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Sample records for aeropyrum pernix kvap

  1. Bending elasticity modulus of giant vesicles composed of aeropyrum pernix k1 archaeal lipid.

    PubMed

    Genova, Julia; Ulrih, Nataša Poklar; Kralj-Iglič, Veronika; Iglič, Aleš; Bivas, Isak

    2015-01-01

    Thermally induced shape fluctuations were used to study elastic properties of giant vesicles composed of archaeal lipids C25,25-archetidyl (glucosyl) inositol and C25,25-archetidylinositol isolated from lyophilised Aeropyrum pernix K1 cells. Giant vesicles were created by electroformation in pure water environment. Stroboscopic illumination using a xenon flash lamp was implemented to remove the blur effect due to the finite integration time of the camera and to obtain an instant picture of the fluctuating vesicle shape. The mean weighted value of the bending elasticity modulus kc of the archaeal membrane determined from the measurements meeting the entire set of qualification criteria was (1.89 ± 0.18) × 10-19 J, which is similar to the values obtained for a membrane composed of the eukaryotic phospholipids SOPC (1.88 ± 0.17) × 10-19 J and POPC (2.00 ± 0.21) ´ 10-19 J. We conclude that membranes composed of archaeal lipids isolated from Aeropyrum pernix K1 cells have similar elastic properties as membranes composed of eukaryotic lipids. This fact, together with the importance of the elastic properties for the normal circulation through blood system, provides further evidence in favor of expectations that archaeal lipids could be appropriate for the design of drug delivery systems. PMID:25821933

  2. Diversity of viruses of the hyperthermophilic archaeal genus Aeropyrum, and isolation of the Aeropyrum pernix bacilliform virus 1, APBV1, the first representative of the family Clavaviridae.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Tomohiro; Yoshida, Takashi; Tanaka, Reiji; Forterre, Patrick; Sako, Yoshihiko; Prangishvili, David

    2010-07-01

    We have surveyed the morphological diversity of viruses infecting the archaeon Aeropyrum pernix, the most thermophilic species among aerobic organisms, growing optimally at 90 degrees C, and isolated and characterized a novel virus, Aeropyrum pernix bacilliform virus 1, APBV1. This is the first virus to be described of the genus Aeropyrum and the archaeal order Desulfurococcales. The virion of APBV1 has rigid bacilliform morphology, about 140x20nm, with one end pointed and the other rounded. It contains highly glycosylated single major protein and three minor proteins. The circular, double-stranded DNA genome comprising 5278bp is the smallest for known archaeal viruses. None of the 14 putative genes, all on the same DNA strand, shows significant similarity to sequences in the public databases. The APBV1 infection caused neither retardation of host growth nor lysis of host cells, and integration of the viral genome into the host chromosome was not detected. On the basis of unusual morphological and genomic properties, we propose to consider APBV1 as the first representative of a new viral family, the Clavaviridae.

  3. Role of F225 in O-phosphoserine sulfhydrylase from Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Emi; Kunimoto, Kohei; Kawai, Yoshito; Kataoka, Misumi; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko; Nakamura, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    O-Phosphoserine sulfhydrylase (OPSS) synthesizes cysteine from O-phospho-L-serine (OPS) and sulfide. We have determined the three-dimensional structures of OPSS from hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1 (ApOPSS) in complex with aminoacrylate intermediate (AA) formed from pyridoxal 5'-phosphate with OPS or in complex with cysteine and compared them with that of ApOPSS. We found an orientational change of F225 at the active-site entrance and constructed an F225A mutant to examine its activities and AA stability and clarify the role of F225 in ApOPSS. The OPS and O-acetyl-L-serine (OAS) sulfhydrylase activities of the F225A mutant decreased by 4.2- and 15-fold compared to those of the wild-type (wt) ApOPSS, respectively. The ability of OPS and OAS to form AA also decreased by 12- and 27-fold, respectively. AA was less stable in the F225A mutant than in the wt ApOPSS. Simulated docking showed that leaving groups, such as phosphate and acetate, were oriented to the inside of the active site in the F225A mutant, whereas they were oriented to the entrance in the wt ApOPSS. These results suggest that F225 in ApOPSS plays important roles in maintaining the hydrophobic environment of AA from solvent water and in controlling the orientation of leaving groups. PMID:27377295

  4. Temperature dependence of kinetic parameters for hyperthermophilic glutamate dehydrogenase from Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    PubMed

    Bhuiya, Mohammad W; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2002-04-01

    The temperature dependence of the steady-state kinetic parameters for a glutamate dehydrogenase from Aeropyrum pernix K1 was investigated. The enzyme showed a biphasic kinetic characteristic for L-glutamate and a monophasic one for NADP at 50-90 degrees C. At low concentrations of L-glutamate the Km decreased from 2.02 to 0.56 mM and the catalytic efficiency (Vmax/Km) markedly increased (4-150 micromol x mg(-1) x mM(-1)) along with the increase of temperature from 50 to 90 degrees C. At high concentrations of the substrate the Km was fairly high and approximately constant (around 225 mM), and the catalytic efficiency was low and its temperature-dependent change was small. The Km (0.039 mM) for NADP did not change with the increase of temperature. In the reductive amination, the Kms for 2-oxoglutarate (1.81 and 9.37 mM at low and high levels of ammonia, respectively) were independent on temperature, but the Kms for ammonia and NADPH rose from 86 to 185 mM and 0.050 to 0.175 mM, respectively.

  5. Role of F225 in O-phosphoserine sulfhydrylase from Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Emi; Kunimoto, Kohei; Kawai, Yoshito; Kataoka, Misumi; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko; Nakamura, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    O-Phosphoserine sulfhydrylase (OPSS) synthesizes cysteine from O-phospho-L-serine (OPS) and sulfide. We have determined the three-dimensional structures of OPSS from hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1 (ApOPSS) in complex with aminoacrylate intermediate (AA) formed from pyridoxal 5'-phosphate with OPS or in complex with cysteine and compared them with that of ApOPSS. We found an orientational change of F225 at the active-site entrance and constructed an F225A mutant to examine its activities and AA stability and clarify the role of F225 in ApOPSS. The OPS and O-acetyl-L-serine (OAS) sulfhydrylase activities of the F225A mutant decreased by 4.2- and 15-fold compared to those of the wild-type (wt) ApOPSS, respectively. The ability of OPS and OAS to form AA also decreased by 12- and 27-fold, respectively. AA was less stable in the F225A mutant than in the wt ApOPSS. Simulated docking showed that leaving groups, such as phosphate and acetate, were oriented to the inside of the active site in the F225A mutant, whereas they were oriented to the entrance in the wt ApOPSS. These results suggest that F225 in ApOPSS plays important roles in maintaining the hydrophobic environment of AA from solvent water and in controlling the orientation of leaving groups.

  6. Catalytic properties and crystal structure of thermostable NAD(P)H-dependent carbonyl reductase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Yudai; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Araki, Tomohiro; Ohshima, Toshihisa; Yoneda, Kazunari

    2016-09-01

    A gene encoding NAD(P)H-dependent carbonyl reductase (CR) from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Its product was effectively purified and characterized. The expressed enzyme was the most thermostable CR found to date; the activity remained at approximately 75% of its activity after incubation for 10min up to 90°C. In addition, A. pernix CR exhibited high stability at a wider range of pH values and longer periods of storage compared with CRs previously identified from other sources. A. pernix CR catalyzed the reduction of various carbonyl compounds including ethyl 4-chloro-3-oxobutanoate and 9,10-phenanthrenequinone, similar to the CR from thyroidectomized (Tx) chicken fatty liver. However, A. pernix CR exhibited significantly higher Km values against several substrates than Tx chicken fatty liver CR. The three-dimensional structure of A. pernix CR was determined using the molecular replacement method at a resolution of 2.09Å, in the presence of NADPH. The overall fold of A. pernix CR showed moderate similarity to that of Tx chicken fatty liver CR; however, A. pernix CR had no active-site lid unlike Tx chicken fatty liver CR. Consequently, the active-site cavity in the A. pernix CR was much more solvent-accessible than that in Tx chicken fatty liver CR. This structural feature may be responsible for the enzyme's lower affinity for several substrates and NADPH. The factors contributing to the much higher thermostability of A. pernix CR were analyzed by comparing its structure with that of Tx chicken fatty liver CR. This comparison showed that extensive formation of the intrasubunit ion pair networks, and the presence of the strong intersubunit interaction, is likely responsible for A. pernix CR thermostability. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that Glu99 plays a major role in the intersubunit interaction. This is the first report regarding the characteristics and three-dimensional structure of

  7. Thermostability and reactivity in organic solvent of O-phospho-L-serine sulfhydrylase from hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takashi; Asai, Shinji; Nakata, Kaori; Kunimoto, Kohei; Oguri, Masateru; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    O-phospho-l-serine sulfhydrylase (OPSS) from archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1 is able to synthesize l-cysteine even at 80 °C. In this article, we compared thermal stability and reactivity in organic solvent of OPSS with those of O-acetyl-l-serine sulfhydrylase B (OASS-B) from Escherichia coli. As a result, the thermostability of OPSS was much higher than that of OASS-B. Moreover, the activity of OPSS increased in the reaction mixture containing the organic solvent, such as N, N'-dimethyl formamide and 1,4-dioxane, whereas that of OASS-B gradually decreased as the content of organic solvent increased. From the crystal structural analysis, the intramolecular electrostatic interactions of N-terminal domain in OPSS seemed to be correlated with the tolerance of OPSS to high temperature and organic solvent. These results indicate that OPSS is more superior to OASS-B for the industrial production of l-cysteine and unnatural amino acids that are useful pharmaceuticals in the presence of organic solvent.

  8. Structure of a putative trans-editing enzyme for prolyl-tRNA synthetase from Aeropyrum pernix K1 at 1.7 Å resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Murayama, Kazutaka; Kato-Murayama, Miyuki; Katsura, Kazushige; Uchikubo-Kamo, Tomomi; Yamaguchi-Hirafuji, Machiko; Kawazoe, Masahito; Akasaka, Ryogo; Hanawa-Suetsugu, Kyoko; Hori-Takemoto, Chie; Terada, Takaho; Shirouzu, Mikako; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2005-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of the APE2540 protein from A. pernix K1 has been determined by the multiple anomalous dispersion method at 1.7 Å resolution. The structure includes two monomers in the asymmetric unit and shares structural similarity with the YbaK protein or cysteinyl-tRNA{sup Pro} deacylase from H. influenzae. The crystal structure of APE2540, the putative trans-editing enzyme ProX from Aeropyrum pernix K1, was determined in a high-throughput manner. The crystal belongs to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 47.4, b = 58.9, c = 53.6 Å, β = 106.8°. The structure was solved by the multiwavelength anomalous dispersion method at 1.7 Å and refined to an R factor of 16.8% (R{sub free} = 20.5%). The crystal structure includes two protein molecules in the asymmetric unit. Each monomer consists of eight β-strands and seven α-helices. A structure-homology search revealed similarity between the trans-editing enzyme YbaK (or cysteinyl-tRNA{sup Pro} deacylase) from Haemophilus influenzae (HI1434; 22% sequence identity) and putative ProX proteins from Caulobacter crescentus (16%) and Agrobacterium tumefaciens (21%)

  9. Bifunctional phosphoglucose/phosphomannose isomerases from the Archaea Aeropyrum pernix and Thermoplasma acidophilum constitute a novel enzyme family within the phosphoglucose isomerase superfamily.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Thomas; Wendorff, Daniel; Schönheit, Peter

    2004-01-16

    The hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Aeropyrum pernix contains phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI) activity. However, obvious homologs with significant identity to known PGIs could not be identified in the sequenced genome of this organism. The PGI activity from A. pernix was purified and characterized. Kinetic analysis revealed that, unlike all known PGIs, the enzyme catalyzed reversible isomerization not only of glucose 6-phosphate but also of epimeric mannose 6-phosphate at similar catalytic efficiency, thus defining the protein as bifunctional phosphoglucose/phosphomannose isomerase (PGI/PMI). The gene pgi/pmi encoding PGI/PMI (open reading frame APE0768) was identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight analyses; the gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli as functional PGI/PMI. Putative PGI/PMI homologs were identified in several (hyper)thermophilic archaea and two bacteria. The homolog from Thermoplasma acidophilum (Ta1419) was overexpressed in E. coli, and the recombinant enzyme was characterized as bifunctional PGI/PMI. PGI/PMIs showed low sequence identity to the PGI superfamily and formed a distinct phylogenetic cluster. However, secondary structure predictions and the presence of several conserved amino acids potentially involved in catalysis indicate some structural and functional similarity to the PGI superfamily. Thus, we propose that bifunctional PGI/PMI constitutes a novel protein family within the PGI superfamily.

  10. Genome variation in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum

    PubMed Central

    Daifuku, Takashi; Yoshida, Takashi; Sako, Yoshihiko

    2013-01-01

    Aeropyrum spp are aerobic, heterotrophic, and hyperthermophilic marine archaea. There are two closely related Aeropyrum species, Aeropyrum camini and Aeropyrum pernix, which are isolated from geographically distinct locations. Recently, we compared their genome sequences to determine their genomic variation. They possess highly conserved small genomes, reflecting their close relationship. The entire genome similarity may result from their survival strategies in adapting to extreme environmental conditions. Meanwhile, synteny disruptions were observed in some regions including clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats elements. Further, the largest portion of their non-orthologous genes were genes in the two proviral regions of A. pernix (Aeropyrum pernix spindle-shaped virus 1 and Aeropyrum pernix ovoid virus 1) or ORFans considered to be derived from viruses. Our data shows that genomic diversification of Aeropyrum spp may be substantially induced by viruses. This suggests that Aeropyrum spp may have a large pan-genome that can be extended by viruses, while each of the species shares a highly conserved small genome specializing for extreme environments. PMID:24251075

  11. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (GAPOR) and nonphosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPN), key enzymes of the respective modified Embden-Meyerhof pathways in the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeota Pyrobaculum aerophilum and Aeropyrum pernix.

    PubMed

    Reher, Matthias; Gebhard, Susanne; Schönheit, Peter

    2007-08-01

    The growth of Pyrobaculum aerophilum on yeast extract and nitrate was stimulated by the addition of maltose. Extracts of maltose/yeast extract/nitrate-grown cells contained all enzyme activities of a modified Embden-Meyerhof (EM) pathway, including ATP-dependent glucokinase, phosphoglucose isomerase, ATP-dependent 6-phosphofructokinase, fructose-1,6-phosphate aldolase, triose-phosphate isomerase, GAPOR, phosphoglycerate mutase, enolase and pyruvate kinase. The activity of GAPOR was stimulated about fourfold by maltose, indicating a role in sugar degradation. GAPOR was purified 200-fold to homogeneity and characterized as a 67 kDa monomeric, extremely thermostable protein. The enzyme showed high specificity for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate and did not use glyceraldehyde, acetaldehyde or formaldehyde as substrates. By matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight analysis of the purified enzyme, ORF PA1029 was identified as a coding gene, gapor, in the sequenced genome of Pyrobaculum aerophilum. The data indicate that the (micro)aerophilic Pyrobaculum aerophilum contains a functional GAPOR as part of a modified EM pathway. Cells of the strictly aerobic crenarchaeon Aeropyrum pernix also contain enzyme activities of a modified EM pathway similar to that of Pyrobaculum aerophilum, except that a GAPN activity replaces GAPOR activity.

  12. Variation of the Virus-Related Elements within Syntenic Genomes of the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Aeropyrum

    PubMed Central

    Daifuku, Takashi; Yoshida, Takashi; Kitamura, Takayuki; Kawaichi, Satoshi; Inoue, Takahiro; Nomura, Keigo; Yoshida, Yui; Kuno, Sotaro

    2013-01-01

    The increasing number of genome sequences of archaea and bacteria show their adaptation to different environmental conditions at the genomic level. Aeropyrum spp. are aerobic and hyperthermophilic archaea. Aeropyrum camini was isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent, and Aeropyrum pernix was isolated from a coastal solfataric vent. To investigate the adaptation strategy in each habitat, we compared the genomes of the two species. Shared genome features were a small genome size, a high GC content, and a large portion of orthologous genes (86 to 88%). The genomes also showed high synteny. These shared features may have been derived from the small number of mobile genetic elements and the lack of a RecBCD system, a recombinational enzyme complex. In addition, the specialized physiology (aerobic and hyperthermophilic) of Aeropyrum spp. may also contribute to the entire-genome similarity. Despite having stable genomes, interference of synteny occurred with two proviruses, A. pernix spindle-shaped virus 1 (APSV1) and A. pernix ovoid virus 1 (APOV1), and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) elements. Spacer sequences derived from the A. camini CRISPR showed significant matches with protospacers of the two proviruses infecting A. pernix, indicating that A. camini interacted with viruses closely related to APSV1 and APOV1. Furthermore, a significant fraction of the nonorthologous genes (41 to 45%) were proviral genes or ORFans probably originating from viruses. Although the genomes of A. camini and A. pernix were conserved, we observed nonsynteny that was attributed primarily to virus-related elements. Our findings indicated that the genomic diversification of Aeropyrum spp. is substantially caused by viruses. PMID:23872576

  13. A Model of Voltage Gating Developed Using the KvAP Channel Crystal Structure

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Indira H.; Durell, Stewart R.; Guy, H. Robert

    2004-01-01

    Having inspected the crystal structure of the complete KvAP channel protein, we suspect that the voltage-sensing domain is too distorted to provide reliable information about its native tertiary structure or its interactions with the central pore-forming domain. On the other hand, a second crystal structure of the isolated voltage-sensing domain may well correspond to a native open conformation. We also observe that the paddle model of gating developed from these two structures is inconsistent with many experimental results, and suspect it to be energetically unrealistic. Here we show that the isolated voltage-sensing domain crystal structure can be docked onto the pore domain portion of the full-length KvAP crystal structure in an energetically favorable way to create a model of the open conformation. Using this as a starting point, we have developed rather conventional models of resting and transition conformations based on the helical screw mechanism for the transition from the open to the resting conformation. Our models are consistent with both theoretical considerations and experimental results. PMID:15454428

  14. Do Lipids Show State-dependent Affinity to the Voltage-gated Potassium Channel KvAP?*

    PubMed Central

    Faure, Élise; Thompson, Christine; Blunck, Rikard

    2014-01-01

    As all integral membrane proteins, voltage-gated ion channels are embedded in a lipid matrix that regulates their channel behavior either by physicochemical properties or by direct binding. Because manipulation of the lipid composition in cells is difficult, we investigated the influence of different lipids on purified KvAP channels reconstituted in planar lipid bilayers of known composition. Lipids developed two distinct and independent effects on the KvAP channels; lipids interacting with the pore lowered the energy barriers for the final transitions, whereas voltage sensor-bound lipids shifted the midpoint of activation dependent on their electrostatic charge. Above all, the midpoint of activation was determined only by those lipids the channels came in contact with first after purification and can seemingly only be exchanged if the channel resides in the open state. The high affinity of the bound lipids to the binding site has implications not only on our understanding of the gating mechanism but also on the general experimental design of any lipid dependence study. PMID:24742679

  15. Open channel current noise analysis of S6 peptides from KvAP channel on bilayer lipid membrane shows bimodal power law scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, Rajan; Malik, Chetan; Ghosh, Subhendu

    2016-06-01

    Open channel current noise in synthetic peptide S6 of KvAP channel was investigated in a voltage clamp experiment on bilayer lipid membrane (BLM). It was observed that the power spectral density (PSD) of the component frequencies follows power law with different slopes in different frequency ranges. In order to know the origin of the slopes PSD analysis was done with signal filtering. It was found that the first slope in the noise profile follows 1 / f pattern which exists at lower frequencies and has high amplitude current noise, while the second slope corresponds to 1 /f 2 - 3 pattern which exists at higher frequencies with low amplitude current noise. In addition, white noise was observed at very large frequencies. It was concluded that the plausible reason for the multiple power-law scaling is the existence of different modes of non-equilibrium ion transport through the S6 channel.

  16. Coupling between the voltage-sensing and pore domains in a voltage-gated potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Schow, Eric V; Freites, J Alfredo; Nizkorodov, Alex; White, Stephen H; Tobias, Douglas J

    2012-07-01

    Voltage-dependent potassium (Kv), sodium (Nav), and calcium channels open and close in response to changes in transmembrane (TM) potential, thus regulating cell excitability by controlling ion flow across the membrane. An outstanding question concerning voltage gating is how voltage-induced conformational changes of the channel voltage-sensing domains (VSDs) are coupled through the S4-S5 interfacial linking helices to the opening and closing of the pore domain (PD). To investigate the coupling between the VSDs and the PD, we generated a closed Kv channel configuration from Aeropyrum pernix (KvAP) using atomistic simulations with experiment-based restraints on the VSDs. Full closure of the channel required, in addition to the experimentally determined TM displacement, that the VSDs be displaced both inwardly and laterally around the PD. This twisting motion generates a tight hydrophobic interface between the S4-S5 linkers and the C-terminal ends of the pore domain S6 helices in agreement with available experimental evidence.

  17. Phospholipid membrane-interaction of a peptide from S4 segment of KvAP K(+) channel and the influence of the positive charges and an identified heptad repeat in its interaction with a S3 peptide.

    PubMed

    Verma, Richa; Ghosh, Jimut Kanti

    2011-06-01

    In order to examine the ability of S3 and S4 segments of a Kv channel to interact with each other, two wild type short peptides derived from the S3 and S4 segments of KvAP channel were synthesized. Additionally, to evaluate the role of positive charges and an identified heptad repeat in the S4 segment, two S4 mutants of the same size as the S4 peptide, one with substitution of two leucine residues in the heptad repeat sequence by two alanine residues and in the other two arginine residues replaced by two glutamines residues were synthesized. Our results show that only the wild type S4 peptide, but not its mutants, self-assembled and permeabilized negatively charged phospholipid vesicles. The S3 peptide showed lesser affinity toward the same kind of lipid vesicles and localized onto its surface. However, the S3 peptide interacted only with S4 wild type peptide, but not with S4 mutants, and altered its localization onto the phospholipid membrane with increased resistance against the proteolytic enzyme, proteinase-k, in the presence of the S4 peptide. The results demonstrate that the selected, synthetic S3 and S4 segments possess the required amino acid sequences to interact with each other and show that the positive charges and the identified heptad repeat in S4 contribute to its assembly and interaction with S3 segment.

  18. Profile structures of the voltage-sensor domain and the voltage-gated K+-channel vectorially oriented in a single phospholipid bilayer membrane at the solid-vapor and solid-liquid interfaces determined by x-ray interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, S.; Liu, J.; Strzalka, J.; Blasie, J. K.

    2011-01-01

    One subunit of the prokaryotic voltage-gated potassium ion channel from Aeropyrum pernix (KvAP) is comprised of six transmembrane α helices, of which S1–S4 form the voltage-sensor domain (VSD) and S5 and S6 contribute to the pore domain (PD) of the functional homotetramer. However, the mechanism of electromechanical coupling interconverting the closed-to-open (i.e., nonconducting-to-K+-conducting) states remains undetermined. Here, we have vectorially oriented the detergent (OG)-solubilized VSD in single monolayers by two independent approaches, namely “directed-assembly” and “self-assembly,” to achieve a high in-plane density. Both utilize Ni coordination chemistry to tether the protein to an alkylated inorganic surface via its C-terminal His6 tag. Subsequently, the detergent is replaced by phospholipid (POPC) via exchange, intended to reconstitute a phospholipid bilayer environment for the protein. X-ray interferometry, in which interference with a multilayer reference structure is used to both enhance and phase the specular x-ray reflectivity from the tethered single membrane, was used to determine directly the electron density profile structures of the VSD protein solvated by detergent versus phospholipid, and with either a moist He (moderate hydration) or bulk aqueous buffer (high hydration) environment to preserve a native structure conformation. Difference electron density profiles, with respect to the multilayer substrate itself, for the VSD-OG monolayer and VSD-POPC membranes at both the solid-vapor and solid-liquid interfaces, reveal the profile structures of the VSD protein dominating these profiles and further indicate a successful reconstitution of a lipid bilayer environment. The self-assembly approach was similarly extended to the intact full-length KvAP channel for comparison. The spatial extent and asymmetry in the profile structures of both proteins confirm their unidirectional vectorial orientation within the reconstituted membrane and

  19. Ultrasound-Assisted Enantioselective Esterification of Ibuprofen Catalyzed by a Flower-Like Nanobioreactor.

    PubMed

    An, Baiyi; Fan, Hailin; Wu, Zhuofu; Zheng, Lu; Wang, Lei; Wang, Zhi; Chen, Guang

    2016-01-01

    A flower-like nanobioreactor was prepared for resolution of ibuprofen in organic solvents. Ultrasound irradiation has been used to improve the enzyme performance of APE1547 (a thermophilic esterase from the archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1) in the enantioselective esterification. Under optimum reaction conditions (ultrasound power, 225 W; temperature, 45 °C; water activity, 0.21), the immobilized APE1547 showed an excellent catalytic performance (enzyme activity, 13.26 μmol/h/mg; E value, 147.1). After ten repeated reaction batches, the nanobioreactor retained almost 100% of its initial enzyme activity and enantioselectivity. These results indicated that the combination of the immobilization method and ultrasound irradiation can enhance the enzyme performance dramatically. PMID:27136511

  20. Enzymatic resolution of ibuprofen in an organic solvent under ultrasound irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dantong; Yue, Hong; Chen, Ge; Jiang, Liyan; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Zhi; Liu, Guangchun

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound has been successfully adopted to improve the biocatalytic properties of APE1547 (a novel esterase from the archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1) in the resolution of ibuprofen. After optimizing the conditions (ultrasound power, 200 W; temperature, 35 °C), the best biocatalytic performance of APE1547 (enzyme activity, 5.39 µmol/H/mg; E value, 130.8) was obtained. Compared with the conventional reaction in an orbital shaker, the enzyme activity was significantly enhanced about 90-fold, and the enantioselectivity was enhanced about fourfold after an ultrasound. The results of scanning electron microscopy clearly indicated that the activation effect of ultrasound on APE1547 originated mainly in the morphological change of the enzyme powder. Both lower particle size and conformational change of APE1547 under ultrasound might be helpful to enhance the enantioselectivity. In addition, APE1547 kept its best performance under the low-power ultrasound for at least five reaction cycles.

  1. Structural properties of archaeal lipid bilayers: small-angle X-ray scattering and molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Polak, Andraž; Tarek, Mounir; Tomšič, Matija; Valant, Janez; Ulrih, Nataša Poklar; Jamnik, Andrej; Kramar, Peter; Miklavčič, Damijan

    2014-07-22

    Aeropyrum pernix is an aerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon that grows in harsh environmental conditions and as such possesses unique structural and metabolic features. Its membrane interfaces with the extreme environment and is the first line of defense from external factors. Therefore, lipids composing this membrane have special moieties that increase its stability. The membrane of A. pernix is composed predominantly of two polar lipids 2,3-di-O-sesterterpanyl-sn-glicerol-1-phospho-1'(2'-O-α-D-glucosyl)-myo-inositol (AGI) and 2,3-di-O-sesterterpanyl-sn-glicerol-1-phospho-myo-inositol (AI). Both have methyl branches in their lipid tails and ether linkages and carbohydrates in their headgroup. These moieties significantly affect the structure and dynamics of the bilayer. To provide a molecular level insight into these characteristics, we used here Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of lipid bilayers of composition similar to those of the archaeal membranes. First, we show that the electron density profiles along the normal to the bilayers derived from the simulations are in good agreement with the profiles obtained by the small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) technique, which provides confidence in the force fields used. Analyses of the simulation data show that the archaeal lipid bilayers are less hydrated than conventional phosphatidylcholine (PC) lipids and that their structure is not affected by the salt present in the surrounding solution. Furthermore, the lateral pressure in their hydrophobic core, due to the presence of the branched tails, is much higher than that at PC-based lipid bilayers. Both the methyl branched tails and the special headgroup moieties contribute to slow drastically the lateral diffusion of the lipids. Furthermore, we found that the lipid head groups associate via hydrogen bonding, which affects their reorientational dynamics. All together, our data provide links between the microscopic properties of these membranes and their overall

  2. The biochemical properties and phylogenies of phosphofructokinases from extremophiles.

    PubMed

    Ronimus, R S; Morgan, H W

    2001-12-01

    The enzyme phosphofructokinase (PFK) is a defining activity of the highly conserved glycolytic pathway, and is present in the domains Bacteria, Eukarya, and Archaea. PFK subtypes are now known that utilize either ATP, ADP, or pyrophosphate as the primary phosphoryl donor and share the ability to catalyze the transfer of phosphate to the 1-position of fructose-6-phosphate. Because of the crucial position in the glycolytic pathway of PFKs, their biochemical characteristics and phylogenies may play a significant role in elucidating the origins of glycolysis and, indeed, of metabolism itself. Despite the shared ability to phosphorylate fructose-6-phosphate, PFKs that have been characterized to date now fall into three sequence families: the PFKA family, consisting of the well-known higher eukaryotic ATP-dependent PFKs together with their ATP- and pyrophosphate-dependent bacterial cousins (including the crenarchaeal pyrophosphate-dependent PFK of Thermoprotetus tenax) and plant pyrophosphate-dependent phosphofructokinases; the PFKB family, exemplified by the minor ATP-dependent PFK activity of Escherichia coli (PFK 2), but which also includes at least one crenarchaeal enzyme in Aeropyrum pernix; and the tentatively named PFKC family, which contains the unique ADP-dependent PFKs from the euryarchaeal genera of Pyrococcus and Thermococcus, which are indicated by sequence analysis to be present also in the methanogenic species Methanococcus jannaschii and Methanosarcina mazei.

  3. ADPase activity of recombinantly expressed thermotolerant ATPases may be caused by copurification of adenylate kinase of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Baoyu; Sysoeva, Tatyana A.; Chowdhury, Saikat; Guo, Liang; Nixon, B.Tracy

    2009-10-06

    Except for apyrases, ATPases generally target only the {gamma}-phosphate of a nucleotide. Some non-apyrase ATPases from thermophilic microorganisms are reported to hydrolyze ADP as well as ATP, which has been described as a novel property of the ATPases from extreme thermophiles. Here, we describe an apparent ADP hydrolysis by highly purified preparations of the AAA+ ATPase NtrC1 from an extremely thermophilic bacterium, Aquifex aeolicus. This activity is actually a combination of the activities of the ATPase and contaminating adenylate kinase (AK) from Escherichia coli, which is present at 1/10 000 of the level of the ATPase. AK catalyzes conversion of two molecules of ADP into AMP and ATP, the latter being a substrate for the ATPase. We raise concern that the observed thermotolerance of E. coli AK and its copurification with thermostable proteins by commonly used methods may confound studies of enzymes that specifically catalyze hydrolysis of nucleoside diphosphates or triphosphates. For example, contamination with E. coli AK may be responsible for reported ADPase activities of the ATPase chaperonins from Pyrococcus furiosus, Pyrococcus horikoshii, Methanococcus jannaschii and Thermoplasma acidophilum; the ATP/ADP-dependent DNA ligases from Aeropyrum pernix K1 and Staphylothermus marinus; or the reported ATP-dependent activities of ADP-dependent phosphofructokinase of P. furiosus. Purification methods developed to separate NtrC1 ATPase from AK also revealed two distinct forms of the ATPase. One is tightly bound to ADP or GDP and able to bind to Q but not S ion exchange matrixes. The other is nucleotide-free and binds to both Q and S ion exchange matrixes.

  4. A simple and effective strategy for solving the problem of inclusion bodies in recombinant protein technology: His-tag deletions enhance soluble expression.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shaozhou; Gong, Cuiyu; Ren, Lu; Li, Xingzhou; Song, Dawei; Zheng, Guojun

    2013-01-01

    The formation of inclusion bodies (IBs) in recombinant protein biotechnology has become one of the most frequent undesirable occurrences in both research and industrial applications. So far, the pET System is the most powerful system developed for the production of recombinant proteins when Escherichia coli is used as the microbial cell factory. Also, using fusion tags to facilitate detection and purification of the target protein is a commonly used tactic. However, there is still a large fraction of proteins that cannot be produced in E. coli in a soluble (and hence functional) form. Intensive research efforts have tried to address this issue, and numerous parameters have been modulated to avoid the formation of inclusion bodies. However, hardly anyone has noticed that adding fusion tags to the recombinant protein to facilitate purification is a key factor that affects the formation of inclusion bodies. To test this idea, the industrial biocatalysts uridine phosphorylase from Aeropyrum pernix K1 and (+)-γ-lactamase and (-)-γ-lactamase from Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 6 were expressed in E. coli by using the pET System and then examined. We found that using a histidine tag as a fusion partner for protein expression did affect the formation of inclusion bodies in these examples, suggesting that removing the fusion tag can promote the solubility of heterologous proteins. The production of soluble and highly active uridine phosphorylase, (+)-γ-lactamase, and (-)-γ-lactamase in our results shows that the traditional process needs to be reconsidered. Accordingly, a simple and efficient structure-based strategy for the production of valuable soluble recombinant proteins in E. coli is proposed.

  5. Models of the Structure and Voltage-Gating Mechanism of the Shaker K+ Channel

    PubMed Central

    Durell, Stewart R.; Shrivastava, Indira H.; Guy, H. Robert

    2004-01-01

    In the preceding, accompanying article, we present models of the structure and voltage-dependent gating mechanism of the KvAP bacterial K+ channel that are based on three types of evidence: crystal structures of portions of the KvAP protein, theoretical modeling criteria for membrane proteins, and biophysical studies of the properties of native and mutated voltage-gated channels. Most of the latter experiments were performed on the Shaker K+ channel. Some of these data are difficult to relate directly to models of the KvAP channel's structure due to differences in the Shaker and KvAP sequences. We have dealt with this problem by developing new models of the structure and gating mechanism of the transmembrane and extracellular portions of the Shaker channel. These models are consistent with almost all of the biophysical data. In contrast, much of the experimental data are incompatible with the “paddle” model of gating that was proposed when the KvAP crystal structures were first published. The general folding pattern and gating mechanisms of our current models are similar to some of our earlier models of the Shaker channel. PMID:15454416

  6. Distance measurements reveal a common topology of prokaryotic voltage-gated ion channels in the lipid bilayer

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Jessica; Blunck, Rikard; Ge, Pinghua; Selvin, Paul R.; Bezanilla, Francisco; Papazian, Diane M.; Correa, Ana M.

    2006-01-01

    Voltage-dependent ion channels are fundamental to the physiology of excitable cells because they underlie the generation and propagation of the action potential and excitation–contraction coupling. To understand how ion channels work, it is important to determine their structures in different conformations in a membrane environment. The validity of the crystal structure for the prokaryotic K+ channel, KVAP, has been questioned based on discrepancies with biophysical data from functional eukaryotic channels, underlining the need for independent structural data under native conditions. We investigated the structural organization of two prokaryotic voltage-gated channels, NaChBac and KVAP, in liposomes by using luminescence resonance energy transfer. We describe here a transmembrane packing representation of the voltage sensor and pore domains of the prokaryotic Na channel, NaChBac. We find that NaChBac and KVAP share a common arrangement in which the structures of the Na and K selective pores and voltage-sensor domains are conserved. The packing arrangement of the voltage-sensing region as determined by luminescence resonance energy transfer differs significantly from that of the KVAP crystal structure, but resembles that of the eukaryotic KV1.2 crystal structure. However, the voltage-sensor domain in prokaryotic channels is closer to the pore domain than in the KV1.2 structure. Our results indicate that prokaryotic and eukaryotic channels that share similar functional properties have similar helix arrangements, with differences arising likely from the later introduction of additional structural elements. PMID:17043236

  7. Artificial Modulation of the Gating Behavior of a K+ Channel in a KvAP-DNA Chimera

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Andrew; Zocchi, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    We present experiments where the gating behavior of a voltage-gated ion channel is modulated by artificial ligand binding. We construct a channel-DNA chimera with the KvAP potassium channel reconstituted in an artificial membrane. The channel is functional and the single channel ion conductivity unperturbed by the presence of the DNA. However, the channel opening probability vs. bias voltage, i.e., the gating, can be shifted considerably by the electrostatic force between the charges on the DNA and the voltage sensing domain of the protein. Different hybridization states of the chimera DNA thus lead to different response curves of the channel. PMID:21526187

  8. Structural Dynamics of an Isolated-Voltage Sensor Domain in Lipid Bilayer

    PubMed Central

    Chakrapani, Sudha; Cuello, Luis G.; Cortes, Marien D.; Perozo, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Summary A strong interplay between the voltage-sensor domain (VSD) and the pore domain (PD) underlies voltage-gated channel functions. In a few voltage-sensitive proteins, the VSD has been shown to function without a canonical PD, although its structure and oligomeric state remain unknown. Here using EPR spectroscopy we show that the isolated-VSD of KvAP can remain monomeric in reconstituted bilayer and retain a transmembrane conformation. We find that water-filled crevices extend deep into the membrane around S3, a scaffold conducive to transport of proton/cations is intrinsic to the VSD. Differences in solvent accessibility in comparison to the full-length KvAP, allowed us to define an interacting footprint of the PD on the VSD. This interaction is centered around S1 and S2 and shows a rotation of 70–100° relative to Kv1.2-Kv2.1 chimera. Sequence-conservation patterns in Kv channels, Hv channels and voltage-sensitive phosphatases reveal several near-universal features suggesting a common molecular architecture for all VSDs. PMID:18334215

  9. Interface connections of a transmembrane voltage sensor.

    PubMed

    Freites, J Alfredo; Tobias, Douglas J; von Heijne, Gunnar; White, Stephen H

    2005-10-18

    Voltage-sensitive ion channels open and close in response to changes in transmembrane (TM) potential caused by the motion of the S4 voltage sensors. These sensors are alpha-helices that include four or more positively charged amino acids, most commonly arginine. The so-called paddle model, based on the high-resolution structure of the KvAP K+ channel [Jiang, et al. (2003) Nature 423, 33-41], posits that the S4 sensors move within the membrane bilayer in response to TM voltage changes. Direct exposure of S4 sensors to lipid is contrary to the classical expectation that the dielectric contrast between the membrane hydrocarbon core and water presents an insurmountable energetic penalty to burial of electric charges. Nevertheless, recent experiments have shown that a helix with the sequence of KvAP S4 can be inserted across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. To reconcile this result with the classical energetics argument, we have carried out a molecular dynamics simulation of an isolated TM S4 helix in a lipid bilayer. The simulation reveals a stabilizing hydrogen-bonded network of water and lipid phosphates around the arginines that reduces the effective thickness of the bilayer hydrocarbon core to approximately 10 A in the vicinity of the helix. It suggests that bilayer phospholipids can adapt locally to strongly perturbing protein elements, causing the phospholipids to become a structural extension of the protein.

  10. Role of terminal dipole charges in aggregation of α-helix pair in the voltage gated K(+) channel.

    PubMed

    Adhya, Lipika; Mapder, Tarunendu; Adhya, Samit

    2013-02-01

    The voltage sensor domain (VSD) of the potassium ion channel KvAP is comprised of four (S1-S4) α-helix proteins, which are encompassed by several charged residues. Apart from these charges, each peptide α-helix having two inherent equal and opposite terminal dipolar charges behave like a macrodipole. The activity of voltage gated ion channel is electrostatic, where all the charges (charged residues and dipolar terminal charges) interact with each other and with the transmembrane potential. There are evidences that the role of the charged residues dominate the stabilization of the conformation and the gating process of the ion channel, but the role of the terminal dipolar charges are never considered in such analysis. Here, using electrostatic theory, we have studied the role of the dipolar terminal charges in aggregation of the S3b-S4 helix pair of KvAP in the absence of any external field (V=0). A system attains stability, when its potential energy reaches minimum values. We have shown that the presence of terminal dipole charges (1) change the total potential energy of the charges on S3b-S4, affecting the stabilization of the α-helix pair within the bilayer lipid membrane and (2) the C- and the N-termini of the α-helices favor a different dielectric medium for enhanced stability. Thus, the dipolar terminal charges play a significant role in the aggregation of the two neighboring α-helices.

  11. Shape matters in protein mobility within membranes

    PubMed Central

    Quemeneur, François; Sigurdsson, Jon K.; Renner, Marianne; Atzberger, Paul J.; Bassereau, Patricia; Lacoste, David

    2014-01-01

    The lateral mobility of proteins within cell membranes is usually thought to be dependent on their size and modulated by local heterogeneities of the membrane. Experiments using single-particle tracking on reconstituted membranes demonstrate that protein diffusion is significantly influenced by the interplay of membrane curvature, membrane tension, and protein shape. We find that the curvature-coupled voltage-gated potassium channel (KvAP) undergoes a significant increase in protein mobility under tension, whereas the mobility of the curvature-neutral water channel aquaporin 0 (AQP0) is insensitive to it. Such observations are well explained in terms of an effective friction coefficient of the protein induced by the local membrane deformation. PMID:24706877

  12. Geographical and altitudinal distribution of Brachycephalus (Anura: Brachycephalidae) endemic to the Brazilian Atlantic Rainforest

    PubMed Central

    Firkowski, Carina R.; Belmonte-Lopes, Ricardo; Corrêa, Leandro; Ribeiro, Luiz F.; Morato, Sérgio A.A.; Antoniazzi-Jr., Reuber L.; Reinert, Bianca L.; Meyer, Andreas L.S.; Cini, Felipe A.; Pie, Marcio R.

    2016-01-01

    Mountains of the Brazilian Atlantic Forest can act as islands of cold and wet climate, leading to the isolation and speciation of species with low dispersal capacity, such as the toadlet species of the genus Brachycephalus. This genus is composed primarily by diurnal species, with miniaturized body sizes (<2.5 cm), inhabiting microhabitats in the leaf litter of montane forests. Still, little is known about the geographical distribution, altitudinal range, and ecological limits of most Brachycephalus species. In this study, we review the available data on the geographical and altitudinal distribution of Brachycephalus based on occurrence records compiled from literature and museums, both for the genus as a whole and separately for the three recently proposed groups of species (ephippium, didactylus, and pernix). The final ensemble dataset comprised 333 records, 120 localities, 28 described species, and six undescribed ones. Species were recorded in six relief units, the richest of which being the Serra do Mar, with 30 species. When the Serra do Mar is subdivided into three subunits, Northern, Central and Southern Serra do Mar, the number of species increase from north to the south, with records of six, nine, and 16 species, respectively. We were able to estimate the extent of occurrence of nearly half of the described species, and the resulting estimates indicate that many of them show remarkably small ranges, some of which less than 50 ha. Brachycephalus species are present from sea level to roughly 1,900 m a.s.l., with the highest richness being found between 751 and 1,000 m a.s.l. (21 spp.). The species with the broadest altitudinal range were B. didactylus (1,075 m) and Brachycephalus sp. 1 (1,035 m), both in the didactylus group, and B. ephippium (1,050 m), of the ephippium group. The broadest altitudinal amplitude for species of the pernix group was recorded for B. brunneus (535 m). The lowest altitudinal records for the pernix group were at 845 m a.s.l. in

  13. Structural characterization of the voltage sensor domain and voltage-gated K+- channel proteins vectorially-oriented within a single bilayer membrane at the solid/vapor and solid/liquid interfaces via neutron interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, S.; Dura, J.A.; Freites, J.A.; Tobias, D.J.; Blasie, J. K.

    2012-01-01

    exchangeable hydrogen throughout the profile structure of both the VSD itself and the VSD:POPC membrane. These two experimentally-determined water and exchangeable hydrogen distribution profiles are in good agreement with molecular dynamics simulations of the VSD protein vectorially-oriented within a fully hydrated POPC bilayer membrane, supporting the existence of the VSD’s water pore. This approach was extended to the full-length Kv-channel (KvAP) at solid/liquid interface, providing the separate profile structures of the KvAP protein and the POPC bilayer within the reconstituted KvAP:POPC membrane. PMID:22686684

  14. Molecular basis of the interaction between gating modifier spider toxins and the voltage sensor of voltage-gated ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Carus H. Y.; King, Glenn F.; Mobli, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-sensor domains (VSDs) are modular transmembrane domains of voltage-gated ion channels that respond to changes in membrane potential by undergoing conformational changes that are coupled to gating of the ion-conducting pore. Most spider-venom peptides function as gating modifiers by binding to the VSDs of voltage-gated channels and trapping them in a closed or open state. To understand the molecular basis underlying this mode of action, we used nuclear magnetic resonance to delineate the atomic details of the interaction between the VSD of the voltage-gated potassium channel KvAP and the spider-venom peptide VSTx1. Our data reveal that the toxin interacts with residues in an aqueous cleft formed between the extracellular S1-S2 and S3-S4 loops of the VSD whilst maintaining lipid interactions in the gaps formed between the S1-S4 and S2-S3 helices. The resulting network of interactions increases the energetic barrier to the conformational changes required for channel gating, and we propose that this is the mechanism by which gating modifier toxins inhibit voltage-gated ion channels. PMID:27677715

  15. Functional Reconstitution of a Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel in Giant Unilamellar Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Aimon, Sophie; Manzi, John; Schmidt, Daniel; Poveda Larrosa, Jose Antonio; Bassereau, Patricia; Toombes, Gilman E. S.

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels are key players in cellular excitability. Recent studies suggest that their behavior can depend strongly on the membrane lipid composition and physical state. In vivo studies of membrane/channel and channel/channel interactions are challenging as membrane properties are actively regulated in living cells, and are difficult to control in experimental settings. We developed a method to reconstitute functional voltage-gated ion channels into cell-sized Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs) in which membrane composition, tension and geometry can be controlled. First, a voltage-gated potassium channel, KvAP, was purified, fluorescently labeled and reconstituted into small proteoliposomes. Small proteoliposomes were then converted into GUVs via electroformation. GUVs could be formed using different lipid compositions and buffers containing low (5 mM) or near-physiological (100 mM) salt concentrations. Protein incorporation into GUVs was characterized with quantitative confocal microscopy, and the protein density of GUVs was comparable to the small proteoliposomes from which they were formed. Furthermore, patch-clamp measurements confirmed that the reconstituted channels retained potassium selectivity and voltage-gated activation. GUVs containing functional voltage-gated ion channels will allow the study of channel activity, distribution and diffusion while controlling membrane state, and should prove a powerful tool for understanding how the membrane modulates cellular excitability. PMID:21998666

  16. Transmembrane Helix Assembly by Max-Min Ant System Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Sujaree, Kanon; Kitjaruwankul, Sunan; Boonamnaj, Panisak; Supunyabut, Chirayut; Sompornpisut, Pornthep

    2015-12-01

    Because of the rapid progress in biochemical and structural studies of membrane proteins, considerable attention has been given on developing efficient computational methods for solving low-to-medium resolution structures using sparse structural data. In this study, we demonstrate a novel algorithm, max-min ant system (MMAS), designed to find an assembly of α-helical transmembrane proteins using a rigid helix arrangement guided by distance constraints. The new algorithm generates a large variety with finite number of orientations of transmembrane helix bundle and finds the solution that is matched with the provided distance constraints based on the behavior of ants to search for the shortest possible path between their nest and the food source. To demonstrate the efficiency of the novel search algorithm, MMAS is applied to determine the transmembrane packing of KcsA and MscL ion channels from a limited distance information extracted from the crystal structures, and the packing of KvAP voltage sensor domain using a set of 10 experimentally determined constraints, and the results are compared with those of two popular used stochastic methods, simulated annealing Monte Carlo method and genetic algorithm. PMID:26058409

  17. Computer simulations of transport through membranes: passive diffusion, pores, channels and transporters.

    PubMed

    Tieleman, D Peter

    2006-10-01

    A key function of biological membranes is to provide mechanisms for the controlled transport of ions, nutrients, metabolites, peptides and proteins between a cell and its environment. We are using computer simulations to study several processes involved in transport. In model membranes, the distribution of small molecules can be accurately calculated; we are making progress towards understanding the factors that determine the partitioning behaviour in the inhomogeneous lipid environment, with implications for drug distribution, membrane protein folding and the energetics of voltage gating. Lipid bilayers can be simulated at a scale that is sufficiently large to study significant defects, such as those caused by electroporation. Computer simulations of complex membrane proteins, such as potassium channels and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, can give detailed information about the atomistic dynamics that form the basis of ion transport, selectivity, conformational change and the molecular mechanism of ATP-driven transport. This is illustrated in the present review with recent simulation studies of the voltage-gated potassium channel KvAP and the ABC transporter BtuCD.

  18. A new species of Brachycephalus (Anura: Brachycephalidae) from Santa Catarina, southern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Bornschein, Marcos R.; Ribeiro, Luiz F.; Blackburn, David C.; Stanley, Edward L.

    2016-01-01

    A new species of Brachycephalus (Anura: Brachycephalidae) is described from the Atlantic Forest of northeastern state of Santa Catarina, southern Brazil. Nine specimens (eight adults and a juvenile) were collected from the leaf litter of montane forests 790–835 m above sea level (a.s.l.). The new species is a member of the pernix group by its bufoniform shape and the absence of dermal co-ossification and is distinguished from all its congeners by a combination of its general coloration (dorsal region of head, dorsum, legs, arms, and flanks light, brownish green to dark, olive green, with darker region in the middle of the dorsum and a white line along the vertebral column in most specimens) and by its smooth dorsum. The geographical distribution of the new species is highly reduced (extent of occurrence estimated as 25.04 ha, or possibly 34.37 ha). In addition, its habitat has experienced some level of degradation, raising concerns about the future conservation of the species. Preliminary density estimates suggest one calling individual every 3–4 m2 at 815–835 m a.s.l. and every 100 m2 at 790 m a.s.l. Together with the recently described B. boticario and B. fuscolineatus, the new species is among the southernmost species of Brachycephalus known to date. PMID:27812425

  19. Geomicrobiological exploration and characterization of a novel deep-sea hydrothermal system at the TOTO caldera in the Mariana Volcanic Arc.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Tatsunori; Takai, Ken; Suzuki, Yohey; Hirayama, Hisako; Konno, Uta; Tsunogai, Urumu; Horikoshi, Koki

    2006-01-01

    Novel hydrothermal activities accompanying effluent white smokers and elemental sulfur chimney structures at the north-east lava dome of the TOTO caldera depression in the Mariana Volcanic Arc have been explored and characterized by geochemical and microbiological surveys. White smoker hydrothermal fluids were observed in the potential hydrothermal activity centre of the field and represented the maximal temperature of 170 degrees C and the lowest pH of 1.6. The chimney structures, all consisting of elemental sulfur (sulfur chimney), were also unique to the TOTO caldera hydrothermal field. Microbial community structures in a sulfur chimney and its formation hydrothermal fluid with a high concentration of hydrogen sulfide (15 mM) have been investigated by culture-dependent and -independent analyses. 16S rRNA gene clone analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis revealed that epsilon-Proteobacteria dominated the microbial communities in the sulfur chimney structure and formed a dense microbial mat covering the sulfur chimney surface. Archaeal phylotypes were consistently minor components in the communities and related to the genera Thermococcus, Pyrodictium, Aeropyrum, and the uncultivated archaeal group of 'deep-sea hydrothermal vent euryarchaeotal group'. Cultivation analysis suggested that the chemolithoautotrophs might play a significant ecological role as primary producers utilizing gas and sulfur compounds provided from hydrothermal fluids.

  20. Microbial community structure of hydrothermal deposits from geochemically different vent fields along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flores, Gilberto E.; Campbell, James H.; Kirshtein, Julie D.; Meneghin, Jennifer; Podar, Mircea; Steinberg, Joshua I.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; Tivey, Margaret Kingston; Voytek, Mary A.; Yang, Zamin K.; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of local fluid geochemistry on microbial communities associated with active hydrothermal vent deposits, we examined the archaeal and bacterial communities of 12 samples collected from two very different vent fields: the basalt-hosted Lucky Strike (37°17'N, 32°16.3'W, depth 1600-1750m) and the ultramafic-hosted Rainbow (36°13'N, 33°54.1'W, depth 2270-2330m) vent fields along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). Using multiplexed barcoded pyrosequencing of the variable region 4 (V4) of the 16S rRNA genes, we show statistically significant differences between the archaeal and bacterial communities associated with the different vent fields. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays of the functional gene diagnostic for methanogenesis (mcrA), as well as geochemical modelling to predict pore fluid chemistries within the deposits, support the pyrosequencing observations. Collectively, these results show that the less reduced, hydrogen-poor fluids at Lucky Strike limit colonization by strict anaerobes such as methanogens, and allow for hyperthermophilic microaerophiles, like Aeropyrum. In contrast, the hydrogen-rich reducing vent fluids at the ultramafic-influenced Rainbow vent field support the prevalence of methanogens and other hydrogen-oxidizing thermophiles at this site. These results demonstrate that biogeographical patterns of hydrothermal vent microorganisms are shaped in part by large scale geological and geochemical processes.

  1. Microbial community structure of hydrothermal deposits from geochemically different vent fields along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

    PubMed

    Flores, Gilberto E; Campbell, James H; Kirshtein, Julie D; Meneghin, Jennifer; Podar, Mircea; Steinberg, Joshua I; Seewald, Jeffrey S; Tivey, Margaret Kingston; Voytek, Mary A; Yang, Zamin K; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise

    2011-08-01

    To evaluate the effects of local fluid geochemistry on microbial communities associated with active hydrothermal vent deposits, we examined the archaeal and bacterial communities of 12 samples collected from two very different vent fields: the basalt-hosted Lucky Strike (37°17'N, 32°16.3'W, depth 1600-1750 m) and the ultramafic-hosted Rainbow (36°13'N, 33°54.1'W, depth 2270-2330 m) vent fields along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). Using multiplexed barcoded pyrosequencing of the variable region 4 (V4) of the 16S rRNA genes, we show statistically significant differences between the archaeal and bacterial communities associated with the different vent fields. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays of the functional gene diagnostic for methanogenesis (mcrA), as well as geochemical modelling to predict pore fluid chemistries within the deposits, support the pyrosequencing observations. Collectively, these results show that the less reduced, hydrogen-poor fluids at Lucky Strike limit colonization by strict anaerobes such as methanogens, and allow for hyperthermophilic microaerophiles, like Aeropyrum. In contrast, the hydrogen-rich reducing vent fluids at the ultramafic-influenced Rainbow vent field support the prevalence of methanogens and other hydrogen-oxidizing thermophiles at this site. These results demonstrate that biogeographical patterns of hydrothermal vent microorganisms are shaped in part by large scale geological and geochemical processes.

  2. Microbial community structure of hydrothermal deposits from geochemically different vent fields along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, Gilberto E; Campbell, James H; Kirshtein, Julie D; Meneghin, Jennifer; Podar, Mircea; Steinberg, Joshua; Seewald, Jeffrey S; Tivey, Margaret Kingston; Voytek, Mary A; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise; Yang, Zamin Koo

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of local fluid geochemistry on microbial communities associated with active hydrothermal vent deposits, we examined the archaeal and bacterial communities of 12 samples collected from two very different vent fields: the basalt-hosted Lucky Strike (37 17'N, 32 16.3'W, depth 1600-1750 m) and the ultramafic-hosted Rainbow (36 13'N, 33 54.1'W, depth 2270-2330 m) vent fields along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). Using multiplexed barcoded pyrosequencing of the variable region 4 (V4) of the 16S rRNA genes, we show statistically significant differences between the archaeal and bacterial communities associated with the different vent fields. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays of the functional gene diagnostic for methanogenesis (mcrA), as well as geochemical modelling to predict pore fluid chemistries within the deposits, support the pyrosequencing observations. Collectively, these results show that the less reduced, hydrogen-poor fluids at Lucky Strike limit colonization by strict anaerobes such as methanogens, and allow for hyperthermophilic microaerophiles, like Aeropyrum. In contrast, the hydrogen-rich reducing vent fluids at the ultramafic-influenced Rainbow vent field support the prevalence of methanogens and other hydrogen-oxidizing thermophiles at this site. These results demonstrate that biogeographical patterns of hydrothermal vent microorganisms are shaped in part by large scale geological and geochemical processes.

  3. Sediment microbial communities in Great Boiling Spring are controlled by temperature and distinct from water communities.

    PubMed

    Cole, Jessica K; Peacock, Joseph P; Dodsworth, Jeremy A; Williams, Amanda J; Thompson, Daniel B; Dong, Hailiang; Wu, Geng; Hedlund, Brian P

    2013-04-01

    Great Boiling Spring is a large, circumneutral, geothermal spring in the US Great Basin. Twelve samples were collected from water and four different sediment sites on four different dates. Microbial community composition and diversity were assessed by PCR amplification of a portion of the small subunit rRNA gene using a universal primer set followed by pyrosequencing of the V8 region. Analysis of 164 178 quality-filtered pyrotags clearly distinguished sediment and water microbial communities. Water communities were extremely uneven and dominated by the bacterium Thermocrinis. Sediment microbial communities grouped according to temperature and sampling location, with a strong, negative, linear relationship between temperature and richness at all taxonomic levels. Two sediment locations, Site A (87-80 °C) and Site B (79 °C), were predominantly composed of single phylotypes of the bacterial lineage GAL35 (\\[pmacr]=36.1%), Aeropyrum (\\[pmacr]=16.6%), the archaeal lineage pSL4 (\\[pmacr]=15.9%), the archaeal lineage NAG1 (\\[pmacr]=10.6%) and Thermocrinis (\\[pmacr]=7.6%). The ammonia-oxidizing archaeon 'Candidatus Nitrosocaldus' was relatively abundant in all sediment samples <82 °C (\\[pmacr]=9.51%), delineating the upper temperature limit for chemolithotrophic ammonia oxidation in this spring. This study underscores the distinctness of water and sediment communities in GBS and the importance of temperature in driving microbial diversity, composition and, ultimately, the functioning of biogeochemical cycles.

  4. The activated state of a sodium channel voltage sensor in a membrane environment

    PubMed Central

    Chakrapani, Sudha; Sompornpisut, Pornthep; Intharathep, Pathumwadee; Roux, Benoît; Perozo, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Direct structural insights on the fundamental mechanisms of permeation, selectivity, and gating remain unavailable for the Na+ and Ca2+ channel families. Here, we report the spectroscopic structural characterization of the isolated Voltage-Sensor Domain (VSD) of the prokaryotic Na+ channel NaChBac in a lipid bilayer. Site-directed spin-labeling and EPR spectroscopy were carried out for 118 mutants covering all of the VSD. EPR environmental data were used to unambiguously assign the secondary structure elements, define membrane insertion limits, and evaluate the activated conformation of the isolated-VSD in the membrane using restrain-driven molecular dynamics simulations. The overall three-dimensional fold of the NaChBac-VSD closely mirrors those seen in KvAP, Kv1.2, Kv1.2-2.1 chimera, and MlotiK1. However, in comparison to the membrane-embedded KvAP-VSD, the structural dynamics of the NaChBac-VSD reveals a much tighter helix packing, with subtle differences in the local environment of the gating charges and their interaction with the rest of the protein. Using cell complementation assays we show that the NaChBac-VSD can provide a conduit to the transport of ions in the resting or “down” conformation, a feature consistent with our EPR water accessibility measurements in the activated or “up” conformation. These results suggest that the overall architecture of VSD’s is remarkably conserved among K+ and Na+ channels and that pathways for gating-pore currents may be intrinsic to most voltage-sensors. Cell complementation assays also provide information about the putative location of the gating charges in the “down/resting” state and hence a glimpse of the extent of conformational changes during activation. PMID:20207950

  5. A Limited 4 Å Radial Displacement of the S4-S5 Linker Is Sufficient for Internal Gate Closing in Kv Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Faure, Élise; Starek, Greg; McGuire, Hugo; Bernèche, Simon; Blunck, Rikard

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels are responsible for the generation of action potentials in our nervous system. Conformational rearrangements in their voltage sensor domains in response to changes of the membrane potential control pore opening and thus ion conduction. Crystal structures of the open channel in combination with a wealth of biophysical data and molecular dynamics simulations led to a consensus on the voltage sensor movement. However, the coupling between voltage sensor movement and pore opening, the electromechanical coupling, occurs at the cytosolic face of the channel, from where no structural information is available yet. In particular, the question how far the cytosolic pore gate has to close to prevent ion conduction remains controversial. In cells, spectroscopic methods are hindered because labeling of internal sites remains difficult, whereas liposomes or detergent solutions containing purified ion channels lack voltage control. Here, to overcome these problems, we controlled the state of the channel by varying the lipid environment. This way, we directly measured the position of the S4-S5 linker in both the open and the closed state of a prokaryotic Kv channel (KvAP) in a lipid environment using Lanthanide-based resonance energy transfer. We were able to reconstruct the movement of the covalent link between the voltage sensor and the pore domain and used this information as restraints for molecular dynamics simulations of the closed state structure. We found that a small decrease of the pore radius of about 3–4 Å is sufficient to prevent ion permeation through the pore. PMID:23019337

  6. Down-state model of the voltage-sensing domain of a potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Schow, Eric V; Freites, J Alfredo; Gogna, Karun; White, Stephen H; Tobias, Douglas J

    2010-06-16

    Voltage-sensing domains (VSDs) of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels undergo a series of conformational changes upon membrane depolarization, from a down state when the channel is at rest to an up state, all of which lead to the opening of the channel pore. The crystal structures reported to date reveal the pore in an open state and the VSDs in an up state. To gain insights into the structure of the down state, we used a set of experiment-based restraints to generate a model of the down state of the KvAP VSD using molecular-dynamics simulations of the VSD in a lipid bilayer in excess water. The equilibrated VSD configuration is consistent with the biotin-avidin accessibility and internal salt-bridge data used to generate it, and with additional biotin-avidin accessibility data. In the model, both the S3b and S4 segments are displaced approximately 10 A toward the intracellular side with respect to the up-state configuration, but they do not move as a rigid body. Arginine side chains that carry the majority of the gating charge also make large excursions between the up and down states. In both states, arginines interact with water and participate in salt bridges with acidic residues and lipid phosphate groups. An important feature that emerges from the down-state model is that the N-terminal half of the S4 segment adopts a 3(10)-helical conformation, which appears to be necessary to satisfy a complex salt-bridge network.

  7. Mobility in geometrically confined membranes

    PubMed Central

    Domanov, Yegor A.; Aimon, Sophie; Toombes, Gilman E. S.; Renner, Marianne; Quemeneur, François; Triller, Antoine; Turner, Matthew S.; Bassereau, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Lipid and protein lateral mobility is essential for biological function. Our theoretical understanding of this mobility can be traced to the seminal work of Saffman and Delbrück, who predicted a logarithmic dependence of the protein diffusion coefficient (i) on the inverse of the size of the protein and (ii) on the “membrane size” for membranes of finite size [Saffman P, Delbrück M (1975) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 72:3111—3113]. Although the experimental proof of the first prediction is a matter of debate, the second has not previously been thought to be experimentally accessible. Here, we construct just such a geometrically confined membrane by forming lipid bilayer nanotubes of controlled radii connected to giant liposomes. We followed the diffusion of individual molecules in the tubular membrane using single particle tracking of quantum dots coupled to lipids or voltage-gated potassium channels KvAP, while changing the membrane tube radius from approximately 250 to 10 nm. We found that both lipid and protein diffusion was slower in tubular membranes with smaller radii. The protein diffusion coefficient decreased as much as 5-fold compared to diffusion on the effectively flat membrane of the giant liposomes. Both lipid and protein diffusion data are consistent with the predictions of a hydrodynamic theory that extends the work of Saffman and Delbrück to cylindrical geometries. This study therefore provides strong experimental support for the ubiquitous Saffman–Delbrück theory and elucidates the role of membrane geometry and size in regulating lateral diffusion. PMID:21768336

  8. Combined effect of carbon dioxide and sulfur on vapor-liquid partitioning of metals in hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokh, Maria A.; Lopez, Mathieu; Gisquet, Pascal; Lanzanova, Aurélie; Candaudap, Frédéric; Besson, Philippe; Pokrovski, Gleb S.

    2016-08-01

    Although CO2 is a ubiquitous volatile in geological fluids typically ranging from a few to more than 50 wt%, its effect on metal vapor-liquid fractionation during fluid boiling and immiscibility phenomena in the Earth's crust remains virtually unknown. Here we conducted first experiments to quantify the influence of CO2 on the partition of different metals in model water + salt + sulfur + CO2 systems at 350 °C and CO2 pressures up to 100 bar, which are typical conditions of formation of many hydrothermal ore deposits. In addition, we performed in situ Raman spectroscopy measurements on these two-phase systems, to determine sulfur and carbon speciation in the liquid and vapor phases. Results show that, in S-free systems and across a CO2 concentration range of 0-50 wt% in the vapor phase, the absolute vapor-liquid partitioning coefficients of metals (Kvap/liq = Cvap/Cliq, where C is the mass concentration of the metal in the corresponding vapor and liquid phase) are in the range 10-6-10-5 for Mo; 10-4-10-3 for Na, K, Cu, Fe, Zn, Au; 10-3-10-2 for Si; and 10-4-10-1 for Pt. With increasing CO2 from 0 to 50 wt%, Kvap/liq values decrease for Fe, Cu and Si by less than one order of magnitude, remain constant within errors (±0.2 log unit) for Na, K and Zn, and increase by 0.5 and 2 orders of magnitude, respectively for Au and Pt. The negative effect of CO2 on the partitioning of some metals is due to weakening of hydration of chloride complexes of some metals (Cu, Fe) in the vapor phase and/or salting-in effects in the liquid phase (Si), whereas both phenomena are negligible for complexes of other metals (Na, K, Zn, Mo). The only exception is Pt (and in a lesser extent Au), which partitions significantly more to the vapor of S-free systems in the presence of CO2, likely due to formation of volatile carbonyl (CO) complexes. In the S-bearing system, with H2S content of 0.1-1.0 wt% in the vapor, Kvap/liq values of Cu, Fe, Mo, and Au are in the range 0.01-0.1, those of Pt 0

  9. Sediment microbial communities in Great Boiling Spring are controlled by temperature and distinct from water communities

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Jessica K; Peacock, Joseph P; Dodsworth, Jeremy A; Williams, Amanda J; Thompson, Daniel B; Dong, Hailiang; Wu, Geng; Hedlund, Brian P

    2013-01-01

    Great Boiling Spring is a large, circumneutral, geothermal spring in the US Great Basin. Twelve samples were collected from water and four different sediment sites on four different dates. Microbial community composition and diversity were assessed by PCR amplification of a portion of the small subunit rRNA gene using a universal primer set followed by pyrosequencing of the V8 region. Analysis of 164 178 quality-filtered pyrotags clearly distinguished sediment and water microbial communities. Water communities were extremely uneven and dominated by the bacterium Thermocrinis. Sediment microbial communities grouped according to temperature and sampling location, with a strong, negative, linear relationship between temperature and richness at all taxonomic levels. Two sediment locations, Site A (87–80 °C) and Site B (79 °C), were predominantly composed of single phylotypes of the bacterial lineage GAL35 (p̂=36.1%), Aeropyrum (p̂=16.6%), the archaeal lineage pSL4 (p̂=15.9%), the archaeal lineage NAG1 (p̂=10.6%) and Thermocrinis (p̂=7.6%). The ammonia-oxidizing archaeon ‘Candidatus Nitrosocaldus' was relatively abundant in all sediment samples <82 °C (p̂=9.51%), delineating the upper temperature limit for chemolithotrophic ammonia oxidation in this spring. This study underscores the distinctness of water and sediment communities in GBS and the importance of temperature in driving microbial diversity, composition and, ultimately, the functioning of biogeochemical cycles. PMID:23235293

  10. Ranolazine inhibition of hERG potassium channels: Drug–pore interactions and reduced potency against inactivation mutants

    PubMed Central

    Du, Chunyun; Zhang, Yihong; El Harchi, Aziza; Dempsey, Christopher E.; Hancox, Jules C.

    2014-01-01

    The antianginal drug ranolazine, which combines inhibitory actions on rapid and sustained sodium currents with inhibition of the hERG/IKr potassium channel, shows promise as an antiarrhythmic agent. This study investigated the structural basis of hERG block by ranolazine, with lidocaine used as a low potency, structurally similar comparator. Recordings of hERG current (IhERG) were made from cell lines expressing wild-type (WT) or mutant hERG channels. Docking simulations were performed using homology models built on MthK and KvAP templates. In conventional voltage clamp, ranolazine inhibited IhERG with an IC50 of 8.03 μM; peak IhERG during ventricular action potential clamp was inhibited ~ 62% at 10 μM. The IC50 values for ranolazine inhibition of the S620T inactivation deficient and N588K attenuated inactivation mutants were respectively ~ 73-fold and ~ 15-fold that for WT IhERG. Mutations near the bottom of the selectivity filter (V625A, S624A, T623A) exhibited IC50s between ~ 8 and 19-fold that for WT IhERG, whilst the Y652A and F656A S6 mutations had IC50s ~ 22-fold and 53-fold WT controls. Low potency lidocaine was comparatively insensitive to both pore helix and S6 mutations, but was sensitive to direction of K+ flux and particularly to loss of inactivation, with an IC50 for S620T-hERG ~ 49-fold that for WT IhERG. Docking simulations indicated that the larger size of ranolazine gives it potential for a greater range of interactions with hERG pore side chains compared to lidocaine, in particular enabling interaction of its two aromatic groups with side chains of both Y652 and F656. The N588K mutation is responsible for the SQT1 variant of short QT syndrome and our data suggest that ranolazine is unlikely to be effective against IKr/hERG in SQT1 patients. PMID:24877995

  11. bSUM: A bead-supported unilamellar membrane system facilitating unidirectional insertion of membrane proteins into giant vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hui; Lee, Sungsoo; Llaguno, Marc C.

    2016-01-01

    Fused or giant vesicles, planar lipid bilayers, a droplet membrane system, and planar-supported membranes have been developed to incorporate membrane proteins for the electrical and biophysical analysis of such proteins or the bilayer properties. However, it remains difficult to incorporate membrane proteins, including ion channels, into reconstituted membrane systems that allow easy control of operational dimensions, incorporation orientation of the membrane proteins, and lipid composition of membranes. Here, using a newly developed chemical engineering procedure, we report on a bead-supported unilamellar membrane (bSUM) system that allows good control over membrane dimension, protein orientation, and lipid composition. Our new system uses specific ligands to facilitate the unidirectional incorporation of membrane proteins into lipid bilayers. Cryo–electron microscopic imaging demonstrates the unilamellar nature of the bSUMs. Electrical recordings from voltage-gated ion channels in bSUMs of varying diameters demonstrate the versatility of the new system. Using KvAP as a model system, we show that compared with other in vitro membrane systems, the bSUMs have the following advantages: (a) a major fraction of channels are orientated in a controlled way; (b) the channels mediate the formation of the lipid bilayer; (c) there is one and only one bilayer membrane on each bead; (d) the lipid composition can be controlled and the bSUM size is also under experimental control over a range of 0.2–20 µm; (e) the channel activity can be recorded by patch clamp using a planar electrode; and (f) the voltage-clamp speed (0.2–0.5 ms) of the bSUM on a planar electrode is fast, making it suitable to study ion channels with fast gating kinetics. Our observations suggest that the chemically engineered bSUMs afford a novel platform for studying lipid–protein interactions in membranes of varying lipid composition and may be useful for other applications, such as targeted

  12. Rheology of biological macromolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariyaratne, Amila Dinesh

    Proteins have interesting mechanical properties in addition to the remarkable functionality. For example, Guanylate kinase is an enzyme that catalyzes Guano- sine monophosphate (GMP) to Guanosine diphosphate (GDP) conversion and this enzyme is approximately 5 nm in size. A gold nano particle of similar size shows linear elasticity for strains up to ˜ 0.1% and shows plastic deformation beyond that, whereas the enzyme Guanylate kinase can have strains up to 1 % with reversible deformation. Our experiments show many different regimes of the mechanical response before the plastic deformation of these proteins. In this dissertation, I study the materials properties of two classes of proteins, an ion channel protein and a transferase, which is a globular protein. The experimental techniques to study the materials properties of these proteins were uniquely developed at the Zocchi lab. Therefore, we were able to observe previously unknown characteristics of these folded proteins. The mechanical properties of the voltage gated potassium channel KvAP was studied by applying AC depolarizing voltages. This technique gave new information about the system that was not seen in the previous studies. These previous experiments were based on applying DC depolarizing voltage steps across the membrane to study the ionic current. By monitoring the ionic current at different depolarizing voltage steps, the DC gating process of the channel could be under- stood. We probed the channel using AC depolarizing signals instead of DC pulses and the ionic current revealed new behaviors, which cannot be predicted with the DC response. We found that the conformational motion of the voltage sensing domain of the ion channel shows internal dissipation. Further, a new non linearity in the dissipation parameter was found in which the dissipation parameter increased with the shear rate of the applied force. Previous studies at the Zocchi lab used a nano rheology experiment on the protein Guanylate

  13. A systematic revision of Baconia Lewis (Coleoptera, Histeridae, Exosternini)

    PubMed Central

    Caterino, Michael S.; Tishechkin, Alexey K.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Here we present a complete revision of the species of Baconia. Up until now there have been 27 species assigned to the genus (Mazur, 2011), in two subgenera (Binhister Cooman and Baconia s. str.), with species in the Neotropical, Nearctic, Palaearctic, and Oriental regions. We recognize all these species as valid and correctly assigned to the genus, and redescribe all of them. We synonymize Binhister, previously used for a polyphyletic assemblage of species with varied relationships in the genus. We move four species into Baconia from other genera, and describe 85 species as new, bringing the total for the genus to 116 species. We divide these into 12 informal species groups, leaving 13 species unplaced to group. We present keys and diagnoses for all species, as well as habitus photos and illustrations of male genitalia for nearly all. The genus now contains the following species and species groups: Baconia loricata group [Baconia loricata Lewis, 1885, B. patula Lewis, 1885, Baconia gounellei (Marseul, 1887a), Baconia jubaris (Lewis, 1901), Baconia festiva (Lewis, 1891), Baconia foliosoma sp. n., Baconia sapphirina sp. n., Baconia furtiva sp. n., Baconia pernix sp. n., Baconia applanatis sp. n., Baconia disciformis sp. n., Baconia nebulosa sp. n., Baconia brunnea sp. n.], Baconia godmani group [Baconia godmani (Lewis, 1888), Baconia venusta (J. E. LeConte, 1845), Baconia riehli (Marseul, 1862), comb. n., Baconia scintillans sp. n., Baconia isthmia sp. n., Baconia rossi sp. n., Baconia navarretei sp. n., Baconia maculata sp. n., Baconia deliberata sp. n., Baconia excelsa sp. n., Baconia violacea (Marseul, 1853), Baconia varicolor (Marseul, 1887b), Baconia dives (Marseul, 1862), Baconia eximia (Lewis, 1888), Baconia splendida sp. n., Baconia jacinta sp. n., Baconia prasina sp. n., Baconia opulenta sp. n., Baconia illustris (Lewis, 1900), Baconia choaspites (Lewis, 1901), Baconia lewisi Mazur, 1984], Baconia salobrus group [Baconia salobrus (Marseul, 1887b

  14. A systematic revision of Baconia Lewis (Coleoptera, Histeridae, Exosternini)

    PubMed Central

    Caterino, Michael S.; Tishechkin, Alexey K.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Here we present a complete revision of the species of Baconia. Up until now there have been 27 species assigned to the genus (Mazur, 2011), in two subgenera (Binhister Cooman and Baconia s. str.), with species in the Neotropical, Nearctic, Palaearctic, and Oriental regions. We recognize all these species as valid and correctly assigned to the genus, and redescribe all of them. We synonymize Binhister, previously used for a polyphyletic assemblage of species with varied relationships in the genus. We move four species into Baconia from other genera, and describe 85 species as new, bringing the total for the genus to 116 species. We divide these into 12 informal species groups, leaving 13 species unplaced to group. We present keys and diagnoses for all species, as well as habitus photos and illustrations of male genitalia for nearly all. The genus now contains the following species and species groups: Baconia loricata group [Baconia loricata Lewis, 1885, B. patula Lewis, 1885, Baconia gounellei (Marseul, 1887a), Baconia jubaris (Lewis, 1901), Baconia festiva (Lewis, 1891), Baconia foliosoma sp. n., Baconia sapphirina sp. n., Baconia furtiva sp. n., Baconia pernix sp. n., Baconia applanatis sp. n., Baconia disciformis sp. n., Baconia nebulosa sp. n., Baconia brunnea sp. n.], Baconia godmani group [Baconia godmani (Lewis, 1888), Baconia venusta (J. E. LeConte, 1845), Baconia riehli (Marseul, 1862), comb. n., Baconia scintillans sp. n., Baconia isthmia sp. n., Baconia rossi sp. n., Baconia navarretei sp. n., Baconia maculata sp. n., Baconia deliberata sp. n., Baconia excelsa sp. n., Baconia violacea (Marseul, 1853), Baconia varicolor (Marseul, 1887b), Baconia dives (Marseul, 1862), Baconia eximia (Lewis, 1888), Baconia splendida sp. n., Baconia jacinta sp. n., Baconia prasina sp. n., Baconia opulenta sp. n., Baconia illustris (Lewis, 1900), Baconia choaspites (Lewis, 1901), Baconia lewisi Mazur, 1984], Baconia salobrus group [Baconia salobrus (Marseul, 1887b