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Sample records for aeropyrum pernix kvap

  1. Perchlorate and chlorate reduction by the Crenarchaeon Aeropyrum pernix and two thermophilic Firmicutes.

    PubMed

    Liebensteiner, Martin G; Pinkse, Martijn W H; Nijsse, Bart; Verhaert, Peter D E M; Tsesmetzis, Nicolas; Stams, Alfons J M; Lomans, Bart P

    2015-12-01

    This study reports the ability of one hyperthermophilic and two thermophilic microorganisms to grow anaerobically by the reduction of chlorate and perchlorate. Physiological, genomic and proteome analyses suggest that the Crenarchaeon Aeropyrum pernix reduces perchlorate with a periplasmic enzyme related to nitrate reductases, but that it lacks a functional chlorite-disproportionating enzyme (Cld) to complete the pathway. Aeropyrum pernix, previously described as a strictly aerobic microorganism, seems to rely on the chemical reactivity of reduced sulfur compounds with chlorite, a mechanism previously reported for perchlorate-reducing Archaeoglobus fulgidus. The chemical oxidation of thiosulfate (in excessive amounts present in the medium) and the reduction of chlorite result in the release of sulfate and chloride, which are the products of a biotic-abiotic perchlorate reduction pathway in Ae. pernix. The apparent absence of Cld in two other perchlorate-reducing microorganisms, Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans and Moorella glycerini strain NMP, and their dependence on sulfide for perchlorate reduction is consistent with the observations made on Ar. fulgidus. Our findings suggest that microbial perchlorate reduction at high temperature differs notably from the physiology of perchlorate- and chlorate-reducing mesophiles and that it is characterized by the lack of a chlorite dismutase and is enabled by a combination of biotic and abiotic reactions.

  2. Analysis of synonymous codon usage in Aeropyrum pernix K1 and other Crenarchaeota microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Peng; Sun, Xiao; Lu, Zuhong

    2007-03-01

    In this study, a comparative analysis of the codon usage bias was performed in Aeropyrum pernix K1 and two other phylogenetically related Crenarchaeota microorganisms (i.e., Pyrobaculum aerophilum str. IM2 and Sulfolobus acidocaldarius DSM 639). The results indicated that the synonymous codon usage in A. pernix K1 was less biased, which was highly correlated with the GC(3S) value. The codon usage patterns were phylogenetically conserved among these Crenarchaeota microorganisms. Comparatively, it is the species function rather than the gene function that determines their gene codon usage patterns. A. pernix K1, P. aerophilum str. IM2, and S. acidocaldarius DSM 639 live in differently extreme conditions. It is presumed that the living environment played an important role in determining the codon usage pattern of these microorganisms. Besides, there was no strain-specific codon usage among these microorganisms. The extent of codon bias in A. pernix K1 and S. acidocaldarius DSM 639 were highly correlated with the gene expression level, but no such association was detected in P. aerophilum str. IM2 genomes.

  3. Bending Elasticity Modulus of Giant Vesicles Composed of Aeropyrum Pernix K1 Archaeal Lipid

    PubMed Central

    Genova, Julia; Poklar Ulrih, Nataša; Kralj-Iglič, Veronika; Iglič, Aleš; Bivas, Isak

    2015-01-01

    Thermally induced shape fluctuations were used to study elastic properties of giant vesicles composed of archaeal lipids C25,25-archetidyl (glucosyl) inositol and C25,25-archetidylinositol isolated from lyophilised Aeropyrum pernix K1 cells. Giant vesicles were created by electroformation in pure water environment. Stroboscopic illumination using a xenon flash lamp was implemented to remove the blur effect due to the finite integration time of the camera and to obtain an instant picture of the fluctuating vesicle shape. The mean weighted value of the bending elasticity modulus kc of the archaeal membrane determined from the measurements meeting the entire set of qualification criteria was (1.89 ± 0.18) × 10−19 J, which is similar to the values obtained for a membrane composed of the eukaryotic phospholipids SOPC (1.88 ± 0.17) × 10−19 J and POPC (2.00 ± 0.21) × 10−19 J. We conclude that membranes composed of archaeal lipids isolated from Aeropyrum pernix K1 cells have similar elastic properties as membranes composed of eukaryotic lipids. This fact, together with the importance of the elastic properties for the normal circulation through blood system, provides further evidence in favor of expectations that archaeal lipids could be appropriate for the design of drug delivery systems. PMID:25821933

  4. Characterization of a Novel Thermostable O-Acetylserine Sulfhydrylase from Aeropyrum pernix K1

    PubMed Central

    Mino, Koshiki; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko

    2003-01-01

    An O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (OASS) from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1, which shares the pyridoxal 5′-phosphate binding motif with both OASS and cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), was cloned and expressed by using Escherichia coli Rosetta(DE3). The purified protein was a dimer and contained pyridoxal 5′-phosphate. It was shown to be an enzyme with CBS activity as well as OASS activity in vitro. The enzyme retained 90% of its activity after a 6-h incubation at 100°C. In the O-acetyl-l-serine sulfhydrylation reaction, it had a pH optimum of 6.7, apparent Km values for O-acetyl-l-serine and sulfide of 28 and below 0.2 mM, respectively, and a rate constant of 202 s−1. In the l-cystathionine synthetic reaction, it showed a broad pH optimum in the range of 8.1 to 8.8, apparent Km values for l-serine and l-homocysteine of 8 and 0.51 mM, respectively, and a rate constant of 0.7 s−1. A. pernix OASS has a high activity in the l-cysteine desulfurization reaction, which produces sulfide and S-(2,3-hydroxy-4-thiobutyl)-l-cysteine from l-cysteine and dithiothreitol. PMID:12644499

  5. Role of F225 in O-phosphoserine sulfhydrylase from Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Emi; Kunimoto, Kohei; Kawai, Yoshito; Kataoka, Misumi; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko; Nakamura, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    O-Phosphoserine sulfhydrylase (OPSS) synthesizes cysteine from O-phospho-L-serine (OPS) and sulfide. We have determined the three-dimensional structures of OPSS from hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1 (ApOPSS) in complex with aminoacrylate intermediate (AA) formed from pyridoxal 5'-phosphate with OPS or in complex with cysteine and compared them with that of ApOPSS. We found an orientational change of F225 at the active-site entrance and constructed an F225A mutant to examine its activities and AA stability and clarify the role of F225 in ApOPSS. The OPS and O-acetyl-L-serine (OAS) sulfhydrylase activities of the F225A mutant decreased by 4.2- and 15-fold compared to those of the wild-type (wt) ApOPSS, respectively. The ability of OPS and OAS to form AA also decreased by 12- and 27-fold, respectively. AA was less stable in the F225A mutant than in the wt ApOPSS. Simulated docking showed that leaving groups, such as phosphate and acetate, were oriented to the inside of the active site in the F225A mutant, whereas they were oriented to the entrance in the wt ApOPSS. These results suggest that F225 in ApOPSS plays important roles in maintaining the hydrophobic environment of AA from solvent water and in controlling the orientation of leaving groups.

  6. A novel O-phospho-L-serine sulfhydrylation reaction catalyzed by O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase from Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    PubMed

    Mino, Koshiki; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko

    2003-09-11

    O-Acetylserine sulfhydrylase (OASS), a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme, catalyzes the synthesis of L-cysteine from O-acetyl-L-serine and sulfide. O-Acetyl-L-serine is labile at high temperatures at which hyperthermophilic archaea live. Herein, a study of the substrate specificity of OASS from Aeropyrum pernix K1 with respect to O-acetyl-L-serine in L-cysteine synthesis is described. L-Azaserine, 3-chloro-L-alanine, and O-phospho-L-serine reacted with A. pernix OASS in a PLP-dependent manner. Sulfhydrylation reactions using these substrates reached a maximum in the pH range between 7.3 and 8.1. L-Azaserine and O-phospho-L-serine were found to be heat-stable substrates. The presence of FeCl3 or NiCl2 strongly inhibited the O-acetyl-L-serine sulfhydrylation reaction, whereas the O-phospho-L-serine sulfhydrylation reaction was only slightly inhibited. Kinetic analyses revealed that the O-phospho-L-serine sulfhydrylation reaction as well as the O-acetyl-L-serine sulfhydrylation reaction for A. pernix OASS followed a ping-pong bi-bi mechanism. In the case of the O-phospho-L-serine sulfhydrylation reaction at 85 degrees C, the K(m) values for O-phospho-L-serine and sulfide, and the rate constant were 250 mM, 12.5 mM, and 14000 s(-1), respectively. The reactivity of O-phospho-L-serine in the L-cysteine synthetic reaction provides a key for understanding the biosynthesis of L-cysteine by hyperthermophilic archaea. This is the first report of an enzyme that catalyzes the O-phospho-L-serine sulfhydrylation reaction.

  7. Thermostability and reactivity in organic solvent of O-phospho-L-serine sulfhydrylase from hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takashi; Asai, Shinji; Nakata, Kaori; Kunimoto, Kohei; Oguri, Masateru; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    O-phospho-l-serine sulfhydrylase (OPSS) from archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1 is able to synthesize l-cysteine even at 80 °C. In this article, we compared thermal stability and reactivity in organic solvent of OPSS with those of O-acetyl-l-serine sulfhydrylase B (OASS-B) from Escherichia coli. As a result, the thermostability of OPSS was much higher than that of OASS-B. Moreover, the activity of OPSS increased in the reaction mixture containing the organic solvent, such as N, N'-dimethyl formamide and 1,4-dioxane, whereas that of OASS-B gradually decreased as the content of organic solvent increased. From the crystal structural analysis, the intramolecular electrostatic interactions of N-terminal domain in OPSS seemed to be correlated with the tolerance of OPSS to high temperature and organic solvent. These results indicate that OPSS is more superior to OASS-B for the industrial production of l-cysteine and unnatural amino acids that are useful pharmaceuticals in the presence of organic solvent.

  8. Structural analysis of the substrate recognition mechanism in O-phosphoserine sulfhydrylase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takashi; Kawai, Yoshito; Kunimoto, Kohei; Iwasaki, Yuka; Nishii, Kaoru; Kataoka, Misumi; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko

    2012-09-07

    L-Cysteine is synthesized from O-acetyl-L-serine (OAS) and sulfide by O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (OASS; EC 2.5.1.47) in plants and bacteria. O-phosphoserine sulfhydrylase (OPSS; EC 2.5.1.65) is a novel enzyme from the hyperthermophilic aerobic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1 (2003). OPSS can use OAS or O-phospho-L-serine (OPS) to synthesize L-cysteine. To elucidate the mechanism of the substrate specificity of OPSS, we analyzed three-dimensional structures of the active site of the enzyme. The active-site lysine (K127) of OPSS forms an internal Schiff base with pyridoxal 5'-phosphate. Therefore, crystals of the complexes formed by the K127A mutant with the external Schiff base of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate with either OPS or OAS were prepared and examined by X-ray diffraction analysis. In contrast to that observed for OASS, no significant difference was seen in the overall structure between the free and complexed forms of OPSS. The side chains of T152, S153, and Q224 interacted with the carboxylate of the substrates, as a previous study has suggested. The side chain of R297 has been proposed to recognize the phosphate group of OPS. Surprisingly, however, the position of R297 was significantly unchanged in the complex of the OPSS K127A mutant with the external Schiff base, allowing enough space for an interaction with OPS. The positively charged environment around the entrance of the active site including S153 and R297 is important for accepting negatively charged substrates such as OPS.

  9. Two complementary enzymes for threonylation of tRNA in crenarchaeota: crystal structure of Aeropyrum pernix threonyl-tRNA synthetase lacking a cis-editing domain.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Satoru; Juan, Ella Czarina Magat; Sato, Yoshiteru; Miyashita, Yu-Ichiro; Hoque, Md Mominul; Suzuki, Kaoru; Sagara, Tsubasa; Tsunoda, Masaru; Sekiguchi, Takeshi; Dock-Bregeon, Anne-Catherine; Moras, Dino; Takénaka, Akio

    2009-11-27

    In protein synthesis, threonyl-tRNA synthetase (ThrRS) must recognize threonine (Thr) from the 20 kinds of amino acids and the cognate tRNA(Thr) from different tRNAs in order to generate Thr-tRNA(Thr). In general, an organism possesses one kind of gene corresponding to ThrRS. However, it has been recently found that some organisms have two different genes for ThrRS in the genome, suggesting that their proteins ThrRS-1 and ThrRS-2 function separately and complement each other in the threonylation of tRNA(Thr), one for catalysis and the other for trans-editing of misacylated Ser-tRNA(Thr). In order to clarify their three-dimensional structures, we performed X-ray analyses of two putatively assigned ThrRSs from Aeropyrum pernix (ApThrRS-1 and ApThrRS-2). These proteins were overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified, and crystallized. The crystal structure of ApThrRS-1 has been successfully determined at 2.3 A resolution. ApThrRS-1 is a dimeric enzyme composed of two identical subunits, each containing two domains for the catalytic reaction and for anticodon binding. The essential editing domain is completely missing as expected. These structural features reveal that ThrRS-1 catalyzes only the aminoacylation of the cognate tRNA, suggesting the necessity of the second enzyme ThrRS-2 for trans-editing. Since the N-terminal sequence of ApThrRS-2 is similar to the sequence of the editing domain of ThrRS from Pyrococcus abyssi, ApThrRS-2 has been expected to catalyze deaminoacylation of a misacylated serine moiety at the CCA terminus.

  10. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (GAPOR) and nonphosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPN), key enzymes of the respective modified Embden-Meyerhof pathways in the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeota Pyrobaculum aerophilum and Aeropyrum pernix.

    PubMed

    Reher, Matthias; Gebhard, Susanne; Schönheit, Peter

    2007-08-01

    The growth of Pyrobaculum aerophilum on yeast extract and nitrate was stimulated by the addition of maltose. Extracts of maltose/yeast extract/nitrate-grown cells contained all enzyme activities of a modified Embden-Meyerhof (EM) pathway, including ATP-dependent glucokinase, phosphoglucose isomerase, ATP-dependent 6-phosphofructokinase, fructose-1,6-phosphate aldolase, triose-phosphate isomerase, GAPOR, phosphoglycerate mutase, enolase and pyruvate kinase. The activity of GAPOR was stimulated about fourfold by maltose, indicating a role in sugar degradation. GAPOR was purified 200-fold to homogeneity and characterized as a 67 kDa monomeric, extremely thermostable protein. The enzyme showed high specificity for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate and did not use glyceraldehyde, acetaldehyde or formaldehyde as substrates. By matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight analysis of the purified enzyme, ORF PA1029 was identified as a coding gene, gapor, in the sequenced genome of Pyrobaculum aerophilum. The data indicate that the (micro)aerophilic Pyrobaculum aerophilum contains a functional GAPOR as part of a modified EM pathway. Cells of the strictly aerobic crenarchaeon Aeropyrum pernix also contain enzyme activities of a modified EM pathway similar to that of Pyrobaculum aerophilum, except that a GAPN activity replaces GAPOR activity.

  11. Three-dimensional structure of a new enzyme, O-phosphoserine sulfhydrylase, involved in l-cysteine biosynthesis by a hyperthermophilic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1, at 2.0A resolution.

    PubMed

    Oda, Yutaka; Mino, Koshiki; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko; Ataka, Mitsuo

    2005-08-12

    O-Phosphoserine sulfhydrylase is a new enzyme found in a hyperthermophilic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1. This enzyme catalyzes a novel cysteine synthetic reaction from O-phospho-l-serine and sulfide. The crystal structure of the enzyme was determined at 2.0A resolution using the method of multi-wavelength anomalous dispersion. A monomer consists of three domains, including an N-terminal domain with a new alpha/beta fold. The topology folds of the middle and C-terminal domains were similar to those of the O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase-A from Salmonella typhimurium and the cystathionine beta-synthase from human. The cofactor, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, is bound in a cleft between the middle and C-terminal domains through a covalent linkage to Lys127. Based on the structure determined, O-phospho-l-serine could be rationally modeled into the active site of the enzyme. An enzyme-substrate complex model and a mutation experiment revealed that Arg297, unique to hyperthermophilic archaea, is one of the most crucial residues for O-phosphoserine sulfhydrylation activity. There are more hydrophobic areas and less electric charges at the dimer interface, compared to the S.typhimurium O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase.

  12. Solution structure and phospholipid interactions of the isolated voltage-sensor domain from KvAP.

    PubMed

    Butterwick, Joel A; MacKinnon, Roderick

    2010-11-05

    Voltage-sensor domains (VSDs) are specialized transmembrane segments that confer voltage sensitivity to many proteins such as ion channels and enzymes. The activities of these domains are highly dependent on both the chemical properties and the physical properties of the surrounding membrane environment. To learn about VSD-lipid interactions, we used nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to determine the structure and phospholipid interface of the VSD from the voltage-dependent K(+) channel KvAP (prokaryotic Kv from Aeropyrum pernix). The solution structure of the KvAP VSD solubilized within phospholipid micelles is similar to a previously determined crystal structure solubilized by a nonionic detergent and complexed with an antibody fragment. The differences observed include a previously unidentified short amphipathic α-helix that precedes the first transmembrane helix and a subtle rigid-body repositioning of the S3-S4 voltage-sensor paddle. Using (15)N relaxation experiments, we show that much of the VSD, including the pronounced kink in S3 and the S3-S4 paddle, is relatively rigid on the picosecond-to-nanosecond timescale. In contrast, the kink in S3 is mobile on the microsecond-to-millisecond timescale and may act as a hinge in the movement of the paddle during channel gating. We characterized the VSD-phospholipid micelle interactions using nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy and showed that the micelle uniformly coats the KvAP VSD and approximates the chemical environment of a phospholipid bilayer. Using paramagnetically labeled phospholipids, we show that bilayer-forming lipids interact with the S3 and S4 helices more strongly than with S1 and S2.

  13. Membrane-perturbing properties of two Arg-rich paddle domains from voltage-gated sensors in the KvAP and HsapBK K(+) channels.

    PubMed

    Unnerståle, Sofia; Madani, Fatemeh; Gräslund, Astrid; Mäler, Lena

    2012-05-15

    Voltage-gated K(+) channels are gated by displacement of basic residues located in the S4 helix that together with a part of the S3 helix, S3b, forms a "paddle" domain, whose position is altered by changes in the membrane potential modulating the open probability of the channel. Here, interactions between two paddle domains, KvAPp from the K(v) channel from Aeropyrum pernix and HsapBKp from the BK channel from Homo sapiens, and membrane models have been studied by spectroscopy. We show that both paddle domains induce calcein leakage in large unilamellar vesicles, and we suggest that this leakage represents a general thinning of the bilayer, making movement of the whole paddle domain plausible. The fact that HsapBKp induces more leakage than KvAPp may be explained by the presence of a Trp residue in HsapBKp. Trp residues generally promote localization to the hydrophilic-hydrophobic interface and disturb tight packing. In magnetically aligned bicelles, KvAPp increases the level of order along the whole acyl chain, while HsapBKp affects the morphology, also indicating that KvAPp adapts more to the lipid environment. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation measurements for HsapBKp show that overall the sequence has anisotropic motions. The S4 helix is well-structured with restricted local motion, while the turn between S4 and S3b is more flexible and undergoes slow local motion. Our results indicate that the calcein leakage is related to the flexibility in this turn region. A possibility by which HsapBKp can undergo structural transitions is also shown by relaxation NMR, which may be important for the gating mechanism.

  14. Open channel current noise analysis of S6 peptides from KvAP channel on bilayer lipid membrane shows bimodal power law scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, Rajan; Malik, Chetan; Ghosh, Subhendu

    2016-06-01

    Open channel current noise in synthetic peptide S6 of KvAP channel was investigated in a voltage clamp experiment on bilayer lipid membrane (BLM). It was observed that the power spectral density (PSD) of the component frequencies follows power law with different slopes in different frequency ranges. In order to know the origin of the slopes PSD analysis was done with signal filtering. It was found that the first slope in the noise profile follows 1 / f pattern which exists at lower frequencies and has high amplitude current noise, while the second slope corresponds to 1 /f 2 - 3 pattern which exists at higher frequencies with low amplitude current noise. In addition, white noise was observed at very large frequencies. It was concluded that the plausible reason for the multiple power-law scaling is the existence of different modes of non-equilibrium ion transport through the S6 channel.

  15. Mobility Measurements Probe Conformational Changes in Membrane Proteins due to Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Richard G.; Turner, Matthew S.

    2015-11-01

    The function of membrane-embedded proteins such as ion channels depends crucially on their conformation. We demonstrate how conformational changes in asymmetric membrane proteins may be inferred from measurements of their diffusion. Such proteins cause local deformations in the membrane, which induce an extra hydrodynamic drag on the protein. Using membrane tension to control the magnitude of the deformations, and hence the drag, measurements of diffusivity can be used to infer—via an elastic model of the protein—how conformation is changed by tension. Motivated by recent experimental results [Quemeneur et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 111, 5083 (2014)], we focus on KvAP, a voltage-gated potassium channel from Aeropyrum pernix. The conformation of KvAP is found to change considerably due to tension, with its "walls," where the protein meets the membrane, undergoing significant angular strains. The torsional stiffness is determined to be 26.8 kBT per radian at room temperature. This has implications for both the structure and the function of such proteins in the environment of a tension-bearing membrane.

  16. Mobility Measurements Probe Conformational Changes in Membrane Proteins due to Tension.

    PubMed

    Morris, Richard G; Turner, Matthew S

    2015-11-06

    The function of membrane-embedded proteins such as ion channels depends crucially on their conformation. We demonstrate how conformational changes in asymmetric membrane proteins may be inferred from measurements of their diffusion. Such proteins cause local deformations in the membrane, which induce an extra hydrodynamic drag on the protein. Using membrane tension to control the magnitude of the deformations, and hence the drag, measurements of diffusivity can be used to infer-via an elastic model of the protein-how conformation is changed by tension. Motivated by recent experimental results [Quemeneur et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 111, 5083 (2014)], we focus on KvAP, a voltage-gated potassium channel from Aeropyrum pernix. The conformation of KvAP is found to change considerably due to tension, with its "walls," where the protein meets the membrane, undergoing significant angular strains. The torsional stiffness is determined to be 26.8k(B)T per radian at room temperature. This has implications for both the structure and the function of such proteins in the environment of a tension-bearing membrane.

  17. Reconstitution of a Transmembrane Protein, the Voltage-gated Ion Channel, KvAP, into Giant Unilamellar Vesicles for Microscopy and Patch Clamp Studies

    PubMed Central

    Garten, Matthias; Aimon, Sophie; Bassereau, Patricia; Toombes, Gilman E. S.

    2015-01-01

    Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs) are a popular biomimetic system for studying membrane associated phenomena. However, commonly used protocols to grow GUVs must be modified in order to form GUVs containing functional transmembrane proteins. This article describes two dehydration-rehydration methods — electroformation and gel-assisted swelling — to form GUVs containing the voltage-gated potassium channel, KvAP. In both methods, a solution of protein-containing small unilamellar vesicles is partially dehydrated to form a stack of membranes, which is then allowed to swell in a rehydration buffer. For the electroformation method, the film is deposited on platinum electrodes so that an AC field can be applied during film rehydration. In contrast, the gel-assisted swelling method uses an agarose gel substrate to enhance film rehydration. Both methods can produce GUVs in low (e.g., 5 mM) and physiological (e.g., 100 mM) salt concentrations. The resulting GUVs are characterized via fluorescence microscopy, and the function of reconstituted channels measured using the inside-out patch-clamp configuration. While swelling in the presence of an alternating electric field (electroformation) gives a high yield of defect-free GUVs, the gel-assisted swelling method produces a more homogeneous protein distribution and requires no special equipment. PMID:25650630

  18. Coupling between the voltage-sensing and pore domains in a voltage-gated potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Schow, Eric V; Freites, J Alfredo; Nizkorodov, Alex; White, Stephen H; Tobias, Douglas J

    2012-07-01

    Voltage-dependent potassium (Kv), sodium (Nav), and calcium channels open and close in response to changes in transmembrane (TM) potential, thus regulating cell excitability by controlling ion flow across the membrane. An outstanding question concerning voltage gating is how voltage-induced conformational changes of the channel voltage-sensing domains (VSDs) are coupled through the S4-S5 interfacial linking helices to the opening and closing of the pore domain (PD). To investigate the coupling between the VSDs and the PD, we generated a closed Kv channel configuration from Aeropyrum pernix (KvAP) using atomistic simulations with experiment-based restraints on the VSDs. Full closure of the channel required, in addition to the experimentally determined TM displacement, that the VSDs be displaced both inwardly and laterally around the PD. This twisting motion generates a tight hydrophobic interface between the S4-S5 linkers and the C-terminal ends of the pore domain S6 helices in agreement with available experimental evidence.

  19. Voltage sensor ring in a native structure of a membrane-embedded potassium channel

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Liang; Zheng, Hongjin; Zheng, Hui; Borkowski, Brian A.; Shi, Dan; Gonen, Tamir; Jiang, Qiu-Xing

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels support electrochemical activity in cells and are largely responsible for information flow throughout the nervous systems. The voltage sensor domains in these channels sense changes in transmembrane potential and control ion flux across membranes. The X-ray structures of a few voltage-gated ion channels in detergents have been determined and have revealed clear structural variations among their respective voltage sensor domains. More recent studies demonstrated that lipids around a voltage-gated channel could directly alter its conformational state in membrane. Because of these disparities, the structural basis for voltage sensing in native membranes remains elusive. Here, through electron-crystallographic analysis of membrane-embedded proteins, we present the detailed view of a voltage-gated potassium channel in its inactivated state. Contrary to all known structures of voltage-gated ion channels in detergents, our data revealed a unique conformation in which the four voltage sensor domains of a voltage-gated potassium channel from Aeropyrum pernix (KvAP) form a ring structure that completely surrounds the pore domain of the channel. Such a structure is named the voltage sensor ring. Our biochemical and electrophysiological studies support that the voltage sensor ring represents a physiological conformation. These data together suggest that lipids exert strong effects on the channel structure and that these effects may be changed upon membrane disruption. Our results have wide implications for lipid–protein interactions in general and for the mechanism of voltage sensing in particular. PMID:23401554

  20. Profile structures of the voltage-sensor domain and the voltage-gated K+-channel vectorially oriented in a single phospholipid bilayer membrane at the solid-vapor and solid-liquid interfaces determined by x-ray interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S.; Liu, J.; Strzalka, J.; Blasie, J. K.

    2011-09-01

    One subunit of the prokaryotic voltage-gated potassium ion channel from Aeropyrum pernix (KvAP) is comprised of six transmembrane α helices, of which S1-S4 form the voltage-sensor domain (VSD) and S5 and S6 contribute to the pore domain (PD) of the functional homotetramer. However, the mechanism of electromechanical coupling interconverting the closed-to-open (i.e., nonconducting-to-K+-conducting) states remains undetermined. Here, we have vectorially oriented the detergent (OG)-solubilized VSD in single monolayers by two independent approaches, namely “directed-assembly” and “self-assembly,” to achieve a high in-plane density. Both utilize Ni coordination chemistry to tether the protein to an alkylated inorganic surface via its C-terminal His6 tag. Subsequently, the detergent is replaced by phospholipid (POPC) via exchange, intended to reconstitute a phospholipid bilayer environment for the protein. X-ray interferometry, in which interference with a multilayer reference structure is used to both enhance and phase the specular x-ray reflectivity from the tethered single membrane, was used to determine directly the electron density profile structures of the VSD protein solvated by detergent versus phospholipid, and with either a moist He (moderate hydration) or bulk aqueous buffer (high hydration) environment to preserve a native structure conformation. Difference electron density profiles, with respect to the multilayer substrate itself, for the VSD-OG monolayer and VSD-POPC membranes at both the solid-vapor and solid-liquid interfaces, reveal the profile structures of the VSD protein dominating these profiles and further indicate a successful reconstitution of a lipid bilayer environment. The self-assembly approach was similarly extended to the intact full-length KvAP channel for comparison. The spatial extent and asymmetry in the profile structures of both proteins confirm their unidirectional vectorial orientation within the reconstituted membrane and

  1. Temperature dependent mistranslation in a hyperthermophile adapts proteins to lower temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Michael H.; Pan, Tao

    2016-01-01

    All organisms universally encode, synthesize and utilize proteins that function optimally within a subset of growth conditions. While healthy cells are thought to maintain high translational fidelity within their natural habitats, natural environments can easily fluctuate outside the optimal functional range of genetically encoded proteins. The hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix (A. pernix) can grow throughout temperature variations ranging from 70 to 100°C, although the specific factors facilitating such adaptability are unknown. Here, we show that A. pernix undergoes constitutive leucine to methionine mistranslation at low growth temperatures. Low-temperature mistranslation is facilitated by the misacylation of tRNALeu with methionine by the methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MetRS). At low growth temperatures, the A. pernix MetRS undergoes a temperature dependent shift in tRNA charging fidelity, allowing the enzyme to conditionally charge tRNALeu with methionine. We demonstrate enhanced low-temperature activity for A. pernix citrate synthase that is synthesized during leucine to methionine mistranslation at low-temperature growth compared to its high-fidelity counterpart synthesized at high-temperature. Our results show that conditional leucine to methionine mistranslation can make protein adjustments capable of improving the low-temperature activity of hyperthermophilic proteins, likely by facilitating the increasing flexibility required for greater protein function at lower physiological temperatures. PMID:26657639

  2. Nonlinearity of a Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel Revealed by the Mechanical Susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariyaratne, Amila; Zocchi, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    The voltage-gated potassium channel from Aeropyrum pernix operates by coupling the voltage-driven motion of a charged group of amino acids to the opening and closing of the pore. In this experiment, we drive this charged group with an ac field and observe the effect on the gating. The measurements for different frequencies and amplitudes of the forcing reveal an essential nonlinearity in the mechanical behavior of the molecule. Within a continuum-mechanics description, we extract the effective dissipation parameter γ for this conformational motion and find γ≈0.2g/s, similar to recent nanorheology measurements on the conformational motion of an enzyme.

  3. Towards understanding the first genome sequence of a crenarchaeon by genome annotation using clusters of orthologous groups of proteins (COGs)

    PubMed Central

    Natale, Darren A; Shankavaram, Uma T; Galperin, Michael Y; Wolf, Yuri I; Aravind, L; Koonin, Eugene V

    2000-01-01

    Background: Standard archival sequence databases have not been designed as tools for genome annotation and are far from being optimal for this purpose. We used the database of Clusters of Orthologous Groups of proteins (COGs) to reannotate the genomes of two archaea, Aeropyrum pernix, the first member of the Crenarchaea to be sequenced, and Pyrococcus abyssi. Results: A. pernix and P. abyssi proteins were assigned to COGs using the COGNITOR program; the results were verified on a case-by-case basis and augmented by additional database searches using the PSI-BLAST and TBLASTN programs. Functions were predicted for over 300 proteins from A. pernix, which could not be assigned a function using conventional methods with a conservative sequence similarity threshold, an approximately 50% increase compared to the original annotation. A. pernix shares most of the conserved core of proteins that were previously identified in the Euryarchaeota. Cluster analysis or distance matrix tree construction based on the co-occurrence of genomes in COGs showed that A. pernix forms a distinct group within the archaea, although grouping with the two species of Pyrococci, indicative of similar repertoires of conserved genes, was observed. No indication of a specific relationship between Crenarchaeota and eukaryotes was obtained in these analyses. Several proteins that are conserved in Euryarchaeota and most bacteria are unexpectedly missing in A. pernix, including the entire set of de novo purine biosynthesis enzymes, the GTPase FtsZ (a key component of the bacterial and euryarchaeal cell-division machinery), and the tRNA-specific pseudouridine synthase, previously considered universal. A. pernix is represented in 48 COGs that do not contain any euryarchaeal members. Many of these proteins are TCA cycle and electron transport chain enzymes, reflecting the aerobic lifestyle of A. pernix. Conclusions: Special-purpose databases organized on the basis of phylogenetic analysis and carefully

  4. Ultrasound-Assisted Enantioselective Esterification of Ibuprofen Catalyzed by a Flower-Like Nanobioreactor.

    PubMed

    An, Baiyi; Fan, Hailin; Wu, Zhuofu; Zheng, Lu; Wang, Lei; Wang, Zhi; Chen, Guang

    2016-04-28

    A flower-like nanobioreactor was prepared for resolution of ibuprofen in organic solvents. Ultrasound irradiation has been used to improve the enzyme performance of APE1547 (a thermophilic esterase from the archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1) in the enantioselective esterification. Under optimum reaction conditions (ultrasound power, 225 W; temperature, 45 °C; water activity, 0.21), the immobilized APE1547 showed an excellent catalytic performance (enzyme activity, 13.26 μmol/h/mg; E value, 147.1). After ten repeated reaction batches, the nanobioreactor retained almost 100% of its initial enzyme activity and enantioselectivity. These results indicated that the combination of the immobilization method and ultrasound irradiation can enhance the enzyme performance dramatically.

  5. Cell Cycle Characteristics of Crenarchaeota: Unity among Diversity▿

    PubMed Central

    Lundgren, Magnus; Malandrin, Laurence; Eriksson, Stefan; Huber, Harald; Bernander, Rolf

    2008-01-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaea Acidianus hospitalis, Aeropyrum pernix, Pyrobaculum aerophilum, Pyrobaculum calidifontis, and Sulfolobus tokodaii representing three different orders in the phylum Crenarchaeota were analyzed by flow cytometry and combined phase-contrast and epifluorescence microscopy. The overall organization of the cell cycle was found to be similar in all species, with a short prereplicative period and a dominant postreplicative period that accounted for 64 to 77% of the generation time. Thus, in all Crenarchaeota analyzed to date, cell division and initiation of chromosome replication occur in close succession, and a long time interval separates termination of replication from cell division. In Pyrobaculum, chromosome segregation overlapped with or closely followed DNA replication, and further genome separation appeared to occur concomitant with cellular growth. Cell division in P. aerophilum took place without visible constriction. PMID:18502873

  6. Cell cycle characteristics of crenarchaeota: unity among diversity.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Magnus; Malandrin, Laurence; Eriksson, Stefan; Huber, Harald; Bernander, Rolf

    2008-08-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaea Acidianus hospitalis, Aeropyrum pernix, Pyrobaculum aerophilum, Pyrobaculum calidifontis, and Sulfolobus tokodaii representing three different orders in the phylum Crenarchaeota were analyzed by flow cytometry and combined phase-contrast and epifluorescence microscopy. The overall organization of the cell cycle was found to be similar in all species, with a short prereplicative period and a dominant postreplicative period that accounted for 64 to 77% of the generation time. Thus, in all Crenarchaeota analyzed to date, cell division and initiation of chromosome replication occur in close succession, and a long time interval separates termination of replication from cell division. In Pyrobaculum, chromosome segregation overlapped with or closely followed DNA replication, and further genome separation appeared to occur concomitant with cellular growth. Cell division in P. aerophilum took place without visible constriction.

  7. Specific electrical capacitance and voltage breakdown as a function of temperature for different planar lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Velikonja, Aljaž; Kramar, Peter; Miklavčič, Damijan; Maček Lebar, Alenka

    2016-12-01

    The breakdown voltage and specific electrical capacitance of planar lipid bilayers formed from lipids isolated from the membrane of archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1 as a function of temperature were studied and compared with data obtained previously in MD simulation studies. Temperature dependence of breakdown voltage and specific electrical capacitance was measured also for dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers and bilayers formed from mixture of diphytanoylphosphocholine (DPhPC) and DPPC in ratio 80:20. The breakdown voltage of archaeal lipids planar lipid bilayers is more or less constant until 50°C, while at higher temperatures a considerable drop is observed, which is in line with the results from MD simulations. The breakdown voltage of DPPC planar lipid bilayer at melting temperature is considerably higher than in the gel phase. Specific electrical capacitance of planar lipid bilayers formed from archaeal lipids is approximately constant for temperatures up to 40°C and then gradually decreases. The difference with MD simulation predictions is discussed. Specific electrical capacitance of DPPC planar lipid bilayers in fluid phase is 1.75 times larger than that of the gel phase and it follows intermediated phases before phase transition. Increase in specific electrical capacitance while approaching melting point of DPPC is visible also for DPhPC:DPPC mixture.

  8. Topological plasticity of enzymes involved in disulfide bond formation allows catalysis in either the periplasm or the cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Hatahet, Feras; Ruddock, Lloyd W

    2013-09-23

    The transmembrane enzymes disulfide bond forming enzyme B (DsbB) and vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) are central to oxidative protein folding in the periplasm of prokaryotes. Catalyzed formation of structural disulfide bonds in proteins also occurs in the cytoplasm of some hyperthermophilic prokaryotes through currently, poorly defined mechanisms. We aimed to determine whether DsbB and VKOR can be inverted in the membrane with retention of activity. By rational design of inversion of membrane topology, we engineered DsbB mutants that catalyze disulfide bond formation in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli. This represents the first engineered inversion of a transmembrane protein with demonstrated conservation of activity and substrate specificity. This successful designed engineering led us to identify two naturally occurring and oppositely oriented VKOR homologues from the hyperthermophile Aeropyrum pernix that promote oxidative protein folding in the periplasm or cytoplasm, respectively, and hence defines the probable route for disulfide bond formation in the cytoplasm of hyperthermophiles. Our findings demonstrate how knowledge on the determinants of membrane protein topology can be used to de novo engineer a metabolic pathway and to unravel an intriguingly simple evolutionary scenario where a new "adaptive" cellular process is constructed by means of membrane protein topology inversion.

  9. Omnipotent role of archaeal elongation factor 1 alpha (EF1α in translational elongation and termination, and quality control of protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kazuki; Kobayashi, Kan; Wada, Miki; Kikuno, Izumi; Takusagawa, Akira; Mochizuki, Masahiro; Uchiumi, Toshio; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Nureki, Osamu; Ito, Koichi

    2010-11-09

    The molecular mechanisms of translation termination and mRNA surveillance in archaea remain unclear. In eukaryotes, eRF3 and HBS1, which are homologous to the tRNA carrier GTPase EF1α, respectively bind eRF1 and Pelota to decipher stop codons or to facilitate mRNA surveillance. However, genome-wide searches of archaea have failed to detect any orthologs to both GTPases. Here, we report the crystal structure of aRF1 from an archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix, and present strong evidence that the authentic archaeal EF1α acts as a carrier GTPase for aRF1 and for aPelota. The binding interface residues between aRF1 and aEF1α predicted from aRF1·aEF1α·GTP ternary structure model were confirmed by in vivo functional assays. The aRF1/eRF1 structural domain with GGQ motif, which corresponds to the CCA arm of tRNA, contacts with all three structural domains of aEF1α showing striking tRNA mimicry of aRF1/eRF1 and its GTPase-mediated catalysis for stop codon decoding. The multiple binding capacity of archaeal EF1α explains the absence of GTPase orthologs for eRF3 and HBS1 in archaea species and suggests that universal molecular mechanisms underlie translational elongation and termination, and mRNA surveillance pathways.

  10. Updating carbamoylphosphate synthase (CPS) phylogenies: occurrence and phylogenetic identity of archaeal CPS genes.

    PubMed

    Cammarano, Piero; Gribaldo, Simonetta; Johann, Andre

    2002-08-01

    Among Bacteria the carA and carB genes encoding the small (CarA) and large (CarB) subunits of carbamoylphosphate synthase (CPS) have been lost in certain symbionts (Haemophylus influenzae) and in most obligate intracellular parasites (Chlamydiae, Spirochaetes, Mycoplasmatales, Rickettsiae) having genome sizes in the 0.7- to 1.1-Mb range. Compared to Bacteria, Archaea exhibit a more varied pattern of CPS gene losses and an unusual propensity to incorporate CPS genes derived from both Bacteria and other Archaea. Schematically they fall into three groups. Group 1 taxa (the crenarchaeon Aeropyrum pernix and the euryarchaea Pyrococcus horikoshi and Pyrococcus abyssii) lack CPS genes altogether. Group 2 taxa (comprising Halobacteriales, Thermoplasmales, Methanococcales, Methanomicrobiales, Archaeoglobales) harbor CPS genes whose encoded CarB and CarA subunit proteins are ostensibly bacterial in origin; that is, they are intermixed with bacterial homologues on a phylogeny of concatenated CarA and CarB sequences and are not distinguishable from bacterial sequences after searching for domain-specific amino acid residue positions. Group 3 taxa (the crenarchaea Pyrobaculum aerophilum, Sulfolobus solfataricus, and Sulfolobus tokodaii and the euryarchaeon Pyrococcus furiosus) harbor CPS genes whose encoded proteins appear to be archaeal: consistent with an archaeal origin, the CarA and CarB sequences in this group possess both unique signatures and signatures affiliating them to Eukarya. Based on the topology of the clade comprising the four Group 3 taxa, we argue that CPS genes of P. furiosus (a euryarchaeon) and those of the crenarchaea P. aerophilum, S. solfataricus, and S. tokodaii are of a single type, resulting from the two genes being laterally transferred from a crenarchaeon to P. furiosus.

  11. A simple and effective strategy for solving the problem of inclusion bodies in recombinant protein technology: His-tag deletions enhance soluble expression.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shaozhou; Gong, Cuiyu; Ren, Lu; Li, Xingzhou; Song, Dawei; Zheng, Guojun

    2013-01-01

    The formation of inclusion bodies (IBs) in recombinant protein biotechnology has become one of the most frequent undesirable occurrences in both research and industrial applications. So far, the pET System is the most powerful system developed for the production of recombinant proteins when Escherichia coli is used as the microbial cell factory. Also, using fusion tags to facilitate detection and purification of the target protein is a commonly used tactic. However, there is still a large fraction of proteins that cannot be produced in E. coli in a soluble (and hence functional) form. Intensive research efforts have tried to address this issue, and numerous parameters have been modulated to avoid the formation of inclusion bodies. However, hardly anyone has noticed that adding fusion tags to the recombinant protein to facilitate purification is a key factor that affects the formation of inclusion bodies. To test this idea, the industrial biocatalysts uridine phosphorylase from Aeropyrum pernix K1 and (+)-γ-lactamase and (-)-γ-lactamase from Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 6 were expressed in E. coli by using the pET System and then examined. We found that using a histidine tag as a fusion partner for protein expression did affect the formation of inclusion bodies in these examples, suggesting that removing the fusion tag can promote the solubility of heterologous proteins. The production of soluble and highly active uridine phosphorylase, (+)-γ-lactamase, and (-)-γ-lactamase in our results shows that the traditional process needs to be reconsidered. Accordingly, a simple and efficient structure-based strategy for the production of valuable soluble recombinant proteins in E. coli is proposed.

  12. Oxidation of archaeal peroxiredoxin involves a hypervalent sulfur intermediate

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Takahiko; Abe, Manabu; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Goto, Tadashi; Yamaguchi, Takafumi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi

    2008-01-01

    The oxidation of thiol groups in proteins is a common event in biochemical processes involving disulfide bond formation and in response to an increased level of reactive oxygen species. It has been widely accepted that the oxidation of a cysteine side chain is initiated by the formation of cysteine sulfenic acid (Cys-SOH). Here, we demonstrate a mechanism of thiol oxidation through a hypervalent sulfur intermediate by presenting crystallographic evidence from an archaeal peroxiredoxin (Prx), the thioredoxin peroxidase from Aeropyrum pernix K1 (ApTPx). The reaction of Prx, which is the reduction of a peroxide, depends on the redox active cysteine side chains. Oxidation by hydrogen peroxide converted the active site peroxidatic Cys-50 of ApTPx to a cysteine sulfenic acid derivative, followed by further oxidation to cysteine sulfinic and sulfonic acids. The crystal structure of the cysteine sulfenic acid derivative was refined to 1.77 Å resolution with Rcryst and Rfree values of 18.8% and 22.0%, respectively. The refined structure, together with quantum chemical calculations, revealed that the sulfenic acid derivative is a type of sulfurane, a hypervalent sulfur compound, and that the Sγ atom is covalently linked to the Nδ1 atom of the neighboring His-42. The reaction mechanism is revealed by the hydrogen bond network around the peroxidatic cysteine and the motion of the flexible loop covering the active site and by quantum chemical calculations. This study provides evidence that a hypervalent sulfur compound occupies an important position in biochemical processes. PMID:18436649

  13. Artificial Modulation of the Gating Behavior of a K+ Channel in a KvAP-DNA Chimera

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Andrew; Zocchi, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    We present experiments where the gating behavior of a voltage-gated ion channel is modulated by artificial ligand binding. We construct a channel-DNA chimera with the KvAP potassium channel reconstituted in an artificial membrane. The channel is functional and the single channel ion conductivity unperturbed by the presence of the DNA. However, the channel opening probability vs. bias voltage, i.e., the gating, can be shifted considerably by the electrostatic force between the charges on the DNA and the voltage sensing domain of the protein. Different hybridization states of the chimera DNA thus lead to different response curves of the channel. PMID:21526187

  14. Artificial phosphorylation sites modulate the activity of a voltage-gated potassium channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariyaratne, Amila; Zocchi, Giovanni

    2015-03-01

    The KvAP potassium channel is representative of a family of voltage-gated ion channels where the membrane potential is sensed by a transmembrane helix containing several positively charged arginines. Previous work by Wang and Zocchi [A. Wang and G. Zocchi, PLoS ONE 6, e18598 (2011), 10.1371/journal.pone.0018598] showed how a negatively charged polyelectrolyte attached in proximity to the voltage sensing element can bias the opening probability of the channel. Here we introduce three phosphorylation sites at the same location and show that the response curve of the channel shifts by about 20 mV upon phosphorylation, while other characteristics such as the single-channel conductance are unaffected. In summary, we construct an artificial phosphorylation site which confers allosteric regulation to the channel.

  15. Geographical and altitudinal distribution of Brachycephalus (Anura: Brachycephalidae) endemic to the Brazilian Atlantic Rainforest.

    PubMed

    Bornschein, Marcos R; Firkowski, Carina R; Belmonte-Lopes, Ricardo; Corrêa, Leandro; Ribeiro, Luiz F; Morato, Sérgio A A; Antoniazzi-Jr, Reuber L; Reinert, Bianca L; Meyer, Andreas L S; Cini, Felipe A; Pie, Marcio R

    2016-01-01

    Mountains of the Brazilian Atlantic Forest can act as islands of cold and wet climate, leading to the isolation and speciation of species with low dispersal capacity, such as the toadlet species of the genus Brachycephalus. This genus is composed primarily by diurnal species, with miniaturized body sizes (<2.5 cm), inhabiting microhabitats in the leaf litter of montane forests. Still, little is known about the geographical distribution, altitudinal range, and ecological limits of most Brachycephalus species. In this study, we review the available data on the geographical and altitudinal distribution of Brachycephalus based on occurrence records compiled from literature and museums, both for the genus as a whole and separately for the three recently proposed groups of species (ephippium, didactylus, and pernix). The final ensemble dataset comprised 333 records, 120 localities, 28 described species, and six undescribed ones. Species were recorded in six relief units, the richest of which being the Serra do Mar, with 30 species. When the Serra do Mar is subdivided into three subunits, Northern, Central and Southern Serra do Mar, the number of species increase from north to the south, with records of six, nine, and 16 species, respectively. We were able to estimate the extent of occurrence of nearly half of the described species, and the resulting estimates indicate that many of them show remarkably small ranges, some of which less than 50 ha. Brachycephalus species are present from sea level to roughly 1,900 m a.s.l., with the highest richness being found between 751 and 1,000 m a.s.l. (21 spp.). The species with the broadest altitudinal range were B. didactylus (1,075 m) and Brachycephalus sp. 1 (1,035 m), both in the didactylus group, and B. ephippium (1,050 m), of the ephippium group. The broadest altitudinal amplitude for species of the pernix group was recorded for B. brunneus (535 m). The lowest altitudinal records for the pernix group were at 845 m a.s.l. in

  16. Geographical and altitudinal distribution of Brachycephalus (Anura: Brachycephalidae) endemic to the Brazilian Atlantic Rainforest

    PubMed Central

    Firkowski, Carina R.; Belmonte-Lopes, Ricardo; Corrêa, Leandro; Ribeiro, Luiz F.; Morato, Sérgio A.A.; Antoniazzi-Jr., Reuber L.; Reinert, Bianca L.; Meyer, Andreas L.S.; Cini, Felipe A.; Pie, Marcio R.

    2016-01-01

    Mountains of the Brazilian Atlantic Forest can act as islands of cold and wet climate, leading to the isolation and speciation of species with low dispersal capacity, such as the toadlet species of the genus Brachycephalus. This genus is composed primarily by diurnal species, with miniaturized body sizes (<2.5 cm), inhabiting microhabitats in the leaf litter of montane forests. Still, little is known about the geographical distribution, altitudinal range, and ecological limits of most Brachycephalus species. In this study, we review the available data on the geographical and altitudinal distribution of Brachycephalus based on occurrence records compiled from literature and museums, both for the genus as a whole and separately for the three recently proposed groups of species (ephippium, didactylus, and pernix). The final ensemble dataset comprised 333 records, 120 localities, 28 described species, and six undescribed ones. Species were recorded in six relief units, the richest of which being the Serra do Mar, with 30 species. When the Serra do Mar is subdivided into three subunits, Northern, Central and Southern Serra do Mar, the number of species increase from north to the south, with records of six, nine, and 16 species, respectively. We were able to estimate the extent of occurrence of nearly half of the described species, and the resulting estimates indicate that many of them show remarkably small ranges, some of which less than 50 ha. Brachycephalus species are present from sea level to roughly 1,900 m a.s.l., with the highest richness being found between 751 and 1,000 m a.s.l. (21 spp.). The species with the broadest altitudinal range were B. didactylus (1,075 m) and Brachycephalus sp. 1 (1,035 m), both in the didactylus group, and B. ephippium (1,050 m), of the ephippium group. The broadest altitudinal amplitude for species of the pernix group was recorded for B. brunneus (535 m). The lowest altitudinal records for the pernix group were at 845 m a.s.l. in

  17. Lipid-dependent gating of a voltage-gated potassium channel

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hui; Liu, Weiran; Anderson, Lingyan Y.; Jiang, Qiu-Xing

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies hypothesized that phospholipids stabilize two voltage-sensing arginine residues of certain voltage-gated potassium channels in activated conformations. It remains unclear how lipids directly affect these channels. Here, by examining the conformations of the KvAP in different lipids, we showed that without voltage change, the voltage-sensor domains switched from the activated to the resting state when their surrounding lipids were changed from phospholipids to nonphospholipids. Such lipid-determined conformational change was coupled to the ion-conducting pore, suggesting that parallel to voltage gating, the channel is gated by its annular lipids. Our measurements recognized that the energetic cost of lipid-dependent gating approaches that of voltage gating, but kinetically it appears much slower. Our data support that a channel and its surrounding lipids together constitute a functional unit, and natural nonphospholipids such as cholesterol should exert strong effects on voltage-gated channels. Our first observation of lipid-dependent gating may have general implications to other membrane proteins. PMID:21427721

  18. Molecular dynamics modelling of nanocarbon cluster properties under conditions close to HE detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derbenev, I. V.; Chizhkova, N. E.; Sapozhnikov, F. A.; Dremov, V. V.

    We use molecular dynamics for modelling properties of carbon nanoclusters. The size of modelled carbon nanoclusters is below 5 nm, which is typical of detonation diamond nanoclusters. We have found their structural changes at P = 0 to be as follows: Diamond → Diamond core + GL-surface → sandwich-type graphite → Graphite-like liquid. In smaller clusters the transformations start at a lower temperature. Adaptive Template Analysis (ATA) was used to determine the structures. We studied evaporation properties at temperatures above 5000 K. For clusters of several thousands of atoms, the simple dependence kvap ˜ e-T0/T/N1/3 (T0 is constant) is quite good. It has been found out that densities of saturated vapour for clusters containing from 4000 to 8000 atoms are very close at T = 5000 K. The structure of nanoclusters was studied at nonzero pressures set by an argon environment. Calculated results suggest that the patterns for different temperatures are qualitatively similar for three pressures under study (20, 25 and 30 GPa). At T = 1000-1500 K, the initial diamond core is preserved and a thin disordered GL layer is present on the surface. At T = 2000-5000 K, graphite grains form in the sample and a thin layer of liquid is present on its surface. The sample is amorphous at 5500 K and 6000 K. The prevalence of the graphite phase at these pressures seems to come from the absence of long-range interaction in REBO-2002.

  19. Molecular basis of the interaction between gating modifier spider toxins and the voltage sensor of voltage-gated ion channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Carus H. Y.; King, Glenn F.; Mobli, Mehdi

    2016-09-01

    Voltage-sensor domains (VSDs) are modular transmembrane domains of voltage-gated ion channels that respond to changes in membrane potential by undergoing conformational changes that are coupled to gating of the ion-conducting pore. Most spider-venom peptides function as gating modifiers by binding to the VSDs of voltage-gated channels and trapping them in a closed or open state. To understand the molecular basis underlying this mode of action, we used nuclear magnetic resonance to delineate the atomic details of the interaction between the VSD of the voltage-gated potassium channel KvAP and the spider-venom peptide VSTx1. Our data reveal that the toxin interacts with residues in an aqueous cleft formed between the extracellular S1-S2 and S3-S4 loops of the VSD whilst maintaining lipid interactions in the gaps formed between the S1-S4 and S2-S3 helices. The resulting network of interactions increases the energetic barrier to the conformational changes required for channel gating, and we propose that this is the mechanism by which gating modifier toxins inhibit voltage-gated ion channels.

  20. The pore structure and gating mechanism of K2P channels

    PubMed Central

    Piechotta, Paula L; Rapedius, Markus; Stansfeld, Phillip J; Bollepalli, Murali K; Erhlich, Gunter; Andres-Enguix, Isabelle; Fritzenschaft, Hariolf; Decher, Niels; Sansom, Mark S P; Tucker, Stephen J; Baukrowitz, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Two-pore domain (K2P) potassium channels are important regulators of cellular electrical excitability. However, the structure of these channels and their gating mechanism, in particular the role of the bundle-crossing gate, are not well understood. Here, we report that quaternary ammonium (QA) ions bind with high-affinity deep within the pore of TREK-1 and have free access to their binding site before channel activation by intracellular pH or pressure. This demonstrates that, unlike most other K+ channels, the bundle-crossing gate in this K2P channel is constitutively open. Furthermore, we used QA ions to probe the pore structure of TREK-1 by systematic scanning mutagenesis and comparison of these results with different possible structural models. This revealed that the TREK-1 pore most closely resembles the open-state structure of KvAP. We also found that mutations close to the selectivity filter and the nature of the permeant ion profoundly influence TREK-1 channel gating. These results demonstrate that the primary activation mechanisms in TREK-1 reside close to, or within the selectivity filter and do not involve gating at the cytoplasmic bundle crossing. PMID:21822218

  1. How does a voltage sensor interact with a lipid bilayer? Simulations of a potassium channel domain.

    PubMed

    Sands, Zara A; Sansom, Mark S P

    2007-02-01

    The nature of voltage sensing by voltage-activated ion channels is a key problem in membrane protein structural biology. The way in which the voltage-sensor (VS) domain interacts with its membrane environment remains unclear. In particular, the known structures of Kv channels do not readily explain how a positively charged S4 helix is able to stably span a lipid bilayer. Extended (2 x 50 ns) molecular dynamics simulations of the high-resolution structure of the isolated VS domain from the archaebacterial potassium channel KvAP, embedded in zwitterionic and in anionic lipid bilayers, have been used to explore VS/lipid interactions at atomic resolution. The simulations reveal penetration of water into the center of the VS and bilayer. Furthermore, there is significant local deformation of the lipid bilayer by interactions between lipid phosphate groups and arginine side chains of S4. As a consequence of this, the electrostatic field is "focused" across the center of the bilayer.

  2. Molecular basis of the interaction between gating modifier spider toxins and the voltage sensor of voltage-gated ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Carus H. Y.; King, Glenn F.; Mobli, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-sensor domains (VSDs) are modular transmembrane domains of voltage-gated ion channels that respond to changes in membrane potential by undergoing conformational changes that are coupled to gating of the ion-conducting pore. Most spider-venom peptides function as gating modifiers by binding to the VSDs of voltage-gated channels and trapping them in a closed or open state. To understand the molecular basis underlying this mode of action, we used nuclear magnetic resonance to delineate the atomic details of the interaction between the VSD of the voltage-gated potassium channel KvAP and the spider-venom peptide VSTx1. Our data reveal that the toxin interacts with residues in an aqueous cleft formed between the extracellular S1-S2 and S3-S4 loops of the VSD whilst maintaining lipid interactions in the gaps formed between the S1-S4 and S2-S3 helices. The resulting network of interactions increases the energetic barrier to the conformational changes required for channel gating, and we propose that this is the mechanism by which gating modifier toxins inhibit voltage-gated ion channels. PMID:27677715

  3. How Does a Voltage Sensor Interact with a Lipid Bilayer? Simulations of a Potassium Channel Domain

    PubMed Central

    Sands, Zara A.; Sansom, Mark S.P.

    2007-01-01

    Summary The nature of voltage sensing by voltage-activated ion channels is a key problem in membrane protein structural biology. The way in which the voltage-sensor (VS) domain interacts with its membrane environment remains unclear. In particular, the known structures of Kv channels do not readily explain how a positively charged S4 helix is able to stably span a lipid bilayer. Extended (2 × 50 ns) molecular dynamics simulations of the high-resolution structure of the isolated VS domain from the archaebacterial potassium channel KvAP, embedded in zwitterionic and in anionic lipid bilayers, have been used to explore VS/lipid interactions at atomic resolution. The simulations reveal penetration of water into the center of the VS and bilayer. Furthermore, there is significant local deformation of the lipid bilayer by interactions between lipid phosphate groups and arginine side chains of S4. As a consequence of this, the electrostatic field is “focused” across the center of the bilayer. PMID:17292841

  4. A new species of Brachycephalus (Anura: Brachycephalidae) from Santa Catarina, southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bornschein, Marcos R; Ribeiro, Luiz F; Blackburn, David C; Stanley, Edward L; Pie, Marcio R

    2016-01-01

    A new species of Brachycephalus (Anura: Brachycephalidae) is described from the Atlantic Forest of northeastern state of Santa Catarina, southern Brazil. Nine specimens (eight adults and a juvenile) were collected from the leaf litter of montane forests 790-835 m above sea level (a.s.l.). The new species is a member of the pernix group by its bufoniform shape and the absence of dermal co-ossification and is distinguished from all its congeners by a combination of its general coloration (dorsal region of head, dorsum, legs, arms, and flanks light, brownish green to dark, olive green, with darker region in the middle of the dorsum and a white line along the vertebral column in most specimens) and by its smooth dorsum. The geographical distribution of the new species is highly reduced (extent of occurrence estimated as 25.04 ha, or possibly 34.37 ha). In addition, its habitat has experienced some level of degradation, raising concerns about the future conservation of the species. Preliminary density estimates suggest one calling individual every 3-4 m(2) at 815-835 m a.s.l. and every 100 m(2) at 790 m a.s.l. Together with the recently described B. boticario and B. fuscolineatus, the new species is among the southernmost species of Brachycephalus known to date.

  5. A new species of Brachycephalus (Anura: Brachycephalidae) from Santa Catarina, southern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Bornschein, Marcos R.; Ribeiro, Luiz F.; Blackburn, David C.; Stanley, Edward L.

    2016-01-01

    A new species of Brachycephalus (Anura: Brachycephalidae) is described from the Atlantic Forest of northeastern state of Santa Catarina, southern Brazil. Nine specimens (eight adults and a juvenile) were collected from the leaf litter of montane forests 790–835 m above sea level (a.s.l.). The new species is a member of the pernix group by its bufoniform shape and the absence of dermal co-ossification and is distinguished from all its congeners by a combination of its general coloration (dorsal region of head, dorsum, legs, arms, and flanks light, brownish green to dark, olive green, with darker region in the middle of the dorsum and a white line along the vertebral column in most specimens) and by its smooth dorsum. The geographical distribution of the new species is highly reduced (extent of occurrence estimated as 25.04 ha, or possibly 34.37 ha). In addition, its habitat has experienced some level of degradation, raising concerns about the future conservation of the species. Preliminary density estimates suggest one calling individual every 3–4 m2 at 815–835 m a.s.l. and every 100 m2 at 790 m a.s.l. Together with the recently described B. boticario and B. fuscolineatus, the new species is among the southernmost species of Brachycephalus known to date. PMID:27812425

  6. Microbial community structure of hydrothermal deposits from geochemically different vent fields along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flores, Gilberto E.; Campbell, James H.; Kirshtein, Julie D.; Meneghin, Jennifer; Podar, Mircea; Steinberg, Joshua I.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; Tivey, Margaret Kingston; Voytek, Mary A.; Yang, Zamin K.; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of local fluid geochemistry on microbial communities associated with active hydrothermal vent deposits, we examined the archaeal and bacterial communities of 12 samples collected from two very different vent fields: the basalt-hosted Lucky Strike (37°17'N, 32°16.3'W, depth 1600-1750m) and the ultramafic-hosted Rainbow (36°13'N, 33°54.1'W, depth 2270-2330m) vent fields along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). Using multiplexed barcoded pyrosequencing of the variable region 4 (V4) of the 16S rRNA genes, we show statistically significant differences between the archaeal and bacterial communities associated with the different vent fields. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays of the functional gene diagnostic for methanogenesis (mcrA), as well as geochemical modelling to predict pore fluid chemistries within the deposits, support the pyrosequencing observations. Collectively, these results show that the less reduced, hydrogen-poor fluids at Lucky Strike limit colonization by strict anaerobes such as methanogens, and allow for hyperthermophilic microaerophiles, like Aeropyrum. In contrast, the hydrogen-rich reducing vent fluids at the ultramafic-influenced Rainbow vent field support the prevalence of methanogens and other hydrogen-oxidizing thermophiles at this site. These results demonstrate that biogeographical patterns of hydrothermal vent microorganisms are shaped in part by large scale geological and geochemical processes.

  7. Microbial community structure of hydrothermal deposits from geochemically different vent fields along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, Gilberto E; Campbell, James H; Kirshtein, Julie D; Meneghin, Jennifer; Podar, Mircea; Steinberg, Joshua; Seewald, Jeffrey S; Tivey, Margaret Kingston; Voytek, Mary A; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise; Yang, Zamin Koo

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of local fluid geochemistry on microbial communities associated with active hydrothermal vent deposits, we examined the archaeal and bacterial communities of 12 samples collected from two very different vent fields: the basalt-hosted Lucky Strike (37 17'N, 32 16.3'W, depth 1600-1750 m) and the ultramafic-hosted Rainbow (36 13'N, 33 54.1'W, depth 2270-2330 m) vent fields along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). Using multiplexed barcoded pyrosequencing of the variable region 4 (V4) of the 16S rRNA genes, we show statistically significant differences between the archaeal and bacterial communities associated with the different vent fields. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays of the functional gene diagnostic for methanogenesis (mcrA), as well as geochemical modelling to predict pore fluid chemistries within the deposits, support the pyrosequencing observations. Collectively, these results show that the less reduced, hydrogen-poor fluids at Lucky Strike limit colonization by strict anaerobes such as methanogens, and allow for hyperthermophilic microaerophiles, like Aeropyrum. In contrast, the hydrogen-rich reducing vent fluids at the ultramafic-influenced Rainbow vent field support the prevalence of methanogens and other hydrogen-oxidizing thermophiles at this site. These results demonstrate that biogeographical patterns of hydrothermal vent microorganisms are shaped in part by large scale geological and geochemical processes.

  8. Geomicrobiological exploration and characterization of a novel deep-sea hydrothermal system at the TOTO caldera in the Mariana Volcanic Arc.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Tatsunori; Takai, Ken; Suzuki, Yohey; Hirayama, Hisako; Konno, Uta; Tsunogai, Urumu; Horikoshi, Koki

    2006-01-01

    Novel hydrothermal activities accompanying effluent white smokers and elemental sulfur chimney structures at the north-east lava dome of the TOTO caldera depression in the Mariana Volcanic Arc have been explored and characterized by geochemical and microbiological surveys. White smoker hydrothermal fluids were observed in the potential hydrothermal activity centre of the field and represented the maximal temperature of 170 degrees C and the lowest pH of 1.6. The chimney structures, all consisting of elemental sulfur (sulfur chimney), were also unique to the TOTO caldera hydrothermal field. Microbial community structures in a sulfur chimney and its formation hydrothermal fluid with a high concentration of hydrogen sulfide (15 mM) have been investigated by culture-dependent and -independent analyses. 16S rRNA gene clone analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis revealed that epsilon-Proteobacteria dominated the microbial communities in the sulfur chimney structure and formed a dense microbial mat covering the sulfur chimney surface. Archaeal phylotypes were consistently minor components in the communities and related to the genera Thermococcus, Pyrodictium, Aeropyrum, and the uncultivated archaeal group of 'deep-sea hydrothermal vent euryarchaeotal group'. Cultivation analysis suggested that the chemolithoautotrophs might play a significant ecological role as primary producers utilizing gas and sulfur compounds provided from hydrothermal fluids.

  9. Movement of the S4 segment in the hERG potassium channel during membrane depolarization.

    PubMed

    Elliott, David J S; Dondas, Naciye Y; Munsey, Tim S; Sivaprasadarao, Asipu

    2009-12-01

    The hERG potassium channel is a member of the voltage gated potassium (Kv) channel family, comprising a pore domain and four voltage sensing domains (VSDs). Like other Kv channels, the VSD senses changes in membrane voltage and transmits the signal to gates located in the pore domain; the gates open at positive potentials (activation) and close at negative potentials, thereby controlling the ion flux. hERG, however, differs from other Kv channels in that it is activated slowly but inactivated rapidly - a property that is crucial for the role it plays in the repolarization of the cardiac action potential. Voltage-gating requires movement of gating charges across the membrane electric field, which is accomplished by the transmembrane movement of the fourth transmembrane segment, S4, of the VSD containing the positively charged arginine or lysine residues. Here we ask if the functional differences between hERG and other Kv channels could arise from differences in the transmembrane movement of S4. To address this, we have introduced single cysteine residues into the S4 region of the VSD, expressed the mutant channels in Xenopus oocytes and examined the effect of membrane impermeable para-chloromercuribenzene sulphonate on function by the two-electrode voltage clamp technique. Our results show that depolarization results in the accessibility of seven consecutive S4 residues, including the first two charged residues, K525 and R528, to extracellularly applied reagent. These data indicate that the extent of S4 movement in hERG is similar to other Kv channels, including the archabacterial KvAP and the Shaker channel of Drosophila.

  10. Bilayer deformation by the Kv channel voltage sensor domain revealed by self-assembly simulations.

    PubMed

    Bond, Peter J; Sansom, Mark S P

    2007-02-20

    Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations are used to explore the interaction with a phospholipid bilayer of the voltage sensor (VS) domain and the S4 helix from the archaebacterial voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel KvAP. Multiple 2-mus self-assembly simulations reveal that the isolated S4 helix may adopt either interfacial or transmembrane (TM) locations with approximately equal probability. In the TM state, the insertion of the voltage-sensing region of S4 is facilitated via local bilayer deformation that, combined with side chain "snorkeling," enables its Arg side chains to interact with lipid headgroups and water. Multiple 0.2-mus self-assembly simulations of the VS domain are also performed, along with simulations of MscL and KcsA, to permit comparison with more "canonical" integral membrane protein structures. All three stably adopt a TM orientation within a bilayer. For MscL and KcsA, there is no significant bilayer deformation. In contrast, for the VS, there is considerable local deformation, which is again primarily due to the lipid-exposed S4. It is shown that for both the VS and isolated S4 helix, the positively charged side chains of S4 are accommodated within the membrane through a combination of stabilizing interactions with lipid glycerol and headgroup regions, water, and anionic side chains. Our results support the possibility that bilayer deformation around key gating charge residues in Kv channels may result in "focusing" of the electrostatic field, and indicate that, when considering competing models of voltage-sensing, it is essential to consider the dynamics and structure of not only the protein but also of the local lipid environment.

  11. Coupled Motions between Pore and Voltage-Sensor Domains: A Model for Shaker B, a Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel

    PubMed Central

    Treptow, Werner; Maigret, Bernard; Chipot, Christophe; Tarek, Mounir

    2004-01-01

    A high-resolution crystal structure of KvAP, an archeabacterial voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel, complexed with a monoclonal Fab fragment has been recently determined. Based on this structure, a mechanism for the activation (opening) of Kv channels has been put forward. This mechanism has since been criticized, suggesting that the resolved structure is not representative of the family of voltage-gated potassium channels. Here, we propose a model of the transmembrane domain of Shaker B, a well-characterized Kv channel, built by homology modeling and docking calculations. In this model, the positively charged S4 helices are oriented perpendicular to the membrane and localized in the groove between segments S5 and S6 of adjacent subunits. The structure and the dynamics of the full atomistic model embedded in a hydrated lipid bilayer were investigated by means of two large-scale molecular dynamics simulations under transmembrane-voltage conditions known to induce, respectively, the resting state (closed) and the activation (opening) of voltage-gated channels. Upon activation, the model undergoes conformational changes that lead to an increase of the hydration of the charged S4 helices, correlated with an upward translation and a tilting of the latter, concurrently with movements of the S5 helices and the activation gate. Although small, these conformational changes ultimately result in an alteration of the ion-conduction pathway. Our findings support the transporter model devised by Bezanilla and collaborators, and further underline the crucial role played by internal hydration in the activation of the channel. PMID:15454436

  12. Mobility in geometrically confined membranes.

    PubMed

    Domanov, Yegor A; Aimon, Sophie; Toombes, Gilman E S; Renner, Marianne; Quemeneur, François; Triller, Antoine; Turner, Matthew S; Bassereau, Patricia

    2011-08-02

    Lipid and protein lateral mobility is essential for biological function. Our theoretical understanding of this mobility can be traced to the seminal work of Saffman and Delbrück, who predicted a logarithmic dependence of the protein diffusion coefficient (i) on the inverse of the size of the protein and (ii) on the "membrane size" for membranes of finite size [Saffman P, Delbrück M (1975) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 72:3111-3113]. Although the experimental proof of the first prediction is a matter of debate, the second has not previously been thought to be experimentally accessible. Here, we construct just such a geometrically confined membrane by forming lipid bilayer nanotubes of controlled radii connected to giant liposomes. We followed the diffusion of individual molecules in the tubular membrane using single particle tracking of quantum dots coupled to lipids or voltage-gated potassium channels KvAP, while changing the membrane tube radius from approximately 250 to 10 nm. We found that both lipid and protein diffusion was slower in tubular membranes with smaller radii. The protein diffusion coefficient decreased as much as 5-fold compared to diffusion on the effectively flat membrane of the giant liposomes. Both lipid and protein diffusion data are consistent with the predictions of a hydrodynamic theory that extends the work of Saffman and Delbrück to cylindrical geometries. This study therefore provides strong experimental support for the ubiquitous Saffman-Delbrück theory and elucidates the role of membrane geometry and size in regulating lateral diffusion.

  13. Mobility in geometrically confined membranes

    PubMed Central

    Domanov, Yegor A.; Aimon, Sophie; Toombes, Gilman E. S.; Renner, Marianne; Quemeneur, François; Triller, Antoine; Turner, Matthew S.; Bassereau, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Lipid and protein lateral mobility is essential for biological function. Our theoretical understanding of this mobility can be traced to the seminal work of Saffman and Delbrück, who predicted a logarithmic dependence of the protein diffusion coefficient (i) on the inverse of the size of the protein and (ii) on the “membrane size” for membranes of finite size [Saffman P, Delbrück M (1975) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 72:3111—3113]. Although the experimental proof of the first prediction is a matter of debate, the second has not previously been thought to be experimentally accessible. Here, we construct just such a geometrically confined membrane by forming lipid bilayer nanotubes of controlled radii connected to giant liposomes. We followed the diffusion of individual molecules in the tubular membrane using single particle tracking of quantum dots coupled to lipids or voltage-gated potassium channels KvAP, while changing the membrane tube radius from approximately 250 to 10 nm. We found that both lipid and protein diffusion was slower in tubular membranes with smaller radii. The protein diffusion coefficient decreased as much as 5-fold compared to diffusion on the effectively flat membrane of the giant liposomes. Both lipid and protein diffusion data are consistent with the predictions of a hydrodynamic theory that extends the work of Saffman and Delbrück to cylindrical geometries. This study therefore provides strong experimental support for the ubiquitous Saffman–Delbrück theory and elucidates the role of membrane geometry and size in regulating lateral diffusion. PMID:21768336

  14. bSUM: A bead-supported unilamellar membrane system facilitating unidirectional insertion of membrane proteins into giant vesicles.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hui; Lee, Sungsoo; Llaguno, Marc C; Jiang, Qiu-Xing

    2016-01-01

    Fused or giant vesicles, planar lipid bilayers, a droplet membrane system, and planar-supported membranes have been developed to incorporate membrane proteins for the electrical and biophysical analysis of such proteins or the bilayer properties. However, it remains difficult to incorporate membrane proteins, including ion channels, into reconstituted membrane systems that allow easy control of operational dimensions, incorporation orientation of the membrane proteins, and lipid composition of membranes. Here, using a newly developed chemical engineering procedure, we report on a bead-supported unilamellar membrane (bSUM) system that allows good control over membrane dimension, protein orientation, and lipid composition. Our new system uses specific ligands to facilitate the unidirectional incorporation of membrane proteins into lipid bilayers. Cryo-electron microscopic imaging demonstrates the unilamellar nature of the bSUMs. Electrical recordings from voltage-gated ion channels in bSUMs of varying diameters demonstrate the versatility of the new system. Using KvAP as a model system, we show that compared with other in vitro membrane systems, the bSUMs have the following advantages: (a) a major fraction of channels are orientated in a controlled way; (b) the channels mediate the formation of the lipid bilayer; (c) there is one and only one bilayer membrane on each bead; (d) the lipid composition can be controlled and the bSUM size is also under experimental control over a range of 0.2-20 µm; (e) the channel activity can be recorded by patch clamp using a planar electrode; and (f) the voltage-clamp speed (0.2-0.5 ms) of the bSUM on a planar electrode is fast, making it suitable to study ion channels with fast gating kinetics. Our observations suggest that the chemically engineered bSUMs afford a novel platform for studying lipid-protein interactions in membranes of varying lipid composition and may be useful for other applications, such as targeted delivery and

  15. Down-State Model of the Voltage-Sensing Domain of a Potassium Channel

    PubMed Central

    Schow, Eric V.; Freites, J. Alfredo; Gogna, Karun; White, Stephen H.; Tobias, Douglas J.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Voltage-sensing domains (VSDs) of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels undergo a series of conformational changes upon membrane depolarization, from a down state when the channel is at rest to an up state, all of which lead to the opening of the channel pore. The crystal structures reported to date reveal the pore in an open state and the VSDs in an up state. To gain insights into the structure of the down state, we used a set of experiment-based restraints to generate a model of the down state of the KvAP VSD using molecular-dynamics simulations of the VSD in a lipid bilayer in excess water. The equilibrated VSD configuration is consistent with the biotin-avidin accessibility and internal salt-bridge data used to generate it, and with additional biotin-avidin accessibility data. In the model, both the S3b and S4 segments are displaced ∼10 Å toward the intracellular side with respect to the up-state configuration, but they do not move as a rigid body. Arginine side chains that carry the majority of the gating charge also make large excursions between the up and down states. In both states, arginines interact with water and participate in salt bridges with acidic residues and lipid phosphate groups. An important feature that emerges from the down-state model is that the N-terminal half of the S4 segment adopts a 310-helical conformation, which appears to be necessary to satisfy a complex salt-bridge network. PMID:20550898

  16. Combined effect of carbon dioxide and sulfur on vapor-liquid partitioning of metals in hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokh, Maria A.; Lopez, Mathieu; Gisquet, Pascal; Lanzanova, Aurélie; Candaudap, Frédéric; Besson, Philippe; Pokrovski, Gleb S.

    2016-08-01

    Although CO2 is a ubiquitous volatile in geological fluids typically ranging from a few to more than 50 wt%, its effect on metal vapor-liquid fractionation during fluid boiling and immiscibility phenomena in the Earth's crust remains virtually unknown. Here we conducted first experiments to quantify the influence of CO2 on the partition of different metals in model water + salt + sulfur + CO2 systems at 350 °C and CO2 pressures up to 100 bar, which are typical conditions of formation of many hydrothermal ore deposits. In addition, we performed in situ Raman spectroscopy measurements on these two-phase systems, to determine sulfur and carbon speciation in the liquid and vapor phases. Results show that, in S-free systems and across a CO2 concentration range of 0-50 wt% in the vapor phase, the absolute vapor-liquid partitioning coefficients of metals (Kvap/liq = Cvap/Cliq, where C is the mass concentration of the metal in the corresponding vapor and liquid phase) are in the range 10-6-10-5 for Mo; 10-4-10-3 for Na, K, Cu, Fe, Zn, Au; 10-3-10-2 for Si; and 10-4-10-1 for Pt. With increasing CO2 from 0 to 50 wt%, Kvap/liq values decrease for Fe, Cu and Si by less than one order of magnitude, remain constant within errors (±0.2 log unit) for Na, K and Zn, and increase by 0.5 and 2 orders of magnitude, respectively for Au and Pt. The negative effect of CO2 on the partitioning of some metals is due to weakening of hydration of chloride complexes of some metals (Cu, Fe) in the vapor phase and/or salting-in effects in the liquid phase (Si), whereas both phenomena are negligible for complexes of other metals (Na, K, Zn, Mo). The only exception is Pt (and in a lesser extent Au), which partitions significantly more to the vapor of S-free systems in the presence of CO2, likely due to formation of volatile carbonyl (CO) complexes. In the S-bearing system, with H2S content of 0.1-1.0 wt% in the vapor, Kvap/liq values of Cu, Fe, Mo, and Au are in the range 0.01-0.1, those of Pt 0

  17. Characterization of Sac10a, a hyperthermophile DNA-binding protein from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    PubMed

    Edmondson, Stephen P; Kahsai, Mebrahtu A; Gupta, Ramesh; Shriver, John W

    2004-10-19

    Sac10a is a member of a group of basic DNA-binding proteins thought to be important in chromatin structure and regulation in the archaeon Sulfolobus. We describe here the isolation, gene identification, and biophysical characterization of native Sac10a. The protein exists as a 23.8 kDa homodimer at pH 7 and unfolds with a T degrees of 122 degrees C. Dissociation of the dimer into folded globular subunits is promoted by decreased pH and salt concentration. Thermal unfolding of the monomeric subunits occurred with two transitions, indicating two independent domains. The dimer demonstrated a high affinity for duplex poly(dAdT) with a K(D) of 5 x 10(-)(10) M and a site size of 17 bp (in 0.15 M KCl, pH 7), with only weak binding (K(D) > 5 x 10(-)(6) M) to poly(dA)-poly(dT), poly(dGdC), poly(dG)-poly(dC), and Escherichia coli DNA under similar conditions. Binding to poly(dAdT) resulted in distortions in the DNA duplex that were consistent with overwinding as indicated by inversion of the CD spectrum of the DNA. The monomeric subunits are predicted to adopt a winged helix DNA-binding motif which dimerizes through formation of a two-stranded coiled coil involving an extended C-terminal helix with more than four heptad repeats (about 45 A in length). This is the first example of the conserved archaeal transcription regulator domain COG3432 to be characterized. Sequences for homologous proteins containing both COG3432 and predicted coiled coil domains occur in the genomes of both crenarchaeota (Sulfolobus, Pyrobaculum, Aeropyrum) and euryarchaeota (Methanosarcina, Methanococcus, Archaeoglobus, Thermoplasma), with multiple genes in some species. Sac10a shows no sequence similarity to the other Sulfolobus chromatin proteins Sac7d, Sac8, Sso10b2, and Alba.

  18. bSUM: A bead-supported unilamellar membrane system facilitating unidirectional insertion of membrane proteins into giant vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hui; Lee, Sungsoo; Llaguno, Marc C.

    2016-01-01

    Fused or giant vesicles, planar lipid bilayers, a droplet membrane system, and planar-supported membranes have been developed to incorporate membrane proteins for the electrical and biophysical analysis of such proteins or the bilayer properties. However, it remains difficult to incorporate membrane proteins, including ion channels, into reconstituted membrane systems that allow easy control of operational dimensions, incorporation orientation of the membrane proteins, and lipid composition of membranes. Here, using a newly developed chemical engineering procedure, we report on a bead-supported unilamellar membrane (bSUM) system that allows good control over membrane dimension, protein orientation, and lipid composition. Our new system uses specific ligands to facilitate the unidirectional incorporation of membrane proteins into lipid bilayers. Cryo–electron microscopic imaging demonstrates the unilamellar nature of the bSUMs. Electrical recordings from voltage-gated ion channels in bSUMs of varying diameters demonstrate the versatility of the new system. Using KvAP as a model system, we show that compared with other in vitro membrane systems, the bSUMs have the following advantages: (a) a major fraction of channels are orientated in a controlled way; (b) the channels mediate the formation of the lipid bilayer; (c) there is one and only one bilayer membrane on each bead; (d) the lipid composition can be controlled and the bSUM size is also under experimental control over a range of 0.2–20 µm; (e) the channel activity can be recorded by patch clamp using a planar electrode; and (f) the voltage-clamp speed (0.2–0.5 ms) of the bSUM on a planar electrode is fast, making it suitable to study ion channels with fast gating kinetics. Our observations suggest that the chemically engineered bSUMs afford a novel platform for studying lipid–protein interactions in membranes of varying lipid composition and may be useful for other applications, such as targeted

  19. Rheology of biological macromolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariyaratne, Amila Dinesh

    Proteins have interesting mechanical properties in addition to the remarkable functionality. For example, Guanylate kinase is an enzyme that catalyzes Guano- sine monophosphate (GMP) to Guanosine diphosphate (GDP) conversion and this enzyme is approximately 5 nm in size. A gold nano particle of similar size shows linear elasticity for strains up to ˜ 0.1% and shows plastic deformation beyond that, whereas the enzyme Guanylate kinase can have strains up to 1 % with reversible deformation. Our experiments show many different regimes of the mechanical response before the plastic deformation of these proteins. In this dissertation, I study the materials properties of two classes of proteins, an ion channel protein and a transferase, which is a globular protein. The experimental techniques to study the materials properties of these proteins were uniquely developed at the Zocchi lab. Therefore, we were able to observe previously unknown characteristics of these folded proteins. The mechanical properties of the voltage gated potassium channel KvAP was studied by applying AC depolarizing voltages. This technique gave new information about the system that was not seen in the previous studies. These previous experiments were based on applying DC depolarizing voltage steps across the membrane to study the ionic current. By monitoring the ionic current at different depolarizing voltage steps, the DC gating process of the channel could be under- stood. We probed the channel using AC depolarizing signals instead of DC pulses and the ionic current revealed new behaviors, which cannot be predicted with the DC response. We found that the conformational motion of the voltage sensing domain of the ion channel shows internal dissipation. Further, a new non linearity in the dissipation parameter was found in which the dissipation parameter increased with the shear rate of the applied force. Previous studies at the Zocchi lab used a nano rheology experiment on the protein Guanylate

  20. A systematic revision of Baconia Lewis (Coleoptera, Histeridae, Exosternini)

    PubMed Central

    Caterino, Michael S.; Tishechkin, Alexey K.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Here we present a complete revision of the species of Baconia. Up until now there have been 27 species assigned to the genus (Mazur, 2011), in two subgenera (Binhister Cooman and Baconia s. str.), with species in the Neotropical, Nearctic, Palaearctic, and Oriental regions. We recognize all these species as valid and correctly assigned to the genus, and redescribe all of them. We synonymize Binhister, previously used for a polyphyletic assemblage of species with varied relationships in the genus. We move four species into Baconia from other genera, and describe 85 species as new, bringing the total for the genus to 116 species. We divide these into 12 informal species groups, leaving 13 species unplaced to group. We present keys and diagnoses for all species, as well as habitus photos and illustrations of male genitalia for nearly all. The genus now contains the following species and species groups: Baconia loricata group [Baconia loricata Lewis, 1885, B. patula Lewis, 1885, Baconia gounellei (Marseul, 1887a), Baconia jubaris (Lewis, 1901), Baconia festiva (Lewis, 1891), Baconia foliosoma sp. n., Baconia sapphirina sp. n., Baconia furtiva sp. n., Baconia pernix sp. n., Baconia applanatis sp. n., Baconia disciformis sp. n., Baconia nebulosa sp. n., Baconia brunnea sp. n.], Baconia godmani group [Baconia godmani (Lewis, 1888), Baconia venusta (J. E. LeConte, 1845), Baconia riehli (Marseul, 1862), comb. n., Baconia scintillans sp. n., Baconia isthmia sp. n., Baconia rossi sp. n., Baconia navarretei sp. n., Baconia maculata sp. n., Baconia deliberata sp. n., Baconia excelsa sp. n., Baconia violacea (Marseul, 1853), Baconia varicolor (Marseul, 1887b), Baconia dives (Marseul, 1862), Baconia eximia (Lewis, 1888), Baconia splendida sp. n., Baconia jacinta sp. n., Baconia prasina sp. n., Baconia opulenta sp. n., Baconia illustris (Lewis, 1900), Baconia choaspites (Lewis, 1901), Baconia lewisi Mazur, 1984], Baconia salobrus group [Baconia salobrus (Marseul, 1887b