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Sample records for aeronomy space physics

  1. Attendees “roasted” at Space Physics and Aeronomy dinner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, C. T.

    The Space Physics and Aeronomy Section's annual dinner was held during the Fall AGU meeting in December at San Francisco's Wu Kong restaurant. The Planetology section joined the SPA section for this year's event, but that's not why tickets for the dinner sold out so early this year; it was because of the many members hoping to receive one of the prestigious awards presented at the dinner each year.The first award presented was a serious one. The Fred Scarf award—which recognizes the year's most outstanding Ph.D. thesis—was received by UCLA's Vassilis Angelopoulos, who did his undergraduate work at the University of Thessaloniki in Greece [Angelopoulos, 1993]. SPA President Janet Luhmann also deserves congratulations for being able to pronounce Thessaloniki.

  2. Space Physics & Aeronomy: Space Science Decadal Surveys Available

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David

    The final, edited texts of two recent advisory committee reports are now available upon request from the National Research Council's Space Studies Board. The reports, New Frontiers in the Solar System: An Integrated Exploration Strategy, the report of the Solar System Exploration Survey (Michael J. S. Belton, Belton Space Exploration Initiatives, chair) and The Sun to the Earth-and Beyond: A Decadal Research Strategy in Solar and Space Physics, the report of the Solar and Space Physics Survey (Louis J. Lanzerotti, Lucent Technologies, chair) are available in a variety of media as follows: New Frontiers in the Solar System: Currently available as a book, a CD-ROM, or online at http://books.nap.edu/html/newfrontiers/0309084954.pdf. We are also taking advanced orders for copies of New Frontiers in Solar System Exploration, a 32-page, full-color booklet describing for a popular audience the principal mission recommendations of the Solar System Exploration Survey.

  3. Aeronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, P.

    1984-01-01

    The central theme of Aeronomy in the 1990 period will be the formulation of a coupled global view of the upper atmosphere as an integral extension of the lower regions. Photochemistry, atmospheric dynamics, the atmospheric energy, and observational requirements for the 1990's are discussed.

  4. Morrow, Reiff, Receive 2013 Space Physics and Aeronomy Richard Carrington Awards: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, Cherilynn

    2014-08-01

    I am delighted to receive the SPARC award, which recognizes education and public outreach (E/PO) efforts that incorporate our community's scientific achievements while addressing authentic educational needs. No one is honored in isolation, and I owe a large debt of gratitude to many fellow pioneers, including the author of the citation above and my fellow SPARC awardee, Pat Reiff. Back in 1994, she was one of two committee members to be overtly supportive as I made the first ever E/PO presentations to the (then) NASA Space Science Advisory Committee. Today all of the recent space science decadal reports include explicit support for E/PO programs integrated within NASA and National Science Foundation research missions.

  5. Morrow, Reiff, Receive 2013 Space Physics and Aeronomy Richard Carrington Awards: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiff, Patricia H.

    2014-08-01

    It is a special privilege to receive this award honoring Richard Carrington's discovery of what we now call space weather. It is particularly appropriate that this award also recognizes Cherilynn Morrow, who 20 years ago made a presentation to the Space Science Advisory Committee on Jeff Rosendhal's idea of mission-based E/PO. We worked together, bringing that idea to the successful, but threatened, network it is today. For me, learning and teaching go hand in hand—as we publish our findings for our peers, we should also repay the public investment in our research with accurate, understandable results. My interest in space science was sparked by a father-daughter course in astronomy sponsored by the Brownies at the Oklahoma City Planetarium and kindled by the Bell Labs production The Strange Case of the Cosmic Rays directed by Frank Capra. Knowing that planetarium shows and educational movies can change lives, I have devoted a large portion of my last 25 years to creating software, shows, and portable planetariums to inspire and engage youth. This has not been a one-person effort, of course. My work Cherilynn Ann Morrow would have been impossible without the collaboration of Carolyn Sumners, vice president of the Houston Museum of Natural Science. Our museum kiosk and planetarium control software would not have happened without the skill and perseverance of my chief programmer, Colin Law. Jim Burch has been first a mentor and then a colleague on both the research and outreach sides of my career. I share this honor with a long line of highly talented students and postdocs who have contributed science content and outreach efforts. Most importantly, without the support of my husband, Tom Hill, I would not have had the time and freedom to build an educational network while continuing research and raising a family. I thank AGU for bestowing this honor.

  6. Aeronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Atreya, S.K.

    1984-10-01

    From the known composition (H2, CH4, C2H2 at Uranus, and H2, CH4, C2H6 at Neptune) and the inversion and photolysis region temperatures, reasonable theoretical models for the upper atmospheric distribution of the neutral and ionospheric species are constructed on the basis of the expected physical and chemical processes. The models indicate that C2H2 would condense over an extensive height range of Uranus. The extent of the haze is expected to be smaller and deeper in the polar region. Some ethane is also expected to condense, mostly in the vicinity of the temperature inversion. The behavior of the acetylene condensation with latitude and time appears to be consistent with its apparent abundance variation (detected by IUE), and the brightening of Uranus observed in ground based imaging. Neptune's polar region, on the other hand is expected to be more hazy or cloudy than the equatorial region.

  7. Aeronomy from the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, A. B.; Budzien, S. A.; Bishop, R. L.; Stephan, A. W.

    2010-12-01

    The lessons learned with The Remote Atmospheric and Ionospheric Detection System (RAIDS) a new NASA experiment studying the Earth's thermosphere and ionosphere from a vantage point on the International Space Station (ISS) will be reviewed. The RAIDS mission focuses on the coupling and transition from the coldest part of the atmosphere, the mesopause near 85 km, up to the hottest regions of the thermosphere above 300 km. Built jointly by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and The Aerospace Corporation, RAIDS also is serving as a pathfinder experiment for atmospheric remote sensing aboard the ISS. The 51.6 deg. orbital inclination and roughly 340 km orbital altitude of the ISS required tailoring atmospheric science objectives appropriate for low- and mid-latitude observations. Orbital precession enables observations over a range of local time and solar illumination conditions, but also causes the orbital plane to intersect the Sun roughly monthly, requiring a temporary shutdown of the RAIDS sensors. Extensive station structures near the field-of-regard pose a risk of scattered light contamination which must be mitigated through good baffling of optical sensors. Activities aboard the manned station, including attitude perturbations from spacecraft dockings and construction activities, occasionally disrupt observations. A significant challenge for limb-viewing RAIDS was ISS pitch oscillations up to ±0.75 deg. per orbit associated with solar array rotation, but NASA adjusted the station’s flight characteristics to provide ±0.2 deg. pitch stability for RAIDS. Jitter and vibration at the extremity of the ISS have not been a concern for RAIDS. Finally, manned environments are notoriously dirty with respect to contamination-sensitive optical instruments, but after twelve months of continuous operation RAIDS does not exhibit any unusual degradation in sensor performance.

  8. Space plasma physics research progress 1987-1990 - Mars, Venus, and Mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Luhmann, J.G. )

    1991-01-01

    Theoretical and observational studies of space plasma physics at the inner planets, Mars, Venus, and Mercury are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on the solar wind interactions and aeronomy (upper neutral atmospheres and ionospheres) of these planets. 206 refs.

  9. Outstanding problems in Mars aeronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luhmann, J. G.

    1995-01-01

    Although the Phobos-2 spacecraft recently obtained important results relevant to some of the major remaining questions in Mars aeronomy, much remains to be done. In particular, not since the Viking Landers have we made in-situ measurements of aeronomical quantities such as atmospheric and ionospheric densities and temperatures below 400 km altitude. We have never made magnetic field measurements at these altitudes. Without such measurements we cannot unambiguously resolve arguments concerning issues such as the significance of the planetary magnetic field in the solar wind interaction, or understand the atmospheric cycle that leads to escape to space. With the trio of future orbiters including Mars Observer, Mars-94, and Planet-B we should see a veritable explosion of new knowledge, but some gaps in aeronomical science coverage will still remain. This paper briefly reviews some of the major unsolved problems in Mars aeronomy, and points out which are expected to remain outstanding after this flotilla of missions.

  10. Aeronomy, a 20th Century emergent science: the role of solar Lyman series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kockarts, G.

    2002-05-01

    Aeronomy is, by definition, a multidisciplinary science which can be used to study the terrestrial atmosphere, as well as any planetary atmosphere and even the interplanetary space. It was officially recognized in 1954 by the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics. The major objective of the present paper is to show how aeronomy developed since its infancy. The subject is so large that a guide-line has been chosen to see how aeronomy affects our atmospheric knowledge. This guideline is the solar Lyman alpha radiation which has different effects in the solar system. After a short description of the origins of aeronomy the first observations of this line are summarized since the beginning of the space age. Then the consequences of these observations are analyzed for the physics and chemistry of the neutral terrestrial atmosphere. New chemical processes had to be introduced, as well as new transport phenomena. Solar Lyman alpha also influences the structure of the Earth’s ionosphere, particularly the D-region. In the terrestrial exosphere, solar Lyman alpha scattered resonantly by atomic hydrogen is at present the only way to estimate this constituent in an almost collisionless medium. Since planetary atmospheres also contain atomic hydrogen, the Lyman alpha line has been used to deduce the abundance of this constituent. The same is true for the interplanetary space where Lyman alpha observations can be a good tool to determine the concentration. The last section of the paper presents a question which is intended to stimulate further research in aeronomy.

  11. A Perspective of the Science and Mission Challenges in Aeronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, James F.

    2010-01-01

    There are significant fundamental problems for which aeronomy can provide solutions and a critical role in applied science and space weather that only aeronomy can address. Examples of unresolved problems include the interaction of neutral and charged, the role of mass and energy transfer across Earth's interface with space, and the predictability of ionospheric density and composition variability. These and other problems impact the productivity of space assets and thus have a tangible applied dimension. This talk will explore open science problems and barriers to potential mission solutions in an era of constrained resources.

  12. The Long, Bumpy Road to a Mars Aeronomy Mission (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebowsky, J. M.; Luhmann, J. G.; Bougher, S. W.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2013-12-01

    With the advent of the space age, early focus was put into characterizing the Earth's upper atmosphere with aeronomy missions. These missions were designed to study the upper atmosphere region of a planet where the ionosphere is produced with particular attention given to the composition, properties and motion of atmosphere constituents. In particular a very successful US series of Atmosphere Explorer aeronomy spacecraft (1963-1977) was implemented. This upper atmosphere region is the envelope that all energy from the sun must penetrate and is recognized as an inseparable part of a planet's entire atmosphere. Venus was the next planet to have its upper atmosphere/ionosphere deeply probed via the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (1978-1986) that carried a complement of instruments similar to some flown on the Atmosphere Explorers. The planet which humans have long set their imagination on, Mars, has yet to be subjected to the same detailed upper atmosphere perusal until now, with MAVEN. Not that attempts have been wanting. More than 30 spacecraft launches to Mars were attempted, but half were not successful and those that attained orbit came far short of attaining the same level of knowledge of the Martian upper atmosphere. Other countries had planned Mars aeronomy missions that didn't bear fruit - e.g. Mars-96 and Nozomi and the US did studies for two missions, Mars Aeronomy Orbiter and MUADEE, that never were implemented. This is about to change. NASA's Scout Program singled out two aeronomy missions in its final competition and the selected mission, MAVEN, will fly with the needed sophistication of instruments to finally probe and understand the top of Mars' atmosphere. Was this late selection of a NASA aeronomy mission to Mars a philosophy change in US priorities or was it an accident of planning and budget constraints? Was it driven by the developing knowledge that Mars really had an early atmosphere environment conducive to life and that an aeronomy mission is indeed

  13. Space physics educational outreach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, Richard A.

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this Space Physics Educational Outreach project was to develop a laboratory experiment and classroom lecture on Earth's aurora for use in lower division college physics courses, with the particular aim of implementing the experiment and lecture at Saint Mary's College of California. The strategy is to teach physics in the context of an interesting natural phenomenon by investigating the physical principles that are important in Earth's aurora, including motion of charged particles in electric and magnetic fields, particle collisions and chemical reactions, and atomic and molecular spectroscopy. As a by-product, the undergraduate students would develop an appreciation for naturally occurring space physics phenomena.

  14. The Future of Systems Aeronomy in Addressing New Science Frontiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyra, J. U.; Paxton, L. J.; Ridley, A.

    2005-12-01

    The future will see a new era in our ability to characterize the state of the sun-Earth system using the SEC Great Observatory, new electronic data handling and data mining technologies, high-performance sun-to-Earth models, new techniques for assimilation of sparse data, and the development of innovative worldwide research tools through integration of ground-based observing sites. The time has come to pull these developing capabilities together into an investigation that seeks to understand aeronomy at a higher level than has previously been possible. Systems Aeronomy is a study of this global system behavior but, more than that, it investigates the large-scale systems-level features that result from elemental processes, like ion-neutral coupling, plasma drifts or radiative cooling. Currently the TIMED mission is making important contributions in identifying and characterizing the "building block" processes that change, evolve and combine to form the system response. Systems Aeronomy must have observational, theoretical and computational components to succeed. One of the key requirements is the ability to capture global data sets and integrate them into a coherent picture of the ITM system and its relationship to geospace. Success requires enhanced coordination between operating satellites throughout the sun-Earth system, new techniques for creating global maps from networks of ground-based and satellite-based sensors, and a new level of international cooperation leveraging off IPY2007, IHY2007, eGY2007, CAWSES, ICESTAR, and other planned worldwide programs. Twenty years down the road, Systems Aeronomy will provide the foundation for understanding planetary atmospheres, significantly extend the range of useful space weather prediction, and provide an important approach for investigating the impacts of anthropogenic and climatological changes in the ITM and on the geospace system as a whole.

  15. Space physics missions handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Robert A. (Compiler); Burks, David H. (Compiler); Hayne, Julie A. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this handbook is to provide background data on current, approved, and planned missions, including a summary of the recommended candidate future missions. Topics include the space physics mission plan, operational spacecraft, and details of such approved missions as the Tethered Satellite System, the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, and the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science.

  16. MOOSE: A Multi-Spectral Observatory Of Sensitive EMCCDs for innovative research in space physics and aeronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samara, M.; Michell, R. G.; Hampton, D. L.; Trondsen, T.

    2012-12-01

    The Multi-Spectral Observatory Of Sensitive EMCCDs (MOOSE) consists of 5 imaging systems and is the result of an NSF-funded Major Research Instrumentation project. The main objective of MOOSE is to provide a resource to all members of the scientific community that have interests in imaging low-light-level phenomena, such as aurora, airglow, and meteors. Each imager consists of an Andor DU-888 Electron Multiplying CCD (EMCCD), combined with a telecentric optics section, made by Keo Scientific Ltd., with a selection of available angular fields of view. During the northern hemisphere winter the system is typically based and operated at Poker Flat Research Range in Alaska, but any or all imagers can be shipped anywhere in individual stand-alone cases. We will discuss the main components of the MOOSE project, including the imagers, optics, lenses and filters, as well as the Linux-based control software that enables remote operation. We will also discuss the calibration of the imagers along with the initial deployments and testing done. We are requesting community input regarding operational modes, such as filter and field of view combinations, frame rates, and potentially moving some imagers to other locations, either for tomography or for larger spatial coverage. In addition, given the large volume of auroral image data already available, we are encouraging collaborations for which we will freely distribute the data and any analysis tools already developed. Most significantly, initial science highlights relating to aurora, airglow and meteors will be discussed in the context of the creative and innovative ways that the MOOSE observatory can be used in order to address a new realm of science topics, previously unachievable with traditional single imager systems.

  17. JOVE NASA-FIT program: Microgravity and aeronomy projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, James D.; Mantovani, James G.; Rassoul, Hamid K.

    1994-01-01

    This semi-annual status report is divided into two sections: Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Lab and Aeronomy Lab. The Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) research involves studying solar cell materials using the STM built at Florida Tech using a portion of our initial Jove equipment funding. One result of the participation in the FSEC project will be to design and build an STM system which is portable. This could serve as a prototype STM system which might be used on the Space Shuttle during a Spacelab mission, or onboard the proposed Space Station. The scanning tunneling microscope is only able to image the surface structure of electrically conductive crystals; by building an atomic force microscope (AFM) the surface structure of any sample, regardless of its conductivity, will be able to be imaged. With regards to the Aeronomy Lab, a total of four different mesospheric oxygen emission codes were created to calculate the intensity along the line of sight of the shuttle observations for 2972A, Herzberg I, Herzberg II, and Chamberlain bands. The thermosphere-ionosphere coupling project was completed with two major accomplishments: collection of 500 data points on modulation of neutral wind with geophysical variables, and establishment of constraints on behavior of the height of the ionosphere as a result of interaction between geophysical and geometrical factors. The magnetotail plasma project has been centered around familiarization with the subject in the form of a literature search and preprocessing of IMP-8 data.

  18. The aeronomy story: A memoir

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, J.

    1977-01-01

    Research in atmospheric physics leading to the identification of the metastable states of nitrogen is described. These forbidden nitrogen atomic molecular radiations were then identified in auroral spectra.

  19. Rossi and Space Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Edward

    2012-03-01

    The beginning of the Space Age opened a new realm of exploration and Bruno Rossi immediately focused on devising an instrument for studying the interplanetary environment. The modulated Faraday cup that he and his colleagues developed was launched on Explorer X on March 21, 1961. Although the lifetime of the battery-powered spacecraft was only 60 hours, that was long enough for the MIT plasma probe to reveal a hot, supersonic solar wind flowing along the flank of the Earth's magnetosphere. The legacy of that first short flight now extends outward on a 34-year journey to 98 AU where the plasma probe on Voyager 2 measures the deflection of the subsonic wind as it approaches the outer frontier of the heliosphere and contact with the interstellar plasma outside. Over the coming decade that legacy will extend inward to within 0.05 AU of the Sun as the plasma probe on Solar Probe Plus explores the region near the inner frontier and the source of the supersonic solar wind. The exploration of the solar wind from near its beginning outward to its end will be a lasting tribute to Bruno Rossi's contributions to Space Physics.

  20. [Reflections on physical spaces and mental spaces].

    PubMed

    Chen, Hung-Yi

    2013-08-01

    This article analyzes certain reciprocal impacts from physical spaces to mental spaces. If the epistemological construction and the spatial imagination from the subject of cogito or the social collectivities are able to influence the construction and creation of the physical spaces of that subject, then the context of that physical space may also affect the cognitive or social subject's mental cognition. This article applies the methodology of iconology from art history (E. Panofsky) and sociology (P. Bourdieu) to explore correlations between the creation of imaginative and physical spaces from the collective consciousness and mental cognition. The author uses Gilles Deleuses's opinion regarding the 17th-century Baroque style and contemporary social collective symptoms as an explanation. From these theoretical studies, the author analyzes the differences of spatial epistemology generated by Taiwan's special geological text. Finally, the author applies Michel Foucault's studies on spatial context to assess the possible application of this thesis of reciprocal impacts from mental spaces to physical spaces in a nursing context. PMID:23922087

  1. [Reflections on physical spaces and mental spaces].

    PubMed

    Chen, Hung-Yi

    2013-08-01

    This article analyzes certain reciprocal impacts from physical spaces to mental spaces. If the epistemological construction and the spatial imagination from the subject of cogito or the social collectivities are able to influence the construction and creation of the physical spaces of that subject, then the context of that physical space may also affect the cognitive or social subject's mental cognition. This article applies the methodology of iconology from art history (E. Panofsky) and sociology (P. Bourdieu) to explore correlations between the creation of imaginative and physical spaces from the collective consciousness and mental cognition. The author uses Gilles Deleuses's opinion regarding the 17th-century Baroque style and contemporary social collective symptoms as an explanation. From these theoretical studies, the author analyzes the differences of spatial epistemology generated by Taiwan's special geological text. Finally, the author applies Michel Foucault's studies on spatial context to assess the possible application of this thesis of reciprocal impacts from mental spaces to physical spaces in a nursing context.

  2. Low Cost Methods to Accomplish Aeronomy Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, G. R.

    2013-12-01

    Accomplishment of aeronomy science using low cost methods involves a number of innovative considerations. These methods will be discussed. They include making broad use of internet to control and operate distributed sensors. Sensor controls should be simple and most important reliable. Imagers are a common sensor for optical systems and include common computer interfaces and menu driven operations which often don't require special software or engineering development. Small, inexpensive but reliable satellite systems are evolving in the Cubesat community. Effective use of students is invaluable, giving them responsibility to operate instrumentation and to routinely archive the data. Management of students is especially important in the early phase of their training to insure quality performance. These ideas will be elaborated on, and most importantly, the science motive is the most important driver for what is done.

  3. Living With a Star, the Geospace Mission Definition Team and Aeronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kintner, Paul M., Jr.; Meier, R. R.; Spann, Jim; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    To gain an understanding of the Sun-Earth system, including how and why the sun varies, how the earth responds, and the impacts on humanity, research is needed that has a integrated and systematic approach. The Living With a Star (LWS) program represents an important element in this regard both to continued progress in space science in general and in Aeronomy in particular. A fundamental question in Aeronomy is how the variable sun affects the ionosphere, thermosphere, and mesosphere. The LWS program focuses on those areas of scientific understanding that promote progress in areas that have human impact and can be investigated with space borne instruments. The Geospace Mission Definition Team is charged with investigating the science priorities identified by the LWS Science Architecture Team and developing an approach to making the necessary measurements in concert with other missions and programs. An important aspect of this approach is that all LWS measurement programs are operating simultaneously for several years. We will review some of the areas that the LWS SAT have emphasized in Aeronomy, including understanding the effects of solar variability on ionospheric density and irregularities, the effects of solar variability on the mass density of the atmosphere at LEO altitudes, and the effects of solar variability on near-surface temperatures and on ozone distribution.

  4. Space Weather: Physics and Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, W. Jeffrey

    2009-03-01

    With the launching of Sputnik, Explorer 1, and the other early satellites, the new discipline of space physics was born, about 50 years ago. Although earlier ground-based observations had provided strong hints about the nature of our space environment above the upper atmosphere, those early satellites initiated a series of surprises and discoveries, including Van Allen's discovery of the Earth's radiation belts. Young scientists were attracted to this new field, and it grew quickly. When the Journal of Geophysical Research was divided into two sections, in 1964, one section was devoted to space physics. The field explored not only new regions of space but also a new state of matter: the rarefied, fully ionized plasma that fills space and interacts intimately with magnetic fields.

  5. Molecules of significance in planetary aeronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohan, H.

    1979-01-01

    This monograph is basically devoted to spectroscopic information of the molecules of planetary interest. Only those molecules have been dealt with which have been confirmed spectroscopically to be present in the atmosphere of major planets of our solar system and play an important role in the aeronomy of the respective planets. An introduction giving the general conditions of planets and their atmospheres including the gaseous molecules is given. Some typical planetary spectra is presented and supported with a discussion on some basic concepts of optical absorption and molecular parameters that are important to the study of planetary atmospheres. Quantities like dipole moments, transition probabilities, Einstein coefficients and line strengths, radiative life times, absorption cross sections, oscillator strengths, line widths and profiles, equivalent widths, growth curves, bond strengths, electronic transition moments, Franck-Condon factors and r-centroids, etc., are discussed. Spectroscopic information and relevant data of 6 diatomic (HF, HCL, CO, H2, O2, N2) and 6 polyatomic (CO2, N2), O3, HeO, NH3, CH4) molecules are presented.

  6. Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The overall goal of the Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) experiment is to resolve why Polar Mesospheric Clouds form and why they vary. By measuring PMCs and the thermal, chemical and dynamical environment in which they form, we will quanti@ the connection between these clouds and the meteorology of the polar mesosphere. In the end, this will provide the basis for study of long-term variability in the mesospheric climate and its relationship to global change. The results of AIM will be a rigorous validation of predictive models that can reliably use past PMC changes and present trends as indicators of global change. The AIM goal will be achieved by measuring PMC extinction, brightness, spatial distribution, particle size distributions, gravity wave activity, dust influx to the atmosphere and precise, vertical profile measurements of temperature, H20, C&, 0 3 , C02, NO. and aerosols. These data can only be obtained by a complement of instruments on an orbiting spacecraft (S/C).

  7. A Space Physics Concept Inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldwin, M. B.; Doxas, I.

    2006-12-01

    A Space Physics concept inventory project has been begun using a large lecture Introduction to Space Weather General Education course for non-science majors at UCLA. Students submit brief 150-250 word essays prior to material be discussed in class through Eds Tool-web-based system developed at the University of Colorado under the Biology Concept Inventory project. Eds Tool enables science education specialists to identify key concepts within the essays and classify them based on their occurrence and type. Initial results based on a class of 74 students taught Winter 2006 show common misconceptions found in understanding intro astronomy occur in Space Physics. This includes confusion between the heliosphere, solar system, galaxy and universe (students often use these terms interchangeably). Space Physics specific misconceptions include confusion between the IMF spiral pattern and the radially flowing solar wind (students often have the idea that the solar wind flows along IMF field lines, instead of the solar wind and IMF flowing out together and hence describe the radial solar wind flow as spiral). Students also have misconceptions regarding multiple step physical mechanisms such as the flow of energy from the solar wind into the Earth's ionosphere through currents or the cause of the aurora. Students will often simplify these processes into a one-step process (solar wind electrons flow directly along the Earth's field line to cause the aurora). This talk will describe our methodology and initial results.

  8. Physics of Colloids in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weitz, Dave; Weeks, Eric; Gasser, Urs; Dinsmore, Tony; Mawley, Suliana; Segre, Phil; Cipelletti, Lucia

    2000-01-01

    This talk will present recent results from ground-based research to support the "Physics of Colloids in Space" project which is scheduled to fly in the ISS approximately one year from now. In addition, results supporting future planned flights will be discussed.

  9. Physical examination during space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, B. A. Jr; Billica, R. D.; Bishop, S. L.; Blackwell, T.; Layne, C. S.; Harm, D. L.; Sandoz, G. R.; Rosenow, E. C. 3rd

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop techniques for conducting a physical examination in microgravity and to describe and document the physiologic changes noted with use of a modified basic physical examination. DESIGN: On the basis of data gathered from physical examinations on KC-135 flights, three physical variables were assessed serially in astronauts during two shuttle missions (of 8- and 10-day duration, respectively). Preflight, in-flight, and postflight examinations were conducted by trained physician-astronauts or flight surgeons, who used this modified examination. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Five male and two female crewmembers participated in the "hands-on" physical examination of all physiologic systems except the genitourinary system. Level of edema, intensity of bowel sounds, and peripheral reflexes were assessed and graded. RESULTS: This investigation identified unique elements of a physical examination performed during space flight that will assist in the development of standard methods for conducting examinations of astronauts in weightlessness. In addition, demonstrable changes induced by microgravity were noted in most physiologic systems examined. CONCLUSION: The data support the hypothesis that the microgravity examination differs from that conducted on earth or in a 1g environment. In addition, alterations in the physiologic response can be detected with use of hands-on technique. These data are invaluable in the development of optimal medical care for humans in space.

  10. Space Physics: a new undergraduate program in physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordstrom, Brian; Smith, Darrel; Anz-Meador, Phillip

    2007-03-01

    In this paper, we describe a new undergraduate physics program entitled ``Space Physics.'' Graduate programs in space physics have been around since 1959, however, this is the first undergraduate program of its kind. The B.S. in Space Physics offers the traditional core of physics courses along with four areas of concentration: Astrophysics, Particle Physics & Cosmology, Exotic Propulsion, and Remote Sensing. The program has over 90 students with the first senior class graduating this Spring 2007. The students are actively engaged in undergraduate research projects that prepare them for careers in the aerospace industry as well as graduate school in physics or space physics. The positive employer feedback from student internships already indicates that our upper-division students are prepared to move onto careers in the aerospace industry. The demographics as well as the details of undergraduate research projects will be presented in this paper.

  11. Solar and Space Physics PhD Production and Job Availability: Implications for the Future of the Space Weather Research Workforce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldwin, M.; Morrow, C. A.; Moldwin, L. A.; Torrence, J.

    2012-12-01

    To assess the state-of-health of the field of Solar and Space Physics an analysis of the number of Ph.D.s produced and number of Job Postings each year was done for the decade 2001-2010. To determine the number of Ph.D's produced in the field, the University of Michigan Ph.D. Dissertation Archive (Proquest) was queried for Solar and Space Physics dissertations produced in North America. The field generated about 30 Ph.D. per year from 2001 to 2006, but then saw the number increase to 50 to 70 per year for the rest of the decade. Only 14 institutions account for the majority of Solar and Space Physics PhDs. To estimate the number of jobs available each year in the field, a compilation of the job advertisements listed in the American Astronomical Society's Solar Physics Division (SPD) and the American Geophysical Union's Space Physics and Aeronomy (SPA) electronic newsletters was done. The positions were sorted into four types (Faculty, Post-doctoral Researcher, and Scientist/Researcher or Staff), institution type (academic, government lab, or industry) and if the position was located inside or outside the United States. Overall worldwide, 943 Solar and Space Physics positions were advertised over the decade. Of this total, 52% were for positions outside the US. Within Solar Physics, 44% of the positions were in the US, while in Space Physics 57% of the positions were for US institutions. The annual average for positions in the US were 26.9 for Solar Physics and 31.5 for Space Physics though there is much variability year-to-year particularly in Solar Physics positions outside the US. A disconcerting trend is a decline in job advertisements in the last two years for Solar Physics positions and between 2009 and 2010 for Space Physics positions. For both communities within the US in 2010, the total job ads reached their lowest levels in the decade (14), approximately half the decadal average number of job advertisements.

  12. Solar physics in the space age

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    A concise and brief review is given of the solar physics' domain, and how its study has been affected by NASA Space programs which have enabled space based observations. The observations have greatly increased the knowledge of solar physics by proving some theories and challenging others. Many questions remain unanswered. To exploit coming opportunities like the Space Station, solar physics must continue its advances in instrument development, observational techniques, and basic theory. Even with the Advance Solar Observatory, other space based observation will still be required for the sure to be ensuing questions.

  13. Beyond relativity and quantum mechanics: space physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Henry H.

    2011-09-01

    Albert Einstein imposed an observer-based epistemology upon physics. Relativity and Quantum Mechanics limit physics to describing and modeling the observer's sensations and measurements. Their "underlying reality" consists only of ideas that serve to model the observer's experience. These positivistic models cannot be used to form physical theories of Cosmic phenomena. To do this, we must again remove the observer from the center of physics. When we relate motion to Cosmic space instead of to observers and we attempt to explain the causes of Cosmic phenomena, we are forced to admit that Cosmic space is a substance. We need a new physics of space. We can begin by replacing Relativity with a modified Lorentzian-Newtonian model of spatial flow, and Quantum Mechanics with a wave-based theory of light and electrons. Space physics will require the reinterpretation of all known phenomena, concepts, and mathematical models.

  14. A Science Strategy for Space Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This report by the Committee on Solar and Space Physics and the Committee on Solar-Terrestrial Research recommends the major directions for scientific research in space physics for the coming decade. As a field of science, space physics has passed through the stage of simply looking to see what is out beyond Earth's atmosphere. It has become a 'hard' science, focusing on understanding the fundamental interactions between charged particles, electromagnetic fields, and gases in the natural laboratory consisting of the galaxy, the Sun, the heliosphere, and planetary magnetospheres, ionospheres, and upper atmospheres. The motivation for space physics research goes far beyond basic physics and intellectual curiosity, however, because long-term variations in the brightness of the Sun virtually affect the habitability of the Earth, while sudden rearrangements of magnetic fields above the solar surface can have profound effects on the delicate balance of the forces that shape our environment in space and on the human technology that is sensitive to that balance. The several subfields of space physics share the following objectives: to understand the fundamental laws or processes of nature as they apply to space plasmas and rarefied gases both on the microscale and in the larger complex systems that constitute the domain of space physics; to understand the links between changes in the Sun and the resulting effects at the Earth, with the eventual goal of predicting the significant effects on the terrestrial environment; and to continue the exploration and description of the plasmas and rarefied gases in the solar system.

  15. Computational space physics in the undergraduate physics curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, R. F.

    2006-12-01

    Computational physics education is a significant aspect of the undergraduate physics curriculum at a growing number of colleges and universities as exhibited, for example, by special sessions on this topic at recent APS (March 2004) and AAPT (Summer 2006) conferences. Since computational space physics has been a forefront research area for decades, it is only natural that examples from our discipline have a presence in this educational trend. The Illinois State University physics department has integrated computing throughout its physics curriculum and has developed a targeted undergraduate major sequence in computational physics. Several examples from magnetospheric physics have been integrated as computational projects in courses such as electromagnetism, advanced computational physics, nonlinear dynamics, and a capstone research course. I will discuss the movement toward more computer simulation in the undergraduate curriculum and give some specific examples of space physics course projects.

  16. Tidi Observations Relating to High Latitude Aeronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gell, D.; Niciejewski, R.; Killeen, T.; Wu, Q.; Skinner, W.; Solomon, S.; Ortland, D.; Kafkalidis, J.; Gablehouse, D.; Johnson, R.

    2003-12-01

    Unique observations of the horizontal neutral winds at high latitudes in the altitude range 60 to 180 km have been performed by TIDI (Thermosphere Ionosphere Doppler Interferometer) since January 2002. The satellite orbit is such that the TIDI field of view includes latitudes to both the north pole and the south pole. Though high latitude neutral wind measurements have been obtained from space with the DE-2 satellite and the UARS satellite, TIDI is the first instrument to sample the mesosphere and the lower thermosphere up to and including both polar regions on a long-term basis. Ground based studies have previously reported a strong semi-diurnal tide in the mesosphere over Resolute, Canada. This paper will describe the climatology that has been obtained by the TIDI instrument since early 2002 for high latitudes. The precession rate of TIMED supports two month averaging of data sets in order to sample all local solar time.

  17. Book Review: Physics of the Space Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    1998-01-01

    Space physics, narrowly defined as the study of Earth's plasma environment, has had an identity crisis throughout its relatively brief existence as a discipline. - The limited and often serendipitous nature of the data requires the research style of an astrophysicist. However, the in situ observations and instrumentation that are central to the field are quite different from the remote observations and instrumentation of astronomy. Compared to neutral gases, the wealth of additional phenomena and the complexity associated with magnetized plasmas and their interaction leaves little in common with the atmospheric scientist. Although the phenomena studied in space physics are ultimately important to astrophysics, the intimate measurements of plasma properties provide a greater commonality with the plasma physicist. Space physics has experienced something of a renaissance in the past few years. The interdisciplinary umbrella "Solar-Terrestrial Physics" or "Sun-Earth Connection" has stimulated an increasing interaction of space physicists, solar physicists and atmospheric scientists. Spectacular images of the Sun from Yohkoh and SOHO and solar-activity-related damage to communications satellites have increased the public's awareness of and interest in "space weather". The dangers of energetic particles and currents in space to technological systems and to future space exploration have elevated space physics observations from interesting scientific measurements that can be included on a space probe to critically important measurements that must be made.

  18. Space physics education via examples in the undergraduate physics curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, R.; Holland, D. L.

    2011-12-01

    The field of space physics is rich with examples of basic physics and analysis techniques, yet it is rarely seen in physics courses or textbooks. As space physicists in an undergraduate physics department we like to use research to inform teaching, and we find that students respond well to examples from magnetospheric science. While we integrate examples into general education courses as well, this talk will focus on physics major courses. Space physics examples are typically selected to illustrate a particular concept or method taught in the course. Four examples will be discussed, from an introductory electricity and magnetism course, a mechanics/nonlinear dynamics course, a computational physics course, and a plasma physics course. Space physics provides examples of many concepts from introductory E&M, including the application of Faraday's law to terrestrial magnetic storm effects and the use of the basic motion of charged particles as a springboard to discussion of the inner magnetosphere and the aurora. In the mechanics and nonlinear dynamics courses, the motion of charged particles in a magnetotail current sheet magnetic field is treated as a Newtonian dynamical system, illustrating the Poincaré surface-of-section technique, the partitioning of phase space, and the KAM theorem. Neural network time series analysis of AE data is used as an example in the computational physics course. Finally, among several examples, current sheet particle dynamics is utilized in the plasma physics course to illustrate the notion of adiabatic/guiding center motion and the breakdown of the adiabatic approximation. We will present short descriptions of our pedagogy and student assignments in this "backdoor" method of space physics education.

  19. Transitional Spaces: Mapping Physical Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprake, Juliet; Thomas, Helen

    2007-01-01

    Museums and buildings are both considered immutable by the majority of people who use them. A small team from Goldsmiths College, the V&A + RIBA Architecture Partnership and Pimlico School set out to challenge this preconception. The Victoria & Albert museum was taken as a case study to investigate how buildings are a physical manifestation of an…

  20. REU Solar and Space Physics Summer School

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, M. A.; Wood, E. L.

    2011-12-01

    The Research Experience for Undergrads (REU) program in Solar and Space Physics at the University of Colorado begins with a week of lectures and labs on Solar and Space Physics. The students in our program come from a variety of majors (physics, engineering, meteorology, etc.) and from a wide range of schools (small liberal arts colleges up through large research universities). The majority of the students have never been exposed to solar and space physics before arriving in Boulder to begin their research projects. We have developed a week-long crash course in the field using the expertise of scientists in Boulder and the labs designed by the Center for Integrated Space Weather Modeling (CISM).

  1. Flat space physics from holography

    SciTech Connect

    Bousso, Raphael

    2004-02-06

    We point out that aspects of quantum mechanics can be derived from the holographic principle, using only a perturbative limit of classical general relativity. In flat space, the covariant entropy bound reduces to the Bekenstein bound. The latter does not contain Newton's constant and cannot operate via gravitational backreaction. Instead, it is protected by--and in this sense, predicts--the Heisenberg uncertainty principle.

  2. The MicroSTAR accelerometer, a key payload for low Earth orbit aeronomy mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christophe, Bruno; Foulon, Bernard; Perrot, Eddy; Liorzou, Françoise; Boulanger, Damien; Lebat, Vincent

    2014-05-01

    With its mature technology inherited from the still in-orbit electrostatic accelerometers of the GRACE and GOCE geodesy missions, the MicroSTAR accelerometer is well suited for low Earth orbit aeronomy missions. Weighting 1 kg inside less than 1 litre and with a power consumption of a little bit more than 1 W, MicroSTAR can be integrated both as auxiliary passenger payload on board any Earth observation satellite either can be the main payload of a micro satellite dedicated to aeronomy and space weather survey. Positioned in the vicinity of the spacecraft centre of gravity, the accelerometer provides the measurements of the satellite non gravitational surface forces. Associated with a precise orbit determination, the accelerometer measurement permits to distinguish the position or velocity fluctuations of the satellite due to the drag fluctuations from those due to the Earth gravity anomalies and so to deduce the atmospheric density after removal of radiation pressures (direct solar, Earth albedo and infrared radiation) assuming a well known mass and wetted surface of the satellite. MicroSTAR shall achieve a resolution performance up to 1.5E-11 m/s2/sqrt(Hz) in the measurement bandwidth from 0.2 mHz to 100 mHz. If integrated at the centre of a nearly spherical micro-satellite, taking advantage of a GPS receiver for precise orbit determination and with a simple mechanical devices for accurate in-orbit centring at the satellite centre of gravity, such a satellite launched on a 300km-1300km orbit with inclination as close as possible to a polar orbit, can provide a global coverage of the upper atmospheric density and of its spatial and temporal variations. After a description of the MicroSTAR instrument, the paper will presents its detailed performance budget and it will be concluded by a short trade off between the possible orbits and the expected scientific performance return pending on the potential LEO satellite missions.

  3. Solar Physics in the Space Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dittmer, Phil D.; And Others

    This amply illustrated booklet provides a physical description of the sun as well as present and future tasks for solar physics study. The first chapter, an introduction, describes the history of solar study, solar study in space, and the relevance of solar study. The second chapter describes the five heliographic domains including the interior,…

  4. Dual Vector Spaces and Physical Singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowlands, Peter

    Though we often refer to 3-D vector space as constructed from points, there is no mechanism from within its definition for doing this. In particular, space, on its own, cannot accommodate the singularities that we call fundamental particles. This requires a commutative combination of space as we know it with another 3-D vector space, which is dual to the first (in a physical sense). The combination of the two spaces generates a nilpotent quantum mechanics/quantum field theory, which incorporates exact supersymmetry and ultimately removes the anomalies due to self-interaction. Among the many natural consequences of the dual space formalism are half-integral spin for fermions, zitterbewegung, Berry phase and a zero norm Berwald-Moor metric for fermionic states.

  5. Physical Space and the Teaching of Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Susi, Frank D.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of the arrangements and use of physical space in the art classroom is discussed. Settings can be purposefully designed to suggest certain meanings as well as exert control over the amount and kind of communication that will occur within them. (Author/RM)

  6. Exploring Space Physics Concepts Using Simulation Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, N. A.

    2008-05-01

    The Center for Integrated Space Weather Modeling (CISM), a Science and Technology Center (STC) funded by the National Science Foundation, has the goal of developing a suite of integrated physics based computer models of the space environment that can follow the evolution of a space weather event from the Sun to the Earth. In addition to the research goals, CISM is also committed to training the next generation of space weather professionals who are imbued with a system view of space weather. This view should include an understanding of both helio-spheric and geo-space phenomena. To this end, CISM offers a yearly Space Weather Summer School targeted to first year graduate students, although advanced undergraduates and space weather professionals have also attended. This summer school uses a number of innovative pedagogical techniques including devoting each afternoon to a computer lab exercise that use results from research quality simulations and visualization techniques, along with ground based and satellite data to explore concepts introduced during the morning lectures. These labs are suitable for use in wide variety educational settings from formal classroom instruction to outreach programs. The goal of this poster is to outline the goals and content of the lab materials so that instructors may evaluate their potential use in the classroom or other settings.

  7. Space Drive Physics: Introduction and Next Steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millis, M. G.

    Research toward the visionary goal of propellantless ``space drives'' is introduced, covering key physics issues and a listing of roughly 2-dozen approaches. The targeted advantage of a space drive is to circumvent the propellant constraints of rockets and the maneuvering limits of light sails by using the interactions between the spacecraft and its surrounding space for propulsion. At present, the scientific foundations from which to engineer a space drive have not been discovered and, objectively, might be impossible. Although no propulsion breakthroughs appear imminent, the subject has matured to where the relevant questions have been broached and are beginning to be answered. The critical make-break issues include; conservation of momentum, uncertain sources of reaction mass, and the net-external thrusting requirement. Note: space drives are not necessarily faster- than-light devices. Speed limits are a separate, unanswered issue. Relevant unsolved physics includes; the sources and mechanisms of inertial frames, coupling of gravitation and electromagnetism, and the nature of the quantum vacuum. The propulsion approaches span mostly stages 1 through 3 of the scientific method (defining the problem, collecting data, and articulating hypotheses), while some have matured to stage 4 (testing hypotheses). Nonviable approaches include `stiction drives,' `gyroscopic antigravity,' and `lifters.' No attempt is made to gauge the prospects of the remaining approaches. Instead, a list of next-step research questions is derived from the examination of these goals, unknowns, and concepts.

  8. Fundamental Physics in Space: the French Contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon-Hirtz, S.

    2002-01-01

    Relativity and quantum physics provide the framework for contemporary physics in which the relations between matter, space and time have been radically rethought during the past century. Physicists however cannot be satisfied with these two distinct theories and they are seeking to unify them and thereby quantify the gravitational field. The key of this research lies in the highly precise study of the gravitational laws. Space environment, allowing large distance experiments and isolation from terrestrial noise, is the ideal place for carrying out very precise experiments on gravitation and is highly suitable for seeking new interactions that could show up in low-energy conditions. Since 1993 when the scientific community gave its first recommandations, CNES has been working out with french research laboratories on a variety of advanced technical instrumentations needed to fulfill such space experiments, especially in the fields of electrostatic microaccelerometers, cold atom clocks and cold atom inertial sensors, optical datation, optical interferometry and drag-free control. A number of Fundamental Physics projects are now under progress, in the frame of the national programme and the participation to the ESA programme, such as : -the MICROSCOPE microsatellite project aimed at testing the Equivalence Principle between inertial mass and gravitational mass at a high level of precision, which is the fourth CNES scientific project based on the MYRIADE microsatellite series, -the PHARAO cold-atom clock which is the heart of the ACES (Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space) european project located on an external pallett of the International Space Station, together with a swiss H- MASER and a micro-wave link making comparison with ground clocks, aimed at relativistic tests and measurement of universal constants, -the T2L2 optical link allowing to compare ultra-stable and ultra-precise clocks, -contribution to the AMS spectrometer aimed at the search for cosmic antimatter, on

  9. Mars Aeronomy Explorer (MAX): Study Employing Distributed Micro-Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shotwell, Robert F.; Gray, Andrew A.; Illsley, Peter M.; Johnson, M.; Sherwood, Robert L.; Vozoff, M.; Ziemer, John K.

    2005-01-01

    An overview of a Mars Aeronomy Explorer (MAX) mission design study performed at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory is presented herein. The mission design consists of ten micro-spacecraft orbiters launched on a Delta IV to Mars polar orbit to determine the spatial, diurnal and seasonal variation of the constituents of the Martian upper atmosphere and ionosphere over the course of one Martian year. The spacecraft are designed to allow penetration of the upper atmosphere to at least 90 km. This property coupled with orbit precession will yield knowledge of the nature of the solar wind interaction with Mars, the influence of the Mars crustal magnetic field on ionospheric processes, and the measurement of present thermal and nonthermal escape rates of atmospheric constituents. The mission design incorporates alternative design paradigms that are more appropriate for-and in some cases motivate-distributed micro-spacecraft. These design paradigms are not defined by a simple set of rules, but rather a way of thinking about the function of instruments, mission reliability/risk, and cost in a systemic framework.

  10. Towards testing quantum physics in deep space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaltenbaek, Rainer

    2016-07-01

    MAQRO is a proposal for a medium-sized space mission to use the unique environment of deep space in combination with novel developments in space technology and quantum technology to test the foundations of physics. The goal is to perform matter-wave interferometry with dielectric particles of up to 10^{11} atomic mass units and testing for deviations from the predictions of quantum theory. Novel techniques from quantum optomechanics with optically trapped particles are to be used for preparing the test particles for these experiments. The core elements of the instrument are placed outside the spacecraft and insulated from the hot spacecraft via multiple thermal shields allowing to achieve cryogenic temperatures via passive cooling and ultra-high vacuum levels by venting to deep space. In combination with low force-noise microthrusters and inertial sensors, this allows realizing an environment well suited for long coherence times of macroscopic quantum superpositions and long integration times. Since the original proposal in 2010, significant progress has been made in terms of technology development and in refining the instrument design. Based on these new developments, we submitted/will submit updated versions of the MAQRO proposal in 2015 and 2016 in response to Cosmic-Vision calls of ESA for a medium-sized mission. A central goal has been to address and overcome potentially critical issues regarding the readiness of core technologies and to provide realistic concepts for further technology development. We present the progress on the road towards realizing this ground-breaking mission harnessing deep space in novel ways for testing the foundations of physics, a technology pathfinder for macroscopic quantum technology and quantum optomechanics in space.

  11. Memory-guided tracking through physical space and feature space.

    PubMed

    Makin, Alexis D J; Chauhan, Tushar

    2014-01-01

    People can estimate the current position of an occluded moving target. This is called motion extrapolation, and it has been suggested that the performance in such tasks is mediated by the smooth-pursuit system. Experiment 1 contrasted a standard position extrapolation task with a novel number extrapolation task. In the position extrapolation task, participants saw a horizontally moving target become occluded, and then responded when they thought the target had reached the end of the occluder. Here the stimuli can be tracked with pursuit eye movements. In the number extrapolation task, participants saw a rapid countdown on the screen that disappeared before reaching zero. Participants responded when they thought the hidden counter would have reached zero. Although this stimulus cannot be tracked with the eyes, performance was comparable on both the tasks. The response times were also found to be correlated. Experiments 2 and 3 extended these findings, using extrapolation through color space as well as number space, while Experiment 4 found modest evidence for similarities between color and number extrapolation. Although more research is certainly needed, we propose that a common rate controller guides extrapolation through physical space and feature space. This functions like the velocity store module of the smooth-pursuit system, but with a broader function than previously envisaged.

  12. Mathematical Methods for Geophysics and Space Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, William I.

    2016-05-01

    Graduate students in the natural sciences - including not only geophysics and space physics but also atmospheric and planetary physics, ocean sciences, and astronomy - need a broad-based mathematical toolbox to facilitate their research. In addition, they need to survey a wider array of mathematical methods that, while outside their particular areas of expertise, are important in related ones. While it is unrealistic to expect them to develop an encyclopedic knowledge of all the methods that are out there, they need to know how and where to obtain reliable and effective insights into these broader areas. Here at last is a graduate textbook that provides these students with the mathematical skills they need to succeed in today's highly interdisciplinary research environment. This authoritative and accessible book covers everything from the elements of vector and tensor analysis to ordinary differential equations, special functions, and chaos and fractals. Other topics include integral transforms, complex analysis, and inverse theory; partial differential equations of mathematical geophysics; probability, statistics, and computational methods; and much more. Proven in the classroom, Mathematical Methods for Geophysics and Space Physics features numerous exercises throughout as well as suggestions for further reading. * Provides an authoritative and accessible introduction to the subject * Covers vector and tensor analysis, ordinary differential equations, integrals and approximations, Fourier transforms, diffusion and dispersion, sound waves and perturbation theory, randomness in data, and a host of other topics * Features numerous exercises throughout * Ideal for students and researchers alike * An online illustration package is available to professors

  13. Physics of untied rotating space elevators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, Steven; Golubović, Leonardo

    2015-12-01

    We explore fundamental aspects of the physics of a novel class of dynamical systems, Rotating Space Elevators (RSE) (L. Golubović, S. Knudsen, Europhys. Lett. 86, 34001 (2009) and S. Knudsen, L. Golubović, Eur. Phys. J. Plus 129, 242 (2014)). An RSE is a loopy string reaching deep into outer space. The floppy RSE loop executes a double rotating motion due to which the objects sliding along the RSE string (climbers) can be transported far away from the Earth's surface without using internal engines or propulsion. By extensive numerical simulations and analytic calculations, this study addresses an interesting and provocative question at the very heart of the RSE physics: What will happen if one unties the rotating space elevator from the Earth? We find that the untied RSE exhibits rich nonlinear dynamics. In particular, strikingly, we find that the untied RSE may still behave as if it were tied to the planet. Such a quasi-tied yet untied RSE remains close to the Earth and exhibits persistent shape and enduring double rotating motion. Moreover, the climbers sliding along such a quasi-tied RSE move in much the same way as they do along a tied RSE. Under some conditions however we find that the untied RSE may undergo an instability leading it to a dynamical state in which the RSE hops well above the Earth surface. By changing the untied RSE parameters, the maximum height reached during hopping may be made to diverge. Such an untied RSE unbinds from the Earth to infinity, i.e., to interplanetary space.

  14. Space Physics Data Facility Web Services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Candey, Robert M.; Harris, Bernard T.; Chimiak, Reine A.

    2005-01-01

    The Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) Web services provides a distributed programming interface to a portion of the SPDF software. (A general description of Web services is available at http://www.w3.org/ and in many current software-engineering texts and articles focused on distributed programming.) The SPDF Web services distributed programming interface enables additional collaboration and integration of the SPDF software system with other software systems, in furtherance of the SPDF mission to lead collaborative efforts in the collection and utilization of space physics data and mathematical models. This programming interface conforms to all applicable Web services specifications of the World Wide Web Consortium. The interface is specified by a Web Services Description Language (WSDL) file. The SPDF Web services software consists of the following components: 1) A server program for implementation of the Web services; and 2) A software developer s kit that consists of a WSDL file, a less formal description of the interface, a Java class library (which further eases development of Java-based client software), and Java source code for an example client program that illustrates the use of the interface.

  15. Fundamental physics in space: The French contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Léon-Hirtz, Sylvie

    2003-08-01

    This paper outlines the space Fundamental Physics projects developped under CNES responsability together with the french scientific community, either in the national french programme or in the french contribution to the ESA programme, mainly: -the MICROSCOPE project which aims at testing the Equivalence Principle between inertial mass and gravitational mass at a high level of precision, on a microsatellite of the MYRIADE series developped by CNES, -the PHARAO cold-atom clock which is part of the ACES project of ESA, located on an external pallett of the International Space Station, together with a swiss H-MASER and a micro-wave link making comparison with ground clocks, aimed at relativistic tests and measurement of universal constants, -the T2L2 optical link allowing to compare ultra-stable and ultra-precise clocks, -a contribution to the AMS spectrometer which searches for cosmic antimatter, on the external part of the International Space Station, -a contribution to the LISA mission of ESA for direct detection and measurement of gravitational waves by interferometry, -ground-based studies on cold-atom interferometers which could be part of the HYPER project submitted to ESA.

  16. Solar and space physics decadal strategy outlines key recommendations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-08-01

    Significant achievements during the past 10 years “set the stage for transformative advances in solar and space physics for the coming decade,” according to a new decadal strategy, released on 15 August by a committee of the U.S. National Research Council (NRC). The report, Solar and Space Physics: A Science for a Technological Society, includes overarching goals and key recommendations for basic and applied research in solar and space physics for 2013-2022.

  17. How to upload a physical quantum state into correlation space

    SciTech Connect

    Morimae, Tomoyuki

    2011-04-15

    In the framework of the computational tensor network [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 220503 (2007)], the quantum computation is performed in a virtual linear space called the correlation space. It was recently shown [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 050503 (2009)] that a state in a correlation space can be downloaded to the real physical space. In this paper, conversely, we study how to upload a state from a real physical space to the correlation space. After showing the impossibility of cloning a state between a real physical space and the correlation space, we propose a simple teleportation-like method of uploading. This method also enables the Gottesman-Chuang gate teleportation trick and entanglement swapping in the virtual-real hybrid setting. Furthermore, compared with the inverse of the downloading method by Cai et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 050503 (2009)], which also works to upload, the proposed uploading method has several advantages.

  18. Space-Based Research in Fundamental Physics and Quantum Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turyshev, Slava G.; Israelsson, Ulf E.; Shao, Michael; Yu, Nan; Kusenko, Alexander; Wright, Edward L.; Everitt, C. W. Francis; Kasevich, Mark; Lipa, John A.; Mester, John C.; Reasenberg, Robert D.; Walsworth, Ronald L.; Ashby, Neil; Gould, Harvey; Paik, Ho Jung

    Space offers unique experimental conditions and a wide range of opportunities to explore the foundations of modern physics with an accuracy far beyond that of ground-based experiments. Space-based experiments today can uniquely address important questions related to the fundamental laws of Nature. In particular, high-accuracy physics experiments in space can test relativistic gravity and probe the physics beyond the Standard Model; they can perform direct detection of gravitational waves and are naturally suited for investigations in precision cosmology and astroparticle physics. In addition, atomic physics has recently shown substantial progress in the development of optical clocks and atom interferometers. If placed in space, these instruments could turn into powerful high-resolution quantum sensors greatly benefiting fundamental physics. We discuss the current status of space-based research in fundamental physics, its discovery potential, and its importance for modern science. We offer a set of recommendations to be considered by the upcoming National Academy of Sciences' Decadal Survey in Astronomy and Astrophysics. In our opinion, the Decadal Survey should include space-based research in fundamental physics as one of its focus areas. We recommend establishing an Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee's interagency "Fundamental Physics Task Force" to assess the status of both ground- and space-based efforts in the field, to identify the most important objectives, and to suggest the best ways to organize the work of several federal agencies involved. We also recommend establishing a new NASA-led interagency program in fundamental physics that will consolidate new technologies, prepare key instruments for future space missions, and build a strong scientific and engineering community. Our goal is to expand NASA's science objectives in space by including "laboratory research in fundamental physics" as an element in the agency's ongoing space research efforts.

  19. Applied Physics Lab Kennedy Space Center: Recent Contributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, Stan; Youngquist, Robert

    2006-01-01

    The mission of the Applied Physics Lab is: (1) Develop and deliver novel sensors and devices to support KSC mission operations. (2) Analyze operational issues and recommend or deliver practical solutions. (3) Apply physics to the resolution of long term space flight issues that affect space port operation on Earth or on other planets.

  20. Connecting the physical and psychosocial space to Sandia's mission.

    SciTech Connect

    Emmanuel, Glory Ruth; Silva, Austin Ray

    2014-07-01

    Sandia Labs has corporate, lab-wide efforts to enhance the research environment as well as improve physical space. However, these two efforts are usually done in isolation. The integration of physical space design with the nurturing of what we call psychosocial space can foster more efficient and effective creativity, innovation, collaboration, and performance. This paper presents a brief literature review on how academia and industry are studying the integration of physical and psychosocial space and focuses on the efforts that we, the authors, have made to improve the research environment in the Cyber Engineering Research Lab (CERL), home to Group 1460. Interviews with subject matter experts from Silicon Valley and the University of New Mexico plus changes to actual spaces in CERL provided us with six lessons learned when integrating physical and psychosocial space. We describe these six key takeaways in hopes that Sandia will see this area as an evolving research capability that Sandia can both contribute to and benefit from.

  1. Hearts, Minds, and the Library's Physical Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huwe, Terence K.

    2010-01-01

    The digital era has revolutionized society's perception of space. Even so, against this backdrop, the struggle to preserve and enhance library space is a battle for the hearts and minds of the communities. It is ongoing, and it will never end. In this article, the author explores two characteristics of successful drives to revitalize physical…

  2. Role of Fundamental Physics in Human Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turyshev, Slava

    2004-01-01

    This talk will discuss the critical role that fundamental physics research plays for the human space exploration. In particular, the currently available technologies can already provide significant radiation reduction, minimize bone loss, increase crew productivity and, thus, uniquely contribute to overall mission success. I will discuss how fundamental physics research and emerging technologies may not only further reduce the risks of space travel, but also increase the crew mobility, enhance safety and increase the value of space exploration in the near future.

  3. Highlights from the First Ever Demographic Study of Solar Physics, Space Physics, and Upper Atmospheric Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldwin, M.; Morrow, C. A.; White, S. C.; Ivie, R.

    2014-12-01

    Members of the Education & Workforce Working Group and the American Institute of Physics (AIP) conducted the first ever National Demographic Survey of working professionals for the 2012 National Academy of Sciences Solar and Space Physics Decadal Survey to learn about the demographics of this sub-field of space science. The instrument contained questions for participants on: the type of workplace; basic demographic information regarding gender and minority status, educational pathways (discipline of undergrad degree, field of their PhD), how their undergraduate and graduate student researchers are funded, participation in NSF and NASA funded spaceflight missions and suborbital programs, and barriers to career advancement. Using contact data bases from AGU, the American Astronomical Society's Solar Physics Division (AAS-SPD), attendees of NOAA's Space Weather Week and proposal submissions to NSF's Atmospheric, Geospace Science Division, the AIP's Statistical Research Center cross correlated and culled these data bases resulting in 2776 unique email addresses of US based working professionals. The survey received 1305 responses (51%) and generated 125 pages of single space answers to a number of open-ended questions. This talk will summarize the highlights of this first-ever demographic survey including findings extracted from the open-ended responses regarding barriers to career advancement which showed significant gender differences.

  4. Sessions on history of space and geophysics spark interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Wilfried

    Three sessions at international conferences were held in 1997 to discuss the history of space and geophysics and its different disciplines. The first session was held during the Assembly of the German Geophysical Society in March in Potsdam, Germany. Topics included the theory of relativity and gravitation in geophysics; work by Albert Abraham Michelson, Leon Foucault, and Ernst Mach; work by Hermann von Helmholtz; and the physical application and geophysical evidence of Werner Heisenberg's research. Also included were discussions relevant to the history of geophysics, aeronomy, meteor astronomy, and geodetical research, including developments in instrumentation during the last few decades.

  5. Physics of Colloids in Space: Microgravity Experiment Launched, Installed, and Activated on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doherty, Michael P.

    2002-01-01

    The Physics of Colloids in Space (PCS) experiment is a Microgravity Fluids Physics investigation that is presently located in an Expedite the Process of Experiments to Space Station (EXPRESS) Rack on the International Space Station. PCS was launched to the International Space Station on April 19, 2001, activated on May 31, 2001, and will continue to operate about 90 hr per week through May 2002.

  6. The physics of the space elevator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravind, P. K.

    2007-02-01

    A space elevator is a tall tower rising from a point on the Earth's equator to a height well above a geostationary orbit, where it terminates in a counterweight. Although the concept is more than a century old, it was only with the discovery of carbon nanotubes that it began to receive serious scientific attention. NASA commissioned a study of the space elevator in the late 1990s that examined the feasibility of such a structure and explored many of its applications. I explain the basic mechanical principles underlying the construction of a space elevator and discuss several of its applications: the transport of payload into space and the launching of spacecraft on voyages to other planets.

  7. Space plasma physics results from Spacelab 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    The Spacelab 1 payload carried several instrument systems which together investigated a number of space plasma phenomena. These experiments used the Space Shuttle Orbiter as a platform for making controlled particle-beam, plasma and neutral gas inputs to the ionosphere and magnetosphere and for observing the outputs produced. Spacelab 1 space-plasma investigations included the Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC), Phenomena Induced by Charged Particle Beams (PICPAB), Atmospheric Emissions Photometric Imaging (AEPI) and the Low Energy Electron Spectrometer and Magnetometer. Among the major phenomena investigated both singly and jointly by these experiments are vehicle charging and neutralization, beam-plasma and wave-particle interactions, anomalous ionization phenomena produced by neutral-gas and plasma injections and several phenomena induced by modulated particle beam injections.

  8. Applied physics: Optical trapping for space mirrors.

    PubMed

    McGloin, David

    2014-02-27

    Might it be possible to create mirrors for space telescopes, using nothing but microscopic particles held in place by light? A study that exploits a technique called optical binding provides a step towards this goal.

  9. New Space Weather and Nonlinear Waves and Processes Prize announced for 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    At the 2011 Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif., AGU announced the creation of a new award: the Space Weather and Nonlinear Waves and Processes Prize. The prize, which is being made possible by a generous contribution from longtime AGU members and NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology, scientists Bruce Tsurutani and Olga Verkhoglyadova, will recognize an AGU member scientist and will come with a $10,000 award. Tsurutani has served as a researcher with JPL since 1972 and is currently a senior research scientist. He was also the president of AGU's Space Physics and Aeronomy section from 1990 to 1992 and is a recipient of AGU's John Adam Fleming Medal, given “for original research and technical leadership in geomagnetism, atmospheric electricity, aeronomy, space physics, and related sciences.” Verkhoglyadova served as a professor of space physics in the Department of Astrophysics and Space Physics at Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, in the Ukraine, prior to coming to the United States. Their leadership and dedication to AGU and to their field are apparent in their passion for this prize.

  10. Cuban Techno-physical Experiments in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altshuler, José; Calzadilla Amaya, Ocatvio; Falcon, Federico; Fuentes, Juan E.; Lodos, Jorge; Vigil Santos, Elena

    When Cuba joined the Intercosmos Program of the socialist countries in the mid-1960s, the great educational and scientific reform taking place at that time in the country had hardly begun to bear fruit. But when, a decade later, the Soviet Union offered all the participant countries the chance to make use of its space vehicles and related installations so that their cosmonauts could carry out original scientific experiments in space, the situation had changed radically in Cuba. In a short time around 200 people already involved in scientific and technological activities succeeded in designing and setting up—in close collaboration with various Soviet, East German and Bulgarian institutions—some 20 scientific experiments that were to be carried out in orbit around the earth during the joint Soviet-Cuban space flight of September 18-26, 1980. Those experiments, and a further one that was also set up for the same space flight—but carried out during a later flight, as mentioned below—are historically important since they were the first in their class to be carried out by humans in space under microgravity conditions.

  11. Generic results of the space physics community survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Rikhi R.; Cohen, Nathaniel B.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of a survey of the members of the space physics research community conducted in 1990-1991 to ascertain demographic information on the respondents and information on their views on a number of facets of their space physics research. The survey was conducted by questionnaire and the information received was compiled in a database and analyzed statistically. The statistical results are presented for the respondent population as a whole and by four different respondent cross sections: individual disciplines of space physics, type of employers, age groups, and research techniques employed. Data from a brief corresponding survey of the graduate students of respondents are also included.

  12. Space physics strategy: Implementation study. Volume 2: Program plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    In June, 1989, the Space Science and Applications Advisory Committee (SSAAC) authorized its Space Physics Subcommittee (SPS) to prepare a plan specifying the future missions, launch sequence, and encompassing themes of the Space Physics Division. The plan, now complete, is the product of a year-long study comprising two week-long workshops - in January and June 1990 - assisted by pre-workshop, inter-workshop, and post-workshop preparation and assessment activities. The workshops engaged about seventy participants, drawn equally from the Division's four science disciplines: cosmic and heliospheric physics, solar physics, magnetosphere physics, and ionosphere-thermosphere-mesospheric physics. An earlier report records the outcome of the first workshop; this is the report of the final workshop.

  13. Space physics strategy-implementation study. Volume 1: Goals, objectives, strategy. A report to the Space Physics Subcommittee of the Space Science and Applications Advisory Committee

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Space physics is defined as the study of the heliosphere as one system; that is, of the Sun and solar wind, and their interactions with the upper atmospheres, ionospheres, and magnetospheres of the planets and comets, with energetic particles, and with the interstellar medium. This report contains a number of reports by different panels on the major topics in the space physics program including: (1) the cosmic and heliospheric physics program for the years 1995 to 2010; (2) ionosphere, thermosphere, and mesosphere studies; (3) magnetospheric physics; (4) solar physics; and (5) space physics theory.

  14. Implementation of the Boston University Space Physics Acquisition Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spence, Harlan E.

    1998-01-01

    The tasks carried out during this grant achieved the goals as set forth in the initial proposal. The Boston University Space Physics Acquisition CEnter (BUSPACE) now provides World Wide Web access to data from a large suite of both space-based and ground-based instruments, archived from different missions, experiments, or campaigns in which researchers associated with the Center for Space Physics (CSP) at Boston University have been involved. These archival data sets are in digital form and are valuable for retrospective data analysis studies of magnetospheric as well as ionospheric, thermospheric, and mesospheric physics. We have leveraged our grass-roots effort with the NASA seed money to establish dedicated hardware (computer and hard disk augmentation) and student support to grow and maintain the system. This leveraging of effort now permits easy access by the space physics community to many underutilized, yet important data sets, one example being that of the SCATHA satellite.

  15. Twenty years of space radiation physics at the BNL AGS and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Miller, J; Zeitlin, C

    2016-06-01

    Highly ionizing atomic nuclei HZE in the GCR will be a significant source of radiation exposure for humans on extended missions outside low Earth orbit. Accelerators such as the LBNL Bevalac and the BNL AGS, designed decades ago for fundamental nuclear and particle physics research, subsequently found use as sources of GCR-like particles for ground-based physics and biology research relevant to space flight. The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at BNL was constructed specifically for space radiation research. Here we review some of the space-related physics results obtained over the first 20 years of NASA-sponsored research at Brookhaven.

  16. Twenty years of space radiation physics at the BNL AGS and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J.; Zeitlin, C.

    2016-06-01

    Highly ionizing atomic nuclei HZE in the GCR will be a significant source of radiation exposure for humans on extended missions outside low Earth orbit. Accelerators such as the LBNL Bevalac and the BNL AGS, designed decades ago for fundamental nuclear and particle physics research, subsequently found use as sources of GCR-like particles for ground-based physics and biology research relevant to space flight. The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at BNL was constructed specifically for space radiation research. Here we review some of the space-related physics results obtained over the first 20 years of NASA-sponsored research at Brookhaven.

  17. Twenty years of space radiation physics at the BNL AGS and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Miller, J; Zeitlin, C

    2016-06-01

    Highly ionizing atomic nuclei HZE in the GCR will be a significant source of radiation exposure for humans on extended missions outside low Earth orbit. Accelerators such as the LBNL Bevalac and the BNL AGS, designed decades ago for fundamental nuclear and particle physics research, subsequently found use as sources of GCR-like particles for ground-based physics and biology research relevant to space flight. The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at BNL was constructed specifically for space radiation research. Here we review some of the space-related physics results obtained over the first 20 years of NASA-sponsored research at Brookhaven. PMID:27345198

  18. NASA physics and chemistry experiments in-space program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabris, E. A.

    1981-01-01

    The Physics and Chemistry Experiments Program (PACE) is part of the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology (OAST) research and technology effort in understanding the fundamental characteristics of physics and chemical phenomena. This program seeks to increase the basic knowledge in these areas by well-planned research efforts which include in-space experiments when the limitations of ground-based activities precludes or restricts the achievement of research goals. Overview study areas are concerned with molecular beam experiments for Space Shuttle, experiments on drops and bubbles in a manned earth-orbiting laboratory, the study of combustion experiments in space, combustion experiments in orbiting spacecraft, gravitation experiments in space, and fluid physics, thermodynamics, and heat-transfer experiments. Procedures for the study program have four phases. An overview study was conducted in the area of materials science.

  19. The space shuttle payload planning working groups. Volume 2: Atmospheric and space physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The findings of the Atmospheric and Space Physics working group of the space shuttle mission planning activity are presented. The principal objectives defined by the group are: (1) to investigate the detailed mechanisms which control the near-space environment of the earth, (2) to perform plasma physics investigations not feasible in ground-based laboratories, and (3) to conduct investigations which are important in understanding planetary and cometary phenomena. The core instrumentation and laboratory configurations for conducting the investigations are defined.

  20. Time and Space: Undergraduate Mexican Physics in Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Candela, Antonia

    2010-01-01

    This is an ethnographic study of the trajectories and itineraries of undergraduate physics students at a Mexican university. In this work learning is understood as being able to move oneself and, other things (cultural tools), through the space-time networks of a discipline (Nespor in Knowledge in motion: space, time and curriculum in…

  1. Classical-physics applications for Finsler b space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Joshua; Lehnert, Ralf

    2015-06-01

    The classical propagation of certain Lorentz-violating fermions is known to be governed by geodesics of a four-dimensional pseudo-Finsler b space parametrized by a prescribed background covector field. This work identifies systems in classical physics that are governed by the three-dimensional version of Finsler b space and constructs a geodesic for a sample non-constant choice for the background covector. The existence of these classical analogues demonstrates that Finsler b spaces possess applications in conventional physics, which may yield insight into the propagation of SME fermions on curved manifolds.

  2. Centralising Space: The Physical Education and Physical Activity Experiences of South Asian, Muslim Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stride, Annette

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the physical education (PE) and physical activity experiences of a group of South Asian, Muslim girls, a group typically marginalised in PE and physical activity research. The study responds to ongoing calls for research to explore across different spaces in young people's lives. Specifically, I draw on a…

  3. Physical parameters affecting living cells in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langbein, Dieter

    The question is posed: Why does a living cell react to the absence of gravity? What sensors may it have? Does it note pressure, sedimentation, convection, or other parameters? If somewhere in a liquid volume sodium ions are replaced by potassium ions, the density of the liquid changes locally: the heavier regions sink, the lighter regions rise. This may contribute to species transport, to the metabolism. Under microgravity this mechanism is strongly reduced. On the other hand, other reasons for convection like thermal and solutal interface convection are left. Do they affect species transport? Another important effect of gravity is the hydrostatic pressure. On the macroscopic side, the pressure between our head and feet changes by 0.35 atmospheres. On the microscopic level the hydrostatic pressure on the upper half of a cell membrane is lower than on the lower half. This, by affecting the ion transport through the membrane, may change the surrounding electric potential. It has been suggested to be one of the reasons for graviperception. Following the discussion of these and other effects possibly important in life sciences in space, an order of magnitude analysis of the residual accelerations tolerable during experiments in materials sciences is outlined. In the field of life sciences only rough estimates are available at present.

  4. How to upload a physical quantum state into correlation space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimae, Tomoyuki

    2011-04-01

    In the framework of the computational tensor network [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.98.220503 98, 220503 (2007)], the quantum computation is performed in a virtual linear space called the correlation space. It was recently shown [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.103.050503 103, 050503 (2009)] that a state in a correlation space can be downloaded to the real physical space. In this paper, conversely, we study how to upload a state from a real physical space to the correlation space. After showing the impossibility of cloning a state between a real physical space and the correlation space, we propose a simple teleportation-like method of uploading. This method also enables the Gottesman-Chuang gate teleportation trick and entanglement swapping in the virtual-real hybrid setting. Furthermore, compared with the inverse of the downloading method by Cai [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.103.050503 103, 050503 (2009)], which also works to upload, the proposed uploading method has several advantages.

  5. Planet-B: A Japanese Mars aeronomy observer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuruda, K.

    1992-01-01

    An introduction is given to a Japanese Mars mission (Planet-B) which is being planned at the Institute of Space and Aeronautical Science (ISAS), Japan. Planet-B aims to study the upper atmosphere of Mars and its interaction with the solar wind. The launch of Planet-B is planned for 1996 on a new launcher, M-L, which is being developed at ISAS. In addition to the interaction with the solar wind, the structure of the Martian upper atmosphere is thought to be controlled by the meteorological condition in the lower atmosphere. The orbit of Planet-B was chosen so that it will pass two important regions, the region where the solar wind interacts with the Martian upper atmosphere and the tail region where ion acceleration is taking place. Considering the drag due to the Martian atmosphere, the periapsis altitude of 150 km and apoapsis of 10 Martian radii are planned. The orbit plane will be nearly parallel to the ecliptic plane. The altitude of the spacecraft will be spin stabilized and its spin axis will be controlled to the point of the earth. The dry weight of the spacecraft will be about 250 kg, including the scientific payload which consists of a magnetometer, plasma instruments, HF sounder, UV imaging spectrometer, and lower atmosphere monitor.

  6. Physics of Colloids in Space: Flight Hardware Operations on ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doherty, Michael P.; Bailey, Arthur E.; Jankovsky, Amy L.; Lorik, Tibor

    2002-01-01

    The Physics of Colloids in Space (PCS) experiment was launched on Space Shuttle STS-100 in April 2001 and integrated into EXpedite the PRocess of Experiments to Space Station Rack 2 on the International Space Station (ISS). This microgravity fluid physics investigation is being conducted in the ISS U.S. Lab 'Destiny' Module over a period of approximately thirteen months during the ISS assembly period from flight 6A through flight 9A. PCS is gathering data on the basic physical properties of simple colloidal suspensions by studying the structures that form. A colloid is a micron or submicron particle, be it solid, liquid, or gas. A colloidal suspension consists of these fine particles suspended in another medium. Common colloidal suspensions include paints, milk, salad dressings, cosmetics, and aerosols. Though these products are routinely produced and used, we still have much to learn about their behavior as well as the underlying properties of colloids in general. The long-term goal of the PCS investigation is to learn how to steer the growth of colloidal structures to create new materials. This experiment is the first part of a two-stage investigation conceived by Professor David Weitz of Harvard University (the Principal Investigator) along with Professor Peter Pusey of the University of Edinburgh (the Co-Investigator). This paper describes the flight hardware, experiment operations, and initial science findings of the first fluid physics payload to be conducted on ISS: The Physics of Colloids in Space.

  7. A Revolutionary Aeronomy Concept to Explore the Coupling of the Solar-Terrestrial System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, James F.

    2014-01-01

    A revolutionary opportunity to explore the consequences of reconnection in the ionosphere as never before will be presented. It is a revolutionary opportunity to explore key Aeronomy emissions on a global scale with spatial and temporal resolution not possible today. For example, observations of the signature of dayside merging and nightside reconnection that are reflected in the auroral oval evolution during disturbed periods and quiet times, will be described; observations that will open a window of discovery for coupling phenomena within Geospace and with the solar wind. The description of this new concept will be presented, and its impact and contribution to understanding magnetic merging will be discussed.

  8. Time and space: undergraduate Mexican physics in motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candela, Antonia

    2010-09-01

    This is an ethnographic study of the trajectories and itineraries of undergraduate physics students at a Mexican university. In this work learning is understood as being able to move oneself and, other things (cultural tools), through the space-time networks of a discipline (Nespor in Knowledge in motion: space, time and curriculum in undergraduate physics and management. Routledge Farmer, London, 1994). The potential of this socio-cultural perspective allows an analysis of how students are connected through extended spaces and times with an international core discipline as well as with cultural features related to local networks of power and construction. Through an example, I show that, from an actor-network-theory (Latour in Science in action. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, 1987), that in order to understand the complexities of undergraduate physics processes of learning you have to break classroom walls and take into account students' movements through complex spatial and temporal traces of the discipline of physics. Mexican professors do not give classes following one textbook but in a moment-to-moment open dynamism tending to include undergraduate students as actors in classroom events extending the teaching space-time of the classroom to the disciplinary research work of physics. I also find that Mexican undergraduate students show initiative and display some autonomy and power in the construction of their itineraries as they are encouraged to examine a variety of sources including contemporary research articles, unsolved physics problems, and even to participate in several physicists' spaces, as for example being speakers at the national congresses of physics. Their itineraries also open up new spaces of cultural and social practices, creating more extensive networks beyond those associated with a discipline. Some economic, historical and cultural contextual features of this school of sciences are analyzed in order to help understanding the particular

  9. Introduction to the Space Physics Analysis Network (SPAN)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. L. (Editor); Peters, D. J. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    The Space Physics Analysis Network or SPAN is emerging as a viable method for solving an immediate communication problem for the space scientist. SPAN provides low-rate communication capability with co-investigators and colleagues, and access to space science data bases and computational facilities. The SPAN utilizes up-to-date hardware and software for computer-to-computer communications allowing binary file transfer and remote log-on capability to over 25 nationwide space science computer systems. SPAN is not discipline or mission dependent with participation from scientists in such fields as magnetospheric, ionospheric, planetary, and solar physics. Basic information on the network and its use are provided. It is anticipated that SPAN will grow rapidly over the next few years, not only from the standpoint of more network nodes, but as scientists become more proficient in the use of telescience, more capability will be needed to satisfy the demands.

  10. Recent measurements for hadrontherapy and space radiation: nuclear physics.

    PubMed

    Miller, J

    2001-01-01

    The particles and energies commonly used for hadron therapy overlap the low end of the charge and energy range of greatest interest for space radiation applications, Z=1-26 and approximately 100-1000 MeV/nucleon. It has been known for some time that the nuclear interactions of the incident ions must be taken into account both in treatment planning and in understanding and addressing the effects of galactic cosmic ray ions on humans in space. Until relatively recently, most of the studies of nuclear fragmentation and transport in matter were driven by the interests of the nuclear physics and later, the hadron therapy communities. However, the experimental and theoretical methods and the accelerator facilities developed for use in heavy ion nuclear physics are directly applicable to radiotherapy and space radiation studies. I will briefly review relevant data taken recently at various accelerators, and discuss the implications of the measurements for radiotherapy, radiobiology and space radiation research.

  11. Recent measurements for hadrontherapy and space radiation: nuclear physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J.

    2001-01-01

    The particles and energies commonly used for hadron therapy overlap the low end of the charge and energy range of greatest interest for space radiation applications, Z=1-26 and approximately 100-1000 MeV/nucleon. It has been known for some time that the nuclear interactions of the incident ions must be taken into account both in treatment planning and in understanding and addressing the effects of galactic cosmic ray ions on humans in space. Until relatively recently, most of the studies of nuclear fragmentation and transport in matter were driven by the interests of the nuclear physics and later, the hadron therapy communities. However, the experimental and theoretical methods and the accelerator facilities developed for use in heavy ion nuclear physics are directly applicable to radiotherapy and space radiation studies. I will briefly review relevant data taken recently at various accelerators, and discuss the implications of the measurements for radiotherapy, radiobiology and space radiation research.

  12. Courses and Resources to Teach Space Physics to Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiff, P. H.

    2008-12-01

    We have created four courses for teachers, and inquiry-based materials to go with them, that embed space physics concepts while teaching Space Physics to National and State standards. The state of Texas recently adopted a "4x4" standard, which makes the "recommended" graduation requirement for high school students to include four science and four math courses. Space Physics is not specifically listed as a topic, but falls naturally as part of three of the Texas High School courses: "Physics", "Astronomy" and "Earth and Space Science", a new course whose syllabus is being decided now. The national standards which are most relevant at the high school level are "Change, Constancy and Measurement", "Motions and Forces", "Interactions of Energy and Matter" and "Natural and Human-induced hazards" [National Science Ed Standards, 1996]. The "Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills" includes circuits, electricity and magnetism, and waves in their Physics course syllabus, and include "describe the Sun's effects on the Earth" in the Astronomy class. In the new Earth and Space Science class we expect that additional heliospheric concepts will be included. At Rice we have four Astronomy courses (and four Earth Science courses) for teachers, two of which involve a substantial space physics content. By taking those eight courses, plus a research project and another content or education elective, the teachers can earn a "Masters of Science Teaching" degree. In "Teaching Earth and Space Science" (ASTR 402) we dedicate about 4 weeks on the Sun and the Earth and its environment. The "Physics of Ham Radio" course (PHYS 401) has an even more relevant focus. That class introduces electricity and magnetism, with hands-on activities on circuits and electromagnetic waves. The students earn their "Technician" class amateur license by making at least 75 per cent on the first quiz, which allows them VHF and UHF broadcast privileges. The second half of the course covers more space weather topics

  13. In Support of Physics: Redesigning library collections, spaces, and services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehman, Kathleen

    2014-03-01

    In order to improve support for physics learning, teaching, and research at the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, the Physics Library personnel have implemented important changes over the past three years. Updates in collection-building practices, changes to physical spaces, and developments of new services have all been made so the Physics Library is more useful to students and faculty. In terms of collection management, all patrons - students, staff, and faculty - have been encouraged to make suggestions for additions to the library collection. The print collections were rearranged to encourage circulation. Spaces within the library have been designated as either group study or silent study, and teaching assistants are encouraged to use the space for their office hours. Library services have also been taken directly to undergraduate physics lab sections to make library information easily accessible for more students. The Physics Library, along with the other branch libraries on campus, has been highlighted in conjunction with the library campaign promoting subject librarians and introducing undergraduate students to ``their'' librarian. Trends in circulation, research questions, and door count statistics will be presented alongside explanations of the implemented changes.

  14. Understanding Space Weather and the Physics Behind It

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knipp, D. J.; Gross, N. A.

    2011-12-01

    A new textbook on space weather, Understanding Space Weather and the Physics Behind It, aimed at upper-level undergraduates and beginning graduate students, contains numerous examples of basic physics applications in space weather. We will highlight a few of the examples from the text. In addition, new material is being developed to support the many references to NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) graphics and scales. Our intent is to provide background and improved understanding of the underpinnings of the operational images. In this presentation we provide a set of questions, tools, and exercises that guide inquiry into the observations and proxies behind some of elements on SWPC's home page. Our materials include observation sequences for the types of space weather disturbances discussed in SWPC's Report of Solar and Geophysical Activity and the NOAA Space Weather Scales. Our instructional materials are in standard electronic document formats and in "dashboard" format supported by tools from the Integrated Space Weather Analysis platform at NASA's Community Coordinated Modeling Center.

  15. Solar and Space Physics: A Science for a Technological Society

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    From the interior of the Sun, to the upper atmosphere and near-space environment of Earth, and outward to a region far beyond Pluto where the Sun's influence wanes, advances during the past decade in space physics and solar physics the disciplines NASA refers to as heliophysics have yielded spectacular insights into the phenomena that affect our home in space. This report, from the National Research Council's (NRC's) Committee for a Decadal Strategy in Solar and Space Physics, is the second NRC decadal survey in heliophysics. Building on the research accomplishments realized over the past decade, the report presents a program of basic and applied research for the period 2013-2022 that will improve scientific understanding of the mechanisms that drive the Sun's activity and the fundamental physical processes underlying near-Earth plasma dynamics, determine the physical interactions of Earth's atmospheric layers in the context of the connected Sun-Earth system, and enhance greatly the capability to provide realistic and specific forecasts of Earth's space environment that will better serve the needs of society. Although the recommended program is directed primarily to NASA (Science Mission Directorate -- Heliophysics Division) and the National Science Foundation (NSF) (Directorate for Geosciences -- Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences) for action, the report also recommends actions by other federal agencies, especially the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) those parts of NOAA charged with the day-to-day (operational) forecast of space weather. In addition to the recommendations included in this summary, related recommendations are presented in the main text of the report.

  16. What Should Space Be Used For? Physical and Political Guidelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grego, Laura

    2005-04-01

    Space has long been important to the commercial, civil scientific, and military sectors, serving essential missions like communications, environmental monitoring and astronomical research, early warning of missile attack, and precision navigation. However, rhetoric, official planning documents, and funded military research programs show that the current administration has a vision for space that significantly departs from long-held norms. This new vision includes four additional missions for satellites: 1) ballistic missile defense, 2) attacking targets on the ground 3) protecting other satellites, and 4) denying other users the ability to operate in space. Such a dramatic change deserves a thorough vetting. The discussion can be organized into three main types of issues: The first are international and strategic issues, such as how space weaponization may affect national and international security and stability; and, in space, what are the roles of weapons versus treaties and cooperation? Second: how useful would space actually be for these four proposed military missions? The laws of physics and the current state of technology will strongly limit what orbiting craft can do. And third: how may these new uses of space affect other current and future users of space? And what are the proper guidelines for the equitable use and longterm stewardship of space?

  17. Importance of Nuclear Physics to NASA's Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, R. K.; Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2001-01-01

    We show that nuclear physics is extremely important for accurate risk assessments for space missions. Due to paucity of experimental input radiation interaction information it is imperative to develop reliable accurate models for the interaction of radiation with matter. State-of-the-art nuclear cross sections models have been developed at the NASA Langley Research center and are discussed.

  18. The use and misuse of statistics in space physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiff, Patricia H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents several statistical techniques most commonly used in space physics, including Fourier analysis, linear correlation, auto- and cross-correlation, power spectral density and superimposed epoch analysis, and presents tests to assess the significance of the results. New techniques such as bootstrapping and jackknifing are presented. When no test of significance is in common usage, a plausible test is suggested.

  19. Geant4 electromagnetic physics updates for space radiation effects simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivantchenko, Anton; Nieminen, Petteri; Incerti, Sebastien; Santin, Giovanni; Ivantchenko, Vladimir; Grichine, Vladimir; Allison, John; Karamitos, Mathiew

    The Geant4 toolkit is used in many applications including space science studies. The new Geant4 version 10.0 released in December 2013 includes a major revision of the toolkit and offers multi-threaded mode for event level parallelism. At the same time, Geant4 electromagnetic and hadronic physics sub-libraries have been significantly updated. In order to validate the new and updated models Geant4 verification tests and benchmarks were extended. Part of these developments was sponsored by the European Space Agency in the context of research aimed at modelling radiation biological end effects. In this work, we present an overview of results of several benchmarks for electromagnetic physics models relevant to space science. For electromagnetic physics, recently Compton scattering, photoelectric effect, and Rayleigh scattering models have been improved and extended down to lower energies. Models of ionization and fluctuations have also been improved; special micro-dosimetry models for Silicon and liquid water were introduced; the main multiple scattering model was consolidated; and the atomic de-excitation module has been made available to all models. As a result, Geant4 predictions for space radiation effects obtained with different Physics Lists are in better agreement with the benchmark data than previous Geant4 versions. Here we present results of electromagnetic tests and models comparison in the energy interval 10 eV - 10 MeV.

  20. Recent Results from the Physics of Colloids in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weitz, David A.; Bailey, A.; Christianson, R.; Manley, S.; Prasad, V.; Segre, P.; Gasser, U.; Cipelletti, L.; Schoefield, A.; Pusey, P.

    2002-01-01

    The Physics of Colloids in Space is an experiment which flew in the ISS. Data on several different samples of colloidal particles were obtained. They provided unexpected information about the behavior of the samples in microgravity. The data are currently being analyzed. The most recent findings will be discussed in this talk.

  1. Getting the Word Out: Undergradute Space Physics at Rice University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiff, P. H.; Alexander, D.

    2006-12-01

    At Rice University we emphasize space physics in our non-major Physics and Astronomy undergraduate classes in addition to our graduate and majors program. In "ASTR 202" (solar system exploration for non- majors), we typically use a textbook which includes magnetospheric and auroral topics in it (many do not). In recent years, we have also created two new courses for undergraduates which highlight space physics. In spring 2005 we began PHYS 401, The Physics of Ham Radio, which includes a significant portion on the Sun, ionosphere, radio propagation, and space storms. It is a fun hands-on way to learn about circuits, electrical theory, antennas, and the effects of space weather, while creating a new hobby at the same time. The students are required to attempt the FCC "Technician" exam as their midterm exam, and all of the class members passed. This course is taken both by undergraduates and by local teachers in the Master of Science Teaching program (the teacher tuition is partially supported by CISM), and is offered every other year (it will be offered again in Spring 2007). In fall 2005 one of us (Alexander) started a new course, ASTR 243 "Exploring the Sun-Earth Connection", which focuses entirely on solar and space weather topics. It required the students to perform several projects over the course of the semester, and used many online resources. The feedback from the first session was very favorable, so it also will likely be offered every other year. Two of the students extended their experience by participating in summer research, one at an REU at the National Solar Observatory working on helioseismology data, and one at an international summer school in the U.K. where she focused on coronal heating. Thus with two courses in an every-other-year rotation, each academic year one undergraduate course in space physics is available at Rice. Furthermore, all senior majors are required to perform research, and each year several students choose a solar or space

  2. Optical aeronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, S.C. )

    1991-01-01

    Optical measurements of thermospheric and ionospheric processes and their interpretation are reviewed and the chemical reactions and their effects on emissions are discussed. Also included are the phenomena which excite the airglow and aurora, i.e., the solar UV/EUV flux and auroral particle precipitation. Consideration is given to solar flux, atomic emissions, molecular emissions, hydrogen geocorona, and molecular oxygen and the green line nightglow.

  3. Physical basis of radiation protection in space travel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, Marco; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-10-01

    The health risks of space radiation are arguably the most serious challenge to space exploration, possibly preventing these missions due to safety concerns or increasing their costs to amounts beyond what would be acceptable. Radiation in space is substantially different from Earth: high-energy (E) and charge (Z) particles (HZE) provide the main contribution to the equivalent dose in deep space, whereas γ rays and low-energy α particles are major contributors on Earth. This difference causes a high uncertainty on the estimated radiation health risk (including cancer and noncancer effects), and makes protection extremely difficult. In fact, shielding is very difficult in space: the very high energy of the cosmic rays and the severe mass constraints in spaceflight represent a serious hindrance to effective shielding. Here the physical basis of space radiation protection is described, including the most recent achievements in space radiation transport codes and shielding approaches. Although deterministic and Monte Carlo transport codes can now describe well the interaction of cosmic rays with matter, more accurate double-differential nuclear cross sections are needed to improve the codes. Energy deposition in biological molecules and related effects should also be developed to achieve accurate risk models for long-term exploratory missions. Passive shielding can be effective for solar particle events; however, it is limited for galactic cosmic rays (GCR). Active shielding would have to overcome challenging technical hurdles to protect against GCR. Thus, improved risk assessment and genetic and biomedical approaches are a more likely solution to GCR radiation protection issues.

  4. Team of three JGR-Space Physics editors appointed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Three editors from the United States, Europe, and Asia have been appointed to lead JGR-Space Physics into the new millennium. This new team will recognize and foster the substantial contributions that scientists from the international community make to the journal. Janet Luhmann, a Senior Fellow at the Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, will serve as Senior Editor. Luhmann will play a coordinating role for the regional editors, which will be especially important as the Union moves into electronic publishing and adopts new ways of using the technology to publish research findings.

  5. Using semantics to extend the space physics data environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narock, T. W.; Szabo, A.; Merka, J.

    2009-04-01

    The space physics data environment is evolving with the advent of virtual observatories. With the primary function of most virtual observatories being data search and retrieval, an emphasis has been placed on providing value-added data processing services. That is, creating web services that take discovered data and provide common and routine processing such as coordinate transformations and data sub-setting. As these services proliferate, finding, accessing and using them no longer becomes a trivial task. This paper discusses a semantic registry that enables the searching of these services via ontology. We discuss the benefits of such a registry and illustrate how the web and application programming interfaces benefit the space physics community.

  6. Radiation Physics for Space and High Altitude Air Travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Goldhagen, P.; Saganti, P.; Shavers, M. R.; McKay, Gordon A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Galactic cosmic rays (GCR) are of extra-solar origin consisting of high-energy hydrogen, helium, and heavy ions. The GCR are modified by physical processes as they traverse through the solar system, spacecraft shielding, atmospheres, and tissues producing copious amounts of secondary radiation including fragmentation products, neutrons, mesons, and muons. We discuss physical models and measurements relevant for estimating biological risks in space and high-altitude air travel. Ambient and internal spacecraft computational models for the International Space Station and a Mars mission are discussed. Risk assessment is traditionally based on linear addition of components. We discuss alternative models that include stochastic treatments of columnar damage by heavy ion tracks and multi-cellular damage following nuclear fragmentation in tissue.

  7. Classical-physics applications for Finsler b space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Josh; Lehnert, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    The Standard-Model Extension (SME) is a general effective field theory for Lorentz and CPT violation incorporating both the Standard Model and General Relativity. The SME provides a framework for experimental searches for Lorentz-violating effects and for the investigation of new physics. The classical propagation of certain Lorentz-violating fermions is known to be governed by geodesics of a four-dimensional pseudo-Finsler b space parametrized by a prescribed background covector field. This talk discusses some aspects of the relation between Finsler geometries and the SME, emphasizing the identification of systems in classical physics that are governed by the three-dimensional version of Finsler b space and the construction of geodesics for some sample background covectors. This work was supported in part by Indiana University's STARS program, by the National Science Foundation under the REU program, and by the Indiana University Center for Spacetime Symmetries under an IUCRG grant.

  8. Space Radiation and Manned Mission: Interface Between Physics and Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hei, Tom

    2012-07-01

    The natural radiation environment in space consists of a mixed field of high energy protons, heavy ions, electrons and alpha particles. Interplanetary travel to the International Space Station and any planned establishment of satellite colonies on other solar system implies radiation exposure to the crew and is a major concern to space agencies. With shielding, the radiation exposure level in manned space missions is likely to be chronic, low dose irradiation. Traditionally, our knowledge of biological effects of cosmic radiation in deep space is almost exclusively derived from ground-based accelerator experiments with heavy ions in animal or in vitro models. Radiobiological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation are subjected to modulations by various parameters including bystander effects, adaptive response, genomic instability and genetic susceptibility of the exposed individuals. Radiation dosimetry and modeling will provide conformational input in areas where data are difficult to acquire experimentally. However, modeling is only as good as the quality of input data. This lecture will discuss the interdependent nature of physics and biology in assessing the radiobiological response to space radiation.

  9. The Space Physics of Life: Searching for Biosignatures on Habitable Icy Worlds Affected by Space Weathering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John F.

    2006-01-01

    Accessible surfaces of the most likely astrobiological habitats (Mars, Europa, Titan) in the solar system beyond Earth are exposed to various chemical and hydrologic weathering processes directly or indirectly induced by interaction with the overlying space environment. These processes can be both beneficial, through provision of chemical compounds and energy, and destructive, through chemical dissociation or burial, to detectable presence of biosignatures. Orbital, suborbital, and surface platforms carrying astrobiological instrumentation must survive, and preferably exploit, space environment interactions to reach these habitats and search for evidence of life or its precursors. Experience from Mars suggests that any detection of biosignatures must be accompanied by characterization of the local chemical environment and energy sources including irradiation by solar ultraviolet photons and energetic particles from the space environment. Orbital and suborbital surveys of surface chemistry and astrobiological potential in the context of the space environment should precede targeted in-situ measurements to maximize probability of biosignature detection through site selection. The Space Physics of Life (SPOL) investigation has recently been proposed to the NASA Astrobiology Institute and is briefly described in this presentation. SPOL is the astrobiologically relevant study of the interactions and relationships of potentially? or previously inhabited, bodies of the solar system with the surrounding environments. This requires an interdisciplinary effort in space physics, planetary science, and radiation biology. The proposed investigation addresses the search for habitable environments, chemical resources to support life, and techniques for detection of organic and inorganic signs of life in the context of the space environment.

  10. Fluid physics, thermodynamics, and heat transfer experiments in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodge, F. T.; Abramson, H. N.; Angrist, S. W.; Catton, I.; Churchill, S. W.; Mannheimer, R. J.; Otrach, S.; Schwartz, S. H.; Sengers, J. V.

    1975-01-01

    An overstudy committee was formed to study and recommend fundamental experiments in fluid physics, thermodynamics, and heat transfer for experimentation in orbit, using the space shuttle system and a space laboratory. The space environment, particularly the low-gravity condition, is an indispensable requirement for all the recommended experiments. The experiments fell broadly into five groups: critical-point thermophysical phenomena, fluid surface dynamics and capillarity, convection at reduced gravity, non-heated multiphase mixtures, and multiphase heat transfer. The Committee attempted to assess the effects of g-jitter and other perturbations of the gravitational field on the conduct of the experiments. A series of ground-based experiments are recommended to define some of the phenomena and to develop reliable instrumentation.

  11. Physics in the magnetic configuration space of W7-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, J.; Beidler, C. D.; Feng, Y.; Maaßberg, H.; Marushchenko, N. B.; Turkin, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The neoclassical confinement and the bootstrap current are analysed in the configuration space of W7-X by self-consistent neoclassical transport simulations. Since the establishment of quasi-stationary operation is the most important goal for W7-X, the analysis concentrates on high-performance discharge scenarios in magnetic configurations which are adjusted so that bootstrap current vanishes, or, alternatively, on scenarios where the bootstrap current can be balanced by strong ECCD. Both scenarios lead to restrictions either in the configuration space or in plasma parameters and ECRH heating scenarios. Furthermore, the flexibility of the magnetic configuration space of W7-X is briefly described with emphasis on other physics topics of interest, for example, ballooning unstable configurations as well as configurations with a magnetic hill which might lead to interchange instability.

  12. Probing Planckian physics in de Sitter space with quantum correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Jun; Zhang, Yao-Zhong; Gould, Mark D.; Fan, Heng; Sun, Cheng-Yi; Yang, Wen-Li

    2014-12-15

    We study the quantum correlation and quantum communication channel of both free scalar and fermionic fields in de Sitter space, while the Planckian modification presented by the choice of a particular α-vacuum has been considered. We show the occurrence of degradation of quantum entanglement between field modes for an inertial observer in curved space, due to the radiation associated with its cosmological horizon. Comparing with standard Bunch–Davies choice, the possible Planckian physics causes some extra decrement on the quantum correlation, which may provide the means to detect quantum gravitational effects via quantum information methodology in future. Beyond single-mode approximation, we construct proper Unruh modes admitting general α-vacua, and find a convergent feature of both bosonic and fermionic entanglements. In particular, we show that the convergent points of fermionic entanglement negativity are dependent on the choice of α. Moreover, an one-to-one correspondence between convergent points H{sub c} of negativity and zeros of quantum capacity of quantum channels in de Sitter space has been proved. - Highlights: • Quantum correlation and quantum channel in de Sitter space are studied. • Gibbons–Hawking effect causes entanglement degradation for static observer. • Planckian physics causes extra decrement on quantum correlation. • Convergent feature of negativity relies on the choice of alpha-vacua. • Link between negativity convergence and quantum channel capacity is given.

  13. Space physics games and simulations for informal education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harold, J.; Dusenbery, P.

    2008-12-01

    We will demonstrate and discuss several game and simulation based plasma physics education products. Developed using NSF education supplements and the long running Space Weather Outreach Program at the Space Science Institute, these activities range from a "mini-golf" game that uses research grade particle pushing algorithms, to a "whack the Earth" coronal mass ejection activity. These games have their roots in "informal" education settings: as a result they assume a short interaction time by the visitor (as compared to traditional classroom experiences), and they cannot assume a particular level of prior knowledge. On the other hand, as web based activities they have a tremendous reach, and are easily available for any instructor interested in using them in classroom environments. Several of the activities have also been programmed to collect data on the visitors' interactions, giving us a window in to both visitor engagement and the degree to which the activities accomplish their learning goals. In addition to exploring these results, we will discuss the next stage in the Space Weather Outreach Program, where we will explore the ability of a series of short games to build the necessary prior knowledge base for acquiring a firm grasp on basic space physics concepts.

  14. An Absolute Phase Space for the Physicality of Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, John S.

    2010-12-22

    We define an abstract and absolute phase space (''APS'') for sub-quantum intrinsic wave states, in three axes, each mapping directly to a duality having fundamental ontological basis. Many aspects of quantum physics emerge from the interaction algebra and a model deduced from principles of 'unique solvability' and 'identifiable entity', and we reconstruct previously abstract fundamental principles and phenomena from these new foundations. The physical model defines bosons as virtual continuous waves pairs in the APS, and fermions as real self-quantizing snapshots of those waves when simple conditions are met. The abstraction and physical model define a template for the constitution of all fermions, a template for all the standard fundamental bosons and their local interactions, in a common framework and compactified phase space for all forms of real matter and virtual vacuum energy, and a distinct algebra for observables and unobservables. To illustrate our scheme's potential, we provide examples of slit experiment variations (where the model finds theoretical basis for interference only occurring between two final sources), QCD (where we may model most attributes known to QCD, and a new view on entanglement), and we suggest approaches for other varied applications. We believe this is a viable candidate for further exploration as a foundational proposition for physics.

  15. An Absolute Phase Space for the Physicality of Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, John S.

    2010-12-01

    We define an abstract and absolute phase space ("APS") for sub-quantum intrinsic wave states, in three axes, each mapping directly to a duality having fundamental ontological basis. Many aspects of quantum physics emerge from the interaction algebra and a model deduced from principles of `unique solvability' and `identifiable entity', and we reconstruct previously abstract fundamental principles and phenomena from these new foundations. The physical model defines bosons as virtual continuous waves pairs in the APS, and fermions as real self-quantizing snapshots of those waves when simple conditions are met. The abstraction and physical model define a template for the constitution of all fermions, a template for all the standard fundamental bosons and their local interactions, in a common framework and compactified phase space for all forms of real matter and virtual vacuum energy, and a distinct algebra for observables and unobservables. To illustrate our scheme's potential, we provide examples of slit experiment variations (where the model finds theoretical basis for interference only occurring between two final sources), QCD (where we may model most attributes known to QCD, and a new view on entanglement), and we suggest approaches for other varied applications. We believe this is a viable candidate for further exploration as a foundational proposition for physics.

  16. Plasma physics and the 2013-2022 decadal survey in solar and space physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Daniel N.

    2016-11-01

    The U.S. National Academies established in 2011 a steering committee to develop a comprehensive strategy for solar and space physics research. This updated and extended the first (2003) solar and space physics decadal survey. The latest decadal study implemented a 2008 Congressional directive to NASA for the fields of solar and space physics, but also addressed research in other federal agencies. The new survey broadly canvassed the fields of research to determine the current state of the discipline, identified the most important open scientific questions, and proposed the measurements and means to obtain them so as to advance the state of knowledge during the years 2013-2022. Research in this field has sought to understand: dynamical behaviour of the Sun and its heliosphere; properties of the space environments of the Earth and other solar system bodies; multiscale interaction between solar system plasmas and the interstellar medium; and energy transport throughout the solar system and its impact on the Earth and other solar system bodies. Research in solar and space plasma processes using observation, theory, laboratory studies, and numerical models has offered the prospect of understanding this interconnected system well enough to develop a predictive capability for operational support of civil and military space systems. We here describe the recommendations and strategic plans laid out in the 2013-2022 decadal survey as they relate to measurement capabilities and plasma physical research. We assess progress to date. We also identify further steps to achieve the Survey goals with an emphasis on plasma physical aspects of the program.

  17. Physics in the Real Universe: Time and Space-Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, George F. R.

    The block universe idea, representing space-time as a fixed whole, suggests the flow of time is an illusion: the entire Universe just is, with no special meaning attached to the present time. This paper points out that this view, in essence represented by usual space-time diagrams, is based on time-reversible microphysical laws, which fail to capture essential features of the time-irreversible macro-physical behaviour and the development of emergent complex systems, including life, which exist in the real Universe. When these are taken into account, the unchanging block Universe view of space-time is best replaced by an evolving block Universe which extends as time evolves, with the potential of the future continually becoming the certainty of the past; space-time itself evolves, as do the entities within it. However this time evolution is not related to any preferred surfaces in space-time; rather it is associated with the evolution of proper time along families of world lines.

  18. Space Commercial Opportunities for Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gavert, R.

    2000-01-01

    Microgravity research at NASA has been an undertaking that has included both science and commercial approaches since the late 80s and early 90s. The Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena community has been developed, through NASA's science grants, into a valuable base of expertise in microgravity science. This was achieved through both ground and flight scientific research. Commercial microgravity research has been primarily promoted thorough NASA sponsored Centers for Space Commercialization which develop cost sharing partnerships with industry. As an example, the Center for Advanced Microgravity Materials Processing (CAMMP)at Northeastern University has been working with cost sharing industry partners in developing Zeolites and zeo-type materials as an efficient storage medium for hydrogen fuel. Greater commercial interest is emerging. The U.S. Congress has passed the Commercial Space Act of 1998 to encourage the development of a commercial space industry in the United States. The Act has provisions for the commercialization of the International Space Station (ISS). Increased efforts have been made by NASA to enable industrial ventures on-board the ISS. A Web site has been established at http://commercial/nasa/gov which includes two important special announcements. One is an open request for entrepreneurial offers related to the commercial development and use of the ISS. The second is a price structure and schedule for U.S. resources and accommodations. The purpose of the presentation is to make the Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena community, which understands the importance of microgravity experimentation, aware of important aspects of ISS commercial development. It is a desire that this awareness will be translated into a recognition of Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena application opportunities coordinated through the broad contacts of this community with industry.

  19. Understanding space weather with new physical, mathematical and philosophical approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateev, Lachezar; Velinov, Peter; Tassev, Yordan

    2016-07-01

    The actual problems of solar-terrestrial physics, in particular of space weather are related to the prediction of the space environment state and are solved by means of different analyses and models. The development of these investigations can be considered also from another side. This is the philosophical and mathematical approach towards this physical reality. What does it constitute? We have a set of physical processes which occur in the Sun and interplanetary space. All these processes interact with each other and simultaneously participate in the general process which forms the space weather. Let us now consider the Leibniz's monads (G.W. von Leibniz, 1714, Monadologie, Wien; Id., 1710, Théodicée, Amsterdam) and use some of their properties. There are total 90 theses for monads in the Leibniz's work (1714), f.e. "(1) The Monad, of which we shall here speak, is nothing but a simple substance, which enters into compounds. By 'simple' is meant 'without parts'. (Theod. 10.); … (56) Now this connexion or adaptation of all created things to each and of each to all, means that each simple substance has relations which express all the others, and, consequently, that it is a perpetual living mirror of the universe. (Theod. 130, 360.); (59) … this universal harmony, according to which every substance exactly expresses all others through the relations it has with them. (63) … every Monad is, in its own way, a mirror of the universe, and the universe is ruled according to a perfect order. (Theod. 403.)", etc. Let us introduce in the properties of monads instead of the word "monad" the word "process". We obtain the following statement: Each process reflects all other processes and all other processes reflect this process. This analogy is not formal at all, it reflects accurately the relation between the physical processes and their unity. The category monad which in the Leibniz's Monadology reflects generally the philosophical sense is fully identical with the

  20. PREFACE: International Symposium on Physical Sciences in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Andreas; Egry, Ivan

    2011-12-01

    ISPS is the major international scientific forum for researchers in physics utilizing the space environment, in particular microgravity. It is intended to inspire and encourage cross-cutting discussions between different scientific communities working in the same environment. Contributions discussing results of experiments carried out on drop towers, parabolic aircraft flights, sounding rockets, unmanned recoverable capsules and, last but not least, the International Space Station ISS, are the backbone of this conference series, complemented by preparatory ground-based work, both experimentally and theoretically. The first International Symposium on Physical Sciences in Space (ISPS) sponsored by the International Microgravity Strategic Planning Group (IMSPG) took place in 2000 in Sorrento, Italy. IMSPG seeks to coordinate the planning of space for research in physical sciences by space agencies worldwide. AEB (Brazil), ASI (Italy), CNES (France), CSA (Canada), DLR (Germany), ESA (Europe), JAXA (Japan), NASA (USA), NSAU (Ukraine) and RSA (Russia) are members, and CNSA (China) and ISRO (India) are also invited to join IMSPG meetings. ISPS-4 was the fourth symposium in that series, following ISPS-2 organized by CSA in 2004 in Toronto, Canada, and ISPS-3 organized in 2007 by JAXA in Nara, Japan. ISPS-4 was jointly organized by ESA and DLR on behalf of the IMSPG and was held in Bonn from 11-15 July 2011. 230 participants from 17 different countries attended ISPS-4. Recent microgravity experiments were presented, analysed, and set in context to results from Earth bound experiments in 16 plenary and 68 topical talks. Lively discussions continued during two dedicated poster sessions and at the exhibition booths of space industry and research centers with new flight hardware on display. The oral presentations at ISPS4 were selected exclusively on the basis of scientific merit, as evidenced through the submitted abstracts. The selection was performed by the International

  1. Wireless avionics for space applications of fundamental physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Linna; Zeng, Guiming

    2016-07-01

    Fundamental physics (FP) research in space relies on a strong support of spacecraft. New types of spacecraft including reusable launch vehicles, reentry space vehicles, long-term on-orbit spacecraft or other new type of spacecraft will pave the way for FP missions. In order to test FP theories in space, flight conditions have to be controlled to a very high precision, data collection and handling abilities have to be improved, real-time and reliable communications in critical environments are needed. These challenge the existing avionics of spacecraft. Avionics consists of guidance, navigation & control, TT&C, the vehicle management, etc. Wireless avionics is one of the enabling technologies to address the challenges. Reasons are expatiated of why it is of great advantage. This paper analyses the demands for wireless avionics by reviewing the FP missions and on-board wireless systems worldwide. Main types of wireless communication are presented. Preliminary system structure of wireless avionics are given. The characteristics of wireless network protocols and wireless sensors are introduced. Key technologies and design considerations for wireless avionics in space applications are discussed.

  2. Physical sciences research plans for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.

    2003-01-01

    The restructuring of the research capabilities of the International Space Station has forced a reassessment of the Physical Sciences research plans and a re-targeting of the major scientific thrusts. The combination of already selected peer-reviewed flight investigations with the initiation of new research and technology programs will allow the maximization of the ISS scientific and technological potential. Fundamental and applied research will use a combination of ISS-based facilities, ground-based activities, and other experimental platforms to address issues impacting fundamental knowledge, industrial and medical applications on Earth, and the technology required for human space exploration. The current flight investigation research plan shows a large number of principal investigators selected to use the remaining planned research facilities. c2003 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Management of the Space Physics Analysis Network (SPAN)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James L.; Thomas, Valerie L.; Butler, Todd F.; Peters, David J.; Sisson, Patricia L.

    1990-01-01

    Here, the purpose is to define the operational management structure and to delineate the responsibilities of key Space Physics Analysis Network (SPAN) individuals. The management structure must take into account the large NASA and ESA science research community by giving them a major voice in the operation of the system. Appropriate NASA and ESA interfaces must be provided so that there will be adequate communications facilities available when needed. Responsibilities are delineated for the Advisory Committee, the Steering Committee, the Project Scientist, the Project Manager, the SPAN Security Manager, the Internetwork Manager, the Network Operations Manager, the Remote Site Manager, and others.

  4. Computational space physics as a capacity building tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toit Strauss, Du; Potgieter, Marius; Moeketsi, Daniel; Kopp, Andreas; Weigel, Bob

    2012-07-01

    Scientific capacity building consists of two parts: (1) Building research infrastructure (hardware) and (2) fostering the scientific know-how to use this infrastructure optimally (the software and application components). The latter is also referred to as human capital development and is the focus of this presentation. We will discuss a capacity building program for computational space physics that was successfully implemented in South Africa. We will also discuss the challenges that face such a program in developing countries and how this program can be used as a template for other developing regions.

  5. Balloon Programme of Indian Centre for Space Physics, Kolkata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Mondal, Sushanta Kumar; Palit, Sourav; Sarkar, Ritabrata; Bhowmick, Debashis

    2012-07-01

    Indian Centre for Space Physics has an independent balloon programme which includes launch, recovery, instrumentation and data analysis. So far, 20 missions have been sent and important data on Cosmic rays, muon detection and X-rays from the Sun have been obtained. We concentrate on weather balloons and miniature payloads. We present the feasibility of science with weather balloons by presenting data from on board accelerometers, gyroscopes, geiger counters, muon detectors and X-ray detectors. We also present examples of photos of cloud coverage, lunar shadow on earth during eclipse, etc. We claim that serious science could be done using our low cost approach.

  6. Data management, archiving, visualization and analysis of space physics data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.

    1995-01-01

    A series of programs for the visualization and analysis of space physics data has been developed at UCLA. In the course of those developments, a number of lessons have been learned regarding data management and data archiving, as well as data analysis. The issues now facing those wishing to develop such software, as well as the lessons learned, are reviewed. Modern media have eased many of the earlier problems of the physical volume required to store data, the speed of access, and the permanence of the records. However, the ultimate longevity of these media is still a question of debate. Finally, while software development has become easier, cost is still a limiting factor in developing visualization and analysis software.

  7. A Physical Model of the Metric Expansion of Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubenstein, John

    2010-02-01

    At the heart of IWPD's Scale Metrics (ISM) theory is the realization that any orthogonal relationship may be equivalently expressed as a linear relationship multiplied by a mathematical scalar. This has significance in the relationship of a worldline to its 4-Velocity and observed 3-Velocity, as well as in understanding the divergence between energy and momentum as invariant mass increases. Spacetime may be depicted by taking the time dimension within four-dimensional spacetime and rotating it until it becomes embedded as a line segment (or ring) within the three spatial dimensions. This allows velocity and momentum to be determined based upon a linear subtraction of physical entities multiplied by a mathematical scalar (X). We will provide evidence supporting the mathematical and physical significance of this scaling factor along with the benefits of ISM theory. This model provides a physical explanation of the metric expansion of space and defines the initial singularity present at the earliest moment of the universe. ISM theory addresses many of the current challenges in physics and makes predictions that are testable with technologies currently in place. )

  8. A Space Analysis of Physical Education Activity and Ancillary Areas in Big Ten Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strand, Bradford N.

    This study compared both physical education "Type A" (activity) space and ancillary space at the Big Ten Universities with the physical education space guidelines established in 1967 by the National Facilities Conference and the assigned guidelines for the seven ancillary space types. The data were obtained through the use of a questionnaire,…

  9. VLF Science at Indian Centre for Space Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Indian Centre for Space Physics has been monitoring VLF signals from stations around the world at its laboratories at Kolkata and Sitapur (Ionospheric and Earthquake Research Centre) as well as at several places throughout India when in a campaign mode. We have been interested to study high energy events from space, such as solar flares and gamma ray bursts. We have made studies during multiple solar eclipses and most importantly made substantial progress in the problem of lithosphere-ionosphere coupling while understanding various types of anomalies prior to major earthquakes. Other effects such as AGWs and LEPs are being studied. We have experience of two antarctic expedition and obtained VLF data from both Maitri and Bharati stations of India, which revealed, among other things, how the signal attenuation can indicate the extent of ice mass in Antarctica. We have been able to reproduce various VLF perturbation events using Atmospheric Chemical evolution model coupled with LWPC code. For instance we have reproduced solar flare induced VLF amplitude perturbation pattern by completely ab initio calculation. We also targeted the inverse problem, namely, deduction of the injected radiation spectra from space from the VLF signal alone, thereby establishing that the Earth can be used as a gigantic detector. These interesting results would be presented in my review talk.

  10. Atom optics and space physics: A summary of an 'Enrico Fermi' summer school

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimondo, Ennio; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst M.; Schleich, Wolfgang P.

    2008-03-01

    We describe the scientific content of the International School of Physics 'Enrico Fermi' on atom optics and space physics, organized by the Italian Physical Society in Varenna at Lake Como, Italy, 2-13 July 2007.

  11. Space plasma physics at the Applied Physics Laboratory over the past half-century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potemra, Thomas A.

    1992-01-01

    An overview is given of space-plasma experiments conducted at the Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) at Johns Hopkins University including observational campaigns and the instrumentation developed. Specific space-plasma experiments discussed include the study of the radiation environment in the Van Allen radiation belt with solid-state proton detectors. Also described are the 5E-1 satellites which acquired particle and magnetic-field data from earth orbit. The Triad satellite and its magnetometer system were developed for high-resolution studies of the earth's magnetic field, and APL contributions to NASA's Interplanetary Monitoring Platforms are listed. The review mentions the International Ultraviolet Explorer, the Atmosphere Explorer mission, and the Active Magnetic Particle Tracer Explorers mission. Other recent programs reviewed include a high-latitude satellite, contributions to the Voyager mission, and radar studies of space plasmas.

  12. Future L5 Missions for Solar Physics and Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auchere, Frederic; Gopalswamy, Nat

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and corotating interaction regions (CIR) are the sources of intense space weather in the heliosphere. Most of the current knowledge on CMEs accumulated over the past few decades has been derived from observations made from the Sun-Earth line, which is not the ideal vantage point to observe Earth-affecting CMEs (Gopalswamy et al., 2011a,b). In this paper, the advantages of remote-sensing and in-situ observations from the Sun-Earth L5 point are discussed. Locating a mission at Sun-Earth L5 has several key benefits for solar physics and space weather: (1) off the Sun-Earth line view is critical in observing Earth-arriving parts of CMEs, (2) L5 coronagraphic observations can also provide near-Sun space speed of CMEs, which is an important input to models that forecast Earth-arrival time of CMEs, (3) backside and frontside CMEs can be readily distinguished even without inner coronal imagers, (4) preceding CMEs in the path of Earth-affecting CMEs can be identified for a better estimate of the travel time, (5) CIRs reach the L5 point a few days before they arrive at Earth, and hence provide significant lead time before CIR arrival, (6) L5 observations can provide advance knowledge of CME and CIR source regions (coronal holes) rotating to Earth view, and (7) magnetograms obtained from L5 can improve the surface magnetic field distribution used as input to MHD models that predict the background solar wind. The paper also discusses L5 mission concepts that can be achieved in the near future. References Gopalswamy, N., Davila, J. M., St. Cyr, O. C., Sittler, E. C., Auchère, F., Duvall, T. L., Hoeksema, J. T., Maksimovic, M., MacDowall, R. J., Szabo, A., Collier, M. R. (2011a), Earth-Affecting Solar Causes Observatory (EASCO): A potential International Living with a Star Mission from Sun-Earth L5 JASTP 73, 658-663, DOI: 10.1016/j.jastp.2011.01.013 Gopalswamy, N., Davila, J. M., Auchère, F., Schou, J., Korendyke, C. M. Shih, A., Johnston, J. C

  13. Free-space optical channel estimation for physical layer security.

    PubMed

    Endo, Hiroyuki; Fujiwara, Mikio; Kitamura, Mitsuo; Ito, Toshiyuki; Toyoshima, Morio; Takayama, Yoshihisa; Takenaka, Hideki; Shimizu, Ryosuke; Laurenti, Nicola; Vallone, Giuseppe; Villoresi, Paolo; Aoki, Takao; Sasaki, Masahide

    2016-04-18

    We present experimental data on message transmission in a free-space optical (FSO) link at an eye-safe wavelength, using a testbed consisting of one sender and two receiver terminals, where the latter two are a legitimate receiver and an eavesdropper. The testbed allows us to emulate a typical scenario of physical-layer (PHY) security such as satellite-to-ground laser communications. We estimate information-theoretic metrics including secrecy rate, secrecy outage probability, and expected code lengths for given secrecy criteria based on observed channel statistics. We then discuss operation principles of secure message transmission under realistic fading conditions, and provide a guideline on a multi-layer security architecture by combining PHY security and upper-layer (algorithmic) security. PMID:27137325

  14. Free-space optical channel estimation for physical layer security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Hiroyuki; Fujiwara, Mikio; Kitamura, Mitsuo; Ito, Toshiyuki; Toyoshima, Morio; Takayama, Yoshihisa; Takenaka, Hideki; Shimizu, Ryosuke; Laurenti, Nicola; Vallone, Giuseppe; Villoresi, Paolo; Aoki, Takao; Sasaki, Masahide

    2016-04-01

    We present experimental data on message transmission in a free-space optical (FSO) link at an eye-safe wavelength, using a testbed consisting of one sender and two receiver terminals, where the latter two are a legitimate receiver and an eavesdropper. The testbed allows us to emulate a typical scenario of physical-layer (PHY) security such as satellite-to-ground laser communications. We estimate information-theoretic metrics including secrecy rate, secrecy outage probability, and expected code lengths for given secrecy criteria based on observed channel statistics. We then discuss operation principles of secure message transmission under realistic fading conditions, and provide a guideline on a multi-layer security architecture by combining PHY security and upper-layer (algorithmic) security.

  15. Biological and Physical Space Research Laboratory 2002 Science Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, P. A. (Editor); Robinson, M. B. (Editor); Murphy, K. L. (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    With the International Space Station Program approaching core complete, our NASA Headquarters sponsor, the new Code U Enterprise, Biological and Physical Research, is shifting its research emphasis from purely fundamental microgravity and biological sciences to strategic research aimed at enabling human missions beyond Earth orbit. Although we anticipate supporting microgravity research on the ISS for some time to come, our laboratory has been vigorously engaged in developing these new strategic research areas.This Technical Memorandum documents the internal science research at our laboratory as presented in a review to Dr. Ann Whitaker, MSFC Science Director, in July 2002. These presentations have been revised and updated as appropriate for this report. It provides a snapshot of the internal science capability of our laboratory as an aid to other NASA organizations and the external scientific community.

  16. The Clifford algebra of physical space and Dirac theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, Jayme, Jr.

    2016-09-01

    The claim found in many textbooks that the Dirac equation cannot be written solely in terms of Pauli matrices is shown to not be completely true. It is only true as long as the term β \\psi in the usual Dirac factorization of the Klein–Gordon equation is assumed to be the product of a square matrix β and a column matrix ψ. In this paper we show that there is another possibility besides this matrix product, in fact a possibility involving a matrix operation, and show that it leads to another possible expression for the Dirac equation. We show that, behind this other possible factorization is the formalism of the Clifford algebra of physical space. We exploit this fact, and discuss several different aspects of Dirac theory using this formalism. In particular, we show that there are four different possible sets of definitions for the parity, time reversal, and charge conjugation operations for the Dirac equation.

  17. Relativity Based on Physical Processes Rather Than Space-Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giese, Albrecht

    2013-09-01

    Physicists' understanding of relativity and the way it is handled is at present dominated by the interpretation of Albert Einstein, who related relativity to specific properties of space and time. The principal alternative to Einstein's interpretation is based on a concept proposed by Hendrik A. Lorentz, which uses knowledge of classical physics to explain relativistic phenomena. In this paper, we will show that on the one hand the Lorentz-based interpretation provides a simpler mathematical way of arriving at the known results for both Special and General Relativity. On the other hand, it is able to solve problems which have remained open to this day. Furthermore, a particle model will be presented, based on Lorentzian relativity, which explains the origin of mass without the use of the Higgs mechanism, based on the finiteness of the speed of light, and which provides the classical results for particle properties that are currently only accessible through quantum mechanics.

  18. Fast Magnetic Reconnection: Bridging Laboratory and Space Plasma Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2012-02-16

    Recent developments in experimental and theoretical studies of magnetic reconnection hold promise for providing solutions to outstanding problems in laboratory and space plasma physics. Examples include sawtooth crashes in tokamaks, substorms in the Earth’s Magnetosphere, eruptive solar flares, and more recently, fast reconnection in laser-produced high energy density plasmas. In each of these examples, a common and long-standing challenge has been to explain why fast reconnection proceeds rapidly from a relatively quiescent state. In this talk, we demonstrate the advantages of viewing these problems and their solutions from a common perspective. We focus on some recent, surprising discoveries regarding the role of secondary plasmoid instabilities of thin current sheets. Nonlinearly, these instabilities lead to fast reconnection rates that are very weakly dependent on the Lundquist number of the plasma.

  19. Free-space optical channel estimation for physical layer security.

    PubMed

    Endo, Hiroyuki; Fujiwara, Mikio; Kitamura, Mitsuo; Ito, Toshiyuki; Toyoshima, Morio; Takayama, Yoshihisa; Takenaka, Hideki; Shimizu, Ryosuke; Laurenti, Nicola; Vallone, Giuseppe; Villoresi, Paolo; Aoki, Takao; Sasaki, Masahide

    2016-04-18

    We present experimental data on message transmission in a free-space optical (FSO) link at an eye-safe wavelength, using a testbed consisting of one sender and two receiver terminals, where the latter two are a legitimate receiver and an eavesdropper. The testbed allows us to emulate a typical scenario of physical-layer (PHY) security such as satellite-to-ground laser communications. We estimate information-theoretic metrics including secrecy rate, secrecy outage probability, and expected code lengths for given secrecy criteria based on observed channel statistics. We then discuss operation principles of secure message transmission under realistic fading conditions, and provide a guideline on a multi-layer security architecture by combining PHY security and upper-layer (algorithmic) security.

  20. The Clifford algebra of physical space and Dirac theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, Jayme, Jr.

    2016-09-01

    The claim found in many textbooks that the Dirac equation cannot be written solely in terms of Pauli matrices is shown to not be completely true. It is only true as long as the term β \\psi in the usual Dirac factorization of the Klein-Gordon equation is assumed to be the product of a square matrix β and a column matrix ψ. In this paper we show that there is another possibility besides this matrix product, in fact a possibility involving a matrix operation, and show that it leads to another possible expression for the Dirac equation. We show that, behind this other possible factorization is the formalism of the Clifford algebra of physical space. We exploit this fact, and discuss several different aspects of Dirac theory using this formalism. In particular, we show that there are four different possible sets of definitions for the parity, time reversal, and charge conjugation operations for the Dirac equation.

  1. Immersive Visualization for Space Physics Science and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiff, P. H.; Sumners, C. T.; Kessel, R. L.

    2004-12-01

    The development of new, relatively inexpensive immersive projection technologies (and portable inflatable fulldome theatres) have now allowed new ways of visualizing data and models. Students can be surrounded by moving imagery, allowing them to experience (and not just be told) about spatial and temporal variations, such as the dance of a Cluster orbit or the compression of field lines during a solar storm. Common misconceptions (such as the reason for the season) can be eliminated by experiences. Fulldome shows also allow a new exciting venue to bring space physics to the planetarium, a venue previously only showing starfields and planets. Now CMEs and solar storms can sweep over the public. New animation and visualization tools have been developed to maximize the experience, including riding on Cluster through an orbit while listening to the data stream from the four spacecraft. A demonstration of the immersive dome in action will be done if possible.

  2. SPASE: The Connection Among Solar and Space Physics Data Centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieman, James R.; King, Todd A.; Roberts, D. Aaron

    2011-01-01

    The Space Physics Archive Search and Extract (SPASE) project is an international collaboration among Heliophysics (solar and space physics) groups concerned with data acquisition and archiving. Within this community there are a variety of old and new data centers, resident archives, "virtual observatories", etc. acquiring, holding, and distributing data. A researcher interested in finding data of value for his or her study faces a complex data environment. The SPASE group has simplified the search for data through the development of the SPASE Data Model as a common method to describe data sets in the various archives. The data model is an XML-based schema and is now in operational use. There are both positives and negatives to this approach. The advantage is the common metadata language enabling wide-ranging searches across the archives, but it is difficult to inspire the data holders to spend the time necessary to describe their data using the Model. Software tools have helped, but the main motivational factor is wide-ranging use of the standard by the community. The use is expanding, but there are still other groups who could benefit from adopting SPASE. The SPASE Data Model is also being expanded in the sense of providing the means for more detailed description of data sets with the aim of enabling more automated ingestion and use of the data through detailed format descriptions. We will discuss the present state of SPASE usage and how we foresee development in the future. The evolution is based on a number of lessons learned - some unique to Heliophysics, but many common to the various data disciplines.

  3. Services, Perspective and Directions of the Space Physics Data Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGuire, Robert E.; Bilitza, Dieter; Candey, Reine A.; Chimiak, Reine A.; Cooper, John F.; Fung, Shing F.; Harris, Bernard T.; Johnson, Rita C.; King, Joseph H.; Kovalick, Tamara; Leckner, Howard A.; Liu, Michael H.; Papitashvili, Natalia E.; Roberts, D. Aaron

    2008-01-01

    The multi-mission data and orbit services of NASA's Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) project offer unique capabilities supporting science of the Heliophysics Great Observatory and that are highly complementary to other services now evolving in the international heliophysics data environment. The VSPO (Virtual Space Physics Observatory) service is an active portal to a wide rage of distributed data sources. CDAWeb (Coordinated Data Analysis Web) offers plots, listings and file downloads for current data from many missions across the boundaries of missions and instrument types. CDAWeb now includes extensive new data from STEREO and THEMIS, plus new ROCSAT IPEI data, the latest data from all four TIMED instruments and high-resolution data from all DE-2 experiments. SSCWeb, Helioweb and out 3D Animated Orbit Viewer (TIPSOD) provide position data and identification of spacecraft and ground conjunctions. OMNI Web, with its new extension to 1- and 5-minute resolution, provides interplanetary parameters at the Earth's bow shock. SPDF maintains NASA's CDF (Common Data Format) standard and a range of associated tools including format translation services. These capabilities are all now available through web services based APIs, one element in SPDF's ongoing work to enable heliophysics community development of Virtual discipline Observatories (e.g. VITMO). We will demonstrate out latest data and capabilities, review the lessons we continue to learn in what science users need and value in this class of services, and discuss out current thinking to the future role and appropriate focus of the SPDF effort in the evolving and increasingly distributed heliophysics data environment.

  4. The cloud imaging and particle size experiment on the aeronomy of ice in the mesosphere mission: Cloud morphology for the northern 2007 season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusch, D. W.; Thomas, G. E.; McClintock, W.; Merkel, A. W.; Bailey, S. M.; Russell, J. M., III; Randall, C. E.; Jeppesen, C.; Callan, M.

    2009-03-01

    The Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) mission was launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California at 4:26:03 EDT on April 25, 2007, becoming the first satellite mission dedicated to the study of noctilucent clouds (NLCs), also known as polar mesospheric clouds (PMC) when viewed from space. We present the first results from one of the three instruments on board the satellite, the Cloud Imaging and Particle Size (CIPS) instrument. CIPS has produced detailed morphology of the Northern 2007 PMC and Southern 2007/2008 seasons with 5 km horizontal spatial resolution. CIPS, with its very large angular field of view, images cloud structures at multiple scattering angles within a narrow spectral bandpass centered at 265 nm. Spatial coverage is 100% above about 70° latitude, where camera views overlap from orbit to orbit, and terminates at about 82°. Spatial coverage decreases to about 50% at the lowest latitudes where data are collected (35°). Cloud structures have for the first time been mapped out over nearly the entire summertime polar region. These structures include [`]ice rings', spatially small but bright clouds, and large regions ([`]ice-free regions') in the heart of the cloud season essentially devoid of ice particles. The ice rings bear a close resemblance to tropospheric convective outflow events, suggesting a point source of mesospheric convection. These rings (often circular arcs) are most likely Type IV NLC ([`]whirls' in the standard World Meteorological Organization (WMO) nomenclature).

  5. Low Cost Balloon programme of Indian Centre for Space Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Indian Centre for Space Physics has launched 89 Missions to near space using single or multiple weather balloons or very light plastic balloons. Basic goal was to capitalize miniaturization of equipments in modern ages. Our typical payload of less than 4kg weight consists of GPS, video camera, cosmic ray detectors, Attitude measurement unit, sunsensor and most importantly a 50-100sqcm X-ray/Gamma-ray detector (usually a scintillator type). The main purpose of the latter is to study spectra of secondary cosmic ray spectra (till our ceiling altitude of 36-42km) over the years and their seasonal variation or variation with solar cycle. We also study solar X-ray spectra, especially of solar flares. We have detected a Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) and pulsars. Our observation of black hole candidates did not yield satisfactory result yet mainly because of poor collimation (~ 10 deg x 10 deg) by lead collimator which introduces strong background also. Our effort with multiple balloon flights enabled us to have long duration flights. We believe that our procedure is very futuristic and yet at an affordable cost.

  6. Physics of Colloids in Space (PCS) Flight Hardware Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koudelka, John M.

    2001-01-01

    investigation that will be located in an Expedite the Process of Experiments to Space Station (EXPRESS) Rack. The investigation will be conducted in the International Space Station U.S. laboratory, Destiny, over a period of approximately 10 months during the station assembly period from flight 6A through flight UF-2. This experiment will gather data on the basic physical properties of colloids by studying three different colloid systems with the objective of understanding how they grow and what structures they form. A colloidal suspension consists of fine particles (micrometer to submicrometer) suspended in a fluid for example, paints, milk, salad dressings, and aerosols. The long-term goal of this investigation is to learn how to steer the growth of colloidal suspensions to create new materials and new structures. This experiment is part of a two-stage investigation conceived by Professor David Weitz of Harvard University along with Professor Peter Pusey of the University of Edinburgh. The experiment hardware was developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center through contracts with Dynacs, Inc., and ZIN Technologies.

  7. Dusty Plasma Physics Facility for the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goree, John; Hahn, Inseob

    2015-09-01

    The Dusty Plasma Physics Facility (DPPF) is an instrument planned for the International Space Station (ISS). If approved by NASA, JPL will build and operate the facility, and NASA will issue calls for proposals allowing investigators outside JPL to carry out research, public education, and outreach. Microgravity conditions on the ISS will be useful for eliminating two unwanted effects of gravity: sedimentation of dust particles to the bottom of a plasma chamber, and masking weak forces such as the ion drag force that act on dust particles. The DPPF facility is expected to support multiple scientific users. It will have a modular design, with a scientific locker, or insert, that can be exchanged without removing the entire facility. The first insert will use a parallel-plate radio-frequency discharge, polymer microspheres, and high-speed video cameras. This first insert will be designed for fundamental physics experiments. Possible future inserts could be designed for other purposes, such as engineering applications, and experimental simulations of astrophysical or geophysical conditions. The design of the facility will allow remote operation from ground-based laboratories, using telescience.

  8. An implementation plan for priorities in solar-system space physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Athay, R. Grant; Baker, Daniel; Fisk, Lennard A.; Fredricks, Robert W.; Harvey, John W.; Jokipii, Jack R.; Kivelson, Margaret; Mendillo, Michael; Nagy, Andrew F.

    1985-01-01

    The scientific objectives and implementation plans and priorities of the Space Science Board in areas of solar physics, heliospheric physics, magnetospheric physics, upper atmosphere physics, solar-terrestrial coupling, and comparative planetary studies are discussed and recommended programs are summarized. Accomplishments of Skylab, Solar Maximum Mission, Nimbus-7, and 11 other programs are highlighted. Detailed mission plans in areas of solar and heliospheric physics, plasma physics, and upper atmospheric physics are also described.

  9. Putting Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) Services to Good Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candey, R. M.; Bilitza, D.; Chimiak, R.; Cooper, J. F.; Garcia, L. N.; Harris, B.; Johnson, R. C.; King, J. H.; Kovalick, T.; Leckner, H.; Liu, M.; McGuire, R. E.; Papitashvili, N. E.; Roberts, A.

    2009-12-01

    The Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) project provides heliophysics science-enabling information services and is the most widely used single access point to heliophysics science data and orbits from NASA's solar-heliospheric satellite missions. Our emphasis has been on active service of the best digital data products and key ancillary information with graphics, listings and production of subsetted or merged files (mass downloads or parameter-specific selections). Our services today include the: (1) Heliophysics Resource Gateway (HRG) data finding service (also known as the Virtual Space Physics Observatory or VSPO); (2) Data services including the Coordinated Data Analysis Web (CDAWeb), OMNIweb compilation of interplanetary parameters (mapped to the Earth's bow shock) and related indices, and their large underlying collection of datasets; (3) Orbit information and display services including the Satellite Situation Center (SSCweb) and the 4D Orbit Viewer interactive Java client; and the (4) Common Data Format (CDF) software library and file format and science file format translation suite. (5) Upcoming is the Heliospheric Event List Manager (HELM) to coordinate lists of interesting events and provide a mechanism for tying together the above services and others. We describe several research projects that heavily used SPDF's services and resulted in publications. Although not actually all used at once, the following research scenario shows how SPDF and VxO services can be combined for studying solar events that produce energetic particles and effects at Earth: use the HRG/VPSO to locate data of interest, perhaps query OMNIWeb for times when energetic particle solar activity is high and query the SSCWeb orbit location service for when Cluster, Geotail, Polar/IMAGE are in position to measure the cusp, magnetotail and the Earth's aurora, respectively. Also query SSCweb for times when Polar and magnetometer ground stations are on the same field lines. Using these times

  10. Neighbourhood green space, physical function and participation in physical activities among elderly men: the Caerphilly Prospective study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The built environment in which older people live plays an important role in promoting or inhibiting physical activity. Most work on this complex relationship between physical activity and the environment has excluded people with reduced physical function or ignored the difference between groups with different levels of physical function. This study aims to explore the role of neighbourhood green space in determining levels of participation in physical activity among elderly men with different levels of lower extremity physical function. Method Using data collected from the Caerphilly Prospective Study (CaPS) and green space data collected from high resolution Landmap true colour aerial photography, we first investigated the effect of the quantity of neighbourhood green space and the variation in neighbourhood vegetation on participation in physical activity for 1,010 men aged 66 and over in Caerphilly county borough, Wales, UK. Second, we explored whether neighbourhood green space affects groups with different levels of lower extremity physical function in different ways. Results Increasing percentage of green space within a 400 meters radius buffer around the home was significantly associated with more participation in physical activity after adjusting for lower extremity physical function, psychological distress, general health, car ownership, age group, marital status, social class, education level and other environmental factors (OR = 1.21, 95% CI 1.05, 1.41). A statistically significant interaction between the variation in neighbourhood vegetation and lower extremity physical function was observed (OR = 1.92, 95% CI 1.12, 3.28). Conclusion Elderly men living in neighbourhoods with more green space have higher levels of participation in regular physical activity. The association between variation in neighbourhood vegetation and regular physical activity varied according to lower extremity physical function. Subjects reporting poor lower extremity

  11. Physics of Gravitational Interaction: Geometry of Space or Quantum Field in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baryshev, Yurij

    2006-03-01

    Thirring-Feynman's tensor field approach to gravitation opens new understanding on the physics of gravitational interaction and stimulates novel experiments on the nature of gravity. According to Field Gravity, the universal gravity force is caused by exchange of gravitons - the quanta of gravity field. Energy of this field is well-defined and excludes the singularity. All classical relativistic effects are the same as in General Relativity. The intrinsic scalar (spin 0) part of gravity field corresponds to ``antigravity'' and only together with the pure tensor (spin 2) part gives the usual Newtonian force. Laboratory and astrophysical experiments which may test the predictions of FG, will be performed in near future. In particular, observations at gravity observatories with bar and interferometric detectors, like Explorer, Nautilus, LIGO and VIRGO, will check the predicted scalar gravitational waves from supernova explosions. New types of cosmological models in Minkowski space are possible too.

  12. Public open space, physical activity, urban design and public health: Concepts, methods and research agenda.

    PubMed

    Koohsari, Mohammad Javad; Mavoa, Suzanne; Villanueva, Karen; Sugiyama, Takemi; Badland, Hannah; Kaczynski, Andrew T; Owen, Neville; Giles-Corti, Billie

    2015-05-01

    Public open spaces such as parks and green spaces are key built environment elements within neighbourhoods for encouraging a variety of physical activity behaviours. Over the past decade, there has been a burgeoning number of active living research studies examining the influence of public open space on physical activity. However, the evidence shows mixed associations between different aspects of public open space (e.g., proximity, size, quality) and physical activity. These inconsistencies hinder the development of specific evidence-based guidelines for urban designers and policy-makers for (re)designing public open space to encourage physical activity. This paper aims to move this research agenda forward, by identifying key conceptual and methodological issues that may contribute to inconsistencies in research examining relations between public open space and physical activity.

  13. Public open space, physical activity, urban design and public health: Concepts, methods and research agenda.

    PubMed

    Koohsari, Mohammad Javad; Mavoa, Suzanne; Villanueva, Karen; Sugiyama, Takemi; Badland, Hannah; Kaczynski, Andrew T; Owen, Neville; Giles-Corti, Billie

    2015-05-01

    Public open spaces such as parks and green spaces are key built environment elements within neighbourhoods for encouraging a variety of physical activity behaviours. Over the past decade, there has been a burgeoning number of active living research studies examining the influence of public open space on physical activity. However, the evidence shows mixed associations between different aspects of public open space (e.g., proximity, size, quality) and physical activity. These inconsistencies hinder the development of specific evidence-based guidelines for urban designers and policy-makers for (re)designing public open space to encourage physical activity. This paper aims to move this research agenda forward, by identifying key conceptual and methodological issues that may contribute to inconsistencies in research examining relations between public open space and physical activity. PMID:25779691

  14. INSPIRE: Interactive NASA Space Physics Ionosphere Radio Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzen, K. A.; Garcia, L. N.; Webb, P. A.; Green, J. L.

    2007-12-01

    The INSPIRE Project is a non-profit scientific and educational corporation whose objective is to bring the excitement of observing very low frequency (VLF) natural radio waves to high school students. Underlying this objective is the conviction that science and technology are the underpinnings of our modern society, and that only with an understanding of these disciplines can people make correct decisions in their lives. Since 1989, the INSPIRE Project has provided specially designed radio receiver kits to over 2,500 students and other groups to make observations of signals in the VLF frequency range. These kits provide an innovative and unique opportunity for students to actively gather data that can be used in a basic research project. Natural VLF emissions that can be studied with the INSPIRE receiver kits include sferics, tweeks, whistlers, and chorus, which originate from phenomena such as lightning. These emissions can either come from the local atmospheric environment within a few tens of kilometers of the receiver or from outer space thousands of kilometers from the Earth. VLF emissions are at such low frequencies that they can be received, amplified and turned into sound that we can hear, with each emission producing in a distinctive sound. In 2006 INSPIRE was re-branded and its mission has expanded to developing new partnerships with multiple science projects. Links to magnetospheric physics, astronomy, and meteorology are being identified. This presentation will introduce the INSPIRE project, display the INSPIRE receiver kits, show examples of the types of VLF emissions that can be collected and provide information on scholarship programs being offered.

  15. Stealth CMEs: A Challenge for Solar Physics and Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, N.; Srivastava, N.

    2013-12-01

    It is commonly believed that coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are a primary driver of intense disturbances in the inner heliosphere. Although many of these CMEs are associated with clear solar transient phenomena such as flares, there have been a number of events without unambiguous solar origin, presenting a significant challenge not only for solar physics research, but also for space weather forecasts. For example, nearly 20% of major geomagnetic storms in solar cycle 23 that involved the interplanetary counterparts of CMEs (i.e., ICMEs) did not leave compelling signatures in EUV or X-ray images. We now tend to consider such orphan CMEs to be 'stealth' CMEs as first identified in data from the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) during last solar minimum. In the meantime the sensitivity of coronal observations has been tremendously improved as the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) was launched in February 2010; SDO carries the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), which provides high-cadence, full-disk images in a broad temperature range as sampled in EUV wavelengths. In principle, AIA should allow us to trace the origin of every Earth-directed CME observed as a limb event by the coronagraphs (COR-1, COR-2, HI-1 and HI-2) on STEREO. In reality, however, we have at least a handful of ICMEs whose origin may not clearly be tracked down to the low corona. Some of them were indeed geo-effective, further complicated by other factors including co-rotating interaction regions (CIRs). Here we give a survey of these events, discussing AIA and STEREO observations of their onsets and propagations in reference to their in-situ manifestations. We list key questions that should be answered by observational and modeling work in order to get more solid understanding of the origin of geomagnetic storms.

  16. Protein Crystals Grow Purer in Space: Physics of Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, Alex A.

    2000-01-01

    This presentation will summarize the quantitative experimental and theoretical results obtained by B.R. Thomas, P.G. Vekilov, D.C. Carter, A.M. Holmes, W.K. Widierow and the Author, the team with expertise in physics, biochemistry, crystallography and engineering. Impurities inhomogeneously trapped by a growing crystal - e.g., producing sectorial structure and/or striations - may induce macroscopic internal stress in it if an impurity molecule has slightly (less than 10%) different shape or volume than the regular one(s) they replace. We tested for the first time plasticity and measured Young modulus E of the triclinic, not cross-linked lysozyme by triple point bending technique. Triclinic lysozyme crystals are purely elastic with E similar or equal to 1/5 (raised dot) 10 (exp 9) partial derivative yn/sq cm. The strength limit, sigma (sub c) similar or equal to 10 (exp -3)E similar or equal to Epsilon (sub c), where sigma (sub c) and epsilon (sub c) are critical stress and strain, respectively. Scaling E and sigma (sub c) with the lattice spacing suggests similar binding stiffness in inorganic and biomolecular crystals. The inhomogeneous internal stress may be resolved in these brittle crystals either by cracking or by creation of misoriented mosaic blocks during, not after growth. If each impurity molecule induces in the lattice elementary strain epsilon (sub 0) similar or equal to 3 (raised dot) 10 (exp -2) (this is maximal elementary strain that can arise at the supersaturation DELTA mu/kT similar or equal to 2 and macroscopic molecular concentration difference between subsequent macrolayers or growth sectors is partial derivativeC similar or equal to 5 (raised dot) 10 (exp -3), the internal strain epsilon similar or equal to epsilon (sub 0) partial derivative C similar or equal to 10 (exp -4). Mosaic misorientation resolving such strain is approximately 30 arcsec. Tenfold increase of impurity concentration may cause cracking. Estimates of stress in an isometric

  17. Parallelization of the Physical-Space Statistical Analysis System (PSAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, J. W.; Guo, J.; Lyster, P. M.

    1999-01-01

    Atmospheric data assimilation is a method of combining observations with model forecasts to produce a more accurate description of the atmosphere than the observations or forecast alone can provide. Data assimilation plays an increasingly important role in the study of climate and atmospheric chemistry. The NASA Data Assimilation Office (DAO) has developed the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System (GEOS DAS) to create assimilated datasets. The core computational components of the GEOS DAS include the GEOS General Circulation Model (GCM) and the Physical-space Statistical Analysis System (PSAS). The need for timely validation of scientific enhancements to the data assimilation system poses computational demands that are best met by distributed parallel software. PSAS is implemented in Fortran 90 using object-based design principles. The analysis portions of the code solve two equations. The first of these is the "innovation" equation, which is solved on the unstructured observation grid using a preconditioned conjugate gradient (CG) method. The "analysis" equation is a transformation from the observation grid back to a structured grid, and is solved by a direct matrix-vector multiplication. Use of a factored-operator formulation reduces the computational complexity of both the CG solver and the matrix-vector multiplication, rendering the matrix-vector multiplications as a successive product of operators on a vector. Sparsity is introduced to these operators by partitioning the observations using an icosahedral decomposition scheme. PSAS builds a large (approx. 128MB) run-time database of parameters used in the calculation of these operators. Implementing a message passing parallel computing paradigm into an existing yet developing computational system as complex as PSAS is nontrivial. One of the technical challenges is balancing the requirements for computational reproducibility with the need for high performance. The problem of computational

  18. Heliospheric Physics and NASA's Vision for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.

    2007-01-01

    The Vision for Space Exploration outlines NASA's development of a new generation of human-rated launch vehicles to replace the Space Shuttle and an architecture for exploring the Moon and Mars. The system--developed by the Constellation Program--includes a near term (approx. 2014) capability to provide crew and cargo service to the International Space Station after the Shuttle is retired in 2010 and a human return to the Moon no later than 2020. Constellation vehicles and systems will necessarily be required to operate efficiently, safely, and reliably in the space plasma and radiation environments of low Earth orbit, the Earth's magnetosphere, interplanetary space, and on the lunar surface. This presentation will provide an overview of the characteristics of space radiation and plasma environments relevant to lunar programs including the trans-lunar injection and trans-Earth injection trajectories through the Earth's radiation belts, solar wind surface dose and plasma wake charging environments in near lunar space, energetic solar particle events, and galactic cosmic rays and discusses the design and operational environments being developed for lunar program requirements to assure that systems operate successfully in the space environment.

  19. Validating Physics-based Space Weather Models for Operational Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gombosi, Tamas; Singer, Howard; Millward, George; Toth, Gabor; Welling, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    The Geospace components of the Space Weather Modeling Framework developed at the University of Michigan is presently transitioned to operational use by the NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center. This talk will discuss the various ways the model is validated and skill scores are calculated.

  20. Research in space science and technology. [including X-ray astronomy and interplanetary plasma physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckley, L. E.

    1977-01-01

    Progress in various space flight research programs is reported. Emphasis is placed on X-ray astronomy and interplanetary plasma physics. Topics covered include: infrared astronomy, long base line interferometry, geological spectroscopy, space life science experiments, atmospheric physics, and space based materials and structures research. Analysis of galactic and extra-galactic X-ray data from the Small Astronomy Satellite (SAS-3) and HEAO-A and interplanetary plasma data for Mariner 10, Explorers 47 and 50, and Solrad is discussed.

  1. Health physics innovations developed during Cassini for future space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickell, Rod; Rutherford, Theresa; Marmaro, George

    1999-01-01

    There has been a long history of space missions involving Space Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) devices starting with the Transit 4A Spacecraft (1961), on through the Apollo, Pioneer, Viking, Voyager, Galileo, Ulysses, Mars Pathfinder, and most recently, Cassini (1997). All of these Major Radiological Source (MRS) missions were processed at the Kennedy Space Center/Cape Canaveral Air Station (KSC/CCAS) Launch Site in full compliance with program and regulatory requirements. The cumulative experience gained supporting these past missions has led to significant innovations which will be useful for bench-marking future MRS ground processing.

  2. Health physics innovations developed during Cassini for future space applications

    SciTech Connect

    Nickell, Rod; Rutherford, Theresa; Marmaro, George

    1999-01-22

    There has been a long history of space missions involving Space Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) devices starting with the Transit 4A Spacecraft (1961), on through the Apollo, Pioneer, Viking, Voyager, Galileo, Ulysses, Mars Pathfinder, and most recently, Cassini (1997). All of these Major Radiological Source (MRS) missions were processed at the Kennedy Space Center/Cape Canaveral Air Station (KSC/CCAS) Launch Site in full compliance with program and regulatory requirements. The cumulative experience gained supporting these past missions has led to significant innovations which will be useful for bench-marking future MRS ground processing.

  3. Physical phenomena related to crystal growth in the space environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, T. L.

    1973-01-01

    The mechanism of crystal growth which may be affected by the space environment was studied. Conclusions as to the relative technical and scientific advantages of crystal growth in space over earth bound growth, without regard to economic advantage, were deduced. It was concluded that the crucibleless technique will most directly demonstrate the unique effects of the greatly reduced gravity in the space environment. Several experiments, including crucibleless crystal growth using solar energy and determination of diffusion coefficients of common dopants in liquid silicon were recommended.

  4. Towards a Radiation Hardened Fluxgate Magnetometer for Space Physics Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, David M.

    Space-based measurements of the Earth's magnetic field are required to understand the plasma processes of the solar-terrestrial connection which energize the Van Allen radiation belts and cause space weather. This thesis describes a fluxgate magnetometer payload developed for the proposed Canadian Space Agencys Outer Radiation Belt Injection, Transport, Acceleration and Loss Satellite (ORBITALS) mission. The instrument can resolve 8 pT on a 65,000 nT field at 900 samples per second with a magnetic noise of less than 10 pT per square-root Hertz at 1 Hertz. The design can be manufactured from radiation tolerant (100 krad) space grade parts. A novel combination of analog temperature compensation and digital feedback simplifies and miniaturises the instrument while improving the measurement bandwidth and resolution. The prototype instrument was successfully validated at the Natural Resources Canada Geomagnetics Laboratory, and is being considered for future ground, satellite and sounding rocket applications.

  5. Precision Cosmic Ray physics with space-born experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Incagli, Marco

    2016-07-01

    More than 100 years after their discoveries, cosmic rays have been extensively studied, both with balloon experiments and with ground observatories. More recently, the possibility of mounting detectors on satellites or on the International Space Station has allowed for a long duration (several years) continuous observation of primary cosmic rays, i.e. before their interaction with the earth atmosphere, thus opening a new regime of precision measurements. In this review, recent results from major space experiments, as Pamela, AMS02 and Fermi, as well as next generation experiments proposed for the International Space Station, for standalone satellites or for the yet to come Chinese Space Station, will be presented. The impact of these experiment on the knowledge of Cosmic Ray propagation will also be discussed.

  6. Physical Examination to Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Employees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Nurse performs tonometry examination, which measure the tension of the eyeball, during an employee's arnual physical examination given by MSFC Occupational Medicine Environmental Health Services under the Center Operations Directorate.

  7. Predictions of space physics are difficult, especially when they are about the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassak, P.

    2015-12-01

    This talk is about the future of space physics, the broad field of study addressing how the sun works, its interaction with Earth and other planets via the solar wind and solar eruptions, and the region of interplanetary space out to the edge of the solar system. It is the chief field feeding into the development of tools for space weather prediction. Space physics is at an exciting - yet critical - time in its evolution. Scientifically, the capabilities afforded by new ground- and space-based observations and the rapidly increasing speed of supercomputing resources are leading to unprecedented progress in the field. Recently launched missions such as the Van Allen Probes and the Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) mission, and upcoming missions such as Solar Probe Plus and Solar Orbiter, will open doors to science not previously accessible through observations. Predicting the future of space physics is difficult; this talk will offer thoughts on the road forward.

  8. Activity space environment and dietary and physical activity behaviors: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Zenk, Shannon N; Schulz, Amy J; Matthews, Stephen A; Odoms-Young, Angela; Wilbur, JoEllen; Wegrzyn, Lani; Gibbs, Kevin; Braunschweig, Carol; Stokes, Carmen

    2011-09-01

    This study examined relationships among individual demographics, environmental features (e.g., fast food outlet density, park land use) of residential neighborhoods and activity spaces, and weight-related behaviors (diet, physical activity). Participants' movement was tracked for 7 days using global positioning systems (GPS). Two activity space measures (one standard deviation ellipse, daily path area) were derived from the GPS data. Activity spaces were generally larger than residential neighborhoods; environmental features of residential neighborhoods and activity spaces were weakly associated; and some activity space environmental features were related to dietary behaviors. Activity spaces may provide new insights into environmental influences on obesity-related behaviors.

  9. Activity Space Environment and Dietary and Physical Activity Behaviors: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Zenk, Shannon N.; Schulz, Amy J.; Matthews, Stephen A.; Odoms-Young, Angela; Wilbur, JoEllen; Wegrzyn, Lani; Gibbs, Kevin; Braunschweig, Carol; Stokes, Carmen

    2011-01-01

    This study examined relationships among individual demographics, environmental features (e.g., fast food outlet density, park land use) of residential neighborhoods and activity spaces, and obesity-related behaviors (diet, physical activity). Participants’ movement was tracked for seven days using global positioning systems (GPS). Two activity space measures (one standard deviation ellipse, daily path area) were derived from the GPS data. Activity spaces were generally larger than residential neighborhoods; environmental features of residential neighborhoods and activity spaces were weakly associated; and some activity space environmental features were related to dietary behaviors. Activity spaces may provide new insights into environmental influences on obesity-related behaviors. PMID:21696995

  10. Health Physics Innovations Developed During Cassini for Future Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickell, Rodney E.; Rutherford, Theresa M.; Marmaro, George M.

    1999-01-01

    The long history of space flight includes missions that used Space Nuclear Auxiliary Power devices, starting with the Transit 4A Spacecraft (1961), continuing through the Apollo, Pioneer, Viking, Voyager, Galileo, Ulysses, Mars Pathfinder, and most recently, Cassini (1997). All Major Radiological Source (MRS) missions were processed at Kennedy Space Center/Cape Canaveral Air Station (KSC/CCAS) Launch Site in full compliance with program and regulatory requirements. The cumulative experience gained supporting these past missions has led to significant innovations which will be useful for benchmarking future MRS mission ground processing. Innovations developed during ground support for the Cassini mission include official declaration of sealed-source classifications, utilization of a mobile analytical laboratory, employment of a computerized dosimetry record management system, and cross-utilization of personnel from related disciplines.

  11. Review of Nuclear Physics Experiments for Space Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Miller, Jack; Adamczyk, Anne M.; Heilbronn, Lawrence H.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Norman, Ryan B.; Guetersloh, Stephen B.; Zeitlin, Cary J.

    2011-01-01

    Human space flight requires protecting astronauts from the harmful effects of space radiation. The availability of measured nuclear cross section data needed for these studies is reviewed in the present paper. The energy range of interest for radiation protection is approximately 100 MeV/n to 10 GeV/n. The majority of data are for projectile fragmentation partial and total cross sections, including both charge changing and isotopic cross sections. The cross section data are organized into categories which include charge changing, elemental, isotopic for total, single and double differential with respect to momentum, energy and angle. Gaps in the data relevant to space radiation protection are discussed and recommendations for future experiments are made.

  12. Mission Statements, Physical Space, and Strategy in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fugazzotto, Sam J.

    2009-01-01

    The effectiveness of higher education institutions has bases in institutional structures and cultures. However, structure and culture represent abstract concepts while institutions realize high performance in practice. Given their salience in higher education, mission statements and campus space bring structure and culture into the realm of…

  13. Curricular, Relational, and Physical Spaces in the Japanese Hoikuen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Daniel E.; Kuby, Candace R.

    2015-01-01

    Recent scholarship looks at the relationship of learning to space and place within educational research. The purpose of this article was to put data produced from teaching in four Japanese preschools into conversation with spatial theory and Ma, a Japanese spatial esthetic. We seek to understand "how" and "what" spaces…

  14. Teacher Education Physical Education: In Search of a Hybrid Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    It is argued that a learning environment underpinned by a strengths-based collaborative approach between universities and schools offers extended pre-service teacher learning opportunities and subsequently enhanced preparation. The term "hybrid space" describes the ideal environment of shared partnership where knowledge is jointly…

  15. The association between objectively measured physical activity and life-space mobility among older people.

    PubMed

    Tsai, L-T; Portegijs, E; Rantakokko, M; Viljanen, A; Saajanaho, M; Eronen, J; Rantanen, T

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the association between objectively measured physical activity and life-space mobility in community-dwelling older people. Life-space refers to the spatial area a person purposefully moves through in daily life (bedroom, home, yard, neighborhood, town, and beyond) and life-space mobility to the frequency of travel and the help needed when moving through different life-space areas. The study population comprised community-living 75- to 90-year-old people {n = 174; median age 79.7 [interquartile range (IQR) 7.1]}, participating in the accelerometer substudy of Life-Space Mobility in Old Age (LISPE) project. Step counts and activity time were measured by an accelerometer (Hookie "AM20 Activity Meter") for 7 days. Life-space mobility was assessed with Life-Space Assessment (LSA) questionnaire. Altogether, 16% had a life-space area restricted to the neighborhood when moving independently. Participants with a restricted life space were less physically active and about 70% of them had exceptionally low values in daily step counts (≤ 615 steps) and moderate activity time (≤ 6.8 min). Higher step counts and activity time correlated positively with life-space mobility. Prospective studies are needed to clarify the temporal order of low physical activity level and restriction in life-space mobility.

  16. The Space Vehicle--Teaching Physics through Astronomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kibble, Bob

    1991-01-01

    Discussed are some areas of overlap between physics and astronomy. Topics include solar power, fusion reactions, atmospheric refraction, solar spectrum, Doppler effects, Hubble constant, quasars, redshift and the expanding universe, sunspots, sundial construction, solar spectroscopes, the moon, optics, wave theory, the history of science,…

  17. Review of nuclear physics experimental data for space radiation.

    PubMed

    Norbury, John W; Miller, Jack

    2012-11-01

    The available nuclear fragmentation data relevant to space radiation studies are reviewed. It is found that there are serious gaps in the data. Helium data are missing in the intervals 280 MeV n-3 GeV n and >15 GeV n. Carbon data are missing >15 GeV n. Iron projectile data are missing at all energies except in the interval 280 MeV n-3 GeV n.

  18. Physics in space-time with scale-dependent metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balankin, Alexander S.

    2013-10-01

    We construct three-dimensional space Rγ3 with the scale-dependent metric and the corresponding Minkowski space-time Mγ,β4 with the scale-dependent fractal (DH) and spectral (DS) dimensions. The local derivatives based on scale-dependent metrics are defined and differential vector calculus in Rγ3 is developed. We state that Mγ,β4 provides a unified phenomenological framework for dimensional flow observed in quite different models of quantum gravity. Nevertheless, the main attention is focused on the special case of flat space-time M1/3,14 with the scale-dependent Cantor-dust-like distribution of admissible states, such that DH increases from DH=2 on the scale ≪ℓ0 to DH=4 in the infrared limit ≫ℓ0, where ℓ0 is the characteristic length (e.g. the Planck length, or characteristic size of multi-fractal features in heterogeneous medium), whereas DS≡4 in all scales. Possible applications of approach based on the scale-dependent metric to systems of different nature are briefly discussed.

  19. Moving through Life-Space Areas and Objectively Measured Physical Activity of Older People

    PubMed Central

    Portegijs, Erja; Tsai, Li-Tang; Rantanen, Taina; Rantakokko, Merja

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Physical activity–an important determinant of health and function in old age–may vary according to the life-space area reached. Our aim was to study how moving through greater life-space areas is associated with greater physical activity of community-dwelling older people. The association between objectively measured physical activity and life-space area reached on different days by the same individual was studied using one-week longitudinal data, to provide insight in causal relationships. Methods One-week surveillance of objectively assessed physical activity of community-dwelling 70–90-year-old people in central Finland from the “Life-space mobility in old age” cohort substudy (N = 174). In spring 2012, participants wore an accelerometer for 7 days and completed a daily diary including the largest life-space area reached (inside home, outside home, neighborhood, town, and beyond town). The daily step count, and the time in moderate (incl. walking) and low activity and sedentary behavior were assessed. Differences in physical activity between days on which different life-space areas were reached were tested using Generalized Estimation Equation models (within-group comparison). Results Participants’ mean age was 80.4±4.2 years and 63.5% were female. Participants had higher average step counts (p < .001) and greater moderate and low activity time (p < .001) on days when greater life-space areas were reached, from the home to the town area. Only low activity time continued to increase when moving beyond the town. Conclusion Community-dwelling older people were more physically active on days when they moved through greater life-space areas. While it is unknown whether physical activity was a motivator to leave the home, intervention studies are needed to determine whether facilitation of daily outdoor mobility, regardless of the purpose, may be beneficial in terms of promoting physical activity. PMID:26252537

  20. The Aeronomy of Mars: Characterization by MAVEN of the Upper Atmosphere Reservoir That Regulates Volatile Escape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bougher, S. W.; Cravens, T. E.; Grebowsky, J.; Luhmann, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Mars thermosphere-ionosphere-exosphere (TIE) system constitutes the atmospheric reservoir (i.e. available cold and hot planetary neutral and thermal ion species) that regulates present day escape processes from the planet. The characterization of this TIE system, including its spatial and temporal (e.g., solar cycle, seasonal, diurnal, episodic) variability is needed to determine present day escape rates. Without knowledge of the physics and chemistry creating this TIE region and driving its variations, it is not possible to constrain either the short term or long term histories of atmosphere escape from Mars. MAVEN (Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution Mission) will make both in-situ and remote measurements of the state variables of the Martian TIE system. A full characterization of the thermosphere (˜100-250 km) and ionosphere (˜100-400 km) structure (and its variability) will be conducted with the collection of spacecraft in-situ measurements that systematically span most local times and latitudes, over a regular sampling of Mars seasons, and throughout the bottom half of the solar cycle. Such sampling will far surpass that available from existing spacecraft and ground-based datasets. In addition, remote measurements will provide a systematic mapping of the composition and structure of Mars neutral upper atmosphere and coronae (e.g. H, C, N, O), as well as probe lower altitudes. Such a detailed characterization is a necessary first step toward answering MAVEN's three main science questions (see Jakosky et al. 2014, this issue). This information will be used to determine present day escape rates from Mars, and provide an estimate of integrated loss to space throughout Mars history.

  1. The Physical Price of a Ticket into Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkey, A.

    As a direct consequence of exposure to microgravity astronauts experience a number of physiological changes, which can have serious medical implications when they return to Earth. Most immediate and significant are the head-ward shift of body fluids and the removal of gravitational loading from bone and muscles, which lead to progressive changes in the cardiovascular and musculoskeletal systems. Cardiovascular adaptations result in an increased incidence of orthostatic intolerance (fainting) post-flight, decreased cardiac output and reduced exercise capacity. Changes in the musculoskeletal system contribute significantly to the impaired functions experienced in the post-flight period. The underlying factor producing these changes is the absence of gravity. Countermeasures, therefore, are designed primarily to simulate Earth-like movements, stresses and system interactions. Exercise is one approach that has received wide operational use and acceptance in both the US and Russian space programmes, and has enabled humans to stay relatively healthy in space for well over a year. Although it remains the most effective countermeasure currently available, significant physiological degrada- tion still occurs. The development of other countermeasures will therefore be necessary for longer duration missions, such as the human exploration of Mars.

  2. New calorimeters for space experiments: physics requirements and technological challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrocchesi, Pier Simone

    2015-07-01

    Direct measurements of charged cosmic radiation with instruments in Low Earth Orbit (LEO), or flying on balloons above the atmosphere, require the identification of the incident particle, the measurement of its energy and possibly the determination of its sign-of-charge. The latter information can be provided by a magnetic spectrometer together with a measurement of momentum. However, magnetic deflection in space experiments is at present limited to values of the Maximum Detectable Rigidity (MDR) hardly exceeding a few TV. Advanced calorimetric techniques are, at present, the only way to measure charged and neutral radiation at higher energies in the multi-TeV range. Despite their mass limitation, calorimeters may achieve a large geometric factor and provide an adequate proton background rejection factor, taking advantage of a fine granularity and imaging capabilities. In this lecture, after a brief introduction on electromagnetic and hadronic calorimetry, an innovative approach to the design of a space-borne, large acceptance, homogeneous calorimeter for the detection of high energy cosmic rays will be described.

  3. An Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory for the Space Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R.; Anderson, J.; Schrick, B.; Ellsworth, C.; Davis, M.

    1976-01-01

    Results of research and engineering analyses to date show that it is feasible to develop and fly on the first Spacelab mission a multipurpose laboratory in which experiments can be performed on the microphysical processes in atmospheric clouds. The paper presents a series of tables on the Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory, with attention given to experiment classes, the preliminary equipment list (particle generators, optical and imaging devices, particle detectors and characterizers, etc.), initial equipment (scientific equipment subsystems and flight support subsystems), and scientific functional requirements (the expansion chamber, the continuous flow diffusion chamber, the static diffusion chamber, the humidifier, and particle generators).

  4. Research in space physics at the University of Iowa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanallen, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    Current investigations relating to energetic particles and the electric, magnetic, and electromagnetic fields associated with the earth, the sun, the moon, the planets, comets, and the interplanetary medium are reported. Primary emphasis is on observational work using a wide diversity of intruments on satellites of the earth and the moon and on planetary and interplanetary spacecraft, and on phenomenological analysis and interpretation. Secondary emphasis is given to closely related observational work by ground based radio-astronomical and optical techniques, and to theoretical problems in plasma physics as relevant to solar, planetary, and interplanetary phenomena.

  5. CVT/GPL phase 2 integrated testing. [in earth observations, space physics, and material sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shurney, R. E.; Maybee, G.; Schmitt, S.

    1974-01-01

    Experiments representing earth observations, space physics, and material sciences disciplines were installed in the General Purpose Laboratory (GPL). The experiments and the GPL are described. The experiments interfaces the GPL and GPL support systems are assessed. The experiments were cloud physics, ionospheric disturbances, material sciences, high energy astronomy, and superfluid helium.

  6. Looking Inside and Out: Perceptions of Physical Activity in Childcare Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberger, Nanci; Butler, Allison G.; Schumacher, Phyllis

    2014-01-01

    This study addresses the need to better understand how providers' perceptions of indoor and outdoor childcare settings can set the stage for arranging play spaces to optimise children's moderate-to-vigorous physical play. Childcare providers' perceptions of the level of physical activity, safety, and quality that children experience…

  7. Innovation Diffusion: A Deterministic Model of Space-Time Integration with Physical Analog

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haynes, Kingsley E.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Extends a fundamental temporal diffusion model to integrate space and time dimensions of innovation diffusion. Compares analogous developments in the physical sciences and argues that the proposed model may help link the concepts of catalysts in physical science diffusion processes to the role of change agents in social science systems. (Author/JG)

  8. Physics of Colloids in Space-2 (PCS-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankaran, Subramanian; Gasser, Urs; Manley, Suliana; Valentine, Megan; Prasad, Vikram; Rudhardt, Daniel; Bailey, Arthur; Dinsmore, Anthony; Segre, Phil; Doherty, Michael P.

    2001-01-01

    The Physics of Colloids-2 (PCS-2) experiment is aimed at investigating the basic physical properties of several types of colloidal suspensions. The three broad classes of colloidal systems of interest are binary colloids, colloid-polymer mixtures, and fractal gels. The objective is to understand their phase behavior as well as the kinetics of the phase transitions in the absence of gravity. The nucleation, growth, and morphology characteristics of the crystals and gels that form would be studied using confocal microscopy. These will be observed directly with excellent time resolution, and therefore extensive information about the different phases and their growth mechanisms will be gained. With the laser tweezers, it will be possible to measure the strength of these structures and to modify them in a controlled way, and the spectrophotometer will provide the possibility to probe their optical properties. We believe that this experiment will provide the basis for future 'colloid engineering' in which complicated structures with novel properties (e.g., photonic crystals) will be grown by controlled self-assembly.

  9. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Biological and Physical Research Enterprise Strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    As the 21st century begins, NASA's new Vision and Mission focuses the Agency's Enterprises toward exploration and discovery.The Biological and Physical Research Enterprise has a unique and enabling role in support of the Agency's Vision and Mission. Our strategic research seeks innovations and solutions to enable the extension of life into deep space safely and productively. Our fundamental research, as well as our research partnerships with industry and other agencies, allow new knowledge and tech- nologies to bring improvements to life on Earth. Our interdisciplinary research in the unique laboratory of microgravity addresses opportunities and challenges on our home planet as well as in space environments. The Enterprise maintains a key role in encouraging and engaging the next generation of explorers from primary school through the grad- uate level via our direct student participation in space research.The Biological and Physical Research Enterprise encompasses three themes. The biological sciences research theme investigates ways to support a safe human presence in space. This theme addresses the definition and control of physiological and psychological risks from the space environment, including radiation,reduced gravity, and isolation. The biological sciences research theme is also responsible for the develop- ment of human support systems technology as well as fundamental biological research spanning topics from genomics to ecologies. The physical sciences research theme supports research that takes advantage of the space environment to expand our understanding of the fundamental laws of nature. This theme also supports applied physical sciences research to improve safety and performance of humans in space. The research partnerships and flight support theme establishes policies and allocates space resources to encourage and develop entrepreneurial partners access to space research.Working together across research disciplines, the Biological and Physical

  10. Space and planetary environment criteria guidelines for use in space vehicle development, 1971 revision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. E. (Editor)

    1971-01-01

    A consolidation of natural environment data is presented for use as design criteria guidelines in space and planetary exploration vehicle development programs. In addition to information in the disciplinary areas of aeronomy, radiation, geomagnetism, astrodynamic constants, and meteoroids for the earth's environment above 90 kilometers, interplanetary space, and the planetary environments, the upper atmosphere model currently recommended for use at MSFC is discussed in detail.

  11. No space for girliness in physics: understanding and overcoming the masculinity of physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Götschel, Helene

    2014-06-01

    Allison Gonsalves' article on "women doctoral students' positioning around discourses of gender and competence in physics" explores narratives of Canadian women physicists concerning their strategies to gain recognition as physicists. In my response to her rewarding and inspiring analysis I will reflect on her findings and arguments and put them into a broader context of research in gender and physics. In addition to her promising strategies to make physics attractive and welcoming to all genders I want to stress two more aspects of the tricky problem: diversity and contextuality of physics.

  12. Dynamical Evolution of Quintessence Cosmology in a Physical Phase Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Jing-Zhao; Zhang, Ming-Jian; Liu, Wen-Biao

    2016-08-01

    The phase space analysis of cosmological parameters Ω ϕ and γ ϕ is given. Based on this, the well-known quintessence cosmology is studied with an exponential potential V(φ )=V0exp (-λ φ ). Given observational data, the current state of universe could be pinpointed in the phase diagrams, thus making the diagrams more informative. The scaling solution of quintessence usually is not supposed to give the cosmic accelerating expansion, but we prove it could educe the transient acceleration. We also find that the differential equations of system used widely in study of scalar field are incomplete, and then a numerical method is used to figure out the range of application.

  13. Physical and biomedical countermeasures for space radiation risk.

    PubMed

    Durante, Marco

    2008-01-01

    Radiation exposure represents a serious hindrance for long-term interplanetary missions because of the high uncertainty on risk coefficients, and to the lack of simple countermeasures. Even if uncertainties in risk assessment will be reduced in the next few years, there is little doubt that appropriate countermeasures have to be taken to reduce the exposure or the biological damage produced by cosmic radiation. In addition, it is necessary to provide effective countermeasures against solar particle events, which can produce acute effects, even life threatening, for inadequately protected crews. Strategies that may prove to be effective in reducing exposure, or the effects of the irradiation, include shielding, administration of drugs or dietary supplements to reduce the radiation effects, crew selection based on a screening of individual radiation sensitivity. It is foreseeable that research in passive and active radiation shielding, radioprotective chemicals, and individual susceptibility will boost in the next years to provide efficient countermeasures to the space radiation threat.

  14. Design and implementation of space physics multi-model application integration based on web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wenping; Zou, Ziming

    With the development of research on space environment and space science, how to develop network online computing environment of space weather, space environment and space physics models for Chinese scientific community is becoming more and more important in recent years. Currently, There are two software modes on space physics multi-model application integrated system (SPMAIS) such as C/S and B/S. the C/S mode which is traditional and stand-alone, demands a team or workshop from many disciplines and specialties to build their own multi-model application integrated system, that requires the client must be deployed in different physical regions when user visits the integrated system. Thus, this requirement brings two shortcomings: reducing the efficiency of researchers who use the models to compute; inconvenience of accessing the data. Therefore, it is necessary to create a shared network resource access environment which could help users to visit the computing resources of space physics models through the terminal quickly for conducting space science research and forecasting spatial environment. The SPMAIS develops high-performance, first-principles in B/S mode based on computational models of the space environment and uses these models to predict "Space Weather", to understand space mission data and to further our understanding of the solar system. the main goal of space physics multi-model application integration system (SPMAIS) is to provide an easily and convenient user-driven online models operating environment. up to now, the SPMAIS have contained dozens of space environment models , including international AP8/AE8、IGRF、T96 models,and solar proton prediction model、geomagnetic transmission model,etc. which are developed by Chinese scientists. another function of SPMAIS is to integrate space observation data sets which offers input data for models online high-speed computing. In this paper, service-oriented architecture (SOA) concept that divides

  15. Physics of Boundaries and their Interactions in Space Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidi, Nojan; Karimabadi, Homayoun; Krauss-Varban, Dietmar

    1998-01-01

    This final report describes a brief summary of our accomplishments during the complete contract period. Traditionally, due to computational limitations, it has been impossible to obtain a global view of the magnetosphere on ion time and spatial scales. As a result, kinetic simulations have concentrated on the local structure of different magnetospheric discontinuities and boundaries. However, due to the emergence of low cost desktop superconductors, as well as by taking full advantage of latest advances in data mining and visualization technology, we were able to bypass our planned (proposed) regional simulations and proceed to large-scale 3-D and 2-D global hybrid simulations of the magnetosphere. As a result, although we are only finishing the second year of the proposed activity, much of the original scientific objectives have been surpassed and new avenues of investigation have been opened. Such simulations have led us to possible explanations of some long-standing issues in magnetospheric physics. They have also enabled us to make a number of important discoveries/predictions, which need to be looked for in satellite data. Examples include: (1) the finding that the bow shock can become unstable to the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH;) (2) the discovery of a mechanism for intermittent reconnection due to ion physics which may be relevant to the explanation of the recurrence rate of flux transfer events (FTEs;) and (3) the finding that the current sheet in the near-Earth magnetotail region can become unstable to KH with detectable, unique ionospheric signatures. Further, we demonstrated a viable mechanism for the onset of reconnection at the magnetopause, examined the detailed structure of the boundary layer incorporating curvature effects, and provided an explanation for the large core fields observed within FTEs as well as flux ropes in the magnetotail.

  16. Physics of Boundaries and their Interactions in Space Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidi, Nojan; Karimabadi, Homayoun; Krauss-Varban, Dietmar

    1998-01-01

    This final report describes a brief summary of our accomplishments during the complete contract period. Traditionally, due to computational limitations, it has been impossible to obtain a global view of the magnetosphere on ion time and spatial scales. As a result, kinetic-simulations have concentrated on the local structure of different magnetospheric discontinuities and boundaries. However, due to the emergence of low cost supercomputers, as well as by taking full advantage of latest advances in data mining and visualization technology, we were able to bypass our planned (proposed) regional simulations and proceed to large-scale 3-D and 2-D global hybrid simulations of the magnetosphere. As a result, although we are only finishing the second year of the proposed activity, much of the original scientific objectives have been surpassed and new avenues of investigation have been opened. Such simulations have led us to possible explanations of some long-standing issues in magnetospheric physics. They have also enables us to make a number of important discoveries predictions, which need to be looked for in satellite data. Examples include the finding that the bow shock can become unstable to the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH), (2) the discovery of a mechanism for intermittent reconnection due to ion physics which may be relevant to the explanation of the recurrence rate of flux transfer events (FTEs), and (3) this finding that the current sheet in the near-Earth magnetotail region can become unstable to KH with detectable, unique ionospheric signatures. Further, we demonstrated a viable mechanism for the onset of reconnection at the magnetopause, examined the detailed structure of the boundary layer incorporating curvature effects, and provided an explanation for the large core fields observed within FTEs as well as flux ropes in the magnetotail.

  17. Optical spectroscopic techniques and instrumentation for atmospheric and space research

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Hays, P.B.

    1994-12-31

    The objective of this conference was to bring together scientists and engineers involved in atmospheric science, space physics, aeronomy, remote sensing, and optical instrumentation to exchange ideas and discuss recent developments in spectroscopic techniques and instrumentation in atmospheric and space research. There is growing concern about the human environment: the atmosphere, ocean, and space. To address those concerns and understand their changing environment, increasingly complex computer models have been developed with the advent of more powerful computers. Therefore, the validation of those models against direct measurements with advanced techniques and instruments is becoming increasingly more difficult and important. Optical spectroscopic techniques and instrumentation have contributed greatly to the validation of those models and their understanding of the earth`s atmosphere and space environment. Improving techniques and instrumentation is becoming ever more important with more demanding requirements on the accuracy and resolution of atmospheric and space observations. This conference had sessions addressing current techniques and instrumentation from the ultraviolet to the infrared and microwave, and from ground-based facilities to satellite-borne missions. Separate abstracts were prepared for most of the papers in this volume.

  18. Natural world physical, brain operational, and mind phenomenal space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fingelkurts, Andrew A.; Fingelkurts, Alexander A.; Neves, Carlos F. H.

    2010-06-01

    Concepts of space and time are widely developed in physics. However, there is a considerable lack of biologically plausible theoretical frameworks that can demonstrate how space and time dimensions are implemented in the activity of the most complex life-system - the brain with a mind. Brain activity is organized both temporally and spatially, thus representing space-time in the brain. Critical analysis of recent research on the space-time organization of the brain's activity pointed to the existence of so-called operational space-time in the brain. This space-time is limited to the execution of brain operations of differing complexity. During each such brain operation a particular short-term spatio-temporal pattern of integrated activity of different brain areas emerges within related operational space-time. At the same time, to have a fully functional human brain one needs to have a subjective mental experience. Current research on the subjective mental experience offers detailed analysis of space-time organization of the mind. According to this research, subjective mental experience (subjective virtual world) has definitive spatial and temporal properties similar to many physical phenomena. Based on systematic review of the propositions and tenets of brain and mind space-time descriptions, our aim in this review essay is to explore the relations between the two. To be precise, we would like to discuss the hypothesis that via the brain operational space-time the mind subjective space-time is connected to otherwise distant physical space-time reality.

  19. CDPP activities: Promoting research and education in space physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genot, V. N.; Andre, N.; Cecconi, B.; Gangloff, M.; Bouchemit, M.; Dufourg, N.; Pitout, F.; Budnik, E.; Lavraud, B.; Rouillard, A. P.; Heulet, D.; Bellucci, A.; Durand, J.; Delmas, D.; Alexandrova, O.; Briand, C.; Biegun, A.

    2015-12-01

    The French Plasma Physics Data Centre (CDPP, http://cdpp.eu/) addresses for more than 15 years all issues pertaining to natural plasma data distribution and valorization. Initially established by CNES and CNRS on the ground of a solid data archive, CDPP activities diversified with the advent of broader networks and interoperability standards, and through fruitful collaborations (e.g. with NASA/PDS): providing access to remote data, designing and building science driven analysis tools then became at the forefront of CDPP developments. For instance today AMDA helps scientists all over the world accessing and analyzing data from ancient to very recent missions (from Voyager, Galileo, Geotail, ... to Maven, Rosetta, MMS, ...) as well as results from models and numerical simulations. Other tools like the Propagation Tool or 3DView allow users to put their data in context and interconnect with other databases (CDAWeb, MEDOC) and tools (Topcat). This presentation will briefly review this evolution, show technical and science use cases, and finally put CDPP activities in the perspective of ongoing collaborative projects (Europlanet H2020, HELCATS, ...) and future missions (Bepicolombo, Solar Orbiter, ...).

  20. Training Early Career Space Weather Researchers and other Space Weather Professionals at the CISM Space Weather Summer School

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, N. A.; Hughes, W.

    2011-12-01

    This talk will outline the organization of a summer school designed to introduce young professions to a sub-discipline of geophysics. Through out the 10 year life time of the Center for Integrated Space Weather Modeling (CISM) the CISM Team has offered a two week summer school that introduces new graduate students and other interested professional to the fundamentals of space weather. The curriculum covers basic concepts in space physics, the hazards of space weather, and the utility of computer models of the space environment. Graduate students attend from both inside and outside CISM, from all the sub-disciplines involved in space weather (solar, heliosphere, geomagnetic, and aeronomy), and from across the nation and around the world. In addition, between 1/4 and 1/3 of the participants each year are professionals involved in space weather in some way, such as: forecasters from NOAA and the Air Force, Air Force satellite program directors, NASA specialists involved in astronaut radiation safety, and representatives from industries affected by space weather. The summer school has adopted modern pedagogy that has been used successfully at the undergraduate level. A typical daily schedule involves three morning lectures followed by an afternoon lab session. During the morning lectures, student interaction is encouraged using "Timeout to Think" questions and peer instruction, along with question cards for students to ask follow up questions. During the afternoon labs students, working in groups of four, answer thought provoking questions using results from simulations and observation data from a variety of source. Through the interactions with each other and the instructors, as well as social interactions during the two weeks, students network and form bonds that will last them through out their careers. We believe that this summer school can be used as a model for summer schools in a wide variety of disciplines.

  1. Astrometric Gravitation Probe: a space mission concept for fundamental physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecchiato, Alberto; Fienga, Agnes; Gai, Mario; Lattanzi, Mario G.; Riva, Alberto; Busonero, Deborah

    2015-08-01

    Modern technological developments have pushed the accuracy of astrometric measurements in the visible band down to the micro-arcsec level. This allows to test theories of gravity in the weak field limit to unprecedented level, with possible consequences spanning from the validity of fundamental physics principles, to tests of theories describing cosmological and galactic dynamics without resorting to Dark Matter and Dark Energy.This is the main goal of Astrometric Gravitation Probe (AGP) mission, which will be achieved by highly accurate astrometric determination of light deflection (as a modern rendition of the Dyson, Eddington, and Robertson eclipse experiment of 1919), aberration, and of the orbits of selected Solar System objects, with specific reference to the excess shift of the pericentre effect.The AGP concept was recently proposed for the recent call for ESA M4 missions as a collaboration among several scientists coming from many different European and US institutions. Its payload is based on a 1.15 m diameter telescope fed through a coronagraphic system by four fields, two set in symmetric positions around the Sun, and two in the opposite direction, all imaged on a CCD detector. Large parts of the instrument are common mode to all fields. The baseline operation mode is the scan of the ±1.13 deg Ecliptic strip, repeated for a minimum of 3 years and up to an optimal duration of 5 years. Operations and calibrations are simultaneous, defined in order to ensure common mode instrumental effects, identified and removed in data reduction. The astrometric and coronagraphic technologies build on the heritage of Gaia and Solar Orbiter.We review the mission concept and its science case, and discuss how this measurement concepts can be scaled to different mission implementations.

  2. The NASA Microgravity Fluid Physics Program: Knowledge for Use on Earth and Future Space Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohl, Fred J.; Singh, Bhim S.; Alexander, J. Iwan; Shaw, Nancy J.; Hill, Myron E.; Gati, Frank G.

    2002-12-01

    Building on over four decades of research and technology development related to the behavior of fluids in low gravity environments, the current NASA Microgravity Fluid Physics Program continues the quest for knowledge to further understand and design better fluids systems for use on earth and in space. The purpose of the Fluid Physics Program is to support the goals of NASA's Biological and Physical Research Enterprise which seeks to exploit the space environment to conduct research and to develop commercial opportunities, while building the vital knowledge base needed to enable efficient and effective systems for protecting and sustaining humans during extended space flights. There are currently five major research areas in the Microgravity Fluid Physics Program: complex fluids, multiphase flows and phase change, interfacial phenomena, biofluid mechanics, and dynamics and instabilities. Numerous investigations into these areas are being conducted in both ground-based laboratories and facilities and in the flight experiments program. Most of the future NASA-sponsored fluid physics and transport phenomena studies will be carried out on the International Space Station in the Fluids Integrated Rack, in the Microgravity Science Glovebox, in EXPRESS racks, and in other facilities provided by international partners. This paper will present an overview of the near- and long-term visions for NASA's Microgravity Fluid Physics Research Program and brief descriptions of hardware systems planned to achieve this research.

  3. The NASA Microgravity Fluid Physics Program: Knowledge for Use on Earth and Future Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, Fred J.; Singh, Bhim S.; Alexander, J. Iwan; Shaw, Nancy J.; Hill, Myron E.; Gati, Frank G.

    2002-01-01

    Building on over four decades of research and technology development related to the behavior of fluids in low gravity environments, the current NASA Microgravity Fluid Physics Program continues the quest for knowledge to further understand and design better fluids systems for use on earth and in space. The purpose of the Fluid Physics Program is to support the goals of NASA's Biological and Physical Research Enterprise which seeks to exploit the space environment to conduct research and to develop commercial opportunities, while building the vital knowledge base needed to enable efficient and effective systems for protecting and sustaining humans during extended space flights. There are currently five major research areas in the Microgravity Fluid Physics Program: complex fluids, multiphase flows and phase change, interfacial phenomena, biofluid mechanics, and dynamics and instabilities. Numerous investigations into these areas are being conducted in both ground-based laboratories and facilities and in the flight experiments program. Most of the future NASA-sponsored fluid physics and transport phenomena studies will be carried out on the International Space Station in the Fluids Integrated Rack, in the Microgravity Science Glovebox, in EXPRESS racks, and in other facilities provided by international partners. This paper will present an overview of the near- and long-term visions for NASA's Microgravity Fluid Physics Research Program and brief descriptions of hardware systems planned to achieve this research.

  4. A unified framework for mesh refinement in random and physical space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Stinis, Panos

    2016-10-01

    In recent work we have shown how an accurate reduced model can be utilized to perform mesh refinement in random space. That work relied on the explicit knowledge of an accurate reduced model which is used to monitor the transfer of activity from the large to the small scales of the solution. Since this is not always available, we present in the current work a framework which shares the merits and basic idea of the previous approach but does not require an explicit knowledge of a reduced model. Moreover, the current framework can be applied for refinement in both random and physical space. In this manuscript we focus on the application to random space mesh refinement. We study examples of increasing difficulty (from ordinary to partial differential equations) which demonstrate the efficiency and versatility of our approach. We also provide some results from the application of the new framework to physical space mesh refinement.

  5. No Space for Girliness in Physics: Understanding and Overcoming the Masculinity of Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Götschel, Helene

    2014-01-01

    Allison Gonsalves' article on "women doctoral students' positioning around discourses of gender and competence in physics" explores narratives of Canadian women physicists concerning their strategies to gain recognition as physicists. In my response to her rewarding and inspiring analysis I will reflect on her findings and…

  6. Physical space and cyberspace: how do they interrelate? A study of offline and online social interaction choice in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Goby, Valerie

    2003-12-01

    This paper investigates if the new space created by cyberspace affects how we use old space--physical space--and how the range of physical space we have access to affects our urge to extend into cyberspace. To do this I polled young IT savvy people in land-scarce Singapore about the amount of physical space they had at their disposal--private space in terms of the size of their house and bedroom space, and public space in terms of how many public meeting areas they frequented. I attempted to see if there was a correlation between the amount of physical space they enjoyed and the amount of time they spent in cyberspace. PMID:14756929

  7. The space shuttle payload planning working groups. Volume 8: Earth and ocean physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The findings and recommendations of the Earth and Ocean Physics working group of the space shuttle payload planning activity are presented. The requirements for the space shuttle mission are defined as: (1) precision measurement for earth and ocean physics experiments, (2) development and demonstration of new and improved sensors and analytical techniques, (3) acquisition of surface truth data for evaluation of new measurement techniques, (4) conduct of critical experiments to validate geophysical phenomena and instrumental results, and (5) development and validation of analytical/experimental models for global ocean dynamics and solid earth dynamics/earthquake prediction. Tables of data are presented to show the flight schedule estimated costs, and the mission model.

  8. Research in space physics at the University of Iowa. [astronomical observatories, spaceborne astronomy, satellite observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanallen, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    Various research projects in space physics are summarized. Emphasis is placed on: (1) the study of energetic particles in outer space and their relationships to electric, magnetic, and electromagnetic fields associated with the earth, the sun, the moon, the planets, and interplanetary medium; (2) observational work on satellites of the earth and the moon, and planetary and interplanetary spacecraft; (3) phenomenological analysis and interpretation; (4) observational work by ground based radio-astronomical and optical techniques; and (5) theoretical problems in plasma physics. Specific fields of current investigations are summarized.

  9. Physical and biological organ dosimetry analysis for international space station astronauts.

    PubMed

    Cucinotta, Francis A; Kim, Myung-Hee Y; Willingham, Veronica; George, Kerry A

    2008-07-01

    In this study, we analyzed the biological and physical organ dose equivalents for International Space Station (ISS) astronauts. Individual physical dosimetry is difficult in space due to the complexity of the space radiation environment, which consists of protons, heavy ions and secondary neutrons, and the modification of these radiation types in tissue as well as limitations in dosimeter devices that can be worn for several months in outer space. Astronauts returning from missions to the ISS undergo biodosimetry assessment of chromosomal damage in lymphocyte cells using the multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique. Individual-based pre-flight dose responses for lymphocyte exposure in vitro to gamma rays were compared to those exposed to space radiation in vivo to determine an equivalent biological dose. We compared the ISS biodosimetry results, NASA's space radiation transport models of organ dose equivalents, and results from ISS and space shuttle phantom torso experiments. Physical and biological doses for 19 ISS astronauts yielded average effective doses and individual or population-based biological doses for the approximately 6-month missions of 72 mSv and 85 or 81 mGy-Eq, respectively. Analyses showed that 80% or more of organ dose equivalents on the ISS are from galactic cosmic rays and only a small contribution is from trapped protons and that GCR doses were decreased by the high level of solar activity in recent years. Comparisons of models to data showed that space radiation effective doses can be predicted to within about a +/-10% accuracy by space radiation transport models. Finally, effective dose estimates for all previous NASA missions are summarized. PMID:18582161

  10. Physical and biological organ dosimetry analysis for international space station astronauts.

    PubMed

    Cucinotta, Francis A; Kim, Myung-Hee Y; Willingham, Veronica; George, Kerry A

    2008-07-01

    In this study, we analyzed the biological and physical organ dose equivalents for International Space Station (ISS) astronauts. Individual physical dosimetry is difficult in space due to the complexity of the space radiation environment, which consists of protons, heavy ions and secondary neutrons, and the modification of these radiation types in tissue as well as limitations in dosimeter devices that can be worn for several months in outer space. Astronauts returning from missions to the ISS undergo biodosimetry assessment of chromosomal damage in lymphocyte cells using the multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique. Individual-based pre-flight dose responses for lymphocyte exposure in vitro to gamma rays were compared to those exposed to space radiation in vivo to determine an equivalent biological dose. We compared the ISS biodosimetry results, NASA's space radiation transport models of organ dose equivalents, and results from ISS and space shuttle phantom torso experiments. Physical and biological doses for 19 ISS astronauts yielded average effective doses and individual or population-based biological doses for the approximately 6-month missions of 72 mSv and 85 or 81 mGy-Eq, respectively. Analyses showed that 80% or more of organ dose equivalents on the ISS are from galactic cosmic rays and only a small contribution is from trapped protons and that GCR doses were decreased by the high level of solar activity in recent years. Comparisons of models to data showed that space radiation effective doses can be predicted to within about a +/-10% accuracy by space radiation transport models. Finally, effective dose estimates for all previous NASA missions are summarized.

  11. Physics of Colloids in Space--Plus (PCS+) Experiment Completed Flight Acceptance Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doherty, Michael P.

    2004-01-01

    The Physics of Colloids in Space--Plus (PCS+) experiment successfully completed system-level flight acceptance testing in the fall of 2003. This testing included electromagnetic interference (EMI) testing, vibration testing, and thermal testing. PCS+, an Expedite the Process of Experiments to Space Station (EXPRESS) Rack payload will deploy a second set of colloid samples within the PCS flight hardware system that flew on the International Space Station (ISS) from April 2001 to June 2002. PCS+ is slated to return to the ISS in late 2004 or early 2005.

  12. US space flight experience. Physical exertion and metabolic demand of extravehicular activity: Past, present, and future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas P.

    1989-01-01

    A review of physical exertion and metabolic demands of extravehicular activity (EVA) on U.S. astronauts is given. Information is given on EVA during Gemini, Apollo and Skylab missions. It is noted that nominal EVA's should not be overstressful from a cardiovascular standpoint; that manual-intensive EVA's such as are planned for the construction phase of the Space Station can and will be demanding from a muscular standpoint, primarily for the upper extremities; that off-nominal unplanned EVA's can be physically demanding both from an endurance and from a muscular standpoint; and that crewmembers should be physically prepared and capable of performing these EVA's at any time during the mission.

  13. Scope and Sequence. Life Sciences, Physical Sciences, Earth and Space Sciences. A Summer Curriculum Development Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortland-Madison Board of Cooperative Educational Services, Cortland, NY.

    Presented is a booklet containing scope and sequence charts for kindergarten and grades 1 to 6 science units. Overviews and lists of major concepts for units in the life, physical, and earth/space sciences are provided in tables for each grade level. Also presented are seven complete units, one for each grade level. Following a table of contents,…

  14. The James Webb Space Telescope: Inspiration and Context for Physics and Chemistry Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillier, Dan; Johnston, Tania; Davies, John

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the design, delivery, evaluation and impact of a CPD course for physics and chemistry teachers. A key aim of the course was to use the context of the James Webb Space Telescope project to inspire teachers and lead to enriched teaching of STEM subjects. (Contains 1 box and 3 figures.)

  15. Green spaces and General Health: Roles of mental health status, social support, and physical activity.

    PubMed

    Dadvand, Payam; Bartoll, Xavier; Basagaña, Xavier; Dalmau-Bueno, Albert; Martinez, David; Ambros, Albert; Cirach, Marta; Triguero-Mas, Margarita; Gascon, Mireia; Borrell, Carme; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J

    2016-05-01

    Green spaces are associated with improved health, but little is known about mechanisms underlying such association. We aimed to assess the association between greenness exposure and subjective general health (SGH) and to evaluate mental health status, social support, and physical activity as mediators of this association. This cross-sectional study was based on a population-based sample of 3461 adults residing in Barcelona, Spain (2011). We characterized outcome and mediators using the Health Survey of Barcelona. Objective and subjective residential proximity to green spaces and residential surrounding greenness were used to characterize greenness exposure. We followed Baron and Kenny's framework to establish the mediation roles and we further quantified the relative contribution of each mediator. Residential surrounding greenness and subjective residential proximity to green spaces were associated with better SGH. We found indications for mediation of these associations by mental health status, perceived social support, and to less extent, by physical activity. These mediators altogether could explain about half of the surrounding greenness association and one-third of the association for subjective proximity to green spaces. We observed indications that mental health and perceived social support might be more relevant for men and those younger than 65years. The results for objective residential proximity to green spaces were not conclusive. In conclusion, our observed association between SGH and greenness exposure was mediated, in part, by mental health status, enhanced social support, and physical activity. There might be age and sex variations in these mediation roles.

  16. The Sun to the Earth - and Beyond: A Decadal Research Strategy in Solar and Space Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The sun is the source of energy for life on earth and is the strongest modulator of the human physical environment. In fact, the Sun's influence extends throughout the solar system, both through photons, which provide heat, light, and ionization, and through the continuous outflow of a magnetized, supersonic ionized gas known as the solar wind. While the accomplishments of the past decade have answered important questions about the physics of the Sun, the interplanetary medium, and the space environments of Earth and other solar system bodies, they have also highlighted other questions, some of which are long-standing and fundamental. The Sun to the Earth--and Beyond organizes these questions in terms of five challenges that are expected to be the focus of scientific investigations in solar and space physics during the coming decade and beyond. While the accomplishments of the past decades have answered important questions about the physics of the Sun, the interplanetary medium, and the space environments of Earth and other solar system bodies, they have also highlighted other questions, some of which are long-standing and fundamental. This report organizes these questions in terms of five challenges that are expected to be the focus of scientific investigations in solar and space physics during the coming decade and beyond: Challenge 1: Understanding the structure and dynamics of the Sun's interior, the generation of solar magnetic fields, the origin of the solar cycle, the causes of solar activity, and the structure and dynamics of the corona. Challenge 2: Understanding heliospheric structure, the distribution of magnetic fields and matter throughout the solar system, and the interaction of the solar atmosphere with the local interstellar medium. Challenge 3: Understanding the space environments of Earth and other solar system bodies and their dynamical response to external and internal influences. Challenge 4: Understanding the basic physical principles manifest

  17. Scaling and correlation of human movements in cyberspace and physical space.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Huang, Zi-Gang; Huang, Liang; Liu, Huan; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2014-11-01

    Understanding the dynamics of human movements is key to issues of significant current interest such as behavioral prediction, recommendation, and control of epidemic spreading. We collect and analyze big data sets of human movements in both cyberspace (through browsing of websites) and physical space (through mobile towers) and find a superlinear scaling relation between the mean frequency of visit 〈f〉 and its fluctuation σ:σ∼〈f〉^{β} with β≈1.2. The probability distribution of the visiting frequency is found to be a stretched exponential function. We develop a model incorporating two essential ingredients, preferential return and exploration, and show that these are necessary for generating the scaling relation extracted from real data. A striking finding is that human movements in cyberspace and physical space are strongly correlated, indicating a distinctive behavioral identifying characteristic and implying that the behaviors in one space can be used to predict those in the other. PMID:25493727

  18. Scaling and correlation of human movements in cyberspace and physical space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Huang, Zi-Gang; Huang, Liang; Liu, Huan; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2014-11-01

    Understanding the dynamics of human movements is key to issues of significant current interest such as behavioral prediction, recommendation, and control of epidemic spreading. We collect and analyze big data sets of human movements in both cyberspace (through browsing of websites) and physical space (through mobile towers) and find a superlinear scaling relation between the mean frequency of visit and its fluctuation σ :σ ˜β with β ≈1.2 . The probability distribution of the visiting frequency is found to be a stretched exponential function. We develop a model incorporating two essential ingredients, preferential return and exploration, and show that these are necessary for generating the scaling relation extracted from real data. A striking finding is that human movements in cyberspace and physical space are strongly correlated, indicating a distinctive behavioral identifying characteristic and implying that the behaviors in one space can be used to predict those in the other.

  19. A Revolutionary Aeronomy Concept to Explore the Coupling of the Solar-Terrestrial System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, James

    2014-01-01

    The Geospace Dynamics Observatory (GDO) mission observes the near-Earth region in space called Geospace with unprecedented resolution, scale and sensitivity. At a distance of 60 Earth Radii (Re) in a near-polar circular orbit and at approximately 27-day period, GDO images the earth's full disk with: (1) a three-channel far ultraviolet imager, (2) an extreme ultraviolet imager of the plasmasphere, and (3) a spectrometer in the near to far ultraviolet range that probes any portion of the disk and simultaneously observes the limb.

  20. Aligning physical learning spaces with the curriculum: AMEE Guide No. 107.

    PubMed

    Nordquist, Jonas; Sundberg, Kristina; Laing, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    This Guide explores emerging issues on the alignment of learning spaces with the changing curriculum in medical education. As technology and new teaching methods have altered the nature of learning in medical education, it is necessary to re-think how physical learning spaces are aligned with the curriculum. The better alignment of learning spaces with the curriculum depends on more directly engaged leadership from faculty and the community of medical education for briefing the requirements for the design of all kinds of learning spaces. However, there is a lack of precedent and well-established processes as to how new kinds of learning spaces should be programmed. Such programmes are essential aspects of optimizing the intended experience of the curriculum. Faculty and the learning community need better tools and instruments to support their leadership role in briefing and programming. A Guide to critical concepts for exploring the alignment of curriculum and learning spaces is provided. The idea of a networked learning landscape is introduced as a way of assessing and evaluating the alignment of physical spaces to the emerging curriculum. The concept is used to explore how technology has widened the range of spaces and places in which learning happens as well as enabling new styles of learning. The networked learning landscaped is explored through four different scales within which learning is accommodated: the classroom, the building, the campus, and the city. High-level guidance on the process of briefing for the networked learning landscape is provided, to take into account the wider scale of learning spaces and the impact of technology. Key to a successful measurement process is argued to be the involvement of relevant academic stakeholders who can identify the strategic direction and purpose for the design of the learning environments in relation to the emerging demands of the curriculum.

  1. Aligning physical learning spaces with the curriculum: AMEE Guide No. 107.

    PubMed

    Nordquist, Jonas; Sundberg, Kristina; Laing, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    This Guide explores emerging issues on the alignment of learning spaces with the changing curriculum in medical education. As technology and new teaching methods have altered the nature of learning in medical education, it is necessary to re-think how physical learning spaces are aligned with the curriculum. The better alignment of learning spaces with the curriculum depends on more directly engaged leadership from faculty and the community of medical education for briefing the requirements for the design of all kinds of learning spaces. However, there is a lack of precedent and well-established processes as to how new kinds of learning spaces should be programmed. Such programmes are essential aspects of optimizing the intended experience of the curriculum. Faculty and the learning community need better tools and instruments to support their leadership role in briefing and programming. A Guide to critical concepts for exploring the alignment of curriculum and learning spaces is provided. The idea of a networked learning landscape is introduced as a way of assessing and evaluating the alignment of physical spaces to the emerging curriculum. The concept is used to explore how technology has widened the range of spaces and places in which learning happens as well as enabling new styles of learning. The networked learning landscaped is explored through four different scales within which learning is accommodated: the classroom, the building, the campus, and the city. High-level guidance on the process of briefing for the networked learning landscape is provided, to take into account the wider scale of learning spaces and the impact of technology. Key to a successful measurement process is argued to be the involvement of relevant academic stakeholders who can identify the strategic direction and purpose for the design of the learning environments in relation to the emerging demands of the curriculum. PMID:27008030

  2. Conceptual Understanding of Students in an Upper Division Space Physics Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, N. A.; Oppenheim, M.

    2006-12-01

    The Astronomy Department of Boston University offers both an upper division undergraduate and a graduate level introductory course in space physics. These are taught by faculty affiliated with both the Center for Space Physics and the Astronomy Department. These courses typically cover phenomena in that occur in the solar corona, solar wind, and the magnetospheres and atmospheres of planets and comets. Topics also include, Solar System plasma physics, magnetic storms, measurement techniques, and space weather affects. In the spring of 2006, a preliminary analysis was conducted of the students' understanding of selected concepts in space physics. This work consisted of multiple-choice pre/post tests and a series of interviews with student volunteers. As part of the tests students were asked to gauge their relative confidence in their answers on a 0-4 Likert Scale. This analysis gives some insight into students' prior knowledge regarding space physics concepts. Results from pretest and interviews showed that students had a particular weakness in their understanding of particle motions in simple field configurations. This is surprising since these students should have typically both an introductory and upper division E&M course. In addition, the results showed misconceptions regarding the structure of the interplanetary magnetic field, the source region of auroral particles, and the relationship between magnetospheric currents and magnetic fields. Post test showed improvement in areas that were of focus in the course, particularly with respect to motion of charged particles in fields. The results of this work are intended to direct future studies and curricular development.

  3. Revisiting Numerical Errors in Direct and Large Eddy Simulations of Turbulence: Physical and Spectral Spaces Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedioun, Ivan; Lardjane, Nicolas; Gökalp, Iskender

    2001-12-01

    Some recent studies on the effects of truncation and aliasing errors on the large eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent flows via the concept of modified wave number are revisited. It is shown that all the results obtained for nonlinear partial differential equations projected and advanced in time in spectral space are not straightforwardly applicable to physical space calculations due to the nonequivalence by Fourier transform of spectral aliasing errors and numerical errors on a set of grid points in physical space. The consequences of spectral static aliasing errors on a set of grid points are analyzed in one dimension of space for quadratic products and their derivatives. The dynamical process that results through time stepping is illustrated on the Burgers equation. A method based on midpoint interpolation is proposed to remove in physical space the static grid point errors involved in divergence forms. It is compared to the sharp filtering technique on finer grids suggested by previous authors. Global performances resulting from combination of static aliasing errors and truncation errors are then discussed for all classical forms of the convective terms in Navier-Stokes equations. Some analytical results previously obtained on the relative magnitude of subgrid scale terms and numerical errors are confirmed with 3D realistic random fields. The physical space dynamical behavior and the stability of typical associations of numerical schemes and forms of nonlinear terms are finally evaluated on the LES of self-decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence. It is shown that the convective form (if conservative properties are not strictly required) associated with highly resolving compact finite difference schemes provides the best compromise, which is nearly equivalent to dealiased pseudo-spectral calculations.

  4. Training Physics Students for Space Careers: Introduction to the Balloon Payload Projects at UL Lafayette

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollerman, W. A.; Mazzino, L.; Fontenot, R.; Giovinazzo, P.; Malespin, C.

    2006-12-01

    In January 2004, the President set goals for the space program in the 21st century. This renewed sense of direction means that a whole new generation of scientists and engineers will be needed to support space- based science and technology. Declining enrollments in science, mathematics, and space related engineering programs are well documented in the United States. These enrollment reductions are also observed at Louisiana colleges and universities, which are starting to recover from last year's hurricanes. Since 2003, physics students at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette (UL Lafayette) have participated in two balloon payload projects sponsored by the Louisiana Space Grant Consortium (LaSPACE). In 2004-2005, physics students at UL Lafayette attended an informal ballooning course to design and build a student-directed payload for launch at the NASA National Scientific Ballooning Facility in Palestine, Texas in May 2005. In 2006, students participated in the High Altitude Student Payload (HASP) program to measure cosmic ray intensities using traditional film and absorbers. This 10 kg payload flew from Fort Sumner, New Mexico in early September 2006. This presentation will discuss our participation in both balloon projects. Emphasis will be placed on highlighting the "hands-on" and step-by-step approach used to provide students with practical space related skills.

  5. Investigations of Physical Processes in Microgravity Relevant to Space Electrochemical Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lvovich, Vadim F.; Green, Robert; Jakupca, Ian

    2015-01-01

    NASA has performed physical science microgravity flight experiments in the areas of combustion science, fluid physics, material science and fundamental physics research on the International Space Station (ISS) since 2001. The orbital conditions on the ISS provide an environment where gravity driven phenomena, such as buoyant convection, are nearly negligible. Gravity strongly affects fluid behavior by creating forces that drive motion, shape phase boundaries and compress gases. The need for a better understanding of fluid physics has created a vigorous, multidisciplinary research community whose ongoing vitality is marked by the continuous emergence of new fields in both basic and applied science. In particular, the low-gravity environment offers a unique opportunity for the study of fluid physics and transport phenomena that are very relevant to management of fluid - gas separations in fuel cell and electrolysis systems. Experiments conducted in space have yielded rich results. These results provided valuable insights into fundamental fluid and gas phase behavior that apply to space environments and could not be observed in Earth-based labs. As an example, recent capillary flow results have discovered both an unexpected sensitivity to symmetric geometries associated with fluid container shape, and identified key regime maps for design of corner or wedge-shaped passive gas-liquid phase separators. In this presentation we will also briefly review some of physical science related to flight experiments, such as boiling, that have applicability to electrochemical systems, along with ground-based (drop tower, low gravity aircraft) microgravity electrochemical research. These same buoyancy and interfacial phenomena effects will apply to electrochemical power and energy storage systems that perform two-phase separation, such as water-oxygen separation in life support electrolysis, and primary space power generation devices such as passive primary fuel cell.

  6. The Impact of Space Experiments on our Knowledge of the Physics of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannelli, Franco; Sabau-Graziati, Lola

    2004-05-01

    With the advent of space experiments it was demonstrated that cosmic sources emit energy practically across all the electromagnetic spectrum via different physical processes. Several physical quantities give witness to these processes which usually are not stationary; those physical observable quantities are then generally variable. Therefore simultaneous multifrequency observations are strictly necessary in order to understand the actual behaviour of cosmic sources. Space experiments have opened practically all the electromagnetic windows on the Universe. A discussion of the most important results coming from multifrequency photonic astrophysics experiments will provide new inputs for the advance of the knowledge of the physics, very often in its more extreme conditions. A multitude of high quality data across practically the whole electromagnetic spectrum came at the scientific community's disposal a few years after the beginning of the Space Era. With these data we are attempting to explain the physics governing the Universe and, moreover, its origin, which has been and still is a matter of the greatest curiosity for humanity. In this paper we will try to describe the last steps of the investigation born with the advent of space experiments, to note upon the most important results and open problems still existing, and to comment upon the perspectives we can reasonably expect. Once the idea of this paper was well accepted by ourselves, we had the problem of how to plan the exposition. Indeed, the exposition of the results can be made in different ways, following several points of view, according to: - a division in diffuse and discrete sources; - different classes of cosmic sources; - different spectral ranges, which implies in turn a sub-classification in accordance with different techniques of observations; - different physical emission mechanisms of electromagnetic radiation; - different vehicles used for launching the experiments (aircraft, balloons, rockets

  7. Workshop on Research for Space Exploration: Physical Sciences and Process Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Bhim S.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of a workshop sponsored by the Microgravity Research Division of NASA to define contributions the microgravity research community can provide to advance the human exploration of space. Invited speakers and attendees participated in an exchange of ideas to identify issues of interest in physical sciences and process technologies. This workshop was part of a continuing effort to broaden the contribution of the microgravity research community toward achieving the goals of the space agency in human exploration, as identified in the NASA Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) strategic plan. The Microgravity program is one of NASA'a major links to academic and industrial basic research in the physical and engineering sciences. At present, it supports close to 400 principal investigators, who represent many of the nation's leading researchers in the physical and engineering sciences and biotechnology. The intent of the workshop provided a dialogue between NASA and this large, influential research community, mission planners and industry technical experts with the goal of defining enabling research for the Human Exploration and Development of Space activities to which the microgravity research community can contribute.

  8. "simplest Molecule" Clarifies Modern Physics I. Cw Laser Space-Time Frame Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimer, T. C.; Harter, W. G.

    2014-06-01

    Molecular spectroscopy makes very precise applications of quantum theory including GPS, BEC, and laser clocks. Now it can return the favor by shedding some light on modern physics mysteries by further unifying quantum theory and relativity. * We first ask, "What is the simplest molecule?" Hydrogen H2 is the simplest, stable molecule. Positronium is an electron-positron (e+e-)-pair. An even simpler "molecule" or "radical" is a photon-pair (γ, γ) that under certain conditions can create an (e+e-)-pair. * To help unravel relativistic and quantum mysteries consider CW laser beam pairs or TE-waveguides. Remarkably, their wave interference immediately gives Minkowski space-time coordinates and clearly relates eight kinds of space-time wave dilations or contractions to shifts in Doppler frequency or wavenumber. * Modern physics students may find this approach significantly simplifies and clarifies relativistic physics in space-time (x,ct) and inverse time-space (ω,ck). It resolves some mysteries surrounding super-constant c=299,792,458m/s by proving "Evenson's Axiom" named in honor of NIST metrologist Ken Evenson (1932-2002) whose spectroscopy established c to start a precision-renaissance in spectroscopy and GPS metrology. * The following Talk II applies this approach to relativistic quantum mechanics.

  9. ``Simplest Molecule'' Clarifies Modern Physics I. CW Laser Space-Time Frame Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimer, Tyle; Harter, William

    2015-05-01

    Molecular spectroscopy makes very precise applications of quantum theory including GPS, BEC, and laser clocks. Now it can return the favor by shedding some light on modern physics mysteries by further unifying quantum theory and relativity. We first ask, ``What is the simplest molecule?'' Hydrogen H2 is the simplest stable molecule. Positronium is an electron-positron (e+e-) -pair. An even simpler ``molecule'' or ``radical'' is a photon-pair (γ, γ) that under certain conditions can create an (e+e-) -pair. To help unravel relativistic and quantum mysteries consider CW laser beam pairs or TE-waveguides. Remarkably, their wave interference immediately gives Minkowski space-time coordinates and clearly relates eight kinds of space-time wave dilations or contractions to shifts in Doppler frequency or wavenumber. Modern physics students may find this approach significantly simplifies and clarifies relativistic physics in space-time (x,ct) and inverse time-space (ω,ck). It resolves some mysteries surrounding super-constant c = 299,792,458 m/s by proving ``Evenson's Axiom'' named in honor of NIST metrologist Ken Evenson (1932-2002) whose spectroscopy established c to start a precision renaissance in spectroscopy and GPS metrology.

  10. Office of Biological and Physical Research: Overview Transitioning to the Vision for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouch, Roger

    2004-01-01

    Viewgraphs on NASA's transition to its vision for space exploration is presented. The topics include: 1) Strategic Directives Guiding the Human Support Technology Program; 2) Progressive Capabilities; 3) A Journey to Inspire, Innovate, and Discover; 4) Risk Mitigation Status Technology Readiness Level (TRL) and Countermeasures Readiness Level (CRL); 5) Biological And Physical Research Enterprise Aligning With The Vision For U.S. Space Exploration; 6) Critical Path Roadmap Reference Missions; 7) Rating Risks; 8) Current Critical Path Roadmap (Draft) Rating Risks: Human Health; 9) Current Critical Path Roadmap (Draft) Rating Risks: System Performance/Efficiency; 10) Biological And Physical Research Enterprise Efforts to Align With Vision For U.S. Space Exploration; 11) Aligning with the Vision: Exploration Research Areas of Emphasis; 12) Code U Efforts To Align With The Vision For U.S. Space Exploration; 13) Types of Critical Path Roadmap Risks; and 14) ISS Human Support Systems Research, Development, and Demonstration. A summary discussing the vision for U.S. space exploration is also provided.

  11. Impact of curvature divergences on physical observers in a wormhole space-time with horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmo, Gonzalo J.; Rubiera-Garcia, D.; Sanchez-Puente, A.

    2016-06-01

    The impact of curvature divergences on physical observers in a black hole space-time, which, nonetheless, is geodesically complete is investigated. This space-time is an exact solution of certain extensions of general relativity coupled to Maxwell’s electrodynamics and, roughly speaking, consists of two Reissner-Nordström (or Schwarzschild or Minkowski) geometries connected by a spherical wormhole near the center. We find that, despite the existence of infinite tidal forces, causal contact is never lost among the elements making up the observer. This suggests that curvature divergences may not be as pathological as traditionally thought.

  12. Cross-mission Analysis Through Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candey, R. M.; Bilitza, D.; Chimiak, R.; Cooper, J. F.; Garcia, L. N.; Harris, B.; Johnson, R. C.; King, J. H.; Kovalick, T.; Leckner, H.; Liu, M.; McGuire, R. E.; Papitashvili, N. E.; Roberts, D.

    2012-12-01

    The Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) project at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center provides widely-used heliophysics science-enabling information services and access to heliophysics science data and orbits from NASA's solar-heliospheric satellite missions. Data services include the Coordinated Data Analysis Web (CDAWeb), OMNIweb compilation of interplanetary parameters and related indices, and their large underlying collection of datasets. Orbit information and display services include the Satellite Situation Center (SSCweb) and the 4D Orbit Viewer interactive Java client. Software includes the IDL CDAWlib library underlying CDAWeb and the Common Data Format (CDF) software library and file format and science file format translation suite.

  13. Conceptual design for the Space Station Freedom fluid physics/dynamics facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Robert L.; Chucksa, Ronald J.; Omalley, Terence F.; Oeftering, Richard C.

    1993-01-01

    A study team at NASA's Lewis Research Center has been working on a definition study and conceptual design for a fluid physics and dynamics science facility that will be located in the Space Station Freedom's baseline U.S. Laboratory module. This modular, user-friendly facility, called the Fluid Physics/Dynamics Facility, will be available for use by industry, academic, and government research communities in the late 1990's. The Facility will support research experiments dealing with the study of fluid physics and dynamics phenomena. Because of the lack of gravity-induced convection, research into the mechanisms of fluids in the absence of gravity will help to provide a better understanding of the fundamentals of fluid processes. This document has been prepared as a final version of the handout for reviewers at the Fluid Physics/Dynamics Facility Assessment Workshop held at Lewis on January 24 and 25, 1990. It covers the background, current status, and future activities of the Lewis Project Study Team effort. It is a revised and updated version of a document entitled 'Status Report on the Conceptual Design for the Space Station Fluid Physics/Dynamics Facility', dated January 1990.

  14. The space shuttle payload planning working groups. Volume 5: Solar physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The findings of the Solar Physics working group of the space shuttle payload planning activity are presented. The areas to be investigated by the solar physics experiments are: (1) the production of mechanical energy in the subphotospheric layers and its transport and dissipation in the upper layers of the atmosphere, (2) the mass flux from the subphotospheric layers into the chromosphere and corona and beyond the solar wind, (3) solar activity and its relationship to magnetic fields, and (4) the production of solar flares. The approach to be followed in conducting the experiments and the equipment required are defined.

  15. A six-dimensional (Z2)3 symmetric model with warped physical space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahabandu, Chetiya; Suranyi, Peter; Rohana Wijewardhana, L. C.; Vaz, Cenalo

    2008-08-01

    The Randall-Sundrum model is studied in six dimension with AdS4 or dS4 metric in the physical four-dimensional space. Two solutions are found, one with induced five-dimensional gravity terms added to the induced cosmological constant terms. We study the graviton modes in both solutions by transforming the mass eigenvalue equation to a Schrodinger equation with a volcano potential. The spectrum of gravitational excitations depends on the input parameters of the theory, the six-dimensional and the effective four-dimensional cosmological constants. The model gives a physically acceptable spectrum if the four-dimensional cosmological constant is sufficiently small.

  16. Agency-Based Male Sex Work: A Descriptive Focus on Physical, Personal, and Social Space

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Michael D.; Grov, Christian; Seal, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Thirty male sex workers (MSWs) from a single agency participated in a qualitative interview about social and occupational aspects of their lives. MSWs established physical (defined areas where clients were not invited) and psychological (limitations of relationship with clients, other escorts, and the agency manager) boundaries to construct personal and professional space regarding sex work. Physical and psychological boundaries often were blended (e.g., bringing friends/family to the agency, utilizing the agency as a “drop-in community center”). The agency further mitigated negative aspects of sex work by providing job training, social support, stigma management, and dual-use space. Actors co-created a context wherein business could be conducted while meeting MSWs' psychosocial needs. PMID:19779572

  17. Space Physics of Close-in Exoplanets and its Implications for Planet Habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Ofer

    2015-04-01

    The search for habitable exoplanets is currently focused on planets orbiting M-dwarf stars, due to the close proximity of the habitable zone to the star. However, the traditional habitability definition does not account for the physical space environment near the planets, which can be extreme at close-in orbits, and can lead to erosion of te planetary atmosphere. In order to sustain their atmosphers, M-dwarf planets need to have either an intrinsic magnetic field, or a thick atmosphere. Here we present a set of numerical magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the interaction of an Earth-like magnetized planet and a Venus-like non-magnetized planet with the stellar wind of M-dwarf star. We study space physics aspects of these interactions and their implications for planet habitability

  18. The Physics of Imaging with Remote Sensors : Photon State Space & Radiative Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Anthony B.

    2012-01-01

    Standard (mono-pixel/steady-source) retrieval methodology is reaching its fundamental limit with access to multi-angle/multi-spectral photo- polarimetry. Next... Two emerging new classes of retrieval algorithm worth nurturing: multi-pixel time-domain Wave-radiometry transition regimes, and more... Cross-fertilization with bio-medical imaging. Physics-based remote sensing: - What is "photon state space?" - What is "radiative transfer?" - Is "the end" in sight? Two wide-open frontiers! center dot Examples (with variations.

  19. Space-time finite-element objects: Efficiently modeling physically complex flows

    SciTech Connect

    Dilts, G.A.

    1996-03-28

    Accurate modeling of high-explosive systems requires detailed consideration of many different physical properties and processes: These diverse processes generally occur in localized regions of the problem. Thus the very partial differential equations used to mathematically model the problem change from one region of space and time to another. The numerical algorithms generally used to solve these equations are frequently conceived in terms of data values for physical field variables u{sup i} defined at a number of spatial points indexed by multi-integer subscripts x{sub J}, resulting in a number of discrete state variables u{sup i}{sub J}. Instead of using as the fundamental object a physical field, which naturally maps to an array, the authors imagine a small piece of space modeled for a small amount of time, a space-time ``element``. Within it, various physical processes occur at various times. Self-contained, it gives account of what happens within its borders. It cooperates with a set of neighbors that organize into meshes, which organize into problems. The authors achieve in the software model a decoupling between the where and the how and the what, lack of which historically has been the source of a great deal of the software overhead of modelling continuum systems, and which is a necessary consequence of writing down u{sup i}{sub J}. An efficient implementation of this idea requires a reformulation of the discretization and solution of systems of conservation laws, and careful class design. A working prototype for systems in one space dimension using Mathematica and C++ is provided.

  20. Basic physical and chemical processes in space radiation effects on polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamaratos, E.; Wilson, J. W.; Chang, C. K.; Xu, Y. J.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of space ionizing radiation on polymers is investigated in terms of operative physical and chemical processes. A useful model of charged particle impact with a polymer was designed. Principle paths of molecular relaxation were identified and energy handling processes were considered. The focus of the study was on energy absorption and the immediately following events. Further study of the radiation degradation of polymers is suggested.

  1. Solo Life to Second Life: The Design of Physical and Virtual Learning Spaces Inspired by the Drama Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholls, Jennifer; Philip, Robyn

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the design of virtual and physical learning spaces developed for students of drama and theatre studies. What can we learn from the traditional drama workshop that will inform the design of drama and theatre spaces created in technology-mediated learning environments? The authors examine four examples of spaces created for…

  2. Physical, anthropometrical, and body composition characteristics of workers at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasley, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    At the Kennedy Space Center, workers are often exposed to cardiovascular and muscular stress in job-related activities which may require a high level of physical fitness in order to safely complete the work task. Similar tasks will be performed at other launch and landing facilities and in space for the Space Station. One such category includes workers who handle toxic propellants and must wear Self-Contained Atmospheric Protective Ensembles (SCAPE) that can weigh 56 lbs. with the air pack. These suits provide a significant physical challenge to many of the workers in terms of carrying this load while moving about and performing work. Furthermore, under some conditions, there is a significant thermal stress. The physical characteristics of these workers are, therefore, of consequence. The purpose of this study was to analyze the anthropometry, body composition, strength, power, endurance, flexibility, aerobic fitness, and blood variables of a representative sample of male KSC SCAPE workers and to compare them with characteristics of other male workers at KSC (total population N=110). Three separate comparisons were made.

  3. Lessons Learned to Date in Developing the Virtual Space Physics Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornwell, C.; Roberts, D. A.; King, J.; Smith, A.

    2005-12-01

    We now have an operational Virtual Space Physics Observatory that provides users the ability to search for and retrieve data from hundreds of space and solar physics data products based on specific terms or a Google-like interface. Lessons learned in building VSPO include: (a) A very close and highly interactive collaboration between scientists and information technologists in the definition and development of services is essential. (b) Constructing a Data Model acceptable to a broad community is very important but very difficult. Variations in usage are inevitable and must be dealt with through translations; this is especially true for the description of variables within data products. (c) Higher-order queries (searches based on events, positions, comparisons of measurements, etc.) are possible, and have been implemented in various systems; currently we see these as being separate from the basic data finding and retrieval services. (d) Building a Virtual Observatory is often more a matter of the tedious details of product descriptions than an exercise in implementing fancy middleware. Paying a knowledgeable third party to build registries can be more efficient than working directly with providers, and automated tools can help but do not solve all the problems. (e) The success of the VO effort in space and solar physics, as elsewhere, will depend on whether the scientific communities involved use and critique the services so that they will come to meet a real need for the integration of resources to solve new scientific problems of perceived importance.

  4. Nuclear Physics and Radiobiology - Issues for Humans in Space and on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Ram

    2008-10-01

    Nuclear physics is playing a vital role in human biological applications, specifically in planned space missions, in hadron radiotherapy, and in low dose radiobiology. While seemingly disparate, these and other areas share a common need for the understanding of nuclear interactions in biological systems. Radiobiology continues to provide valuable information that will help develop better methods for using radiation in the treatment of disease as well as provide a scientific basis for radiation protection standards. NASA is now focused on the agency's vision for space exploration encompassing a broad range of human and robotic missions including missions to the Moon, Mars and beyond. As a result, there is a focus on long duration space missions. Protection from hazards of space radiation has been identified as one of the five NASA critical areas for human space flight. The cost effective design of spacecraft demands a very stringent requirement on the optimization process. Exposures from the hazards of severe space radiation in deep space and/or long duration missions are very different from that of low earth orbit, and much needs to be done about their effects. However, it is clear that revolutionary technologies will need to be developed. Here on earth, particulate radiation treatment for cancer, such as proton radiotherapy, is playing an increasing important role, while the biological effectiveness remains less well understood than for x-rays and other forms of medical radiation treatments. Advanced imaging, dosimetric, Monte Carlo, and other techniques from nuclear physics are utilized to study the molecular basis of fractionation dependency and other tumor and normal tissue radiation responses, such as radiosensitivity. Moreover, advances developed by biological research efforts, such as the sequencing of the human genome, have opened new horizons for radiobiology. New techniques have made it possible to determine at the cellular / molecular level how living

  5. Space life sciences: ground-based iron-ion biology and physics, including shielding.

    PubMed

    2005-01-01

    This session of the 35th Scientific Assembly of COSPAR focuses on recent advances in ground-based studies of high-energy (mainly 1 GeV/nucleon) iron ions. The theme is interdisciplinary in nature and encompasses both physics and biology reports. Manned space missions, including those of the International Space Station and the planned Mars mission, will require the extended presence of crew members in space. As such, a better understanding in shielding design--in radiation detection as well as radio-protection based on simulating studies--is much needed. On the other hand, a better understanding of the basic mechanisms that modulate radiation sensitivity; in determining DNA double strand breaks, chromosomal aberrations, and the induction of apoptosis, will provide important information for an interventional approach. PMID:15929229

  6. Theory of planetary atmospheres: an introduction to their physics and chemistry /2nd revised and enlarged edition/

    SciTech Connect

    Chamberlain, J.W.; Hunten, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    Theoretical models of planetary atmospheres are characterized in an introductory text intended for graduate physics students and practicing scientists. Chapters are devoted to the vertical structure of an atmosphere; atmospheric hydrodynamics; the chemistry and dynamics of the earth stratosphere; planetary astronomy; ionospheres; airglows, auroras, and aeronomy; and the stability of planetary atmospheres. Extensive graphs, diagrams, and tables of numerical data are provided.

  7. A kinetic equation for linear stable fractional motion with applications to space plasma physics

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, Nicholas W; Credgington, Daniel; Sanchez, Raul; Rosenberg, SJ; Chapman, Sandra C

    2009-01-01

    Levy flights and fractional Brownian motion have become exemplars of the heavy-tailed jumps and long-ranged memory widely seen in physics. Natural time series frequently combine both effects, and linear fractional stable motion (lfsm) is a model process of this type, combining {alpha}-stable jumps with a memory kernel. In contrast complex physical spatiotemporal diffusion processes where both the above effects compete have for many years been modeled using the fully fractional kinetic equation for the continuous-time random walk (CTRW), with power laws in the probability density functions of both jump size and waiting time. We derive the analogous kinetic equation for lfsm and show that it has a diffusion coefficient with a power law in time rather than having a fractional time derivative like the CTRW. We discuss some preliminary results on the scaling of burst 'sizes' and 'durations' in lfsm time series, with applications to modeling existing observations in space physics and elsewhere.

  8. AlGaN UV LED and Photodiodes Radiation Hardness and Space Qualifications and Their Applications in Space Science and High Energy Density Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, K. X.

    2011-05-31

    This presentation provides an overview of robust, radiation hard AlGaN optoelectronic devices and their applications in space exploration & high energy density physics. Particularly, deep UV LED and deep UV photodiodes are discussed with regard to their applications, radiation hardness and space qualification. AC charge management of UV LED satellite payload instruments, which were to be launched in late 2012, is covered.

  9. Swarm - The European Space Agency's Constellation Mission: Mapping Earth's Magnetic and Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floberghagen, Rune

    2016-07-01

    Launched on 22 November 2013, the three-satellite Swarm constellation is about halfway into its four-year nominal mission. Embarking identical, high accuracy and high spatial as well as temporal resolution instrumentation on all satellites, the mission has ambitious goals reaching from the deep Earth interior (the liquid outer core) all the way out to the solar-terrestrial interaction in the magnetosphere. One may safely state that the mission addresses a diverse range of science issues, and therefore acts as a true discoverer in many fields. Measurements of the magnetic field (magnitude and vector components), the electric field (through ion drift velocity, ion density, ion temperature, electron density, electron temperature and spacecraft potential), the gas density and horizontal winds as well as precise positioning are supported by a range of derived products for the magnetic field, geophysics, aeronomy and space physics communities. Indeed, Swarm is at the forefront of cross-cutting science issues that involve significant parts of the space and earth physics community. In recent data exploitation and science projects we have also seen a high number of coupling studies emerging. This contribution details the status and achievements of the mission in the field of magnetic field, electric field and geospace research. It furthermore discusses the the Agency's further plans, beyond the currently foreseen nominal end of mission in spring 2018. The role of Swarm for space weather research will also be discussed.

  10. Target error for image-to-physical space registration: preliminary clinical results using laser range scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Aize; Miga, Michael I.; Dumpuri, P.; Ding, S.; Dawant, B. M.; Thompson, R. C.

    2007-03-01

    In this paper, preliminary results from an image-to-physical space registration platform are presented. The current platform employs traditional and novel methods of registration which use a variety of data sources to include: traditional synthetic skin-fiducial point-based registration, surface registration based on facial contours, brain feature point-based registration, brain vessel-to-vessel registration, and a more comprehensive cortical surface registration method that utilizes both geometric and intensity information from both the image volume and physical patient. The intraoperative face and cortical surfaces were digitized using a laser range scanner (LRS) capable of producing highly resolved textured point clouds. In two in vivo cases, a series of registrations were performed using these techniques and compared within the context of a true target error. One of the advantages of using a textured point cloud data stream is that true targets among the physical cortical surface and the preoperative image volume can be identified and used to assess image-to-physical registration methods. The results suggest that iterative closest point (ICP) method for intraoperative face surface registration is equivalent to point-based registration (PBR) method of skin fiducial markers. With regard to the initial image and physical space registration, for patient 1, mean target registration error (TRE) were 3.1+/-0.4 mm and 3.6 +/-0.9 mm for face ICP and skin fiducial PBR, respectively. For patient 2, the mean TRE were 5.7 +/-1.3 mm, and 6.6 +/-0.9 mm for face ICP and skin fiducial PBR, respectively. With regard to intraoperative cortical surface registration, SurfaceMI outperformed feature based PBR and vessel ICP with 1.7+/-1.8 mm for patient 1. For patient 2, the best result was achieved by using vessel ICP with 1.9+/-0.5 mm.

  11. Research in aeronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, B. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    Progress in aeronomic research is reported. The following topics are discussed: ionospheric theory; rocket experiments; system development for Urbana measurements; meteor radar; coherent and incoherent scatter radar; and laser radar.

  12. Volumic imaging of artificially generated data: unified concept for physical and hypothetical virtual spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Valery

    1997-02-01

    Human visual system is well suited for reliable and adequate volumic perception of natural environment. Volumic data flows coming from outer physical space are easily acquired in real time. Current modes of imitating physical spaces or creating of hypothetical virtual spaces have a lot of drawbacks. The quality and the speed of volumic data presentation are severely limited. Moreover most of current devices destined to operate with artificially generated volumic data flows seem poorly compatible with eye/brian data processing procedures. It can be illustrated for example by multiple failures in introduction of public stereoscopic TV in spite of numerous lengthy efforts made for years since the appearance of TV. Thus quite novel approaches must be formulated and novel principles introduced. Unified concept of volumic imaging of artificially generated data is introduced here. This concept gives way to creation of principally novel prospective devices which might drastically enhance authenticity of perceived artificially generated data. Quite novel principle of 'one-eyed' volumic imaging system for robotics is proposed.

  13. [A review on urban metabolism research based on physical space entities for environmental management].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ye; Liu, Dan

    2015-07-01

    Urban metabolism is a basic theory for coping with global environmental problems, which is coherent with the aims of national environmental management. This paper analyzed the concept of urban metabolism, and pointed out the meaning for urban metabolism in physical space entities; reviewed the current methods for urban metabolism and its merits and shortages; analyzed the system boundaries, connotation, and methodologies; and summarized the advances on urban meta-bolism practices in physical space entities. At last, we made conclusions that there were shortages, including conception system, basic theory system, and interdisciplinary integrated theory system in current urban metabolism research, and the current cases studied in urban metabolism were limited and not suitable to the harmony development between society, economy, and environment. In the future, we need to strengthen comparison between different case studies from different countries, develop the prior modes of typical urban metabolism research, identify the mechanism for urban ecosystem, and strengthen the spatial decision support system of environmental management taking urban spatial entity spaces as units. PMID:26710653

  14. [A review on urban metabolism research based on physical space entities for environmental management].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ye; Liu, Dan

    2015-07-01

    Urban metabolism is a basic theory for coping with global environmental problems, which is coherent with the aims of national environmental management. This paper analyzed the concept of urban metabolism, and pointed out the meaning for urban metabolism in physical space entities; reviewed the current methods for urban metabolism and its merits and shortages; analyzed the system boundaries, connotation, and methodologies; and summarized the advances on urban meta-bolism practices in physical space entities. At last, we made conclusions that there were shortages, including conception system, basic theory system, and interdisciplinary integrated theory system in current urban metabolism research, and the current cases studied in urban metabolism were limited and not suitable to the harmony development between society, economy, and environment. In the future, we need to strengthen comparison between different case studies from different countries, develop the prior modes of typical urban metabolism research, identify the mechanism for urban ecosystem, and strengthen the spatial decision support system of environmental management taking urban spatial entity spaces as units.

  15. "Let's Sit Forward": Investigating Interprofessional Communication, Collaboration, Professional Roles, and Physical Space at EmergiCare.

    PubMed

    Dean, Marleah; Gill, Rebecca; Barbour, Joshua B

    2016-12-01

    Communication is key to hospital emergency department (ED) caregiving. Interventions in ED processes (and health care organizing in general) have struggled when they have ignored the professional role expectations that enable and constrain providers with patients and each other. Informed by a communication as design (CAD) approach, this study explored the intersections of professional roles, physical space, and communication at EmergiCare-an academic medical center and level-1 trauma center hospital. Based on an ethnographic analysis of field notes from 70 hours of shadowing at the EmergiCare ED, this study identified two specific communication patterns, "case talk" and "comfort talk," that reflect different logics for communication in health care organizing. The findings indicate (a) that case and comfort talk have different status and therefore different influence in EmergiCare ED interprofessional communication and (b) that the arrangement of physical space at EmergiCare ED reflects the requirements of case talk more so than comfort talk. These findings have important implications for theory and practice, including the importance of considering the macro-discursive construction of professional roles reified in the arrangement of work space. PMID:27093130

  16. How does mental-physical multimorbidity express itself in lived time and space? A phenomenological analysis of encounters with depression and chronic physical illness.

    PubMed

    Coventry, Peter A; Dickens, Chris; Todd, Chris

    2014-10-01

    Mental-physical multimorbidity (the co-existence of mental and physical ill health) is highly prevalent and associated with significant impairments and high healthcare costs. While the sociology of chronic illness has developed a mature discourse on coping with long term physical illness the impact of mental and physical health have remained analytically separated, highlighting the need for a better understanding of the day-to-day complexities encountered by people living with mental-physical multimorbidity. We used the phenomenological paradigm of the lived body to elucidate how the experience of mental-physical multimorbidity shapes people's lifeworlds. Nineteen people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and depression (defined as a score ≥8 on depression scale of Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) were recruited from secondary NHS care and interviewed at their homes. Data were analysed phenomenologically using van Manen's lifeworld existential framework of the lived body, lived time, lived space, lived relations. Additionally, we re-analysed data (using the same framework) collected from 13 people recruited from secondary NHS care with either COPD, rheumatoid arthritis, heart disease, or type 1 or type 2 diabetes and depression. The phenomenology of mental-physical multimorbidity was articulated through embodied and emotional encounters with day-to-day life in four ways: [a] participants' perception of lived time and lived space contracted; [b] time and [c] space were experienced as liminal categories, enforcing negative mood and temporal and spatial contraction; and [d] time and space could also be customised to reinstate agency and self-determination. Mental-physical multimorbidity negatively impacts on individuals' perceptions of lived time and lived space, leading to a loss of agency, heightened uncertainty, and poor well-being. Harnessing people's capacity to modify their experience of time and space may be a novel way to support people

  17. Undergraduate space science program at Alabama A&M University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lal, R.; Tan, A.; Lyatsky, W.

    A new undergraduate Physics Program with Space Science as the major concentration area has been initiated at Alabama A&M University (AAMU) in 2001. This program is funded by NASAÆs OSS and OEOP Offices under the NRA 00-OSS-02 Minority University Education and Research Partnership Initiative in Space Science-2000. The partner institutions are NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH). A primary objective of this Program is to train undergraduate and graduate minority (principally African-American) students in the extremely underrepresented areas of Space Science and to prepare them for eventual teaching and/or research careers in this increasingly important field. The best way to achieve this is to recruit students early from high school, and not wait until they have already selected their specialty in college. Also, a student with a BS degree in Physics with specialization in Space Science will have a decisive advantage in pursuing graduate studies in Space Science than the others. The BS degree requires a student to take 30 credit hours of Physics courses and an additional 18 hours in the chosen area of concentration. Several basic traditional courses in Lower Atmosphere, Aeronomy, the Solar System and Orbital Mechanics have been developed. Additional courses in Plasma Physics, Solar Physics and Astronomy will be taught by NASA-MSFC scientists and UAH faculty. A parallel objective is to expose the student to research experience early in their ca- reers. Each student is required to complete a one semester Undergraduate Research Opportunity Project (UROP) on a relevant topic from Space Science. The students will be guided in research by AAMU and UAH faculty and MSFC scientists. Each student will be required to write a term paper and make an oral presentation before a committee of advisors. This experience will enhance the Space

  18. Replacing the Singlet Spinor of the EPR-B Experiment in the Configuration Space with Two Single-Particle Spinors in Physical Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gondran, Michel; Gondran, Alexandre

    2016-09-01

    Recently, for spinless non-relativistic particles, Norsen (Found Phys 40:1858-1884, 2010) and Norsen et al. (Synthese 192:3125-3151, 2015) show that in the de Broglie-Bohm interpretation it is possible to replace the wave function in the configuration space by single-particle wave functions in physical space. In this paper, we show that this replacment of the wave function in the configuration space by single-particle functions in the 3D-space is also possible for particles with spin, in particular for the particles of the EPR-B experiment, the Bohm version of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen experiment.

  19. Replacing the Singlet Spinor of the EPR-B Experiment in the Configuration Space with Two Single-Particle Spinors in Physical Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gondran, Michel; Gondran, Alexandre

    2016-04-01

    Recently, for spinless non-relativistic particles, Norsen (Found Phys 40:1858-1884, 2010) and Norsen et al. (Synthese 192:3125-3151, 2015) show that in the de Broglie-Bohm interpretation it is possible to replace the wave function in the configuration space by single-particle wave functions in physical space. In this paper, we show that this replacment of the wave function in the configuration space by single-particle functions in the 3D-space is also possible for particles with spin, in particular for the particles of the EPR-B experiment, the Bohm version of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen experiment.

  20. Identity, Physical Space, and Stigma Among African American Men Living with HIV in Chicago and Seattle.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Judith L; Raunig, Manuela; Brunsteter, Halley; Desmond, Michelle; Rao, Deepa

    2015-12-01

    African American men have the highest rates of HIV in the USA, and research has shown that stigma, mistrust of health care, and other psychosocial factors interfere with optimal engagement in care with this population. In order to further understand reducing stigma and other psychosocial issues among African American men, we conducted qualitative interviews and focus groups with African American men in two metropolitan areas in the USA: Chicago and Seattle. We examined transcripts for relationships across variables of stigma, anonymity, self-identity, and space within the context of HIV. Our analysis pointed to similarities between experiences of stigma across the two cities and illustrated the relationships between space, isolation, and preferred anonymity related to living with HIV. The men in our study often preferred that their HIV-linked identities remain invisible and anonymous, associated with perceived and created isolation from physical community spaces. This article suggests that our health care and housing institutions may influence preferences for anonymity. We make recommendations in key areas to create safer spaces for African American men living with HIV and reduce feelings of stigma and isolation.

  1. Identity, Physical Space, and Stigma Among African American Men Living with HIV in Chicago and Seattle.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Judith L; Raunig, Manuela; Brunsteter, Halley; Desmond, Michelle; Rao, Deepa

    2015-12-01

    African American men have the highest rates of HIV in the USA, and research has shown that stigma, mistrust of health care, and other psychosocial factors interfere with optimal engagement in care with this population. In order to further understand reducing stigma and other psychosocial issues among African American men, we conducted qualitative interviews and focus groups with African American men in two metropolitan areas in the USA: Chicago and Seattle. We examined transcripts for relationships across variables of stigma, anonymity, self-identity, and space within the context of HIV. Our analysis pointed to similarities between experiences of stigma across the two cities and illustrated the relationships between space, isolation, and preferred anonymity related to living with HIV. The men in our study often preferred that their HIV-linked identities remain invisible and anonymous, associated with perceived and created isolation from physical community spaces. This article suggests that our health care and housing institutions may influence preferences for anonymity. We make recommendations in key areas to create safer spaces for African American men living with HIV and reduce feelings of stigma and isolation. PMID:26863561

  2. Unique Programme of Indian Centre for Space Physics using large rubber Balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Sarkar, Ritabrata; Bhowmick, Debashis; Chakraborty, Subhankar

    Indian Centre for Space Physics (ICSP) has developed a unique capability to pursue space based studies at a very low cost. Here, large rubber balloons are sent to near space (~ 40km) with payloads of less than 4kg weight. These payloads can be cosmic ray detectors, X-ray detectors, muon detectors apart from communication device, GPS, and nine degrees of freedom measuring capabilities. With two balloons in orbiter-launcher configuration, ICSP has been able to conduct long duration flights upto 12 hours. ICSP has so far sent 56 Dignity missions to near space and obtained Cosmic Ray and muon variation on a regular basis, dynamical spectrum of solar flares and gamma ray burst apart from other usual parameters such as wind velocity components, temperature and pressure variations etc. Since all the payloads are retrieved by parachutes, the cost per mission remains very low, typically around USD1000.00. The preparation time is low. Furthermore, no special launching area is required. In principle, such experiments can be conducted on a daily basis, if need be. Presently, we are also incorporating studies relating to earth system science such as Ozone, aerosols, micro-meteorites etc.

  3. Free-Space optical interconnects for cable-less readout in particle physics detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Chramowicz, John; Kwan, Simon; Moretti, Tony; Sugg, Alan; Prosser, Alan; /Fermilab

    2010-10-01

    Particle physics detectors utilize readout data links requiring a complicated network of copper wires or optical fibers. These links are both massive and costly. Upgrades to such detectors may require additional bandwidth to be provisioned with limited space available to route new cables or fibers. In contrast, free-space optical interconnects will offer cable-less readout, thereby resulting in significant reductions of material and labor. A collaborative effort between Fermilab and Vega Wave Systems is pursuing the development of a unique free-space optical link design that utilizes the transparency of silicon at wavelengths including 1310 nm and multiple wavelengths used in standard telecommunications applications such as coarse wavelength division multiplexing (CWDM). The first step in the pursuit of that design is a proof that the concept may be viable. To that end, experiments have been performed to characterize the bit error rate performance of a prototype link over a free-space optical path and through doped silicon at multi-gigabit rates. These experiments have demonstrated that operation within acceptable bit error rates is possible using single and multiple wavelength transmission arrangements.

  4. Physical design and Monte Carlo simulations of a space radiation detector onboard the SJ-10 satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ya-Qing; Wang, Huan-Yu; Cui, Xing-Zhu; Peng, Wen-Xi; Fan, Rui-Rui; Liang, Xiao-Hua; Gao, Ming; Zhang, Yun-Long; Zhang, Cheng-Mo; Zhang, Jia-Yu; Yang, Jia-Wei; Wang, Jin-Zhou; Zhang, Fei; Dong, Yi-Fan; Guo, Dong-Ya; Zhou, Da-Wei

    2015-01-01

    A radiation gene box (RGB) onboard the SJ-10 satellite is a device carrying mice and drosophila cells to determine the biological effects of space radiation environment. The shielded fluxes of different radioactive sources were calculated and the linear energy transfers of γ-rays, electrons, protons and α-particles in the tissue were acquired using A-150 tissue-equivalent plastic. Then, a conceptual model of a space radiation instrument employing three semiconductor sub-detectors for deriving the charged and uncharged radiation environment of the RGB was designed. The energy depositions in the three sub-detectors were classified into 15 channels (bins) in an algorithm derived from the Monte Carlo method. The physical feasibility of the conceptual instrument was also verified by Monte Carlo simulations.

  5. Access to green space, physical activity and mental health: a twin study

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Cline, Hannah; Turkheimer, Eric; Duncan, Glen E

    2015-01-01

    Background Increasing global urbanisation has resulted in a greater proportion of the world’s population becoming exposed to risk factors unique to urban areas, and understanding these effects on public health is essential. The aim of this study was to examine the association between access to green space and mental health among adult twin pairs. Methods We used a multilevel random intercept model of same-sex twin pairs (4338 individuals) from the community-based University of Washington Twin Registry to analyse the association between access to green space, as measured by the Normalised Difference Vegetation Index and self-reported depression, stress, and anxiety. The main parameter of interest was the within-pair effect for identical (monozygotic, MZ) twins because it was not subject to confounding by genetic or shared childhood environment factors. Models were adjusted for income, physical activity, neighbourhood deprivation and population density. Results When treating twins as individuals and not as members of a twin pair, green space was significantly inversely associated with each mental health outcome. The association with depression remained significant in the within-pair MZ univariate and adjusted models; however, there was no within-pair MZ effect for stress or anxiety among the models adjusted for income and physical activity. Conclusions These results suggest that greater access to green space is associated with less depression, but provide less evidence for effects on stress or anxiety. Understanding the mechanisms linking neighbourhood characteristics to mental health has important public health implications. Future studies should combine twin designs and longitudinal data to strengthen causal inference. PMID:25631858

  6. The physical space of science: the Neurosciences Institute and Skirkanich Hall.

    PubMed

    Williams, Tod; Tsien, Billie

    2010-01-01

    This is the first in a series of articles that Landes Bioscience will publish about the physical space where research takes place-the laboratories and classrooms where the science you read about in our journals is happening. Here we interviewed New York-based architects Tod Williams and Billie Tsien about two of their projects, The Neurosciences Institute in La Jolla and Skirkanich Hall at the University of Pennsylvania. We asked them, among other things, how they engaged scientists in the design process. Here is their response.

  7. Testing Gravitational Physics with Space-based Gravitational-wave Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.

    2011-01-01

    Gravitational wave observations provide exceptional and unique opportunities for precision tests of gravitational physics, as predicted by general relativity (GR). Space-based gravitational wave measurements, with high signal-to-noise ratios and large numbers of observed events may provide the best-suited gravitational-wave observations for testing GR with unprecedented precision. These observations will be especially useful in testing the properties of gravitational waves and strong-field aspects of the theory which are less relevant in other observations. We review the proposed GR test based on observations of massive black hole mergers, extreme mass ratio inspirals, and galactic binary systems.

  8. Equivalence of curvature and noncommutativity in a physical space: Harmonic oscillator on sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorashi, S. A. A.; Mahdifar, A.; Roknizadeh, R.

    2014-06-01

    We study the two-dimensional harmonic oscillator on a noncommutative plane. We show that by introducing appropriate Bopp shifts, one can obtain the Hamiltonian of a two-dimensional harmonic oscillator on a sphere according to the Higgs model. By calculating the commutation relations, we show that this noncommutativity is strictly dependent on the curvature of the background space. In other words, we introduce a kind of duality between noncommutativity and curvature by introducing noncommutativity parameters as functions of curvature. Also, it is shown that the physical realization of such model is a charged harmonic oscillator in the presence of electromagnetic field.

  9. The use and misuse of statistical analyses. [in geophysics and space physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiff, P. H.

    1983-01-01

    The statistical techniques most often used in space physics include Fourier analysis, linear correlation, auto- and cross-correlation, power spectral density, and superposed epoch analysis. Tests are presented which can evaluate the significance of the results obtained through each of these. Data presented without some form of error analysis are frequently useless, since they offer no way of assessing whether a bump on a spectrum or on a superposed epoch analysis is real or merely a statistical fluctuation. Among many of the published linear correlations, for instance, the uncertainty in the intercept and slope is not given, so that the significance of the fitted parameters cannot be assessed.

  10. Fuzzy physical programming for Space Manoeuvre Vehicles trajectory optimization based on hp-adaptive pseudospectral method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Runqi; Savvaris, Al; Tsourdos, Antonios

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a fuzzy physical programming (FPP) method has been introduced for solving multi-objective Space Manoeuvre Vehicles (SMV) skip trajectory optimization problem based on hp-adaptive pseudospectral methods. The dynamic model of SMV is elaborated and then, by employing hp-adaptive pseudospectral methods, the problem has been transformed to nonlinear programming (NLP) problem. According to the mission requirements, the solutions were calculated for each single-objective scenario. To get a compromised solution for each target, the fuzzy physical programming (FPP) model is proposed. The preference function is established with considering the fuzzy factor of the system such that a proper compromised trajectory can be acquired. In addition, the NSGA-II is tested to obtain the Pareto-optimal solution set and verify the Pareto optimality of the FPP solution. Simulation results indicate that the proposed method is effective and feasible in terms of dealing with the multi-objective skip trajectory optimization for the SMV.

  11. Fluid Physics Experiments onboard International Space Station: Through the Eyes of a Scientist.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevtsova, Valentina

    Fluids are present everywhere in everyday life. They are also present as fuel, in support systems or as consumable in rockets and onboard of satellites and space stations. Everyone experiences every day that fluids are very sensitive to gravity: on Earth liquids flow downwards and gases mostly rise. Nowadays much of the interest of the scientific community is on studying the phenomena at microscales in so-called microfluidic systems. However, at smaller scales the experimental investigation of convective flows becomes increasingly difficult as the control parameter Ra scales with g L (3) (g; acceleration level, L: length scale). A unique alternative to the difficulty of investigating systems with small length scale on the ground is to reduce the gravity level g. In systems with interfaces, buoyancy forces are proportional to the volume of the liquid, while capillary forces act solely on the liquid surface. The importance of buoyancy diminishes either at very small scales or with reducing the acceleration level. Under the weightless conditions of space where buoyancy is virtually eliminated, other mechanisms such as capillary forces, diffusion, vibration, shear forces, electrostatic and electromagnetic forces are dominating in the fluid behaviour. This is why research in space represents a powerful tool for scientific research in this field. Understanding how fluids work really matters and so does measuring their properties accurately. Presently, a number of scientific laboratories, as usual goes with multi-user instruments, are involved in fluid research on the ISS. The programme of fluid physics experiments on-board deals with capillary flows, diffusion, dynamics in complex fluids (foams, emulsions and granular matter), heat transfer processes with phase change, physics and physico-chemistry near or beyond the critical point and it also extends to combustion physics. The top-level objectives of fluid research in space are as follows: (i) to investigate fluid

  12. Fluid Physical and Transport Phenomena Studies aboard the International Space Station: Planned Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Bhim S.

    1999-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the microgravity fluid physics and transport phenomena experiments planned for the International Spare Station. NASA's Office of Life and Microgravity Science and Applications has established a world-class research program in fluid physics and transport phenomena. This program combines the vast expertise of the world research community with NASA's unique microgravity facilities with the objectives of gaining new insight into fluid phenomena by removing the confounding effect of gravity. Due to its criticality to many terrestrial and space-based processes and phenomena, fluid physics and transport phenomena play a central role in the NASA's Microgravity Program. Through widely publicized research announcement and well established peer-reviews, the program has been able to attract a number of world-class researchers and acquired a critical mass of investigations that is now adding rapidly to this field. Currently there arc a total of 106 ground-based and 20 candidate flight principal investigators conducting research in four major thrust areas in the program: complex flows, multiphase flow and phase change, interfacial phenomena, and dynamics and instabilities. The International Space Station (ISS) to be launched in 1998, provides the microgravity research community with a unprecedented opportunity to conduct long-duration microgravity experiments which can be controlled and operated from the Principal Investigators' own laboratory. Frequent planned shuttle flights to the Station will provide opportunities to conduct many more experiments than were previously possible. NASA Lewis Research Center is in the process of designing a Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) to be located in the Laboratory Module of the ISS that will not only accommodate multiple users but, allow a broad range of fluid physics and transport phenomena experiments to be conducted in a cost effective manner.

  13. Spacing and physical habitat selection patterns by peregrine falcons in central West Greenland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wightman, C.; Fuller, Mark R.

    2005-01-01

    We examined nest-site spacing and selection of nesting cliffs by Peregrine Falcons (Falco peregrinus) in central West Greenland. Our sample included 67 nesting cliffs that were occupied at least once between 1972 and 1999 and 38 cliffs with no known history of Peregrine Falcon occupancy. We measured 29 eyrie, cliff, and topographical features at each occupied nesting cliff and unused cliff in 1998a??1999 and used them to model the probability of peregrines occupying a cliff for a breeding attempt. Nearest-neighbor distance was significantly greater than both nearest-cliff distance and nearest-occupied distance (the distance between an occupied cliff and one occupied at least once, 1972a??1999). Thus, spacing among occupied cliffs was probably the most important factor limiting nesting-cliff availability, and, ultimately, peregrine nesting densities. Although some unused cliffs were unavailable in a given year because of peregrine spacing behavior, physical characteristics apparently made some cliffs unsuitable, regardless of availability. We confirmed the importance of several features common to descriptions of peregrine nesting habitat and found that peregrines occupied tall nesting cliffs with open views. They chose nesting cliffs with eyrie ledges that provided a moderate degree of overhang protection and that were inaccessible to ground predators. Overall, we concluded that certain features of a cliff were important in determining its suitability as a nest site, but within a given breeding season there also must be sufficient spacing between neighboring falcon pairs. Our habitat model and information on spacing requirements may be applicable to other areas of Greenland and the Arctic, and can be used to test the generalities about features of Peregrine Falcon nesting cliffs throughout the species' widespread distribution.

  14. Developing a Musical Vocabulary to Communicate, Perceive and Analyze Space Physics Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, M. S.

    2008-12-01

    "Light Runners" is a touring E/PO program that provides unprecedented access to STEREO space mission imagery data to the blind and visually handicapped, as well as sighted populations across the country. The program builds on the successful implementation of the innovative science museum exhibit "Walk on the Sun", developed under NASA Ideas Grant ID05-049. The exhibit uses advanced sonification methods to present image pixel data as highly differentiated music, and visually tracks the explorer's physical movements to select those pixels. Musical feedback is generated in real-time based on selections of subsets of the image by the explorer's hands, arms and body movements. Initial indications suggest people not only enjoy the musical effects produced as they explore the imagery using their body movements, spending an average of 2 minutes on the exhibit, but also use the feedback to analyze and compare subsequent images. Blind students, for example, who spent 1 ½ to 3 hours on the exhibit, have reported being able to scan images of the Sun, find its edges and hot spots and control the playback and rewind of movies of the images as they explore imagery from up to 8 cameras on board each spacecraft. Explorers have access to over a million images, comprising more than a years worth of data from the mission and kept up to date as new images are received. The musical sonification vocabulary for this project is compared to two other space physics sonification projects.

  15. High Energy Astrophysics and Cosmology from Space: NASA's Physics of the Cosmos Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornschemeier, Ann

    2016-03-01

    We summarize currently-funded NASA activities in high energy astrophysics and cosmology, embodied in the NASA Physics of the Cosmos program, including updates on technology development and mission studies. The portfolio includes development of a space mission for measuring gravitational waves from merging supermassive black holes, currently envisioned as a collaboration with the European Space Agency (ESA) on its L3 mission and development of an X-ray observatory that will measure X-ray emission from the final stages of accretion onto black holes, currently envisioned as a NASA collaboration on ESA's Athena observatory. The portfolio also includes the study of cosmic rays and gamma ray photons resulting from a range of processes, of the physical process of inflation associated with the birth of the universe and of the nature of the dark energy that dominates the mass-energy of the modern universe. The program is supported by an analysis group called the PhysPAG that serves as a forum for community input and analysis and the talk will include a description of activities of this group.

  16. Career Aspirations and Career Outcomes for Solar and Space Physics Ph.D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldwin, M.; Morrow, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    Results from a recent graduate student survey found unsurprisingly that Solar and Space Physics (S&SP) Ph.D. graduate students almost all aspire to have research careers in Solar and Space Physics. This study reports on the research career outcomes over the last decade for S&SP Ph.Ds. We used publication of peer-reviewed articles as the indicator for persistence in a research career. We found that nearly two-thirds (64%) of Ph.D.s who graduated between 2001 to 2009 published refereed-papers four or more years after their Ph.D., while 17% of Ph.D.s never published another paper beyond the year they received their Ph.D. The remaining 19% of Ph.Ds, stopped publishing within three-years of receiving their Ph.D. We found that though there is statistically no difference on persistence of publishing research between graduates of the largest programs compared to all other programs, there are significant differences between programs. We also found there was no gender differences in any of the persistence data (i.e., men and women stop or continue publishing at the same rates). Graduate programs, faculty advisors and potential graduate students can use these data for career planning. This study suggests that a significant majority of S&SP Ph.D.s (77%) find post-doctoral research positions and a majority (56%) find research careers beyond their post-doc.

  17. Countermeasure of the negative effects of weightlessness on physical systems in long-term space flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovskaya, I. B.; Grigoriev, A. I.; Stepantzov, V. I.

    The system of countermcasure of microgravity effects has been developed in Russia that allowed to perform safely long-term space flights. This system that includes different means and methods such as special regimens of physical exercises, axial loading ("Pingiun") and antigravity suits, low body negative pressure device (LBNP, "Chibis") and "cuffs" and others has been used with certain variations at certain stages of flight in 27 successfully accomplished space flights that lasted from 60 to 439 days. The pre-, in- and postflight studies performed in 57 crew members of these flights have shown that the system of countermeasure is effective in preventing or diminishing to a great extent almost all the negative effects of weightlessness in flights of a year and more duration and that the intensity and duration of changes recorded in different body systems after flights do not correlate significantly to flight durations, correlating strongly to the volume and intensity of physical exercises used during flight and especially during concluding stage of it.

  18. A physical-space approach for the probability hypothesis density and cardinalized probability hypothesis density filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdinc, Ozgur; Willett, Peter; Bar-Shalom, Yaakov

    2006-05-01

    The probability hypothesis density (PHD) filter, an automatically track-managed multi-target tracker, is attracting increasing but cautious attention. Its derivation is elegant and mathematical, and thus of course many engineers fear it; perhaps that is currently limiting the number of researchers working on the subject. In this paper, we explore a physical-space approach - a bin model - which leads us to arrive the same filter equations as the PHD. Unlike the original derivation of the PHD filter, the concepts used are the familiar ones of conditional probability. The original PHD suffers from a "target-death" problem in which even a single missed detection can lead to the apparent disappearance of a target. To obviate this, PHD originator Mahler has recently developed a new "cardinalized" version of PHD (CPHD). We are able to extend our physical-space derivation to the CPHD case as well. We stress that the original derivations are mathematically correct, and need no embellishment from us; our contribution here is to offer an alternative derivation, one that we find appealing.

  19. Some Thermodynamic Considerations on the Physical and Quantum Nature of Space and Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohrab, Siavash H.; Piltch, Nancy (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    It is suggested that the Planck h = m(sub k)c Lambda(sub k) and the Boltzmann k = m(sub k)c nu(sub k)Constants have stochastic foundation. It is further suggested that a body of fluid at equilibrium is composed of a spectrum of molecular clusters (energy levels) the size of which are governed by the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution function. Brownian motions are attributed to equilibrium between suspensions and molecular clusters. Atomic (molecular) transition between different size atomic- (molecular-) clusters (energy levels) is shown to result in emission/absorption of energy in accordance with Bohr's theory of atomic spectra. Physical space is identified as a tachyonic fluid that is Dirac's stochastic ether or de Broglie's hidden thermostat. Compressibility of physical space, in accordance with Planck's compressible ether, is shown to result in the Lorentz-Fitzgerald contraction, thus providing a causal explanation of relativistic effect in accordance with the perceptions of Poincare and Lorentz. The invariant Schrodinger equation is derived from the invariant Bernoulli equation for incompressible potential flow. Following Heisenberg a temporal uncertainty relation is introduced as Delta(nu(sub Beta)) Delta(Rho(sub Beta)) > = k.

  20. Applications of Robust, Radiation Hard AlGaN Optoelectronic Devices in Space Exploration and High Energy Density Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, K.

    2011-05-04

    This slide show presents: space exploration applications; high energy density physics applications; UV LED and photodiode radiation hardness; UV LED and photodiode space qualification; UV LED AC charge management; and UV LED satellite payload instruments. A UV LED satellite will be launched 2nd half 2012.

  1. An Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Space Physics Course: Understanding the Process of Science Through One Field's Colorful History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Ramon E.

    1996-01-01

    Science education in this country is in its greatest period of ferment since the post-Sputnik frenzy a generation ago. In that earlier time, however, educators' emphasis was on producing more scientists and engineers. Today we recognize that all Americans need a good science background. The ability to observe, measure, think quantitatively, and reach logical conclusions based on available evidence is a set of skills that everyone entering the workforce needs to acquire if our country is to be competitive in a global economy. Moreover, as public policy increasingly crystallizes around scientific issues, it is critical that citizens be educated in science so that they may provide informed debate and on these issues. In order to develop this idea more fully, I proposed to teach a historically based course about space physics as an honors course at the University of Maryland-College Park (UMCP). The honors program at UMCP was established to foster broad-based undergraduate courses that utilize innovative teaching techniques to provide exemplary education to a select group of students. I designed an introductory course that would have four basic goals: to acquaint students with geomagnetic and auroral phenomena and their relationship to the space environment; to examine issues related to the history of science using the evolution of the field as an example; to develop familiarity with basic skills such as describing and interpreting observations, analyzing scientific papers, and communicating the results of their own research; and to provide some understanding of basic physics, especially those aspect that play a role in the near-earth space environment.

  2. Space and Atmospheric Physics Education and Research at North Carolina A&T State University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, J. R.; Smith, G.; Kebede, A.

    2006-11-01

    gutaye@ncat.edu In this communication we discuss the new undergraduate and graduate space and atmospheric physics program at NC A&T State University. The program is designed to train future generation space scientists to meet the workforce needs of NASA, aerospace industries and academic institutions. In order to fortify this effort, we have initiated collaboration with US Air Force, GSFC and University of Michigan. We plan to contribute to the current scientific issues associated with TEC variations, scintillations and disturbances, and the morphology/manifestations of Ionospheric Spread F phenomena, and their variations with locations, specifically over low and mid-latitudes. In order to facilitate research we plan to install a magnetometer, a coherent beacon receiver and GPS receivers. In the long run the space science research community and K12 students and teachers will use of these facilities. We will discuss our recent experience during the IHY-SCINDA 2006 workshop, in Sal Cape Verde, as well as the plans of the upcoming IHY-Africa workshop, November 5-9, 2007 Addis Ababa Ethiopia.

  3. Expectations of BepiColombo MMO: Space plasma physics of the Hermean magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, M.; Murakami, G.

    2015-12-01

    Little had been known about the Hermean magnetosphere until MESSENGER explored the region. The region is formed as the weak planetary magnetic field stands against the intense solar wind in the close proximity of the Sun. Various prediction had been given by noting the difference in the parameters from the well-studied terrestiral magnetosphere of a similar setting and scaling the well-knowns to the Hermean environment. MESSENGER results, however, show a wide varieity of phenomena that are out of the scope of what one could have reasonably argued. The micro-magnetosphere of Mercury is much more dynamic than one had predicted. BepiColombo MMO, the JAXA spacecraft of the BepiColombo Mercury exploration mission, is equipped to study the space environment of the planet Mercury. Being a spinning spacecraft, BepiColombo MMO has much less constraint for plasma observations and is expected to extract essential elements of space plasma physics that become visible in the Hermean environment. Here we review MESSENGER results and how MMO will contribute to deepen our understanding of space plasmas by addressing the puzzles raised by MESSEGNER.

  4. Mars Exploration: Is There Water on Mars? An Educator's Guide with Activities for Physical and Earth and Space Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TERC, Cambridge, MA.

    This educator's guide discusses whether there is water on the planet Mars. The activities, written for grades 9-12, concern physical, earth, and space sciences. By experimenting with water as it changes state and investigating some effects of air pressure, students not only learn core ideas in physical science but can also deduce the water…

  5. Present status of developments in physical sorption cooling for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benthem, B.; Doornink, J.; Boom, E.; Holland, H. J.; Lerou, P. P. P. M.; Burger, J. F.; ter Brake, H. J. M.

    2014-11-01

    A sorption cooler uses the Joule-Thomson effect for cooling a gas by expanding it through a flow restriction. The flow of gas is sustained by a compressor consisting of one or more sorption cells, which cyclically adsorb and desorb gas according to the fully reversible process of physical sorption. The technology has been shown to provide active cooling in the cryogenic temperature range without exporting vibrations or electromagnetic interference. Due to full reversibility of the process and the absence of moving parts (apart from check valves, which open and close with a very low frequency), such a cooler has the potential for a very long life and high reliability. This paper starts with a recapitulation of the principles of physical sorption cooling followed by an overview of the strengths and weaknesses of the technology in relation to other space cooling technologies, such as pulse-tube cooling and Stirling cooling. Next, the present status of physical sorption cooling technology is presented based on developments previously and currently being performed by the University of Twente, Dutch Space and Kryoz Technologies. A summary will be given of the various existing demonstrator- and lab-models which have been built, along with an overview of the tests which have so far been performed. The central result of this paper is an assessment of the current Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of various sorption cooler configurations, along with their application range in terms of temperatures, heat loads and mission profile. Finally, an outline is given on the way forward currently being pursued by the developers to achieve full maturity of the technology.

  6. Proceedings of the 2003 NASA/JPL Workshop on Fundamental Physics in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strayer, Don (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    The 2003 Fundamental Physics workshop included presentations ranging from forces acting on RNA to properties of clouds of degenerate Fermi atoms, to techniques to probe for a added space-time dimensions, and to flight hardware for low temperature experiments, amongst others. Mark Lee from NASA Headquarters described the new strategic plan that NASA has developed under Administrator Sean O'Keefe's leadership. Mark explained that the Fundamental Physics community now needs to align its research program and the roadmap describing the long-term goals of the program with the NASA plan. Ulf Israelsson of JPL discussed how the rewrite of the roadmap will be implemented under the leadership of the Fundamental Physics Discipline Working Group (DWG). Nick Bigelow, chair of the DWG, outlined how investigators can contribute to the writing of the roadmap. Results of measurements on very cold clouds of Fermi atoms near a Feshbach resonance were described by three investigators. Also, new measurements relating to tests of Einstein equivalence were discussed. Investigators also described methods to test other aspects of Einstein's relativity theories.

  7. A New Multi-Wavelength Synoptic Network for Solar Physics and Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Frank; Roth, Markus; Thompson, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Continuous solar observations are important for many research topics in solar physics, such as magnetic field evolution, flare and CME characteristics, and p-mode oscillation measurements. In addition, space weather operations require constant streams of solar data as input. The deployment of a number of identical instruments around the world in a network has proven to be a very effective strategy for obtaining nearly continuous solar observations. The financial costs of a network are 1-2 orders of magnitude lower than space-based platforms; network instrumentation can be easily accessed for maintenance and upgrades; and telemetry bandwidth is readily available. Currently, there are two solar observing networks with consistent instruments: BiSON and GONG, both designed primarily for helioseismology. In addition, GONG has been augmented with continual magnetic field measurements and H-alpha imagery, with both being used for space weather operational purposes. However, GONG is now 18 years old and getting increasingly more challenging to maintain. There are also at least three scientific motivations for a multi-wavelength network: Recent advances in helioseismology have demonstrated the need for multi-wavelength observations to allow more accurate interpretation of the structure and dynamics below sunspots. Vector magnetometry would greatly benefit from multi-wavelength observations to provide height information and resolve the azimuthal ambiguity. Finally, space weather operations always need a consistent reliable source of continual solar data. This presentation will outline the scientific need for a multi-wavelength network, and discuss some concepts for the design of the instrumentation. A workshop on the topic will be held in Boulder this April.

  8. The ESA Virtual Space Weather Modelling Centre - Phase 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poedts, Stefaan

    The ESA ITT project (AO/1-6738/11/NL/AT) to develop Phase 1 of a Virtual Space Weather Modelling Centre has the following objectives and scope: 1. The construction of a long term (~10 yrs) plan for the future development of a European virtual space weather modelling centre consisting of a new ‘open’ and distributed framework for the coupling of physics based models for space weather phenomena; 2. The assessment of model capabilities and the amount of work required to make them operational by integrating them in this framework and the identification of computing and networking requirements to do so. 3. The design of a system to enable models and other components to be installed locally or geographically distributed and the creation of a validation plan including a system of metrics for testing results. The consortium that took up this challenge involves: 1)the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (Prime Contractor, coordinator: Prof. S. Poedts); 2) the Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy (BIRA-IASB); 3) the Royal Observatory of Belgium (ROB); 4) the Von Karman Institute (VKI); 5) DH Consultancy (DHC); 6) Space Applications Services (SAS). The project started on May 14 2012, and will finish in May 2014. Thus, by the time of the meeting, both Phase 1A and Phase 1B (the development of the prototype) will be finished. The final report will be presented incl. the architecture decisions made, the framework, the current models integrated already as well as the model couplers installed. The prototype VSWMC will be demonstrated.

  9. Promoting Physical Activity Through the Shared Use of School Recreational Spaces: A Policy Statement From the American Heart Association

    PubMed Central

    Young, Deborah R.; Spengler, John O.; Frost, Natasha; Evenson, Kelly R.; Vincent, Jeffrey M.; Whitsel, Laurie

    2014-01-01

    Most Americans are not sufficiently physically active, even though regular physical activity improves health and reduces the risk of many chronic diseases. Those living in rural, non-White, and lower-income communities often have insufficient access to places to be active, which can contribute to their lower level of physical activity. The shared use of school recreational facilities can provide safe and affordable places for communities. Studies suggest that challenges to shared use include additional cost, liability protection, communication among constituencies interested in sharing space, and decision-making about scheduling and space allocation. This American Heart Association policy statement has provided recommendations for federal, state, and local decision-makers to support and expand opportunities for physical activity in communities through the shared use of school spaces. PMID:24134355

  10. TIMED Science With the Space Physics Data Facility's (SPDF) Data and Models Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilitza, D.; McGuire, R. E.; Kovalick, T.; Candey, R. M.; Leckner, H.

    2005-12-01

    NASA's Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) provides access to a large volume of data and models that are of relevance to Ionospheric, Thermospheric and Mesospheric (ITM) physics and to the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) mission in particular. SPDF has developed a number of web systems to facilitate user access to important data and model resources and is making these services available through Web Services (or Application Programming Interfaces, API) directly to applications such as VxOs. The Coordinated Data Analysis web (CDAWeb) provides access to data from most of NASA's currently operating space science satellites and many of the earlier missions covering the full expanse of the Earth-Sun system from mesosphere to heliosphere. CDAWeb lets user plot data using a wide range of parameter display options including mapped images and movies; capabilities also include parameter listings and data downloads in CDF and ASCII format. TIMED data display options, for example, include GUVI airglow intensities and TIDI neutral wind vectors in a transverse Mercator projection that shows simultaneously both poles and the equatorial region. Coupled with CDAWeb's comprehensive coverage of solar wind parameters the TIMED data will provide new insights into the ITM response to solar and magnetic storms. SPDF's SSCWeb interface enables users to plot orbits for the majority of space physics satellites and to query for magnetic field line conjunctions between multiple spacecraft and ground stations and for magnetic region occupancy and thus enables coordinates science investigation between TIMED and CEDAR ground stations. Recently an Interactive 3-D orbit viewer was added to SSCWeb. Access to legacy data from older ITM satellite missions is provided through the ATMOWeb browse and download system enabling the study of solar cycle effects on ITM parameters. SPDF's Modelweb service is the front-end to a unique collection of solar-terrestrial databased

  11. Crosswalking near-Earth and space physics ontologies in SPASE and ESPAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galkin, I. A.; Fung, S. F.; Benson, R. F.; Heynderickx, D.; Ritschel, B.; King, T. A.; Roberts, D. A.; Hapgood, M. A.; Belehaki, A.

    2015-12-01

    In order to support scientific discoveries in Heliophysics (HP), with modern data systems, the HP Data Centers actively pursue harmonization of available metadata that allows crossing boundaries between existing data models, conventions, and resource interfaces. The discoverability of HP observations is improved when associated metadata describes their physical content in agreed terms as a part of the resource registration. One of the great challenges of enabling such content-targeted data search capability is the harmonization of domain ontology across data providers. Ontologies are the cornerstones of the content-aware data systems: they define an agreed vocabulary of keywords that capture the essence of domain-specific concepts and their relationships. With the introduction of the Virtual Wave Observatory (VWO), as part of NASA's Virtual System Observatory in 2008, the task of formulating the HP ontology became yet more complicated. Definitions of the wave domain concepts required several layers of specifications that described the generation, propagation, and interaction of the waves with the underlying medium in addition to the observation itself. Simple keyword lists could not provide a sufficiently information-rich description, given the complexity of the wave domain, and the development of a more powerful schema was required. The ontology research at the VWO eventually resulted in a suitable multi-hierarchical design that found its first implementation in 2015 at one of the European space physics data repositories, the near-Earth Space Data Infrastructure for e-Science (ESPAS). Similar to many other European geoscience projects, ESPAS is based on the ISO 19156 Observation and Measurements standard. In cooperation with the NASA VWO, the ESPAS project has deployed a space physics ontology design for all data registration purposes. The VWO science team is now uniquely positioned to establish a crosswalk between the ESPAS ontology based on ISO 19156 and the VWO

  12. Physical performance is maintained in women consuming only foods used on the U.S. Space Shuttle.

    PubMed

    Gretebeck, R J; Siconolfi, S F; Rice, B; Lane, H W

    1994-11-01

    In-flight reductions in caloric intake, body weight, lean body mass (LBM), aerobic capacity, and other measures of physical performance have been consistent findings in the U.S. and Russian space programs. The diet provided for astronauts in space has been suggested as a possible contributor to these changes because food selection, preparation, and storage facilities are limited on spacecraft. In this ground-based study, consuming only foods used on the Space Shuttle for 28 d did not affect aerobic capacity, LBM, or measures of muscle strength or endurance in 12 healthy women (ages 28-47 years). However, normal consumption patterns were affected by restriction to the Space Shuttle diet, namely a proportional increase in carbohydrate consumed, with compensatory decreases in protein and fat. These results suggest that physical performance and LBM can be maintained under normal gravity conditions in active women who consume a Space Shuttle food-system diet for 28 d.

  13. Plasma physics and environmental perturbation laboratory. [magnetospheric experiments from space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogl, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    Current work aimed at identifying the active magnetospheric experiments that can be performed from the Space Shuttle, and designing a laboratory to carry out these experiments is described. The laboratory, known as the PPEPL (Plasma Physics and Environmental Perturbation Laboratory) consists of 35-ft pallet of instruments connected to a 25-ft pressurized control module. The systems deployed from the pallet are two 50-m booms, two subsatellites, a high-power transmitter, a multipurpose accelerator, a set of deployable canisters, and a gimbaled instrument platform. Missions are planned to last seven days, during which two scientists will carry out experiments from within the pressurized module. The type of experiments to be performed are outlined.

  14. BOOK REVIEW: Introduction to Plasma Physics: With Space and Laboratory Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, P. K.

    2005-07-01

    A new textbook on plasma physics must be very welcome, as this will encourage the teaching of courses on the subject. This book is written by two experts in their fields, and is aimed at advanced undergraduate and postgraduate courses. There are of course many other plasma physics textbooks available. The niche which this particular book fills is really defined by its subtitle: that is, `with space and laboratory applications'. This differs from most other books which tend to emphasise either space or fusion applications (but not both) or to concentrate only on general theory. Essentially, the emphasis here is on fundamental plasma physics theory, but applications are given from time to time. For example, after developing Alfvén wave theory, observations of Alfvén waves in the solar wind and in the Jovian magnetosphere are presented; whilst ion acoustic cylcotron waves are illustrated by data from a laboratory Q machine. It is fair to say that examples from space seem to predominate. Nevertheless, the approach of including a broad range of applications is very good from an educational point of view, and this should help to train a generation of students with a grasp of fundamental plasma physics who can work in a variety of research fields. The subject coverage of the book is fairly conventional and there are no great surprises. It begins, inevitably, with a discussion of plasma parameters (Debye length etc) and of single particle motions. Both kinetic theory and magnetohydrodynamics are introduced. Waves are quite extensively discussed in several chapters, including both cold and hot plasmas, magnetised and unmagnetised. Nonlinear effects—a large subject!—are briefly discussed. A final chapter deals with collisions in fully ionised plasmas. The choice of contents of a textbook is always something of a matter of personal choice. It is easy to complain about what has been left out, and everyone has their own favourite topics. With that caveat, I would question

  15. The space density, environments, and physical properties of large Lyalpha nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prescott, Moire Kathleen Murphy

    Powerful forces are at work in giant Lya nebulae, a rare and mysterious population in the high redshift universe. Much like the spatially extended emission line halos around high redshift radio galaxies--but without the strong radio emission-- Lya nebulae (or Lya 'blobs') boast copious Lya emission (10^44 erg s -1 ), large sizes (~100 kpc), complex gas morphologies, and the company of numerous compact, star-forming galaxies, and may offer a window into dramatic episodes of massive galaxy formation. The small sample sizes and complex inner workings of Lya nebulae have limited progress on understanding the their space density, environments, and physical conditions. This thesis strives to answer fundamental questions about Lya nebulae and pave the way for understanding their role in the build up of massive galaxy systems. To address the frequency of collapse of these massive structures, we carried out the largest systematic Lya nebula survey to date and measured the Lya nebula space density. As an unbiased test of the environment of Lya nebulae, we studied the surroundings of a Lya nebula and confirmed that Lya nebulae reside preferentially in overdense regions. To disentangle the sources of ionization, we took a census of all the compact ionization sources within a large Lya nebula using high resolution imaging. Finally, we used photoionization modeling to put constraints on the physical conditions, the metallicity, and the sources of ionization within Lya nebulae. Future work will be able to build on this thesis by expanding the systematic search for Lya nebulae to other existing deep broad-band datasets, mapping the three-dimensional overdense structures in which Lya nebulae live out to >=50 (comoving) Mpc scales, and disentangling multiple sources of ionization within a larger sample of individual systems using deep optical and near-infrared spectroscopy and detailed photoionization modeling.

  16. Virtual Observatories for Space Physics Observations and Simulations: New Routes to Efficient Access and Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Aaron

    2005-01-01

    New tools for data access and visualization promise to make the analysis of space plasma data both more efficient and more powerful, especially for answering questions about the global structure and dynamics of the Sun-Earth system. We will show how new existing tools (particularly the Virtual Space Physics Observatory-VSPO-and the Visual System for Browsing, Analysis and Retrieval of Data-ViSBARD; look for the acronyms in Google) already provide rapid access to such information as spacecraft orbits, browse plots, and detailed data, as well as visualizations that can quickly unite our view of multispacecraft observations. We will show movies illustrating multispacecraft observations of the solar wind and magnetosphere during a magnetic storm, and of simulations of 3 0-spacecraft observations derived from MHD simulations of the magnetosphere sampled along likely trajectories of the spacecraft for the MagCon mission. An important issue remaining to be solved is how best to integrate simulation data and services into the Virtual Observatory environment, and this talk will hopefully stimulate further discussion along these lines.

  17. Phase separation during the Experiment on Physics of Colloids in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Still photographs taken over 16 hours on Nov. 13, 2001, on the International Space Station have been condensed into a few seconds to show the de-mixing -- or phase separation -- process studied by the Experiment on Physics of Colloids in Space. Commanded from the ground, dozens of similar tests have been conducted since the experiment arrived on ISS in 2000. The sample is a mix of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA or acrylic) colloids, polystyrene polymers and solvents. The circular area is 2 cm (0.8 in.) in diameter. The phase separation process occurs spontaneously after the sample is mechanically mixed. The evolving lighter regions are rich in colloid and have the structure of a liquid. The dark regions are poor in colloids and have the structure of a gas. This behavior carnot be observed on Earth because gravity causes the particles to fall out of solution faster than the phase separation can occur. While similar to a gas-liquid phase transition, the growth rate observed in this test is different from any atomic gas-liquid or liquid-liquid phase transition ever measured experimentally. Ultimately, the sample separates into colloid-poor and colloid-rich areas, just as oil and vinegar separate. The fundamental science of de-mixing in this colloid-polymer sample is the same found in the annealing of metal alloys and plastic polymer blends. Improving the understanding of this process may lead to improving processing of these materials on Earth.

  18. Movie of phase separation during physics of colloids in space experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Still photographs taken over 16 hours on Nov. 13, 2001, on the International Space Station have been condensed into a few seconds to show the de-mixing -- or phase separation -- process studied by the Experiment on Physics of Colloids in Space. Commanded from the ground, dozens of similar tests have been conducted since the experiment arrived on ISS in 2000. The sample is a mix of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA or acrylic) colloids, polystyrene polymers and solvents. The circular area in the video is 2 cm (0.8 in.) in diameter. The phase separation process occurs spontaneously after the sample is mechanically mixed. The evolving lighter regions are rich in colloid and have the structure of a liquid. The dark regions are poor in colloids and have the structure of a gas. This behavior carnot be observed on Earth because gravity causes the particles to fall out of solution faster than the phase separation can occur. While similar to a gas-liquid phase transition, the growth rate observed in this test is different from any atomic gas-liquid or liquid-liquid phase transition ever measured experimentally. Ultimately, the sample separates into colloid-poor and colloid-rich areas, just as oil and vinegar separate. The fundamental science of de-mixing in this colloid-polymer sample is the same found in the annealing of metal alloys and plastic polymer blends. Improving the understanding of this process may lead to improving processing of these materials on Earth.

  19. Meeting Classroom Needs: Designing Space Physics Educational Outreach for Science Education Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urquhart, M. L.; Hairston, M.

    2008-12-01

    As with all NASA missions, the Coupled Ion Neutral Dynamics Investigation (CINDI) is required to have an education and public outreach program (E/PO). Through our partnership between the University of Texas at Dallas William B. Hanson Center for Space Sciences and Department of Science/Mathematics Education, the decision was made early on to design our educational outreach around the needs of teachers. In the era of high-stakes testing and No Child Left Behind, materials that do not meet the content and process standards teachers must teach cannot be expected to be integrated into classroom instruction. Science standards, both state and National, were the fundamental drivers behind the designs of our curricular materials, professional development opportunities for teachers, our target grade levels, and even our popular informal educational resource, the "Cindi in Space" comic book. The National Science Education Standards include much more than content standards, and our E/PO program was designed with this knowledge in mind as well. In our presentation we will describe how we came to our approach for CINDI E/PO, and how we have been successful in our efforts to have CINDI materials and key concepts make the transition into middle school classrooms. We will also present on our newest materials and high school physics students and professional development for their teachers.

  20. Promoting Scientist Communications Through Graduate Summer School in Heliophysics and Space Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, N. A.; Schrijver, K.; Bagenal, F.; Sojka, J. J.; Wiltberger, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    edagogical tools that promote student interaction can be applied successfully during graduate workshops to enhance community and communication among the participants and instructors. The NASA/LWS funded Heliophysics Summer School and the NSF funded Space Weather Summer School provide graduate students starting research in the field, and others who are involved in space physics, an opportunity to learn from and interact with leaders in the field and each other. These interactions can happen casually, but there are a number of programatic aspects that foster the interaction so that they can be as fruitful as possible during the short period. These include: specific "ice-breaker" activities, practicing "elevator speeches", embedded lecture questions, question cards, discussion questions, interactive lab activities, structured lab groups, and use of social media. We are continuing to develop new ways to foster profession interaction during these short courses. Along with enhancing their own learning, the inclusion of these strategies provides both the participants and the instructors with models of good pedagogical tools and builds community among the students. Our specific implementation of these strategies and evidence of success will be presented.

  1. Space- and time-dependent scaling of numbers in mathematical structures: effects on physical and geometric quantities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benioff, Paul

    2016-03-01

    The relationship between the foundations of mathematics and physics is a topic of of much interest. This paper continues this exploration by examination of the effect of space- and time- dependent number scaling on theoretical descriptions of some physical and geometric quantities. Fiber bundles provide a good framework to introduce a space- and time- or space-time-dependent number scaling field. The effect of the scaling field on a few nonlocal physical and geometric quantities is described. The effect on gauge theories is to introduce a new complex scalar field into the derivatives appearing in Lagrangians. U(1) invariance of Lagrangian terms does not affect the real part of the scaling field. For this field, any mass is possible. The scaling field is also shown to affect quantum wave packets and path lengths, and geodesic equations even on flat space. Scalar fields described so far in physics are possible candidates for the scaling field. The lack of direct evidence for the field in physics restricts the scaling field in that the gradient of the field must be close to zero in a local region of cosmological space and time. There are no restrictions outside the region. It is also seen that the scaling field does not affect comparisons of computation or measurements outputs with one another. However, it does affect the assignment of numerical values to the outputs of computations or measurements. These are needed because theory predictions are in terms of numerical values.

  2. Characteristics of personal space during obstacle circumvention in physical and virtual environments.

    PubMed

    Gérin-Lajoie, Martin; Richards, Carol L; Fung, Joyce; McFadyen, Bradford J

    2008-02-01

    It is not known how the flexible protective zone maintained around oneself during locomotion (personal space or PS; see [Gérin-Lajoie M, Richards CL, McFadyen BJ. The negotiation of stationary and moving obstructions during walking: anticipatory locomotor adaptations and preservation of personal space. Motor Control 2005;9:242-69]) is modulated with walking speed, whether both sides of the PS are symmetrical, and whether the circumvention of physical and virtual obstructions elicit the same use of such PS. Personal space was measured in ten adults as they circumvented a cylindrical obstacle that was stationary within their path. Both left and right passes were performed at natural self-selected, slow and fast walking speeds. The same circumvention task was also performed at natural speeds in an immersive virtual environment (VE) replicating the same obstruction scenario. The shape and size of PS were maintained across walking speeds, and a smaller PS was generally observed on the dominant side. The general shape and lateral bias of the PS were preserved in the VE while its size was slightly increased. The systematic behavior across walking speeds and types of environment and the lateral bias suggest that PS is used to control navigation. This study deepens our understanding of normal adaptive walking behavior and has implications for the development of better tools for the assessment and retraining of locomotor capacity in different populations, from people with walking deficits to elite athletes. Since the PS behavior was shown to be robust in the VE used for this study, the virtual reality technology is proposed as a promising platform for the development of such assessment and retraining applications.

  3. Characteristics of personal space during obstacle circumvention in physical and virtual environments.

    PubMed

    Gérin-Lajoie, Martin; Richards, Carol L; Fung, Joyce; McFadyen, Bradford J

    2008-02-01

    It is not known how the flexible protective zone maintained around oneself during locomotion (personal space or PS; see [Gérin-Lajoie M, Richards CL, McFadyen BJ. The negotiation of stationary and moving obstructions during walking: anticipatory locomotor adaptations and preservation of personal space. Motor Control 2005;9:242-69]) is modulated with walking speed, whether both sides of the PS are symmetrical, and whether the circumvention of physical and virtual obstructions elicit the same use of such PS. Personal space was measured in ten adults as they circumvented a cylindrical obstacle that was stationary within their path. Both left and right passes were performed at natural self-selected, slow and fast walking speeds. The same circumvention task was also performed at natural speeds in an immersive virtual environment (VE) replicating the same obstruction scenario. The shape and size of PS were maintained across walking speeds, and a smaller PS was generally observed on the dominant side. The general shape and lateral bias of the PS were preserved in the VE while its size was slightly increased. The systematic behavior across walking speeds and types of environment and the lateral bias suggest that PS is used to control navigation. This study deepens our understanding of normal adaptive walking behavior and has implications for the development of better tools for the assessment and retraining of locomotor capacity in different populations, from people with walking deficits to elite athletes. Since the PS behavior was shown to be robust in the VE used for this study, the virtual reality technology is proposed as a promising platform for the development of such assessment and retraining applications. PMID:17512201

  4. AMS-02 Capabilities in Solar Energetic Particle Measurements for Space Weather Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consolandi, Cristina; Bindi, Veronica; Corti, Claudio; Hoffman, Julia; Whitman, Kathryn

    2016-04-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02), thanks to its large acceptance of about 0.45 m2 sr, is the biggest Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) detector ever flown in space. AMS-02 was installed on the International Space Station (ISS) on May 19, 2011, where it will measure cosmic rays from 1 GV up to a few TV, for the duration of the ISS, currently extended till 2024. During these years of operation, AMS-02 measured several increases of the protons flux over the Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) background associated to the strongest solar events. AMS-02 has observed the related SEP accelerated during M- and X-class flares and fast coronal mass ejections measuring an increase of the proton flux near 1 GV and above. Some of these solar events were also followed by the typical GCR suppression i.e. Forbush decrease, which makes even more evident the measurement of the SEP flux over the GCR background. Thanks to its large acceptance and particle detection capabilities, AMS-02 is able to perform precise measurements in a short period of time which is typical of these transient phenomena and to collect enough statistics to measure fine structures and time evolution of particle spectra. The events observed by AMS-02 since the beginning of its mission will be presented and some of the more interesting events will be shown. AMS-02 observations with their unprecedented resolution and high statistics, will improve the understanding of SEP behavior at high energies to constrain models of SEP production used in space weather physics.

  5. The impact of interventions to promote physical activity in urban green space: a systematic review and recommendations for future research.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Ruth F; Christian, Hayley; Veitch, Jenny; Astell-Burt, Thomas; Hipp, J Aaron; Schipperijn, Jasper

    2015-01-01

    Evidence is mounting on the association between the built environment and physical activity (PA) with a call for intervention research. A broader approach which recognizes the role of supportive environments that can make healthy choices easier is required. A systematic review was undertaken to assess the effectiveness of interventions to encourage PA in urban green space. Five databases were searched independently by two reviewers using search terms relating to 'physical activity', 'urban green space' and 'intervention' in July 2014. Eligibility criteria included: (i) intervention to encourage PA in urban green space which involved either a physical change to the urban green space or a PA intervention to promote use of urban green space or a combination of both; and (ii) primary outcome of PA. Of the 2405 studies identified, 12 were included. There was some evidence (4/9 studies showed positive effect) to support built environment only interventions for encouraging use and increasing PA in urban green space. There was more promising evidence (3/3 studies showed positive effect) to support PAprograms or PA programs combined with a physical change to the built environment, for increasing urban green space use and PA of users. Recommendations for future research include the need for longer term follow-up post-intervention, adequate control groups, sufficiently powered studies, and consideration of the social environment, which was identified as a significantly under-utilized resource in this area. Interventions that involve the use of PA programs combined with a physical change to the built environment are likely to have a positive effect on PA. Robust evaluations of such interventions are urgently required. The findings provide a platform to inform the design, implementation and evaluation of future urban green space and PAintervention research.

  6. Ontology of Space Physics for e-Science Applications Based on ISO 19156

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galkin, I. A.; Fung, S. F.; Benson, R. F.; Heynderickx, D.; Charisi, A.; Lowe, D.; Ventouras, S.; Ritschel, B.; Hapgood, M. A.; Belehaki, A.; Roberts, D. A.; King, T. A.; Narock, T.

    2014-12-01

    A structural, ontological presentation of the discipline domain concepts and their relationships is a powerful e-science tool: it enables data search and discovery by content of the observations. Even a simple classification of the concepts using the parent-child hierarchies enables analyses by association, thus bringing a greater insight in the data. Ontology specifications have been put to many uses in space physics, primarily to harmonize data analysis across multiple data resources and thus facilitate interoperability. Among the multitude of ontology writeups, the SPASE data model stands out as a prominent, highly detailed collection of keywords for heliophysics. We will present an ontology design that draws its strengths from SPASE and further enhances it with a greater structural organization of the keyword vocabularies, in particular related to wave phenomena, as well as describes a variety of events and activities in the Sun-Earth system beyond the quiet-time behaviour. The new ontology is being developed for the Near Earth Space Data Infrastructure for e-Science (ESPAS) project funded by the 7th European Framework, whose data model is based on a suite of ISO 19156 standards for Observations and Measurements (O&M). The O&M structure and language have driven the ESPAS ontology organization, with the Observed Property vocabulary as its cornerstone. The ontology development has progressed beyond the O&M framework to include domain-specific components required to describe the space physics concepts in a dictionary-controlled, unambiguous manner. Not surprisingly, wave phenomena and events presented the greatest challenge to the ESPAS ontology team as they demanded characterization of processes involved in the wave generation, propagation, modification, and reception, as well as the propagation medium itself. One of the notable outcomes of this effort is the ability of the new ontology schema to accommodate and categorize, for example, the URSI standard

  7. Using data from automatic planetary stations for solving problems in astronomy and space physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeva, Penka; Stoev, Alexey; Bojurova, Eva

    The specific nature of the Astronomy and Space Physics problems promote students' interest in the relevant sciences and provoke their creativity. It is illustrated by numerous examples of positive response from the participants in the Astronomy Olympiad to extraordinary moments in problems, especially those related to space flight and scientific data and photographs from satellites and automatic interplanetary stations (AIS). Jupiter's satellite Io is one of the satellites with the highest volcano activity in the solar system. So far, the volcanoes of Io were photographed for a short time only by the interplanetary stations Voyager 1 and Galileo - sent by NASA, and New Horizons of ESA. By monitoring these often erupting volcanoes, however, one can quickly gather detailed information and establish methods for prediction of eruptions, including the Earth's volcanoes. This could push forward research on volcanism in the Solar system. Therefore, this issue was used for creation conditions for problems in astronomy. The report shows how through measurements on images of Io taken with AIS heights of the jets emitted by volcanoes are defined. Knowing the mass and radius of the satellite initial speed of the emitted particles is evaluated. Similarly, the initial rate of discharge of earth volcanoes and ice geysers on Saturn's satellite Enceladus are also evaluated. An attempt is made to explain the rings of ejection around the volcanoes on Io. The ratio of the diameter of the dispersion of the substance to the height of the stream is studied. Actually, maximum speed of the particles is evaluated as the boundaries of the volcanic "fountain" are determined by the fast moving particles reaching maximal height. The observed ratio is compared with the theoretical one derived by the students. The results show that although the volcanoes of Io , Earth's volcanoes and even ice geysers of Enceladus operate under very different conditions and arise from different causes, the initial

  8. Applying Forecast Models from the Center for Integrated Space Weather Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehmeyr, M.; Baker, D. N.; Millward, G.; Odstrcil, D.

    2007-12-01

    The Center for Integrated Space Weather Modeling (CISM) has developed three forecast models (FMs) for the Sun-Earth chain. They have been matured by various degrees toward the operational stage. The Sun-Earth FM suite comprises empirical and physical models: the Planetary Equivalent Amplitude (AP-FM), the Solar Wind (SW- FM), and the Geospace (GS-FM) models. We give a brief overview of these forecast models and touch briefly on the associated validation studies. We demonstrate the utility of the models: AP-FM supporting the operations of the AIM (Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere) mission soon after launch; SW-FM providing assistance with the interpretation of the STEREO beacon data; and GS-FM combining model and observed data to characterize the aurora borealis. We will then discuss space weather tools in a more general sense, point out where the current capabilities and shortcomings are, and conclude with a look forward to what areas need improvement to facilitate better real-time forecasts.

  9. SU-E-E-03: Shared Space Fosters Didactic and Professional Learning Across Professions for Medical and Physics Residents

    SciTech Connect

    Dieterich, S; Perks, J; Fragoso, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Medical Physicists and Radiation Oncologists are two professions who should be working as a team for optimal patient care, yet lack of mutual understanding about each others respective role and work environment creates barriers To improve collaboration and learning, we designed a shared didactic and work space for physics and radiation oncology residents to maximize interaction throughout their professional training. Methods: Physician and Physics residents are required to take the same didactic classes, including journal clubs and respective seminars. The residents also share an office environment among the seven physician and two physic residents. Results: By maximizing didactic overlap and sharing office space, the two resident groups have developed a close professional relationship and supportive work environment. Several joint research projects have been initiated by the residents. Awareness of physics tasks in the clinic has led to a request by the physician residents to change physics didactics, converting the physics short course into a lab-oriented course for the medical residents which is in part taught by the physics residents. The physics seminar is given by both residency groups; increased motivation and interest in learning about physics has led to several medical resident-initiated topic selections which generated lively discussion. The physics long course has changed toward including more discussion among residents to delve deeper into topics and study beyond what passing the boards would require. A supportive work environment has developed, embedding the two physics residents into a larger residents group, allowing them to find mentor and peers more easily. Conclusion: By creating a shared work and didactic environment, physician and physics residents have improved their understanding of respective professional practice. Resident-initiated changes in didactic practice have led to improved learning and joint research. A strong social

  10. Space Time Physics and Fractality: Festschrift in honour of Mohamed El Naschie on the occasion of his 60th birthday

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weibel, Peter; Ord, Garnet; Rössler, Otto

    2005-01-01

    Space and Time are the prison bars of reality. Space Time Physics and Fractality is an attempt to tunnel through the rigidity of it all -- by turning everything into dust or smoke. These two ancient traditions are brought together here for the first time -- in the spirit of Democritus and Anaxagoras. Mohamed El Naschie, the sexagenarian, is the "dust dragon". The book contains papers by people who are infected by the same virus of desperately wanting to understand, and represents an incomparable breakthrough.

  11. Space or Physics? Children Use Physical Reasoning to Solve the Trap Problem from 2.5 Years of Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seed, Amanda M.; Call, Josep

    2014-01-01

    By 3 years of age, children can solve tasks involving physical principles such as locating a ball that rolled down a ramp behind an occluder by the position of a partially visible solid wall (Berthier, DeBlois, Poirer, Novak, & Clifton, 2000; Hood, Carey, & Prasada, 2000). However, the extent to which children use physical information (the…

  12. Beyond Physical Activity: The Importance of Play and Nature-Based Play Spaces for Children's Health and Development.

    PubMed

    Herrington, Susan; Brussoni, Mariana

    2015-12-01

    The reduction of child obesity continues to be a challenge worldwide. Research indicates that playing outdoors, particularly in natural play spaces, boosts children's physical activity, potentially decreasing childhood obesity. We present evidence that natural play spaces also provide for more diverse forms of play for children of varying ages and competencies. This is crucial because play spaces designed expressly for physical activity may not increase physical activity among less active children. Moreover, when researchers only examine physical activity in play, they overlook the valuable contributions that play makes to other aspects of children's health and development. To enhance research on children and their play environments, we introduce the theory of play affordances. To assist in the creation of more natural play spaces, we describe the Seven Cs, an evidence-based approach for designing children's play spaces that promotes diverse play. We end with some preliminary insights from our current research using the Seven Cs to illustrate the connections between play, nature, and children's healthy development.

  13. Beyond Physical Activity: The Importance of Play and Nature-Based Play Spaces for Children's Health and Development.

    PubMed

    Herrington, Susan; Brussoni, Mariana

    2015-12-01

    The reduction of child obesity continues to be a challenge worldwide. Research indicates that playing outdoors, particularly in natural play spaces, boosts children's physical activity, potentially decreasing childhood obesity. We present evidence that natural play spaces also provide for more diverse forms of play for children of varying ages and competencies. This is crucial because play spaces designed expressly for physical activity may not increase physical activity among less active children. Moreover, when researchers only examine physical activity in play, they overlook the valuable contributions that play makes to other aspects of children's health and development. To enhance research on children and their play environments, we introduce the theory of play affordances. To assist in the creation of more natural play spaces, we describe the Seven Cs, an evidence-based approach for designing children's play spaces that promotes diverse play. We end with some preliminary insights from our current research using the Seven Cs to illustrate the connections between play, nature, and children's healthy development. PMID:26399254

  14. Social and Physical Environmental Factors Influencing Adolescents’ Physical Activity in Urban Public Open Spaces: A Qualitative Study Using Walk-Along Interviews

    PubMed Central

    Van Hecke, Linde; Deforche, Benedicte; Van Dyck, Delfien; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Veitch, Jenny; Van Cauwenberg, Jelle

    2016-01-01

    Most previous studies examining physical activity in Public Open Spaces (POS) focused solely on the physical environment. However, according to socio-ecological models the social environment is important as well. The aim of this study was to determine which social and physical environmental factors affect adolescents’ visitation and physical activity in POS in low-income neighbourhoods. Since current knowledge on this topic is limited, especially in Europe, qualitative walk-along interviews were used to obtain detailed and context-specific information. Participants (n = 30, aged 12–16 years, 64% boys) were recruited in POS in low-income neighbourhoods in Brussels, Ghent and Antwerp (Belgium). Participants were interviewed while walking in the POS with the interviewer. Using this method, the interviewer could observe and ask questions while the participant was actually experiencing the environment. All audio-recorded interviews were transcribed and analysed using Nvivo 10 software and thematic analysis was used to derive categories and subcategories using a grounded theory approach. The most important subcategories that were supportive of visiting POS and performing physical activity in POS were; accessibility by foot/bicycle/public transport, located close to home/school, presence of (active) friends and family, cleanliness of the POS and features, availability of sport and play facilities, large open spaces and beautiful sceneries. The most important subcategories that were unsupportive of visiting POS and physical activity in POS were; presence of undesirable users (drug users, gangs and homeless people), the behaviour of other users and the cleanliness of the POS and features. Social factors appeared often more influential than physical factors, however, it was the combination of social and physical factors that affected adolescents’ behaviour in POS. Easily accessible POS with high quality features in the proximity of adolescents’ home or school may

  15. Social and Physical Environmental Factors Influencing Adolescents' Physical Activity in Urban Public Open Spaces: A Qualitative Study Using Walk-Along Interviews.

    PubMed

    Van Hecke, Linde; Deforche, Benedicte; Van Dyck, Delfien; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Veitch, Jenny; Van Cauwenberg, Jelle

    2016-01-01

    Most previous studies examining physical activity in Public Open Spaces (POS) focused solely on the physical environment. However, according to socio-ecological models the social environment is important as well. The aim of this study was to determine which social and physical environmental factors affect adolescents' visitation and physical activity in POS in low-income neighbourhoods. Since current knowledge on this topic is limited, especially in Europe, qualitative walk-along interviews were used to obtain detailed and context-specific information. Participants (n = 30, aged 12-16 years, 64% boys) were recruited in POS in low-income neighbourhoods in Brussels, Ghent and Antwerp (Belgium). Participants were interviewed while walking in the POS with the interviewer. Using this method, the interviewer could observe and ask questions while the participant was actually experiencing the environment. All audio-recorded interviews were transcribed and analysed using Nvivo 10 software and thematic analysis was used to derive categories and subcategories using a grounded theory approach. The most important subcategories that were supportive of visiting POS and performing physical activity in POS were; accessibility by foot/bicycle/public transport, located close to home/school, presence of (active) friends and family, cleanliness of the POS and features, availability of sport and play facilities, large open spaces and beautiful sceneries. The most important subcategories that were unsupportive of visiting POS and physical activity in POS were; presence of undesirable users (drug users, gangs and homeless people), the behaviour of other users and the cleanliness of the POS and features. Social factors appeared often more influential than physical factors, however, it was the combination of social and physical factors that affected adolescents' behaviour in POS. Easily accessible POS with high quality features in the proximity of adolescents' home or school may stimulate

  16. The association between green space and depressive symptoms in pregnant women: moderating roles of socioeconomic status and physical activity

    PubMed Central

    McEachan, R R C; Prady, S L; Smith, G; Fairley, L; Cabieses, B; Gidlow, C; Wright, J; Dadvand, P; van Gent, D; Nieuwenhuijsen, M J

    2016-01-01

    Background The current study explored the association between green space and depression in a deprived, multiethnic sample of pregnant women, and examined moderating and mediating variables. Method 7547 women recruited to the ‘Born in Bradford’ cohort completed a questionnaire during pregnancy. A binary measure of depressive symptoms was calculated using a validated survey. Two green space measures were used: quintiles of residential greenness calculated using the normalised difference vegetation index for three neighbourhood sizes (100, 300 and 500 m buffer zones around participant addresses); access to major green spaces estimated as straight line distance between participant address and nearest green space (>0.5 hectares). Logistic regression analyses examined relationships between green space and depressive symptoms, controlling for ethnicity, demographics, socioeconomic status (SES) and health behaviours. Multiplicative interactions explored variations by ethnic group, SES or activity levels. Mediation analysis assessed indirect effects via physical activity. Results Pregnant women in the greener quintiles were 18–23% less likely to report depressive symptoms than those in the least green quintile (for within 100 m of green space buffer zone). The green space-depressive symptoms association was significant for women with lower education or who were active. Physical activity partially mediated the association of green space, but explained only a small portion of the direct effect. Conclusions Higher residential greenness was associated with a reduced likelihood of depressive symptoms. Associations may be stronger for more disadvantaged groups and for those who are already physically active. Improving green space is a promising intervention to reduce risk of depression in disadvantaged groups. PMID:26560759

  17. Space physics analysis network node directory (The Yellow Pages): Fourth edition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, David J.; Sisson, Patricia L.; Green, James L.; Thomas, Valerie L.

    1989-01-01

    The Space Physics Analysis Network (SPAN) is a component of the global DECnet Internet, which has over 17,000 host computers. The growth of SPAN from its implementation in 1981 to its present size of well over 2,500 registered SPAN host computers, has created a need for users to acquire timely information about the network through a central source. The SPAN Network Information Center (SPAN-NIC) an online facility managed by the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) was developed to meet this need for SPAN-wide information. The remote node descriptive information in this document is not currently contained in the SPAN-NIC database, but will be incorporated in the near future. Access to this information is also available to non-DECnet users over a variety of networks such as Telenet, the NASA Packet Switched System (NPSS), and the TCP/IP Internet. This publication serves as the Yellow Pages for SPAN node information. The document also provides key information concerning other computer networks connected to SPAN, nodes associated with each SPAN routing center, science discipline nodes, contacts for primary SPAN nodes, and SPAN reference information. A section on DECnet Internetworking discusses SPAN connections with other wide-area DECnet networks (many with thousands of nodes each). Another section lists node names and their disciplines, countries, and institutions in the SPAN Network Information Center Online Data Base System. All remote sites connected to US-SPAN and European-SPAN (E-SPAN) are indexed. Also provided is information on the SPAN tail circuits, i.e., those remote nodes connected directly to a SPAN routing center, which is the local point of contact for resolving SPAN-related problems. Reference material is included for those who wish to know more about SPAN. Because of the rapid growth of SPAN, the SPAN Yellow Pages is reissued periodically.

  18. Solar and Space Physics Science Enabled by Pico and Nano Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, C.; Fish, C. S.

    2012-12-01

    The most significant advances in solar and space physics, or Heliophysics, over the next decade are most likely to derive from new observational techniques. The connection between advances in scientific understanding and technology has historically been demonstrated across many disciplines and time. Progress on some of the most compelling scientific problems will most likely occur through multipoint observations within the space environment to understand the coupling between disparate regions: Heliosphere, magnetosphere, ionosphere, thermosphere and mesosphere. Multipoint measurements are also needed to develop understanding of the various scalars or vector field signatures (i.e gradients, divergence) that arise from coupling processes that occur across temporal and spatial scales or within localized regions. The resources that are available over the next decades for all areas of Heliophysics research have limits and it is therefore important that the community be innovative in developing new observational techniques to advance science. One of the most promising new observational techniques becoming available are miniaturized sensors and satellite systems called pico- or nano-satellites and CubeSats. These are enabled by the enormous investment of the commercial, medical, and defense industries in producing highly capable, portable and low-power battery-operated consumer electronics, in-situ composition probes, and novel reconnaissance sensors. The advancements represented by these technologies have direct application in developing pico- or nano-satellites and CubeSats system for Heliophysics research. In this talk we overview the current environment and technologies surrounding these novel small satellites and discuss the types and capabilities of the miniature sensors that are being developed. We discuss how pico- or nano-satellites and CubeSats can be used to address highest priority science identified in the Decadal Survey and the innovations and advancements

  19. Emerging technologies for assessing physical activity behaviors in space and time.

    PubMed

    Hurvitz, Philip M; Moudon, Anne Vernez; Kang, Bumjoon; Saelens, Brian E; Duncan, Glen E

    2014-01-01

    Precise measurement of physical activity is important for health research, providing a better understanding of activity location, type, duration, and intensity. This article describes a novel suite of tools to measure and analyze physical activity behaviors in spatial epidemiology research. We use individual-level, high-resolution, objective data collected in a space-time framework to investigate built and social environment influences on activity. First, we collect data with accelerometers, global positioning system units, and smartphone-based digital travel and photo diaries to overcome many limitations inherent in self-reported data. Behaviors are measured continuously over the full spectrum of environmental exposures in daily life, instead of focusing exclusively on the home neighborhood. Second, data streams are integrated using common timestamps into a single data structure, the "LifeLog." A graphic interface tool, "LifeLog View," enables simultaneous visualization of all LifeLog data streams. Finally, we use geographic information system SmartMap rasters to measure spatially continuous environmental variables to capture exposures at the same spatial and temporal scale as in the LifeLog. These technologies enable precise measurement of behaviors in their spatial and temporal settings but also generate very large datasets; we discuss current limitations and promising methods for processing and analyzing such large datasets. Finally, we provide applications of these methods in spatially oriented research, including a natural experiment to evaluate the effects of new transportation infrastructure on activity levels, and a study of neighborhood environmental effects on activity using twins as quasi-causal controls to overcome self-selection and reverse causation problems. In summary, the integrative characteristics of large datasets contained in LifeLogs and SmartMaps hold great promise for advancing spatial epidemiologic research to promote healthy behaviors.

  20. A New Undergraduate Course on the Physics of Space Situational Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jost, T.; Dearborn, M.; Chun, F.; McHarg, G.

    As documented in the National Defense Authorization Act for fiscal year 2010, space situational awareness (SSA) is a high priority for the DoD and intelligence community. A fundamental understanding of the technical issues involved with SSA requires knowledge in many different scientific areas. The mission of the United States Air Force Academy (USAFA) is to educate, train, and inspire men and women to become officers of character motivated to lead the United States Air Force in service to our Nation. The physics department is implementing the USAFA mission and the need for technically competent officers in SSA through a comprehensive SSA Initiative. As part of the Initiative, we are developing a course to provide junior or senior cadets with the scientific background necessary to understand the challenges associated with SSA missions and systems. This presentation introduces the planned course objectives and includes a discussion of topics to be covered. Examples of topics include, optically resolved imaging, radiometry and photometry, radar detection and tracking, orbital prediction, debris and collision avoidance, detection of proximity operations and modeling and simulation tools. Cadets will have hands-on opportunities to collect metrics of a designated object using Academy assets such as the 41 cm telescope. Cadets will convert telescope gimbal angles into an orbital data. Cadets will synthesize what they learned in the course by completing the semester with a final project where the collected data is merged with a notional scenario to present a mock decision briefing. This class will be open to cadets of any academic major, since the intent is to prepare officers with basic technical competence in SSA applications. This is critical since graduates of the Academy become commissioned officers in the military and serve in a large variety of leadership positions -- from the researcher to the warfighter. Since we are currently developing the course, the SSA

  1. Emerging Technologies for Assessing Physical Activity Behaviors in Space and Time

    PubMed Central

    Hurvitz, Philip M.; Moudon, Anne Vernez; Kang, Bumjoon; Saelens, Brian E.; Duncan, Glen E.

    2014-01-01

    Precise measurement of physical activity is important for health research, providing a better understanding of activity location, type, duration, and intensity. This article describes a novel suite of tools to measure and analyze physical activity behaviors in spatial epidemiology research. We use individual-level, high-resolution, objective data collected in a space-time framework to investigate built and social environment influences on activity. First, we collect data with accelerometers, global positioning system units, and smartphone-based digital travel and photo diaries to overcome many limitations inherent in self-reported data. Behaviors are measured continuously over the full spectrum of environmental exposures in daily life, instead of focusing exclusively on the home neighborhood. Second, data streams are integrated using common timestamps into a single data structure, the “LifeLog.” A graphic interface tool, “LifeLog View,” enables simultaneous visualization of all LifeLog data streams. Finally, we use geographic information system SmartMap rasters to measure spatially continuous environmental variables to capture exposures at the same spatial and temporal scale as in the LifeLog. These technologies enable precise measurement of behaviors in their spatial and temporal settings but also generate very large datasets; we discuss current limitations and promising methods for processing and analyzing such large datasets. Finally, we provide applications of these methods in spatially oriented research, including a natural experiment to evaluate the effects of new transportation infrastructure on activity levels, and a study of neighborhood environmental effects on activity using twins as quasi-causal controls to overcome self-selection and reverse causation problems. In summary, the integrative characteristics of large datasets contained in LifeLogs and SmartMaps hold great promise for advancing spatial epidemiologic research to promote healthy

  2. Emerging technologies for assessing physical activity behaviors in space and time.

    PubMed

    Hurvitz, Philip M; Moudon, Anne Vernez; Kang, Bumjoon; Saelens, Brian E; Duncan, Glen E

    2014-01-01

    Precise measurement of physical activity is important for health research, providing a better understanding of activity location, type, duration, and intensity. This article describes a novel suite of tools to measure and analyze physical activity behaviors in spatial epidemiology research. We use individual-level, high-resolution, objective data collected in a space-time framework to investigate built and social environment influences on activity. First, we collect data with accelerometers, global positioning system units, and smartphone-based digital travel and photo diaries to overcome many limitations inherent in self-reported data. Behaviors are measured continuously over the full spectrum of environmental exposures in daily life, instead of focusing exclusively on the home neighborhood. Second, data streams are integrated using common timestamps into a single data structure, the "LifeLog." A graphic interface tool, "LifeLog View," enables simultaneous visualization of all LifeLog data streams. Finally, we use geographic information system SmartMap rasters to measure spatially continuous environmental variables to capture exposures at the same spatial and temporal scale as in the LifeLog. These technologies enable precise measurement of behaviors in their spatial and temporal settings but also generate very large datasets; we discuss current limitations and promising methods for processing and analyzing such large datasets. Finally, we provide applications of these methods in spatially oriented research, including a natural experiment to evaluate the effects of new transportation infrastructure on activity levels, and a study of neighborhood environmental effects on activity using twins as quasi-causal controls to overcome self-selection and reverse causation problems. In summary, the integrative characteristics of large datasets contained in LifeLogs and SmartMaps hold great promise for advancing spatial epidemiologic research to promote healthy behaviors

  3. SEVAN particle-detector network for Solar Physics and Space Weather research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarian, A.

    2009-04-01

    A network of detectors called SEVAN (Space Environmental Viewing and Analysis Network) is planned in the framework of the International Heliophysical Year (IHY), to improve fundamental research of the Solar accelerators and Space Weather conditions. The network will detect changing fluxes of the most of species secondary cosmic rays at different altitudes, latitudes and altitudes those constituting powerful integrated device in exploration of solar modulation effects. Surface particle detectors measure time series of secondary particles born in cascades originated in the atmosphere by nuclear interactions of the "primary" protons and nuclei accelerated in galaxy. During violent solar explosions sometimes additional particles, accelerated at sun's environments, are added to this "background" flux. If solar particles are energetic enough they also will generate secondary particles reaching earth surface. Therefore, registration of changing time series of secondary particles shed light on the high-energy particle acceleration mechanisms by solar flares and Coronal Mass Ejection driven shocks. Network of particle detectors located at middle-to-low latitudes is sensitive to the highest energy solar particles. The enigma of particle acceleration in supernovae remnants, super-massive black holes, clusters of galaxies can be researched using particle beams accelerated by sun and detected at earth. The shock acceleration is a universal process responsible for the same physical process (particle acceleration) on the different scales. Time series of intensities of high energy particles can also provide highly cost-effective information on the key characteristics of the disturbances of interplanetary magnetic field. Recent results on of the detection of the extreme solar events (2003, 2005) by the monitors of the Aragats Space-Environmental Center (ASEC) illustrate wide possibilities opening with introduction of new particle detectors measuring neutron, electron and muon

  4. Hybrid Modeling of Plasmas and Applications to Fusion and Space Physics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazeminejad, Farzad

    Since the early days of controlled fusion research, plasma physicists have encountered great challenges in obtaining solutions to the highly nonlinear equations which govern the behavior of fusion plasmas; with the growth of other applications of plasma physics (space plasmas, plasma accelerators, ... etc.) these problems have grown in importance. Obtaining reasonable solutions to the nonlinear equations is crucial to our understanding of the behavior of plasmas. With the advent of high speed computers, computer modeling of plasmas has moved into the front row of the tools used in research of their nonlinear plasma dynamics. There are roughly speaking two types of plasma models, particle models and fluid models. Particle models try to emulate nature by following the motion of a large number of charged particles in their self consistent electromagnetic fields. Fluid models on the other hand use macroscopic fluid equations to model the plasma. MHD models are typical of this type. Particle models in general require larger memory for the computer due to the massive amounts of data associated with the particles' kinematical variables. Particle models are generally limited to studying small regions of plasma for relatively short time intervals. Fluid models are better fit to handle large scales and long times; i.e., quite often the complete plasma involved in an experiment. The drawback of the fluid models however is that, they miss the physical phenomenon taking place at the microscale and these phenomenon can influence the properties of fluid; i.e., its resistivity, viscosity, heat transport, etc. One can attempt to put these effects in as phenomenological coefficients, but such approaches are always somewhat ad hoc. Another approach is to start with fluid models and incorporate more physics. Such models are referred to as hybrid models. In this thesis, two such models are discussed. They are then applied to two problems; the first is a simulation of the artificial

  5. The NASA Heliophysics Active Final Archive at the Space Physics Data Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGuire, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    The 2009 NASA Heliophysics Science Data Management Policy re-defined and extended the responsibilities of the Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) project. Building on SPDF's established capabilities, the new policy assigned the role of active "Final Archive" for non-solar NASA Heliophysics data to SPDF. The policy also recognized and formalized the responsibilities of SPDF as a source for critical infrastructure services such as VSPO to the overall Heliophysics Data Environment (HpDE) and as a Center of Excellence for existing SPDF science-enabling services and software including CDAWeb, SSCWeb/4D Orbit Viewer, OMNIweb and CDF. We will focus this talk to the principles, strategies and planned SPDF architecture to effectively and efficiently perform these roles, with special emphasis on how SPDF will ensure the long-term preservation and ongoing online community access to all the data entrusted to SPDF. We will layout our archival philosophy and what we are advocating in our work with NASA missions both current and future, with potential providers of NASA and NASA-relevant archival data, and to make the data and metadata held by SPDF accessible to other systems and services within the overall HpOE. We will also briefly review our current services, their metrics and our current plans and priorities for their evolution.

  6. Space Launch System Base Heating Test: Environments and Base Flow Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Manish; Knox, Kyle S.; Seaford, C. Mark; Dufrene, Aaron T.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Space Launch System (SLS) vehicle is composed of four RS-25 liquid oxygen-hydrogen rocket engines in the core-stage and two 5-segment solid rocket boosters and as a result six hot supersonic plumes interact within the aft section of the vehicle during flight. Due to the complex nature of rocket plume-induced flows within the launch vehicle base during ascent and a new vehicle configuration, sub-scale wind tunnel testing is required to reduce SLS base convective environment uncertainty and design risk levels. This hot-fire test program was conducted at the CUBRC Large Energy National Shock (LENS) II short-duration test facility to simulate flight from altitudes of 50 kft to 210 kft. The test program is a challenging and innovative effort that has not been attempted in 40+ years for a NASA vehicle. This paper discusses the various trends of base convective heat flux and pressure as a function of altitude at various locations within the core-stage and booster base regions of the two-percent SLS wind tunnel model. In-depth understanding of the base flow physics is presented using the test data, infrared high-speed imaging and theory. The normalized test design environments are compared to various NASA semi-empirical numerical models to determine exceedance and conservatism of the flight scaled test-derived base design environments. Brief discussion of thermal impact to the launch vehicle base components is also presented.

  7. An Overview of SBIR Phase 2 Physical Sciences and Biomedical Technologies in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2015-01-01

    Technological innovation is the overall focus of NASA's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. The program invests in the development of innovative concepts and technologies to help NASA's mission directorates address critical research and development needs for agency projects. This report highlights innovative SBIR Phase II projects from 2007-2012 specifically addressing areas in physical sciences and biomedical technologies in space, which is one of six core competencies at NASA Glenn Research Center. There are twenty two technologies featured with emphasis on a wide spectrum of applications such as reusable handheld electrolyte, sensor for bone markers, wideband single crystal transducer, mini treadmill for musculoskeletal, and much more. Each article in this report describes an innovation, technical objective, and highlights NASA commercial and industrial applications. This report serves as an opportunity for NASA personnel including engineers, researchers, and program managers to learn of NASA SBIR's capabilities that might be crosscutting into this technology area. As the result, it would cause collaborations and partnerships between the small companies and NASA Programs and Projects resulting in benefit to both SBIR companies and NASA.

  8. A New 50-MHz VHF Digital Bistatic Radar for E-region Space Physics Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussey, G. C.; Huyghebaert, D. R.; St-Maurice, J. P.; McWilliams, K. A.

    2015-12-01

    A new fully digital bistatic 50-MHz VHF radar is currently being developed by the radar group in the Institute of Space and Atmospheric Studies (ISAS) at the University of Saskatchewan. This paper presents the scientific motivation for the new radar. Traditionally bistatic radars have had excellent time resolution, but were significantly lacking in range resolution. With the now available accurate timing abilities and advanced pulse modulation techniques, bistatic radar configurations with both excellent temporal and spatial resolution are able to map or 'image' the E-region. The E-region portion of the ionosphere being the base of the magnetosphere has both global (ionosphere-magnetosphere system) and local phenomena of interest. The currents in the magnetosphere close in the E-region. Field-aligned currents (FACs) and Alfven waves are phenomena with origins in the magnetosphere which present their 'signatures' in the E-region. For example, Alfven waves (produced by the Alfven wave resonator) have different time scales, from less than a Hertz to periods of tens of minutes --- and the high temporal and spatial resolution of this new digital E-region radar will be able to detect them all. The E-region is also a dynamic plasma medium with the two-steam and gradient drift instabilities present and the improved measurement abilities will give fresh physical insight.

  9. The supersymmetric parameter space in light of B-physics observables and electroweak precision data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, John; Heinemeyer, Sven; Olive, Keith A.; Weber, Arne M.; Weiglein, Georg

    2007-08-01

    Indirect information about the possible scale of supersymmetry (SUSY) breaking is provided by B-physics observables (BPO) as well as electroweak precision observables (EWPO). We combine the constraints imposed by recent measurements of the BPO BR(b → sγ), BR(Bs → μ+μ-), BR(Bu → τντ) and ΔMBs with those obtained from the experimental measurements of the EWPO MW, sin2 θeff, ΓZ, (g-2)μ and Mh, incorporating the latest theoretical calculations of these observables within the Standard Model and supersymmetric extensions. We perform a χ2 fit to the parameters of the constrained minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (CMSSM), in which the SUSY-breaking parameters are universal at the GUT scale, and the non-universal Higgs model (NUHM), in which this constraint is relaxed for the soft SUSY-breaking contributions to the Higgs masses. Assuming that the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) provides the cold dark matter density preferred by WMAP and other cosmological data, we scan over the remaining parameter space. Within the CMSSM, we confirm the preference found previously for a relatively low SUSY-breaking scale, though there is some slight tension between the EWPO and the BPO. In studies of some specific NUHM scenarios compatible with the cold dark matter constraint we investigate (MA, tan β) planes and find preferred regions that have values of χ2 somewhat lower than in the CMSSM.

  10. Through Microgravity and Towards the Stars: Microgravity and Strategic Research at Marshall's Biological and Physical Space Research Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, Peter A.

    2003-01-01

    The Microgravity and Strategic research at Marshall s Biological and Physical Space Research Laboratory will be reviewed. The environment in orbit provides a unique opportunity to study Materials Science and Biotechnology in the absence of sedimentation and convection. There are a number of peer-selected investigations that have been selected to fly on the Space Station that have been conceived and are led by Marshall s Biological and Physical Research Laboratory s scientists. In addition to Microgravity research the Station will enable research in "Strategic" Research Areas that focus on enabling humans to live, work, and explore the solar system safely. New research in Radiation Protection, Strategic Molecular Biology, and In-Space Fabrication will be introduced.

  11. Effects of X-ray flares on the aeronomy of Mars: Simultaneous measurements of ionospheric effects of X-ray flares on Earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, Syed A.; Machado Santos, Angela; Abdu, Mangalathayil A.; Batista, Inez S.; Shah, Siddhi Y.; Thirupathaiah, P.

    2016-07-01

    MIRI: Validation and Testing Requirements We have studied X-ray aeronomy in the ionospheric E region of Mars during six X-ray flares that occurred on 28 March and 6 April, 2001; 17,18 March and 21 April, 2003 and 19 February, 2005 respectively. These flares were responded by the corresponding electron density profiles of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS). The time series of photoionization rate, photoelectron impact ionization rate, photoelectron flux, ion density, electron density and total Electron Content (TEC) are predicted for each flare day. The estimated production rate, flux and densities are increased by 1-2 orders of magnitude due to effects of these flares in the E region ionosphere of Mars. The normalized estimated TEC are compared with the normalized measured TEC of MGS profiles. At the peak flare time the normalized estimated and normalized measured TEC were enhanced by a factor of 5-10 and 2 respectively. The effects of these flares were also registered in the D region equatorial ionosphere of Earth at Fortaleza observatory. The flares of 6 April, 2001, 17 March and 21 April, 2003 also produced electron density enhancement in the E region ionosphere of Earth at College AK and Cachoeira Paulista observatories. The minimum frequency fmin, recorded in ionogram, increased by 100% (due to D region absorption) while the foE increased by 20%, in the Earth's ionosphere.

  12. Investigating fundamental physics and space environment with a dedicated Earth-orbiting spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peron, Roberto

    The near-Earth environment is a place of first choice for performing fundamental physics experiments, given its proximity to Earth and at the same time being relatively quiet dynamically for particular orbital arrangements. This environment also sees a rich phenomenology for what concerns gravitation. In fact, the general theory of relativity is an incredibly accurate description of gravitational phenomenology. However, its overall validity is being questioned by the theories that aim at reconciling it with the microscopic domain. Challenges come also from the ‘mysteries’ of Dark Matter and Dark Energy, though mainly at scales from the galactic up to the cosmological. It is therefore important to precisely test the consequences of the theory -- as well as those of competing ones -- at all the accessible scales. At the same time, the development of high-precision experimental space techniques, which are needed for tests in fundamental physics, opens the way to complementary applications. The growth of the (man-made) orbital debris population is creating problems to the future development of space. The year 2009 witnessed the first accidental collision between two satellites in orbit (Iridium and Cosmos) that led to the creation of more debris. International and national agencies are intervening by issuing and/or adopting guidelines to mitigate the growth of orbital debris. A central tenet of these guidelines requires a presence in space shorter than 25 years to satellites in low Earth orbit (LEO) after the conclusion of their operational lives. However, the determination of the natural lifetime of a satellite in LEO is very uncertain due to a large extent to the short-term and long-term variability of the atmospheric density in LEO and the comparatively low-accuracy of atmospheric density models. Many satellites orbiting in the 500-1200 km region with circular or elliptical orbits will be hard pressed to establish before flight whether or not they meet the 25

  13. Whole Atmosphere-Ionosphere Coupled Model (GAIA) for Space Weather Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinagawa, H.; Jin, H.; Miyoshi, Y.; Fujiwara, H.; Tanaka, T.; Fujita, S.; Terada, K.; Murata, K. T.

    2011-12-01

    Space near the Earth, called geospace, is a highly complex system, consisting of the solar wind, the magnetosphere, the ionosphere, and the neutral atmosphere. Those regions have different physical characteristics with different temporal and spatial scales. In particular, the magnetosphere, the ionosphere, and the neutral atmosphere are strongly coupled with each other, and interaction between the regions is nonlinear and extremely complicated. Even within each region, there are strong interactions between physical processes with different temporal and spatial scales. Furthermore, the geospace environment significantly varies as electromagnetic energy and particles from the sun vary. In order to quantitatively understand such a complicated system, it is necessary to model the entire region by including all fundamental processes self-consistently. Various types of global numerical models of geospace have been constructed and used to study space weather disturbances in many institutions in the world. At the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) of Japan, a real-time solar wind model, magnetosphere model, and ionosphere-thermosphere model have been developed and used for daily space weather forecast. In addition to the effect of geospace disturbance on the upper atmosphere, recent observations of the ionosphere and the thermosphere have revealed that atmospheric waves generated in the lower atmosphere significantly influence the upper atmosphere, the ionosphere, and possibly the magnetosphere. In order to quantitatively study the effects of the lower atmosphere on the ionosphere, we have developed an atmosphere-ionosphere coupled model, which includes the whole neutral atmosphere and the ionosphere. The model is called GAIA (Ground-to-topside model of Atmosphere and Ionosphere for Aeronomy). Using GAIA, relationship between the ionosphere and the atmosphere is being studied. We plan to incorporate magnetospheric inputs to the polar

  14. Apollo-Soyuz pamphlet no. 9: General science. [experimental design in Astronomy, Biology, Geophysics, Aeronomy and Materials science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, L. W.; From, T. P.

    1977-01-01

    The objectives and planning activities for the Apollo-Soyuz mission are summarized. Aspects of the space flight considered include the docking module and launch configurations, spacecraft orbits, and weightlessness. The 28 NASA experiments conducted onboard the spacecraft are summarized. The contributions of the mission to the fields of astronomy, geoscience, biology, and materials sciences resulting from the experiments are explored.

  15. Laser range scanning for image-guided neurosurgery: investigation of image-to-physical space registrations.

    PubMed

    Cao, Aize; Thompson, R C; Dumpuri, P; Dawant, B M; Galloway, R L; Ding, S; Miga, M I

    2008-04-01

    In this article a comprehensive set of registration methods is utilized to provide image-to-physical space registration for image-guided neurosurgery in a clinical study. Central to all methods is the use of textured point clouds as provided by laser range scanning technology. The objective is to perform a systematic comparison of registration methods that include both extracranial (skin marker point-based registration (PBR), and face-based surface registration) and intracranial methods (feature PBR, cortical vessel-contour registration, a combined geometry/intensity surface registration method, and a constrained form of that method to improve robustness). The platform facilitates the selection of discrete soft-tissue landmarks that appear on the patient's intraoperative cortical surface and the preoperative gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) image volume, i.e., true corresponding novel targets. In an 11 patient study, data were taken to allow statistical comparison among registration methods within the context of registration error. The results indicate that intraoperative face-based surface registration is statistically equivalent to traditional skin marker registration. The four intracranial registration methods were investigated and the results demonstrated a target registration error of 1.6 +/- 0.5 mm, 1.7 +/- 0.5 mm, 3.9 +/- 3.4 mm, and 2.0 +/- 0.9 mm, for feature PBR, cortical vessel-contour registration, unconstrained geometric/intensity registration, and constrained geometric/intensity registration, respectively. When analyzing the results on a per case basis, the constrained geometric/intensity registration performed best, followed by feature PBR, and finally cortical vessel-contour registration. Interestingly, the best target registration errors are similar to targeting errors reported using bone-implanted markers within the context of rigid targets. The experience in this study as with others is that brain shift can compromise extracranial

  16. The NASA Heliophysics Active Final Archive at the Space Physics Data Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, R. E.; Bilitza, D.; Candey, R. M.; Chimiak, R.; Cooper, J. F.; Garcia, L. N.; Harris, B.; Johnson, R. C.; King, J. H.; Kovalick, T.; Lal, N.; Leckner, H.; Liu, M.; Papitashvili, N. E.; Roberts, D.

    2012-12-01

    The 2009 NASA Heliophysics Science Data Management Policy re-defined and extended the responsibilities of the Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) project. Building on SPDF's established capabilities, the new policy assigned the role of active "Final Archive" for non-solar NASA Heliophysics data to SPDF. The policy also recognized and formalized the responsibilities of SPDF as a source for critical infrastructure services such as VSPO to the overall Heliophysics Data Environment (HpDE) and as a Center of Excellence for existing SPDF science-enabling services and software including CDAWeb, SSCWeb/4D Orbit Viewer, OMNIweb and CDF. In this talk, we will discuss the positive impacts of this policy on data planning by missions such as RBSP and MMS and on working coordination with SPDF capabilities to better address NASA program-level requirements in multi-mission science and long-term archiving. We will discuss the key principles, strategies and planned SPDF architecture to effectively and efficiently perform these roles, with special emphasis on how SPDF will ensure the long-term preservation and ongoing online community access to all the data entrusted to SPDF. We will lay out our archival philosophy and what we are advocating in our work with NASA missions both current and future, with potential providers of NASA and NASA-relevant archival data, and to make the data and metadata held by SPDF accessible to other systems and services within the overall HpDE. We will also briefly review our current services, their metrics and our current plans and priorities for their evolution.

  17. Physical demands and injuries to the upper extremity associated with the space program.

    PubMed

    Viegas, Steven F; Williams, David; Jones, Jeffrey; Strauss, Samuel; Clark, Jonathan

    2004-05-01

    Hand and upper-extremity overuse and repetitive injuries in astronauts have been and continue to be a common problem in the space program. The demands on upper-extremity use in the astronaut training program, the zero-gravity environment, the extreme temperature conditions of space, the effects of space travel on human physiology/anatomy, and the constraints and pressures of space suits and gloves all can negatively impact upper-extremity function in ways that can result in overuse/repetitive injuries. Future plans for space exploration include endeavors that will continue and even increase the demands on the hand and upper extremity.

  18. Space Rocks Tell Their Secrets: Space Science Applications of Physics and Chemistry for High School and College Classes. Update.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindstrom, M. M.; Tobola, K. W.; Allen, J. S.; Stocco, K.; Henry, M.; Allen, J. S.; McReynolds, Julie; Porter, T. Todd; Veile, Jeri

    2005-01-01

    As the scientific community studies Mars remotely for signs of life and uses Martian meteorites as its only available samples, teachers, students, and the general public continue to ask, "How do we know these meteorites are from Mars?" This question sets the stage for a six-lesson instructional package Space Rocks Tell Their Secrets. Expanding on the short answer "It's the chemistry of the rock", students are introduced to the research that reveals the true identities of the rocks. Since few high school or beginning college students have the opportunity to participate in this level of research, a slide presentation introduces them to the labs, samples, and people involved with the research. As they work through the lessons and interpret authentic data, students realize that the research is an application of two basic science concepts taught in the classroom, the electromagnetic spectrum and isotopes. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  19. Space Rocks Tell Their Secrets: Space Science Applications of Physics and Chemistry for High School and College Classes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindstrom, M. M.; Tobola, K. W.; Stocco, K.; Henry, M.; Allen, J. S.

    2003-01-01

    As the scientific community studies Mars remotely for signs of life and uses Martian meteorites as its only available samples, teachers, students, and the general public continue to ask, "How do we know these meteorites are from Mars?" This question sets the stage for a three-lesson instructional package Space Rocks Tell Their Secrets. Expanding on the short answer "It's the chemistry of the rock", students are introduced to the research that reveals the true identities of the rocks. Since few high school or beginning college students have the opportunity to participate in this level of research, a slide presentation introduces them to the labs, samples, and people involved with the research. As they work through the lessons and interpret real data, students realize that the research is an application of basic science concepts they should know, the electromagnetic spectrum and isotopes. They can understand the results without knowing how to do the research or operate the instruments.

  20. Space Rocks Tell Their Secrets: Space Science Applications of Physics and Chemistry for High School and College Classes: Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindstrom, M. M.; Tobola, K. W.; Stocco, K.; Henry, M.; Allen, J. S.; McReynolds, Julie; Porter, T. Todd; Veile, Jeri

    2004-01-01

    As the scientific community studies Mars remotely for signs of life and uses Martian meteorites as its only available samples, teachers, students, and the general public continue to ask, How do we know these meteorites are from Mars? This question sets the stage for a six-lesson instructional package Space Rocks Tell Their Secrets. Expanding on the short answer It s the chemistry of the rock , students are introduced to the research that reveals the true identities of the rocks. Since few high school or beginning college students have the opportunity to participate in this level of research, a slide presentation introduces them to the labs, samples, and people involved with the research. As they work through the lessons and interpret authentic data, students realize that the research is an application of two basic science concepts taught in the classroom, the electromagnetic spectrum and isotopes.

  1. Experimental equipment for the measurement of thermofluidynamic conditions in fluid physic experiments on board of space platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monti, R.

    1981-09-01

    Computerized devices are described which have been designed, realized and ground tested for the non-invasive measurements of surface temperature, of interface geometry and of liquid velocity. This equipment has been used in laboratory researches on liquid floating zones which simulate space experiments in fluid physics. The systems may be used for space experiments, once TV and thermographic recordings are available on ground after the mission. Other solutions are suggested which would imply an on-board microcomputer system for data preelaboration and which would substantially reduce the amount of data to be recorded and/or transmitted to ground.

  2. Solving kinetic equations with adaptive mesh in phase space for rarefied gas dynamics and plasma physics (Invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Kolobov, Vladimir; Arslanbekov, Robert; Frolova, Anna

    2014-12-09

    The paper describes an Adaptive Mesh in Phase Space (AMPS) technique for solving kinetic equations with deterministic mesh-based methods. The AMPS technique allows automatic generation of adaptive Cartesian mesh in both physical and velocity spaces using a Tree-of-Trees data structure. We illustrate advantages of AMPS for simulations of rarefied gas dynamics and electron kinetics on low temperature plasmas. In particular, we consider formation of the velocity distribution functions in hypersonic flows, particle kinetics near oscillating boundaries, and electron kinetics in a radio-frequency sheath. AMPS provide substantial savings in computational cost and increased efficiency of the mesh-based kinetic solvers.

  3. Solving kinetic equations with adaptive mesh in phase space for rarefied gas dynamics and plasma physics (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolobov, Vladimir; Arslanbekov, Robert; Frolova, Anna

    2014-12-01

    The paper describes an Adaptive Mesh in Phase Space (AMPS) technique for solving kinetic equations with deterministic mesh-based methods. The AMPS technique allows automatic generation of adaptive Cartesian mesh in both physical and velocity spaces using a Tree-of-Trees data structure. We illustrate advantages of AMPS for simulations of rarefied gas dynamics and electron kinetics on low temperature plasmas. In particular, we consider formation of the velocity distribution functions in hypersonic flows, particle kinetics near oscillating boundaries, and electron kinetics in a radio-frequency sheath. AMPS provide substantial savings in computational cost and increased efficiency of the mesh-based kinetic solvers.

  4. Goal-Oriented Down-Selection Criteria for Fusion Space Propulsion Based on a Concept's Physical Limitations

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, C D

    2000-11-01

    We propose that rational down-selection criteria for fusion space propulsion should be based on the goals for NASA's future missions, and in particular, on performance goals. Specifically, if the ultimate long-range performance for a certain fusion concept for a particular mission cannot exceed that expected for an economically and environmentally viable fission-propulsion system, which is obviously based on a more mature technology than the fusion system, NASA should not spend the time and resources required to develop that fusion system. We also propose consideration of inherent physical constraints for each space-propulsion concept, because the physical constraints can limit a concept's ultimate performance. Such constraints can thus make a concept subject to down-selection even though there are currently large uncertainties in a particular system's ultimate performance, projected cost of development, or even ''proof-of-principle'' status. One way to impose such goal-oriented criteria is to require all viable fusion concepts for a given mission to have an alpha (i.e., a ratio of dry mass to jet power) less than a maximum that corresponds to the performance of the fission systems. Specifically, using a Mars roundtrip as an example, we discuss how physical limitations in target gain and nozzle physics can preclude a concept achieving the required alpha. This goal-oriented approach for down-selection based on physical constraints can help NASA know up front where to wisely spend its R&D funds.

  5. 5 CFR 792.230 - May an agency use appropriated funds to improve the physical space of the family child care homes...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... improve the physical space of the family child care homes or child care centers? 792.230 Section 792.230... EMPLOYEES' HEALTH AND COUNSELING PROGRAMS Agency Use of Appropriated Funds for Child Care Costs for Lower... May an agency use appropriated funds to improve the physical space of the family child care homes...

  6. Nuclear Physics Issues in Space Radiation Risk Assessment-The FLUKA Monte Carlo Transport Code Used for Space Radiation Measurement and Protection

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K. T.

    2007-02-12

    The long term human exploration goals that NASA has embraced, requires the need to understand the primary radiation and secondary particle production under a variety of environmental conditions. In order to perform accurate transport simulations for the incident particles found in the space environment, accurate nucleus-nucleus inelastic event generators are needed, and NASA is funding their development. For the first time, NASA is including the radiation problem into the . design of the next manned exploration vehicle. The NASA-funded FLUER-S (FLUKA Executing Under ROOT-Space) project has several goals beyond the improvement of the internal nuclear physics simulations. These include making FLUKA more user-friendly. Several tools have been developed to simplify the use of FLUKA without compromising its accuracy or versatility. Among these tools are a general source input, ability of distributive computing, simplification of geometry input, geometry and event visualization, and standard FLUKA scoring output analysis using a ROOT GUI. In addition to describing these tools we will show how they have been used for space radiation environment data analysis in MARIE, IVCPDS, and EVCPDS. Similar analyses can be performed for future radiation measurement detectors before they are deployed in order to optimize their design. These tools can also be used in the design of nuclear-based power systems on manned exploration vehicles and planetary surfaces. In addition to these space applications, the simulations are being used to support accelerator based experiments like the cross-section measurements being performed at HIMAC and NSRL at BNL.

  7. Accessing Solar Irradiance Data via LISIRD, the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics Interactive Solar Irradiance Datacenter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankratz, C. K.; Wilson, A.; Snow, M. A.; Lindholm, D. M.; Woods, T. N.; Traver, T.; Woodraska, D.

    2015-12-01

    The LASP Interactive Solar Irradiance Datacenter, LISIRD, http://lasp.colorado.edu/lisird, allows the science community and the public to explore and access solar irradiance and related data sets using convenient, interactive or scriptable, standards-based interfaces. LISIRD's interactive plotting allows users to investigate and download irradiance data sets from a variety of sources, including space missions, ground observatories, and modeling efforts. LISIRD's programmatic interfaces allow software-level data retrievals and facilitate automation. This presentation will describe the current state of LISIRD, provide details of the data sets it serves, outline data access methods, identify key technologies in-use, and address other related aspects of serving spectral and other time series data. We continue to improve LISIRD by integrating new data sets, and also by advancing its data management and presentation capabilities to meet evolving best practices and community needs. LISIRD is hosted and operated by the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, LASP, which has been a leader in Atmospheric and Heliophysics science for over 60 years. LASP makes a variety of space-based measurements of solar irradiance, which provide crucial input for research and modeling in solar-terrestrial interactions, space physics, planetary, atmospheric, and climate sciences. These data sets consist of fundamental measurements, composite data sets, solar indices, space weather products, and models. Current data sets available through LISIRD originate from the SORCE, SDO (EVE), UARS (SOLSTICE), TIMED (SEE), and SME space missions, as well as several other space and ground-based projects. LISIRD leverages several technologies to provide flexible and standards-based access to the data holdings available through LISIRD. This includes internet-accessible interfaces that permit data access in a variety of formats, data subsetting, as well as program-level access from data analysis

  8. Need for a network of observatories for space debris dynamical and physical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piergentili, Fabrizio; Santoni, Fabio; Castronuovo, Marco; Portelli, Claudio; Cardona, Tommaso; Arena, Lorenzo; Sciré, Gioacchino; Seitzer, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Space debris represents a major concern for space missions since the risk of impact with uncontrolled objects has increased dramatically in recent years. Passive and active mitigation countermeasures are currently under consideration but, at the base of any of such corrective actions is the space debris continuous monitoring through ground based surveillance systems.At the present, many space agencies have the capability to get optical measurements of space orbiting objects mainly relaying on single observatories. The recent research in the field of space debris, demonstrated how it is possible to increase the effectiveness of optical measurements exploitation by using joint observations of the same target from different sites.The University of Rome "La Sapienza", in collaboration with Italian Space Agency (ASI), is developing a scientific network of observatories dedicated to Space Debris deployed in Italy (S5Scope at Rome and SPADE at Matera) and in Kenya at the Broglio Space Center in Malindi (EQUO). ASI founded a program dedicated to space debris, in order to spread the Italian capability to deal with different aspects of this issue. In this framework, the University of Rome is in charge of coordinating the observatories network both in the operation scheduling and in the data analysis. This work describes the features of the observatories dedicated to space debris observation, highlighting their capabilities and detailing their instrumentation. Moreover, the main features of the scheduler under development, devoted to harmonizing the operations of the network, will be shown. This is a new system, which will autonomously coordinate the observations, aiming to optimize results in terms of number of followed targets, amount of time dedicated to survey, accuracy of orbit determination and feasibility of attitude determination through photometric data.Thus, the authors will describe the techniques developed and applied (i) to implement the multi-site orbit

  9. The Space Physics ``Data Problem'' from the Perspectives of Different Stakeholders (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, E. F.

    2010-12-01

    Researchers, the PIs of VOs, and funding agencies frequently refer to an overarching “the data problem”. The Heliophysical Data Environment and other programs in the US and around the world have been put in place to address this issue. The data environment in space physics has evolved significantly in the last decade, and as a result there has been a dramatic and definitely positive increase in the effectiveness of systems for delivery of data to the research community. This has manifested itself in the form of in general much shorter (frequently less than a day) times between observation and the availability of scientific data products, greater uniformity in and long-term stability of file types and structures, the implementation of metadata standards, the establishment of remarkably effective summary plots and web-based browsing tools, and the growing availability of software that makes working with the scientific data products much easier than it used to be. Still, there are issues related to data and data services that need to be revisited as the data environment continues to evolve. Foremost in my mind is a sense that from the perspectives of funding agencies, producers of different types of data, and data users there is certainly not one “data problem”. For example, as a general rule funding agencies want data widely used, while university researchers who are producing data want to lead discovery-type research that uses that data in some key way. The PI of a big project usually benefits optimally if the data is totally open and widely utilized, while the interests of a grad student carrying out a project that centers in some way on data are often best served by a possibly years-long period during which access to that specific data is not open to the broader community. Novice or one-time users of a type of data are often best served by a web-based tool that will make a straightforward plot for them, while expert users usually just want access to a

  10. Primary and High School resources for teachers and students to improve the space physics education in Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, P. V.; Pinto, V. A.; Stepanova, M. V.; Valdivia, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    Primary and High School educational programs in Chile include a wide geophysical section inside the natural sciences and physics courses. Unfortunately, teacher generally have a lack of preparation and knowledge in this field and there is small amount of available didactical material in the native languaje. This implies that in the reality the geophysical topics are ignored year after year in the school rooms. By the preparation of didactic material and web resources in magnetosphere, solar wind and solar topics, in accordance with the official programs of the Chilean Ministry of Education, we are collaborating to the outreach of the space physics in Chile. As the primary diffusion mechanism is the web, we hope that all the spanish talking community in Latin America can benefit from the public teaching resources that we are developing. There are a growing number of space scientist and graduate students volunteering for this endeavour.

  11. Physical Properties and Durability of New Materials for Space and Commercial Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hambourger, Paul D.

    2003-01-01

    To develop and test new materials for use in space power systems and related space and commercial applications, to assist industry in the application of these materials, and to achieve an adequate understanding of the mechanisms by which the materials perform in their intended applications.

  12. Physical Space and the Resource-Based View of the College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fugazzotto, Sam J.

    2010-01-01

    Space serves as a key resource for colleges and universities, and institutions exchange information about it with each other and with prospective students. Using content analysis to examine several widely circulated publications, this study looked for differences in the value attributed to space when institutional leaders present it to students…

  13. History matching for exploring and reducing climate model parameter space using observations and a large perturbed physics ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Daniel; Goldstein, Michael; Allison, Lesley; Blaker, Adam; Challenor, Peter; Jackson, Laura; Yamazaki, Kuniko

    2013-10-01

    We apply an established statistical methodology called history matching to constrain the parameter space of a coupled non-flux-adjusted climate model (the third Hadley Centre Climate Model; HadCM3) by using a 10,000-member perturbed physics ensemble and observational metrics. History matching uses emulators (fast statistical representations of climate models that include a measure of uncertainty in the prediction of climate model output) to rule out regions of the parameter space of the climate model that are inconsistent with physical observations given the relevant uncertainties. Our methods rule out about half of the parameter space of the climate model even though we only use a small number of historical observations. We explore 2 dimensional projections of the remaining space and observe a region whose shape mainly depends on parameters controlling cloud processes and one ocean mixing parameter. We find that global mean surface air temperature (SAT) is the dominant constraint of those used, and that the others provide little further constraint after matching to SAT. The Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) has a non linear relationship with SAT and is not a good proxy for the meridional heat transport in the unconstrained parameter space, but these relationships are linear in our reduced space. We find that the transient response of the AMOC to idealised CO2 forcing at 1 and 2 % per year shows a greater average reduction in strength in the constrained parameter space than in the unconstrained space. We test extended ranges of a number of parameters of HadCM3 and discover that no part of the extended ranges can by ruled out using any of our constraints. Constraining parameter space using easy to emulate observational metrics prior to analysis of more complex processes is an important and powerful tool. It can remove complex and irrelevant behaviour in unrealistic parts of parameter space, allowing the processes in question to be more easily

  14. Where can they play? Outdoor spaces and physical activity among adolescents in U.S. urbanized areas

    PubMed Central

    Boone-Heinonen, Janne; Casanova, Kathleen; Richardson, Andrea S.; Gordon-Larsen, Penny

    2010-01-01

    Objective To estimate behavior-specific effects of several objectively-measured outdoor spaces on different types of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in a large, diverse sample of U.S. adolescents. Methods Using data from Wave I (1994–95) of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (U.S., n=10,359) and a linked geographic information system, we calculated percent greenspace coverage and distance to the nearest neighborhood and major parks. Using sex-stratified multivariable logistic regression, we modeled reported participation in wheel-based activities, active sports, exercise, and ≥5 MVPA bouts/week as a function of each outdoor space variable, controlling for individual- and neighborhood-level sociodemographics. Results Availability of major or neighborhood parks was associated with higher participation in active sports and, in females, wheel-based activity and reporting ≥5 MVPA bouts/week [OR (95% CI): up to 1.71 (1.29. 2.27)]. Greater greenspace coverage was associated with reporting ≥5 MVPA bouts/week in males and females [OR (95% CI): up to 1.62 (1.10, 2.39) for 10.1 to 20% versus ≤10% greenspace] and exercise participation in females [OR (95% CI): up to 1.73 (1.21, 2.49)]. Conclusions Provision of outdoor spaces may promote different types of physical activities, with potentially greater benefits in female adolescents, who have particularly low physical activity levels. PMID:20655948

  15. Does activity space size influence physical activity levels of adolescents?—A GPS study of an urban environment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nolan C.; Voss, Christine; Frazer, Amanda D.; Hirsch, Jana A.; McKay, Heather A.; Winters, Meghan

    2015-01-01

    Background Physical activity (PA) is closely linked with child and youth health, and active travel may be a solution to enhancing PA levels. Activity spaces depict the geographic coverage of one's travel. Little is known about activity spaces and PA in adolescents. Objective To explore the relation between adolescent travel (using a spatial measure of activity space size) and daily moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA), with a focus on school days. Methods We used Global Positioning Systems to manually identify trips and generate activity spaces for each person-day; quantified by area for 39 students (13.8 ± 0.6 years, 38% female) attending high school in urban Downtown Vancouver, Canada. We assessed the association between activity space area and MVPA using multi-level regression. We calculated total, school-day and trip-based MVPA for each valid person-day (accelerometry; ≥ 600 min wear time). Results On school days, students accrued 68.2 min/day (95% CI 60.4–76.0) of MVPA. Daily activity spaces averaged 2.2 km2 (95% CI 1.3–3.0). There was no association between activity space size and school-day MVPA. Students accrued 21.8 min/day (95% CI 19.2–24.4) of MVPA during school hours, 19.4 min/day (95% CI 15.1–23.7) during travel, and 28.3 min/day (95% CI 22.3–34.3) elsewhere. Conclusion School and school travel are important sources of PA in Vancouver adolescents, irrespective of activity space area covered. PMID:26807349

  16. SPACE PHYSICS: Developing resources for astrophysics at A-level: the TRUMP Astrophysics project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinbank, Elizabeth

    1997-01-01

    After outlining the astrophysical options now available in A-level physics syllabuses, this paper notes some of the particular challenges facing A-level teachers and students who chose these options and describes a project designed to support them. The paper highlights some key features of the project that could readily be incorporated into other areas of physics curriculum development.

  17. Locally covariant quantum field theory and the problem of formulating the same physics in all space-times.

    PubMed

    Fewster, Christopher J

    2015-08-01

    The framework of locally covariant quantum field theory is discussed, motivated in part using 'ignorance principles'. It is shown how theories can be represented by suitable functors, so that physical equivalence of theories may be expressed via natural isomorphisms between the corresponding functors. The inhomogeneous scalar field is used to illustrate the ideas. It is argued that there are two reasonable definitions of the local physical content associated with a locally covariant theory; when these coincide, the theory is said to be dynamically local. The status of the dynamical locality condition is reviewed, as are its applications in relation to (i) the foundational question of what it means for a theory to represent the same physics in different space-times and (ii) a no-go result on the existence of natural states.

  18. Science on Spacelab. [astronomy, high energy astrophysics, life sciences, and solar, atmospheric and space physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmerling, E. R.

    1977-01-01

    Spacelab was developed by the European Space Agency for the conduction of scientific and technological experiments in space. Spacelab can be taken into earth orbit by the Space Shuttle and returned to earth after a period of 1-3 weeks. The Spacelab modular system of pallets, pressurized modules, and racks can contain large payloads with high power and telemetry requirements. A working group has defined the 'Atmospheres, Magnetospheres, and Plasmas-in-Space' project. The project objectives include the absolute measurement of solar flux in a number of carefully selected bands at the same time at which atmospheric measurements are made. NASA is committed to the concept that the scientist is to play a key role in its scientific programs.

  19. Challenges and Opportunities For Space Plasma Physics in the Use of Electromagnetic Fields Measurements (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torbert, R. B.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2013-12-01

    This presentation will review recent progress and future challenges in the use of electromagnetic fields measurements for understanding space plasma phenomena. A summary of the performance of the instrumentation on the recently launched Van Allen Probes and the upcoming NASA MMS mission will describe the state-of-the-art in many of these measurements techniques. There will also be speculation on areas of possible future instrument development that will enhance new space missions.

  20. SWUIS-A: a versatile low-cost UV/VIS/IR imaging system for airborne astronomy and aeronomy research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durda, Daniel D.; Stern, S. Alan; Tomlinson, William; Slater, David C.; Vilas, Faith

    2000-11-01

    We have developed and successfully flight-tested on 14 different airborne missions the hardware and techniques for routinely conducting valuable astronomical and aeronomical observations from high-performance, two-seater military-type aircraft. The SWUIS-A (Southwest Universal Imaging System- Airborne_ system consists of an image-intensified CCD camera with broad band response from the near-UV to the near IR, high-quality foreoptics, a miniaturized video recorder, and aircraft-to-camera power and telemetry interface with associated camera controls, and associated cables, filters, and other minor equipments. SWUIS-A's suite of high-quality foreoptics gives it selectable, variable focal length/variable field-of-view capabilities. The SWUIS-A camera frames at 60Hz video rates, which is a key requirement for both jitter compensation and high time resolution (useful fro occultation, lightning, and auroral studies). Broadband SWUIS-A image coadds can exceed a limiting magnitude of V=10.5 in<1sec with dark sky conditions. A valuable attribute of SWUIS-A airborne observations is the fact that the astronomer flies with the instrument, thereby providing Space Shuttle-like payload specialist capability to close-the-loop in real-time on the research done on each research mission. Key advantages of the small, high-performance aircraft on which we can fly SWUIS-A include significant cost savings over larger, more conventional airborne platforms, worldwide basing obviating the need for expensive, campaign-style movement of specialized large aircraft and their logistics support teams, and ultimately faster reaction times to transient events. Compared to ground-based instruments, airborne research platforms offer superior atmospheric transmission, the mobility to reach remote and often-times otherwise unreachable locations over the Earth, and virtually- guaranteed good weather for observing the sky. Compared to space-based instruments, airborne platforms typically offer substantial

  1. SWUIS-A: A Versatile, Low-Cost UV/VIS/IR Imaging System for Airborne Astronomy and Aeronomy Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durda, Daniel D.; Stern, S. Alan; Tomlinson, William; Slater, David C.; Vilas, Faith

    2001-01-01

    We have developed and successfully flight-tested on 14 different airborne missions the hardware and techniques for routinely conducting valuable astronomical and aeronomical observations from high-performance, two-seater military-type aircraft. The SWUIS-A (Southwest Universal Imaging System - Airborne) system consists of an image-intensified CCD camera with broad band response from the near-UV to the near IR, high-quality foreoptics, a miniaturized video recorder, an aircraft-to-camera power and telemetry interface with associated camera controls, and associated cables, filters, and other minor equipment. SWUIS-A's suite of high-quality foreoptics gives it selectable, variable focal length/variable field-of-view capabilities. The SWUIS-A camera frames at 60 Hz video rates, which is a key requirement for both jitter compensation and high time resolution (useful for occultation, lightning, and auroral studies). Broadband SWUIS-A image coadds can exceed a limiting magnitude of V = 10.5 in <1 sec with dark sky conditions. A valuable attribute of SWUIS-A airborne observations is the fact that the astronomer flies with the instrument, thereby providing Space Shuttle-like "payload specialist" capability to "close-the-loop" in real-time on the research done on each research mission. Key advantages of the small, high-performance aircraft on which we can fly SWUIS-A include significant cost savings over larger, more conventional airborne platforms, worldwide basing obviating the need for expensive, campaign-style movement of specialized large aircraft and their logistics support teams, and ultimately faster reaction times to transient events. Compared to ground-based instruments, airborne research platforms offer superior atmospheric transmission, the mobility to reach remote and often-times otherwise unreachable locations over the Earth, and virtually-guaranteed good weather for observing the sky. Compared to space-based instruments, airborne platforms typically offer

  2. Planning Movements in Visual and Physical Space in Monkey Posterior Parietal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Shenbing; Morel, Pierre; Gail, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    Neurons in the posterior parietal cortex respond selectively for spatial parameters of planned goal-directed movements. Yet, it is still unclear which aspects of the movement the neurons encode: the spatial parameters of the upcoming physical movement (physical goal), or the upcoming visual limb movement (visual goal). To test this, we recorded neuronal activity from the parietal reach region while monkeys planned reaches under either normal or prism-reversed viewing conditions. We found predominant encoding of physical goals while fewer neurons were selective for visual goals during planning. In contrast, local field potentials recorded in the same brain region exhibited predominant visual goal encoding, similar to previous imaging data from humans. The visual goal encoding in individual neurons was neither related to immediate visual input nor to visual memory, but to the future visual movement. Our finding suggests that action planning in parietal cortex is not exclusively a precursor of impending physical movements, as reflected by the predominant physical goal encoding, but also contains spatial kinematic parameters of upcoming visual movement, as reflected by co-existing visual goal encoding in neuronal spiking. The co-existence of visual and physical goals adds a complementary perspective to the current understanding of parietal spatial computations in primates.

  3. [Food environment and space accessibility evaluation to perform physical activity in 3 socially contrasting neighbourhoods of Buenos Aires city].

    PubMed

    Garipe, Leila Yasmin; Gónzalez, Verónica; Biasizzo, Antonella; Soriano, Jennifer Laila; Perman, Gaston; Giunta, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Due to the environmental influences on health, the goal of this study was to describe and compare the built environment in 3 socially contrasting neighbourhoods of Buenos Aires city.In 2011 a cross-sectional study was conducted in 3 socially contrasting neighbourhoods of Buenos Aires city: Recoleta (upper class), Almagro (middle class) and Constitución (lower class). Grocery stores and food stands were surveyed as well as all suitable spaces to perform physical activity. An analysis was conducted to assess the density of every food outlet per Km2 of each neighbourhood's area and per 10000 inhabitants. 2778 food stores and 149 outdoor physical activity facilities were surveyed. A higher density was observed in Constitución for fast food restaurants (Recoleta 3.6; Almagro 2.4; Constitución 6.7) and food stands (Recoleta 4.2; Almagro 1.2; Constitución 25.7) and a lower density for outdoor physical activity facilities. Population density and area density proved to be analogous. Statistically relevant differences were observed regarding the dimension of each food outlet: grocery stores, fruit stands, pubs, restaurants and food stands, as well as in the number of food stores and outdoor physical activity facilities. The information gathered in this study could be highly useful for public health policies on healthy lifestyles, and could eventually redefine the built environment in order to improve the city's equality regarding outdoor physical activity facilities and food stores. PMID:25647550

  4. [Food environment and space accessibility evaluation to perform physical activity in 3 socially contrasting neighbourhoods of Buenos Aires city].

    PubMed

    Garipe, Leila Yasmin; Gónzalez, Verónica; Biasizzo, Antonella; Soriano, Jennifer Laila; Perman, Gaston; Giunta, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Due to the environmental influences on health, the goal of this study was to describe and compare the built environment in 3 socially contrasting neighbourhoods of Buenos Aires city.In 2011 a cross-sectional study was conducted in 3 socially contrasting neighbourhoods of Buenos Aires city: Recoleta (upper class), Almagro (middle class) and Constitución (lower class). Grocery stores and food stands were surveyed as well as all suitable spaces to perform physical activity. An analysis was conducted to assess the density of every food outlet per Km2 of each neighbourhood's area and per 10000 inhabitants. 2778 food stores and 149 outdoor physical activity facilities were surveyed. A higher density was observed in Constitución for fast food restaurants (Recoleta 3.6; Almagro 2.4; Constitución 6.7) and food stands (Recoleta 4.2; Almagro 1.2; Constitución 25.7) and a lower density for outdoor physical activity facilities. Population density and area density proved to be analogous. Statistically relevant differences were observed regarding the dimension of each food outlet: grocery stores, fruit stands, pubs, restaurants and food stands, as well as in the number of food stores and outdoor physical activity facilities. The information gathered in this study could be highly useful for public health policies on healthy lifestyles, and could eventually redefine the built environment in order to improve the city's equality regarding outdoor physical activity facilities and food stores.

  5. Physics, chemistry and pulmonary sequelae of thermodegradation events in long-mission space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, Paul; Sklar, Michael; Ramirez, W. Fred; Smith, Gerald J.; Morgenthaler, George W.; Oberdoerster, Guenter

    1993-01-01

    An event in which electronic insulation consisting of polytetrafluoroethylene undergoes thermodegradation on the Space Station Freedom is considered experimentally and theoretically from the initial chemistry and convective transport through pulmonary deposition in humans. The low-gravity enviroment impacts various stages of event simulation. Vapor-phase and particulate thermodegradation products were considered as potential spacecraft contaminants. A potential pathway for the production of ultrafine particles was identified. Different approaches to the simulation and prediction of contaminant transport were studied and used to predict the distribution of generic vapor-phase products in a Space Station model. A lung transport model was used to assess the pulmonary distribution of inhaled particles, and, finally, the impact of adaptation to low gravity on the human response to this inhalation risk was explored on the basis of known physiological modifications of the immune, endocrine, musculoskeletal and pulmonary systems that accompany space flight.

  6. Technical issues in the conduct of large space platform experiments in plasma physics and geoplasma sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szuszczewicz, Edward P.

    1986-01-01

    Large, permanently-manned space platforms can provide exciting opportunities for discoveries in basic plasma and geoplasma sciences. The potential for these discoveries will depend very critically on the properties of the platform, its subsystems, and their abilities to fulfill a spectrum of scientific requirements. With this in mind, the planning of space station research initiatives and the development of attendant platform engineering should allow for the identification of critical science and technology issues that must be clarified far in advance of space station program implementation. An attempt is made to contribute to that process, with a perspective that looks to the development of the space station as a permanently-manned Spaceborne Ionospheric Weather Station. The development of this concept requires a synergism of science and technology which leads to several critical design issues. To explore the identification of these issues, the development of the concept of an Ionospheric Weather Station will necessarily touch upon a number of diverse areas. These areas are discussed.

  7. Situative Creativity: Larger Physical Spaces Facilitate Thinking of Novel Uses for Everyday Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Joel; Nokes-Malach, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    People often use spatial metaphors (e.g., think "laterally," "outside the box") to describe exploration of the problem space during creative problem solving. In this paper, we probe the potential cognitive underpinnings of these spatial metaphors. Drawing on theories of situative cognition, semantic foraging theory, and…

  8. Quantized space-time and its influence on two physical problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Meng-Sen; Zhao, Hui-Hua

    2014-04-01

    Based on Snyder's idea of quantized space-time, we derive a new generalized uncertainty principle and new modified density of states. Accordingly, we discuss the influence of the modified generalized uncertainty principle on the black hole entropy and the influence of the modified density of states on the Stefan-Boltzman law.

  9. A Tie for Third Place: Teens Need Physical Spaces as well as Virtual Places

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heeger, Paula Brehm

    2006-01-01

    "Third places" or public and informal gathering places have declined over the years. Third places, which are "neutral ground" where people gather to discuss, interact, and enjoy the company of those they know, are important for the health of communities. It's a known fact that teens have a strong need to socialize, and their third-space options…

  10. Physical-Chemical Solid Waste Processing for Space Missions at Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, John W.; Pisharody, Suresh; Moran, Mark; Wignarajah, K.; Tleimat, Maher; Pace, Greg

    2001-01-01

    As space missions become longer in duration and reach out to more distant locations such as Mars, solids waste processing progresses from storage technologies to reclamation technologies. Current low Earth orbit technologies consist of store-and dispose to space or return to Earth. Fully regenerative technologies recycle wastes. The materials reclaimed from waste can be used to provide the basic materials to support plant growth for food including carbon dioxide, water, and nutrients. Other products can also be reclaimed from waste such as hydrocarbons and activated carbon. This poster describes development at Ames Research Center of a process to make activated carbon from space mission wastes and to make an incineration system that produces clean flue gas. Inedible biomass and feces contain hydrocarbons in a form that can be pyrolyzed and converted to activated carbon. The activated carbon can then be used to clean up contaminants from various other life support systems; in particular, the activated carbon can be used regeneratively to remove NOx from incinerator flue gas. Incinerator flue gas can also be cleaned up by the use of reductive and oxidative catalysts. A catalytic incinerator flue gas cleanup system has been developed at ARC that produces flue gas clean enough (with the exception of carbon dioxide) to meet the Space Minimum Allowable Concentration limits for human exposure.

  11. Perceived Danger in Urban Public Space. The Impacts of Physical Features and Personal Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blobaum, Anke; Hunecke, Marcel

    2005-01-01

    What are the most relevant factors influencing perceived danger in urban public space? To answer this question, a field experiment of students(N = 122) was carried out on a German university campus within which perceived danger was analyzed under systematic variation of lighting, prospect, and opportunities of escape. Two standardized…

  12. A Capability to Generate Physics-based Mass Estimating Relationships for Conceptual Space Vehicle Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olds, John R.; Marcus, Leland

    2002-01-01

    This paper is written in support of the on-going research into conceptual space vehicle design conducted at the Space Systems Design Laboratory (SSDL) at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Research at the SSDL follows a sequence of a number of the traditional aerospace disciplines. The sequence of disciplines and interrelationship among them is shown in the Design Structure Matrix (DSM). The discipline of Weights and Sizing occupies a central location in the design of a new space vehicle. Weights and Sizing interact, either in a feed forward or feed back manner, with every other discipline in the DSM. Because of this principle location, accuracy in Weights and Sizing is integral to producing an accurate model of a space vehicle concept. Instead of using conceptual level techniques, a simplified Finite Element Analysis (FEA) technique is described as applied to the problem of the Liquid Oxygen (LOX) tank bending loads applied to the forward Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) tank of the Georgia Tech Air Breathing Launch Vehicle (ABLV).

  13. Solar And Cosmic Ray Physics And The Space Environment: Studies For And With LISA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaul, D. N. A.; Aplin, K. L.; Araújo, H.; Bingham, R.; Blake, J. B.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Buchman, S.; Fazakerley, A.; Finn, L. S.; Fletcher, L.; Glover, A.; Grimani, C.; Hapgood, M.; Kellet, B.; Matthews, S.; Mulligan, T.; Ni, W.-T.; Nieminen, P.; Posner, A.; Quenby, J. J.; Roming, P.; Spence, H.; Sumner, T.; Vocca, H.; Wass, P.; Young, P.

    2006-11-01

    With data analysis preparations for LISA underway, there has been renewed interest in studying solar, cosmic ray and environmental physics for, and using LISA. The motivation for these studies is two fold. The primary incentive is to predict and consequently minimize the impact of disturbances associated with these factors, to maximize LISA's gravitational wave scientific yield. The second stimulus is the unique opportunity that is afforded by LISA's long-baseline 3-spacecraft configuration for studies of solar, cosmic ray and environmental physics. Here we present an overview of recent progress in these studies.

  14. Physics of Phase Space Matching for Staging Plasma and Traditional Accelerator Components Using Longitudinally Tailored Plasma Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X. L.; Hua, J. F.; Wu, Y. P.; Zhang, C. J.; Li, F.; Wan, Y.; Pai, C.-H.; Lu, W.; An, W.; Yu, P.; Hogan, M. J.; Joshi, C.; Mori, W. B.

    2016-03-01

    Phase space matching between two plasma-based accelerator (PBA) stages and between a PBA and a traditional accelerator component is a critical issue for emittance preservation. The drastic differences of the transverse focusing strengths as the beam propagates between stages and components may lead to a catastrophic emittance growth even when there is a small energy spread. We propose using the linear focusing forces from nonlinear wakes in longitudinally tailored plasma density profiles to control phase space matching between sections with negligible emittance growth. Several profiles are considered and theoretical analysis and particle-in-cell simulations show how these structures may work in four different scenarios. Good agreement between theory and simulation is obtained, and it is found that the adiabatic approximation misses important physics even for long profiles.

  15. Physical and Thermal Properties Evaluated of Teflon FEP Retrieved From the Hubble Space Telescope During Three Servicing Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce A.; deGroh, Kim, K.; Sutter, James K.; Gaier, James R.; Messer, Russell, K.; Scheiman, Daniel A.; McClendon, Mark W.; Viens, Michael J.; Wang, L. Len; He, Charles C.; Gummow, Jonathan D.

    2002-01-01

    Mechanical properties of aluminized Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) thermal control materials on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) exposed to low Earth orbit for up to 9.7 years have significantly degraded, with extensive cracking occurring on orbit. The NASA Glenn Research Center and the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center have collaborated on analyzing the physical and thermal properties of aluminized FEP (FEP-Al, DuPont) materials retrieved in December 1999 during HST's third servicing mission (SM3A). Comparisons have been made to properties of FEP-Al retrieved during the first and second HST servicing missions, SM1 and SM2, in order to determine degradation processes for FEP on HST.

  16. Physics of Phase Space Matching for Staging Plasma and Traditional Accelerator Components Using Longitudinally Tailored Plasma Profiles.

    PubMed

    Xu, X L; Hua, J F; Wu, Y P; Zhang, C J; Li, F; Wan, Y; Pai, C-H; Lu, W; An, W; Yu, P; Hogan, M J; Joshi, C; Mori, W B

    2016-03-25

    Phase space matching between two plasma-based accelerator (PBA) stages and between a PBA and a traditional accelerator component is a critical issue for emittance preservation. The drastic differences of the transverse focusing strengths as the beam propagates between stages and components may lead to a catastrophic emittance growth even when there is a small energy spread. We propose using the linear focusing forces from nonlinear wakes in longitudinally tailored plasma density profiles to control phase space matching between sections with negligible emittance growth. Several profiles are considered and theoretical analysis and particle-in-cell simulations show how these structures may work in four different scenarios. Good agreement between theory and simulation is obtained, and it is found that the adiabatic approximation misses important physics even for long profiles.

  17. Physics of Phase Space Matching for Staging Plasma and Traditional Accelerator Components Using Longitudinally Tailored Plasma Profiles.

    PubMed

    Xu, X L; Hua, J F; Wu, Y P; Zhang, C J; Li, F; Wan, Y; Pai, C-H; Lu, W; An, W; Yu, P; Hogan, M J; Joshi, C; Mori, W B

    2016-03-25

    Phase space matching between two plasma-based accelerator (PBA) stages and between a PBA and a traditional accelerator component is a critical issue for emittance preservation. The drastic differences of the transverse focusing strengths as the beam propagates between stages and components may lead to a catastrophic emittance growth even when there is a small energy spread. We propose using the linear focusing forces from nonlinear wakes in longitudinally tailored plasma density profiles to control phase space matching between sections with negligible emittance growth. Several profiles are considered and theoretical analysis and particle-in-cell simulations show how these structures may work in four different scenarios. Good agreement between theory and simulation is obtained, and it is found that the adiabatic approximation misses important physics even for long profiles. PMID:27058082

  18. Collaborative Curriculum Making in the Physical Education Vein: A Narrative Inquiry of Space, Activity and Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Cheryl J.; You, JeongAe; Oh, Suhak

    2013-01-01

    Located at the intersection where teaching and curriculum meet, this narrative inquiry examines how collaborative curriculum making unfolded between and among six members of a physical education department in a middle school in the mid-southern USA. The internationally significant work takes the position that long-term relations are prerequisite…

  19. Phases and Interfaces from Real Space Atomically Resolved Data: Physics-Based Deep Data Image Analysis.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Rama K; Ziatdinov, Maxim; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2016-09-14

    Advances in electron and scanning probe microscopies have led to a wealth of atomically resolved structural and electronic data, often with ∼1-10 pm precision. However, knowledge generation from such data requires the development of a physics-based robust framework to link the observed structures to macroscopic chemical and physical descriptors, including single phase regions, order parameter fields, interfaces, and structural and topological defects. Here, we develop an approach based on a synergy of sliding window Fourier transform to capture the local analog of traditional structure factors combined with blind linear unmixing of the resultant 4D data set. This deep data analysis is ideally matched to the underlying physics of the problem and allows reconstruction of the a priori unknown structure factors of individual components and their spatial localization. We demonstrate the principles of this approach using a synthetic data set and further apply it for extracting chemical and physically relevant information from electron and scanning tunneling microscopy data. This method promises to dramatically speed up crystallographic analysis in atomically resolved data, paving the road toward automatic local structure-property determinations in crystalline and quasi-ordered systems, as well as systems with competing structural and electronic order parameters. PMID:27517608

  20. A Demonstration of the Analysis of Variance Using Physical Movement and Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, William J.; Siakaluk, Paul D.

    2011-01-01

    Classroom demonstrations help students better understand challenging concepts. This article introduces an activity that demonstrates the basic concepts involved in analysis of variance (ANOVA). Students who physically participated in the activity had a better understanding of ANOVA concepts (i.e., higher scores on an exam question answered 2…

  1. Phases and Interfaces from Real Space Atomically Resolved Data: Physics-Based Deep Data Image Analysis.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Rama K; Ziatdinov, Maxim; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2016-09-14

    Advances in electron and scanning probe microscopies have led to a wealth of atomically resolved structural and electronic data, often with ∼1-10 pm precision. However, knowledge generation from such data requires the development of a physics-based robust framework to link the observed structures to macroscopic chemical and physical descriptors, including single phase regions, order parameter fields, interfaces, and structural and topological defects. Here, we develop an approach based on a synergy of sliding window Fourier transform to capture the local analog of traditional structure factors combined with blind linear unmixing of the resultant 4D data set. This deep data analysis is ideally matched to the underlying physics of the problem and allows reconstruction of the a priori unknown structure factors of individual components and their spatial localization. We demonstrate the principles of this approach using a synthetic data set and further apply it for extracting chemical and physically relevant information from electron and scanning tunneling microscopy data. This method promises to dramatically speed up crystallographic analysis in atomically resolved data, paving the road toward automatic local structure-property determinations in crystalline and quasi-ordered systems, as well as systems with competing structural and electronic order parameters.

  2. Phases and interfaces from real space atomically resolved data: Physics-based deep data image analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Vasudevan, Rama K.; Ziatdinov, Maxim; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2016-08-12

    Advances in electron and scanning probe microscopies have led to a wealth of atomically resolved structural and electronic data, often with ~1–10 pm precision. However, knowledge generation from such data requires the development of a physics-based robust framework to link the observed structures to macroscopic chemical and physical descriptors, including single phase regions, order parameter fields, interfaces, and structural and topological defects. Here, we develop an approach based on a synergy of sliding window Fourier transform to capture the local analog of traditional structure factors combined with blind linear unmixing of the resultant 4D data set. This deep data analysismore » is ideally matched to the underlying physics of the problem and allows reconstruction of the a priori unknown structure factors of individual components and their spatial localization. We demonstrate the principles of this approach using a synthetic data set and further apply it for extracting chemical and physically relevant information from electron and scanning tunneling microscopy data. Furthermore, this method promises to dramatically speed up crystallographic analysis in atomically resolved data, paving the road toward automatic local structure–property determinations in crystalline and quasi-ordered systems, as well as systems with competing structural and electronic order parameters.« less

  3. Moving across Physical and Online Spaces: A Case Study in a Blended Primary Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thibaut, Patricia; Curwood, Jen Scott; Carvalho, Lucila; Simpson, Alyson

    2015-01-01

    With the introduction of digital tools and online connectivity in primary schools, the shape of teaching and learning is shifting beyond the physical classroom. Drawing on the architecture of productive learning networks framework, we examine the affordances and limitations of an upper primary learning network and focus on how the digital and…

  4. Information Needs: for Planning Physical Facilities in Colleges and Universities. Space Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caudill, Rowlett and Scott, Architects, Houston, TX.

    As an economical method of evaluating alternative building programs prior to deciding upon one, a computer-based mathematical model is described which could be used to simulate an institution's use of physical facilities. Information is presented regarding program input, measure of effectiveness, and program procedure. Sample forms and sample…

  5. Methods of Achieving and Maintaining Physical Fitness for Prolonged Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olree, Harry D. (Principal Investigator); Corbin, Bob; Penrod, James; Smith, Carroll

    1969-01-01

    This final summary report covers the five experiments that were conducted over a 24-month period beginning May 1, 1967 and ending April 30, 1969. Experiment I revealed that running and riding a bicycle ergometer produced similar gains in physical fitness variables. In Experiment I the subjects exercising at a 180 heart rate made a greater improvement in physical fitness than did those exercising a t a 140 or 160 heart rate. In Experiment II the subjects who exercised sixty minutes per day made greater gains on specified components of physical fitness than did those who exercised twenty or forty minutes per day, twelve times per week made greater gains on specified components of physical fitness than did those who exercised three or six times per week. In Experiment V, it was found that subjects could maintain a moderate level of fitness by exercising at a pulse rate of 160 beats per minute for twenty-minute periods three times per week, that subjects who "overtrained" by exercising twice daily to near exhaustion increased in fitness and that those subjects who discontinued training decreased in fitness.

  6. Analysis and evaluation of ZPPR (Zero Power Physics Reactor) critical experiments for a 100 kilowatt-electric space reactor

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, H.F.; Collins, P.J.; Carpenter, S.G.; Olsen, D.N.; Smith, D.M.; Schaefer, R.W. ); Doncals, R.A.; Andre, S.V.; Porter, C.A. ); Cowan, C.L; Stewart, S.L.; Protsik, R. . Astro Space Div.)

    1990-01-01

    ZPPR critical experiments were used for physics testing the reactor design of the SP-100, a 100-kW thermoelectric LMR that is being developed to provide electrical power for space applications. These tests validated all key physics characteristics of the design, including the ultimate safety in the event of a launch or re-entry accident. Both the experiments and the analysis required the use of techniques not previously applied to fast reactor designs. A few significant discrepancies between the experimental and calculated results leave opportunities for further optimization. An initial investigation has been made into application of the ZPPR-20 results, along with those of other relevant integral data, to the SP-100 design. 13 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  7. Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromley, D. Allan

    1980-01-01

    The author presents the argument that the past few years, in terms of new discoveries, insights, and questions raised, have been among the most productive in the history of physics. Selected for discussion are some of the most important new developments in physics research. (Author/SA)

  8. Heliophysics Science and the Moon: Potential Solar and Space Physics Science for Lunar Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This report addresses both these features new science enabled by NASAs exploration initiative and enabling science that is critical to ensuring a safe return to the Moon and onward to Mars. The areas of interest are structured into four main themes: Theme 1: Heliophysics Science of the Moon Studies of the Moons unique magnetodynamic plasma environment. Theme 2: Space Weather, Safeguarding the Journey Studies aimed at developing a predictive capability for space weather hazards. Theme 3: The Moon as a Historical Record Studies of the variation of the lunar regolith to uncover the history of the Sun, solar system, local interstellar medium, galaxy, and universe. Theme 4: The Moon as a Heliophysics Science Platform Using the unique environment of the lunar surface as a platform to provide observations beneficial to advancing heliophysics science.

  9. Quantum simulations in phase-space: from quantum optics to ultra-cold physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, Peter D.; Chaturvedi, Subhash

    2016-07-01

    As a contribution to the international year of light, we give a brief history of quantum optics in phase-space, with new directions including quantum simulations of multipartite Bell violations, opto-mechanics, ultra-cold atomic systems, matter-wave Bell violations, coherent transport and quantum fluctuations in the early Universe. We mostly focus on exact methods using the positive-P representation, and semiclassical truncated Wigner approximations.

  10. Physical limitations in sensors for a drag-free deep space probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juillerat, R.

    1971-01-01

    The inner perturbing forces acting on sensors were analyzed, taking into account the technological limitations imposed on the proof mass position pickup and proof mass acquisition system. The resulting perturbing accelerations are evaluated as a function of the drag-free sensor parameters. Perturbations included gravitational attraction, electrical action, magnetic action, pressure effects, radiation effects, and action of the position pickup. These data can be used to study the laws of guidance, providing an optimization of the space probe as a whole.

  11. New Solutions of Three Nonlinear Space- and Time-Fractional Partial Differential Equations in Mathematical Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Ruo-Xia; Wang, Wei; Chen, Ting-Hua

    2014-11-01

    Motivated by the widely used ansätz method and starting from the modified Riemann—Liouville derivative together with a fractional complex transformation that can be utilized to transform nonlinear fractional partial differential equations to nonlinear ordinary differential equations, new types of exact traveling wave solutions to three important nonlinear space- and time-fractional partial differential equations are obtained simultaneously in terms of solutions of a Riccati equation. The results are new and first reported in this paper.

  12. SEVAN CRO Particle Detector for Solar Physics and Space Weather research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roša, D.; Angelov, Ch.; Arakelyan, K.; Arsov, T.; Avakyan, K.; Chilingarian, A.; Chilingaryan, S.; Hovhanissyan, A.; Hovhannisyan, T.; Hovsepyan, G.; Sargsyan, D.; Hržina, D.; Kalapov, I.; Karapetyan, T.; Kozliner, L.; Mailyan, B.; Maričić, D.; Nishev, A.; Pokhsraryan, D.; Reymers, A.; Romštajn, I.; Stamenov, J.; Tchorbadjieff, A.; Vanyan, L.

    The installation of the SEVAN CRO particle detector at Zagreb Astronomical Observatory was finished at the end of 2008. The detector is a fully autonomous unit, with the capability to send data via the Internet, and it is a part of the SEVAN (Space Environmental Viewing and Analysis Network), which includes detectors located at middle to low latitudes. Till to now the SEVAN modules are installed at Aragats Space Environmental Centre in Armenia (3 units), Bulgaria (Moussala) and Croatia (Zagreb). SEVAN detectors are use for simultaneous measurements of flux of most species of secondary cosmic rays born in the atmospheric cascade caused by primary ions and solar neutrons. These devices can be used for exploration of solar modulation effects on galactic cosmic rays. The main scientific aim is to the improve research of solar particle acceleration in the vicinity of the Sun by detecting highest energy solar cosmic rays giving additional secondaries detected by surface particle detectors and to improve researches of the space environment conditions.

  13. Skylab experiments. Volume 5: Astronomy and space physics. [Skylab observations of galactic radiation, solar energy, and interplanetary composition for high school level education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The astronomy and space physics investigations conducted in the Skylab program include over 20 experiments in four categories to explore space phenomena that cannot be observed from earth. The categories of space research are as follows: (1) phenomena within the solar system, such as the effect of solar energy on Earth's atmosphere, the composition of interplanetary space, the possibility of an inner planet, and the X-ray radiation from Jupiter, (2) analysis of energetic particles such as cosmic rays and neutrons in the near-earth space, (3) stellar and galactic astronomy, and (4) self-induced environment surrounding the Skylab spacecraft.

  14. Hybrid modeling of plasmas and applications to fusion and space physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazeminejad, Farzad

    Since the early days of controlled fusion research, plasma physicists have encountered great challenges in obtaining solutions to the highly nonlinear equations which govern the behavior of fusion plasmas; with the growth of other applications of plasma physics these problems have grown in importance. Obtaining reasonable solutions to the nonlinear equations is crucial to understanding the behavior of plasmas. With the advent of high speed computers, computer modeling of plasmas has moved into the front row of the tools used in research of their nonlinear plasma dynamics. There are roughly speaking two types of plasma models, particle models and fluid models. Particle models in general require larger memory for the computer due to the massive amounts of data associated with the particles' kinematical variables. Fluid models are better fit to handle large scales and long times. The drawback of fluid models however, is that they miss the physical phenomena taking place at the microscale and these phenomena can influence the properties of the fluids. Another approach is to start with fluid models and incorporate more physics. Such models are referred to as hybrid models: two such models are discussed. They are then applied to two problems; the first is a simulation of the artificial comet generated by the AMPTE experiment; the second is the production of enhanced noise in fusion plasmas by injected energetic ions or by fusion reaction products. In both cases, the models demonstrate qualitative agreement with the experimental observations.

  15. Nuclear Physics in Space: What We Can Learn From Cosmic Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moskalenko, Igor V.

    2004-01-01

    Studies and discoveries in cosmic-ray physics and generally in Astrophysics provide a fertile ground for research in many areas of Particle Physics and Cosmology, such as the search for dark matter, antimatter, new particles, and exotic physics, studies of the nucleosynthesis, origin of Galactic and extragalactic gamma-ray diffuse emission, formation of the large scale structure of the universe etc. In several years new missions are planned for cosmic-ray experiments, which will tremendously increase the quality and accuracy of cosmic-ray data. On the other hand, direct measurements of cosmic rays are possible in only one location on the outskirts of the Milky Way galaxy and present only a snapshot of very dynamic processes. It has been recently realized that direct information about the fluxes and spectra of cosmic rays in distant locations is provided by the Galactic diffuse gamma-rays, therefore, complementing the local cosmic-ray studies. A wealth of information is also contained in the isotopic abundances of cosmic rays, therefore, accurate evaluation of the isotopic production cross sections is of primary importance for Astrophysics of cosmic rays, studies of the galactic chemical evolution, and Cosmology. In this talk, I will show new results obtained with GALPROP, the most advanced numerical model for cosmic-ray propagation, which includes in a self-consistent way all cosmic-ray species (stable and long-lived radioactive isotopes from H to Ni, antiprotons, positrons and electrons, gamma rays and synchrotron radiation), and all relevant processes and reactions.

  16. The User Community and a Multi-Mission Data Project: Services, Experiences and Directions of the Space Physics Data Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, Shing F.; Bilitza, D.; Candey, R.; Chimiak, R.; Cooper, John; Fung, Shing; Harris, B.; Johnson R.; King, J.; Kovalick, T.; Leckner, H.; Papitashvili, N.; Roberts, Aaron

    2008-01-01

    From a user's perspective, the multi-mission data and orbit services of NASA's Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) project offer a unique range of important data and services highly complementary to other services presently available or now evolving in the international heliophysics data environment. The VSP (Virtual Space Physics Observatory) service is an active portal to a wide range of distributed data sources. CDAWeb (Coordinate Data Analysis Web) enables plots, listings and file downloads for current data cross the boundaries of missions and instrument types (and now including data from THEMIS and STEREO). SSCWeb, Helioweb and our 3D Animated Orbit Viewer (TIPSOD) provide position data and query logic for most missions currently important to heliophysics science. OMNIWeb with its new extension to 1- and 5-minute resolution provides interplanetary parameters at the Earth's bow shock as a unique value-added data product. SPDF also maintains NASA's CDF (common Data Format) standard and a range of associated tools including translation services. These capabilities are all now available through webservices-based APIs as well as through our direct user interfaces. In this paper, we will demonstrate the latest data and capabilities now supported in these multi-mission services, review the lessons we continue to learn in what science users need and value in this class of services, and discuss out current thinking to the future role and appropriate focus of the SPDF effort in the evolving and increasingly distributed heliophysics data environment.

  17. CDPP tools : Promoting research and education with AMDA, 3DView and the propagation tool in space physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genot, Vincent; Cecconi, Baptiste

    The CDPP (Centre de Données de la Physique des Plasmas, http://cdpp.eu/), the French data center for plasma physics, is engaged for more than a decade in the archiving and dissemination of plasma data products from space missions and ground observatories. Besides these activities, the CDPP developed an online analysis tool, AMDA (http://amda.cdpp.eu/). It enables in depth analysis of large amount of space physics, planetary and model data through dedicated functionalities such as: visualization, data mining, cataloguing ... It is used (about 250 connections per month) by scientists for their own research, but also by graduate students in the classroom and for dedicated projects. AMDA is ideally complemented by two companion tools also developed at CDPP : 3DView (http://3dview.cdpp.eu/) which provides immersive data visualisations in planetary environments and the Propagation Tool (http://propagationtool.cdpp.eu/) which enables tracking of solar perturbations in the heliosphere with different analytical models and white light imaging techniques. This presentation will focus on some scientific cases combining the use of the three tools. (2.1) Data Mining and Intelligent Systems for Massive Data Sets

  18. Kuang's Semi-Classical Formalism for Calculating Electron Capture Cross Sections: A Space- Physics Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barghouty, A. F.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate estimates of electroncapture cross sections at energies relevant to the modeling of the transport, acceleration, and interaction of energetic neutral atoms (ENA) in space (approximately few MeV per nucleon) and especially for multi-electron ions must rely on detailed, but computationally expensive, quantum-mechanical description of the collision process. Kuang's semi-classical approach is an elegant and efficient way to arrive at these estimates. Motivated by ENA modeling efforts for apace applications, we shall briefly present this approach along with sample applications and report on current progress.

  19. Information Telecommunications of Pushchino Radio Astronomy Observatory, Astro Space Center of Lebedev Physical Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumsky, V.; Isaev, E. A.; Samodurov, V. A.; Likhachev, S. F.; Shatskaya, M. V.; Kitaeva, M. A.; Zaytcev, A. Yu.; Ovchinnikov, I. L.; Kornilov, V. V.

    Buffer data center was created in the territory of the Pushchino Radio Astronomy Observatory three years ago. The necessity of its creation was caused by the high requirements to the speed and quality of the transmission large amounts of scientific and telemetry data received by tracking station RT-22 from the space radio telescope of the international project "Radioastron". The transfer of this data is carried out over a long distance over 100 km from the Pushchino to Moscow center of processing and storage ASC FIAN. And now we use the data center as a center of local network of the Observatory.

  20. The CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) for high-energy astroparticle physics on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adriani, O.; Akaike, Y.; Asano, K.; Asaoka, Y.; Bagliesi, M. G.; Bigongiari, G.; Binns, W. R.; Bonechi, S.; Bongi, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Castellini, G.; Cherry, M. L.; Collazuol, G.; Ebisawa, K.; Di Felice, V.; Fuke, H.; Guzik, T. G.; Hams, T.; Hareyama, M.; Hasebe, N.; Hibino, K.; Ichimura, M.; Ioka, K.; Israel, M. H.; Javaid, A.; Kamioka, E.; Kasahara, K.; Kataoka, J.; Kataoka, R.; Katayose, Y.; Kawanaka, N.; Kitamura, H.; Kotani, T.; Krawczynski, H. S.; Krizmanic, J. F.; Kubota, A.; Kuramata, S.; Lomtadze, T.; Maestro, P.; Marcelli, L.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Mitchell, J. W.; Miyake, S.; Mizutani, K.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mori, K.; Mori, M.; Mori, N.; Motz, H. M.; Munakata, K.; Murakami, H.; Nakagawa, Y. E.; Nakahira, S.; Nishimura, J.; Okuno, S.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozawa, S.; Palma, F.; Papini, P.; Rauch, B. F.; Ricciarini, S. B.; Sakamoto, T.; Sasaki, M.; Shibata, M.; Shimizu, Y.; Shiomi, A.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Takahashi, I.; Takayanagi, M.; Takita, M.; Tamura, T.; Tateyama, N.; Terasawa, T.; Tomida, H.; Torii, S.; Tunesada, Y.; Uchihori, Y.; Ueno, S.; Vannuccini, E.; Wefel, J. P.; Yamaoka, K.; Yanagita, S.; Yoshida, A.; Yoshida, K.; Yuda, T.

    2015-05-01

    The CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) is a space experiment, currently under development by Japan in collaboration with Italy and the United States, which will measure the flux of cosmic-ray electrons (and positrons) up to 20 TeV energy, of gamma rays up to 10 TeV, of nuclei with Z from 1 to 40 up to 1 PeV energy, and will detect gamma-ray bursts in the 7 keV to 20 MeV energy range during a 5 year mission. These measurements are essential to investigate possible nearby astrophysical sources of high energy electrons, study the details of galactic particle propagation and search for dark matter signatures. The main detector of CALET, the Calorimeter, consists of a module to identify the particle charge, followed by a thin imaging calorimeter (3 radiation lengths) with tungsten plates interleaving scintillating fibre planes, and a thick energy measuring calorimeter (27 radiation lengths) composed of lead tungstate logs. The Calorimeter has the depth, imaging capabilities and energy resolution necessary for excellent separation between hadrons, electrons and gamma rays. The instrument is currently being prepared for launch (expected in 2015) to the International Space Station ISS, for installation on the Japanese Experiment Module - Exposure Facility (JEM-EF).

  1. The CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) for high-energy astroparticle physics on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adriani, O.; Akaike, Y.; Asano, K.; Asaoka, Y.; Bagliesi, M. G.; Bigongiari, G.; Binns, W. R.; Bonechi, S.; Bongi, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Castellini, G.; Cherry, M. L.; Collazuol, G.; Ebisawa, K.; Di Felice, V.; Fuke, H.; Guzik, T. G.; Hams, T.; Hareyama, M.; Hasebe, N.; Hibino, K.; Ichimura, M.; Ioka, K.; Israel, M. H.; Javaid, A.; Kamioka, E.; Kasahara, K.; Kataoka, J.; Kataoka, R.; Katayose, Y.; Kawanaka, N.; Kitamura, H.; Kotani, T.; Krawczynski, H. S.; Krizmanic, J. F.; Kubota, A.; Kuramata, S.; Lomtadze, T.; Maestro, P.; Marcelli, L.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Mitchell, J. W.; Miyake, S.; Mizutani, K.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mori, K.; Mori, M.; Mori, N.; Motz, H. M.; Munakata, K.; Murakami, H.; Nakagawa, Y. E.; Nakahira, S.; Nishimura, J.; Okuno, S.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozawa, S.; Palma, F.; Papini, P.; Rauch, B. F.; Ricciarini, S. B.; Sakamoto, T.; Sasaki, M.; Shibata, M.; Shimizu, Y.; Shiomi, A.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Takahashi, I.; Takayanagi, M.; Takita, M.; Tamura, T.; Tateyama, N.; Terasawa, T.; Tomida, H.; Torii, S.; Tunesada, Y.; Uchihori, Y.; Ueno, S.; Vannuccini, E.; Wefel, J. P.; Yamaoka, K.; Yanagita, S.; Yoshida, A.; Yoshida, K.; Yuda, T.

    2015-08-01

    The CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) is a space experiment, currently under development by Japan in collaboration with Italy and the United States, which will measure the flux of cosmic-ray electrons (and positrons) up to 20 TeV energy, of gamma rays up to 10 TeV, of nuclei with Z from 1 to 40 up to 1 PeV energy, and will detect gamma-ray bursts in the 7 keV to 20 MeV energy range during a 5 year mission. These measurements are essential to investigate possible nearby astrophysical sources of high energy electrons, study the details of galactic particle propagation and search for dark matter signatures. The main detector of CALET, the Calorimeter, consists of a module to identify the particle charge, followed by a thin imaging calorimeter (3 radiation lengths) with tungsten plates interleaving scintillating fibre planes, and a thick energy measuring calorimeter (27 radiation lengths) composed of lead tungstate logs. The Calorimeter has the depth, imaging capabilities and energy resolution necessary for excellent separation between hadrons, electrons and gamma rays. The instrument is currently being prepared for launch (expected in 2015) to the International Space Station ISS, for installation on the Japanese Experiment Module - Exposure Facility (JEM-EF).

  2. Physics and potentials of fissioning plasmas for space power and propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thom, K.; Schwenk, F. C.; Schneider, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    Fissioning uranium plasmas are the nuclear fuel in conceptual high-temperature gaseous-core reactors for advanced rocket propulsion in space. A gaseous-core nuclear rocket would be a thermal reactor in which an enriched uranium plasma at about 10,000 K is confined in a reflector-moderator cavity where it is nuclear critical and transfers its fission power to a confining propellant flow for the production of thrust at a specific impulse up to 5000 sec. With a thrust-to-engine weight ratio approaching unity, the gaseous-core nuclear rocket could provide for propulsion capabilities needed for manned missions to the nearby planets and for economical cislunar ferry services. Fueled with enriched uranium hexafluoride and operated at temperatures lower than needed for propulsion, the gaseous-core reactor scheme also offers significant benefits in applications for space and terrestrial power. They include high-efficiency power generation at low specific mass, the burnup of certain fission products and actinides, the breeding of U-233 from thorium with short doubling times, and improved convenience of fuel handling and processing in the gaseous phase.

  3. The Calorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) for High Energy Astroparticle Physics on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torii, Shoji

    The Calorimetric Electron Telescope, CALET, space experiment, currently under development by Japan in collaboration with Italy and the United States, will measure the flux of Cosmic Ray electrons (and positrons) t o 20 TeV, gamma rays to 10 TeV , nuclei with Z=1 to 40 up to 1,000 TeV, and Gamma-ray bursts in the 7 keV- 10 MeV energy range during a five year mission. These measurements are essential to investigate possible nearby astrophysical sources of high energy electrons, study the details of galactic particle propagation and search for dark matter signatures. The main detector of Calet, the Calorimeter, consists of a module to identify the particle charge, followed by a thin imaging calorimeter (3 radiation lengths) with tungsten plates interleaving scintillating fiber planes, and a thick energy measuring calorimeter (27 radiation lengths) composed of lead tungstate logs. The Calorimeter has the depth, imaging capabilities and energy resolution necessary for excellent separation between hadrons, electrons and gamma rays. The instrument is currently being prepared for launch, during the Japan Fiscal Year (April, 2014- March, 2015) time frame, to the International Space Station (ISS) for installation on the Japanese Experiment Module - Exposure Facility (JEM-EF).

  4. Physics of Hard Spheres Experiment (PhaSE) or "Making Jello in Space"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, Jerri S.; Doherty, Michael P.

    1998-01-01

    The Physics of Hard Spheres Experiment (PHaSE) is a highly successful experiment that flew aboard two shuttle missions to study the transitions involved in the formation of jellolike colloidal crystals in a microgravity environment. A colloidal suspension, or colloid, consists of fine particles, often having complex interactions, suspended in a liquid. Paint, ink, and milk are examples of colloids found in everyday life. In low Earth orbit, the effective force of gravity is thousands of times less than at the Earth's surface. This provides researchers a way to conduct experiments that cannot be adequately performed in an Earth-gravity environment. In microgravity, colloidal particles freely interact without the complications of settling that occur in normal gravity on Earth. If the particle interactions within these colloidal suspensions could be predicted and accurately modeled, they could provide the key to understanding fundamental problems in condensed matter physics and could help make possible the development of wonderful new "designer" materials. Industries that make semiconductors, electro-optics, ceramics, and composites are just a few that may benefit from this knowledge. Atomic interactions determine the physical properties (e.g., weight, color, and hardness) of ordinary matter. PHaSE uses colloidal suspensions of microscopic solid plastic spheres to model the behavior of atomic interactions. When uniformly sized hard spheres suspended in a fluid reach a certain concentration (volume fraction), the particle-fluid mixture changes from a disordered fluid state, in which the spheres are randomly organized, to an ordered "crystalline" state, in which they are structured periodically. The thermal energy of the spheres causes them to form ordered arrays, analogous to crystals. Seven of the eight PHaSE samples ranged in volume fraction from 0.483 to 0.624 to cover the range of interest, while one sample, having a concentration of 0.019, was included for

  5. Space Launch System Base Heating Test: Environments and Base Flow Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Manish; Knox, Kyle; Seaford, Mark; Dufrene, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    NASA MSFC and CUBRC designed and developed a 2% scale SLS propulsive wind tunnel test program to investigate base flow effects during flight from lift-off to MECO. This type of test program has not been conducted in 40+ years during the NASA Shuttle Program. Dufrene et al paper described the operation, instrumentation type and layout, facility and propulsion performance, test matrix and conditions and some raw results. This paper will focus on the SLS base flow physics and the generation and results of the design environments being used to design the thermal protection system.

  6. From Born Reciprocity to Reciprocal Relativity: A Paradigm for Space-Time Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvis, Peter

    Born's principle of reciprocity -- the exchangeability of relativistic energy-momentum and time-position -- can be seen as a discrete element of a continuous group of symmetry transformations which transcend relativity. Invariance under the semi-direct product of the Weyl-Heisenberg group H(4) of canonical commutation relations with the non-compact unitary group U(3, 1) -- the so-called quaplectic group U(3, 1) ⋉ H(4) -- has been considered by Low as an extension of Born reciprocity to a fundamental symmetry principle of `reciprocal relativity' for the physics of non-inertial frames and high energy processes...

  7. Review study and evaluation of possible flight experiments relating to cloud physics experiments in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, R. J.; Wu, S. T.

    1976-01-01

    The general objectives of the Zero-Gravity Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory Program are to improve the level of knowledge in atmospheric cloud research by placing at the disposal of the terrestrial-bound atmospheric cloud physicist a laboratory that can be operated in the environment of zero-gravity or near zero-gravity. This laboratory will allow studies to be performed without mechanical, aerodynamic, electrical, or other techniques to support the object under study. The inhouse analysis of the Skylab 3 and 4 experiments in dynamics of oscillations, rotations, collisions and coalescence of water droplets under low gravity-environment is presented.

  8. Volume I. Percussion Sextet. (original Composition). Volume II. The Simulation of Acoustical Space by Means of Physical Modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzara, Leonard Charles

    1990-01-01

    The dissertation is in two parts:. 1. Percussion Sextet. The Percussion Sextet is a one movement musical composition with a length of approximately fifteen minutes. It is for six instrumentalists, each on a number of percussion instruments. The overriding formal problem was to construct a coherent and compelling structure which fuses a diversity of musical materials and textures into a dramatic whole. Particularly important is the synthesis of opposing tendencies contained in stochastic and deterministic processes: global textures versus motivic detail, and randomness versus total control. Several compositional techniques are employed in the composition. These methods of composition will be aided, in part, by the use of artificial intelligence techniques programmed on a computer. Finally, the percussion ensemble is the ideal medium to realize the above processes since it encompasses a wide range of both pitched and unpitched timbres, and since a great variety of textures and densities can be created with a certain economy of means. 2. The simulation of acoustical space by means of physical modeling. This is a written report describing the research and development of a computer program which simulates the characteristics of acoustical space in two dimensions. With the computer program the user can simulate most conventional acoustical spaces, as well as those physically impossible to realize in the real world. The program simulates acoustical space by means of geometric modeling. This involves defining wall equations, phantom source points and wall diffusions, and then processing input files containing digital signals through the program, producing output files ready for digital to analog conversion. The user of the program is able to define wall locations and wall reflectivity and roughness characteristics, all of which can be changed over time. Sound source locations are also definable within the acoustical space and these locations can be changed independently at

  9. Physics models in the MARS15 code for accelerator and space applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, N. V.; Gudima, K. K.; Mashnik, S. G.; Rakhno, I. L.; Sierk, A. J.; Striganov, S.

    2004-01-01

    The MARS code system, developed over 30 years, is a set of Monte Carlo programs for detailed simulation of hadronic and electromagnetic cascades in an arbitrary geometry of accelerator, detector and spacecraft components with particle energy ranging from a fraction of an electron volt up to 100 TeV. The new MARS15 (2004) version is described with an emphasis on modeling physics processes. This includes an extended list of elementary particles and arbitrary heavy ions, their interaction cross-sections, inclusive and exclusive nuclear event generators, photo - hadron production, correlated ionization energy loss and multiple Coulomb scattering, nuclide production and residual activation, and radiation damage (DPA). In particular, the details of a new model for leading baryon production and implementation of advanced versions of the Cascade-Exciton Model (CEM03), and the Los Alamos version of Quark-Gluon String Model (LAQGSM03) are given. The applications that are motivating these developments, needs for better nuclear data, and future physics improvements are described.

  10. Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Norman Robert

    2013-03-01

    Preface; Introduction; Part I. The Propositions of Science: 1. The subject matter of science; 2. The nature of laws; 3. The nature of laws (contd); 4. The discovery and proof of laws; 5. The explanation of laws; 6. Theories; 7. Chance and probability; 8. The meaning of science; 9. Science and philosophy; Part II. Measurement: 10. Fundamental measurement; 11. Physical number; 12. Fractional and negative magnitudes; 13. Numerical laws and derived magnitudes; 14. Units and dimensions; 15. The uses of dimensions; 16. Errors of measurement; methodical errors; 17. Errors of measurement; errors of consistency and the adjustment of observations; 18. Mathematical physics; Appendix; Index.

  11. Testing nuclear physics from space with quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillot, Sebastien

    2016-07-01

    X-ray observations of quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries (qLMXBs) provide one of the methods to understand the internal structure of neutron stars and therefore place constraints on the nuclear physics of dense matter. The hot thermal emission from the surface of neutron stars in qLMXBs allows us to measure the neutron star radius. In the past few years, promising results were obtained from statistical analyses that combined the X-ray spectra of qLMXBs. In this talk, I will summarize the constraints on the internal structure of neutron star obtained from currently available observations of qLMXBs, as well as the most recent results. In an effort to be as conservative as possible with the observational constraints, I will present the current limitations of this method, and how these limitations can be overcome with more observations of qLXMBs with current and future instrumentation.

  12. Soil, Groundwater, Surface Water, and Sediments of Kennedy Space Center, Florida: Background Chemical and Physical Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shmalzer, Paul A.; Hensley, Melissa A.; Mota, Mario; Hall, Carlton R.; Dunlevy, Colleen A.

    2000-01-01

    This study documented background chemical composition of soils, groundwater, surface; water, and sediments of Kennedy Space Center. Two hundred soil samples were collected, 20 each in 10 soil classes. Fifty-one groundwater wells were installed in 4 subaquifers of the Surficial Aquifer and sampled; there were 24 shallow, 16 intermediate, and 11 deep wells. Forty surface water and sediment samples were collected in major watershed basins. All samples were away from sites of known contamination. Samples were analyzed for organochlorine pesticides, aroclors, chlorinated herbicides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), total metals, and other parameters. All aroclors (6) were below detection in all media. Some organochlorine pesticides were detected at very low frequencies in soil, sediment, and surface water. Chlorinated herbicides were detected at very low frequencies in soil and sediments. PAH occurred in low frequencies in soiL, shallow groundwater, surface water, and sediments. Concentrations of some metals differed among soil classes, with subaquifers and depths, and among watershed basins for surface water but not sediments. Most of the variation in metal concentrations was natural, but agriculture had increased Cr, Cu, Mn, and Zn.

  13. Intervention Effects on Adolescent Physical Activity in the Multicomponent SPACE Study: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Toftager, Mette; Christiansen, Lars B.; Ersbøll, Annette K.; Kristensen, Peter L.; Due, Pernille; Troelsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Background Multicomponent school-based interventions have the potential to reduce the age-related decline in adolescents' physical activity (PA), yet there is not consistent evidence to guide non-curricular and school environment interventions. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a multicomponent environmental school-based intervention, designed to reduce the age-related decline in PA among adolescents. Methods A cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted with 7 intervention and 7 control schools. Baseline measurements were carried out in spring 2010 with 2 years of follow-up. A total of 1,348 students (11–13 years, in grade 5 and 6) enrolled in the study at baseline. The 14 schools included in the study were located in the Region of Southern Denmark. The intervention consisted of organizational and physical changes in the school environment with a total of 11 intervention components. The primary outcome measure was overall PA (cpm, counts per minute) and was supported by analyses of time spent in MVPA, and time spent sedentary. Furthermore, a secondary outcome measure was PA in school time and during recess. PA was measured using accelerometer (Actigraph GT3X). Results A total of 797 students completed the trial and had valid accelerometer data. No significant difference was found for overall PA with an adjusted difference of −19.1 cpm (95% CI: −93, 53) or for school time activity with an adjusted difference of 6 cpm (95% CI: −73, 85). A sensitivity analysis revealed a positive significant intervention effect of PA in recess with an adjusted difference of 95 cpm. Conclusions No evidence was found of the overall effect of a non-curricular multicomponent school-based intervention on PA among Danish adolescents. The intervention was positively associated with PA during school time and recess, however, with small estimates. Lack of effect on overall PA could be due to both program theory and different degrees of implementation

  14. High-energy electromagnetic cascades in extragalactic space: Physics and features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezinsky, V.; Kalashev, O.

    2016-07-01

    Using the analytic modeling of the electromagnetic cascades compared with more precise numerical simulations, we describe the physical properties of electromagnetic cascades developing in the universe on cosmic microwave background and extragalactic background light radiations. A cascade is initiated by very-high-energy photon or electron, and the remnant photons at large distance have two-component energy spectrum, ∝E-2 (∝E-1.9 in numerical simulations) produced at the cascade multiplication stage and ∝E-3 /2 from Inverse Compton electron cooling at low energies. The most noticeable property of the cascade spectrum in analytic modeling is "strong universality," which includes the standard energy spectrum and the energy density of the cascade ωcas as its only numerical parameter. Using numerical simulations of the cascade spectrum and comparing it with recent Fermi LAT spectrum, we obtained the upper limit on ωcas stronger than in previous works. The new feature of the analysis is the "Emax rule." We investigate the dependence of ωcas on the distribution of sources, distinguishing two cases of universality: the strong and weak ones.

  15. 3DBMO: A time series canonical generator to study the PSD dimensional dependence for space physics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovani, Paulo; Rosa, Reinaldo; Dantas, Murilo

    2016-07-01

    The study of density, magnetic and electric field fluctuations in real systems, such as nonlinear processes in the solar, magnetospheric and ionospheric environments, is generally analyzed using Power Spectrum Density (PSD) which is calculated from one-dimensional data in the form of time series. In this work we present a new simulation device of multi-dimensional harmonic mechanical oscillations (we call 3DBMO) for generate robust time series from selected elements, where the spectral analysis is used to determine the hypothesis of dependence variation of the power spectrum according to the structure of the generated system. The importance of this study is discussed into the context of turbulent process in space physics which is usually characterized by using PSD.

  16. The User Community and a Multi-Mission Data Project: Services, Experiences and Directions of the Space Physics Data Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, R.; Bilitza, D.; Candey, R.; Chimiak, R.; Cooper, J.; Fung, S.; Harris, B.; Johnson, R.; King, J.; Kovalick, T.; Leckner, H.; Papitashvili, N.; Roberts, D. A.

    2008-05-01

    From a science user's perspective, the multi-mission data and orbit services of NASA's Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) project offers a unique range of important data and services directly supporting the Heliophysics Great Observatory and highly complementary to other services presently available or now evolving in the international heliophysics data environment. The VSPO (Virtual Space Physics Observatory) service is an active portal to a wide range of distributed data sources. CDAWeb (Coordinated Data Analysis Web) enables plots, listings and file downloads for current data across the boundaries of missions and instrument types (and now including data from THEMIS and STEREO). SSCWeb, Helioweb and our 3D Animated Orbit Viewer (TIPSOD) provide position data and query logic for most missions currently important to heliophysics science. OMNIWeb with its new extension to 1- and 5-minute resolution provides interplanetary parameters at the Earth's bow shock as a unique value-added data product. SPDF also maintains NASA's CDF (Common Data Format) standard and a range of associated tools including format translation services. These capabilities are all now available through webservices-based APIs, one element in SPDF's ongoing work to enable heliophysics community development of Virtual discipline Observatories and the ready attachment of SPDF services into those interfaces. In this paper, we will demonstrate the latest data and capabilities now supported in these multi-mission services, review the lessons we continue to learn in what science users need and value in this class of services, and discuss our current thinking to the future role and appropriate focus of the SPDF effort in the evolving and increasingly distributed heliophysics data environment.

  17. Innovative multilayer coatings for space solar physics: performances and stability over time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuppella, Paola; Corso, Alain J.; Nicolosi, Piergiorgio; Windt, David L.; Pelizzo, Maria G.

    2011-05-01

    Different solar mission are in progress and others are foreseen in the next future to study the structure and the dynamics of the Sun and its interaction with the Earth. Different instruments devoted to solar physics are required to have high reflecting MultiLayers (MLs) coatings. For example, the Multi Element Telescope for Imaging and Spectroscopy (METIS) coronograph will fly on board of SOLar Orbiter (SOLO) mission to perform simultaneous observation at 30.4 nm (He - II Lyman - α line), 121.6 nm (H - I Lyman - α line) and in the visible range, therefore its optics will require high performances in a wide spectral region. It should be desirable to reach higher reflectivity as well as long term stability and lifetime, then different candidate coatings will be considered. The Sounding - Rocket Coronographic Experiment (SCORE) is a prototype of METIS equipped with Mg/SiC optics and it has flown on board of a NASA sounding rocket. The Mg/SiC multilayers offer good performances in terms of reflectivity, but the long term stability and the lifetime have been preliminary investigated and there are open problems to be further studied. Besides standard Mo/Si multilayer, a possible alternative is represented by new multilayer structures based on well known Mo/Si stack in which the performances have been improved by superimposing innovative capping layers. Another alternative is represented by a recently developed multilayer based on an Ir/Si material couple. In this paper we review and compare the performances of such multilayer in all the spectral ranges of interest for SOLO.

  18. Automatic Georeferencing of Astronaut Auroral Photography: Providing a New Dataset for Space Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riechert, Maik; Walsh, Andrew P.; Taylor, Matt

    2014-05-01

    Astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) have taken tens of thousands of photographs showing the aurora in high temporal and spatial resolution. The use of these images in research though is limited as they often miss accurate pointing and scale information. In this work we develop techniques and software libraries to automatically georeference such images, and provide a time and location-searchable database and website of those images. Aurora photographs very often include a visible starfield due to the necessarily long camera exposure times. We extend on the proof-of-concept of Walsh et al. (2012) who used starfield recognition software, Astrometry.net, to reconstruct the pointing and scale information. Previously a manual pre-processing step, the starfield can now in most cases be separated from earth and spacecraft structures successfully using image recognition. Once the pointing and scale of an image are known, latitudes and longitudes can be calculated for each pixel corner for an assumed auroral emission height. As part of this work, an open-source Python library is developed which automates the georeferencing process and aids in visualization tasks. The library facilitates the resampling of the resulting data from an irregular to a regular coordinate grid in a given pixel per degree density, it supports the export of data in CDF and NetCDF formats, and it generates polygons for drawing graphs and stereographic maps. In addition, the THEMIS all-sky imager web archive has been included as a first transparently accessible imaging source which in this case is useful when drawing maps of ISS passes over North America. The database and website are in development and will use the Python library as their base. Through this work, georeferenced auroral ISS photography is made available as a continously extended and easily accessible dataset. This provides potential not only for new studies on the aurora australis, as there are few all-sky imagers in

  19. Solar-Heliospheric-Interstellar Cosmic Ray Tour with the NASA Virtual Energetic Particle Observatory and the Space Physics Data Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, John F.; Papitashvili, Natalia E.; Johnson, Rita C.; Lal, Nand; McGuire, Robert E.

    2015-04-01

    NASA now has a large collection of solar, heliospheric, and local interstellar (Voyager 1) cosmic ray particle data sets that can be accessed through the data system services of the NASA Virtual Energetic Particle Observatory (VEPO) in collaboration with the NASA Space Physics Data Facility SPDF), respectively led by the first and last authors. The VEPO services were developed to enhance the long-existing OMNIWeb solar wind and energetic particle services of SPDF for on-line browse, correlative, and statistical analysis of NASA and ESA mission fields, plasma, and energetic particle data. In this presentation we take of tour through VEPO and SPDF of SEP reservoir events, the outer heliosphere earlier surveyed by the Pioneer, Voyager, and Ulysses spacecraft and now being probed by New Horizons, and the heliosheath-heliopause-interstellar regions now being explored by the Voyagers and IBEX. Implications of the latter measurements are also considered for the flux spectra of low to high energy cosmic rays in interstellar space.

  20. Physics-Based Methods of Failure Analysis and Diagnostics in Human Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smelyanskiy, Vadim N.; Luchinsky, Dmitry Georgievich; Hafiychuk, Vasyl Nmn; Osipov, Viatcheslav V.; Patterson-Hine, F. Ann

    2010-01-01

    The Integrated Health Management (IHM) for the future aerospace systems requires to interface models of multiple subsystems in an efficient and accurate information environment at the earlier stages of system design. The complexity of modern aeronautic and aircraft systems (including e.g. the power distribution, flight control, solid and liquid motors) dictates employment of hybrid models and high-level reasoners for analysing mixed continuous and discrete information flow involving multiple modes of operation in uncertain environments, unknown state variables, heterogeneous software and hardware components. To provide the information link between key design/performance parameters and high-level reasoners we rely on development of multi-physics performance models, distributed sensors networks, and fault diagnostic and prognostic (FD&P) technologies in close collaboration with system designers. The main challenges of our research are related to the in-flight assessment of the structural stability, engine performance, and trajectory control. The main goal is to develop an intelligent IHM that not only enhances components and system reliability, but also provides a post-flight feedback helping to optimize design of the next generation of aerospace systems. Our efforts are concentrated on several directions of the research. One of the key components of our strategy is an innovative approach to the diagnostics/prognostics based on the real time dynamical inference (DI) technologies extended to encompass hybrid systems with hidden state trajectories. The major investments are into the multiphysics performance modelling that provides an access of the FD&P technologies to the main performance parameters of e.g. solid and liquid rocket motors and composite materials of the nozzle and case. Some of the recent results of our research are discussed in this chapter. We begin by introducing the problem of dynamical inference of stochastic nonlinear models and reviewing earlier

  1. Physics.

    PubMed

    Bromley, D A

    1980-07-01

    From massive quarks deep in the hearts of atomic nuclei to the catastrophic collapse of giant stars in the farthest reaches of the universe, from the partial realization of Einstein's dream of a unified theory of the forces of nature to the most practical applications in technology, medicine, and throughout contemporary society, physics continues to have a profound impact on man's view of the universe and on the quality of life. The author argues that the past few years, in terms of new discoveries, new insight-and the new questions-have been among the most productive in the history of the field and puts into context his selection of some of the most important new developments in this fundamental science.

  2. Effect of space flight and head-down bedrest on neuroendocrine response to metabolic stress in physically trained subjects.

    PubMed

    Kvetnanský, R; Ksinantová, L; Koska, J; Noskov, V B; Vigas, M; Grigoriev, A I; Macho, L

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of plasma epinephrine (EPI) and norepinephrine (NE) responses to insulin induced hypoglycemia (ITT) 3 weeks before the space flight (SF), on the 5th day of SF, on the 2nd and 16th days after the landing in the first Slovak astronaut, and before and on the 5th day of prolonged subsequent head-down (-6 degrees) bed rest (BR) in 15 military aircraft pilots. Blood samples during the test were collected via cannula inserted into cubital vein, centrifuged in the special appliance Plasma-03, frozen in Kryogem-03, and at the end of the 8-day space flight transferred to Earth in special container for hormonal analysis. Insulin hypoglycemia was induced by i.v. administration of 0.1 IU/kg BW insulin (Actrapid HM) in bolus. Insulin administration led to a comparable hypoglycemia in pre-flight, in-flight conditions and before and after bed rest. ITT led to a pronounced increase in EPI levels and moderate increase in NE in pre-flight studies. However, an evidently reduced EPI response was found after insulin administration during SF and during BR. Thus, during the real microgravity in SF and simulated microgravity in BR, insulin-induced hypoglycemia activates the adrenomedullary system to less extent than at conditions of the Earth gravitation. Post-flight changes in EPI and NE levels did not significantly differ from those of pre-flight since SF was relatively short (8 days) and the readaptation to Earth gravitation was fast. It seems, that an increased blood flow in brain might be responsible for the reduced EPI response to insulin. Responses to ITT in physically fit subjects indicate the stimulus specificity of deconditioning effect of 5 days bed rest on stress response. Thus, the data indicate that catecholamine responses to ITT are reduced after exposure to real as well as simulated microgravity.

  3. Effect of space flight and head-down bedrest on neuroendocrine response to metabolic stress in physically trained subjects.

    PubMed

    Kvetnanský, R; Ksinantová, L; Koska, J; Noskov, V B; Vigas, M; Grigoriev, A I; Macho, L

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of plasma epinephrine (EPI) and norepinephrine (NE) responses to insulin induced hypoglycemia (ITT) 3 weeks before the space flight (SF), on the 5th day of SF, on the 2nd and 16th days after the landing in the first Slovak astronaut, and before and on the 5th day of prolonged subsequent head-down (-6 degrees) bed rest (BR) in 15 military aircraft pilots. Blood samples during the test were collected via cannula inserted into cubital vein, centrifuged in the special appliance Plasma-03, frozen in Kryogem-03, and at the end of the 8-day space flight transferred to Earth in special container for hormonal analysis. Insulin hypoglycemia was induced by i.v. administration of 0.1 IU/kg BW insulin (Actrapid HM) in bolus. Insulin administration led to a comparable hypoglycemia in pre-flight, in-flight conditions and before and after bed rest. ITT led to a pronounced increase in EPI levels and moderate increase in NE in pre-flight studies. However, an evidently reduced EPI response was found after insulin administration during SF and during BR. Thus, during the real microgravity in SF and simulated microgravity in BR, insulin-induced hypoglycemia activates the adrenomedullary system to less extent than at conditions of the Earth gravitation. Post-flight changes in EPI and NE levels did not significantly differ from those of pre-flight since SF was relatively short (8 days) and the readaptation to Earth gravitation was fast. It seems, that an increased blood flow in brain might be responsible for the reduced EPI response to insulin. Responses to ITT in physically fit subjects indicate the stimulus specificity of deconditioning effect of 5 days bed rest on stress response. Thus, the data indicate that catecholamine responses to ITT are reduced after exposure to real as well as simulated microgravity. PMID:16231455

  4. Research and technology 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    This report presents the on-going research activities at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center for the year 1988. The subjects presented are space transportation systems, shuttle cargo vehicle, materials processing in space, environmental data base management, microgravity science, astronomy, astrophysics, solar physics, magnetospheric physics, aeronomy, atomic physics, rocket propulsion, materials and processes, telerobotics, and space systems.

  5. SEVAN particle-detector network located at Middle-Low latitudes for Solar Physics and Space Weather research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarian, Ashot

    A network of middle to low latitude particle detectors called SEVAN (Space Environmental Viewing and Analysis Network) is planned in the framework of the International Heliophysical Year (IHY), to improve fundamental research of the Solar accelerators and Space Weather conditions. The network will detect changing fluxes of secondary cosmic rays at different altitudes, latitudes and altitudes those constituting powerful integrated device in exploration of solar modulation effects. Surface particle detectors measure time series of secondary particles born in cascades originated in the atmosphere by nuclear interactions of the "primary" protons and nuclei accelerated in galaxy. During violent solar explosions additional particles, accelerated at sun's environments, can add to this "background" flux. If solar particles are energetic enough they also will generate secondary particles reaching earth surface. Therefore, registration of changing time series of secondary particles shed light on the high-energy particle acceleration mechanisms by solar flares and Coronal Mass Ejection driven shocks. Network of particle detectors located at middle-to-low latitudes is sensitive to the highest energy solar particles. The enigma of particle acceleration in supernovae remnants, super-massive black holes, clusters of galaxies can be researched using particle beams accelerated by sun and detected at earth. The shock acceleration is a universal process responsible for the same physical process (particle acceleration) on the different scales. Time series of intensities of high energy particles can also provide highly cost-effective information on the key characteristics of the disturbances of interplanetary magnetic field. Recent results on of the detection of the extreme solar events (2003, 2005) by the monitors of the Aragats Space-Environmental Center (ASEC) illustrate wide possibilities opening with introduction of new particle detectors measuring neutron, electron and muon

  6. Space Plasma Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    Dr. James L. Horwitz and R. Hugh Comfort's studies with the high altitude TIDE data have been progressing well. We concluded a study on the relationship of polar cap ion properties observed by TIDE near apogee with solar wind and IMF conditions. We found that in general H+ did not correlate as well as O+ with solar wind and IMF parameters. O+ density correlated(sub IMF), and Kp. At lower solar wind speeds, O+ density decreased with increasing latitude, but this trend was not observed at higher solar wind speeds. By comparing these results with results from other studies of O+ in different parts of the magnetosphere, we concluded that O+ ions often leave the ionosphere near the foot point of the cusp/cleft region, pass through the high-altitude polar cap lobes, and eventually arrive in the plasma sheet. We found that H+ outflows are a persistent feature of the polar cap and are not as dependent on the geophysical conditions; even classical polar wind models show H+ ions readily escaping owing to their low mass. Minor correlations with solar wind drivers were found; specifically, H+ density correlated best with IMF By, V(sub sw)B(sub IMF), and ESW(sub sw).

  7. [Effect of short- and long-time space flights on some biochemical and physical-chemical parameters of cosmonauts' blood].

    PubMed

    Grigorév, A I; Larina, I M; Noskov, V B; Menshtkin, V V; Natochkin, I V

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to look for original approaches to the analysis of physical-chemical (osmolality, sodium, potassium, and calcium concentrations) and hormonal (cortisol, aldosterone, vasopressin, parathormone, calcitonin) parameters of cosmonauts' serum. To this event, we investigated 35 cosmonauts who had made either short- (up to 8 days) or long-term (up to 366 days) space flights. The dispersion factor of these parameters was found to be a criterion for assessment of the reaction of human regulatory systems to extreme impacts. No evident correlative link between the preflight and postflight concentrations of inorganic serum components was established; however, there was a high correlation of parathormone and cortisol concentrations inferring the participation of these hormones in readaptation. Integral analysis of all the mineral and hormonal parameters of blood serum shapes them into something unique apt to change after flight. Our data alludes to the fact that the approaches used for evaluation of the data resulting from conventional techniques open up new possibilities for prediction of changes in and identification of the character of individual reaction of humans to the spaceflight factors. PMID:8963264

  8. How to constrain the physical properties of very hot super-earths with the James Web Space Telescope?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuel, B.; Rouan, D.; Léger, A.; Cavarroc, C.

    2012-12-01

    Space missions dedicated to exoplanet transit detection led to the discovery of the first super-earths with a measured radius. Surprisingly, the two first rocky planets discovered, CoRoT-7b and Kepler 10b (Léger et al. 2009; Batalha et al. 2011) show very similar parameters: their radius is respectively 1.7 and 1.4 {R_{oplus}} and they orbitate around (resp.) a K and a G star in 0.85 days. The properties of this two objects are expected to be very exotic (Léger et al. 2011). We expect them to be phase locked, with a large lava ocean on the irradiated face (with T reaching 2500 K and 3000 K, respectively) and cold hemisphere with a temperature lower than 50-75 K. We look for observational tests to validate this model among a larger family of models. We suggest to make an observation with the instrument NIRCam on the futur JWST. We investigate the amount of information that such an observation would provide on the physical and dynamical properties of CoRoT-7b, and we focus in particular on two parameters that could influence the surface nature of the very hot super-earth: the albedo, and the phase-locking.

  9. Activities, accomplishments and research progress of the Center for Theoretical Geoplasma Physics, Center for Space Research, Massachusetts Inst. of Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tom

    1992-02-01

    This annual report contains a detailed description of the activities, accomplishments, and research progress of the MIT Center for Theoretical Geoplasma Physics established under the University Research Initiative Program by AFOSR. During this second phase of the program, the Center has made definite strides toward the goals prescribed in the renewal proposal. The Center now has a staff of twenty-five (25) faculty, research scientists, postdoctoral, graduate and undergraduate students and visiting scientists. Members of the Center published forty-eight (48) scientific papers and five (5) books and proceedings, delivered forty (40) invited lectures and fifty-one (51) contributed papers. We have initiated a number of new research activities to complement our other ongoing research programs. Some of our research efforts have already been utilized by Dr. J. R. Jasperse's group at the Geophysics Directorate of the Phillips Laboratory in practical space technology applications relevant to the missions of the Air Force. In addition to the Phillips Laboratory, the Center has interacted with numerous research organizations and universities. The research publications are generally the direct product of such interactions.

  10. Does office space occupation matter? The role of the number of persons per enclosed office space, psychosocial work characteristics, and environmental satisfaction in the physical and mental health of employees.

    PubMed

    Herbig, B; Schneider, A; Nowak, D

    2016-10-01

    The study examined the effects of office space occupation, psychosocial work characteristics, and environmental satisfaction on physical and mental health of office workers in small-sized and open-plan offices as well as possible underlying mechanisms. Office space occupation was characterized as number of persons per one enclosed office space. A total of 207 office employees with similar jobs in offices with different space occupation were surveyed regarding their work situation (psychosocial work characteristics, satisfaction with privacy, acoustics, and control) and health (psychosomatic complaints, irritation, mental well-being, and work ability). Binary logistic and linear regression analyses as well as bootstrapped mediation analyses were used to determine associations and underlying mechanisms. Employee health was significantly associated with all work characteristics. Psychosocial work stressors had the strongest relation to physical and mental health (OR range: 1.66-3.72). The effect of office space occupation on employee health was mediated by stressors and environmental satisfaction, but not by psychosocial work resources. As assumed by sociotechnical approaches, a higher number of persons per enclosed office space was associated with adverse health effects. However, the strongest associations were found with psychosocial work stressors. When revising office design, a holistic approach to work (re)design is needed.

  11. Commemoration of the centenary of the birth of Academician S N Vernov(Joint scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences and the Department of Physics of M V Lomonosov Moscow State University, 16 June 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-02-01

    On 16 June 2010, a joint scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Joint Physical Society of the Russian Federation, Scientific Council of the Department of Physics of Moscow State University (MSU), Scientific Council of the MSU SINP, RAS Council on Space Research, Coordination Scientific and Technical Council of the Federal Space Agency, RAS Scientific Council on the Integrated Problem of Cosmic Rays and RAS Scientific Council on Physics of Solar-Terrestrial Relations took place at the R V Khokhlov central physics auditorium of the MSU Department of Physics. The session was devoted to the 100th anniversary of the birth of Academician Sergei Nikolaevich Vernov.The agenda of the session announced on the website www.gpad.ac.ru of the RAS Physical Sciences Division listed the following reports:Ryazhskaya O G (RAS Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow) "Opening address"; (1) Matveev V A (RAS Physical Sciences Division, Moscow) "A few words about S N Vernov" (2) Sadovnichy V A (M V Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow) "S N Vernov as a scientist at Moscow State University"; (3) Trukhin V I (M V Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow) "S N Vernov as a professor in the MSU Department of Physics"; (4) Panasyuk M I (D V Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics of M V Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow) "Cosmic ray astrophysics before and after 1957"; (5) Dergachev V A (RAS A F Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, St. Petersburg) "S N Vernov and space physics: Apatity-Leningrad, 1968-1983"; (6) Stozhkov Yu I ( P N Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, Moscow) "S N Vernov and ground-breaking studies of cosmic rays in the stratosphere"; (7) Berezhko E G, Krymsky G F (Yu G Shafer Institute of Cosmophysical Research and Aeronomy of the SB RAS Yakutsk Scientific Center, Yakutsk) "S N Vernov and cosmic ray research in Yakutia".Texts of the articles based on the reports presented are printed below. • Opening address, O

  12. Safe Play Spaces To Promote Physical Activity in Inner-City Children: Results from a Pilot Study of an Environmental Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Farley, Thomas A.; Meriwether, Rebecca A.; Baker, Erin T.; Watkins, Liza T.; Johnson, Carolyn C.; Webber, Larry S.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives. We evaluated the effect of providing a safe play space on the physical activity level of inner-city schoolchildren. Methods. In 1 of 2 matched neighborhoods, we opened a schoolyard and provided attendants to ensure children’s safety. Over the next 2 years we directly observed the number of children and their physical activity levels in the school-yard, as well as in the surrounding intervention and comparison neighborhoods. We also surveyed children in the schools in the intervention and comparison neighborhoods regarding sedentary activities. Results. After the schoolyard was opened, a mean of 71.4 children used it on weekdays and 25.8 used it on weekends during the school year. When observed, 66% of these children were physically active. The number of children who were outdoors and physically active was 84% higher in the intervention neighborhood than the comparison neighborhood. Survey results showed that children in the intervention school reported declines relative to the children in the comparison school in watching television, watching movies and DVDs, and playing video games on weekdays. Conclusion. When children were provided with a safe play space, we observed a relative increase in their physical activity. Provision of safe play spaces holds promise as a simple replicable intervention. PMID:17666701

  13. Overview of Pre-Flight Physical Training, In-Flight Exercise Countermeasures and the Post-Flight Reconditioning Program for International Space Station Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerstman, Eric

    2011-01-01

    International Space Station (ISS) astronauts receive supervised physical training pre-flight, utilize exercise countermeasures in-flight, and participate in a structured reconditioning program post-flight. Despite recent advances in exercise hardware and prescribed exercise countermeasures, ISS crewmembers are still found to have variable levels of deconditioning post-flight. This presentation provides an overview of the astronaut medical certification requirements, pre-flight physical training, in-flight exercise countermeasures, and the post-flight reconditioning program. Astronauts must meet medical certification requirements on selection, annually, and prior to ISS missions. In addition, extensive physical fitness testing and standardized medical assessments are performed on long duration crewmembers pre-flight. Limited physical fitness assessments and medical examinations are performed in-flight to develop exercise countermeasure prescriptions, ensure that the crewmembers are physically capable of performing mission tasks, and monitor astronaut health. Upon mission completion, long duration astronauts must re-adapt to the 1 G environment, and be certified as fit to return to space flight training and active duty. A structured, supervised postflight reconditioning program has been developed to prevent injuries, facilitate re-adaptation to the 1 G environment, and subsequently return astronauts to training and space flight. The NASA reconditioning program is implemented by the Astronaut Strength, Conditioning, and Rehabilitation (ASCR) team and supervised by NASA flight surgeons. This program has evolved over the past 10 years of the International Space Station (ISS) program and has been successful in ensuring that long duration astronauts safely re-adapt to the 1 g environment and return to active duty. Lessons learned from this approach to managing deconditioning can be applied to terrestrial medicine and future exploration space flight missions.

  14. Summaries of physical research in the geosciences

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    The Department of Energy supports research in the geosciences in order to provide a sound foundation of fundamental knowledge in those areas of the geosciences which are germane to the Department of Energy's many missions. The Division of Engineering and Geosciences, part of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the Office of Energy Research, supports the Geosciences Research Program. The participants in this program include Department of Energy laboratories, industry, universities, and other governmental agencies. The summaries in this document, prepared by the investigators, briefly describe the scope of the individual programs. The Geosciences Research Program includes research in geology, petrology, geophysics, geochemistry, solar physics, solar-terrestrial relationships, aeronomy, seismology, and natural resource modeling and analysis, including their various subdivisions and interdisciplinary areas. All such research is related either directly or indirectly to the Department of Energy's long-range technological needs.

  15. Physical Development: Thinking Physically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strickland, Erik

    2005-01-01

    Children grow and develop physically according to their own experiences, characteristics, and abilities. Physical development is so important and the environment should allow each child to find her space in the sunshine. This can be done by: (1) creating the right outdoor environment; (2) allowing children time to use it; (3) encouraging movement…

  16. Physical parameters and morphology of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko - a main target of Rosetta space mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churyumov, Klim; Kleshchonok, Valery; Mozgova, Alyona

    Rosetta, a European space vehicle was head to the icy nucleus of the short period comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on 2 March, 2004 from cosmodrome Kouru. On 20 Jan. 2014, Rosetta after 10 years of flight and 31-month sleep has been woke up succesfully and now will approche to the icy nucleus of comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko and pass away into orbit around the cometary nucleus. In November 2014 the Philae probe will be sent from Rosetta on the nucleus of comet 67P to study the relict matter of the Solar system. Comet 67P was discovered by the Kyiv astronomers Klim Churyumov and Svitlana Gerasimenko on 22 October 1969 on the five photographic plates exponed with the help of 50-cm Maksutov’s reflector of the Alma-Ata Astrophysical Institute on 9, 11 and 21 Sept. 1969. First 5 exact positions of comet were sent to Dr Brian Marsden. Dr B.Marsden showed it was new comet. The comet had an apparent magnitude of 13 and a faint tail about 1 arcmin in length at position angle 280 degrees. The astronomer Nikolay Belyaev from Saint-Petersbourg calculated that the comet followed an elliptical orbit. In 1982 it had the close encounter with the Earth at 0.3910 A.U. On the basis of the observations of comet 67P obtained in Nizhny Arkhyz with the help of the 6- BTA reflector of SAO of RAS some physical parameters of its comet plasma tail (coefficients of diffusion Dp(parallel) , Ds(perpendicular) and induction of magnetic field B) were determined. Other results of exploration of comet 67P (its polarisation, spectral observations, the light curve and morphology) in different apparitions are discussed.

  17. Effects of space flight and -6 degrees bed rest on the neuroendocrine response to metabolic stress in physically fit subjects.

    PubMed

    Ksinantová, Lucia; Koska, Juraj; Martinkovic, Miroslav; Vigas, Milan; Macho, Ladislav; Kvetnansky, Richard

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of plasma epinephrine (EPI) and norepinephrine (NE) responses to insulin-induced hypoglycemia (ITT) 3 weeks before the space flight (SF), on the fifth day of SF, on days 2 and 16 after landing in the first Slovak astronaut, and before and on the fifth day of prolonged bed rest (BR) in 15 military aircraft pilots, aged 33.5 +/- 1.4 years, body mass index (BMI) 26.5 +/- 0.7 kg/m(2), maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2max)) 55.2 +/- 2.4 mL/kg/min, who volunteered for the study. ITT was induced by i.v. administrations of 0.1 IU/kg body weight insulin (Actrapid HM) in a bolus. Insulin administration led to a comparable hypoglycemia in preflight, actual flight conditions, and before and after bed rest. ITT led to a pronounced increase in EPI levels and moderate increase in NE in preflight studies. However, an evidently reduced plasma elevation of EPI was found after insulin administration during SF and during BR. Thus, during the real microgravity in SF and simulated microgravity in BR, ITT activates the adrenomedullary system to less extent that at conditions of the Earth's gravitation. Post-flight changes in EPI and NE did not differ from those of preflight values, since SF was relatively short (8 days) and the readaptation to Earth's gravitation was fast. It seems that an increased blood flow in brain might be responsible for the reduced EPI response to insulin. Responses to ITT in physically fit subjects indicate the stimulus specificity of the deconditioning effect of 5 days of bed rest on the stress response. PMID:15240415

  18. Multipurpose Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    The concept of multipurpose spaces in schools is certainly not new. Especially in elementary schools, the combination of cafeteria and auditorium (and sometimes indoor physical activity space as well) is a well-established approach to maximizing the use of school space and a school district's budget. Nonetheless, there continue to be refinements…

  19. Research and technology, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, P. Y.

    1990-01-01

    The annual report of the Marshall Space Flight Center for 1990 is presented. Brief summaries of research are presented for work in the fields of transportation systems, space systems, data systems, microgravity science, astronomy, astrophysics, solar physics, magnetospheric physics, atomic physics, aeronomy, Earth science and applications, propulsion technology, materials and processes, structures and dynamics, automated systems, space systems, and avionics.

  20. Knowledge in Motion: Space, Time and Curriculum in Undergraduate Physics and Management. Knowledge, Identity and School Life Series: 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nespor, Jan

    Physics and management are disciplines deeply implicated in the domination of the physical and social world. This book is the product of ethnographic fieldwork that studied physics and management programs as points of entry that give access to larger processes that constitute and reproduce disciplines and center around the incorporation of…

  1. Data catalog series for space science and applications flight missions. Volume 5A: Descriptions of astronomy, astrophysics, and solar physics spacecraft and investigations. Volume 5B: Descriptions of data sets from astronomy, astrophysics, and solar physics spacecraft and investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Sang J. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The main purpose of the data catalog series is to provide descriptive references to data generated by space science flight missions. The data sets described include all of the actual holdings of the Space Science Data Center (NSSDC), all data sets for which direct contact information is available, and some data collections held and serviced by foreign investigators, NASA and other U.S. government agencies. This volume contains narrative descriptions of data sets of astronomy, astrophysics, solar physics spacecraft and investigations. The following spacecraft series are included: Mariner, Pioneer, Pioneer Venus, Venera, Viking, Voyager, and Helios. Separate indexes to the planetary and interplanetary missions are also provided.

  2. The IMPEx data model - a common metadata standard for the analysis of simulated and observational space plasma physics data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ubaidi, Tarek

    The FP7-SPACE project IMPEx (http://impex-fp7.oeaw.ac.at/) was established to provide a web-based infrastructure to facilitate the inter-comparison and joint use of spacecraft in-situ measurements and computational models in the fields of planetary plasma science. Within this project several observational (CDAWeb, AMDA, CLWeb), as well as numerical simulation (FMI, LATMOS, SINP) databases provide datasets, which can be combined for further analysis and scientific investigation. The major goal of this project consists in providing an environment for the connection and joint operation of the different types of numerical and observational data sources in order to validate numerical simulations with spacecraft observations and vice versa. As an important milestone of IMPEx, a common metadata standard was developed for the description of the currently integrated simulation models and the archived datasets. This standard is called IMPEx Data Model (DM). It is based on the SPASE DM, which originates from the Heliospheric physics community, and which was developed for the description of observational data. A considerable part of the project effort is dedicated to the development of standardized (web service-) interfaces and protocols using the IMPEx DM as an extension of the standard SPASE DM for the communication between the different tools and databases of the IMPEx research infrastructure. For the visualization and analysis of the archived datasets available within IMPEx and beyond, several tools (AMDA, 3DView, ClWeb) were upgraded to be able to work with the newly developed metadata standards and protocols. To meet the requirement of extendibility, the IMPEx DM as well as the established communication protocols have been designed to be as compact as possible and yet general and powerful enough to integrate a wide range of data sets and to allow for simple procedures when attaching new components to the system. Furthermore the IMPEx DM has by now also been successfully

  3. Teacher Interactions within the Physical Environment: How Teachers Alter Their Space and/or Routines Because of Classroom Character.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Dale Christopher

    Through questionnaires, observations, and interviews, this study revealed the degree to which 31 high school teachers altered their classroom spaces and/or adjusted their routines to meet their pedagogical goals at a temporary school site. Teachers emphatically desired: (1) an appropriate amount of space to rearrange student furniture, enabling…

  4. Space Weather Forecasting: An Enigma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sojka, J. J.

    2012-12-01

    The space age began in earnest on October 4, 1957 with the launch of Sputnik 1 and was fuelled for over a decade by very strong national societal concerns. Prior to this single event the adverse effects of space weather had been registered on telegraph lines as well as interference on early WWII radar systems, while for countless eons the beauty of space weather as mid-latitude auroral displays were much appreciated. These prior space weather impacts were in themselves only a low-level science puzzle pursued by a few dedicated researchers. The technology boost and innovation that the post Sputnik era generated has almost single handedly defined our present day societal technology infrastructure. During the decade following Neil's walk on the moon on July 21, 1969 an international thrust to understand the science of space, and its weather, was in progress. However, the search for scientific understand was parsed into independent "stove pipe" categories: The ionosphere-aeronomy, the magnetosphere, the heliosphere-sun. The present day scientific infrastructure of funding agencies, learned societies, and international organizations are still hampered by these 1960's logical divisions which today are outdated in the pursuit of understanding space weather. As this era of intensive and well funded scientific research progressed so did societies innovative uses for space technologies and space "spin-offs". Well over a decade ago leaders in technology, science, and the military realized that there was indeed an adverse side to space weather that with each passing year became more severe. In 1994 several U.S. agencies established the National Space Weather Program (NSWP) to focus scientific attention on the system wide issue of the adverse effects of space weather on society and its technologies. Indeed for the past two decades a significant fraction of the scientific community has actively engaged in understanding space weather and hence crossing the "stove

  5. Planetary aeronomy and astronomy : proceedings of the topical meeting of the COSPAR Interdisciplinary Scientific Commission C (Session C2 and C4) of the COSPAR twenty-third plenary meeting held in Budapest, Hungary, 2-14 June 1980

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atreya, S. K.; Caldwell, J. J.

    Studies contained in this volume focus on the planetary upper atmospheres and ionospheres, including inner and outer planets, and observations of the planets from earth-orbiting vehicles. Papers are presented on the physical properties of the clouds of Venus, model calculations of the dayside ionosphere of Venus, the meteorology of Jupiter's atmosphere, Raman scattering as a probe of planetary atmospheres, and research on comets from space.

  6. Running into Trouble: Constructions of Danger and Risk in Girls' Access to Outdoor Space and Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Sheryl

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers girls' participation in running and other outdoor physical activities in their local areas in London, UK. The paper is concerned with the operation of risk discourses in and around this participation and looks at the way that such discourses impacted on girls' opportunities to take part in physical activities that required…

  7. Enhancing the Spaces of Reflection: A Buddy Peer-Review Process within Physical Education Initial Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, Penny; Lane, Kathleen; Aldous, David

    2013-01-01

    Innovation in enhancing the reflective abilities of physical education trainee teachers was explored in this study through establishing peer "training buddies" during their school placements. Opportunities for active engagement in peer- and self-reflection were provided to full-time Post-Graduate Secondary Physical Education trainee teachers (n =…

  8. Efficient and physically accurate modeling and simulation of anisoplanatic imaging through the atmosphere: a space-variant volumetric image blur method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhardt, Colin N.; Ritcey, James A.

    2015-09-01

    We present a novel method for efficient and physically-accurate modeling & simulation of anisoplanatic imaging through the atmosphere; in particular we present a new space-variant volumetric image blur algorithm. The method is based on the use of physical atmospheric meteorology models, such as vertical turbulence profiles and aerosol/molecular profiles which can be in general fully spatially-varying in 3 dimensions and also evolving in time. The space-variant modeling method relies on the metadata provided by 3D computer graphics modeling and rendering systems to decompose the image into a set of slices which can be treated in an independent but physically consistent manner to achieve simulated image blur effects which are more accurate and realistic than the homogeneous and stationary blurring methods which are commonly used today. We also present a simple illustrative example of the application of our algorithm, and show its results and performance are in agreement with the expected relative trends and behavior of the prescribed turbulence profile physical model used to define the initial spatially-varying environmental scenario conditions. We present the details of an efficient Fourier-transform-domain formulation of the SV volumetric blur algorithm and detailed algorithm pseudocode description of the method implementation and clarification of some nonobvious technical details.

  9. Constant-energetics physical-space forcing methods for improved convergence to homogeneous-isotropic turbulence with application to particle-laden flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassenne, Maxime; Urzay, Javier; Park, George I.; Moin, Parviz

    2016-03-01

    This study investigates control-based forcing methods for incompressible homogeneous-isotropic turbulence forced linearly in physical space which result in constant turbulent kinetic energy, constant turbulent dissipation (also constant enstrophy), or a combination of the two based on a least-squares error minimization. The methods consist of proportional controllers embedded in the forcing coefficients. During the transient, the controllers adjust the forcing coefficients such that the controlled quantity achieves very early a minimal relative error with respect to its target stationary value. Comparisons of these forcing methods are made with the non-controlled approaches of Rosales and Meneveau ["Linear forcing in numerical simulations of isotropic turbulence: Physical space implementations and convergence properties," Phys. Fluids 17, 095106 (2005)] and Carroll and Blanquart ["A proposed modification to Lundgren's physical space velocity forcing method for isotropic turbulence," Phys. Fluids 25, 105114 (2013)], using direct numerical simulations (DNS) and large-eddy simulations (LES). The results indicate that the proposed constant-energetics forcing methods shorten the transient period from a user-defined artificial flow field to Navier-Stokes turbulence while maintaining steadier statistics. Additionally, the proposed method of constant kinetic-energy forcing behaves more robustly in coarse LES when initial conditions are employed that favor the occurrence of subgrid-scale backscatter, whereas the other approaches fail to provide physical turbulent flow fields. For illustration, the proposed forcing methods are applied to dilute particle-laden homogeneous-isotropic turbulent flows; the results serve to highlight the influences of the forcing strategies on the disperse-phase statistics.

  10. Neural correlates of causality judgment in physical and social context--the reversed effects of space and time.

    PubMed

    Blos, Johannes; Chatterjee, Anjan; Kircher, Tilo; Straube, Benjamin

    2012-11-01

    The perception of causal relationships is crucial to understanding and interacting with our physical and social environment. However, whether the same or different neural processes are involved in perceiving physical and social causality is unknown. Therefore, this study is focused on commonalities and differences in the neural correlates of causality perception in both contexts. During fMRI data-acquisition, participants judged causal relationships of objects in two types of animated video clips (physical/social) with similar manipulations of temporal and spatial stimulus characteristics. Four conditions were analyzed in a two-factorial design [physical causal (PC), physical non-causal (PNC), social causal (SC), social non-causal (SNC)]. We found that higher angles and longer time delays led to decreasing judgments of causality in the physical context, whereas the same manipulations led to increasing judgments in the social context. Instead of a common network for causal judgments (PC>PNC∩SC>SNC), we found a reversed activation pattern for the factors context and judgment. PC and SNC [(PC>PNC)>(SC>SNC)] produced activations in the bilateral insula, the right angular and inferior frontal gyrus and the medial supplementary motor area. PNC and SC [(PC>PNC)<(SC>SNC)] produced activity in medial frontal, left superior temporal and anterior cingulate brain regions. Our data suggest, that the same brain regions contribute to the impression of physical and social causality. However, they demonstrate a reversed activation pattern that reflects the stimulus characteristics of the respective conditions. Thus, specific stimulus characteristics are crucial for the perception of causality.

  11. Solar cosmic ray measurements at high heliocentric latitudes. [proposed space missions of solar probes to study solar physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, K. A.

    1976-01-01

    A brief review is presented of what might result from a program of solar cosmic ray observations on 'out-of-the-ecliptic' spacecraft. The following topics are discussed: (1) The magnetic fields of the sun at high latitudes, (2) propagation of fast charged particles in the solar corona and in interplanetary space at high latitudes, (3) origin of interplanetary particle populations and the solar wind, (4) other particle phenomena in interplanetary space (e.g., acceleration of shock waves), and (5) effect of spacecraft mission characteristics on solar cosmic ray studies at high latitudes. Maps of polar coronal magnetic fields are shown.

  12. Program to study optimal protocol for cardiovascular and muscular efficiency. [physical fitness training for manned space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olree, H. D.

    1974-01-01

    Training programs necessary for the development of optimal strength during prolonged manned space flight were examined, and exercises performed on the Super Mini Gym Skylab 2 were compared with similar exercises on the Universal Gym and calisthenics. Cardiopulmonary gains were found negligible but all training groups exhibited good gains in strength.

  13. A Back-to-Front Derivation: The Equal Spacing of Quantum Levels Is a Proof of Simple Harmonic Oscillator Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, David L.; Romero, Luciana C. Davila

    2009-01-01

    The dynamical behaviour of simple harmonic motion can be found in numerous natural phenomena. Within the quantum realm of atomic, molecular and optical systems, two main features are associated with harmonic oscillations: a finite ground-state energy and equally spaced quantum energy levels. Here it is shown that there is in fact a one-to-one…

  14. Aerosol and nucleation research in support of NASA cloud physics experiments in space. [ice nuclei generator for the atmospheric cloud physics laboratory on Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vali, G.; Rogers, D.; Gordon, G.; Saunders, C. P. R.; Reischel, M.; Black, R.

    1978-01-01

    Tasks performed in the development of an ice nucleus generator which, within the facility concept of the ACPL, would provide a test aerosol suitable for a large number and variety of potential experiments are described. The impact of Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory scientific functional requirements on ice nuclei generation and characterization subsystems was established. Potential aerosol generating systems were evaluated with special emphasis on reliability, repeatability and general suitability for application in Spacelab. Possible contamination problems associated with aerosol generation techniques were examined. The ice nucleating abilities of candidate test aerosols were examined and the possible impact of impurities on the nucleating abilities of those aerosols were assessed as well as the relative merits of various methods of aerosol size and number density measurements.

  15. Packaging a Successful NASA Mission to Reach a Large Audience with a Small Budget. Earth's Dynamic Space: Solar-Terrestrial Physics and NASA's Polar Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Nicola J.; Goldberg, Richard; Barnes, Robin J.; Sigwarth, John B.; Beisser, Kerri B.; Moore, Thomas E.; Hoffman, Robert A.; Russell, Christopher T.; Scudder, Jack D.; Spann, James F.

    2004-01-01

    To showcase the on-going and wide-ranging scope of the Polar science discoveries, the Polar science team has created a one-stop shop for a thorough introduction to geospace physics, in the form of a DVD with supporting website. The DVD, Earth's Dynamic Space: Solar-Terrestrial Physics & NASA's Polar Mission, can be viewed as an end-to-end product or split into individual segments and tailored to lesson plans. Capitalizing on the Polar mission and its amazing science return, the Polar team created an exciting multi-use DVD intended for audiences ranging from a traditional classroom and after school clubs, to museums and science centers. The DVD tackles subjects such as the aurora, the magnetosphere and space weather, whilst highlighting the science discoveries of the Polar mission. This platform introduces the learner to key team members as well as the science principles. Dramatic visualizations are used to illustrate the complex principles that describe Earth's dynamic space. In order to produce such a wide-ranging product on a shoe-string budget, the team poured through existing NASA resources to package them into the Polar story. Team members also created visualizations using Polar data to complement the NASA stock footage. Scientists donated their time to create and review scripts to make this a real team effort, working closely with the award winning audio-visual group at JHU/Applied Physics Laboratory. The team was excited to be invited to join NASA's Sun-Earth Day 2005 E/PO program and the DVD will be distributed as part of the supporting educational packages.

  16. Packaging a successful NASA mission to reach a large audience within a small budget. Earth's Dynamic Space: Solar-Terrestrial Physics & NASA's Polar Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, N. J.; Goldberg, R.; Barnes, R. J.; Sigwarth, J. B.; Beisser, K. B.; Moore, T. E.; Hoffman, R. A.; Russell, C. T.; Scudder, J.; Spann, J. F.; Newell, P. T.; Hobson, L. J.; Gribben, S. P.; Obrien, J. E.; Menietti, J. D.; Germany, G. G.; Mobilia, J.; Schulz, M.

    2004-12-01

    To showcase the on-going and wide-ranging scope of the Polar science discoveries, the Polar science team has created a one-stop shop for a thorough introduction to geospace physics, in the form of a DVD with supporting website. The DVD, Earth's Dynamic Space: Solar-Terrestrial Physics & NASA's Polar Mission, can be viewed as an end-to-end product or split into individual segments and tailored to lesson plans. Capitalizing on the Polar mission and its amazing science return, the Polar team created an exciting multi-use DVD intended for audiences ranging from a traditional classroom and after school clubs, to museums and science centers. The DVD tackles subjects such as the aurora, the magnetosphere and space weather, whilst highlighting the science discoveries of the Polar mission. This platform introduces the learner to key team members as well as the science principles. Dramatic visualizations are used to illustrate the complex principles that describe Earth’s dynamic space. In order to produce such a wide-ranging product on a shoe-string budget, the team poured through existing NASA resources to package them into the Polar story, and visualizations were created using Polar data to complement the NASA stock footage. Scientists donated their time to create and review scripts in order to make this a real team effort, working closely with the award winning audio-visual group at JHU/Applied Physics Laboratory. The team was excited to be invited to join NASA’s Sun-Earth Day 2005 E/PO program and the DVD will be distributed as part of the supporting educational packages.

  17. Angry Birds in Space

    NASA Video Gallery

    Aboard the International Space Station, Flight Engineer Don Pettit of NASA created a video using Angry Birds Space to explain how physics works in space, including demonstrating trajectories in mic...

  18. Space flight research relevant to health, physical education, and recreation: With particular reference to Skylab's life science experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanhuss, W. D.; Heusner, W. W.

    1979-01-01

    Data collected in the Skylab program relating to physiological stresses is presented. Included are routine blood measures used in clinical medicine as research type endocrine analyses to investigate the metabolic/endocrine responses to weightlessness. The daily routine of physical exercise, coupled with appropriate dietary intake, sleep, work, and recreation periods were considered essential in maintaining the crew's health and well being.

  19. Thermal and neutron-physical features of the nuclear reactor for a power pulsation plant for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordeev, É. G.; Kaminskii, A. S.; Konyukhov, G. V.; Pavshuk, V. A.; Turbina, T. A.

    2012-05-01

    We have explored the possibility of creating small-size reactors with a high power output with the provision of thermal stability and nuclear safety under standard operating conditions and in emergency situations. The neutron-physical features of such a reactor have been considered and variants of its designs preserving the main principles and approaches of nuclear rocket engine technology are presented.

  20. New Tools to Discover the Physical Links From CME Eruptions to Radiation Effects in Deep Space: a First in Heliospheric End-to-End Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorby, M. J.; Schwadron, N. A.; Linker, J. A.; Spence, H. E.; Townsend, L. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2012-12-01

    We've taken fundamental new steps in physics based coupling; combining MHD simulation results with our fully 3D Lagrangian code has allowed us to attain flux and dosage rates out to 1AU. The Earth-Moon-Mars Radiation Environment Module (EMMREM) is a collection of tools based on the output of the Energetic Particle Radiation Environment Model (EPREM), which solves the focused transport equation to determine energetic particles fluxes [1]. We feed resulting flux from EPREM into the Baryon Transport (BRYNTRYN) code developed at NASA to calculate dose rates and accumulated dosages. Recently we have coupled EPREM to Magnetohydrodynamics Around a Sphere (MAS) developed at Predictive Science, Inc. [2]. The MAS / EPREM couplings allow us to accurately model the physics of evolving CMEs and their impact on the acceleration of SEPs. We detail physical regimes associated with strong and weak scattering of energetic particles near shocks, both by background magnetic field flux and self-excited waves. Results from both weak and severe SEP events will be presented, along with a comparison of the results with CRaTER and GOES data. Validation of the coupling and the implications for predicting dose rates at 1AU will also be discussed. This critical step in the evolution of code coupling enables us to explore, discover, and ultimately predict connections between SEP events and their effects on the space environment through the inner heliosphere. Thus, we present fundamental new modeling capabilities that provide critical insights into the physical causes and behavior of extreme solar events. [1] Schwadron, N. A. and A. L. Townsend, et al. (2010) Space Weather Journal, Vol. 8, S00E02. [2] Linker, J. A. and Z. Mikić, et al. (1999) J. Geophys. Res., 104(A5), 9808-9830.

  1. Simulation of DNA Damage in Human Cells from Space Radiation Using a Physical Model of Stochastic Particle Tracks and Chromosomes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, Artem; Plante, Ianik; Hada, Megumi; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    The formation of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and chromosomal aberrations (CAs) is of great importance in radiation research and, specifically, in space applications. We are presenting a recently developed model, in which chromosomes simulated by NASARTI (NASA Radiation Tracks Image) is combined with nanoscopic dose calculations performed with the Monte-Carlo simulation by RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) in a voxelized space. The model produces the number of DSBs, as a function of dose for high-energy iron, oxygen, and carbon ions, and He ions. The combined model calculates yields of radiation-induced CAs and unrejoined chromosome breaks in normal and repair deficient cells. The merged computational model is calibrated using the relative frequencies and distributions of chromosomal aberrations reported in the literature. The model considers fractionated deposition of energy to approximate dose rates of the space flight environment. The merged model also predicts of the yields and sizes of translocations, dicentrics, rings, and more complex-type aberrations formed in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase during the first cell division after irradiation.

  2. Simulations of atmospheric TGFs and related physical processes: detection from space and side effects on MXGS/ASIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro-González, Javier; Blay, Pere; Espinós, Hector; Reglero, Víctor; Connell, Paul; Eyles, Chris

    2014-05-01

    The Atmosphere-Space Interactions Monitor (ASIM) is an ESA mission which will be attached to the Columbus module of the International Space Station (ISS). The main goal of the ASIM mission is to characterize the optical and high-energy emission related to severe thunderstorms. We are setting up a set of simulations in order to analyse the expected detections from ASIM and in particular from the Modular X-ray and Gamma-ray Sensor (MXGS) imager. On the one hand we have developed a mass model of the instrument for its use in Geant4 applications. We plan to characterize the response of the instrument to the incident high-energy radiation, and the effects of background from backscattered photons from the Columbus module. On the other hand we are developing a set of atmospheric models to set up Geant4 simulations of electron avalanche and gamma-ray propagation, with emphasis on: a) the possible residual optical emission due to interaction with atmospheric components, and b) the expected spectral and timing properties of the resulting high-energy emission towards space. We plan to include comparisons with other software toolkits like CORSIKA or LEPTRACK (under developed at the University of Valencia).

  3. Process Simulation of Complex Biological Pathways in Physical Reactive Space and Reformulated for Massively Parallel Computing Platforms.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Narayan; Li, Jie; Sharma, Vishakha; Jiang, Hanyu; Compagnoni, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Biological systems encompass complexity that far surpasses many artificial systems. Modeling and simulation of large and complex biochemical pathways is a computationally intensive challenge. Traditional tools, such as ordinary differential equations, partial differential equations, stochastic master equations, and Gillespie type methods, are all limited either by their modeling fidelity or computational efficiency or both. In this work, we present a scalable computational framework based on modeling biochemical reactions in explicit 3D space, that is suitable for studying the behavior of large and complex biological pathways. The framework is designed to exploit parallelism and scalability offered by commodity massively parallel processors such as the graphics processing units (GPUs) and other parallel computing platforms. The reaction modeling in 3D space is aimed at enhancing the realism of the model compared to traditional modeling tools and framework. We introduce the Parallel Select algorithm that is key to breaking the sequential bottleneck limiting the performance of most other tools designed to study biochemical interactions. The algorithm is designed to be computationally tractable, handle hundreds of interacting chemical species and millions of independent agents by considering all-particle interactions within the system. We also present an implementation of the framework on the popular graphics processing units and apply it to the simulation study of JAK-STAT Signal Transduction Pathway. The computational framework will offer a deeper insight into various biological processes within the cell and help us observe key events as they unfold in space and time. This will advance the current state-of-the-art in simulation study of large scale biological systems and also enable the realistic simulation study of macro-biological cultures, where inter-cellular interactions are prevalent.

  4. America in Space, the First Decade - Space Physics and Astronomy, Man in Space, Exploring the Moon and Planets, Putting Satellites to Work, NASA Spacecraft, Spacecraft Tracking, Linking Man and Spacecraft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corliss, William R.; Anderton, David A.

    Included are seven booklets, part of a series published on the occasion of the tenth anniversary of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The publications are intended as overviews of some important activities, programs, and events of NASA. They are written for the layman and cover several science disciplines. Each booklet…

  5. COMSAT's destructive physical analysis of aerospace nickel-cadmium cells for NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbins, Kathleen M. B.; Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Yi, Thomas Y.

    1993-01-01

    Over the past 5 years, COMSAT has performed numerous destructive physical analyses (DPA's) on NASA-Goddard-supplied nickel-cadmium (Ni/Cd) cells. The samples included activated but uncycled cells, wet stored cells, cycled cells, and anomalous cells. The DPA's provided visual, morphological, and chemical analyses of the cell components. The DPA data for the analyzed cells are presented. For the cells investigated, the leading cause of poor performance, as determined by DPA, has been poor negative electrode utilization, which resulted in negative-electrode-limiting operation.

  6. Physical and statistical modeling of attenuation due to atmospheric hydrometeors on free-space optical links at 850 and 1550 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabner, Martin; Kvicera, Vaclav

    2012-10-01

    Atmospheric hydrometeors such as rain and fog may cause attenuation of an optical signal and degrade the performance of free-space optical (FSO) systems. For efficient design of the FSO links, attenuation characteristics must be predicted by sufficiently reliable models that have been tested on experimental data. A long term experiment on the FSO links operating at 850 and 1550 nm wavelengths is conducted in Prague. The path lengths are 100 and 853 m. Received power fluctuations on the FSO links and relevant meteorological quantities such as rain intensity and liquid water content of fog are measured simultaneously. The relationships between the physical parameters of hydrometeors and path attenuation are analyzed and compared with theoretical relations derived using the Mie scattering theory together with some natural assumptions about the physical properties of scattering particles such as droplet size distribution of different types of hydrometeors. Long term statistics of attenuation are obtained and availability performance of the experimental FSO links is assessed. The method for predicting attenuation statistics based on physical and statistical models is introduced and the errors of the proposed models with respect to measured data are analyzed. The models are compared with the existing empirical relationships derived from other FSO experiments and differences are discussed.

  7. Differential collision cross-sections for atomic oxygen: Analysis of space flight instruments for solar terrestrial physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torr, Douglas G.

    1991-01-01

    A summary of the status of the Cross-section Facility at MSFC is presented. A facility was designed, fabricated, assembled, tested, and operated for measurement of differential scattering cross sections important to understand the induced environment for a vehicle (e.g., Space Station) in low earth orbit. A user's manual for the facility is also presented. The performance of the facility was evaluated and found to be satisfactory in all the essential areas. Differential scattering cross sections were measured and results for the scattering measurements are included. Input to the development of the Ultraviolet Imager Optical System is also discussed. Design, fabrication, and evaluation of UV filters using a four-layer aluminum base are reported.

  8. Probabilistic Physics-Based Risk Tools Used to Analyze the International Space Station Electrical Power System Output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Bhogila M.; Hoge, Peter A.; Nagpal, Vinod K.; Hojnicki, Jeffrey S.; Rusick, Jeffrey J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the methods employed to apply probabilistic modeling techniques to the International Space Station (ISS) power system. These techniques were used to quantify the probabilistic variation in the power output, also called the response variable, due to variations (uncertainties) associated with knowledge of the influencing factors called the random variables. These uncertainties can be due to unknown environmental conditions, variation in the performance of electrical power system components or sensor tolerances. Uncertainties in these variables, cause corresponding variations in the power output, but the magnitude of that effect varies with the ISS operating conditions, e.g. whether or not the solar panels are actively tracking the sun. Therefore, it is important to quantify the influence of these uncertainties on the power output for optimizing the power available for experiments.

  9. Research and technology 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center annual report summarizes their advanced studies, research programs, and technological developments. Areas covered include: transportation systems; space systems such as Gravity Probe-B and Gamma Ray Imaging Telescope; data systems; microgravity science; astronomy and astrophysics; solar, magnetospheric, and atomic physics; aeronomy; propulsion; materials and processes; structures and dynamics; automated systems; space systems; and avionics.

  10. Testing the Efficacy of OurSpace, a Brief, Group Dynamics-Based Physical Activity Intervention: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chalin, Patrice; Thompson, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Background Emerging technologies (ie, mobile phones, Internet) may be effective tools for promoting physical activity (PA). However, few interventions have provided effective means to enhance social support through these platforms. Face-to-face programs that use group dynamics-based principles of behavior change have been shown to be highly effective in enhancing social support through promoting group cohesion and PA, but to date, no studies have examined their effects in Web-based programs. Objective The aim was to explore proof of concept and test the efficacy of a brief, online group dynamics-based intervention on PA in a controlled experiment. We expected that the impact of the intervention on PA would be moderated by perceptions of cohesion and the partner’s degree of presence in the online media. Methods Participants (n=135) were randomized into same-sex dyads and randomly assigned to one of four experimental conditions: standard social support (standard), group dynamics-based–high presence, group dynamics-based–low presence, or individual control. Participants performed two sets of planking exercises (pre-post). Between sets, participants in partnered conditions interacted with a virtual partner using either a standard social support app or a group dynamics-based app (group dynamics-based–low presence and group dynamics-based–high presence), the latter of which they participated in a series of online team-building exercises. Individual participants were given an equivalent rest period between sets. To increase presence during the second set, participants in the group dynamics-based–high presence group saw a live video stream of their partner exercising. Perceptions of cohesion were measured using a modified PA Group Environment Questionnaire. Physical activity was calculated as the time persisted during set 2 after controlling for persistence in set 1. Results Perceptions of cohesion were higher in the group dynamics-based–low presence (overall

  11. Space Science and Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, James

    2005-01-01

    Space Science a t Marshall Space Flight Center is diverse and very interesting. It ranges from high energy astrophysics to astrobiology, from solar physics to space weather to dusty plasmas. I will present some of the more interesting investigations regarding auroral physics, what it takes to build a space camera, and laboratory investigations of dust. There will be time for questions and answers at the conclusion.

  12. The physical role of gravitational and gauge degrees of freedom in general relativity II: Dirac versus Bergmann observables and the objectivity of space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusanna, Luca; Pauri, Massimo

    2006-02-01

    This is the second of a couple of papers in which we aim to show the peculiar capability of the Hamiltonian ADM formulation of metric gravity to grasp a series of conceptual and technical problems that appear to have not been directly discussed so far. In this paper we also propose new viewpoints about issues that, being deeply rooted into the foundational level of Einstein theory, seem particularly worth of clarification in connection with the alternative programs of string theory and loop quantum gravity. The achievements of the present work include: (1) the analysis of the so-called Hole phenomenology in strict connection with the Hamiltonian treatment of the initial value problem. The work is carried through in metric gravity for the class of spatially non-compact Christoudoulou-Klainermann space-times, in which the temporal evolution is ruled by the weak ADM energy. It is crucial to our analysis the re-interpretation of active diffeomorphisms as passive and metric-dependent dynamical symmetries of Einstein's equations, a re-interpretation which enables to disclose their (nearly unknown) connection to gauge transformations on-shell; this is expounded in the first paper (gr-qc/0403081); (2) the utilization of the Bergmann-Komar intrinsic pseudo-coordinates, defined as suitable functionals of the Weyl curvature scalars, as tools for a specific gauge-fixing to the super-hamiltonian and super-momentum constraints; (3) the consequent construction of a physical atlas of 4-coordinate systems for the 4-dimensional mathematical manifold, in terms of the highly non-local degrees of freedom of the gravitational field (its four independent Dirac observables). Such construction embodies the physical individuation of the points of space-time as point-events, both in absence and presence of matter, and associates a non-commutative structure to each gauge fixing or 4-dimensional coordinate system; (4) a clarification of the multiple definition given by Peter Bergmann of the

  13. Space colonization.

    PubMed

    Parrish, Clyde F

    2003-12-01

    A series of workshops were sponsored by the Physical Science Division of NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research to address operational gravity-compliant in-situ resource utilization and life support techologies. Workshop participants explored a Mars simulation study on Devon Island, Canada; the processing of carbon dioxide in regenerative life support systems; space tourism; rocket technology; plant growth research for closed ecological systems; and propellant extraction of planetary regoliths.

  14. Space colonization.

    PubMed

    Parrish, Clyde F

    2003-12-01

    A series of workshops were sponsored by the Physical Science Division of NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research to address operational gravity-compliant in-situ resource utilization and life support techologies. Workshop participants explored a Mars simulation study on Devon Island, Canada; the processing of carbon dioxide in regenerative life support systems; space tourism; rocket technology; plant growth research for closed ecological systems; and propellant extraction of planetary regoliths. PMID:14696587

  15. Destructive physical analysis of hollow cathodes from the Deep Space 1 Flight spare ion engine 30,000 hr life test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sengupta, Anita

    2005-01-01

    Destructive physical analysis of the discharge and neutralizer hollow cathode assemblies from the Deep Space 1 Flight Spare 30,000 Hr life test was performed to characterize physical and chemical evidence of operationally induced effects after 30,372 hours of operation with beam extraction. Post-test inspection of the discharge-cathode assembly was subdivided into detailed analyses at the subcomponent level. Detailed materials analysis and optical inspection of the insert, orifice plate, cathode tube, heater, keeper assembly, insulator, and low-voltage propellant isolator were performed. Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and scanning electron microscopy (SEW analyses were used to determine the extent and composition of regions of net deposition and erosion of both the discharge and neutralizer inserts. A comparative approach with an un-operated 4:1:1 insert was used to determine the extent of impregnate material depletion as a function of depth from the ID surface and axial position from the orifice plate. Analysis results are compared and contrasted with those obtained from similar analyses on components from shorter term tests, and provide insight regarding the prospect for successful longer-term operation consistent with SOA ion engine program life objectives at NASA.

  16. TIDI observations relating to low latitude aeronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niciejewski, R.; Killeen, T.; Kafkalidis, J.; Wu, Q.; Skinner, W.; Solomon, S.; Ortland, D.; Gell, D.; Gablehouse, D.; Johnson, R.

    2003-04-01

    The TIDI instrument aboard the TIMED satellite has been observing the neutral winds in the upper atmosphere on a routine basis since early January 2002. The instrument simultaneously samples the thin limb of the Earth with four separate telescopes providing two forward views and two rearward views, one of each on either side of the orbital path. At equator crossings, these two side views are separated by about 30 degrees of longitude at the tangent point altitude, or 2 hours of local time. Thus, on any orbit TIDI obtains two horizontal vector winds at the dayside equator crossing and two on the nightside equator crossing as well as for all low latitudes. This is significantly greater than the data output of either the HRDI or the DE-2 satellite observations. This paper will describe the climatology that has been obtained by the TIDI instrument since early 2002 for low latitudes. The precession rate of TIMED supports two month averaging of data sets in order to sample all local solar time. Tidal structure is evident in the resulting zonal and meridional winds for mesosphere and lower thermosphere altitudes.

  17. The aeronomy of vibrationally excited ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, J. E.; Allen, J. E., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Theoretical calculations show that above 80 km in the earth's atmosphere the production of vibrationally excited ozone by chemical processes leads to number densities which are usually larger than those expected for local thermodynamic equilibrium. Quenching of highly excited molecules produced in O+O2+M, O3+M provided a significant source of the lower lying states above the mesopause while the 9.6 microns emission of O3 (0,0,1) was a major sink. Analysis of available laboratory results implied that reactions involving excited ozone play a significant role in the global ozone balance despite the relatively small abundance of the molecule. However, this effect is implicit in many of the rate coefficients currently used in stratospheric calculations. In the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere, where the excited state populations differ from those for thermal equilibrium, published reaction rate data are not necessarily applicable to aeronomic calculations.

  18. Nonlinear Oscillators in Space Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lester,Daniel; Thronson, Harley

    2011-01-01

    We discuss dynamical systems that produce an oscillation without an external time dependent source. Numerical results are presented for nonlinear oscillators in the Em1h's atmosphere, foremost the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBOl. These fluid dynamical oscillators, like the solar dynamo, have in common that one of the variables in a governing equation is strongly nonlinear and that the nonlinearity, to first order, has particular form. of 3rd or odd power. It is shown that this form of nonlinearity can produce the fundamental li'equency of the internal oscillation. which has a period that is favored by the dynamical condition of the fluid. The fundamental frequency maintains the oscillation, with no energy input to the system at that particular frequency. Nonlinearities of 2nd or even power could not maintain the oscillation.

  19. Sonification Prototype for Space Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candey, R. M.; Schertenleib, A. M.; Diaz Merced, W. L.

    2005-12-01

    As an alternative and adjunct to visual displays, auditory exploration of data via sonification (data controlled sound) and audification (audible playback of data samples) is promising for complex or rapidly/temporally changing visualizations, for data exploration of large datasets (particularly multi-dimensional datasets), and for exploring datasets in frequency rather than spatial dimensions (see also International Conferences on Auditory Display ). Besides improving data exploration and analysis for most researchers, the use of sound is especially valuable as an assistive technology for visually-impaired people and can make science and math more exciting for high school and college students. Only recently have the hardware and software come together to make a cross-platform open-source sonification tool feasible. We have developed a prototype sonification data analysis tool using the JavaSound API and NASA GSFC's ViSBARD software . Wanda Diaz Merced, a blind astrophysicist from Puerto Rico, is instrumental in advising on and testing the tool.

  20. Physics: A Career for You?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Inst. of Physics, New York, NY.

    Information is provided for students who may be interested in pursuing a career in physics. This information includes the type of work done and areas studied by physicists in the following areas: nuclear physics, solid-state physics, elementary-particle physics, atomic/molecular/electron physics, fluid/plasma physics, space/planetary physics,…

  1. Solar Fireworks - Integrating an Exhibit on Solar Physics and Space Science into the Science and Astronomy Curriculum of High-School and College Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denker, C.; Wang, H.; Conod, K. D.; Wintemberg, T.; Calderon, I.

    2005-05-01

    Astronomers at The Newark Museum's Alice and Leonard Dreyfuss Planetarium teamed up with the New Jersey Institute of Technology's (NJIT) Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research (CSTR) and the Big Bear Solar Observatory in presenting Solar Fireworks. The exhibit opened on May 15, 2004 and features two exhibition kiosks with interactive touch screen displays, where students and other visitors can take "virtual tours" in the fields of solar physics, solar activity, Sun-Earth connection, and geo-sciences. Planetarium and museum visits are an integral part of the introductory physics and astronomy classes at NJIT and the exhibition has been integrated in the astronomy curriculum. For example, NJIT students of the Astronomy Club and regular astronomy courses were closely involved in the design and development of the exhibit. The exhibit is the latest addition to the long-running natural science exhibit "Dynamic Earth: Revealing Nature's Secrets" at the museum. More than 30,000 people per year attend various programs offered by the planetarium including public shows, more than a dozen programs for school groups, after school activities, portable planetarium outreach, outdoor sky watches, solar observing and other family events. More than 1,000 high school students visited the planetarium in 2004. The exhibit is accompanied by a yearly teacher workshop (the first one was held on October 18-20, 2004) to enhance the learning experience of classes visiting the Newark Museum. The planetarium and museum staff has been working with teachers of Newark high schools and has presented many workshops for educators on a wide range of topics from astronomy to zoology. At the conclusion of the exhibit in December 2005, the exhibit will go "on the road" and will be made available to schools or other museums. Finally, the exhibit will find its permanent home at the new office complex of CSTR at NJIT. Acknowledgements: Solar Fireworks was organized by The Newark Museum and the New Jersey

  2. Soft coral abundance on the central Great Barrier Reef: effects of Acanthaster planci, space availability, and aspects of the physical environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabricius, K. E.

    1997-07-01

    The distribution and abundance of soft coral genera on reefs of the central Great Barrier Reef was investigated in relation to reef position, recent history of disturbance, wave exposure, substratum slope and depth. Eighty-five 25 m long transects were surveyed at 10 m depth on windward sides of 14 mid- and outer-shelf reefs. A further 75 transects in different zones on one mid-shelf reef (Davies Reef) between 5 and 30 m depth were investigated. The crown-of-thorns starfish Acanthaster planci had caused large-scale mortality of scleractinians on eight of these reefs five to ten years prior to the study, and as a result, scleractinian cover was only 35-55% of that on the six unimpacted reefs. On the impacted reefs, stony corals with massive and encrusting growths form had smaller average colony diameters but similar or slightly lower numerical abundance. In contrast, mean colony size, cover and abundance of branching stony corals showed no difference between impacted and unimpacted reefs. Twenty-four genera of soft corals (in eight families) were recorded, and none showed different abundance or cover in areas of former A. planci impact, compared to unaffected sites. Similarly, no difference was detected among locations in the numbers or area cover of sponges, tunicates, zoanthids, Halimeda or other macro-algae. Mean soft coral cover was 2 to 5% at 10 m on sheltered mid-shelf reefs, and 12 to 17% on more current-exposed reefs. Highest cover and abundances generally occurred on platforms of outer-shelf reefs exposed to relatively strong currents but low wave energy. On Davies Reef, cover and colony numbers of the families Nephtheidae and Xeniidae were low within the zone of wave impact, in flow-protected bays and lagoons, on shaded steep slopes, and at depths above 10 and below 25 m. In contrast, distributions of genera of the family Alcyoniidae were not related to these physical parameters. The physical conditions of a large proportion of habitats appear "sub

  3. Enhanced Spectral Analysis of SEP Reservoir Events by OMNIWeb Multi-Source Browse Services of the Space Physics Data Facility and the Virtual Energetic Particle Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, John F.; Papitashvili, Natalia E.; Johnson, Rita C.; McGuire, Robert

    2015-04-01

    The NASA Space Physics Data Facility and Virtual Energetic Particle Observatory (VEPO) have jointly upgraded the highly used OMNIWeb services for heliospheric solar wind data to also include energetic electron, proton, and heavier ion data in a variety of graphical browse formats. The underlying OMNI and VEPO data now span just over a half century from 1963 to the present. The new services include overlay of differential flux spectra from multiple instruments and spacecraft, scatter plots of fluxes from two user-selected energy channels, distribution function histograms of selected parameters, and spectrograms of flux vs. energy and time. Users can also overlay directional flux spectra from different angular channels. Data from most current and some past (Helios 1&2, Pioneer 10&11) heliospheric spacecraft and instruments are wholly or partially covered by these evolving new services. The traditional OMNI service of correlating magnetic field and plasma data from L1 to 1 AU solar wind sources is also being extended for other spacecraft, e.g. Voyager 1 and 2, to correlations with energetic particle channels. The user capability is, for example, demonstrated to rapidly scan through particle flux spectra from consecutive time periods for so-called “reservoir” events, in which solar energetic particle flux spectra converge in shape and amplitude from multiple spacecraft sources within the inner heliosphere. Such events are important for understanding spectral evolution of global heliospheric events and for intercalibration of flux data from multiple instruments of the same and different spacecraft. These services are accessible at http://omniweb.gsfc.nasa.gov/. SPDF and VEPO are separately accessible at http://spdf.gsfc.nasa.gov/ and http://vepo.gsfc.nasa.gov/.In the future we will propose to extend OMNIWeb particle flux data coverage to the plasma and suprathermal energy range.

  4. Report on active and planned spacecraft and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vette, J. I. (Editor); Vostreys, R. W. (Editor); Horowitz, R. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    Information is presented, concerning active and planned spacecraft and experiments known to the National Space Science Data Center. The information included a wide range of disciplines: astronomy, earth sciences, meteorology, planetary sciences, aeronomy, particles and fields, solar physics, life sciences, and material sciences. These spacecraft projects represented the efforts and funding of individual countries as well as cooperative arrangements among different countries.

  5. Report on active and planned spacecraft and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brecht, J. J. (Editor)

    1974-01-01

    Information dealing with active and planned spacecraft and experiments known to the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) is presented. Included is information concerning a wide range of disciplines: astronomy, earth sciences, meteorology, planetary sciences, aeronomy, particles and fields, solar physics, life sciences, and material sciences. These spacecraft represent the efforts and funding of individual countries, as well as cooperative arrangements among different countries.

  6. Parker Lecturers Gather at Joint Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crooker, Nancy

    2008-08-01

    Present and past Parker Lecturers, who are Bowie Lecturers of AGU's Space Physics and Aeronomy (SPA) section, gathered at the Joint Assembly in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the publication of Eugene Parker's famous paper predicting the existence of the supersonic solar wind (see Figure 1).

  7. Camden active spaces: Does the construction of active school playgrounds influence children's physical activity levels? A longitudinal quasi-experiment protocol

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Lee; Kipps, Courtney; Aggio, Daniel; Fox, Paul; Robinson, Nigel; Trend, Verena; Munnery, Suzie; Kelly, Barry; Hamer, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Physical activity is essential for every facet of children's health. However, physical activity levels in British children are low. The school environment is a promising setting to increase children's physical activity but limited empirical evidence exists on how a change in the outdoor physical school environment influences physical activity behaviour. The London Borough of Camden is redesigning seven existing school playgrounds to engage children to become more physically active. The primary aim of this project is to evaluate the impact of the redesigned playgrounds on children's physical activity, well-being and physical function/fitness. Method and analysis This project will use a longitudinal quasi-experimental design. Seven experimental schools and one control school will take part. One baseline data collection session and two follow-ups will be carried out. Between baseline and follow-up, the experimental school playgrounds will be redesigned. At baseline, a series of fitness tests, anthropometric and questionnaire measurements, and 7-day objective physical activity monitoring (Actigraph accelerometer) will be carried out on children (aged 5–16 years). This will be repeated at follow-up. Changes in overall physical activity levels and levels during different times of the day (eg, school breaks) will be examined. Multilevel regression modelling will be used to analyse the data. Ethics and dissemination The results of this study will be disseminated through peer-review publications and scientific presentations. Ethical approval was obtained through the University College London Research Ethics Committee (Reference number: 4400/002). PMID:25232566

  8. RTEMP: Exploring an end-to-end, agnostic platform for multidisciplinary real-time analytics in the space physics community and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaddock, D.; Donovan, E.; Spanswick, E.; Jackel, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    Large-scale, real-time, sensor-driven analytics are a highly effective set of tools in many research environments; however, the barrier to entry is expensive and the learning curve is steep. These systems need to operate efficiently from end to end, with the key aspects being data transmission, acquisition, management and organization, and retrieval. When building a generic multidisciplinary platform, acquisition and data management needs to be designed with scalability and flexibility as the primary focus. Additionally, in order to leverage current sensor web technologies, the integration of common sensor data standards (ie. SensorML and SWE Services) should be supported. Perhaps most important, researchers should be able to get started and integrate the platform into their set of research tools as easily and quickly as possible. The largest issue with current platforms is that the sensor data must be formed and described using the previously mentioned standards. As useful as these standards are for organizing data, they are cumbersome to adopt, often restrictive, and are required to be geospatially-driven. Our solution, RTEMP (Real-time Environment Monitoring Platform), is a real-time analytics platform with over ten years and an estimated two million dollars of investment. It has been developed for our continuously expanding requirements of operating and building remote sensors and supporting equipment for space physics research. A key benefit of our approach is RTEMP's ability to manage agnostic data. This allows data that flows through the system to be structured in any way that best addresses the needs of the sensor operators and data users, enabling extensive flexibility and streamlined development and research. Here we begin with an overview of RTEMP and how it is structured. Additionally, we will showcase the ways that we are using RTEMP and how it is being adopted by researchers in an increasingly broad range of other research fields. We will lay out a

  9. Communication spaces

    PubMed Central

    Coiera, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Background and objective Annotations to physical workspaces such as signs and notes are ubiquitous. When densely annotated, work areas become communication spaces. This study aims to characterize the types and purpose of such annotations. Methods A qualitative observational study was undertaken in two wards and the radiology department of a 440-bed metropolitan teaching hospital. Images were purposefully sampled; 39 were analyzed after excluding inferior images. Results Annotation functions included signaling identity, location, capability, status, availability, and operation. They encoded data, rules or procedural descriptions. Most aggregated into groups that either created a workflow by referencing each other, supported a common workflow without reference to each other, or were heterogeneous, referring to many workflows. Higher-level assemblies of such groupings were also observed. Discussion Annotations make visible the gap between work done and the capability of a space to support work. Annotations are repairs of an environment, improving fitness for purpose, fixing inadequacy in design, or meeting emergent needs. Annotations thus record the missing information needed to undertake tasks, typically added post-implemented. Measuring annotation levels post-implementation could help assess the fit of technology to task. Physical and digital spaces could meet broader user needs by formally supporting user customization, ‘programming through annotation’. Augmented reality systems could also directly support annotation, addressing existing information gaps, and enhancing work with context sensitive annotation. Conclusions Communication spaces offer a model of how work unfolds. Annotations make visible local adaptation that makes technology fit for purpose post-implementation and suggest an important role for annotatable information systems and digital augmentation of the physical environment. PMID:24005797

  10. Gymnastics in Phase Space

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Alexander Wu; /SLAC

    2012-03-01

    As accelerator technology advances, the requirements on accelerator beam quality become increasingly demanding. Facing these new demands, the topic of phase space gymnastics is becoming a new focus of accelerator physics R&D. In a phase space gymnastics, the beam's phase space distribution is manipulated and precision tailored to meet the required beam qualities. On the other hand, all realization of such gymnastics will have to obey accelerator physics principles as well as technological limitations. Recent examples of phase space gymnastics include Emittance exchanges, Phase space exchanges, Emittance partitioning, Seeded FELs and Microbunched beams. The emittance related topics of this list are reviewed in this report. The accelerator physics basis, the optics design principles that provide these phase space manipulations, and the possible applications of these gymnastics, are discussed. This fascinating new field promises to be a powerful tool of the future.

  11. The Climate Space Concept: Analysis of the Steady State Heat Energy Budget of Animals. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Transport Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, R. D.

    These materials were designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. Several modules in the thermodynamic series considered the application of the First Law to…

  12. News Education: Physics Education Networks meeting has global scale Competition: Competition seeks the next Brian Cox Experiment: New measurement of neutrino time-of-flight consistent with the speed of light Event: A day for all those who teach physics Conference: Students attend first Anglo-Japanese international science conference Celebration: Will 2015 be the 'Year of Light'? Teachers: Challenging our intuition in spectacular fashion: the fascinating world of quantum physics awaits Research: Science sharpens up sport Learning: Kittinger and Baumgartner: on a mission to the edge of space International: London International Youth Science Forum calls for leading young scientists Competition: Physics paralympian challenge needs inquisitive, analytical, artistic and eloquent pupils Forthcoming events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-05-01

    Education: Physics Education Networks meeting has global scale Competition: Competition seeks the next Brian Cox Experiment: New measurement of neutrino time-of-flight consistent with the speed of light Event: A day for all those who teach physics Conference: Students attend first Anglo-Japanese international science conference Celebration: Will 2015 be the 'Year of Light'? Teachers: Challenging our intuition in spectacular fashion: the fascinating world of quantum physics awaits Research: Science sharpens up sport Learning: Kittinger and Baumgartner: on a mission to the edge of space International: London International Youth Science Forum calls for leading young scientists Competition: Physics paralympian challenge needs inquisitive, analytical, artistic and eloquent pupils Forthcoming events

  13. [Space diet].

    PubMed

    Luigi, R

    1989-06-01

    Food prepared for astronauts meets various physical and biological requirements determined by living conditions in a space environment. Onboard systems, work programs, launch costs impose weight and volume limitations. For all investigated food items, the manufacturing technique must take into account all flight specific mechanical parameters. From a nutrition and sanitation standpoint, food packs must be designed to comply with certain specific effects of long term flights ans selected food items must be thoroughly safe, which requires very strict laboratory testing. The diet must also be varied, if possible it should match astronauts' personal preferences. Food preparations must be easy to use. Space food items are original applications of existing technologies: they are of very high quality.

  14. To Boldly Go: America's Next Era in Space. The Plasma Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Dr. France Cordova, NASA's Chief Scientist, chaired this, the eighth seminar in the Administrator's Seminar Series. She introduced the NASA Administrator, Daniel S. Goldin, who, in turn, introduced the subject of plasma. Plasma, an ionized gas, is a function of temperature and density. We ve learned that, at Jupiter, the radiation is dense. But, Goldin asked, what else do we know? Dr. Cordova then introduced Dr. James Van Allen, for whom the Van Allen radiation belt was named. Dr. Van Allen, a member of the University of Iowa faculty, discussed the growing interest in practical applications of space physics, including radiation fields and particles, plasmas and ionospheres. He listed a hierarchy of magnetic fields, beginning at the top, as pulsars, the Sun, planets, interplanetary medium, and interstellar medium. He pointed out that we have investigated eight of the nine known planets,. He listed three basic energy sources as 1) kinetic energy from flowing plasma such as constitutional solar wind or interstellar wind; 2) rotational energy of the planet, and 3) orbital energy of satellites. He believes there are seven sources of energetic particles and five potential places where particles may go. The next speaker, Dr. Ian Axford of New Zealand, has been associated with the Max Planck Institut fuer Aeronomie and plasma physics. He has studied solar and galactic winds and clusters of galaxies of which there are several thousand. He believes that the solar wind temperature is in the millions of degrees. The final speaker was Dr. Roger Blanford of the California Institute of Technology. He classified extreme plasmas as lab plasmas and cosmic plasmas. Cosmic plasmas are from supernovae remnants. These have supplied us with heavy elements and may come via a shock front of 10(sup 15) electron volts. To understand the physics of plasma, one must learn about x-rays, the maximum energy of acceleration by supernova remnants, particle acceleration and composition of cosmic

  15. Study of optimal training protocols and devices for developing and maintaining physical fitness in females prior to and during space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olree, H. D.; Corbin, B.; Smith, C.

    1977-01-01

    Pedalling a bicycle at least ten minutes a day at 85% of maximum pulse rate, three days a week for ten weeks will produce moderate increases in overall strength and physical work capacity in college-age females. The longer the training session, up to thirty minutes per session, the greater are the increases in physical work capacity that result when college-age females are trained three days a week for ten weeks at 85% of their maximum heart rate.

  16. The Unique Ability of the Electron-Positron (Epo) Lattice (Epola) Model of Space to Explain the Natural Causes of All Known Physical Features and Phenomena, Extrinsic to Nuclear Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simhony, Menahem

    1999-10-01

    The binding energy _bE of an epo pair in the epola is 1.02 MeV. In an epola spot, deformed by a "guest" nucleus, such a quantum can be absorbed; this frees an epo pair off bonds, making it appear to our detection. The epo lattice constant is 4.4 fm, 50 R_e. Thus atomic bodies can move in the epola, sweeping their constituent nuclei and electrons between epola particles, creating EM de Broglie waves in the epola space, but no winds or currents. Starting a motion provides the energy of the bound epola particles that vibrate in the waves. This led us to answer the question WHY there is inertia. Epola deformations by masses of constituent nuclear particles of atomic bodies led us to answer the question WHY there is gravity. Epola deformations by electric charges and magnetism of the particles lead to answer the questions of HOW and WHY does space carry and transfer with the speed c of light the tremendous gravitational and EM interaction forces, energies, and radiations. The lattice structure per se causes all quantizations, and the applicability of the otherwise "divine" principles of uncertainty, exclusion, particle-wave duality, universality of our backyard findings, etc. 1.M.Simhony, The Epola Space, 1990, 160 pp, and The Story of Matter and Space, 1999, 70 pp (available from the author). M.Simhony, Invitation to the Natural Physics or Matter, Space, and Radiation, World Scientific, 1994. See the website: http://come.to/natural_physics

  17. Higher Education Space: Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple, Paul; Barnett, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on a study of changing demands for space in United Kingdom (UK) higher education. Physical spaces that universities require are related to their functions in complex ways, and the connections between space and academic performance are not well understood. No simple algorithm can calculate a single university's space needs, but a…

  18. X ray, extreme and far ultraviolet optical thin films for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zukic, Muamer; Torr, Douglas G.; Kim, Jongmin

    1993-01-01

    Far and extreme ultraviolet optical thin film filters find many uses in space astronomy, space astrophysics, and space aeronomy. Spacebased spectrographs are used for studying emission and absorption features of the earth, planets, sun, stars, and the interstellar medium. Most of these spectrographs use transmission or reflection filters. This requirement has prompted a search for selective filtering coatings with high throughput in the FUV and EUV spectral region. Important progress toward the development of thin film filters with improved efficiency and stability has been made in recent years. The goal for this field is the minimization of absorption to get high throughput and enhancement of wavelength selection. The Optical Aeronomy Laboratory (OAL) at the University of Alabama in Huntsville has recently developed the technology to determine optical constants of bulk and film materials for wavelengths extending from x-rays (0.1 nm) to the FUV (200 nm), and several materials have been identified that were used for designs of various optical devices which previously have been restricted to space application in the visible and near infrared. A new design concept called the Pi-multilayer was introduced and applied to the design of optical coatings for wavelengths extending from x-rays to the FUV. Section 3 of this report explains the Pi-multilayer approach and demonstrates its application for the design and fabrication of the FUV coatings. Two layer Pi-stacks have been utilized for the design of reflection filters in the EUV wavelength range from 70 - 100 nm. In order to eliminate losses due to the low reflection of the imaging optics and increase throughput and out-of-band rejection of the EUV instrumentation we introduced a self-filtering camera concept. In the FUV region, MgF2 and LiF crystals are known to be birefringent. Transmission polarizers and quarterwave retarders made of MgF2 or LiF crystals are commercially available but the performances are poor. New

  19. The quantum space race

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennewein, Thomas; Higgins, Brendon

    2013-03-01

    Sending satellites equipped with quantum technologies into space will be the first step towards a global quantum-communication network. As Thomas Jennewein and Brendon Higgins explain, these systems will also enable physicists to test fundamental physics in new regimes.

  20. Advanced solar space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohlin, J. D.

    1979-01-01

    The space missions in solar physics planned for the next decade are similar in that they will have, for the most part, distinct, unifying science objectives in contrast to the more general 'exploratory' nature of the Orbiting Solar Observatory and Skylab/ATM missions of the 1960's and 70's. In particular, the strategy for advanced solar physics space missions will focus on the quantitative understanding of the physical processes that create and control the flow of electromagnetic and particulate energy from the sun and through interplanetary space at all phases of the current sunspot cycle No. 21. Attention is given to the Solar Maximum Mission, the International Solar Polar Mission, solar physics on an early Shuttle mission, principal investigator class experiments for future spacelabs, the Solar Optical Telescope, the Space Science Platform, the Solar Cycle and Dynamics Mission, and an attempt to send a spacecraft to within 4 solar radii of the sun's surface.