  9. [Using in-situ reflectance to monitor the chlorophyll concentration in the surface layer of tidal flat].

    PubMed

    Xing, Qian-Guo; Yu, Ding-Feng; Lou, Ming-Jing; Lü, Ying-Chun; Li, Shao-Peng; Han, Qiu-Ying

    2013-08-01

    An optical monitoring method is proposed for the rapid, non destructive measurements of chlorophyll concentration (Chl-a) in the surface sediments of emerged tidal flat, and it can be further applied in remote sensing work. Hyperspectral reflectance of intertidal sediments were measured in day time at the tidal flats of the Sishili Bay, the Northern Yellow Sea, and surface sediments (3 mm) were sampled for the in-door measurements of Chl-a. On the basis of the reflectance at 650, 675 and 700 nm, the indices of normalized difference index of microbenthos (NDI-MPB) and trough depth (T-depth) were proposed for the measurements of microphytobenthos biomass. T-depth can be used to remove the linear background spectral noises and indicate the existence of microphytobenthos; Good linear relationship was observed between NDI-MPB and Chl-a content in sediments (2.22-49.36 mg x m(-2), r > 0.99), which may be used to monitor the biomass of microphy to benthos. PMID:24159873

  10. High-resolution shallow reflection seismic image and surface evidence of the Upper Tiber Basin active faults (Northern Apennines, Italy)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donne, D.D.; Plccardi, L.; Odum, J.K.; Stephenson, W.J.; Williams, R.A.

    2007-01-01

    Shallow seismic reflection prospecting has been carried out in order to investigate the faults that bound to the southwest and northeast the Quaternary Upper Tiber Basin (Northern Apennines, Italy). On the northeastern margin of the basin a ??? 1 km long reflection seismic profile images a fault segment and the associated up to 100 meters thick sediment wedge. Across the southwestern margin a 0.5 km-long seismic profile images a 50-55??-dipping extensional fault, that projects to the scarp at the base of the range-front, and against which a 100 m thick syn-tectonic sediment wedge has formed. The integration of surface and sub-surface data allows to estimate at least 190 meters of vertical displacement along the fault and a slip rate around 0.25 m/kyr. Southwestern fault might also be interpreted as the main splay structure of regional Alto Tiberina extensional fault. At last, the 1917 Monterchi earthquake (Imax=X, Boschi et alii, 2000) is correlable with an activation of the southwestern fault, and thus suggesting the seismogenic character of this latter.

  11. Null tests for oblate spheroids. [aspheric surfaces in reflecting optical system designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, J. M.; Parks, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    In most real cases requiring simple null optics, the optical path difference cannot be reduced to zero but can be kept at a fractional wavelength level so that interferometric data reduction can be used to account for the residual error. In other cases, computer-generated holograms may be used to obtain apparently straight fringes when the desired surface is obtained. Two examples, one involving an f/2.5 concave oblate spheroid and the other a Paul-Baker secondary, are examined. It is shown that although the null tests are not generally perfect, the residual error is small and the tests are simple.

  12. Modeling of reflection-type laser-driven white lighting considering phosphor particles and surface topography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Ho; Joo, Jae-Young; Lee, Sun-Kyu

    2015-07-27

    This paper presents a model of blue laser diode (LD)-based white lighting coupled with a yellow YAG phosphor, for use in the proper design and fabrication of phosphor in automotive headlamps. First, the sample consisted of an LD, collecting lens, and phosphor was prepared that matches the model. The light distribution of the LD and the phosphor were modeled to investigate an effect of the surface topography and phosphor particle properties on the laser-driven white lighting systems by using the commercially available optical design software. Based on the proposed model, the integral spectrum distribution and the color coordinates were discussed. PMID:26367551

  13. A multilayer bidirectional reflectance model for the analysis of planetary surface hyperspectral images at visible and near-infrared wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douté, Sylvain; Schmitt, Bernard

    1998-12-01

    We present a practical, timely, and effective radiative transfer algorithm, suitable for qualitative and quantitative analyses of high-resolution hyperspectral images of planetary surfaces in the visible and near-infrared domains. The bidirectional reflectance of a plane parallel, absorbing, scattering, and slightly stratified medium is generated. The local mean properties of scattering and absorption of such media are obtained apart, using semiempirical approaches. The functions which express the diffuse reflection and transmission behaviors of each homogeneous layer are then derived. For the multiple scattering term, we numerically resolve the equations appearing in the H, X and Y function method of radiative transfer, reducing the real phase function to a simplified one which can nevertheless be anisotropic. A better approach to the physical realism is obtained for the single and double scattering contributions, using their real analytical expressions. This contrasts with the Hapke model dedicated to homogeneous and semi-infinite media, where only an isotropic reduced phase function is adopted and the single scattering correction is applied. The bidirectional reflectance and the derived quantities (albedos) of an optically semi-infinite homogeneous medium are then easily derived from these quantities. For a stratified medium, a simple adding algorithm based on principles of invariance is presented. Compared to earlier and more complete theoretical developments, this model in most cases reproduces the dependence of the bidirectional reflectance according to the different geometrical and radiative parameters with a maximum of 10% relative error. It leads to important gains of computation time and significantly extends the validity of Hapke's or similar practical approaches.

  14. Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave Lidar Measurements of Surface Reflectance and Implications for CO2 Column Measurements: Results from 2013 ASCENDS Airborne Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehrir, A. R.; Browell, E. V.; Harrison, F. W.; Dobler, J. T.; Lin, B.; Ismail, S.; Kooi, S. A.; Obland, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    Improved knowledge of the Earth's surface reflectance in the 1.57-micron spectral band is of particular importance for accurate Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) measurements and modeling of IPDA CO2 column measurements as required by the Active Sensing of CO2 Emission of Nights Days and Seasons (ASCENDS) Decadal Survey space mission. The Earth's surface albedo in the near-infrared portion of the spectrum is extremely low for snow and ice and for water under high wind conditions, and this can lead to degraded signal to noise ratios of surface reflectances and of IPDA CO2 column retrievals, requiring increased integration periods. This paper discusses the magnitude and variability of the surface reflectance and corresponding column CO2 measurements over snow measured using an intensity-modulated continuous-wave (IM-CW) laser absorption spectrometer (LAS), namely the Exelis Multi-function Fiber Laser Lidar (MFLL), during the winter 2013 ASCENDS airborne campaign. This LAS system is currently being evaluated by NASA Langley as the ASCENDS space mission prototype system. The surface reflectance measurements over snow and ice as well as over water collected during the 2013 winter DC-8 flight campaign were calibrated using surface reflectance data obtained over well-established satellite radiometric calibration sites such as Railroad Valley, Nevada and over other homogeneous desert sites in California and Arizona that have been used for similar calibrations on past ASCENDS airborne campaigns. Two separate flights targeting differences in surface reflectances between fresh and aged snow were conducted over the U.S. Central Plains and Colorado Rockies, respectively. From these measurements, the nominal surface reflectance of fresh snow (less than 1-2 days old; ~ 0.01/sr at 1.57 microns) was found to be approximately half that of aged snow (3-4 days old; ~ 0.02/sr) which is believed to be a result of increased absorption due to the snow water content. The

  15. Computer simulation studies on free surface reflection of underwater shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Kamegai, M.; Rosenkilde, C.E.; Klein, L.S.

    1987-07-01

    A computer simulation was used to study the irregular surface rarefaction phenomena produced by an underwater shock wave generated from a strong point explosion. We simulated the explosions with energies near 10/sup 15/ joules at three depths (3 m, 21 m, and 66.5 m) and computed the shock propagation until the peak pressure decayed to less than 0.1 GPa (1 Kbar). The simulations permitted the determination of the onset point of irregular rarefaction on the surface, and of the envelope separating the irregular and regular-rarefaction regions. The theoretical predictions of the onset points are consistent with the code results for all three cases. However, the predicted region boundaries, which are calculated from the arrival of the first rarefaction signal, are in agreement with the simulation results only in the weak shock case (DOB = 66.5 m). For the strong and intermediate shock cases (DOB = 3 m and 21 m, respectively), agreement was not obtained. The implication of the discrepancy in these cases is discussed. 9 refs., 8 figs.

  16. Investigating the structural changes of β-amyloid peptide aggregation using attenuated-total-reflection surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, K.-C.; Yu, L.-Y.; Yih, J.-N.; Chen, S.-J.

    2007-02-01

    This study utilizes a surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) based on the attenuated-total-reflection (ATR) method to investigate that the structural information of the biomolecular monolayer on sensing surface can be dynamically observed with a higher signal-to-noise ratio signal. The secondary structures of long oligonucleotides and their influence on the DNA hybridization on the sensing surface are investigated. The SERS spectrum provides the structural information of the oligonucleotides with the help of a silver colloidal nanoparticle monolayer by control of the size and distribution of the nanoparticles adapted as a Raman active substrate. It is found that the ring-breathing modes of adenine, thymine, guanine, and cytosine in Raman fingerprint associated with three 60mer oligonucleotides with prominent secondary structures are lower than those observed for the two oligonucleotides with no obvious secondary structures. It is also determined that increasing the DNA hybridization temperature from 35°C to 45°C reduces secondary structure effects. The ATR-SERS biosensing technique will be used to provide valuable structural information regarding the short-term reversible interactions and long-term polymerization events in the Aβ aggregates on the sensing surface.

  17. Joint retrieval of hourly-resolved aerosol optical depths and surface reflectance using MSG/SEVIRI observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Sebastien; Govaerts, Yves

    2010-05-01

    A new aerosol algorithm is developed at EUMETSAT to derive simultaneously the surface bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF) and the hourly variations of the tropospheric aerosol load from observations acquired by the SEVIRI radiometer on-board the Meteosat Second Generation satellites. In order to retrieve the aerosol optical thickness for each cloud-free observation, the algorithm makes the assumption that both the aerosol class and the surface radiative properties do not change during the course of the day. Hence, this algorithm infers the surface BRF from a forward radiative transfer model against daily accumulated observations in the 0.6, 0.8 and 1.6 MSG/SEVIRI bands. These daily time series provide the angular sampling used to discriminate the radiative effects that result from the surface anisotropy, from those caused by the aerosol scattering. The inversion method relies on the Optimal Estimation method which balances the information derived from the observations and the prior knowledge on the system. This approach allows the tracking of sharp daily variations of the aerosol atmospheric load, in particular in the case of quickly developing dust storm fronts. Results of comparisons with the AERONET aerosol product are presented on specific cases on pixel basis in order to assess the performance of this new algorithm.

  18. Accounting for surface reflectance in the derivation of vertical column densities of NO2 from airborne imaging DOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Andreas Carlos; Schönhardt, Anja; Richter, Andreas; Bösch, Tim; Seyler, André; Constantin, Daniel Eduard; Shaiganfar, Reza; Merlaud, Alexis; Ruhtz, Thomas; Wagner, Thomas; van Roozendael, Michel; Burrows, John. P.

    2016-04-01

    Nitrogen oxides, NOx (NOx = NO + NO2) play a key role in tropospheric chemistry. In addition to their directly harmful effects on the respiratory system of living organisms, they influence the levels of tropospheric ozone and contribute to acid rain and eutrophication of ecosystems. As they are produced in combustion processes, they can serve as an indicator for anthropogenic air pollution. In the late summers of 2014 and 2015, two extensive measurement campaigns were conducted in Romania by several European research institutes, with financial support from ESA. The AROMAT / AROMAT-2 campaigns (Airborne ROmanian Measurements of Aerosols and Trace gases) were dedicated to measurements of air quality parameters utilizing newly developed instrumentation at state-of-the-art. The experiences gained will help to calibrate and validate the measurements taken by the upcoming Sentinel-S5p mission scheduled for launch in 2016. The IUP Bremen contributed to these campaigns with its airborne imaging DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) instrument AirMAP (Airborne imaging DOAS instrument for Measurements of Atmospheric Pollution). AirMAP allows retrieving spatial distributions of trace gas columns densities in a stripe below the aircraft. The measurements have a high spatial resolution of approximately 30 x 80 m2 (along x across track) at a typical flight altitude of 3000 m. Supported by the instrumental setup and the large swath, gapless maps of trace gas distributions above a large city, like Bucharest or Berlin, can be acquired within a time window of approximately two hours. These properties make AirMAP a valuable tool for the validation of trace gas measurements from space. DOAS retrievals yield the density of absorbers integrated along the light path of the measurement. The light path is altered with a changing surface reflectance, leading to enhanced / reduced slant column densities of NO2 depending on surface properties. This effect must be considered in

  19. Dielectric Maps of the Martian Polar Regions from MARSIS/Mex Surface Reflectivity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, P.; Mouginot, J.; Pommerol, A.; Kofman, W. W.; Clifford, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    Most of classic remote-sensing methods probe the surface and very close subsurface of the Martian crust and are thus only sensitive to processes that occurred under the Amazonian climate. Sounding radar has the potential to probe deeper into the crust, revealing processes that occurred in a distant past.We report here on the completion and improvement of dielectric maps of the Martian polar regions assembled from MARSIS measurements, building upon the initial work of [1]. New data collected by MARSIS since 2008 have been incorporated to greatly increase the level of details in the northern hemisphere. In our presentation, we will briefly discuss the method used to extract values of dielectric con-stant from MARSIS measurements which was explained in details by [1]. As a reasonable ap-proximation, we show that these maps are representative of the average dielectric constant of the first 50 to 100 meters below the surface. We compare the dielectric maps of the northern and southern polar regions of Mars and note a stricking difference between both hemispheres. In the south, a strong decrease of the dielectric constant is consistent with the inferred limit for the presence of stable water ice in the ground. In the north, a similar decrease of dielectric constant is observed but it compasses a much broader area than the one where water ice is at equilibrium under the current climate. The dielectric constant pattern displays a much better correlation with the global topography and, to some extent, with the putative shorelines of the past ocean. Ancient water activity is likely responsible for the observed dielectric pattern. To test the link between the geologic nature of the terrains and the value of dielectric con-stant, we produced a composite geologic / dielectric map from the geologic map of [2] and our dielectric map. A detailed examination of this map confirms the strong link between the geologic nature of the formations and their dielectric constant. Hesperian

  20. Size distribution of Parkfield’s microearthquakes reflects changes in surface creep rate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tormann, Theresa; Wiemer, Stefan; Metzger, Sabrina; Michael, Andrew J.; Hardebeck, Jeanne L.

    2013-01-01

    The nucleation area of the series of M6 events in Parkfield has been shown to be characterized by low b-values throughout the seismic cycle. Since low b-values represent high differential stresses, the asperity structure seems to be always stably stressed and even unaffected by the latest main shock in 2004. However, because fault loading rates and applied shear stress vary with time, some degree of temporal variability of the b-value within stable blocks is to be expected. We discuss in this study adequate techniques and uncertainty treatment for a detailed analysis of the temporal evolution of b-values. We show that the derived signal for the Parkfield asperity correlates with changes in surface creep, suggesting a sensitive time resolution of the b-value stress meter, and confirming near-critical loading conditions within the Parkfield asperity.

  1. Biomimetic compound eye with a high numerical aperture and anti-reflective nanostructures on curved surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, T; Yu, W; Li, C; Zhang, H; Xu, Z; Lu, Z; Sun, Q

    2012-06-15

    Biomimetic compound eyes with a high numerical aperture on a curved surface were successfully fabricated by intelligent integration of traditional top-down and bottom-up micro- and nanofabrication methods together. In addition, the new hybrid micro- and nanofabrication method allows us to fabricate the antireflective nanostructures on each ommatidium to increase its vision sensitivity by improving the light transmission. The fabricated compound eye was optically characterized and was shown to have a numerical aperture of 0.77 for each ommatidium. Furthermore, it is shown that the transmission of the compound eye can be improved by 2.3% for the wavelength of 632.8 nm and a clearer image can be formed by the fabricated compound eye with antireflective nanostructures compared with that without antireflective nanostructures. In addition, the developed hybrid manufacturing method can be adapted to the fabrication of other complex micro- and nanodevices for photonics or other research areas. PMID:22739920

  2. Light depolarization in off-specular reflection on submicro rough metal surfaces with imperfectly random roughness.

    PubMed

    Liu, Linsheng; Li, Xuefeng; Nonaka, Kazuhiro

    2015-02-01

    Depolarization at a rough surface relates to its roughness and irregularity (e.g., sags and crests) besides the material property. However, there is still lack of general theory to clearly describe the relationship between depolarization ratios and surface conditions, and one important reason is that the mechanism of depolarization relates to geometric parameters such as microcosmic height/particle distributions of sub-micro to nm levels. To study the mechanism in more detail, a compact laser instrument is developed, and depolarization information of a linearly polarized incident light is used for analyzing the roughness, during which a He-Ne laser source (λ = 632.8 nm) is used. Three nickel specimens with RMS roughness (Rq) less than λ/4 are fabricated and tested. Six different areas in each specimen are characterized in detail using an AFM. Rq are in the range of 34.1-155.0 nm, and the heights are non-Gaussian distribution in the first specimen and near-Gaussian distribution in the others. Off-specular inspection is carried out exactly on these 18 characterized areas, and results show that the cross-polarization ratios match quite well with Rq values of the first sample that has Rq ≤ λ/10 (or Rt ≤ λ), while they match well with maximum height, Rt, values of the other two that have Rt > λ (the maximum derivation is 11%). In addition, since this instrument is simple, portable, stable, and low-cost, it has great potential for practical online roughness testing after a linear calibration. PMID:25725823

  3. Analysis of Visible/SWIR surface reflectance ratios for aerosol retrievals from satellite in Mexico City urban area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Almeida Castanho, A. D.; Prinn, R.; Martins, V.; Herold, M.; Ichoku, C.; Molina, L. T.

    2007-10-01

    The surface reflectance ratio between the visible (VIS) and shortwave infrared (SWIR) radiation is an important quantity for the retrieval of the aerosol optical depth (τa) from the MODIS sensor data. Based on empirically determined VIS/SWIR ratios, MODIS τa retrieval uses the surface reflectance in the SWIR band (2.1 µm), where the interaction between solar radiation and the aerosol layer is small, to predict the visible reflectances in the blue (0.47 µm) and red (0.66 µm) bands. Therefore, accurate knowledge of the VIS/SWIR ratio is essential for achieving accurate retrieval of aerosol optical depth from MODIS. We analyzed the surface reflectance over some distinct surface covers in and around the Mexico City metropolitan area (MCMA) using MODIS radiances at 0.66 µm and 2.1 µm. The analysis was performed at 1.5 km×1.5 km spatial resolution. Also, ground-based AERONET sun-photometer data acquired in Mexico City from 2002 to 2005 were analyzed for aerosol depth and other aerosol optical properties. In addition, a network of hand-held sun-photometers deployed in Mexico City, as part of the MCMA-2006 Study during the MILAGRO Campaign, provided an unprecedented measurement of τa in 5 different sites well distributed in the city. We found that the average RED/SWIR ratio representative of the urbanized sites analyzed is 0.73±0.06 for scattering angles <140° and goes up to 0.77±0.06 for higher ones. The average ratio for non-urban sites was significantly lower (approximately 0.55). In fact, this ratio strongly depends on differences in urbanization levels (i.e. relative urban to vegetation proportions and types of surface materials). The aerosol optical depth retrieved from MODIS radiances at a spatial resolution of 1.5 km×1.5 km and averaged within 10×10 km boxes were compared with collocated 1-h τa averaged from sun-photometer measurements. The use of the new RED/SWIR ratio of 0.73 in the MODIS retrieval over Mexico City led to a significant improvement

  4. Retrieval of diffuse attenuation coefficient in the China seas from surface reflectance.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhongfeng; Wu, Tingting; Su, Yuanyuan

    2013-07-01

    Accurate estimation of the diffuse attenuation coefficient is important for our understanding the availability of light to underwater communities, which provide critical information for the China seas ecosystem. However, algorithm developments and validations of the diffuse attenuation coefficient in the China seas have been seldom performed before and therefore our knowledge on the quality of retrieval of the diffuse attenuate coefficient is poor. In this paper optical data at 306 sites collected in coastal waters of the China seas between July 2000 and February 2004 are used to evaluate three typical existing Kd(490) models. The in situ Kd(490) varied greatly among different sites from 0.029 m(-1) to 10.3 m(-1), with a mean of 0.92 ± 1.59 m(-1). Results show that the empirical model and the semi-analytical model significantly underestimate the Kd(490) value, with estimated mean values of 0.24 m(-1) and 0.5 m(-1), respectively. The combined model also shows significant differences when the in situ Kd(490) range from 0.2 m(-1) to 1 m(-1). Thus, the present study proposes that the three algorithms cannot be directly used to appropriately estimate Kd(490) in the turbid coastal waters of the China seas without a fine tuning for regional applications. In this paper, new Kd(490) algorithms are developed based on the semi-analytical retrieval of the absorption coefficient a(m(-1)) and the backscattering coefficient bb(m(-1)) from the reflectance at two wavelengths, 488 and 667 nm for the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and 490 and 705 nm for the Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) applications, respectively. With the new approaches, the mean ratio and the relative percentage difference are 1.05 and 4.6%, respectively, based on an independent in situ data set. Furthermore, the estimates are reliable within a factor of 1.9 (95% confidence interval). Comparisons also show that the Kd(490) derived with the new algorithms are well correlated

  5. Making Sense of 2.5 Million Surface Reflectance Spectra of Mercury from MESSENGER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amore, M.; Helbert, J.; D'Incecco, P.; Domingue, D. L.; Izenberg, N. R.; McClintock, W. E.

    2012-12-01

    The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface and Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft has mapped the surface of Mercury on a global basis during its one-year primary orbital mission and the first third of its extended mission, producing ~2.5 million spectra from March 2011 to July 2012. The primary challenge to analyzing this dataset is to cope with its large size. In earlier studies of MASCS data, we combined several approaches, ranging from principal component analysis (PCA) to unsupervised cluster analysis and regridding to global and local fixed grids. Each of those techniques provided insight into spectral variations for different volumes of data, but each was quickly overcome by the growing dataset. The most recent version of our data analysis procedure uses PostgreSQL, a type of database management that controls the creation, integrity, maintenance, and use of a database. It embeds a high-level query language, which greatly simplifies database organization as well as retrieval and presentation of database information. We set up a data pipeline to update automatically the MASCS data, read them from the NASA Planetary Data System format, regrid the data to a common grid length, and store all information in the database. All data are then readily available to any authorized user in our network. We are working on a library to access the data directly from within our analysis software, and some preliminary functions have been implemented. As an example, the calculation of a parameter representing the database takes 2 s even for the full dataset of 2.5 million entries. It is thus straightforward to create and analyze rapidly the data, as for example the distribution of normalized radiance at a fixed wavelength. The new methodology provides facilities for controlling data access, enforcing data integrity, managing concurrency control, and recovering the database after a failure and

  6. Assessment of Cloud Screening with Apparent Surface Reflectance in Support of the ICESat-2 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Yuekui; Marshak, Alexander; Palm, Stephen P.; Wang, Zhuosen; Schaaf, Crystal

    2011-01-01

    The separation of cloud and clear scenes is usually one of the first steps in satellite data analysis. Before deriving a geophysical product, almost every satellite mission requires a cloud mask to label a scene as either clear or cloudy through a cloud detection procedure. For clear scenes, products such as surface properties may be retrieved; for cloudy scenes, scientist can focus on studying the cloud properties. Hence the quality of cloud detection directly affects the quality of most satellite operational and research products. This is certainly true for the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite-2 (lCESat-2), which is the successor to the ICESat-l. As a top priority mission, ICESat-2 will continue to provide measurements of ice sheets and sea ice elevation on a global scale. Studies have shown that clouds can significantly affect the accuracy of the retrieved results. For example, some of the photons (a photon is a basic unit of light) in the laser beam will be scattered by cloud particles on its way. So instead of traveling in a straight line, these photons are scattered sideways and have traveled a longer path. This will result in biases in ice sheet elevation measurements. Hence cloud screening must be done and be done accurately before the retrievals.

  7. Liquid atomization induced by pulse laser reflection at and beneath the liquid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utsunomiya, Y.; Kajiwara, T.; Nishiyama, T.; Nagayama, K.; Kubota, S.; Nakahara, M.

    2008-11-01

    In this paper, precision high speed imaging of the pulse laser ablation of liquid surface has been described. This study is based on our previous findings that appreciable reduction of pulse laser ablation threshold of transparent material in case the pulse laser beam is incident from the water side on the interface of the transparent material and air or water. We have performed a series of experiments to observe the ablation process for laser incidence on the interface of water and air. Whole processes were observed by shadowgraphy optics by using a ns pulse laser and a high-resolution film. Within the tested experimental conditions, minimum laser fluence for laser ablation at water-air interface is shown to be around 12-16 J/cm2. We have confirmed that laser ablation phenomena will take place only when laser beam is incident on the water-air interface from inside the water medium. Many slender liquid ligaments extend like milk crown and seem to be atomized at the tip of them. Jet tip is moving at supersonic velocity but is decelerated very rapidly. By changing the laser energy with keeping laser fluence at the interface, temporal evolution changes appreciably at least in the early stage of the process. These detailed structures can be resolved only by pulse laser photography by using high-resolution film.

  8. Forty-Year Calibrated Record of Earth-Surface Reflected Radiance from Landsat: A Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markham, Brian; Helder, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Sensors on Landsat satellites have been collecting images of the Earth's surface for nearly 40 years. These images have been invaluable for characterizing and detecting changes in the land cover and land use of the world. Although initially conceived as primarily picture generating sensors, even the early sensors were radiometrically calibrated and spectrally characterized prior to launch and incorporated some capabilities to monitor their radiometric calibration once on orbit. Recently, as the focus of studies has shifted to monitoring Earth surface parameters over significant periods of time, serious attention has been focused toward bringing the data from all these sensors onto a common radiometric scale over this 40-year period. This effort started with the most recent systems and then was extended back in time. Landsat-7 ETM+, the best-characterized sensor of the series prior to launch and once on orbit, and the most stable system to date, was chosen to serve as the reference. The Landsat-7 project was the first of the series to build an image assessment system into its ground system, allowing systematic characterization of its sensors and data. Second, the Landsat-5 TM (still operating at the time of the Landsat-7 launch and continues to operate) calibration history was reconstructed based on its internal calibrator, vicarious calibrations, pseudo-invariant sites and a tie to Landsat-7 ETM+ at the time of the commissioning of Landsat-7. This process was performed in two iterations: the earlier one relied primarily on the TM internal calibrator. When this was found to have some deficiencies, a revised calibration was based more on pseudo-invariant sites, though the internal calibrator was still used to establish the short-term variations in response due to icing build up on the cold focal plane. As time progressed, a capability to monitor the Landsat-5 TM was added to the image assessment system. The Landsat-4 TM, which operated from 1982-1992, was the third

  9. Characteristics of hypervelocity impact craters on LDEF experiment S1003 and implications of small particle impacts on reflective surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, Michael J.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Devries, Christopher; Merrow, James E.

    1993-01-01

    The Ion Beam textured and coated surfaces EXperiment (IBEX), designated S1003, was flown on LDEF at a location 98 deg in a north facing direction relative to the ram direction. Thirty-six diverse materials were exposed to the micrometeoroid (and some debris) environment for 5.8 years. Optical property measurements indicated no changes for almost all of the materials except S-13G, Kapton, and Kapton-coated surfaces, and these changes can be explained by other environmental effects. From the predicted micrometeoroid flux of NASA SP-8013, no significant changes in optical properties of the surfaces due to micrometeoroids were expected. There were hypervelocity impacts on the various diverse materials flown on IBEX, and the characteristics of these craters were documented using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The S1003 alumigold-coated aluminum cover tray was sectioned into 2 cm x 2 cm pieces for crater documentation. The flux curve generated from this crater data fits well between the 1969 micrometeoroid model and the Kessler debris model for particles less than 10(exp -9) gm which were corrected for the S1003 positions (98 deg to ram). As the particle mass increases, the S1003 impact data is greater than that predicted by even the debris model. This, however, is consistent with data taken on intercostal F07 by the Micrometeoroid/Debris Special Investigating Group (M/D SIG). The mirrored surface micrometeoroid detector flown on IBEX showed no change in solar reflectance and corroborated the S1003 flux curve, as well as results of this surface flown on SERT 2 and OSO 3 for as long as 21 years.

  10. Characteristics of hypervelocity impact craters on LDEF experiment S1003 and implications of small particle impacts on reflective surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirtich, Michael J.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Devries, Christopher; Merrow, James E.

    1993-04-01

    The Ion Beam textured and coated surfaces EXperiment (IBEX), designated S1003, was flown on LDEF at a location 98 deg in a north facing direction relative to the ram direction. Thirty-six diverse materials were exposed to the micrometeoroid (and some debris) environment for 5.8 years. Optical property measurements indicated no changes for almost all of the materials except S-13G, Kapton, and Kapton-coated surfaces, and these changes can be explained by other environmental effects. From the predicted micrometeoroid flux of NASA SP-8013, no significant changes in optical properties of the surfaces due to micrometeoroids were expected. There were hypervelocity impacts on the various diverse materials flown on IBEX, and the characteristics of these craters were documented using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The S1003 alumigold-coated aluminum cover tray was sectioned into 2 cm x 2 cm pieces for crater documentation. The flux curve generated from this crater data fits well between the 1969 micrometeoroid model and the Kessler debris model for particles less than 10(exp -9) gm which were corrected for the S1003 positions (98 deg to ram). As the particle mass increases, the S1003 impact data is greater than that predicted by even the debris model. This, however, is consistent with data taken on intercostal F07 by the Micrometeoroid/Debris Special Investigating Group (M/D SIG). The mirrored surface micrometeoroid detector flown on IBEX showed no change in solar reflectance and corroborated the S1003 flux curve, as well as results of this surface flown on SERT 2 and OSO 3 for as long as 21 years.

  11. IMPACT OF DIELECTRIC PARAMETERS ON THE REFLECTIVITY OF 3C-SiC WAFERS WITH A ROUGH SURFACE MORPHOLOGY IN THE RESTSTRAHLEN REGION

    SciTech Connect

    J.A.A. Engelbrecht; E. Janzén; A. Henry; I.J. van Rooyen

    2014-04-01

    A layer-on-substrate model is used to obtain the infrared reflectance for 3C-SiC with a rough surface morphology. The effect of varying dielectric parameters of the “damaged layer” on the observed reflectivity of the 3C-SiC in the reststrahlen region is assessed. Different simulated reflectance spectra are obtained to those if the dielectric parameters of the “substrate” were varied. Most notable changes in the shape of the simulated reststrahlen peak are observed for changes in the high frequency dielectric constant, the phonon damping constant, the phonon frequencies and “thickness” of damaged surface layer.

  12. The relationship between large-scale vertical motion, highly reflective cloud, and sea surface temperature in the tropical Pacific region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmermann, Peter H.; Newell, Reginald E.; Selkirk, Henry B.

    1988-01-01

    Vertical motion fields at 850 mbar over the tropical Pacific region are calculated from the 1963-1973 mean wind fields for 4 months of the year and for October 1972, the peak month in the 1972-1973 El Nino event. These vertical motion fields are derived using the projective separation technique, which has the unique property of separating vertical motion into components due to meridional wind convergence and zonal wind convergence. This separation permits investigation of the response of the Hadley and Walker circulations to annual and interannual variation of the sea surface temperature in the tropical Pacific. The large-scale features of the computed vertical motion fields are in agreement with those of highly reflective clouds, which indicate the locations of deep convection. Examination of the annual cycle of the vertical motion and its components shows no strong variation of the Walker circulation with the east-west gradient of sea surface temperature. On the other hand, a strong correlation is found between meridional overturning in the eastern Pacific and the local equatorial sea surface temperature: during El Nino events, the eastern and central Pacific contribution to the Hadley circulation tends to increase.

  13. Femtosecond laser nanostructuring of titanium metal towards fabrication of low-reflective surfaces over broad wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dar, Mudasir H.; Kuladeep, R.; Saikiran, V.; Narayana Rao, D.

    2016-05-01

    We investigated experimentally the formation of laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on titanium (Ti) metal upon irradiation with linearly polarized Ti:Sapphire femtosecond (fs) laser pulses of ∼110 fs pulse width and 800 nm wavelength in air and water environments. It is observed that initially formed random and sparsely distributed nano-roughness (nanoholes, nanoparticles and nanoprotrusions) gets periodically structured with increase in number of laser pulses. In air at lower fluence, we observed the formation of high spatial frequency-LIPSS (HSFL) oriented parallel to the laser polarization direction, whereas at higher fluence formation of low spatial frequency-LIPSS (LSFL) were observed that are oriented perpendicular to the incident laser polarization. In water two types of subwavelength structures were observed, one with spatial periodicity of ∼λ/15 and oriented parallel to laser polarization, while the other oriented perpendicular to laser polarization with feature size of λ/4. The optimal conditions for fabricating periodic sub-wavelength structures are determined by controlling the fluence and pulse number. The fs laser induced surface modifications were found to suppress the specular reflection of the Ti surface over a wide wavelength range of 250-2000 nm to a great extent.

  14. Use of Seismic Reflection Data and Traveltime Tomography to Image the Near Surface Velocity Structure in the Mississippi Embayment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, J.; Magnani, M.; Waldron, B.; Powell, C.

    2007-12-01

    The Memphis aquifer represents one of the highest quality reservoirs of drinking water in the nation and it is separated from the shallow unconfined aquifer by the Upper Claiborne clay. Recent studies show that the confining unit might be discontinuous over the greater Memphis area exposing the Memphis aquifer to potential contamination. We present the results of a seismic reflection profile collected near Memphis, TN with the goal of imaging the structures and potential breaches in the Upper Claiborne confining clay. The imaged area is characterized by a highly heterogeneous shallow velocity structure and low P wave velocities in the ultrashallow unconsolidated materials. The data were collected using a shotgun source and a 1 m source spacing, 0.25 m receiver spacing and a 168-geophone spread for a max offset of 42 m. Raw seismic data show several reflected arrivals in the first 200ms, widespread ground roll, and air wave energy as well as consistent refracted phases across the 1 km - long profile. In addition to the reflection profile we present the preliminary results of first arrival travel time tomography performed along the profile to constrain the velocity field in the shallow portion of the profile. The velocity was then used to remove the effect of the near surface velocity variations. The main data processing steps included elevation statics and frequency and FK filtering. First arrival travel time modeling started with an initial estimate of the 2-layer velocity model using the slope/intercept method. We then modeled first-arrival picks on 1095 shot gathers using the Geo TOMO+ package. The algorithm computes travel times by tracing turning rays and is also able to handle raypaths through low-velocity zones (blind zones). The final resolution is estimated through a ray-information density map, which shows the cumulative contribution of the ray segments traversing different areas of the model. Synthetic models were generated and tested for the tomography

  15. Near-surface, marine seismic-reflection data defines potential hydrogeologic confinement bypass in a tertiary carbonate aquifer, southeastern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, Kevin J.; Walker, Cameron; Westcott, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 210 km of near-surface, high-frequency, marine seismic-reflection data were acquired on the southeastern part of the Florida Platform between 2007 and 2011. Many high-resolution, seismic-reflection profiles, interpretable to a depth of about 730 m, were collected on the shallow-marine shelf of southeastern Florida in water as shallow as 1 m. Landward of the present-day shelf-margin slope, these data image middle Eocene to Pleistocene strata and Paleocene to Pleistocene strata on the Miami Terrace. This high-resolution data set provides an opportunity to evaluate geologic structures that cut across confining units of the Paleocene to Oligocene-age carbonate rocks that form the Floridan aquifer system.Seismic profiles image two structural systems, tectonic faults and karst collapse structures, which breach confining beds in the Floridan aquifer system. Both structural systems may serve as pathways for vertical groundwater flow across relatively low-permeability carbonate strata that separate zones of regionally extensive high-permeability rocks in the Floridan aquifer system. The tectonic faults occur as normal and reverse faults, and collapse-related faults have normal throw. The most common fault occurrence delineated on the reflection profiles is associated with karst collapse structures. These high-frequency seismic data are providing high quality structural analogs to unprecedented depths on the southeastern Florida Platform. The analogs can be used for assessment of confinement of other carbonate aquifers and the sealing potential of deeper carbonate rocks associated with reservoirs around the world.

  16. A Solar Reflectance Method for Retrieving Cloud Optical Thickness and Droplet Size Over Snow and Ice Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platnick, S.; Li, J. Y.; King, M. D.; Gerber, H.; Hobbs, P. V.

    1999-01-01

    Cloud optical thickness and effective radius retrievals from solar reflectance measurements are traditionally implemented using a combination of spectral channels that are absorbing and non-absorbing for water particles. Reflectances in non-absorbing channels (e.g., 0.67, 0.86, 1.2 micron spectral window bands) are largely dependent on cloud optical thickness, while longer wavelength absorbing channels (1.6, 2. 1, and 3.7 micron window bands) provide cloud particle size information. Cloud retrievals over ice and snow surfaces present serious difficulties. At the shorter wavelengths, ice is bright and highly variable, both characteristics acting to significantly increase cloud retrieval uncertainty. In contrast, reflectances at the longer wavelengths are relatively small and may be comparable to that of dark open water. A modification to the traditional cloud retrieval technique is devised. The new algorithm uses only a combination of absorbing spectral channels for which the snow/ice albedo is relatively small. Using this approach, retrievals have been made with the MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS) imager flown aboard the NASA ER-2 from May - June 1998 during the Arctic FIRE-ACE field deployment. Data from several coordinated ER-2 and University of Washington CV-580 in situ aircraft observations of liquid water stratus clouds are examined. MAS retrievals of optical thickness, droplet effective radius, and liquid water path are shown to be in good agreement with the in situ measurements. The initial success of the technique has implications for future operational satellite cloud retrieval algorithms in polar and wintertime regions.

  17. An AERONET-based aerosol classification using the Mahalanobis distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamill, Patrick; Giordano, Marco; Ward, Carolyne; Giles, David; Holben, Brent

    2016-09-01

    We present an aerosol classification based on AERONET aerosol data from 1993 to 2012. We used the AERONET Level 2.0 almucantar aerosol retrieval products to define several reference aerosol clusters which are characteristic of the following general aerosol types: Urban-Industrial, Biomass Burning, Mixed Aerosol, Dust, and Maritime. The classification of a particular aerosol observation as one of these aerosol types is determined by its five-dimensional Mahalanobis distance to each reference cluster. We have calculated the fractional aerosol type distribution at 190 AERONET sites, as well as the monthly variation in aerosol type at those locations. The results are presented on a global map and individually in the supplementary material. Our aerosol typing is based on recognizing that different geographic regions exhibit characteristic aerosol types. To generate reference clusters we only keep data points that lie within a Mahalanobis distance of 2 from the centroid. Our aerosol characterization is based on the AERONET retrieved quantities, therefore it does not include low optical depth values. The analysis is based on "point sources" (the AERONET sites) rather than globally distributed values. The classifications obtained will be useful in interpreting aerosol retrievals from satellite borne instruments.

  18. Characterization of the Vajont landslide (North-Eastern Italy) by means of reflection and surface wave seismics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petronio, Lorenzo; Boaga, Jacopo; Cassiani, Giorgio

    2016-05-01

    The mechanisms of the disastrous Vajont rockslide (North-Eastern Italy, October 9, 1963) have been studied in great detail over the past five decades. Nevertheless, the reconstruction of the rockslide dynamics still presents several uncertainties, including those related to the accurate estimation of the actual landslide mass. This work presents the results of a geophysical characterization of the Vajont landslide body in terms of material properties and buried geometry. Both aspects add new information to the existing dataset and will help a better understanding of the rockslide failure mechanisms and dynamics. In addition, some general considerations concerning the intricacies of landslide characterization can be drawn, with due attention to potential pitfalls. The employed techniques are: (i) high resolution P-wave reflection, (ii) high resolution SH-wave reflection, (iii) controlled source surface wave analysis. We adopted as a seismic source a vibrator both for P waves and SH waves, using vertical and horizontal geophones respectively. For the surface wave seismic survey we used a heavy drop-weight source and low frequency receivers. Despite the high noise level caused by the fractured conditions of the large rock body, a common situation in landslide studies, we managed to achieve a satisfying imaging quality of the landslide structure thanks to the large number of active channels, the short receiver interval and the test of appropriate seismic sources. The joint use of different seismic techniques help focus the investigation on the rock mass mechanical properties. Results are in good agreement with the available borehole data, the geological sections and the mechanical properties of the rockmass estimated by other studies. In general the proposed approach is likely to be applicable successfully to similar situations where scattering and other noise sources are a typical bottleneck to geophysical data acquisition on landslide bodies.

  19. Oxidation of CO on a Pt-Fe alloy electrode studied by surface enhanced infrared reflection--absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Masahiro; Zhu, Yimin; Uchida, Hiroyuki

    2000-03-02

    To clarify the CO-tolerant mechanism at Pt-based alloy anode catalysts, surface-enhanced infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy with the attenuated total reflection technique (ATR-SEIRAS), coupled with CV measurement, was used to observe the oxidation process of adsorbed CO on a typical Pt-Fe (Pt-Fe = 0.27/0.73) alloy. The alloy electrode exhibits a lower saturated coverage of CO ({theta}{sub co} = 0.55) than that of pure Pt ({theta}{sub co} = 1.0). The dominating linear CO is observed around 2,000 cm{sup {minus}1} when the equilibrium adlayer of CO covers the alloy electrode; however, linear and bridged CO and also COOH were found at the pure Pt electrode at the same CO coverage in the non-steady-state. On the basis of previous results that a Pt skin is formed during the repetitive potential cycling due to the dissolution of Fe on the alloy surface and the skin exhibits less electronic density in the d band, it can be explained that the lowered linear CO coverage and almost no bridged CO are obtained as the result of the lowered back-donation of d electrons from the Pt skin to adsorbates on the alloy surface. The wavenumber shift of the linear CO stretching to a lower value at the alloy, which is not simple predicted by the lowering of the back-donation of the electron, is ascribed to the weakening of the C -Pt bond. As a presumable effect of the electronic structure change at the Pt skin, the dissociation-oxidation of adsorbed water as well as a formation of adsorbed HOOH species are clearly observed beyond 0.6 V in the electrolyte solution without CO, which is different from that at the pure Pt electrode. Carbonate species can also be detected around 1,300--1,450 cm{sup {minus}1}, which are possibly produced by the surface reaction of CO{sub 2} with water.

  20. Sublimation of water ice mixed with silicates and tholins: Evolution of surface texture and reflectance spectra, with implications for comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poch, Olivier; Pommerol, Antoine; Jost, Bernhard; Carrasco, Nathalie; Szopa, Cyril; Thomas, Nicolas

    2016-03-01

    The surfaces of many objects in the Solar System comprise substantial quantities of water ice sometimes mixed with minerals and/or organic molecules. The sublimation of the ice changes the structural and optical properties of these objects. We present laboratory data on the evolution of the structure and the visible and near-infrared spectral reflectance of icy surface analogues of cometary ices, made of water ice, complex organic matter (tholins) and silicates, as they undergo sublimation under low temperature (<-70 °C) and pressure (10-5 mbar) conditions inside the SCITEAS simulation chamber. As the water ice sublimated, we observed in situ the formation of a porous sublimation lag deposit, or sublimation mantle, at the top of the ice. This mantle is a network of filaments made of the non-volatile particles. Organics or phyllosilicates grains, able to interact via stronger inter-particulate forces than olivine grains, can form a foam-like structure having internal cohesiveness, holding olivine grains together. As this mantle builds-up, the band depths of the sub-surface water ice are attenuated until complete extinction under only few millimeters of mantle. Optically thick sublimation mantles are mainly featureless in the near infrared. The absorption bands of the minerals present in the mantle are weak, or even totally absent if minerals are mixed with organics which largely dominate the VIS-NIR reflectance spectrum. During sublimation, ejections of large fragments of mantle, triggered by the gas flow, expose ice particles to the surface. The contrast of brightness between mantled and ice-exposed areas depends on the wavelength range and the dust/ice ratio considered. We describe how the chemical nature of the non-volatiles, the size of their particles, the way they are mixed with the ice and the dust/ice mass ratio influence the texture, activity and spectro-photometric properties of the sublimation mantles. These data provide useful references for